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Sample records for prolonged population exposure

  1. Cognitive Changes During Prolonged Exposure versus Prolonged Exposure Plus Cognitive Restructuring in Female Assault Survivors with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.; Rauch, Sheila A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors report on changes in cognitions related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among 54 female survivors of sexual and nonsexual assault with chronic PTSD who completed either prolonged exposure alone or in combination with cognitive restructuring. Treatment included 9-12 weekly sessions, and assessment was conducted at pretreatment,…

  2. A comparison of Narrative Exposure Therapy and Prolonged Exposure therapy for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Mørkved, N; Hartmann, K; Aarsheim, L M; Holen, D; Milde, A M; Bomyea, J; Thorp, S R

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to compare and contrast Prolonged Exposure (PE) and Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET). We examined the treatment manuals to describe the theoretical foundation, treatment components, and procedures, including the type, manner, and focus of exposure techniques and recording methods used. We examined extant clinical trials to investigate the range of treatment formats reported, populations studied, and clinical outcome data. Our search resulted in 32 studies on PE and 15 studies on NET. Consistent with prior reviews of PTSD treatment, it is evident that PE has a solid evidence base and its current status as a first line treatment for the populations studied to this date is warranted. We argue that NET may have advantages in treating complex traumatization seen in asylum seekers and refugees, and for this population NET should be considered a recommended treatment. NET and PE have several commonalities, and it is recommended that studies of these treatments include a broader range of populations and trauma types to expand the current knowledge on the treatment of PTSD.

  3. [Prolonged fever: specific issues in the young adult population].

    PubMed

    Carmoi, T; Grateau, G; Billhot, M; Dumas, G; Biale, L; Perrot, G; Algayres, J-P

    2010-12-01

    Early studies on prolonged fever date back to the 1960s. Fifty years later, prolonged unexplained fever remains a diagnostic challenge to the general internists. Although the aetiologies of prolonged fevers have not changed much in the general population, the distribution between the various causes is not the same anymore. A regular decrease in infectious and neoplastic causes is noticed whatever the age. Prolonged fevers related to inflammatory disorders and fevers that remain of unknown origin still represent approximately 30 to 50% of the cases. In the young adult population, as in the older patients, prolonged fevers can be attributed to four groups: infection, inflammation, neoplasic and other aetiologies (including drug-related fevers). In the young adult population, the management of prolonged fever presents some specific issues that are the purpose of this review coupled with our own experience. The prognosis of undiagnosed prolonged fever is usually favourable, as a life-threatening aetiology is exceptionally diagnosed during the follow-up if the initial management was complete and accurate.

  4. Media Impacts on Women's Fertility Desires: A Prolonged Exposure Experiment.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia; Willis, Laura E; Kennard, Ashley R

    2016-06-01

    Media exposure may have implications for family planning, a public health issue of key importance. Drawing on social comparison theory and social identity theory, a prolonged exposure experiment examined whether media portrayals of women's social roles affect fertility desires among 166 American, nonstudent, never married, childless women ages 21-35 years old. After sign-up and baseline sessions, participants viewed magazine pages five days in a row. Stimuli presented women in either mother/homemaker roles, beauty ideal roles, or professional roles. Three days later, participants again indicated their number of desired children and time planned until first birth. Exposure to mother/homemaker and beauty ideal portrayals increased the number of desired children across time. Exposure to professional portrayals increased the time planned until 1st birth compared to beauty ideal portrayals-this impact was partially mediated by a shift toward more progressive gender norms (per social identity theory) and assimilation (per social comparison theory). PMID:27166510

  5. Media Impacts on Women's Fertility Desires: A Prolonged Exposure Experiment.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia; Willis, Laura E; Kennard, Ashley R

    2016-06-01

    Media exposure may have implications for family planning, a public health issue of key importance. Drawing on social comparison theory and social identity theory, a prolonged exposure experiment examined whether media portrayals of women's social roles affect fertility desires among 166 American, nonstudent, never married, childless women ages 21-35 years old. After sign-up and baseline sessions, participants viewed magazine pages five days in a row. Stimuli presented women in either mother/homemaker roles, beauty ideal roles, or professional roles. Three days later, participants again indicated their number of desired children and time planned until first birth. Exposure to mother/homemaker and beauty ideal portrayals increased the number of desired children across time. Exposure to professional portrayals increased the time planned until 1st birth compared to beauty ideal portrayals-this impact was partially mediated by a shift toward more progressive gender norms (per social identity theory) and assimilation (per social comparison theory).

  6. QT prolongation and safety in the Indian population.

    PubMed

    Dabhi, Jayesh; Mehta, Anita

    2007-09-01

    The QT interval in electrocardiogram (ECG) reflects the total duration of ventricular myocardial depolarization and repolarization. It has been well recognized that many condition may cause QT interval prolongation. Unfortunately, numbers of cardiac and non-cardiac drug prolong the QT interval and cause a distinctive polymorphic ventricular tachycardia termed torsade de pointes (TdP). TdP can degenerate into ventricular fibrillation, which leads to sudden cardiac death. Recently various regulatory and clinical bodies of Europe, USA, Canada and Australia have made their focus on the drugs that induce prolongation of QT interval. Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) of the European Agency issued a document entitled 'Points to Consider: The assessment of the potential for QT interval prolongation by non-cardiovascular medicinal products' [1, 2]. In addition, USFDA adopted the guideline 'Clinical evaluation of QT/QTc interval prolongation and proarrhythmic potential for non-anti arrhythmic drugs' [3]. These documents and guidelines are primarily concern with development of novel agents and the new use or new dose of already approved drugs. The scope of this guideline is to study the effect of drugs on QT prolongation and give idea of evaluation of drug's effects on QT prolongation. Today more than 50 available drugs (both old and new) have been identify, which prolong the QT interval [1]. Several drugs have been withdrawn from many countries on this basis but many of these drugs are still available in Indian market and potentially creating life-threatening arrhythmias. This article will focus on recommendation of study on the normal limits of QT interval in Indian population and preparation of the database, which can be helpful in withdrawal of drugs from the market that produces QT prolongation.

  7. Pulmonary function and clearance after prolonged sulfuric acid aerosol exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, P.J. ); Gerrity, T.R.; DeWitt, P.; Folinsbee, L.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors studied pulmonary function and clearance responses after a 4 H exposure to 75-100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid aerosol (SAA). Healthy subjects, who exercised for 30 min/H at ventilation of about 25 L/min, were exposed once to clean air and once to SAA. Oral hygiene and acidic juice gargle were used to minimize oral ammonia. Lung function tests, including spirometry, plethysmography, and partial flow-volume (PEFV) curves were performed before and after exposure. Clearance of 99m-Technetium labeled iron oxide was assessed after each exposure. The first moment of fractional tracheobronchial retention (M1TBR), after correcting for 24 H retention and normalizing to time zero, was used as an index of clearance. There were no significant changes in lung volumes, airways resistance, or maximum expiratory flows after SAA exposure. Flow at 40% of total lung capacity on PEFV curves decreased 17% (NS) after SAA exposure. Tracheobronchial clearance was accelerated after a single exposure to SAA; M1TBR decreased from 73 {plus minus} 5 min (air) to 69 {plus minus} 5 min (SAA). These results suggest that acute prolonged exposure to low levels of SAA has minimal effects on lung mechanics in healthy subjects but does produce a modest acceleration of particle clearance.

  8. Examining potential contraindications for prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    PubMed Central

    van Minnen, Agnes; Harned, Melanie S.; Zoellner, Lori; Mills, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Although prolonged exposure (PE) has received the most empirical support of any treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), clinicians are often hesitant to use PE due to beliefs that it is contraindicated for many patients with PTSD. This is especially true for PTSD patients with comorbid problems. Because PTSD has high rates of comorbidity, it is important to consider whether PE is indeed contraindicated for patients with various comorbid problems. Therefore, in this study, we examine the evidence for or against the use of PE with patients with problems that often co-occur with PTSD, including dissociation, borderline personality disorder, psychosis, suicidal behavior and non-suicidal self-injury, substance use disorders, and major depression. It is concluded that PE can be safely and effectively used with patients with these comorbidities, and is often associated with a decrease in PTSD as well as the comorbid problem. In cases with severe comorbidity, however, it is recommended to treat PTSD with PE while providing integrated or concurrent treatment to monitor and address the comorbid problems. PMID:22893847

  9. Integrating Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Prolonged Exposure to Treat Co-Occurring Borderline Personality Disorder and PTSD: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harned, Melanie S.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the high rate of trauma and PTSD among individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), no studies have specifically evaluated the treatment of PTSD in a BPD population. These case studies illustrate the use of a protocol based on prolonged exposure therapy that can be integrated into standard dialectical behavior therapy to treat…

  10. Effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on thyroid and reproductive function in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on (1) thyroid status and reproductive performance of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and (2) F1 embryo survival and early larval development. Using a static-renewal procedure, mixed sex populations of adult zebrafish were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 mg/l nominal concentrations of waterborne perchlorate for 10 weeks. Thyroid histology was qualitatively assessed, and females and males were separated and further exposed to their respective treatments for six additional weeks. Eight females in each tank replicate (n = 3) were paired weekly with four males from the same respective treatment, and packed-egg (spawn) volume (PEV) was measured each of the last five weeks. At least once during weeks 14-16 of exposure, other end points measured included fertilization rate, fertilized egg diameter, hatching rate, standard length, and craniofacial development of 4-day-postfertilization larvae and thyroid hormone content of 3.5-h embryos and of exposed mothers. At 10 weeks of exposure, perchlorate at both concentrations caused thyroidal hypertrophy and colloid depletion. A marked reduction in PEV was observed toward the end of the 6-week spawning period, but fertilization and embryo hatching rates were unaffected. Fertilized egg diameter and larval length were increased by parental exposure to perchlorate. Larval head depth was unaffected but the forward protrusion of the lower jaw-associated cartilage complexes, Meckel's and ceratohyal, was decreased. Exposure to both concentrations of perchlorate inhibited whole-body thyroxine content in mothers and embryos, but triiodothyronine content was unchanged. In conclusion, prolonged exposure of adult zebrafish to perchlorate not only disrupts their thyroid endocrine system but also impairs reproduction and influences early F1 development. ?? 2007 Oxford University Press.

  11. Prolonged noise exposure-induced auditory threshold shifts in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Di; Decker, Brandon; Muthaiah, Vijaya Prakash Krishnan; Sheppard, Adam; Salvi, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) initially increases with exposure duration, but eventually reaches an asymptotic threshold shift (ATS) once the exposure duration exceeds 18-24 h. Equations for predicting the ATS have been developed for several species, but not for rats, even though this species is extensively used in noise exposure research. To fill this void, we exposed rats to narrowband noise (NBN, 16-20 kHz) for 5 weeks starting at 80 dB SPL in the first week and then increasing the level by 6 dB per week to a final level of 104 dB SPL. Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were recorded before, during, and following the exposure to determine the amount of hearing loss. The noise induced threshold shift to continuous long-term exposure, defined as compound threshold shift (CTS), within and above 16-20 kHz increased with noise level at the rate of 1.82 dB threshold shift per dB of noise level (NL) above a critical level (C) of 77.2 dB SPL i.e. CTS = 1.82(NL-77.2). The normalized amplitude of the largest ABR peak measured at 100 dB SPL decreased at the rate of 3.1% per dB of NL above the critical level of 76.9 dB SPL, i.e., %ABR Reduction = 3.1%(NL-76.9). ABR thresholds measured >30 days post-exposure only partially recovered resulting in a permanent threshold shift of 30-40 dB along with severe hair cell loss in the basal, high-frequency region of the cochlea. In the rat, CTS increases with noise level with a slope similar to humans and chinchillas. The critical level (C) in the rat is similar to that of humans, but higher than that of chinchillas. PMID:25219503

  12. Long-term behavioral effects in a rat model of prolonged postnatal morphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael M; Bajic, Dusica

    2015-10-01

    Prolonged morphine treatment in neonatal pediatric populations is associated with a high incidence of opioid tolerance and dependence. Despite the clinical relevance of this problem, our knowledge of long-term consequences is sparse. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether prolonged morphine administration in a neonatal rat is associated with long-term behavioral changes in adulthood. Newborn animals received either morphine (10 mg/kg) or equal volume of saline subcutaneously twice daily for the first 2 weeks of life. Morphine-treated animals underwent 10 days of morphine weaning to reduce the potential for observable physical signs of withdrawal. Animals were subjected to nonstressful testing (locomotor activity recording and a novel-object recognition test) at a young age (Postnatal Days [PDs] 27-31) or later in adulthood (PDs 55-56), as well as stressful testing (calibrated forceps test, hot plate test, and forced swim test) only in adulthood. Analysis revealed that prolonged neonatal morphine exposure resulted in decreased thermal but not mechanical threshold. Importantly, no differences were found for total locomotor activity (proxy of drug reward/reinforcement behavior), individual forced swim test behaviors (proxy of affective processing), or novel-object recognition test. Performance on the novel-object recognition test was compromised in the morphine-treated group at the young age, but the effect disappeared in adulthood. These novel results provide insight into the long-term consequences of opioid treatment during an early developmental period and suggest long-term neuroplastic differences in sensory processing related to thermal stimuli.

  13. LONG-TERM BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN A RAT MODEL OF PROLONGED POSTNATAL MORPHINE EXPOSURE

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Michael M.; Bajic, Dusica

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged morphine treatment in neonatal pediatric populations is associated with a high incidence of opioid tolerance and dependence. Despite the clinical relevance of this problem, our knowledge of the long-term consequences is sparse. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether prolonged morphine administration in a neonatal rat is associated with long-term behavioral changes in adulthood. Newborn animals received either morphine (10mg/kg) or equal volume of saline subcutaneously twice daily for the first 2 weeks of life. Morphine treated animals underwent 10 days of morphine weaning to reduce the potential for observable physical signs of withdrawal. Animals were subjected to non-stressful testing (locomotor activity recording and a Novel-Object Recognition test) at a young age (PD27-31) or later in adulthood (PD55-56), as well as stressful testing (calibrated forceps test, Hot Plate test, and Forced Swim test) only in adulthood. Analysis revealed that prolonged neonatal morphine exposure resulted in decreased thermal, but not mechanical threshold. Importantly, no differences were found for total locomotor activity (proxy of drug reward/reinforcement behavior), individual Forced Swim test behaviors (proxy of affective processing), or Novel-Object Recognition test. Performance on the Novel-Object Recognition test was compromised in the morphine treated group at the young age, however the effect disappeared in adulthood. These novel results provide insight into the long-term consequences of opioid treatment during an early developmental period and suggest long-term neuroplastic differences in sensory processing related to thermal stimuli. PMID:26214209

  14. Thyroid hormone responses to prolonged cold exposure in man

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, C. J.; Ekins, R. P.; Leith, I. M.; Williams, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    1. Four men, of ages varying from 23 to 28 years, living at Halley Bay, Antarctica (75° 31′ S, 26° 39′ W), were exposed to a mean air temperature of 6·6° C. 2. The concentration of serum triiodothyronine (T3) rose significantly by the second day, remained raised, and returned to pre-exposure levels within 2 days of return to a normal environment. 3. The concentration of serum thyroxine (T4) rose more slowly than did the T3, reaching a maximum in 3-4 days and also returning to normal within 2 days of return to a normal environment. 4. There was a wide individual variation in the change of concentration of serum cortisol. PMID:4422816

  15. A meta-analytic review of prolonged exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Powers, Mark B; Halpern, Jacqueline M; Ferenschak, Michael P; Gillihan, Seth J; Foa, Edna B

    2010-08-01

    Two decades of research demonstrate the efficacy of exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The efficacy of prolonged exposure (PE), a specific exposure therapy program for PTSD that has been disseminated throughout the world, has been established in many controlled studies using different trauma populations. However, a meta-analysis of the effectiveness of PE for PTSD has not been conducted to date. The purpose of the current paper is to estimate the overall efficacy of PE for PTSD relative to adequate controls. We included all published randomized controlled trials of PE vs. control (wait-list or psychological placebo) for the treatment of PTSD in adolescents or adults. Treatments were classified as PE if they included multiple sessions of imaginal and in vivo exposure and were based on the manualized treatment developed by Foa, Rothbaum, Riggs, and Murdock (1991). Thirteen studies with a total sample size of 675 participants met the final inclusion criteria. The primary analyses showed a large effect for PE versus control on both primary (Hedges's g=1.08) and secondary (Hedges's g=0.77) outcome measures. Analyses also revealed medium to large effect sizes for PE at follow-up, both for primary (Hedges's g=0.68) and secondary (Hedges's g=0.41) outcome measures. There was no significant difference between PE and other active treatments (CPT, EMDR, CT, and SIT). Effect sizes were not moderated by time since trauma, publication year, dose, study quality, or type of trauma. The average PE-treated patient fared better than 86% of patients in control conditions at post-treatment on PTSD measures. PE is a highly effective treatment for PTSD, resulting in substantial treatment gains that are maintained over time.

  16. Persistent and Unusual Respiratory Findings after Prolonged Glutaraldehyde Exposure.

    PubMed

    Copeland, S; Nugent, K

    2015-07-01

    Glutaraldehyde is commonly used in endoscopy labs to clean and disinfect instruments. It can cause direct irritation of the skin and the upper and lower airways. Health care workers are also at risk for the development of irritant-induced or sensitizer-induced occupational asthma when exposed to this chemical. Herein, we report on a patient who had frequent exposures to glutaraldehyde over one year while working in an endoscopy lab and developed chronic upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms. Multiple spirometric tests during her evaluation revealed variable results including restrictive pattern with a response to bronchodilators, obstructive pattern with a paradoxic bronchoconstrictive response to bronchodilators, and obstructive pattern with a partial response to bronchodilators. These results indicate that the distribution of inflammation and bronchial responsiveness can vary in a single patient with glutaraldehyde-induced occupational asthma. Therefore, the evaluation may be more difficult than might be expected in patients with occupational asthma, and some patients will need multiple pulmonary function tests to characterize their airway disease.

  17. Hippocampal damage associated with prolonged glucocorticoid exposure in primates.

    PubMed

    Sapolsky, R M; Uno, H; Rebert, C S; Finch, C E

    1990-09-01

    In the laboratory rat and guinea pig, glucocorticoids (GCs), the adrenal steroids that are secreted during stress, can damage the hippocampus and exacerbate the hippocampal damage induced by various neurological insults. An open question is whether GCs have similar deleterious effects in the primate hippocampus. In fact, we showed that sustained and fatal stress was associated with preferential hippocampal damage in the vervet monkey; however, it was not possible to determine whether the excessive GC secretion that accompanied such stress was the damaging agent. The present study examines this possibility. Pellets of cortisol (the principal GC of primates) were stereotaxically implanted into hippocampi of 4 vervet monkeys; contralateral hippocampi were implanted with cholesterol pellets as a control. One year later at postmortem, preferential damage occurred in the cortisol-implanted side. In the cholesterol side, mild cell layer irregularity was noted in 2 of 4 cases. By contrast in the cortisol-exposed hippocampi, all cases had at least 2 of the following neuropathologic markers: cell layer irregularity, dendritic atrophy, soma shrinkage and condensation, or nuclear pyknosis. Damage was severe in some cases, and was restricted to the CA3/CA2 cellfield. This anatomical distribution of damage, and the cellular features of the damage agree with that observed in instances of GC-induced toxicity in the rodent hippocampus, and of stress-induced toxicity in the primate hippocampus. These observations suggest that sustained GC exposure (whether due to stress, Cushings syndrome or exogenous administration) might damage the human hippocampus.

  18. Prolonged Exposure versus Dynamic Therapy for Adolescent PTSD: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Foa, Edna B.; Shafran, Naama; Aderka, Idan M.; Powers, Mark B.; Rachamim, Lilach; Rosenbach, Lea; Yadin, Elna; Apter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy and maintenance of developmentally adapted prolonged exposure therapy for adolescents (PE-A) compared with active control time-limited dynamic therapy (TLDP-A) for decreasing posttraumatic and depressive symptoms in adolescent victims of single-event traumas. Method: Thirty-eight adolescents (12 to 18 years old)…

  19. Direction of Influence between Posttraumatic and Depressive Symptoms during Prolonged Exposure Therapy among Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aderka, Idan M.; Foa, Edna B.; Applebaum, Edna; Shafran, Naama; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Our objective in the present study was to examine the temporal sequencing of posttraumatic and depressive symptoms during prolonged exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and adolescents. Method: Participants were 73 children and adolescents (56.2% female) between the ages of 8 and 18. Participants…

  20. Sudden Gains in Prolonged Exposure for Children and Adolescents with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aderka, Idan M.; Appelbaum-Namdar, Edna; Shafran, Naama; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to examine sudden gains during developmentally adjusted prolonged exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among children and adolescents. We hypothesized that sudden gains would be detected and would be predictive of treatment outcome and follow-up. Method: Sixty-three youngsters (ages 8-17) completed a…

  1. Prolonged Exposure Therapy for a Vietnam Veteran with PTSD and Early-Stage Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duax, Jeanne M.; Waldron-Perrine, Brigid; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Adams, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Although prolonged exposure therapy (PE) is considered an evidence-based treatment for PTSD, there has been little published about the use of this treatment for older adults with comorbid early-stage dementia. As the number of older adults in the United States continues to grow, so will their unique mental health needs. The present article…

  2. Prolonged Exposure Treatment of Chronic PTSD in Juvenile Sex Offenders: Promising Results from Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) was used to treat chronic PTSD secondary to severe developmental trauma in two adolescent male sex offenders referred for residential sex offender treatment. Both youth were treatment resistant prior to initiation of PE and showed evidence of long-standing irritability and depression/anxiety. Clinical observation and…

  3. Characterization of anxiety-related responses in male rats following prolonged exposure to therapeutic doses of oral methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Britton, Gabrielle B; Bethancourt, José A

    2009-10-01

    Increases in the rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis and the prescribed use of methylphenidate (MPH) in recent years have raised concerns over the potential effects of early MPH exposure on brain structure and function in adulthood. Animal studies have shown that long-term MPH exposure can modify anxiety-related behaviors and related neural circuitry in adulthood. The present study employed a battery of behavioral tests and repeated testing to assess the long-term effects of MPH exposure on anxious responding. Male Wistar rats beginning on post-natal day 27 were exposed to 4 or 7 weeks of twice daily MPH administration at doses of 2, 3, or 5 mg/kg. MPH was administered orally and on weekdays only in order to approximate drug treatment in clinical populations. Behavioral testing began 18 days following the last drug administration. Our results indicate that prolonged oral MPH treatment at therapeutic doses has little or no enduring effects on anxious behaviors. However, a comparison of MPH groups that received treatment for 4 or 7 weeks suggests that the two treatment periods influenced anxious behaviors in observably different manners in adulthood; namely, a more prolonged period of exposure produced less anxiety relative to the shorter period of MPH exposure as indicated by behaviors in the light-dark transition, elevated plus-maze, and fear conditioning tests. These findings were interpreted as evidence of the importance of considering length of drug exposure in pre-clinical studies aimed at investigating the effects of MPH exposure in ADHD populations.

  4. Physiological Stress Responses to Prolonged Exposure to MS-222 and Surgical Implantation in Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Katie A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2014-07-17

    While many studies have investigated the effects of transmitters on fish condition, behavior, and survival, to our knowledge, no studies have taken into account anesthetic exposure time in addition to tag and surgery effects. We investigated stress responses to prolonged MS-222 exposure after stage 4 induction in surgically implanted juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Survival, tag loss, plasma cortisol concentration, and blood Na+, K+, Ca2+, and pH were measured immediately following anesthetic exposure and surgical implantation and 1, 7, and 14 days post-treatment. Despite the prolonged anesthetic exposure, 3-15 minutes post Stage 4 induction, there were no mortalities or tag loss in any treatment. MS-222 was effective at delaying immediate cortisol release during surgical implantation; however, osmotic disturbances resulted, which were more pronounced in longer anesthetic time exposures. From day 1 to day 14, Na+, Ca2+, and pH significantly decreased, while cortisol significantly increased. The cortisol increase was exacerbated by surgical implantation. There was a significant interaction between MS-222 time exposure and observation day for Na+, Ca2+, K+, and pH; variations were seen in the longer time exposures, although not consistently. In conclusion, stress response patterns suggest stress associated with surgical implantation is amplified with increased exposure to MS-222.

  5. Prolonged exposure to insulin induces mitochondrion-derived oxidative stress through increasing mitochondrial cholesterol content in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mei, Shuang; Gu, Haihua; Yang, Xuefeng; Guo, Huailan; Liu, Zhenqi; Cao, Wenhong

    2012-05-01

    We addressed the link between excessive exposure to insulin and mitochondrion-derived oxidative stress in this study and found that prolonged exposure to insulin increased mitochondrial cholesterol in cultured hepatocytes and in mice and stimulated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased the reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide ratio in cultured hepatocytes. Exposure of isolated hepatic mitochondria to cholesterol alone promoted ROS emission. The oxidative stress induced by the prolonged exposure to insulin was prevented by inhibition of cholesterol synthesis with simvastatin. We further found that prolonged exposure to insulin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and the increased ROS production came from mitochondrial respiration complex I. Finally, we observed that prolonged exposure to insulin decreased mitochondrial membrane fluidity in a cholesterol synthesis-dependent manner. Together our results demonstrate that excess exposure to insulin causes mitochondrion-derived oxidative stress through cholesterol synthesis in hepatocytes.

  6. Effects of prolonged exposure to space flight factors for 175 days on lettuce seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzgodina, L. V.; Maximova, E. N.; Akatov, Yu. A.

    We have studied the effects of prolonged (up to 175 days) exposure of Lactuca sativa seeds to space flight factors, including primary cosmic radiation heavy ions. The data obtained evidence a significant fourfold increase ofs pontaneous mutagenesis in seeds both with regard to the total number of aberrant cells as well as the formation of single cells with multiple aberrations. Comparison of the present experiment with earlier works shows that the frequency of such aberrations increases with the duration of the flight.

  7. Effects of prolonged exposure to space flight factors for 175 days on lettuce seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N.; Akatov, Yu.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of prolonged (up to 175 days) exposure of Lactuca sativa seeds to space flight factors, including primary cosmic radiation heavy ions have been studied. The data obtained evidence a significant fourfold increase of spontaneous mutagenesis in seeds both with regard to the total number of aberrant cells as well as the formation of single cells with multiple aberrations. Comparison of the present experiment with earlier works shows that the frequency of such aberrations increases with the duration of the flight.

  8. Population-Based Study of QT Interval Prolongation in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Krati; Ackerman, Michael J.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Matteson, Eric L.; Gabriel, Sherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Heart rate corrected QT interval (QTc) (which is obtained from a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and reflects ventricular repolarization duration) is a strong predictor of cardiovascular mortality. Our primary purpose is to determine the impact of QTc prolongation on mortality in RA patients. Methods A population-based inception cohort of patients with RA fulfilling 1987 ACR criteria in 1988–2007 was identified, with an age- and sex-matched comparison cohort and followed until death, migration or 12-31-2008. Data were collected on ECG variables, medications known to prolong QT interval, electrolytes, cardiovascular risk factors and disease status and RA disease characteristics. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine QTc prolongation as predictor of mortality. Results QTc prolongation prior to RA incidence/index date was similar in RA (15%) and non-RA (18%) subjects. During follow-up, the cumulative incidence of QTc prolongation was higher among RA (48% at 20 years after RA incidence) than non-RA (38% at 20 years after index date; p= 0.004). Idiopathic QTc prolongation (excluding prolongations explained by ECG changes, medications, etc.) was marginally associated with all-cause mortality (HR: 1.28; 95% CI: 0.91–1.81, p=0.16), but was not associated with cardiovascular mortality (HR: 1.10; 95% CI:0.43–2.86, p= 0.83) in RA. Conclusion RA patients have a significantly elevated risk of developing QTc prolongation. However, idiopathic prolonged QTc was only marginally associated with all-cause mortality in RA patients. The clinical implications of these findings in RA require further study. PMID:25572282

  9. Home cage locomotor changes in non-human primates after prolonged welding-fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong Yong; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Jung Duck; Han, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jong Seong; Heo, Jeong Doo; Yu, Il Je

    2013-12-01

    To define the relationship between the brain concentration of manganese and neurological signs, such as locomotion, after prolonged welding-fume exposure, cynomolgus monkeys were acclimated for 1 month and then divided into three concentration groups: unexposed, low concentration (31 mg/m(3) total suspended particulate (TSP), 0.9 mg/m(3) of Mn), and high concentration (62 mg/m(3) TSP, 1.95 mg/m(3) of Mn) of TSP. The monkeys were exposed to manual metal-arc stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes for 2 h per day over 8 months in an inhalation chamber system equipped with an automatic fume generator. The home cage locomotor activity and patterns were determined using a camera system over 2-4 consecutive days. After 25 and 32 weeks of exposure, the home cage locomotor activity of the high-concentration primates was found to be 5-6 times higher than that of the unexposed primates, and this increased locomotor activity was maintained for 7 weeks after ceasing the welding-fume exposure, eventually subsiding to three times higher after 13 weeks of recovery. Therefore, the present results, along with our previous observations of a high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 signal in the globus pallidus and increased blood Mn concentration, indicate that prolonged welding-fume exposure can cause neurobehavioral changes in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:24304306

  10. Home cage locomotor changes in non-human primates after prolonged welding-fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong Yong; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Jung Duck; Han, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jong Seong; Heo, Jeong Doo; Yu, Il Je

    2013-12-01

    To define the relationship between the brain concentration of manganese and neurological signs, such as locomotion, after prolonged welding-fume exposure, cynomolgus monkeys were acclimated for 1 month and then divided into three concentration groups: unexposed, low concentration (31 mg/m(3) total suspended particulate (TSP), 0.9 mg/m(3) of Mn), and high concentration (62 mg/m(3) TSP, 1.95 mg/m(3) of Mn) of TSP. The monkeys were exposed to manual metal-arc stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes for 2 h per day over 8 months in an inhalation chamber system equipped with an automatic fume generator. The home cage locomotor activity and patterns were determined using a camera system over 2-4 consecutive days. After 25 and 32 weeks of exposure, the home cage locomotor activity of the high-concentration primates was found to be 5-6 times higher than that of the unexposed primates, and this increased locomotor activity was maintained for 7 weeks after ceasing the welding-fume exposure, eventually subsiding to three times higher after 13 weeks of recovery. Therefore, the present results, along with our previous observations of a high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 signal in the globus pallidus and increased blood Mn concentration, indicate that prolonged welding-fume exposure can cause neurobehavioral changes in cynomolgus monkeys.

  11. Selective enhancement of xenobiotic metabolizing systems of rat lungs by prolonged exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Miura, T.

    1987-04-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0.2 and 0.4 ppm O/sub 3/ for 4, 8, and 12 weeks and to 0.1 and 0.2 ppm O/sub 3/ for 4 weeks to examine the effects of prolonged exposure to O/sub 3/ on the xenobiotic metabolizing systems in the lung. Exposures to 0.2 and 0.4 ppm O/sub 3/ caused a significant increase in the NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase activity and cytochrome P-450 content in a dose-dependent manner during 4-12 weeks, whereas NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase was not altered. After 12 weeks of exposure to 0.4 ppm O/sub 3/, NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase and cytochrome P-450 reached a maximum showing 138 and 221% those of the control levels, respectively. At 0.1 ppm O/sub 3/, the cytochrome P-450 content still increased significantly to 152% that of the control on the fourth week. In parallel to the increment of cytochrome P-450 benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase and 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase increased significantly during 4-12 weeks of exposures to 0.2 and 0.4 ppm O/sub 3/. After a 4-week exposure to 0.1 and 0.2 ppm O/sub 3/, benzphetamine N-demethylase increased to the largest degree among the enzymes metabolizing four kinds of xenobiotics examined. 7-Ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase also increased significantly but of smaller magnitude, whereas coumarin hydroxylase was not affected. These results show that prolonged exposures to 0.1-0.4 ppm O/sub 3/ persistently enhance pulmonary cytochrome P-450 systems. It is also suggested that some isozyme(s) of pulmonary cytochrome P-450, especially that catalyzing benzphetamine N-demethylation, are preferentially increased by exposure to low levels of O/sub 3/.

  12. Prolonged exposure and virtual reality-enhanced imaginal exposure for PTSD following a terrorist bulldozer attack: a case study.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Sara A; Hoffman, Hunter G; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Tamar Weiss, Patrice L; Avitzour, Sara; Josman, Naomi

    2010-02-01

    In this case study, virtual reality was used to augment imaginal exposure in a protocol based on prolonged exposure. A 29-year-old male patient developed posttraumatic stress disorder after surviving a deadly terrorist bulldozer attack on two civilian buses and several cars in Jerusalem; the traumas witnessed by the survivor included a decapitation. The crowded bus in which the patient was riding was pushed over onto its side by the terrorist, injuring, trapping, and terrifying the passengers and causing gasoline to leak. Guided by his therapist, the patient entered an immersive computer-generated virtual world to go "back" to the scene of the traumatic event to help him gain access to his memories of the event, process and reduce the intensity of the emotions (fear/anger) associated with his pathological memories, and change unhealthy thought patterns. Traumatic memories of childhood abuse and traumatic memories of the bulldozer terrorist attack were treated using imaginal exposure while the patient was in the virtual environment BusWorld. The patient showed large posttreatment reductions in PTSD symptoms, and his Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) scores dropped from 79 pretreatment to zero immediately posttreatment, and CAPS was still at zero 6 months later. Although case studies are inconclusive by nature, these encouraging preliminary results suggest that further exploration of the use of virtual reality during modified prolonged exposure for PTSD is warranted. As terrorist attacks increase in frequency and severity worldwide, research is needed on how to minimize the psychological consequences of terrorism.

  13. Short and prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells: metabolic and osmotic effects.

    PubMed

    Moruzzi, Noah; Del Sole, Marianna; Fato, Romana; Gerdes, Jantje M; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bergamini, Christian; Brismar, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    High blood glucose levels are the main feature of diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism linking high glucose concentration to diabetic complications is still not fully elucidated, particularly with regard to human physiology. Excess of glucose is likely to trigger a metabolic response depending on the cell features, activating deleterious pathways involved in the complications of diabetes. In this study, we aim to elucidate how acute and prolonged hyperglycaemia alters the biology and metabolism in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We found that hyperglycaemia triggers a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis that is maintained over prolonged time. Moreover, osmotic pressure is a major factor in the early metabolic response, decreasing both mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cellular proliferation. After prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia we observed decreased mitochondrial steady-state and uncoupled respiration, together with a reduced ATP/ADP ratio. At the same time, we could not detect major changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and reactive oxygen species. We suggest that the physiological and metabolic alterations observed in healthy human primary fibroblasts and endothelial cells are an adaptive response to hyperglycaemia. The severity of metabolic and bioenergetics impairment associated with diabetic complications may occur after longer glucose exposure or due to interactions with cell types more sensitive to hyperglycaemia.

  14. Prolonged Exposure for Guilt and Shame in a Veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Lisa A.; Gros, Daniel F.; Strachan, Martha; Worsham, Glenna; Foa, Edna B.; Acierno, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Morally injurious events appear capable of producing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), even though they may not involve actual or perceived life-threat or a response of fear, horror, or helplessness. Researchers have questioned whether exposure therapies can address these events. The current report presents evidence of the effectiveness of this treatment approach for addressing posttraumatic symptoms related to a morally injurious event through an illustrative case of an Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran with PTSD characterized by symptoms of guilt and shame. The veteran was successfully treated with nine sessions of prolonged exposure therapy, reporting minimal PTSD symptoms one week post-treatment and at a six-month follow-up assessment. Implications for the treatment of veterans with significant guilt and shame using exposure-based therapies, and with respect to the recent changes to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD, are discussed. PMID:25505798

  15. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration.

  16. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  17. The effect of prolonged exposure to 750 C air on the tribological performance of PM212

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemis, Kirk; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Dellacorte, Christopher; Sliney, Harold E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of prolonged exposure to 750 C air on the tribological performance and dimensional stability of PM212, a high temperature, self-lubricating composite, is studied. PM212, by weight, contains 70 percent metal-bonded Cr3C2, 15 percent BaF2/CaF2 eutectic, and 15 percent silver. Rub blocks were fabricated from PM212 by cold isostatic pressing followed by sintering. Prior to tribo-testing, the rub blocks were exposed to 750 C air for periods ranging from 100 to 1000 hours. Then, the rub blocks were slid against nickel-based superalloy disks in a double-rub-block tribometer in air under a 66 N load at temperatures from 25 to 750 C with a sliding velocity of 0.36 m/s. Unexposed rub blocks were tested for baseline comparison. Friction coefficients ranged from 0.24 to 0.37 for the unexposed rub blocks and from 0.32 to 0.56 for the exposed ones. Wear for both the composite blocks and superalloy disks was typically in the moderate to low range of 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m. Friction and wear data were similar for the rub blocks exposed for 100, 500, and 1000 hours. Prolonged exposure to 750 C air increased friction and wear of the PM212 rub blocks at room temperature, but their triboperformance remained unaffected at higher temperatures, probably due to the formation of lubricious metal oxides. Dimensional stability of the composite was studied by exposing specimens of varying thicknesses for 500 hours in air at 750 C. Block thicknesses were found to increase with increased exposure time until steady state was reached after 100 hours of exposure, probably due to oxidation.

  18. Attenuation of signaling and nitric oxide production following prolonged leptin exposure in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquicett, Carmelo; Graves, Anitra; Kleinhenz, Dean J; Hart, C Michael

    2007-11-01

    Acute leptin exposure stimulates endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production in vitro. In contrast, chronic elevations in circulating leptin levels in patients with obesity are associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired endothelial NO production. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to examine the direct effects of acute and more sustained leptin stimulation on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and NO production in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). HAECs were treated with vehicle or with leptin (5 or 60 ng/mL) acutely (30-60 minutes) or for 72 hours. HAEC NO release into culture media was measured with a chemiluminescence technique, and superoxide (O(2)(-.)) production was measured with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. HAEC eNOS activity was measured as the conversion of (3)H-arginine to (3)H-citrulline, and protein levels of eNOS, phospho-eNOS (serine 1177), Erk, phospho-Erk, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS3), xanthine oxidase (XO), and the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase components p22phox, p67phox, Nox-4, and gp91phox were examined by Western blotting or immunoprecipitation. Acute leptin exposure increased eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation and caused Erk activation. In contrast, prolonged leptin stimulation was not cytotoxic and failed to alter eNOS expression, phosphorylation, or HAEC NO release. Furthermore, prolonged leptin stimulation did not alter O(2)(-.) production or NADPH oxidase or XO expression but increased SOCS3 expression. In contrast to acute stimulation, prolonged (72 hours) stimulation does not alter endothelial cell NO or O(2)(-.) production. We postulate that chronic leptin stimulation, through increased SOCS3 expression, may attenuate the effects of leptin on vascular endothelial function. PMID:18062898

  19. Drug-induced QT interval prolongation: does ethnicity of the thorough QT study population matter?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rashmi R

    2013-01-01

    Inter-ethnic differences in drug responses have been well documented. Drug-induced QT interval prolongation is a major safety concern and therefore, regulatory authorities recommend a clinical thorough QT study (TQT) to investigate new drugs for their QT-prolonging potential. A positive study, determined by breach of a preset regulatory threshold, significantly influences late phase clinical trials by requiring intense ECG monitoring. A few studies that are currently available, although not statistically conclusive at present, question the assumption that ethnicity of the study population may not influence the outcome of a TQT study. Collective consideration of available pharmacogenetic and clinical information suggests that there may be inter-ethnic differences in QT-prolonging effects of drugs and that Caucasians may be more sensitive than other populations. The information also suggest s that (a) these differences may depend on the QT-prolonging potency of the drug and (b) exposure–response (E–R) analysis may be more sensitive than simple changes in QTc interval in unmasking this difference. If the QT response in Caucasians is generally found to be more intense than in non-Caucasians, there may be significant regulatory implications for domestic acceptance of data from a TQT study conducted in foreign populations. However, each drug will warrant an individual consideration when extrapolating the results of a TQT studyfrom one ethnic population to another and the ultimate clinical relevance of any difference. Further adequately designed and powered studies, investigating the pharmacologic properties and E–R relationships of additional drugs with different potencies, are needed in Caucasians, Oriental/Asian and African populations before firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:22882246

  20. Prolonged exposure to arsenic in UK private water supplies: toenail, hair and drinking water concentrations.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D R S; Watts, M J; Hamilton, E M; Fletcher, T; Leonardi, G S; Close, R M; Exley, K S; Crabbe, H; Polya, D A

    2016-05-18

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) in drinking water is an established cause of cancer and other adverse health effects. Arsenic concentrations >10 μg L(-1) were previously measured in 5% of private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, UK. The present study investigated prolongued exposure to As by measuring biomarkers in hair and toenail samples from 212 volunteers and repeated measurements of As in drinking water from 127 households served by PWS. Strong positive Pearson correlations (rp = 0.95) indicated stability of water As concentrations over the time period investigated (up to 31 months). Drinking water As concentrations were positively correlated with toenail (rp = 0.53) and hair (rp = 0.38) As concentrations - indicative of prolonged exposure. Analysis of washing procedure solutions provided strong evidence of the effective removal of exogenous As from toenail samples. Significantly higher As concentrations were measured in hair samples from males and smokers and As concentrations in toenails were negatively associated with age. A positive association between seafood consumption and toenail As and a negative association between home-grown vegetable consumption and hair As was observed for volunteers exposed to <1 As μg L(-1) in drinking water. These findings have important implications regarding the interpretation of toenail and hair biomarkers. Substantial variation in biomarker As concentrations remained unaccounted for, with soil and dust exposure as possible explanations. PMID:27120003

  1. Prolonged exposure to arsenic in UK private water supplies: toenail, hair and drinking water concentrations.

    PubMed

    Middleton, D R S; Watts, M J; Hamilton, E M; Fletcher, T; Leonardi, G S; Close, R M; Exley, K S; Crabbe, H; Polya, D A

    2016-05-18

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) in drinking water is an established cause of cancer and other adverse health effects. Arsenic concentrations >10 μg L(-1) were previously measured in 5% of private water supplies (PWS) in Cornwall, UK. The present study investigated prolongued exposure to As by measuring biomarkers in hair and toenail samples from 212 volunteers and repeated measurements of As in drinking water from 127 households served by PWS. Strong positive Pearson correlations (rp = 0.95) indicated stability of water As concentrations over the time period investigated (up to 31 months). Drinking water As concentrations were positively correlated with toenail (rp = 0.53) and hair (rp = 0.38) As concentrations - indicative of prolonged exposure. Analysis of washing procedure solutions provided strong evidence of the effective removal of exogenous As from toenail samples. Significantly higher As concentrations were measured in hair samples from males and smokers and As concentrations in toenails were negatively associated with age. A positive association between seafood consumption and toenail As and a negative association between home-grown vegetable consumption and hair As was observed for volunteers exposed to <1 As μg L(-1) in drinking water. These findings have important implications regarding the interpretation of toenail and hair biomarkers. Substantial variation in biomarker As concentrations remained unaccounted for, with soil and dust exposure as possible explanations.

  2. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Behnaz; Andrew, Nigel R

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus 'natural' fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies. PMID:27547583

  3. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Behnaz; Andrew, Nigel R

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus 'natural' fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies.

  4. The physiological consequences of varied heat exposure events in adult Myzus persicae: a single prolonged exposure compared to repeated shorter exposures

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Nigel R.

    2016-01-01

    The study of environmental stress tolerance in aphids has primarily been at low temperatures. In these cases, and in the rare cases of high temperature tolerance assessments, all exposures had been during a single stress event. In the present study, we examined the physiological consequences of repeated high temperature exposure with recovery periods between these stress events in Myzus persicae. We subjected individuals to either a single prolonged three hour heating event, or three one hour heating events with a recovery time of 24 h between bouts. Aphids exposed to repeated bouts of high temperatures had more glucose and higher expression of proteins and osmolyte compounds, such as glycerol, compared to the prolonged exposure group. However, aphids exposed to the repeated high temperature treatment had reduced sources of energy such as trehalose and triglyceride compounds than the prolonged exposure group. Recovery time had more physiological costs (based on production of more protein and consumption of more trehalose and triglyceride) and benefits (based on production of more osmolytes) in repeated high temperature treatments. As aphids are known to respond differently to constant versus ‘natural’ fluctuating temperature regimes, conclusions drawn from constant temperature data sets may be problematic. We suggest future experiments assessing insect responses to thermal stress incorporate a repeated stress and recovery pattern into their methodologies. PMID:27547583

  5. Exposure of the general population to gasoline.

    PubMed Central

    Akland, G G

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the currently available information on gasoline exposure to the general population. In general, the largest contribution to the time weighted exposures results from exposures while indoors, which are influenced by the outside air, indoor sources, and attached garages. Personal activities, including refueling and commuting, contribute significantly higher exposures but last for only a small portion of the 24-hr time weighted average. The highest exposed group includes those individuals living near large service stations and those with contaminated water supplies. PMID:8020446

  6. Hypothalamic sensing of ketone bodies after prolonged cerebral exposure leads to metabolic control dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Lionel; Geller, Sarah; Hébert, Audrey; Repond, Cendrine; Fioramonti, Xavier; Leloup, Corinne; Pellerin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies have been shown to transiently stimulate food intake and modify energy homeostasis regulatory systems following cerebral infusion for a moderate period of time (<6 hours). As ketone bodies are usually enhanced during episodes of fasting, this effect might correspond to a physiological regulation. In contrast, ketone bodies levels remain elevated for prolonged periods during obesity, and thus could play an important role in the development of this pathology. In order to understand this transition, ketone bodies were infused through a catheter inserted in the carotid to directly stimulate the brain for a period of 24 hours. Food ingested and blood circulating parameters involved in metabolic control as well as glucose homeostasis were determined. Results show that ketone bodies infusion for 24 hours increased food intake associated with a stimulation of hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptides. Moreover, insulinemia was increased and caused a decrease in glucose production despite an increased resistance to insulin. The present study confirms that ketone bodies reaching the brain stimulates food intake. Moreover, we provide evidence that a prolonged hyperketonemia leads to a dysregulation of energy homeostasis control mechanisms. Finally, this study shows that brain exposure to ketone bodies alters insulin signaling and consequently glucose homeostasis. PMID:27708432

  7. Changes in Temporal Attention Inhibition Following Prolonged Exposure and Sertraline in the Treatment of PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Echiverri-Cohen, Aileen; Zoellner, Lori A.; Gallop, Robert; Feeny, Norah; Jaeger, Jeffrey; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective Attentional inhibitory deficits expressed as difficulty ignoring irrelevant stimuli in the pursuit of goal-directed behavior may serve as a fundamental mechanism of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence of inhibitory processes as central to extinction suggests that exposure-based treatments may act more directly on the inhibitory deficits implicated in PTSD, whereas, in facilitating serotonergic neurotransmission, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be less direct and bring about general neurochemical changes in the fear circuitry. If these inhibitory deficits underlie PTSD, then inhibition should improve with successful treatment, with those treated with prolonged exposure (PE) potentially resulting in greater changes in inhibition than those treated with sertraline. Method Changes in temporal attentional inhibition, using an attentional blink (AB) paradigm, were examined at pre-and post-treatment in 49 individuals (74.5% female, 66.7% Caucasian, age M = 37.69, SD = 12.8 years) with chronic PTSD. Participants completed 10 weeks of either PE or sertraline. Results Individuals who made greater improvements with PE showed faster improvements in temporal inhibition on the critical inhibitory lag of AB than those who made greater improvements with sertraline (d = 0.94). These changes could not be accounted for by basic attention. Conclusions Greater improvement in fundamental attentional inhibitory processes with better treatment response to PE, compared to sertraline, suggests potential specificity in how PTSD treatments normalize inhibitory processes, such that exposure-based treatments like PE may target inhibitory processes and improve basic inhibitory functioning. Public Health Significance Statement Inhibitory processes, particularly related to temporal attention, may play a critical role in response to exposure therapy for PTSD. The main finding that individuals with PTSD who made more clinical improvement showed faster

  8. Adolescent pre-exposure to ethanol or MDMA prolongs the conditioned rewarding effects of MDMA.

    PubMed

    Do Couto, B Ribeiro; Rodríguez-Arias, M; Fuentes, S; Gagliano, H; Armario, A; Miñarro, J; Aguilar, M A

    2011-07-01

    Adolescents often take ethanol (EtOH) in combination with MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine). In the present work we studied the effect of repeated intermittent adolescent pre-exposure to both drugs on the behavioral and neurochemical effects of MDMA in mice. Sixteen days after pre-treatment, the rewarding and reinstating effects of MDMA in the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm were evaluated, along with the levels of biogenic amines, basal motor activity and corticosterone response to different challenges. Pre-exposure to EtOH, MDMA or EtOH+MDMA did not affect the CPP induced by 10mg/kg of MDMA. However, adolescent exposure to EtOH or MDMA increased the duration of the conditioned rewarding effects of MDMA. Following extinction of the CPP, a priming dose of 5mg/kg of MDMA elicited reinstatement in all the groups, with the duration of this reinstated CPP being longer in mice pre-treated with MDMA. After reinstatement, an increase in monoamine levels was observed in mice pre-exposed to EtOH (DA, DOPAC and 5-HT in the striatum and 5-HIAA in the cortex and hippocampus) or MDMA (5-HT in the hippocampus). Basal motor activity and basal levels of corticosterone were not affected by any of these pre-treatments, but the group pre-exposed to MDMA showed higher levels of corticosterone in response to the administration of 10mg/kg of MDMA. Behavioral and hormonal effects of adolescent exposure to MDMA were reversed by co-administration of EtOH. Our results suggest that exposure to EtOH or MDMA during adolescence prolongs the rewarding properties of MDMA.

  9. Does Change in Distress Matter? Mechanisms of Change in Prolonged Exposure for PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Bluett, Ellen J.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Clinically, many individuals persist in prolonged exposure therapy (PE) for chronic PTSD despite continuing distress during recounting of the trauma memory (imaginal exposure). Theorists suggest that distress reduction is necessary for successful treatment outcome (e.g., Foa & Kozak, 1986), while others suggest otherwise (e.g., Craske et al., 2008). This study examined clinically reliable changes in distress, relations to broad clinical outcomes, and whether homework adherence affected this relationship. Method In 116 patients with PTSD, first to last imaginal exposure sessions’ peak and average distress was examined, calculating reliable change in distress. Homework adherence and helpfulness were examined. At post-treatment, PTSD symptoms (re-experiencing, avoidance, hyperarousal), depression, and functioning were examined. Results Patients exhibited a lack of reliable change in distress (64.7%) more than a reliable change in distress (35.3%). Although no difference in post-treatment PTSD diagnostic status, individuals experiencing a reliable change in distress reported lower PTSD severity (re-experiencing, hyperarousal), depression, and better functioning. Further, perceived helpfulness of imaginal homework had an indirect effect on this relationship. Limitations This study did not utilize a distress tolerance self-report measure; however, examined self-reported distress during imaginal exposure. Conclusions Results are encouraging for clinicians treating PTSD with PE, arguing that lack of reliable change in distress to the trauma memory does not result in treatment failure. Patient “buy in” to homework, rather than amount completed, was related to the process of distress reduction. Results suggest that distress reduction in imaginal exposure is not a key mechanism underlying therapeutic change in PE. PMID:24091202

  10. Prolonged exposure of the HIV-1 gp41 membrane proximal region with L669S substitution

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoying; Dennison, S. Moses; Liu, Pinghuang; Gao, Feng; Jaeger, Frederick; Montefiori, David C.; Verkoczy, Laurent; Haynes, Barton F.; Alam, S. Munir; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2010-01-01

    The conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 envelope is a target for the rare broadly neutralizing 2F5, Z13, and 4E10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). One strategy to elicit such antibodies is to design an immunogen with increased exposure of the 2F5 and 4E10 mAb epitopes. In this study we characterize a single leucine to serine substitution at position 669 (L669S) in the gp41 Env MPER that confers >250-fold more neutralization sensitivity to 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs than does the wild-type gp41 sequence. On synthetic liposomes, increased solvent exposure of MPER tryptophan residues and stable docking of 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs to mutant MPER peptide liposomes indicate more favorable membrane orientation of MPER neutralizing epitopes with L669S substitution. The time during which virus is sensitive to 2F5 mAb-mediated neutralization is approximately 3-fold longer when the mutation is present. These data suggest that a major contribution to the L669S mutant virus phenotype of enhanced susceptibility to MPER mAbs is prolonged exposure of the MPER neutralizing epitope during viral entry. PMID:20231447

  11. Signal transduction disturbance related to hepatocarcinogenesis in mouse by prolonged exposure to Nanjing drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Cheng, Shupei; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2013-09-01

    Toxicogenomic approaches were used to investigate the potential hepatocarcinogenic effects on mice by oral exposure to Nanjing drinking water (NJDW). Changes in the hepatic transcriptome of 3 weeks male mice (Mus musculus) were monitored and dissected after oral exposure to NJDW for 90 days. No preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions were observed in the hepatic tissue by the end of NJDW exposure. However, total of 746 genes were changed transcriptionally. Thirty-one percent of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were associated with the functional categories of cell cycle regulation, adhesion, growth, apoptosis, and signal transduction, which are closely implicated in tumorigenesis and progression. Interrogation of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes revealed that 43 DEGs were mapped to several crucial signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In signal transduction network constructed via Genes2Networks software, Egfr, Akt1, Atf2, Ctnnb1, Hras, Mapk1, Smad2, and Ccnd1 were hubs. Direct gene-disease relationships obtained from Comparative Toxicogenomics Database and scientific literatures revealed that the hubs have direct mechanism or biomarker relationships with hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions or hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, prolonged intake of NJDW without employing any indoor water treatment strategy might predispose mouse to HCC. Furthermore, Egfr, Akt1, Ctnnb1, Hras, Mapk1, Smad2, and Ccnd1 were identified as promising biomarkers of the potential combined hepatocarcinogenicity.

  12. Experimental chronic obstructive lung disease. I. Bronchopulmonary changes induced in rabbits by prolonged exposure to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, J; Marinescu, D; Tapu, V; Eskenasy, A

    1978-01-01

    The prolonged exposure to formaldehyde induces in the rabbit lung reactional and dystrophic changes involving the intrapulmonary bronchi, the bronchioli and the lung tissue. These changes are represented by bronchial cell hyperplasia with hypermucigenesis, extrusion of bronchial cells, bronchiolar hypermucigenesis, parcellary squamous metaplasia or necrobiosis of epithelia, thickening of bronchial and bronchiolar walls by subepithelial cell accumulations, destruction of musculo-elastic structures with stenosis or ectasia; the vascular reactions are hyperhaemic and proliferative with an obstructive and fibrous tendency; the parenchymal lesions are atelectasias, intralobular emphysema, and cellular thickening of alveolar walls and interlobular areas. The acid phosphatase, Tween-60-esterase, naphthol-AS-D-acetate-esterase, proline-oxidase and hydroxyproline-2-epimerase activities are increasing, while the leucyl-aminopeptidase and beta-glucuronidase ones are decreasing. The qualitative observations are completed and sustained by quanitative studies of mucous cell kinetics, of cell accumulations and differentiations. PMID:151223

  13. Effects of additional prolonged exposure to psychoeducation and relaxation in acute stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Freyth, Claudia; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Sartory, Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the effect of prolonged exposure (PE) on the heart rate (HR) and skin conductance response to trauma-related stimuli in acute stress disorder (ASD). Forty recent trauma victims with ASD were randomly assigned to three sessions of either PE or supportive counseling (SC) with both groups also receiving psychoeducation and progressive relaxation. Assessments were carried out before and after treatment and again after 3 months. Four years later, patients were asked by telephone whether they had received further treatment. There were no significant group differences with regard to symptomatic improvement at the end of treatment. Both groups showed initial cardiac acceleration to trauma-related pictures. After treatment the PE group showed attenuation of the HR response and a reduction in spontaneous fluctuations (SF) whereas the SC group showed a decelerative (orienting) response and a marginal increase in SF. Following SC, 43% received further treatment compared to 9% after PE.

  14. Mild traumatic brain injury and treatment response in prolonged exposure for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Rebecca K; Rauch, Sheila A M; Tuerk, Peter W; Smith, Erin; Defever, Andrew M; Mayer, Rebecca A; Messina, Michael; Venners, Margaret

    2013-06-01

    A proportion of U.S. veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan have experienced mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which is associated with increased risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Prolonged Exposure (PE) has proven effectiveness in the treatment of PTSD; however, some clinicians have reservations about using PE with individuals with a history of mTBI. We examined the impact of PE for veterans with PTSD and with or without a history of mTBI in a naturalistic sample of 51 veterans who received PE at a Veterans Health Administration PTSD clinic. We also analyzed previously collected data from a controlled trial of 22 veterans randomly assigned to PE or present centered therapy. For both sets of data, we found that PE reduced symptom levels and we also did not detect an effect for mTBI, suggesting that PE may be helpful for individuals with PTSD and a history of mTBI. PMID:23696427

  15. Increased agonist affinity at the mu-opioid receptor induced by prolonged agonist exposure

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Arttamangkul, Seksiri; Clark, Mary J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.; Traynor, John R.; Williams, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to high-efficacy agonists results in desensitization of the mu opioid receptor (MOR). Desensitized receptors are thought to be unable to couple to G-proteins, preventing downstream signaling, however the changes to the receptor itself are not well characterized. In the current study, confocal imaging was used to determine whether desensitizing conditions cause a change in agonist-receptor interactions. Using rapid solution exchange, the binding kinetics of fluorescently labeled opioid agonist, dermorphin Alexa594 (derm A594), to MORs was measured in live cells. The affinity of derm A594 binding increased following prolonged treatment of cells with multiple agonists that are known to cause receptor desensitization. In contrast, binding of a fluorescent antagonist, naltrexamine Alexa 594, was unaffected by similar agonist pre-treatment. The increased affinity of derm A594 for the receptor was long-lived and partially reversed after a 45 min wash. Treatment of the cells with pertussis toxin did not alter the increase in affinity of the derm A594 for MOR. Likewise the affinity of derm A594 for MORs expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from arrestin 1 and 2 knockout animals increased following treatment of the cells with the desensitization protocol. Thus, opioid receptors were “imprinted” with a memory of prior agonist exposure that was independent of G-protein activation or arrestin binding that altered subsequent agonist-receptor interactions. The increased affinity suggests that acute desensitization results in a long lasting but reversible conformational change in the receptor. PMID:23447620

  16. The action spectrum for vitamin D3: initial skin reaction and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Arjan; den Outer, Peter; van Kranen, Henk; Slaper, Harry

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D3 photosynthesis in the skin is formulated as a set of reaction equations, including side-reactions to lumisterol, tachysterol and toxisterols, and the accompanying reverse reactions, isomerisation of previtamin D3 to vitamin D3 and photodegradation of vitamin D3. The solution of this set is given for the stationary irradiance spectrum. The effective action spectrum for the instantaneous vitamin D3 production changes shape as a function of exposure, and therefore, no single action spectrum can be used. We assessed the action spectrum for unexposed skin and for skin that has been exposed to 7.5 Standard Erythemal Doses (SED). We constructed two new estimates: (1) the RIVM action spectrum, based on absorption spectra, quantum yields and skin transmission spectra, and (2) the modified QUT action spectrum, which is adjusted for self-absorption and skin transmission. For previously unexposed skin, the modified QUT action spectrum gives a qualitatively similar, but larger estimate than the RIVM action spectrum. We have not been able to solve the lack of quantitative agreement between the vitamin D production estimates from the three action spectrum estimates (RIVM, modified QUT and CIE). All new action spectra have stronger emphasis on the short wavelengths than the CIE action spectrum. We showed that, for wavelengths larger than 300 nm, the bandwidth that was used in the experiment that formed the basis of the CIE action spectrum, gives a red-shift of about 1 nm. Generally, with the formation of previtamin D3, the return reaction to provitamin D3 limits the production of vitamin D3. After some exposure, the new action spectrum has negative values for the longer wavelengths in the UVB. For the RIVM action spectrum, this happens after 7.5 SED, for the modified QUT action spectrum already after 1.25 SED, and after 7.5 SED the net production rate is largely cancelled. Thus prolonged exposure of previously unexposed skin saturates vitamin D3 formation. For maximum

  17. Wet-cold exposure and hypothermia: thermal and metabolic responses to prolonged exercise in rain.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R L; Hayward, J S

    1996-09-01

    Simulated conditions of hiking in rain, wind, and cold, without protective rainwear, were used to investigate wet-cold hypothermia in 18 male subjects. Thermal, metabolic, and motor responses were monitored during an attempted 5-h walk (5.1 km/h) at 5 degrees C, with continuous exposure to rain (7.4 cm/h) and wind (8.0 km/h) over the final 4 h. The majority of subjects (11) could not complete the protocol because of intolerance of wet-cold conditions during the last 2 h. Therefore, data from 5 subjects who completed the protocol in rain and control conditions were used to describe the general pattern of response. During the 1st h of walking, core temperature rose 1 degree C to 38.1 degrees C. The subsequent 2 h of rain caused substantial cold stress, indicated by a 40% increase in heat production due to shivering and significant loss of strength and manual dexterity. However, core temperature only decreased to 37.1 degrees C, merely eliminating the initial exercise hyperthermia. Over the last 2 h of rain, core temperature remained relatively stable at 36.8 degrees C, decreasing slightly to 36.4 degrees C by 5 h. Two other subjects developed significant hypothermia (35 degrees C). One demonstrated fatigue of shivering after 2.5 h of rain, confirming the exhaustion hypothesis of wet-cold hypothermia. The older cooled rapidly when he failed to maintain the walking pace. We conclude that if a person can tolerate the intense discomfort of prolonged wet-cold exposure, he or she has the potential to resist significant core hypothermia for at least 4 h of walking under the conditions of this experiment. Exceptions to this generalization occur, making exposure of < 4 h a hypothermia risk for some individuals. Exposures > 4 h would involve increasing probability of rapid decline into hypothermia, associated with exhaustion of shivering and exercise heat production.

  18. Cultural adaptations of prolonged exposure therapy for treatment and prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder in african americans.

    PubMed

    Williams, Monnica T; Malcoun, Emily; Sawyer, Broderick A; Davis, Darlene M; Bahojb Nouri, Leyla; Bruce, Simone Leavell

    2014-06-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly disabling disorder, afflicting African Americans at disproportionately higher rates than the general population. When receiving treatment, African Americans may feel differently towards a European American clinician due to cultural mistrust. Furthermore, racism and discrimination experienced before or during the traumatic event may compound posttrauma reactions, impacting the severity of symptoms. Failure to adapt treatment approaches to encompass cultural differences and racism-related traumas may decrease treatment success for African American clients. Cognitive behavioral treatment approaches are highly effective, and Prolonged Exposure (PE) in particular has the most empirical support for the treatment of PTSD. This article discusses culturally-informed adaptations of PE that incorporates race-related trauma themes specific to the Black experience. These include adding more sessions at the front end to better establish rapport, asking directly about race-related themes during the assessment process, and deliberately bringing to the forefront race-related experiences and discrimination during treatment when indicated. Guidelines for assessment and the development of appropriate exposures are provided. Case examples are presented demonstrating adaptation of PE for a survivor of race-related trauma and for a woman who developed internalized racism following a sexual assault. Both individuals experienced improvement in their posttrauma reactions using culturally-informed adaptations to PE.

  19. Cultural Adaptations of Prolonged Exposure Therapy for Treatment and Prevention of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Monnica T.; Malcoun, Emily; Sawyer, Broderick A.; Davis, Darlene M.; Bahojb Nouri, Leyla; Bruce, Simone Leavell

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly disabling disorder, afflicting African Americans at disproportionately higher rates than the general population. When receiving treatment, African Americans may feel differently towards a European American clinician due to cultural mistrust. Furthermore, racism and discrimination experienced before or during the traumatic event may compound posttrauma reactions, impacting the severity of symptoms. Failure to adapt treatment approaches to encompass cultural differences and racism-related traumas may decrease treatment success for African American clients. Cognitive behavioral treatment approaches are highly effective, and Prolonged Exposure (PE) in particular has the most empirical support for the treatment of PTSD. This article discusses culturally-informed adaptations of PE that incorporates race-related trauma themes specific to the Black experience. These include adding more sessions at the front end to better establish rapport, asking directly about race-related themes during the assessment process, and deliberately bringing to the forefront race-related experiences and discrimination during treatment when indicated. Guidelines for assessment and the development of appropriate exposures are provided. Case examples are presented demonstrating adaptation of PE for a survivor of race-related trauma and for a woman who developed internalized racism following a sexual assault. Both individuals experienced improvement in their posttrauma reactions using culturally-informed adaptations to PE. PMID:25379272

  20. Prolonged exposure of cholestatic rats to complete dark inhibits biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yuyan; Onori, Paolo; Meng, Fanyin; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Francis, Heather; Franchitto, Antonio; Ray, Debolina; Kennedy, Lindsey; Greene, John; Renzi, Anastasia; Mancinelli, Romina; Gaudio, Eugenio; Glaser, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are common features in cholestatic liver disease. Melatonin is synthesized by the pineal gland as well as the liver. Melatonin inhibits biliary hyperplasia of bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats. Since melatonin synthesis (by the enzyme serotonin N-acetyltransferase, AANAT) from the pineal gland increases after dark exposure, we hypothesized that biliary hyperplasia and liver fibrosis are diminished by continuous darkness via increased melatonin synthesis from the pineal gland. Normal or BDL rats (immediately after surgery) were housed with light-dark cycles or complete dark for 1 wk before evaluation of 1) the expression of AANAT in the pineal gland and melatonin levels in pineal gland tissue supernatants and serum; 2) biliary proliferation and intrahepatic bile duct mass, liver histology, and serum chemistry; 3) secretin-stimulated ductal secretion (functional index of biliary growth); 4) collagen deposition, liver fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver, and cholangiocytes; and 5) expression of clock genes in cholangiocytes. In BDL rats exposed to dark there was 1) enhanced AANAT expression/melatonin secretion in pineal gland and melatonin serum levels; 2) improved liver morphology, serum chemistry and decreased biliary proliferation and secretin-stimulated choleresis; and 4) decreased fibrosis and expression of fibrosis markers in liver sections, total liver and cholangiocytes and reduced biliary expression of the clock genes PER1, BMAL1, CLOCK, and Cry1. Thus prolonged dark exposure may be a beneficial noninvasive therapeutic approach for the management of biliary disorders. PMID:25214401

  1. Germ cell studies in mice after prolonged exposure to nitrous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mazze, R.I.; Rice, S.A.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Felton, J.S.; Brodsky, J.B.; Baden, J.M.

    1983-03-15

    Male and female Swiss Webster (SW) mice, age 13 to 14 weeks, were exposed by inhalation for 4 hr per day, 5 days per week, for 14 weeks, to either room air, 0.5% nitrous oxide, 5.0% nitrous oxide, or 50% nitrous oxide. Murine germ cells were examined for evidence of injury after this exposure. A group of male mice were treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) as a positive control for sperm abnormalities while a group of female mice were treated with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) as a positive control for oocyte destruction. There were no significant differences among the four inhalation exposure groups in testes weight, percentage of abnormally shaped sperm, sperm count, or histologic appearance of the testes; the mean percentage (+/- SE) of abnormal sperm ranged from 8.9 +/- 2.4 (5.0% nitrous oxide) to 13.5 +/- 0.5 (50% nitrous oxide) with a concurrent control value of 10.4 +/- 2.3%. In the positive control experiment, 25.2 +/- 4.1% of sperm from mice treated with MMS were abnormal compared with 2.5 +/- 0.3% of sperm from mice treated with saline (p less than 0.001), indicating that sperm of SW mice are sensitive to chemical damage. There was no significant difference between the mean number of oocytes in mice treated with 50% nitrous oxide (33.3 +/- 14.4) and in control mice (29.8 +/- 8.0). In the positive control experiment, mice treated with 3-MC had significantly fewer (p less than 0.001) primordial oocytes, 67.2 +/- 19.5 compared with control mice, 222.4 +/- 21.9, indicating that this strain is sensitive to chemical damage of the ovary. Thus, murine germ cells showed no evidence of toxic effects due to prolonged exposure to nitrous oxide.

  2. Randomized Trial of Prolonged Exposure for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with and without Cognitive Restructuring: Outcome at Academic and Community Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.; Hembree, Elizabeth A.; Cahill, Shawn P.; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Riggs, David S.; Feeny, Norah C.; Yadin, Elna

    2005-01-01

    Female assault survivors (N = 171) with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomly assigned to prolonged exposure (PE) alone, PE plus cognitive restructuring (PE/CR), or wait-list (WL). Treatment, which consisted of 9-12 sessions, was conducted at an academic treatment center or at a community clinic for rape survivors. Evaluations…

  3. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; van Rhoon, G C; Verduijn, G M; Naus-Postema, N C; Paulides, M M

    2016-01-21

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg(-1)) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients' feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R (2) =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature simulations as a

  4. Absence of acute ocular damage in humans after prolonged exposure to intense RF EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Verduijn, G. M.; Naus-Postema, N. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radio frequency (RF) radiation. Experimental data obtained using animals showed that RF heating of the eye, particularly over a specific threshold, can induce cataracts. During the treatment of cancer in the head and neck by hyperthermia, the eyes receive a considerable dose of RF radiation due to stray radiation from the prolonged (60 min) and intense exposure at 434 MHz of this region. In the current study, we verified the exposure guidelines for humans by determining the association between the electromagnetic and thermal dose in the eyes with the reported ocular effects. We performed a simulation study to retrospectively assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature increase in the eyes of 16 selected patients (encompassing a total of 74 treatment sessions) whose treatment involved high power delivery as well as a minimal distance between the tumor site and the eye. Our results show that the basic restrictions on the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (10 W kg-1) and peak tissue temperature increase (1 °C) are exceeded by up to 10.4 and 4.6 times, on average, and by at least 6.2 and 1.8 times when considering the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval. Evaluation of the acute effects according to patients’ feedback (all patients), the common toxicity criteria scores (all patients) and an ophthalmology investigation (one patient with the highest exposure) revealed no indication of any serious acute ocular effect, even though the eyes were exposed to high electromagnetic fields, leading to a high thermal dose. We also found that, although there is a strong correlation (R 2  =  0.88) between the predicted induced SAR and temperature in the eye, there are large uncertainties regarding the temperature-SAR relationship. Given this large uncertainty (129%) compared with the uncertainty of 3D temperature simulations (61%), we recommend using temperature

  5. Prognostic evaluation of spinal microlesions under exposure of longitudinal blow accelerations of prolonged action.

    PubMed

    Mazurin YuV; Stupakov, G P

    1995-01-01

    The performed experimental investigations were aimed at qualitative and approximate quantitative estimation of parameters of cumulated microtraumatic destructions in spine, leading to its lowered bearing capabilities under prolonged loading with compressing exposures corresponding to high levelled maneuverable accelerations, which exceed 5 G and onset rates 10 G/s and more. Process of microlesions in bone tissues of vertebral bodies at this range of accelerations is not still sufficiently studied. Practical importance of these effects has close relation as to problem of high intensity flight maneuvering accelerations with onset rates up to 10 G/s and higher as well as to estimation if impact acceleration tolerance in ejection event with controllable flightpath of kicked out capatult seat. The data, received in natural experiments on spinal segments T11-L3 with fixation of acoustical emission signals (AES), suggest that stage of minor lesion of vertebral bodies (the first degree of severity), characterizing by avalanche-like increment of acoustical emission signals and starting point of specific crack in loading flow chart, may be pertained as having fragile character. PMID:11538944

  6. Static and dynamic vestibulo-cervico-ocular responses after prolonged exposure to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Kornilova, L N; Sagalovitch, S V; Temnikova, V V; Yakushev, A G

    2007-01-01

    The vestibular function was investigated in 13 Russian crew members of the ISS missions on days 1(2), 4(5), and 8(9) after prolonged exposure to microgravity (126 to 195 days). The static torsional otolith-cervico-ocular reflex was studied, as well as the dynamic vestibulo-cervico-ocular responses, vestibular reactivity, and spontaneous oculomotor activity using videooculography (VOG) and electrooculography (EOG) for simultaneous recording of eye movements. On days 1-2 of return to the gravity (R+1-2), the cosmonauts were found to increase the spontaneous oculomotor activity (floating eye movements, both typical and atypical forms of spontaneous nystagmus, square wave jerks, gaze nystagmus) with the head held in the vertical position. The otolith function during static head inclinations to the right or left shoulder at 30 degrees was suppressed as determined by the inversion or absence, or reduction by half of the amplitude of torsional compensatory eye counter-rolling and the vestibular reactivity during head yaw movements at 0.125 Hz was increased as revealed by a lowered threshold and an increased intensity of vestibular nystagmus. The pattern, depth, dynamics, and velocity of the vestibular function recovery varied with individual participants in the investigation. However, the suppressed otolith functioning in the period of readaptation to the normal gravity was, as a rule, accompanied by an exaggerated vestibular reactivity. PMID:18626133

  7. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With QT Prolongation in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chi-Sheng; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Tu, Chia-Hung; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Liao, Wei-Chih; Lee, Yi-Chia; Chiu, Han-Mo; Lin, Hung-Ju; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Chen, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is independently associated with QT prolongation among patients with diabetes. It has not yet been determined whether this association remains valid in the general population. We designed an observational study to explore this association. Methods and Results We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 31 116 consecutive participants in our health management program. Heart rate–corrected QT (QTc) interval was derived from 12-lead electrocardiography and by Bazett’s formula. NAFLD was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasonography and classified as none, mild, moderate, or severe, according to the ultrasonographic criteria. A multivariable linear regression model was fitted for the association between QTc interval and potential predictors (including demographic, anthropometric, biochemical factors, and comorbidities). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were fitted to assess the association between the severity of NAFLD and QTc prolongation, with the adjustment of significant predictors derived from multivariable linear regression. The mean QTc interval was 421.3 ms (SD 45.4 ms). In the multivariable linear regression analyses, mild, moderate, and severe NAFLD were associated with increases of 2.55, 6.59, and 12.13 ms, respectively, in QTc interval compared with no NAFLD (all P<0.001). In the multivariable logistic regression analyses, mild, moderate, and severe NAFLD were associated with an increased risk for QTc prolongation, with odds ratios of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.01 to 1.21, P<0.05), 1.61 (95% CI: 1.36 to 1.9, P<0.001), and 1.31 (95% CI: 1.16 to 2.24, P<0.01), respectively, in women, and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.01 to 1.21, P<0.05), 1.39 (95% CI: 1.22 to 1.59, P<0.001), and 1.87 (95% CI: 1.16 to 2.24, P<0.001), respectively, in men, after adjusting for predictors known to be associated with the QTc interval. The association remained significant among subgroups with or without diabetes. Conclusions The severity of NAFLD

  8. Prolonged environmental exposure of arsenic through drinking water on the risk of hypertension and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Bing; Xi, Shuhua; Zheng, Quanmei; Lv, Xiuqiang; Sun, Guifan

    2013-11-01

    Prolonged exposure to inorganic arsenic has been a severe environmental public health issue worldwide in the recent decades. Increasing evidence has suggested a possible role of prolonged arsenic exposure through drinking water in the development of arsenic-induced chronic noncancer diseases, among which hypertension and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are the focus of concern. Although exposure to high levels of arsenic has been reported to be associated with excess risk of hypertension or T2D in a dose-dependent manner, the association has yet to be established, especially low-level exposure. This cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the potential association between prolonged environmental arsenic exposure through drinking water and the prevalence of hypertension and T2D in Inner Mongolia, China, with emphasis on the assessment of low-level exposure. In this study (a total of 669 men and women), we found that the blood pressure levels were significantly correlated with cumulative arsenic exposure and that the systolic blood pressure of the subjects with arsenic exposure>50 μg/L was significantly higher than those of the subjects with <10 and 10-50 μg/L exposure. Significant prevalence of hypertension was found in the subjects of the >50 μg/L group both before and after adjustment for confounders. In addition, a significant negative relationship was found between urinary arsenic percentage of dimethylated arsenic (DMA%) and the prevalence of hypertension in the >50 μg/L group. However, low-level arsenic exposure (10-50 μg/L) was not statistically associated with hypertension. No significant difference of blood glucose was found among the groups with different arsenic exposure levels. No statistical association was found between arsenic exposure and T2D. Our findings suggested that prolonged arsenic exposure might play a role in the development of hypertension; however, only high-level arsenic was associated with the risk of hypertension. Our findings also

  9. Prolonged ELS test with the marine flatfish sole (Solea solea) shows delayed toxic effects of previous exposure to PCB 126.

    PubMed

    Foekema, Edwin M; Deerenberg, Charlotte M; Murk, Albertinka J

    2008-11-21

    The effect of the dioxin-like PCB 126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl) on the early development of the marine flatfish sole (Solea solea) was tested in a newly developed early life stage (ELS) test that includes the metamorphosis of the symmetric larvae into an asymmetrical flatfish. Early life stages of sole were exposed to a concentration series of PCB 126 in seawater until 4, 8, 10 and 15 days post fertilisation (dpf). Subsequently the development of the larvae was registered under further unexposed conditions. The LC50s at the start of the free-feeding stage (12 dpf) ranged between 39 and 83 ng PCB 126/l depending on exposure duration. After the fish had completed the metamorphosis, the LC50 values ranged between 1.7 and 3.7 ng PCB 126/l for the groups exposed for 4, 8 and 10 dpf, respectively. Thus exposure for only 4 days, covering only the egg stage, was sufficient to cause adverse effects during a critical developmental phase two weeks later. The internal dosages of these larvae, determined by means of an in vitro gene reporter assay as dioxin-equivalent values (TEQ), revealed a LD50 of 1ng TEQ/g lipid, which is within the same order of magnitude as TEQ levels found in fish from highly polluted areas. This study indicates that ELS fish tests that are terminated shortly after the fish becomes free-feeding, underestimate the toxic potential of compounds with low acute toxicity such as PCBs. Our prolonged ELS with this native marine flatfish suggests that reproductive success of fish populations at contaminated sites can be affected by persistent compounds that are accumulated by the female fish and passed on to the eggs.

  10. Change in Negative Cognitions Associated with PTSD Predicts Symptom Reduction in Prolonged Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Alyson K.; Gillihan, Seth J.; Fisher, Aaron J.; Mintz, Jim; McLean, Carmen P.; Yehuda, Rachel; Foa, Edna B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The goal of the current study was to examine mechanisms of change in Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emotional Processing Theory of PTSD proposes that disconfirmation of erroneous cognitions associated with PTSD is a central mechanism in PTSD symptom reduction; but to date, the causal relationship between change in pathological cognitions and change in PTSD severity has not been established. Method Female sexual or nonsexual assault survivors (N = 64) with a primary diagnosis of PTSD received 10 weekly sessions of PE. Self-reported PTSD symptoms, depression symptoms, and PTSD-related cognitions were assessed at pre-treatment, each of the 10 PE treatment sessions, and post-treatment. Results Lagged mixed-effect regression models indicated that session-to-session reductions in PTSD-related cognitions drove successive reductions in PTSD symptoms. By contrast, the reverse effect of PTSD symptom change on change in cognitions was smaller and did not reach statistical significance. Similarly, reductions in PTSD-related cognitions drove successive reductions in depression symptoms whereas the reverse effect of depression symptoms on subsequent cognition change was smaller and not significant. Notably, the relationships between changes in cognitions and PTSD symptoms were stronger than the relationships between changes in cognitions and depression symptoms. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to establish change in PTSD-related cognitions as a central mechanism of PE treatment. These findings are consistent with Emotional Processing Theory and have important clinical implications for the effective implementation of PE. PMID:24188512

  11. Transmitter secretion in the frog neuromuscular synapse after prolonged exposure to calcium-free solutions.

    PubMed

    Zefirov, A L; Mukhamedzyanov, R D; Minlebaev, M G; Cheranov, S Yu; Abdrakhmanov, M M; Grigor'ev, P N

    2003-07-01

    Experiments on neuromuscular synapses from frog skin/chest muscle preparations in conditions of extracellular recording addressed changes in the spontaneous and evoked transmitter secretion after long-term (1.5-6 h) maintenance of preparations in calcium-free solution containing EGTA. Use of three microelectrodes for recording of single-quantum postsynaptic signals showed that calcium-free solution altered the characteristic topography of transmitter secretion in nerve terminals, with widening and fusion of groups of transmitter release. These changes persisted after preparations were returned to the initial solution. These data suggest that calcium-free solutions lead to disorganization of the active zones of nerve endings, At initially low extracellular Ca ion concentrations (0.15-0.4 mM), disorganization of active zones induced by prolonged maintenance of preparations in calcium-free solutions led to decreases in the mean amplitude of endplate currents (EPC) because of decreases in their quantum composition, increases in the time course of transmitter secretion, and decreases in the frequency of miniature endplate currents. The relationship between quantum composition of EPC and the extracellular Ca ion concentration showed a sharp displacement towards higher concentrations, without significant changes in the slope of the relationship. At high initial Ca concentrations (1.8 mM), long-term exposure to calcium-free solutions led to a less marked decrease in EPC amplitude. It is suggested that the extra- and intracellular Ca ion concentrations support the maintenance of the characteristic morphofunctional organization of the apparatus responsible for transmitter secretion in frog nerve endings. Disorganization of the active zones leads to disruption of elements involved in transmitter secretion and decreases in the efficiency of secretion.

  12. Nutritional considerations during prolonged exposure to a confined, hyperbaric, hyperoxic environment: recommendations for saturation divers.

    PubMed

    Deb, S K; Swinton, P A; Dolan, E

    2016-01-01

    Saturation diving is an occupation that involves prolonged exposure to a confined, hyperoxic, hyperbaric environment. The unique and extreme environment is thought to result in disruption to physiological and metabolic homeostasis, which may impact human health and performance. Appropriate nutritional intake has the potential to alleviate and/or support many of these physiological and metabolic concerns, whilst enhancing health and performance in saturation divers. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to identify the physiological and practical challenges of saturation diving and consequently provide evidence-based nutritional recommendations for saturation divers to promote health and performance within this challenging environment. Saturation diving has a high-energy demand, with an energy intake of between 44 and 52 kcal/kg body mass per day recommended, dependent on intensity and duration of underwater activity. The macronutrient composition of dietary intake is in accordance with the current Institute of Medicine guidelines at 45-65 % and 20-35 % of total energy intake for carbohydrate and fat intake, respectively. A minimum daily protein intake of 1.3 g/kg body mass is recommended to facilitate body composition maintenance. Macronutrient intake between individuals should, however, be dictated by personal preference to support the attainment of an energy balance. A varied diet high in fruit and vegetables is highly recommended for the provision of sufficient micronutrients to support physiological processes, such as vitamin B12 and folate intake to facilitate red blood cell production. Antioxidants, such as vitamin C and E, are also recommended to reduce oxidised molecules, e.g. free radicals, whilst selenium and zinc intake may be beneficial to reinforce endogenous antioxidant reserves. In addition, tailored hydration and carbohydrate fueling strategies for underwater work are also advised. PMID:26744625

  13. Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water and QT-Interval Prolongation: Results from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fen; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Eunus, Mahbub; McClintock, Tyler R.; Patwary, Tazul Islam; Islam, Tariqul; Ghosal, Anajan Kumar; Islam, Shahidul; Hasan, Rabiul; Levy, Diane; Sarwar, Golam; Slavkovich, Vesna; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Arsenic exposure from drinking water has been associated with heart disease; however, underlying mechanisms are uncertain. Objective: We evaluated the association between a history of arsenic exposure from drinking water and the prolongation of heart rate–corrected QT (QTc), PR, and QRS intervals. Method: We conducted a study of 1,715 participants enrolled at baseline from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study. We assessed the relationship of arsenic exposure in well water and urine samples at baseline with parameters of electrocardiogram (ECG) performed during 2005–2010, 5.9 years on average since baseline. Results: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for QTc prolongation, defined as a QTc ≥ 450 msec in men and ≥ 460 msec in women, was 1.17 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.35) for a 1-SD increase in well-water arsenic (108.7 µg/L). The positive association appeared to be limited to women, with adjusted ORs of 1.24 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.47) and 1.24 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.53) for a 1-SD increase in baseline well-water and urinary arsenic, respectively, compared with 0.99 (95% CI: 0.73, 1.33) and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.49, 1.51) in men. There were no apparent associations of baseline well-water arsenic or urinary arsenic with PR or QRS prolongation in women or men. Conclusions: Long-term arsenic exposure from drinking water (average 95 µg/L; range, 0.1–790 µg/L) was associated with subsequent QT-interval prolongation in women. Future longitudinal studies with repeated ECG measurements would be valuable in assessing the influence of changes in exposure. PMID:23384555

  14. Prolonged exposure to acid and bile induces chromosome abnormalities that precede malignant transformation of benign Barrett’s epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is an asymptomatic, pre-malignant condition of the esophagus that can progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). BE arises typically in individuals with long-standing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The neoplastic progression of BE has been extensively studied histologically and defined as a metaplasia- dyplasia- carcinoma sequence. However the genetic basis of this process is poorly understood. It is conceived that preclinical models of BE may facilitate discovery of molecular markers due to ease of longitudinal sampling. Clinical markers to stratify the patients at higher risk are vital to institute appropriate therapeutic intervention since EAC has very poor prognosis. We developed a dynamic in-vitro BE carcinogenesis (BEC) model by exposing naïve Barrett’s epithelium cell line (BAR-T) to acid and bile at pH4 (B4), 5min/day for a year. The BEC model acquired malignant characteristics after chronic repeated exposure to B4 similar to the sequential progression of BE to EAC in vivo. Aim To study cytogenetic changes during progressive transformation in the BEC model. Results We observed that the BAR-T cells progressively acquired several chromosomal abnormalities in the BEC model. Evidence of chromosomal loss (-Y) rearrangements [t(10;16) and dup (11q)] and clonal selection appeared during the early stages of the BEC model. Clonal selection resulted in a stabilized monoclonal population of cells that had a changed morphology and formed colony in soft agar. BAR-T cells grown in parallel without any exposure did not show any of these abnormalities. Conclusions Prolonged acid and bile exposure induced chromosomal aberrations and clonal selection in benign BAR-T cells. Since aneuploidy preceded morphological/dysplastic changes in the BEC model, chromosomal aberrations may be an early predictor of BE progression. The [t(10;16) and dup(11q)] aberrations identified in this study harbor several genes associated with cancer

  15. A Genome-Wide mRNA Expression Profile in Caenorhabditis elegans under Prolonged Exposure to 1750MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Dawen; Yu, Zhoulong; Wu, Tongning; Zhang, Chenggang

    2016-01-01

    Objective C. elegans has been used as a biomonitor for microwave-induced stress. However, the RF (radiofrequency) fields that have been used in previous studies were weak (≤1.8W/kg), and the bio-effects on C. elegans were mostly negative or ambiguous. Therefore, this study used more intense RF fields (SAR = 3W/kg) and longer time course of exposure (60h at 25°C, L1 stage through adult stage) to investigate the biological consequences of 1750 MHz RF fields in wild-type worms. Methods The growth rates and lifespans of RF-exposure group and the control group were carefully recorded. RNA samples were collected at L4 (35h) and gravid adult (50h) stages for further high-throughput sequencing, focusing on differences between the RF-exposure and the sham control groups. Results The RF-exposed and sham control groups developed at almost the same rate and had similar longevity curves. In L4 stage worms, 94 up-regulated and 17 down-regulated genes were identified, while 186 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated genes were identified in adult stage worms. GO analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes at 35h were associated with growth, body morphogenesis and collagen and cuticle-based development. Genes that were linked to growth rate and reproductive development were differentially expressed at 50h. Some embryonic and larval development genes in the offspring were also differentially expressed at 50h. Ten genes were differentially expressed at both 35h and 50h, most of which were involved in both embryonic and larval developmental processes. Although prolonged RF fields did not induce significant temperature increase in RF exposure groups, the temperature inside worms during exposure was unknown. Conclusions No harmful effects were observed in prolonged exposure to 1750 MHz RF fields at SAR of 3W/kg on development and longevity of C. elegans. Although some differentially expressed genes were found after prolonged RF exposure, these differences were ascribed to

  16. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage.

  17. Glucose Homeostasis During Short-term and Prolonged Exposure to High Altitudes

    PubMed Central

    Ader, Marilyn; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the literature related to high altitude medicine is devoted to the short-term effects of high-altitude exposure on human physiology. However, long-term effects of living at high altitudes may be more important in relation to human disease because more than 400 million people worldwide reside above 1500 m. Interestingly, individuals living at higher altitudes have a lower fasting glycemia and better glucose tolerance compared with those who live near sea level. There is also emerging evidence of the lower prevalence of both obesity and diabetes at higher altitudes. The mechanisms underlying improved glucose control at higher altitudes remain unclear. In this review, we present the most current evidence about glucose homeostasis in residents living above 1500 m and discuss possible mechanisms that could explain the lower fasting glycemia and lower prevalence of obesity and diabetes in this population. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate and maintain the lower fasting glycemia in individuals who live at higher altitudes could lead to new therapeutics for impaired glucose homeostasis. PMID:25675133

  18. Hepatic and intestine alterations in mice after prolonged exposure to low oral doses of Microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Sedan, Daniela; Laguens, Martín; Copparoni, Guido; Aranda, Jorge Oswaldo; Giannuzzi, Leda; Marra, Carlos Alberto; Andrinolo, Darío

    2015-09-15

    Oral intake of Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is the principal route of exposure to this toxin, with prolonged exposure leading to liver damage of unspecific symptomatology. The aim of the present paper was therefore to investigate the liver and intestine damage generated by prolonged oral exposure to low MC-LR doses (50 and 100 μg MC-LR/kg body weight, administrated every 48 h during a month) in a murine model. We found alterations in TBARS, SOD activity and glutathione content in liver and intestine of mice exposed to both doses of MC-LR. Furthermore, the presence of MC-LR was detected in both organs. We also found hepatic steatosis (3.6 ± 0.6% and 15.3 ± 1.6%) and a decrease in intraepithelial lymphocytes (28.7 ± 5.0% and 44.2 ± 8.7%) in intestine of 50- and 100-μg MC-LR/kg treated animals, respectively. This result could have important implications for mucosal immunity, since intraepithelial lymphocytes are the principal effectors of this system. Our results indicate that prolonged oral exposure at 50 μg MC-LR/kg every 48 h generates significant damage not only in liver but also in intestine. This finding calls for a re-appraisal of the currently accepted NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level), 40 μg MC-LR/kg body weight, used to derive the guideline value for MC-LR in drinking water.

  19. The inoculating role of previous exposure to potentially traumatic life events on coping with prolonged exposure to rocket attacks: A lifespan perspective.

    PubMed

    Palgi, Yuval; Gelkopf, Marc; Berger, Rony

    2015-06-30

    Relatively little research have addressed the effect of prolonged exposure to rocket attacks with a lifespan perspective and only a handful of these studies focused on the effect of this exposure as a function of aging. The present study examined the effects of seven years of rocket attacks fired toward the south of Israel on adult participants of different ages. We examined whether potentially traumatic life events (PTLEs) unrelated to rocket attacks moderated the association between post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and age. Data were obtained from a 2007 telephone survey using the Random Digit Dialing method and including 343 individuals (76.7% participation rate). Exposure to rockets, PTLEs, global distress, and post-traumatic symptomatology were assessed. Older age was associated with a higher level of PTS symptoms. Higher PTLE levels attenuated the association between age and PTS symptoms. Our results suggest that age is a risk factor for developing PTS symptoms under prolonged exposure to rocket attacks. However, previous levels of exposure to other negative events, as well as gender, appear to inoculate a person to stress, thus modulating the age-PTS association.

  20. The inoculating role of previous exposure to potentially traumatic life events on coping with prolonged exposure to rocket attacks: A lifespan perspective.

    PubMed

    Palgi, Yuval; Gelkopf, Marc; Berger, Rony

    2015-06-30

    Relatively little research have addressed the effect of prolonged exposure to rocket attacks with a lifespan perspective and only a handful of these studies focused on the effect of this exposure as a function of aging. The present study examined the effects of seven years of rocket attacks fired toward the south of Israel on adult participants of different ages. We examined whether potentially traumatic life events (PTLEs) unrelated to rocket attacks moderated the association between post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and age. Data were obtained from a 2007 telephone survey using the Random Digit Dialing method and including 343 individuals (76.7% participation rate). Exposure to rockets, PTLEs, global distress, and post-traumatic symptomatology were assessed. Older age was associated with a higher level of PTS symptoms. Higher PTLE levels attenuated the association between age and PTS symptoms. Our results suggest that age is a risk factor for developing PTS symptoms under prolonged exposure to rocket attacks. However, previous levels of exposure to other negative events, as well as gender, appear to inoculate a person to stress, thus modulating the age-PTS association. PMID:25863821

  1. Effects of herbicides on Lemna gibba and recovery from damage after prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, M; Itoh, K; Suyama, K

    2010-04-01

    To determine the potential impact of contaminants on the aquatic vascular plants Lemna sp., toxicity tests are usually conducted for a 4- to 14-day exposure, and the toxicity is usually expressed as EC50. However, the effects of longer exposure and the recovery potential after exposure to chemicals are other important factors which should be considered. We present the relative risks of a variety of exposure scenarios and recovery potentials from damage, using herbicides with different modes of action. Toxicity was assessed on the basis of both EC50 and relative growth rate (RGR) compared with untreated controls in exposure and recovery. The EC50 of atrazine was found to be 89 ppb, and its phytostatic concentrations were 1600 and 800 ppb for exposure periods of 14 and 28 days, respectively, and no phytocidal effects were observed up to 3200 ppb for a 28-day exposure. The RGR in recovery was not affected by the RGR in exposure, and regrowth was possible even after complete inhibition of growth for 28 days at the highest concentration tested. Alachlor, with an EC50 of 31 ppb, was phytostatic at 400 ppb for a 14-day exposure and phytocidal at 200 ppb for 21- and 28-day exposures. Paraquat, with an EC50 of 31 ppb, showed phytocidal rather than phytostatic effects. All phytostatic fronds could not grow in the recovery period, and the phytocidal concentration decreased with exposure period, from 80 ppb for a 7-day exposure to 20 ppb for 21- and 28-day exposures. The RGR of alachlor and paraquat in recovery was dependent on the RGR in exposure. In the case of cyclosulfamuron, phytostatic concentrations were 100 and 50 ppb for 7- and 14-day exposures, respectively. In the case of exposures longer than 21 days, however, it exhibited phytocidal activity at 10 ppb. The results of this study suggest that it is important to examine the effects of chemicals over a longer exposure period as well as the recovery potential from damage for reliable ecological risk assessment. PMID

  2. The effect of prolonged exposure to 750{degree}C air on the tribological performance of PM212

    SciTech Connect

    Bemis, K.; Bogdanski, M.S.; DellaCorte, C.; Sliney, H.E.

    1994-05-01

    The effect of prolonged exposure to 750C air on tribological performance and dimensional stability of PM212, a high temperature, self-lubricating composite, is studied. PM212, contains 70% metal-bonded Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, 15% BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2} eutectic and 15% silver. Rub blocks were fabricated from PM212 by cold isostatic pressing followed by sintering. Prior to tribo-testing, the rub blocks were exposed to 750C air from 100 to 1000 hours. Then, the rub blocks were slid against nickel-based superalloy disks in a double-rub-block tribometer in air under 66N load at temperatures from 25 to 750C with a sliding velocity of 0.36 m/s. Unexposed rub blocks were tested for baseline comparison. Friction coefficients ranged from 0.24 to 0.37 for unexposed rub blocks and from 0.32 to 0.56 for the exposed ones. Wear for both the composite blocks and superalloy disks was typically in the moderate to low range of 10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}6} mm{sup 3} /N-m. Friction and wear data were similar for the rub blocks exposed for 100, 500, and 1000 hours. Prolonged exposure to 750C air increased friction and wear of the PM212 rub blocks at room temperature, but triboperformance remained unaffected at higher temperatures, probably due to formation of lubricous metal oxides. Dimensional stability of the composite was studied by exposing specimens of varying thicknesses for 500 hours in air at 750C. Block thicknesses were found to increase with increased exposure time until steady state was reached after 100 hours of exposure, probably due to oxidation.

  3. Prolonged Morphine Exposure Induces Increased Firm Adhesion in an in Vitro Model of the Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Strazza, Marianne; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Dampier, Will; Lin, Wei; Feng, Rui; Maubert, Monique E.; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) has been defined as a critically important protective barrier that is involved in providing essential biologic, physiologic, and immunologic separation between the central nervous system (CNS) and the periphery. Insults to the BBB can cause overall barrier damage or deregulation of the careful homeostasis maintained between the periphery and the CNS. These insults can, therefore, yield numerous phenotypes including increased overall permeability, interendothelial gap formation, alterations in cytokine and chemokine secretion, and accelerated cellular passage. The current studies expose the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3, to prolonged morphine exposure and aim to uncover the mechanisms underlying alterations in barrier function in vitro. These studies show alterations in the mRNA and protein levels of the cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule that correlate with an increased firm adhesion of the CD3+ subpopulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overall, these studies suggest that prolonged morphine exposure may result in increased cell migration into the CNS, which may accelerate pathological processes in many diseases that involve the BBB. PMID:27294916

  4. Effects of processing and prolonged high temperature exposure on the microstructure of Nb-1Zr-C sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uz, Mehmet; Titran, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    High temperature stability of the microstructure of Nb-1Zr sheet containing 0.1 and 0.06 wt. percent C was studied as affected by processing and prolonged 1350 K exposure with and without applied stress. Sheets were fabricated by cold rolling bars that were single-, double-, or triple-extruded at 1900 K. Creep samples were double-annealed (1 h at 1755 K + 2 h at 1475 K) prior to testing at 1350 K and 10,000 - 34,500 h. The microstructures of the as-cast, extruded, rolled, DA, and crept samples were characterized using various metallographic and analytical methods. The precipitates were rather coarse Nb2C initially, but transformed to finer (less than or equal to 1 micron) carbides of (Zr, Nb)C with each subsequent high temperature process. The grain size, and the relative amount and morphology of (Zr, Nb)C were found to be affected by the number of extrusions and to some extent by C-content. However, the microstructures of all the crept samples were similar with (Zr, Nb)C distributed throughout the matrix indicating that prolonged exposure to 1350 K gave rise to complete transformation of Nb2C to (Zr, Nb)C regardless of the processing history. These and other observations are presented with the emphasis on the correlation between processing, microstructure, and creep properties.

  5. Prolonged exposure to acetaminophen reduces testosterone production by the human fetal testis in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    van den Driesche, Sander; Macdonald, Joni; Anderson, Richard A; Johnston, Zoe C; Chetty, Tarini; Smith, Lee B; McKinnell, Chris; Dean, Afshan; Homer, Natalie Z; Jorgensen, Anne; Camacho-Moll, Maria E; Sharpe, Richard M; Mitchell, Rod T

    2015-05-20

    Most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life, although the factors responsible for suppressing fetal testosterone remain largely unknown. Protracted use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism in sons, but effects on fetal testosterone production have not been demonstrated. We used a validated xenograft model to expose human fetal testes to clinically relevant doses and regimens of acetaminophen. Exposure to a therapeutic dose of acetaminophen for 7 days significantly reduced plasma testosterone (45% reduction; P = 0.025) and seminal vesicle weight (a biomarker of androgen exposure; 18% reduction; P = 0.005) in castrate host mice bearing human fetal testis xenografts, whereas acetaminophen exposure for just 1 day did not alter either parameter. Plasma acetaminophen concentrations (at 1 hour after the final dose) in exposed host mice were substantially below those reported in humans after a therapeutic oral dose. Subsequent in utero exposure studies in rats indicated that the acetaminophen-induced reduction in testosterone likely results from reduced expression of key steroidogenic enzymes (Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1). Our results suggest that protracted use of acetaminophen (1 week) may suppress fetal testosterone production, which could have adverse consequences. Further studies are required to establish the dose-response and treatment-duration relationships to delineate the maximum dose and treatment period without this adverse effect.

  6. Physiological responses of mules on prolonged exposure to high altitude (3 650 m)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riar, S. S.; Shankar Bhat, K.; Sen Gupta, J.

    1982-06-01

    Eight healthy male animals were inducted and kept for 2 1/2 years at 3 650 m altitude and subjected to normal work schedules. Physiological measurements viz. heart rate, blood pressure, minute ventilation, oxygen consumption, respiration rate, hemoglobin, packed cell haematocrit volume and eosinophil count were made on these animals at periodic intervals. On acute induction to an altitude of 3 650 m these animals demonstrated a sudden increase in tidal volume, a decrease in Rf and no change in VE, suggesting a decreased dead space/tidal volume ratio at altitude. However, all these changes stabilised within 3 weeks but on prolongation of stay, the physical state of these animals was adversely affected. The respiratory adjustments occurring on return to sea level appear to be a response to thermal stress. The initial increase in heart rate and blood pressure stabilised by the 2nd week.

  7. Prolonged Radiant Exposure of the Middle Ear during Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth V; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Dedmon, Matthew M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Cohen, Michael S; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides a high-resolution, wide-field view of the middle ear compared with the conventional operating microscope, reducing the need for a postauricular incision or mastoidectomy. Our group has shown in cadaveric human temporal bone studies that radiant energy from the endoscope tip can quickly elevate temperatures of the tympanic cavity. Elevated temperatures of the middle ear are associated with acute auditory brainstem response shifts in animal models. In EES, proposed methods to decrease middle ear temperature include frequent removal of the endoscope and the use of suction to rapidly dissipate heat; however, the routine application of such cooling techniques remains unknown. Herein, we aim to quantify the duration that the tympanic cavity is typically exposed to the endoscope during routine endoscopic middle ear surgery. We find that the tympanic cavity is exposed to the endoscope without a cooling mechanism for a prolonged period of time.

  8. Exposure of pink salmon embryos to dissolved polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons delays development, prolonging vulnerability to mechanical damage.

    PubMed

    Carls, Mark G; Thedinga, John F

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to dissolved polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from crude oil delays pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) embryo development, thus prolonging their susceptibility to mechanical damage (shock). Exposure also caused mortality, edema, and anemia consistent with previous studies. Hatching and yolk consumption were delayed, indicating the rate of embryonic development was slowed by PAH exposure. The net result was that exposed embryos were more susceptible to shock than normal, unexposed embryos. Susceptibility to shock was protracted by 4-6d for more than a month in embryos exposed to exponentially declining, dissolved PAH concentrations in water passed through oiled rock; the initial total PAH concentration was 22.4microgL(-1) and the geometric mean concentration was 4.5microgL(-1) over the first 20d. Protracted susceptibility to shock caused by exposure to PAHs dissolved from oil could potentially increase the reported incidence of mortality in oiled stream systems, such as those in Prince William Sound after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, if observers fail to discriminate between direct mortality and shock-induced mortality. PMID:20089299

  9. Exposure of pink salmon embryos to dissolved polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons delays development, prolonging vulnerability to mechanical damage.

    PubMed

    Carls, Mark G; Thedinga, John F

    2010-06-01

    Exposure to dissolved polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from crude oil delays pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) embryo development, thus prolonging their susceptibility to mechanical damage (shock). Exposure also caused mortality, edema, and anemia consistent with previous studies. Hatching and yolk consumption were delayed, indicating the rate of embryonic development was slowed by PAH exposure. The net result was that exposed embryos were more susceptible to shock than normal, unexposed embryos. Susceptibility to shock was protracted by 4-6d for more than a month in embryos exposed to exponentially declining, dissolved PAH concentrations in water passed through oiled rock; the initial total PAH concentration was 22.4microgL(-1) and the geometric mean concentration was 4.5microgL(-1) over the first 20d. Protracted susceptibility to shock caused by exposure to PAHs dissolved from oil could potentially increase the reported incidence of mortality in oiled stream systems, such as those in Prince William Sound after the Exxon Valdez oil spill, if observers fail to discriminate between direct mortality and shock-induced mortality.

  10. Prolonged Oxaliplatin Exposure Alters Intracellular Calcium Signaling: A New Mechanism To Explain Oxaliplatin-Associated Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Christin; McGowan, Margit; Jordt, Sven; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2012-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a platinum based cytotoxic agent commonly used to treat colorectal cancers. Despite its effectiveness, oxaliplatin administration is associated with the development of cold-induced peripheral neuropathy. This potentially permanent side effect is provoked by cold exposure and can range from mild and self limited to severe and debilitating. Even with tumor shrinkage, these painful side effects can force dose-reduction or discontinuation of treatment. Neither the mechanism of action of oxaliplatin nor that of cold-induced neuropathy is understood. Paclitaxel, an entirely different chemotherapeutic agent used to treat a variety of malignancies, also is associated with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Unlike oxaliplatin, neurotoxicity arising from paclitaxel treatment is better understood and was found to have profound effects on intracellular calcium signaling (1,2). In this study we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on calcium signaling pathways and found that acute exposure of either a neuroblastoma cell line or primary neurons with therapeutic concentrations of oxaliplatin had no effect on intracellular calcium signaling. We also found that cellular temperature sensors (TRP channels) were also not activated by oxaliplatin. Interestingly, prolonged exposure of oxaliplatin sensitized cells to subsequent stimuli and enhanced the magnitude of intracellular calcium responses. Taken together, our results suggest that acute oxaliplatin exposure will not induce abnormal calcium signaling but oxaliplatin-primed cells do exhibit enhanced sensitivity. These findings provide new insight to the mechanism behind oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. PMID:21859566

  11. A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER: SHEDS-PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM) that will be publicly available in Fall 2002. The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS-PM) model uses a probabilistic approach ...

  12. DIETARY EXPOSURE TO PYRETHROIDS IN THE U.S POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the contribution of pyrethroid residues in food as an important driver of exposure. The levels of urinary metabolites of pyrethroids reported in NHANES were used as a general estimate of population exposure to pyrethroids. Dietary exposure to pyrethroids was estimat...

  13. Evaluation of the CNS and cardiovascular effects of prolonged exposure to bromotrifluromethane (CBrF3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, I.; Garcia, C.; Gleiser, C.; Haines, R., Jr.; Hamilton, M.; Hartmann, R., Jr.; Mendez, V.; Samuels, A.; Miguel, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    The proposed use of bromotrifluoromethane (CBrF3) as a fire extinguishant in aircraft, spacecraft and submarines has stimulated increasing interest and research in the toxicological properties of this compound. In a spacecraft, because of its unique recirculating life support system, the introduction of CBrF3 by leakage or intentional discharge, will result in continuous exposure of crewman to low concentrations of this compound for periods of up to 7 days, or possibly even longer. The effects of low concentrations of CBrF3, under continuous exposure conditions, on the CNS and cardiovascular systems of animals to enable an assessment of these risks were investigated.

  14. Comparative cellular toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human astrocyte and neuronal cells after acute and prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Coccini, Teresa; Grandi, Stefania; Lonati, Davide; Locatelli, Carlo; De Simone, Uliana

    2015-05-01

    Although in the last few decades, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO₂NPs) have attracted extensive interest due to their use in wide range of applications, their influences on human health are still quite uncertain and less known. Evidence exists indicating TiO₂NPs ability to enter the brain, thus representing a realistic risk factor for both chronic and accidental exposure with the consequent needs for more detailed investigation on CNS. A rapid and effective in vitro test strategy has been applied to determine the effects of TiO₂NPs anatase isoform, on human glial (D384) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cell lines. Toxicity was assessed at different levels: mitochondrial function (by MTT), membrane integrity and cell morphology (by calcein AM/PI staining) after acute exposure (4-24-48 h) at doses from 1.5 to 250 μg/ml as well as growth and cell proliferation (by clonogenic test) after prolonged exposure (7-10 days) at sub-toxic concentrations (from 0.05 to 31 μg/ml). The cytotoxic effects of TiO₂NPs were compared with those caused by TiO₂ bulk counterpart treatment. Acute TiO₂NP exposure produced (i) dose- and time-dependent alterations of the mitochondrial function on D384 and SH-SY5Y cells starting at 31 and 15 μg/ml doses, respectively, after 24h exposure. SH-SY5Y were slightly more sensitive than D384 cells; and (ii) cell membrane damage occurring at 125 μg/ml after 24h exposure in both cerebral cells. Comparatively, the effects of TiO₂ bulk were less pronounced than those induced by nanoparticles in both cerebral cell lines. Prolonged exposure indicated that the proliferative capacity (colony size) was compromised at the extremely low TiO₂NP doses namely 1.5 μg/ml and 0.1 μg/ml for D384 and SH-SY5Y, respectively; cell sensitivity was still higher for SH-SY5Y compared to D384. Colony number decrease (15%) was also evidenced at ≥0.2 μg/ml TiO₂NP dose. Whereas, TiO₂ bulk treatment affected cell morphology only. TiO₂ internalization in SH

  15. Prolonged head-down tilt exposure reduces maximal cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Levine, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    Cutaneous vasodilation and sweat rate are reduced during a thermal challenge after simulated and actual microgravity exposure. The effects of microgravity exposure on cutaneous vasodilator capacity and on sweat gland function are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that simulated microgravity exposure, using the 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest model, reduces maximal forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (FVC) and sweat gland function and that exercise during HDT preserves these responses. To test these hypotheses, 20 subjects were exposed to 14 days of strict HDT bed rest. Twelve of those subjects exercised (supine cycle ergometry) at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum for 90 min/day throughout HDT bed rest. Before and after HDT bed rest, maximal FVC was measured, via plethysmography, by heating the entire forearm to 42 degrees C for 45 min. Sweat gland function was assessed by administering 1 x 10(-6) to 2 M acetylcholine (9 doses) via intradermal microdialysis while simultaneously monitoring sweat rate over the microdialysis membranes. In the nonexercise group, maximal FVC and maximal stimulated sweat rate were significantly reduced after HDT bed rest. In contrast, these responses were unchanged in the exercise group. These data suggest that 14 days of simulated microgravity exposure, using the HDT bed rest model, reduces cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity, whereas aerobic exercise training during HDT bed rest preserves these responses.

  16. Biologic effects of prolonged exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields in rats. 2: 50 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Margonato, V.; Cerretelli, P.; Nicolini, P.; Conti, R.; Zecca, L.; Veicsteinas, Z.

    1995-12-31

    To provide possible laboratory support to health risk evaluation associated with long-term, low-intensity magnetic field exposure, 256 male albino rats and an equal number of control animals (initial age 12 weeks) were exposed 22 h/day to a 50 Hz magnetic flux density of 5 {micro}T for 32 weeks (a total of about 5,000 h). Hematology was studied from blood samples before exposure to the field and at 12 week intervals. Morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, and testes as well as brain neurotransmitters were assessed at the end of the exposure period. In two identical sets of experiments, no significant differences in the investigated variables were found between exposed and sham-exposed animals. It is concluded that continuous exposure to a 50 Hz magnetic field of 5 {micro}T from week 12 to week 44, which makes up {approximately}70% of the life span of the rat before sacrifice, does not cause changes in growth rate, in the morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, testes, and bone marrow, in hematology and hematochemistry, or in the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin.

  17. Combining group-based exposure therapy with prolonged exposure to treat U.S. Vietnam veterans with PTSD: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ready, David J; Vega, Edward M; Worley, Virginia; Bradley, Bekh

    2012-10-01

    Group-based exposure therapy (GBET) of 16-week duration was developed to treat combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and decreased PTSD symptoms in 3 noncontrolled open trials with low attrition (0%-5%). Group-based exposure therapy has not produced as much PTSD symptom reduction as Prolonged Exposure (PE) within a U.S. Veterans Affairs PTSD treatment program, although PE had more dropouts (20%). This pilot study was of a model that combined key elements of GBET with components of PE in an effort to increase the effectiveness of a group-based treatment while reducing its length and maintaining low attrition. Twice per week, 8 Vietnam combat veterans with PTSD were treated for 12 weeks, with an intervention that included 2 within-group war trauma presentations per participant, 6 PE style individual imaginal exposure (IE) sessions per participant, daily listening to recorded IE sessions, and daily in vivo exposure exercises. All completed treatment and showed Significant reductions on all measures of PTSD with large effect sizes; 7 participants no longer met PTSD criteria on treating clinician administered interviews and a self-report measure at posttreatment. Significant reductions in depression with large effect sizes and moderate reductions in PTSD-related cognitions were also found. Most gains were maintained 6 months posttreatment. PMID:22965936

  18. Responses of older men with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to prolonged ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, H. Jr.; Shamoo, D.A.; Anderson, K.R.; Linn, W.S.

    1997-01-01

    We tested responses to ozone (O{sub 3}) under simulated {open_quotes}worst-case{close_quotes} ambient exposure conditions. Subjects included 9 men who had severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with subnormal carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (i.e., an emphysemic component) and 10 age-matched healthy men. Each subject was exposed to 0.24 ppm O{sub 3} and to clean air (control) in an environmentally controlled chamber at 24{degrees}C and 40% relative humidity. Exposures were randomized, they occurred 1 wk apart, and they lasted 4 h. During each half-hour interval, light exercise occurred (e.e., average ventilation 20 l/mm) for 15 min. during both control and O{sub 3} exposures, group mean symptom intensity and specific airway resistance (SRaw) increased, whereas forced expiratory performance decreased. The healthy subgroup`s mean arterial oxygen saturation (SaO{sub 2}) rose slightly, and the COPD subgroup`s mean SaO{sub 2} declined slightly, during exercise. Group mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1.0}) declined significantly in O{sub 3} exposures, compared with controls (p {approx}.01). Mean excess FEV{sub 1.0} loss after 4 h in O{sub 3} (relative to control) was 8% of the preexposure value in the COPD subgroup, compared with 3% in the healthy subgroup (p > .05 [nonsignificant]). Overall FEV{sub 1.0} loss during O{sub 3} exposures, including exercise effects, averaged 19% in the COPD subgroup, compared with 2% in the healthy subgroup (p < .001). Symptoms, SRaw, and SaO{sub 2} responses, as well as healthy subjects` postexposure bronchial reactivity, differed little between O{sub 3}-exposed and control subjects. We therefore concluded that in older men with or without severe COPD, O{sub 3} causes lung dysfunction under {open_quotes}worst-case{close_quotes} ambient exposure conditions, despite older subjects` comparative unresponsiveness to O{sub 3}. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A special type of scald caused by prolonged exposure to slowly heated water.

    PubMed

    Pircher, R; Pollak, S; Vogt, S; Epting, T; Kramer, L; Geisenberger, D

    2016-06-01

    When skin is subjected to water temperatures gradually rising from moderate to critical ranges for a prolonged period of time, the resulting scalds will initially present as reddening, followed by blistering and at last by full-thickness burns. On changing from second- to third-degree burn, the blisters stop to become enlarged and solidify due to heat-induced coagulation necrosis. Such gradually intensifying tissue damage results in multiple firm skin blisters together with third-degree burn of the affected area. The initially serous blister fluid assumes a jelly-like consistency as the proteins undergo denaturation. Scalds of this special type may occur in persons taking a bath and becoming incapable to act so that the warm water tap remains turned on or a hairdryer continues to work after having been dropped into the bath water. On the basis of two relevant fatalities (suicidal electrocutions in bathtubs by means of hairdryers), the macroscopic and histological appearance of blisters which only secondarily turned into a full-thickness scald is compared with blisters in genuine second-degree scalds. The blister fluid of the latter ones was also investigated as to their protein composition and hemoglobin concentration. PMID:27129143

  20. Can prolonged exposure to low VPD disturb the ABA signalling in stomatal guard cells?

    PubMed Central

    Aliniaeifard, Sasan; van Meeteren, Uulke

    2013-01-01

    The response of stomata to many environmental factors is well documented. Multiple signalling pathways for abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure have been proposed over the last decades. However, it seems that exposure of a leaf for a long time (several days) to some environmental conditions generates a sort of memory in the guard cells that results in the loss of suitable responses of the stomata to closing stimuli, such as desiccation and ABA. In this review paper we discuss changes in the normal pattern of signal transduction that could account for disruption of guard cell signalling after long-term exposure to some environmental conditions, with special emphasis on long-term low vapour pressure deficit (VPD). PMID:23956410

  1. [Prolonged exposure to atmospheric air pollution and mortality from respiratory causes].

    PubMed

    Eilstein, D

    2009-12-01

    Different designs can be used to analyze the relationships between respiratory mortality and long term exposure to atmospheric pollution: epidemiological studies (cohort, prevalence study) demonstrate the reality of the relationship and toxicological studies explain it. Cohort studies have the advantage of being able to take into account many confounding factors and thus avoid biases (which is not the case with prevalence studies), but require significant human and financial resources. They were first adopted in the US, but are now more often applied in Europe. The results are relatively consistent, as they all show a statistically significant association between an increase in particulate pollution and cardiopulmonary mortality. Mortality from lung cancer is also associated with long term exposition to particles and sometimes to ozone or nitrogen oxides. Cerebrovascular diseases and sudden death of young children have also been associated with particulate pollution. The relationships are more powerful for long term than short term exposure but are also linear and without threshold. In order to explain these effects (today the causality of the relationship is certain) there are many possible factors, particularly regarding particulate exposures: an increase in cardiovascular risk biomarkers (fibrinogen, white blood cells, and platelets), atherosclerosis, chronic inflammation of lung tissues increased by acute exposure, etc. More and more studies address the interaction between gene and environment and even epigenetic phenomena which could be responsible of these effects. Public Health impact could be quantified. The European E&H surveillance program Apheis, for example, estimated that if PM2.5 levels remained below 15 microg/m(3), a 30 year old person could see his life expectancy increased by 1 month to 2 years, depending on the studied city. Finally, mortality is not the only relevant indicator for health effects of air pollution. ISAAC studies address asthma

  2. Survival of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A after prolonged air exposure.

    PubMed

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G; Ranganathan, Abhaya; Couger, M B; Liggenstoffer, Audra S; Youssef, Noha H; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are efficient plant biomass degraders and represent promising agents for a variety of biotechnological applications. We evaluated the tolerance of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, to air exposure in liquid media using soluble (cellobiose) and insoluble (dried switchgrass) substrates. Strain C1A grown on cellobiose survived for 11, and 13.5 hours following air exposure when grown under planktonic, and immobilized conditions, respectively. When grown on switchgrass media, strain C1A exhibited significantly enhanced air tolerance and survived for 168 hours. The genome of strain C1A lacked a catalase gene, but contained superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase genes. Real time PCR analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase, exhibits a transient increase in expression level post aeration. Interestingly, the C1A superoxide dismutase gene of strain C1A appears to be most closely related to bacterial SODs, which implies its acquisition from a bacterial donor via cross kingdom horizontal gene transfer during Neocallimastigomycota evolution. We conclude that strain C1A utilizes multiple mechanisms to minimize the deleterious effects of air exposure such as physical protection and the production of oxidative stress enzymes. PMID:25367149

  3. Survival of the anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A after prolonged air exposure

    PubMed Central

    Struchtemeyer, Christopher G.; Ranganathan, Abhaya; Couger, M. B.; Liggenstoffer, Audra S.; Youssef, Noha H.; Elshahed, Mostafa S.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are efficient plant biomass degraders and represent promising agents for a variety of biotechnological applications. We evaluated the tolerance of an anaerobic fungal isolate, Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A, to air exposure in liquid media using soluble (cellobiose) and insoluble (dried switchgrass) substrates. Strain C1A grown on cellobiose survived for 11, and 13.5 hours following air exposure when grown under planktonic, and immobilized conditions, respectively. When grown on switchgrass media, strain C1A exhibited significantly enhanced air tolerance and survived for 168 hours. The genome of strain C1A lacked a catalase gene, but contained superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase genes. Real time PCR analysis indicated that superoxide dismutase, but not glutathione peroxidase, exhibits a transient increase in expression level post aeration. Interestingly, the C1A superoxide dismutase gene of strain C1A appears to be most closely related to bacterial SODs, which implies its acquisition from a bacterial donor via cross kingdom horizontal gene transfer during Neocallimastigomycota evolution. We conclude that strain C1A utilizes multiple mechanisms to minimize the deleterious effects of air exposure such as physical protection and the production of oxidative stress enzymes. PMID:25367149

  4. Changes in pulmonary function and airway reactivity due to prolonged exposure to typical ambient ozone (O sub 3 ) levels

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, D.; McDonnell, W.; Folinsbee, L.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Ives, P.

    1989-01-01

    Previously observed (JAPCA 38:28-35, 1988) pulmonary responses of delta FEV1 (-13%), moderate to severe pain upon inspiration, and a doubling of PD100 for methacholine following prolonged moderate exercise at 0.12 ppm O3 were of sufficient magnitude to warrant the assessing of responses at a lower range of concentrations, i.e., 0.08, 0.10 and 0.12 ppm O3. Exposures consisted of six 50-min exercises (VE approximately equals 40 L/min), each followed by 10-min rest; a 35-min lunch break was included. When compared with exposures to 0.00 ppm, substantial pulmonary function decrements, respiratory symptoms and increases in nonspecific airway reactivity were observed at all three O3 concentrations. For example, decreases in FEV1 (P < 0.01) of 7%, 7% and 12% were observed at 0.08, 0.10 and 0.12 ppm O3, respectively. The ratios (P < 0.005) of PD100 observed in 0.00 ppm to that in O3 were 1.56 at 0.08 ppm, 1.89 at 0.10 ppm, and 2.21 at 0.12 ppm O3. It is concluded that exercise representative of a day of moderate to heavy work or play performed during exposures to O3 at levels and pattern often found in ambient air induced clinically meaningful pulmonary responses.

  5. Cognitive and Affective Predictors of Treatment Outcome in Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Shireen L.; Vogt, Dawne S.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined cognitive and affective predictors of treatment dropout and treatment efficacy in Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and Prolonged Exposure (PE) for PTSD. Study participants were women with PTSD from a sexual assault who received at least one session of either treatment (n=145) as part of a randomized clinical trial. Results revealed that younger age, lower intelligence, and less education were associated with higher treatment dropout, whereas higher depression and guilt at pretreatment were associated with greater improvement in PTSD symptomatology. Results by treatment condition indicated that women with higher anger at pretreatment were more likely to drop out of PE and that older women in PE and younger women in CPT had the best overall outcomes. These findings have implications for efforts to enhance treatment efficacy and retention in CBT treatment protocols. PMID:19595295

  6. Cognitive and affective predictors of treatment outcome in Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Shireen L; Vogt, Dawne S; Resick, Patricia A

    2009-09-01

    This study examined cognitive and affective predictors of treatment dropout and treatment efficacy in Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and Prolonged Exposure (PE) for PTSD. Study participants were women with PTSD from a sexual assault who received at least one session of either treatment (n = 145) as part of a randomized clinical trial. Results revealed that younger age, lower intelligence, and less education were associated with higher treatment dropout, whereas higher depression and guilt at pretreatment were associated with greater improvement in PTSD symptomatology. Results by treatment condition indicated that women with higher anger at pretreatment were more likely to dropout of PE and that older women in PE and younger women in CPT had the best overall outcomes. These findings have implications for efforts to enhance treatment efficacy and retention in CBT treatment protocols. PMID:19595295

  7. Changes in thyroid status of rats after prolonged exposure to low dose dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane.

    PubMed

    Yaglova, N V; Yaglov, V V

    2014-04-01

    The effect of low dose dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), omnipresent ecotoxicant and endocrine disruptor, on the functioning of the endocrine system is an urgent problem. We studied the effect of low dose DDT on thyroid status in rats. Rats receiving DDT in a dose of 1.890±0.086 μg/kg for 6 weeks showed increased concentrations of thyroid hormones, particularly triiodothyronine, and reduced level of thyrotropin. Longer exposure reduced the production of thyroid hormones. The dynamics of thyroid status parameters during DDT treatment in a low dose was similar to changes observed during the development of hypothyroidism induced by iodine deficiency. PMID:24824690

  8. Effects of prolonged exposure of lettuce seeds to HZE particles on orbital stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzgodina, L. V.; Maksimova, E. N.; Kaminskaya, E. V.

    In a study of the biological effects of cosmic HZE particles, lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seeds were flown on the orbital stations Salyut 6 and 7 for varying periods of time (from 40 to 457 days). The dependence of the biological damage on flight duration, physical parameters and the fact of passage of an HZE particle through the seed was estimated using the criterion of the frequency of aberrant cells. The arrangement of the flight biological container Biobloc made it possible to trace the location of tracks of individual HZE particles with Z>=6 and LET 200 keV/um. In seeds hit by HZE particles, for all exposure times, a statistically significant much higher yield of aberrant cells and also of cells containing multiple chromosome aberrations was observed than in the control material. The frequency of aberrant cells is markedly higher (by a factor of 1,5) in seeds hit than in non-hit ones. The changes of the yield of aberrant cells as a function of the absorbed dose (3.2-63.4 mGy) and the fluence (4.8-44.2 particles/cm2) are linear for the exposure duration ranging from 40 to 457 days.

  9. Effect of cadmium on blood of tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus (Peters), during prolonged exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruparelia, S.G.; Verma, Y.; Saiyed, S.R. ); Rawal, U.M. )

    1990-08-01

    Cadmium is recognized as one of the most hazardous environmental pollutants and is toxic to many living organisms. Experimental and environmental exposure to cadmium has been reported to cause disease in humans and other mammals. Recent reviews on cadmium have reported on acute and subacute effects on fish, mechanisms of toxicity, the role of toxicity modifying factors and various sublethal effects, i.e., hematological and biochemical disorders. However, very little information is available on the subacute effects of cadmium on fish blood exposed in hard water. The present investigation, therefore, was carried out to observe the effects of cadmium on the blood of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) in hard and alkaline water to determine whether cadmium causes changes in blood of fish kept in hard water in the same way it causes changes in blood of fish kept in soft water.

  10. POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PARTICULATE MATTER: A COMPARISON OF EXPOSURE MODEL PREDICTIONS AND MEASUREMENT DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is currently developing an integrated human exposure source-to-dose modeling system (HES2D). This modeling system will incorporate models that use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposures to environmental ...

  11. Integrating population dynamics into mapping human exposure to seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, S.; Aubrecht, C.

    2012-11-01

    Disaster risk is not fully characterized without taking into account vulnerability and population exposure. Assessment of earthquake risk in urban areas would benefit from considering the variation of population distribution at more detailed spatial and temporal scales, and from a more explicit integration of this improved demographic data with existing seismic hazard maps. In the present work, "intelligent" dasymetric mapping is used to model population dynamics at high spatial resolution in order to benefit the analysis of spatio-temporal exposure to earthquake hazard in a metropolitan area. These night- and daytime-specific population densities are then classified and combined with seismic intensity levels to derive new spatially-explicit four-class-composite maps of human exposure. The presented approach enables a more thorough assessment of population exposure to earthquake hazard. Results show that there are significantly more people potentially at risk in the daytime period, demonstrating the shifting nature of population exposure in the daily cycle and the need to move beyond conventional residence-based demographic data sources to improve risk analyses. The proposed fine-scale maps of human exposure to seismic intensity are mainly aimed at benefiting visualization and communication of earthquake risk, but can be valuable in all phases of the disaster management process where knowledge of population densities is relevant for decision-making.

  12. Ozone exposure of a weed community produces adaptive changes in seed populations of Spergula arvensis.

    PubMed

    Landesmann, Jennifer B; Gundel, Pedro E; Martínez-Ghersa, M Alejandra; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the major drivers of global change. This stress factor alters plant growth and development. Ozone could act as a selection pressure on species communities composition, but also on population genetic background, thus affecting life history traits. Our objective was to evaluate the consequences of prolonged ozone exposure of a weed community on phenotypic traits of Spergulaarvensis linked to persistence. Specifically, we predicted that the selection pressure exerted by high ozone concentrations as well as the concomitant changes in the weed community would drive population adaptive changes which will be reflected on seed germination, dormancy and longevity. In order to test seed viability and dormancy level, we conducted germination experiments for which we used seeds produced by S. arvensis plants grown within a weed community exposed to three ozone treatments during four years (0, 90 and 120 ppb). We also performed a soil seed bank experiment to test seed longevity with seeds coming from both the four-year ozone exposure experiment and from a short-term treatment conducted at ambient and added ozone concentrations. We found that prolonged ozone exposure produced changes in seed germination, dormancy and longevity, resulting in three S. arvensis populations. Seeds from the 90 ppb ozone selection treatment had the highest level of germination when stored at 75% RH and 25 °C and then scarified. These seeds showed the lowest dormancy level when being subjected to 5 ºC/5% RH and 25 ºC/75% followed by 5% RH storage conditions. Furthermore, ozone exposure increased seed persistence in the soil through a maternal effect. Given that tropospheric ozone is an important pollutant in rural areas, changes in seed traits due to ozone exposure could increase weed persistence in fields, thus affecting weed-crop interactions, which could ultimately reduce crop production.

  13. Ozone Exposure of a Weed Community Produces Adaptive Changes in Seed Populations of Spergula arvensis

    PubMed Central

    Landesmann, Jennifer B.; Gundel, Pedro E.; Martínez-Ghersa, M. Alejandra; Ghersa, Claudio M.

    2013-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is one of the major drivers of global change. This stress factor alters plant growth and development. Ozone could act as a selection pressure on species communities composition, but also on population genetic background, thus affecting life history traits. Our objective was to evaluate the consequences of prolonged ozone exposure of a weed community on phenotypic traits of Spergulaarvensis linked to persistence. Specifically, we predicted that the selection pressure exerted by high ozone concentrations as well as the concomitant changes in the weed community would drive population adaptive changes which will be reflected on seed germination, dormancy and longevity. In order to test seed viability and dormancy level, we conducted germination experiments for which we used seeds produced by S. arvensis plants grown within a weed community exposed to three ozone treatments during four years (0, 90 and 120 ppb). We also performed a soil seed bank experiment to test seed longevity with seeds coming from both the four-year ozone exposure experiment and from a short-term treatment conducted at ambient and added ozone concentrations. We found that prolonged ozone exposure produced changes in seed germination, dormancy and longevity, resulting in three S. arvensis populations. Seeds from the 90 ppb ozone selection treatment had the highest level of germination when stored at 75% RH and 25 °C and then scarified. These seeds showed the lowest dormancy level when being subjected to 5 ºC/5% RH and 25 ºC/75% followed by 5% RH storage conditions. Furthermore, ozone exposure increased seed persistence in the soil through a maternal effect. Given that tropospheric ozone is an important pollutant in rural areas, changes in seed traits due to ozone exposure could increase weed persistence in fields, thus affecting weed-crop interactions, which could ultimately reduce crop production. PMID:24086640

  14. Prolonged exposure to methylglyoxal causes disruption of vascular KATP channel by mRNA instability

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Li, Shanshan; Konduru, Anuhya S.; Zhang, Shuang; Trower, Timothy C.; Shi, Weiwei; Cui, Ningren; Yu, Lei; Wang, Yali; Zhu, Daling

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia and excessive production of intermediary metabolites including methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive carbonyl species that can lead to cell injuries. Interacting with proteins, lipids, and DNA, excessive MGO can cause dysfunction of various tissues, especially the vascular walls where diabetic complications often take place. However, the potential vascular targets of excessive MGO remain to be fully understood. Here we show that the vascular Kir6.1/SUR2B isoform of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels is likely to be disrupted with an exposure to submillimolar MGO. Up to 90% of the Kir6.1/SUR2B currents were suppressed by 1 mM MGO with a time constant of ∼2 h. Consistently, MGO treatment caused a vast reduction of both Kir6.1 and SUR2B mRNAs endogenously expressed in the A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. In the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin-D, MGO remained to lower the Kir6.1 and SUR2B mRNAs to the same degree as MGO alone, suggesting that the MGO effect is likely to compromise the mRNA stability. Luciferase reporter assays indicated that the 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs) of the Kir6.1 but not SUR2 mRNA were targeted by MGO. In contrast, the SUR2B mRNAs obtained with in vitro transcription were disrupted by MGO directly, while the Kir6.1 transcripts were unaffected. Consistent with these results, the constriction of mesenteric arterial rings was markedly augmented with an exposure to 1 mM MGO for 2 h, and such an MGO effect was totally eliminated in the presence of glibenclamide. These results therefore suggest that acting on the 3′-UTR of Kir6.1 and the coding region of SUR2B, MGO causes instability of Kir6.1 and SUR2B mRNAs, disruption of vascular KATP channels, and impairment of arterial function. PMID:22972803

  15. Effects of prolonged low-level cadmium exposure on the tadpole immune system.

    PubMed

    Zettergren, L D; Boldt, B W; Petering, D H; Goodrich, M S; Weber, D N; Zettergren, J G

    1991-01-01

    Uninjected (Group I) and sheep erythrocyte (SRBC)-injected (Group II) Rana tadpoles were exposed to varying sublethal concentrations of cadmium (Cd) for 6 weeks. In order to assess possible effects on the tadpole immune system we determined pre-B, B mu, and plasma cell (PC mu) frequencies in liver and mesonephros of Group I larvae, and hemagglutinating antibody (HA) titers of Group II animals. Group I and Group II control animals were cultivated in water with no added Cd (0 ppm), while treatments were set at 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 ppm Cd. We found that (a) Cd appeared to stimulate a significant increase in the frequency of B mu cells in animals treated at 0.4 and 0.8 ppm, (b) certain treated Group II larvae contained significantly increased amounts of HA in their serum, while their serum protein concentrations were not significantly different, and (c) there was a dose-related increase in tissue Cd levels in treated Group II larvae. Our observations suggest that chronic low-level exposure to Cd may (a) result in a slight increases in the frequency of B mu cells in unimmunized animals, (b) increase immune responsiveness of immunized larvae, and (c) increase liver and mesonephros accumulations of Cd. Preliminary studies indicated that cytosolic Cd is associated with a protein which appears to be similar to mammalian metallothionein.

  16. Factors involved in strain-induced injury in skeletal muscles and outcomes of prolonged exposures.

    PubMed

    Stauber, William T

    2004-02-01

    Repetitive motion disorders can involve lengthening of skeletal muscles to perform braking actions to decelerate limbs under load often resulting in muscle strains and injury. Injury is a loss of isometric force (weakness) requiring days to recover. The capacity of skeletal muscle to tolerate repeated strains is dependent on multiple factors including individual variation. The most important factors producing muscle strain injury are the magnitude of the resisting force (peak-stretch force) and the number of strains. Other factors such as muscle length and fiber type contribute to the susceptibility to injury as well, but to a lesser degree. Strain injury can also lead to inflammation and pain. Chronic exposure to repeated strains can result in fibrosis that is not completely reversed after months of rest. Long rest times appear to be the only factor reported to prevent inflammation in rats following repeated strain injury. Further understanding of the mechanism for prevention of histopathologic changes by long rest times should provide a rationale for prevention of negative outcomes.

  17. Skin wound trauma, following high-dose radiation exposure, amplifies and prolongs skeletal tissue loss.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua M; Swift, Sibyl N; Smith, Joan T; Kiang, Juliann G; Allen, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the detrimental effects of non-lethal, high-dose (whole body) γ-irradiation on bone, and the impact that radiation combined with skin trauma (i.e. combined injury) has on long-term skeletal tissue health. Recovery of bone after an acute dose of radiation (RI; 8 Gy), skin wounding (15-20% of total body skin surface), or combined injury (RI+Wound; CI) was determined 3, 7, 30, and 120 days post-irradiation in female B6D2F1 mice and compared to non-irradiated mice (SHAM) at each time-point. CI mice demonstrated long-term (day 120) elevations in serum TRAP 5b (osteoclast number) and sclerostin (bone formation inhibitor), and suppression of osteocalcin levels through 30 days as compared to SHAM (p<0.05). Radiation-induced reductions in distal femur trabecular bone volume fraction and trabecular number through 120 days post-exposure were significantly greater than non-irradiated mice (p<0.05) and were exacerbated in CI mice by day 30 (p<0.05). Negative alterations in trabecular bone microarchitecture were coupled with extended reductions in cancellous bone formation rate in both RI and CI mice as compared to Sham (p<0.05). Increased osteoclast surface in CI animals was observed for 3 days after irradiation and remained elevated through 120 days (p<0.01). These results demonstrate a long-term, exacerbated response of bone to radiation when coupled with non-lethal wound trauma. Changes in cancellous bone after combined trauma were derived from extended reductions in osteoblast-driven bone formation and increases in osteoclast activity.

  18. The immune response of women with prolonged exposure to electromagnetic fields produced by radiotelevision broadcasting stations.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, P; Di Giampaolo, L; Di Donato, A; Antonucci, A; Paiardini, G; Morelli, S; Vasile, R; Spagnoli, G; Reale, M; Dadorante, V; Kouri, M; Di Gioacchino, M

    2006-01-01

    Twelve women, five of them housewives, exposed in their residences to electromagnetic fields (EMFs)emitted by radio-television broadcasting stations for a mean period of 13 years, were investigated. The EMFs in the balconies of the homes were (mean + S.D.) 4.3 + 1.4 V/m in the year 2000 and 3.7 + 1.3 V/m in 2005, while the exposure in the nearby area was <2.0 V/m. The EMF exposed women showed in 2000 reduced blood NK lymphocytes as well as PHA stimulated PBMC proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-gamma release. In the year 2005, the EMF exposed women and 48 control women with similar ages(mean 43 years), smoking habits, atopy and social level were investigated. State (temporary) and trait(tendency of the personality) anxiety were determined by STAI I and II, respectively. Blood cytotoxic activity and lymphocyte subsets were also determined. The ratio STAI I/STAI II of the EMF exposed group was lower than that of the control group. The blood cytotoxic activity of the exposed women was lower (p<0.01), percent of B CD45+-CD19+ lymphocytes higher and percent of CD45+-CD3+-CD8+ cells lower (p<0.05). Moreover, cytotoxic activity/CD45+-CD16+-56+ NK lymphocytes of the controls was negatively correlated with STAI I and STAI II (p<0.001). In conclusion, this study demonstrates reduced blood cytotoxic activity and increased trait anxiety in relation to state anxiety in EMF exposed women. An effect of EMFs on immune functions, in part mediated by nervous mechanisms, may be hypothesized. However, the influence of lifestyle may not be excluded.

  19. Prolonged exposure to low levels of aluminum leads to changes associated with brain aging and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bondy, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum is one of the most common metal elements in the earth's crust. It is not an essential element for life and has commonly been thought of as a rather inert and insoluble mineral. Therefore, it has often been regarded as not posing a significant health hazard. In consequence, aluminum-containing agents been used in many food processing steps and also in removal by flocculation of particulate organic matter from water. In recent years, acid rain has tended to mobilize aluminum-containing minerals into a more soluble form, ionic Al(3+), which has found their way into many reservoirs that constitute residential drinking water resources. As a result, the human body burden of aluminum has increased. Epidemiological studies suggest that aluminum may not be as innocuous as was previously thought and that aluminum may actively promote the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Epidemiological data is strengthened by experimental evidence of aluminum exposure leading to excess inflammatory activity within the brain. Such apparently irrelevant immune activity unprovoked by an exogenous infectious agent characterizes the aging brain and is even more pronounced in several neurodegenerative diseases. The causation of most of these age-related neurological disorders is not understood but since they are generally not genetic, one must assume that their development is underlain by unknown environmental factors. There is an increasing and coherent body of evidence that implicates aluminum as being one such significant factor. Evidence is outlined supporting the concept of aluminum's involvement in hastening brain aging. This acceleration would then inevitably lead to increased incidence of specific age-related neurological diseases. PMID:24189189

  20. Prolonged exposure to low levels of aluminum leads to changes associated with brain aging and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bondy, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum is one of the most common metal elements in the earth's crust. It is not an essential element for life and has commonly been thought of as a rather inert and insoluble mineral. Therefore, it has often been regarded as not posing a significant health hazard. In consequence, aluminum-containing agents been used in many food processing steps and also in removal by flocculation of particulate organic matter from water. In recent years, acid rain has tended to mobilize aluminum-containing minerals into a more soluble form, ionic Al(3+), which has found their way into many reservoirs that constitute residential drinking water resources. As a result, the human body burden of aluminum has increased. Epidemiological studies suggest that aluminum may not be as innocuous as was previously thought and that aluminum may actively promote the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Epidemiological data is strengthened by experimental evidence of aluminum exposure leading to excess inflammatory activity within the brain. Such apparently irrelevant immune activity unprovoked by an exogenous infectious agent characterizes the aging brain and is even more pronounced in several neurodegenerative diseases. The causation of most of these age-related neurological disorders is not understood but since they are generally not genetic, one must assume that their development is underlain by unknown environmental factors. There is an increasing and coherent body of evidence that implicates aluminum as being one such significant factor. Evidence is outlined supporting the concept of aluminum's involvement in hastening brain aging. This acceleration would then inevitably lead to increased incidence of specific age-related neurological diseases.

  1. The immune response of women with prolonged exposure to electromagnetic fields produced by radiotelevision broadcasting stations.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, P; Di Giampaolo, L; Di Donato, A; Antonucci, A; Paiardini, G; Morelli, S; Vasile, R; Spagnoli, G; Reale, M; Dadorante, V; Kouri, M; Di Gioacchino, M

    2006-01-01

    Twelve women, five of them housewives, exposed in their residences to electromagnetic fields (EMFs)emitted by radio-television broadcasting stations for a mean period of 13 years, were investigated. The EMFs in the balconies of the homes were (mean + S.D.) 4.3 + 1.4 V/m in the year 2000 and 3.7 + 1.3 V/m in 2005, while the exposure in the nearby area was <2.0 V/m. The EMF exposed women showed in 2000 reduced blood NK lymphocytes as well as PHA stimulated PBMC proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-gamma release. In the year 2005, the EMF exposed women and 48 control women with similar ages(mean 43 years), smoking habits, atopy and social level were investigated. State (temporary) and trait(tendency of the personality) anxiety were determined by STAI I and II, respectively. Blood cytotoxic activity and lymphocyte subsets were also determined. The ratio STAI I/STAI II of the EMF exposed group was lower than that of the control group. The blood cytotoxic activity of the exposed women was lower (p<0.01), percent of B CD45+-CD19+ lymphocytes higher and percent of CD45+-CD3+-CD8+ cells lower (p<0.05). Moreover, cytotoxic activity/CD45+-CD16+-56+ NK lymphocytes of the controls was negatively correlated with STAI I and STAI II (p<0.001). In conclusion, this study demonstrates reduced blood cytotoxic activity and increased trait anxiety in relation to state anxiety in EMF exposed women. An effect of EMFs on immune functions, in part mediated by nervous mechanisms, may be hypothesized. However, the influence of lifestyle may not be excluded. PMID:17291406

  2. Influence of body heat content on hand function during prolonged cold exposures.

    PubMed

    Flouris, A D; Cheung, S S; Fowles, J R; Kruisselbrink, L D; Westwood, D A; Carrillo, A E; Murphy, R J L

    2006-09-01

    We examined the influence of 1) prior increase [preheating (PHT)], 2) increase throughout [heating (HT)], and 3) no increase [control (Con)] of body heat content (H(b)) on neuromuscular function and manual dexterity of the hands during a 130-min exposure to -20 degrees C (coldEx). Ten volunteers randomly underwent three passive coldEx, incorporating a 10-min moderate-exercise period at the 65th min while wearing a liquid conditioning garment (LCG) and military arctic clothing. In PHT, 50 degrees C water was circulated in the LCG before coldEx until core temperature was increased by 0.5 degrees C. In HT, participants regulated the inlet LCG water temperature throughout coldEx to subjective comfort, while the LCG was not operating in Con. Thermal comfort, rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, mean finger temperature (T(fing)), change in H(b) (DeltaH(b)), rate of body heat storage, Purdue pegboard test, finger tapping, handgrip, maximum voluntary contraction, and evoked twitch force of the first dorsal interosseus muscle were recorded. Results demonstrated that, unlike in HT and PHT, thermal comfort, rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, twitch force, maximum voluntary contraction, and finger tapping declined significantly in Con. In contrast, T(fing) and Purdue pegboard test remained constant only in HT. Generalized estimating equations demonstrated that DeltaH(b) and T(fing) were associated over time with hand function, whereas no significant association was detected for rate of body heat storage. It is concluded that increasing H(b) not only throughout but also before a coldEx is effective in maintaining hand function. In addition, we found that the best indicator of hand function is DeltaH(b) followed by T(fing).

  3. Characteristics of Prolonged Concussion Recovery in a Pediatric Subspecialty Referral Population

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Daniel J.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Master, Christina L.; Arbogast, Kristy B.; Grady, Matthew F.; Robinson, Roni L.; Goodman, Arlene M.; Wiebe, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify pre-existing characteristics associated with prolonged recovery from concussion in a sample of patients referred to a pediatric sports medicine clinic. Study design This was a retrospective, exploratory cohort study of 247 patients age 5-18 years old with concussion referred to a tertiary pediatric hospital-affiliated sports medicine clinic from July 1, 2010, through December 31, 2011. A random sample of all eligible patient visits (3740) was chosen for further review and abstraction. Statistical comparisons between subsets of patients were conducted using exact chi-square tests, logistic regression, quantile regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves. Results The median time until returning to school part-time was 12 days (interquartile range (IQR) 6-21); until returning to school full-time without accommodations was 35 days (IQR 11-105); until becoming symptom-free was 64 days (IQR 18-119); and until being fully cleared to return to sports was 75 days (IQR 30-153). 73% of all patients were symptomatic for >4 weeks, 73% were prescribed some form of school accommodation, and 61% reported a decline in grades. Characteristics associated with a prolonged recovery included a history of depression or anxiety; an initial complaint of dizziness; abnormal convergence or symptom provocation following oculomotor examination on physical examination; and history of prior concussion. Conclusion Pediatric and adolescent patients with concussion may experience cognitive and emotional morbidity that can last for several months following injury. Clinicians should consider specific pre-existing characteristics and presenting symptoms that may be associated with a more complicated recovery for concussion patients. PMID:25262302

  4. Overexpression of hsp27 Rescued Neuronal Cell Death and Reduction in Life- and Health-Span in Drosophila melanogaster Against Prolonged Exposure to Dichlorvos.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Saini, Sanjay; Khatoon, Rehana; Sharma, Divya; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Kar Chowdhuri, Debapratim

    2016-07-01

    Long-term exposure to dichlorvos (O,O-dimethyl-2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate (DDVP), an organophosphate pesticide) is reported to exert neurotoxicity, i.e., generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative damage, and neuronal cell death along with life- and health-span reduction in nontarget organisms including humans. However, studies on genetic modulation towards neuroprotection against prolonged DDVP exposure are elusive. Hsp27 (a small heat shock protein) is involved in various cellular processes and thus has attained emphasis as a therapeutic target. We aimed to examine the protective effect of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure using an in vivo model Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were exposed to 15.0 ng/ml DDVP for a prolonged period to examine neuronal cell death, locomotor performance, and lifespan. After prolonged exposure, cell death, ROS level, glutathione depletion, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate level (NADPH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activities were examined in fly brain tissues at different days of age (days 10, 20, and 30). Flies with ubiquitous overexpression of hsp27 showed better resistance (improved lifespan and locomotor performance) in comparison to that targeted to motor neurons and nervous system. These flies also exhibited lesser intracellular ROS level and glutathione depletion by restoring G6PD activity, NADPH level, and TrxR activity in their brains thereby resisted neuronal cell death. Conversely, hsp27 knockdown flies exhibited reversal of the above endpoints. The study evidenced the neuroprotective efficacy of hsp27 overexpression against prolonged DDVP exposure and favored Hsp27 as a therapeutic target towards achieving better organismal (including human) health against long-term chemical exposure.

  5. Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

  6. Modeling Population Exposures to Silver Nanoparticles Present in Consumer Products

    PubMed Central

    Royce, Steven G.; Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Cai, Ting; Xu, Shu S.; Alexander, Jocelyn A.; Mi, Zhongyuan; Calderon, Leonardo; Mainelis, Gediminas; Lee, KiBum; Lioy, Paul J.; Tetley, Teresa D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposures of the general population to manufactured nanoparticles (MNPs) are expected to keep rising due to increasing use of MNPs in common consumer products (PEN 2014). The present study focuses on characterizing ambient and indoor population exposures to silver MNPs (nAg). For situations where detailed, case-specific exposure-related data are not available, as in the present study, a novel tiered modeling system, Prioritization/Ranking of Toxic Exposures with GIS (Geographic Information System) Extension (PRoTEGE), has been developed: it employs a product Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) approach coupled with basic human Life Stage Analysis (LSA) to characterize potential exposures to chemicals of current and emerging concern. The PRoTEGE system has been implemented for ambient and indoor environments, utilizing available MNP production, usage, and properties databases, along with laboratory measurements of potential personal exposures from consumer spray products containing nAg. Modeling of environmental and microenvironmental levels of MNPs employs Probabilistic Material Flow Analysis combined with product LCA to account for releases during manufacturing, transport, usage, disposal, etc. Human exposure and dose characterization further employs screening Microenvironmental Modeling and Intake Fraction methods combined with LSA for potentially exposed populations, to assess differences associated with gender, age, and demographics. Population distributions of intakes, estimated using the PRoTEGE framework, are consistent with published individual-based intake estimates, demonstrating that PRoTEGE is capable of capturing realistic exposure scenarios for the US population. Distributions of intakes are also used to calculate biologically-relevant population distributions of uptakes and target tissue doses through human airway dosimetry modeling that takes into account product MNP size distributions and age-relevant physiological parameters. PMID:25745354

  7. The Relationship between Posttraumatic and Depressive Symptoms during Prolonged Exposure with and without Cognitive Restructuring for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aderka, Idan M.; Gillihan, Seth J.; McLean, Carmen P.; Foa, Edna B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present study, we examined the relationship between posttraumatic and depressive symptoms during prolonged exposure (PE) treatment with and without cognitive restructuring (CR) for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Female assault survivors (N = 153) with PTSD were randomized to either PE alone or PE…

  8. Treating Low-Income and Minority Women with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Pilot Study Comparing Prolonged Exposure and Treatment as Usual Conducted by Community Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feske, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-one female psychiatric outpatients with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are randomly assigned to prolonged exposure (PE; n = 9) for PTSD or treatment as usual (TAU; n = 12). Participants are predominately low income and African American with complex trauma and psychiatric histories. Treatment is delivered by community…

  9. Are 60-minute prolonged exposure sessions with 20-minute imaginal exposure to traumatic memories sufficient to successfully treat PTSD? A randomized noninferiority clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Nacasch, Nitsa; Huppert, Jonathan D; Su, Yi-Jen; Kivity, Yogev; Dinshtein, Yula; Yeh, Rebecca; Foa, Edna B

    2015-05-01

    The study aims to determine whether 60-minute sessions of prolonged exposure (PE) that include 20 minutes of imaginal exposure (IE) are noninferior to the standard 90-minute sessions that include 40 minutes of IE in treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to explore the relationship of treatment outcome to within- and between-session habituation and change in negative cognitions. Thirty-nine adult veterans with chronic PTSD were randomly assigned to 90-minute (n=19) or 60-minute (n=20) sessions of PE. PTSD symptoms were assessed by an unaware independent evaluator before and after treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Self-reports of depression and negative cognitions were assessed before and after treatment. Participants in both conditions showed significant reductions in PTSD symptoms. Sixty-minute sessions were found to be noninferior to 90-minute sessions in reducing PTSD symptoms, as the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval for the difference between conditions in the PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview (posttreatment: 6.00; follow-up: 6.77) was below the predefined noninferiority margin (7.00). Participants receiving shorter sessions showed less within- and between-session habituation than those receiving longer sessions, but no group differences in reductions in negative cognitions were found. The current findings indicate that the outcomes of 60-minute sessions of PE do not differ from those of 90-minute sessions. In addition, change in trauma-related cognitions and between-session habituation are both potential mechanisms of PE.

  10. Exposure to a Mixture of Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans Resulted in a Prolonged Time to Pregnancy in Women

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chiu-Yueh; Wang, Ying-Jan; Chen, Pau-Chung; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq; Guo, Yueliang Leon

    2008-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) may affect the female reproductive system in animals and humans. In 1978–1979, a mass poisoning occurred in central Taiwan due to PCB/PCDF-contaminated cooking oil; this incident was called Yucheng (“oil disease” in Chinese). Objective The purpose of our study was to determine whether PCB/PCDF exposure affected fertility in exposed women. Methods After the event, we followed the exposed individuals and a reference group who were sex-, age-, and community-matched. In 2003, we obtained fertility histories from Yucheng and reference women by telephone interview. We used Kaplan–Meier survival curves and multivariable Cox regression to compare time to pregnancy (TTP) between Yucheng and reference women, and we performed multiple logistic regression to determine whether PCB/PCDF exposure caused infertility. Results In total, 412 women responded, with a median TTP of 4 months in Yucheng women and 3 months in reference women (p = 0.019). After adjusting for confounders by Cox regression, we found a fecundability ratio of 0.90 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.80–1.00] for Yucheng women. Among the 408 women who had noncontraceptive sexual activity for > 12 months, 19.7% of Yucheng women and 9.7% of reference women did not become pregnant (i.e., they were infertile). After we adjusted for confounders by logistic regression, the infertility odds ratio was 2.34 (95% CI, 1.23–4.59) for Yucheng women compared with the reference group. Conclusions We found prolonged TTP and reduced fertility among women previously exposed to PCBs/PCDFs. Because of the limited sample size and the relatively small decrease in the fertility rate, these effects require cautious interpretation and further investigation for confirmation. PMID:18470317

  11. Static torsional otolith-cervical-ocular reflex after prolonged exposure to weightlessness and a 7-day immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Naumov, I. A.; Makarova, S. M.

    2011-05-01

    To determine the role of the support-proprioceptive factor in the functioning of the vestibular system, in particular the static torsional otolith-cervical-ocular reflex (OCOR), comparative OCOR studies with videooculography recording were performed after a 7-day "dry" horizontal immersion (16 subjects) and after a prolonged (126-195 days) exposure to weightlessness (13 cosmonauts). For the first time, it was demonstrated that minimization of the support and proprioceptive afferentation may result in an inversion or absence of the static torsional OCOR and the development of a positional nystagmus with an inverted reflex. A comparative OCOR data analysis of cosmonauts and immersion subjects has revealed similarity of responses. However, changes in OCOR after immersion were noted in only 60% of the subjects, while after space flight, 90% of cosmonauts showed them. Post-flight changes were more frequent, marked and long-lasting. Statistical analysis has shown that there were significant differences between pre- and post-flight data according to both parametric and non-parametric methods of multiple comparisons, whereas only parametric methods have found significant differences within immersion data.

  12. Changes in Negative Cognitions Mediate PTSD Symptom Reductions During Client-Centered Therapy and Prolonged Exposure for Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Carmen P.; Yeh, Rebecca; Rosenfield, David; Foa, Edna B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether changes in negative trauma-related cognitions play an important role in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression during prolonged exposure therapy for adolescents (PE-A). Method Secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial comparing PE-A with client-centered therapy (CCT) for PTSD. Participants were 61 adolescent female sexual assault survivors ages 13–18 who received 8–14 weekly sessions of PE-A or CCT at a community rape crisis center. PTSD severity was assessed at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and 3-months post-treatment. Participants also completed self-report measures of negative posttraumatic cognitions and depressive symptoms at the same assessment points. Results Cross lag panel mediation analyses showed that change in negative trauma-related cognitions mediated change in PTSD symptoms and depressive symptoms whereas change in PTSD and depressive symptoms did not mediate change in negative cognitions. Conclusion Our findings support EPT and suggest that change in negative trauma-related cognitions is a mechanism of both PE-A and CCT. PMID:25812826

  13. Prolonged Exposure for Treating PTSD Among Female Methadone Patients Who Were Survivors of Sexual Abuse in Israel.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Miriam; Nacasch, Nitsa; Levit, Shabtay; Katz, Noam; Foa, Edna B

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this pilot study were: (a) to test the feasibility of prolonged exposure (PE) therapy conducted by a social worker staff on female patients in methadone program clinics who were survivors of child sexual abuse or rape and (b) to examine preliminary outcomes of PE on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and illicit drug use at pre- and posttreatment, and up to 12-month follow-ups. Twelve female methadone patients who were survivors of child sexual abuse or rape diagnosed with PTSD were enrolled in 13-19 weekly individual PE sessions. Assessments were conducted at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment, as well as at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-ups. The treatment outcomes measures included PTSD symptoms, depressive symptoms, and illicit drug use. Ten of the 12 study patients completed treatment. PTSD and depressive symptoms showed significant reduction. No relapse to illicit drug use was detected. These preliminary results suggest that PE may be delivered by methadone social workers with successful outcomes. Further research should test the efficacy of PE among methadone patients in a randomized control trial with standard care as the control condition.

  14. Imagery rescripting and reprocessing therapy after failed prolonged exposure for post-traumatic stress disorder following industrial injury.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Brad K; Weis, Jo M; Smucker, Mervin R; Christianson, Heidi F

    2007-12-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) has been reported to be effective for improving post-traumatic stress symptoms in 60-65% of trauma victims suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study examined the results of adding an imagery-based, cognitive restructuring component (imagery rescripting and reprocessing therapy, IRRT) to the treatment of 23 Type I trauma victims suffering from PTSD, all of whom failed to improve with PE alone. With the added treatment component, 18 of 23 clients showed a full recovery from their PTSD symptoms, and no longer met criteria for PTSD after 1-3 sessions of IRRT. It was noteworthy that non-FEAR emotions (e.g., guilt, shame, anger) were found to be predominant for all 23 PE failures examined in this study, suggesting that a simple habituation model (on which PE is based) is not sufficient to address non-FEAR emotions in PTSD. By contrast, IRRT, a cognitive restructuring treatment, was much more effective in PTSD symptom reduction for these clients. It was proposed that more detailed, individualized trauma assessments be conducted for each patient that focus on (1) identifying the predominant trauma-related emotions and cognitions that maintain the PTSD response, and (2) finding the best CBT "treatment fit" for the specific trauma characteristics of each patient.

  15. The effects of prolonged thermal exposure on the fracture and fatigue behavior of aluminum-lithium alloy 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. ); McNulty, J.C. . Materials Dept.)

    1993-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys are currently being considered for applications at moderately elevated temperatures; accordingly, a study has been made on the effects of prolonged (100 and 1,000 hours overaging) thermal exposure at 149 C and 260 C on the mechanical properties of a peak-aged Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy 8090-T8771. In the as-received T8771 temper, the alloy exhibits an excellent combination of strength ([approximately]500 MPa) and toughness (35 MPa[radical]m) with moderate tensile elongation (4 pct). Overaging at 149 C results in a [approximately]50 pct reduction in ductility and toughness, primarily associated with the growth of equilibrium phases along grain/subgrain boundaries, resulting in formation of solute-depleted precipitate-free zones and coarsening of matrix [delta][prime] and S precipitates; strength levels and fatigue-crack growth rates, however, remain largely unchanged. Thermal exposures at 260 C, conversely, lead to dramatic reductions in strength (by [approximately]50 to 80 pct), toughness (by [approximately]30 pct) and fatigue-crack propagation resistance; crack-growth rates at all [Delta]K levels above [approximately]5 MPa[radical]m are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude faster. Microstructurally, this was associated with complete dissolution of [delta][prime], severe coarsening of S and T[sub 2] precipitates in the matrix, and formation of equilibrium Cu and Mg-rich intermetallic phases in the matrix and along grain boundaries. The resulting lack of planar-slip deformation and low yield strength of 8090 following overaging exposures at 260 C increase the cumulative crack-tip damage per cycle and reduce the tendency for crack-path deflection, thereby accelerating fatigue-crack growth rates. Despite this degradation in properties, the 8090-T8771 alloy has better strength retention and generally superior fatigue-crack growth properties compared to similarly overaged Al-Li-Cu-Zr 2090 and Al-Cu-Zn-Mg 7,150 alloys.

  16. Treating PTSD in Suicidal and Self-injuring Women with Borderline Personality Disorder: Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Prolonged Exposure Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Harned, Melanie S.; Korslund, Kathryn E.; Foa, Edna B.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the development and pilot testing of a protocol based on Prolonged Exposure (PE) that can be added to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) to treat PTSD in suicidal and self-injuring individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD, PTSD, and recent and/or imminent serious intentional self-injury (n=13) received one year of DBT with the DBT PE Protocol, plus three months of follow up assessment. The treatment was associated with significant reductions in PTSD, with the majority of patients no longer meeting criteria for PTSD at post-treatment (71.4% of DBT PE Protocol completers, 60.0% of the intent-to-treat sample). A minority of patients (27.3%) engaged in intentional self-injury during the study. Improvements were also found for suicidal ideation, dissociation, trauma-related guilt cognitions, shame, anxiety, depression, and social adjustment. There was no evidence that the DBT PE Protocol led to exacerbations of intentional self-injury urges or behaviors, PTSD, treatment dropout, or crisis service use. Overall, the results indicate that this integrated BPD and PTSD treatment is feasible to implement within one year of treatment, highly acceptable to patients and therapists, safe to administer, and shows promise as an effective intervention for PTSD in this complex and high-risk patient population. PMID:22503959

  17. Pdgfrβ+ Mural Preadipocytes Contribute to Adipocyte Hyperplasia Induced by High-Fat-Diet Feeding and Prolonged Cold Exposure in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Vishvanath, Lavanya; MacPherson, Karen A; Hepler, Chelsea; Wang, Qiong A; Shao, Mengle; Spurgin, Stephen B; Wang, Margaret Y; Kusminski, Christine M; Morley, Thomas S; Gupta, Rana K

    2016-02-01

    The expansion of white adipose tissue (WAT) in obesity involves de novo differentiation of new adipocytes; however, the cellular origin of these cells remains unclear. Here, we utilize Zfp423(GFP) reporter mice to characterize adipose mural (Pdgfrβ(+)) cells with varying levels of the preadipocyte commitment factor Zfp423. We find that adipose tissue contains distinct mural populations, with levels of Zfp423 distinguishing adipogenic from inflammatory-like mural cells. Using our "MuralChaser" lineage tracking system, we uncover adipose perivascular cells as developmental precursors of adipocytes formed in obesity, with adipogenesis and precursor abundance regulated in a depot-dependent manner. Interestingly, Pdgfrβ(+) cells do not significantly contribute to the initial cold-induced recruitment of beige adipocytes in WAT; it is only after prolonged cold exposure that these cells differentiate into beige adipocytes. These results provide genetic evidence for a mural cell origin of white adipocytes in obesity and suggest that beige adipogenesis may originate from multiple sources.

  18. Natural ionizing radiation exposure of the Spanish population.

    PubMed

    García-Talavera, M; Matarranz, J L; Martínez, M; Salas, R; Ramos, L

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the exposure of the Spanish population to natural radiation sources. The annual average effective dose is estimated to be 1.6 mSv, taking into account contributions from cosmic radiation (18%), terrestrial gamma radiation (30%), radon and thoron inhalation (34%) and ingestion (18%). Cosmic radiation doses were calculated from town altitude data. Terrestrial gamma ray exposure outdoors were derived from the MARNA (natural gamma radiation map of Spain); indoor exposure was obtained multiplying the corresponding outdoor value by an experimentally calculated conversion factor. Radon doses were estimated from national surveys carried out throughout the country. To assess doses by ingestion, data from a detailed study on consumption habits in Spain and average radioactivity values from UNSCEAR have been considered. The variability in the exposures among individuals in the population has been explicitly taken into account in the assessment.

  19. The Distribution of Exposure to Radon: Effects of Population Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.; Rein, S.; Nero, A.V.; Wollenberg Jr., H.A.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of population exposures to radon, rather than the distribution of indoor radon concentrations, determines the fraction of population exposed to exceptionally high risk from radon exposures. Since this fraction at high risk has prompted the development of public policies on radon, it is important to first determine the magnitude of this fraction, and then how it much would decrease with different implementation program options for radon mitigation. This papers presents an approach to determining the distribution of population exposures to radon from public domain data, and illustrates it with application to the state of Minnesota. During this work, we are led to define a radon entry potential index which appears useful in the search for regions with high radon houses.

  20. Lead exposure in Canada geese of the Eastern Prairie Population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeStefano, S.; Brand, C.J.; Rusch, D.H.; Finley, Daniel L.; Gillespie, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    We monitored lead exposure in Eastern Prairie Population Canada geese during summer-winter, 1986-1987 and 1987-1988 at 5 areas. Blood lead concentrations in geese trapped during summer at Cape Churchill Manitoba were below levels indicative of recent lead exposure (0.18 ppm). Geese exposed to lead (≥0.18 ppm blood lead) increased to 7.6% at Oak Hammock Wildlife Management Area (WMA), southern Manitoba, where lead shot was still in use, and to 10.0% at Roseau River WMA, northern Minnesota, when fall-staging geese were close to a source of lead shot in Manitoba. Proportion of birds exposed to lead dropped to <2% at Lac Qui Parle WMA, Minnesota, a steel shot zone since 1980. On the wintering grounds at Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri, 4.9% of all geese showed exposure to lead before the hunting season. Lead exposure rose to 10.0% after hunting ended and then decreased to 5.2% in late winter. Incidence of lead shot in gizzards and concentrations of lead in livers supported blood assay data. Soil samples indicated that lead shot continues to be available to geese at Swan Lake, even though the area was established as a non-toxic shot zone in 1978. Steel shot zones have reduced lead exposure in the Eastern Prairie Population, but lead shot persists in the environment and continues to account for lead exposure and mortality in Eastern Prairie Population Canada geese.

  1. An estimation of Canadian population exposure to cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Timmins, Rachel; Verdecchia, Kyle; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2009-08-01

    The worldwide average exposure to cosmic rays contributes to about 16% of the annual effective dose from natural radiation sources. At ground level, doses from cosmic ray exposure depend strongly on altitude, and weakly on geographical location and solar activity. With the analytical model PARMA developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, annual effective doses due to cosmic ray exposure at ground level were calculated for more than 1,500 communities across Canada which cover more than 85% of the Canadian population. The annual effective doses from cosmic ray exposure in the year 2000 during solar maximum ranged from 0.27 to 0.72 mSv with the population-weighted national average of 0.30 mSv. For the year 2006 during solar minimum, the doses varied between 0.30 and 0.84 mSv, and the population-weighted national average was 0.33 mSv. Averaged over solar activity, the Canadian population-weighted average annual effective dose due to cosmic ray exposure at ground level is estimated to be 0.31 mSv.

  2. Satellite-aided evaluation of population exposure to air pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, William J.; George, Anthony J.; Bryant, Nevin A.

    1979-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 set schedules for states to implement regional, spatial assessments of air quality impacts. Accordingly, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently published guidelines for quantifying population exposure to adverse air quality impact by using air quality and population data by census tracts. Our research complements the EPA guidelines in that it demonstrates the ability to determine population exposure to air pollution through computer processing that utilizes Landsat satellite-derived land use information. Three variables-a 1985 estimate of total suspended particulates for 2-km2 grid cells, Landsat-derived residential land cover data for 0.45-ha cells, and population totals for census tracts-were spatially registered and cross-tabulated to produce tabular and map products illustrating relative air quality exposure for residential population by 2-km2 cells. It would cost $20,000 to replicate our analysis for an area similar in size to the 4000-km2 Portland area. Once completed, the spatially fine, computer-compatible air quality and population data are amenable to the timely and efficient generation of population-at-risk tabular and map information on a continuous or periodic basis.

  3. Changes in PTSD and Depression during Prolonged Exposure and Client-Centered Therapy for PTSD in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Carmen P.; Su, Yi-Jen; Carpenter, Joseph K.; Foa, Edna B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depressive symptoms are common among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Prolonged exposure therapy (PE) for PTSD has been found to alleviate both PTSD and depressive symptoms, but relatively little is known about the pattern of PTSD and depressive symptom change during treatment. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in PTSD and depression during PE for adolescent (PE-A) and client-centered Therapy (CCT). The moderating role of PE-A vs. CCT and the possible differences across symptom clusters of PTSD were also examined. Method Participants were 61 female adolescents with sexual assault-related PTSD randomized to PE-A (n = 31) or CCT (n = 30). Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory and the Child PTSD Symptom Scale at pre-, mid-, and post-treatment, and before each treatment session. Results Multilevel mediation analysis indicated a reciprocal but asymmetrical relationship between changes in PTSD and depression during treatment in the overall sample. Moderated mediation analysis showed that the reciprocal relation was observed only during PE-A. Reductions in PTSD led to reductions in depression to a greater extent (48.7%, 95% CI [30.2, 67.2]) than vice versa (22.0% [10.6, 33.4]). For participants receiving CCT, reduction in PTSD led to reductions in depression (31.6% [11.8, 51.4]) but not vice versa (7.4% [−7.1, 21.9]). The reciprocal relationship between PTSD and depression was also observed across different symptoms clusters of PTSD. Conclusions Our findings suggest that changes in PTSD led to changes in depressive symptoms to a greater extent than vice versa across PE-A and CCT. PMID:25751238

  4. Treating posttraumatic stress disorder with MDMA-assisted psychotherapy: A preliminary meta-analysis and comparison to prolonged exposure therapy.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Timothy; Workman, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Since the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has become a major area of research and development. The most widely accepted treatment for PTSD is prolonged exposure (PE) therapy, but for many patients it is intolerable or ineffective. ±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-assisted psychotherapy (MDMA-AP) has recently re-emerged as a new treatment option, with two clinical trials having been published and both producing promising results. However, these results have yet to be compared to existing treatments. The present paper seeks to bridge this gap in the literature. Often the statistical significance of clinical trials is overemphasized, while the magnitude of the treatment effects is overlooked. The current meta-analysis aims to provide a comparison of the cumulative effect size of the MDMA-AP studies with those of PE. Effect sizes were calculated for primary and secondary outcome measures in the MDMA-AP clinical trials and compared to those of a meta-analysis including several PE clinical trials. It was found that MDMA-AP had larger effect sizes in both clinician-observed outcomes than PE did (Hedges' g=1.17 vs. g=1.08, respectively) and patient self-report outcomes (Hedges' g=0.87 vs. g=0.77, respectively). The dropout rates of PE and MDMA-AP were also compared, revealing that MDMA-AP had a considerably lower percentage of patients dropping out than PE did. These results suggest that MDMA-AP offers a promising treatment for PTSD. PMID:27118529

  5. A statistical framework for the validation of a population exposure model based on personal exposure data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Delphy; Valari, Myrto; Markakis, Konstantinos; Payan, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    Currently, ambient pollutant concentrations at monitoring sites are routinely measured by local networks, such as AIRPARIF in Paris, France. Pollutant concentration fields are also simulated with regional-scale chemistry transport models such as CHIMERE (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere) under air-quality forecasting platforms (e.g. Prev'Air http://www.prevair.org) or research projects. These data may be combined with more or less sophisticated techniques to provide a fairly good representation of pollutant concentration spatial gradients over urban areas. Here we focus on human exposure to atmospheric contaminants. Based on census data on population dynamics and demographics, modeled outdoor concentrations and infiltration of outdoor air-pollution indoors we have developed a population exposure model for ozone and PM2.5. A critical challenge in the field of population exposure modeling is model validation since personal exposure data are expensive and therefore, rare. However, recent research has made low cost mobile sensors fairly common and therefore personal exposure data should become more and more accessible. In view of planned cohort field-campaigns where such data will be available over the Paris region, we propose in the present study a statistical framework that makes the comparison between modeled and measured exposures meaningful. Our ultimate goal is to evaluate the exposure model by comparing modeled exposures to monitor data. The scientific question we address here is how to downscale modeled data that are estimated on the county population scale at the individual scale which is appropriate to the available measurements. To assess this question we developed a Bayesian hierarchical framework that assimilates actual individual data into population statistics and updates the probability estimate.

  6. European consumer exposure to cosmetic products, a framework for conducting population exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Hall, B; Tozer, S; Safford, B; Coroama, M; Steiling, W; Leneveu-Duchemin, M C; McNamara, C; Gibney, M

    2007-11-01

    Access to reliable exposure data is essential to evaluate the toxicological safety of ingredients in cosmetic products. This study was carried out by European cosmetic manufacturers acting within the trade association Colipa, with the aim to construct a probabilistic European population model of exposure. The study updates, in distribution form, the current exposure data on daily quantities of six cosmetic products. Data were collected using a combination of market information databases and a controlled product use study. In total 44,100 households and 18,057 individual consumers in five European countries provided data using their own products. All product use occasions were recorded, including those outside of home. The raw data were analysed using Monte Carlo simulation and a European Statistical Population Model of exposure was constructed. A significant finding was an inverse correlation between frequency of product use and quantity used per application for body lotion, facial moisturiser, toothpaste and shampoo. Thus it is not appropriate to calculate daily exposure to these products by multiplying the maximum frequency value by the maximum quantity per event value. The results largely confirm the exposure parameters currently used by the cosmetic industry. Design of this study could serve as a model for future assessments of population exposure to chemicals in products other than cosmetics.

  7. Within-population variation in ejaculate characteristics in a prolonged breeder, Peron's tree frog, Litoria peronii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Craig D. H.; Uller, Tobias; Wapstra, Erik; Olsson, Mats

    2008-11-01

    Sperm number is often a good predictor of success in sperm competition; however, it has become increasingly clear that, for some species, variation in probability of paternity cannot be explained by sperm number alone. Intraspecific variation in ejaculate characteristics, such as the number of viable sperm and sperm longevity, may play an equally important role in determining fertilization success. Here, we assess variation among ejaculates in three factors that may contribute to fertilization success (number of sperm per ejaculate, viability, and longevity), in a population of Peron’s tree frog ( Litoria peronii). We detected large variation among males in the number of sperm per ejaculate and the proportion of viable sperm within ejaculates, which could not be explained by variation in either male size or body condition. However, the proportion of viable sperm released by males increased over the season. Finally, we assessed sperm longevity (proportion viable sperm determined using a dual-fluorochrome vital dye) at two different temperatures. At 23°C, on average, 75% of sperm remained viable after 2 h, but there were significant differences amongst males with the percentage of viable sperm ranging from 43% to 95%. For sperm incubated at 4°C, ejaculates varied fivefold in sperm longevity with some males having 50% viable sperm after 5 days. Our data suggest that ejaculate characteristics (sperm number, viability, and longevity) vary widely in Peron’s tree frog and may therefore play an important role in determining siring success both in the presence and absence of sperm competition. We discuss the results in relation to selection on ejaculate traits via natural and sexual selection in this and other amphibians.

  8. Satellite-aided evaluation of population exposure to air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, W. J.; George, A. J., Jr.; Bryant, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation of population exposure to air pollution through the computer processing of Landsat digital land use data, along with total suspended particulate estimates and population data by census tracts, is demonstrated. Digital image processing was employed to analyze simultaneously data from Landsat MSS bands 4 through 7 in order to extract land use and land cover information. The three data sets were spatially registered in a digital format, compatible with integrated computer processing, and cross-tabulated. A map illustrating relative air quality by 2-sq km cells for the residential population in the Portland, Oregon area is obtained.

  9. Factors affecting outdoor exposure in winter: population-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Tiina M.; Raatikka, Veli-Pekka; Rytkönen, Mika; Jokelainen, Jari; Rintamäki, Hannu; Ruuhela, Reija; Näyhä, Simo; Hassi, Juhani

    2006-09-01

    The extent of outdoor exposure during winter and factors affecting it were examined in a cross-sectional population study in Finland. Men and women aged 25-74 years from the National FINRISK 2002 sub-study ( n=6,591) were queried about their average weekly occupational, leisure-time and total cold exposure during the past winter. The effects of gender, age, area of residence, occupation, ambient temperature, self-rated health, physical activity and education on cold exposure were analysed. The self-reported median total cold exposure time was 7 h/week (8 h men, 6 h women),<1 h/week (2 h men, 0 h women) at work, 4 h/week (5 h men, 4 h women) during leisure time and 1 h/week (1 h men, 1.5 h women) while commuting to work. Factors associated with increased occupational cold exposure among men were: being employed in agriculture, forestry and industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being less educated and being aged 55-64 years. Factors associated with increased leisure-time cold exposure among men were: employment in industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being a pensioner or unemployed, reporting at least average health, being physically active and having college or vocational education. Among women, being a housewife, pensioner or unemployed and engaged in physical activity increased leisure-time cold exposure, and young women were more exposed than older ones. Self-rated health was positively associated with leisure time cold exposure in men and only to a minor extent in women. In conclusion, the subjects reported spending 4% of their total time under cold exposure, most of it (71%) during leisure time. Both occupational and leisure-time cold exposure is greater among men than women.

  10. Inulin Supplementation Lowered the Metabolic Defects of Prolonged Exposure to Chlorpyrifos from Gestation to Young Adult Stage in Offspring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reygner, Julie; Lichtenberger, Lydia; Elmhiri, Ghada; Dou, Samir; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Rhazi, Larbi; Depeint, Flore; Bach, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organophosphorus insecticide, is involved in metabolic disorders. We assess the hypothesis whether supplementation with prebiotics from gestation to adulthood, through a modulation of microbiota composition and fermentative activity, alleviates CPF induced metabolic disorders of 60 days old offspring. 5 groups of Wistar rats, from gestation until weaning, received two doses of CPF pesticide: 1 mg/kg/day (CPF1) or 3.5 mg/kg/day (CPF3.5) with free access to inulin (10g/L in drinking water). Then male pups received the same treatment as dams. Metabolic profile, leptin sensitivity, insulin receptor (IR) expression in liver, gut microbiota composition and short chain fatty acid composition (SCFAs) in the colon, were analyzed at postnatal day 60 in the offspring (PND 60). CPF3.5 increased offspring’s birth body weight (BW) but decreased BW at PND60. Inulin supplementation restored the BW at PND 60 to control levels. Hyperinsulinemia and decrease in insulin receptor β in liver were seen in CPF1 exposed rats. In contrast, hyperglycemia and decrease in insulin level were found in CPF3.5 rats. Inulin restored the levels of some metabolic parameters in CPF groups to ranges comparable with the controls. The total bacterial population, short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and butyrate levels were enhanced in CPF groups receiving inulin. Our data indicate that developmental exposure to CPF interferes with metabolism with dose related effects evident at adulthood. By modulating microbiota population and fermentative activity, inulin corrected adult metabolic disorders of rats exposed to CPF during development. Prebiotics supply may be thus considered as a novel nutritional strategy to counteract insulin resistance and diabetes induced by a continuous pesticide exposure. PMID:27760213

  11. Exposure to indoor tanning in France: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tanning lamp sessions have increased in Europe in recent years. Recent epidemiological studies have confirmed a proven link between melanoma and artificial UV exposure. However, in France, little information is available to determine the exposure of the population. This article presents the results from the ‘Baromètre cancer 2010’ concerning the proportion of users exposed to artificial UV radiation in France, their characteristics and level of information on the risks associated. Methods A two stage random sampling telephone survey assisted by CATI system (household, individual) was performed from 3 April 2010 to 7 August 2010 on a sample of 3,359 people aged 15 to 75 years old. Results In 2010, 13.4% of the French population reported to have tanning lamp sessions at least once in their lifetime and 3.5% of the total population reported the use of artificial UV radiation over the last twelve months. Exposure over the last twelve months is most commonly seen among females (5.0%) and young population between 20–25 years old (9.6%). In addition, 3.5% of those under 18 years report having attended UV booths at least once during their lifetime even though they are forbidden to minors. Moreover, more than one the third of users reported more than 10 exposures within a year. The places of exposure cited most often were beauty salons (50%) and tanning centers (46%). Only 49.2% of those surveyed felt that they were well informed on the risks of cancer associated with UV booths. Furthermore, the population was found to have misconceptions about artificial UV radiation. One quarter of the population, believe that artificial UV radiation use before vacation protects the skin from sunburn. Conclusions This first study on artificial UV radiation exposure in France has better quantified and characterized the users. It has also defined the state of knowledge and the perception of risk by the general French population. This work will contribute to determine

  12. Cold exposure reveals two populations of microtubules in pulmonary endothelia

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Stevens, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules are composed of α-tubulin and β-tubulin dimers. Microtubules yield tubulin dimers when exposed to cold, which reassemble spontaneously to form microtubule fibers at 37°C. However, mammalian neurons, glial cells, and fibroblasts have cold-stable microtubules. While studying the microtubule toxicity mechanisms of the exotoxin Y from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, we observed that some endothelial microtubules were very difficult to disassemble in the cold. As a consequence, we designed studies to test the hypothesis that microvascular endothelium has a population of cold-stable microtubules. Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells (control) were grown under regular cell culture conditions, followed by exposure to an ice-cold water bath and a microtubule extraction protocol. Polymerized microtubules were detected by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analyses. After cold exposure, immunofluorescence revealed that the majority of HeLa cell microtubules disassembled, whereas a smaller population of endothelial cell microtubules disassembled. Immunoblot analyses showed that microvascular endothelial cells express the microtubule cold-stabilizing protein N-STOP (neuronal stable tubule-only polypeptides), and that N-STOP binds to endothelial microtubules after cold exposure, but not if microtubules are disassembled with nocodazole before cold exposure. Hence, pulmonary endothelia have a population of cold-stable microtubules. PMID:20971804

  13. Exposure assessment of particulate matter for susceptible populations in Seattle.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L-J Sally; Box, Michael; Kalman, David; Kaufman, Joel; Koenig, Jane; Larson, Tim; Lumley, Thomas; Sheppard, Lianne; Wallace, Lance

    2003-01-01

    In this article we present results from a 2-year comprehensive exposure assessment study that examined the particulate matter (PM) exposures and health effects in 108 individuals with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and asthma. The average personal exposures to PM with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 microm (PM2.5) were similar to the average outdoor PM2.5 concentrations but significantly higher than the average indoor concentrations. Personal PM2.5 exposures in our study groups were lower than those reported in other panel studies of susceptible populations. Indoor and outdoor PM2.5, PM10 (PM with aerodynamic diameters < 10 microm), and the ratio of PM2.5 to PM10 were significantly higher during the heating season. The increase in outdoor PM10 in winter was primarily due to an increase in the PM2.5 fraction. A similar seasonal variation was found for personal PM2.5. The high-risk subjects in our study engaged in an equal amount of dust-generating activities compared with the healthy elderly subjects. The children in the study experienced the highest indoor PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations. Personal PM2.5 exposures varied by study group, with elderly healthy and CHD subjects having the lowest exposures and asthmatic children having the highest exposures. Within study groups, the PM2.5 exposure varied depending on residence because of different particle infiltration efficiencies. Although we found a wide range of longitudinal correlations between central-site and personal PM2.5 measurements, the longitudinal r is closely related to the particle infiltration efficiency. PM2.5 exposures among the COPD and CHD subjects can be predicted with relatively good power with a microenvironmental model composed of three microenvironments. The prediction power is the lowest for the asthmatic children. PMID:12782491

  14. Modeling population exposures to outdoor sources of hazardous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ozkaynak, Halûk; Palma, Ted; Touma, Jawad S; Thurman, James

    2008-01-01

    Accurate assessment of human exposures is an important part of environmental health effects research. However, most air pollution epidemiology studies rely upon imperfect surrogates of personal exposures, such as information based on available central-site outdoor concentration monitoring or modeling data. In this paper, we examine the limitations of using outdoor concentration predictions instead of modeled personal exposures for over 30 gaseous and particulate hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the US. The analysis uses the results from an air quality dispersion model (the ASPEN or Assessment System for Population Exposure Nationwide model) and an inhalation exposure model (the HAPEM or Hazardous Air Pollutant Exposure Model, Version 5), applied by the US. Environmental protection Agency during the 1999 National Air Toxic Assessment (NATA) in the US. Our results show that the total predicted chronic exposure concentrations of outdoor HAPs from all sources are lower than the modeled ambient concentrations by about 20% on average for most gaseous HAPs and by about 60% on average for most particulate HAPs (mainly, due to the exclusion of indoor sources from our modeling analysis and lower infiltration of particles indoors). On the other hand, the HAPEM/ASPEN concentration ratio averages for onroad mobile source exposures were found to be greater than 1 (around 1.20) for most mobile-source related HAPs (e.g. 1, 3-butadiene, acetaldehyde, benzene, formaldehyde) reflecting the importance of near-roadway and commuting environments on personal exposures to HAPs. The distribution of the ratios of personal to ambient concentrations was found to be skewed for a number of the VOCs and reactive HAPs associated with major source emissions, indicating the importance of personal mobility factors. We conclude that the increase in personal exposures from the corresponding predicted ambient levels tends to occur near locations where there are either major emission sources of HAPs

  15. Changes in CR-39 proton sensitivity due to prolonged exposure to high vacuums relevant to the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Manuel, M J-E; Rosenberg, M J; Sinenian, N; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A B; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2011-09-01

    When used at facilities like OMEGA and the NIF, CR-39 is exposed to high vacuum environments before and after irradiation by charged particles and neutrons. Using an electrostatic linear accelerator at MIT, studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of high vacuum exposure on the sensitivity of CR-39 to fusion protons in the ~1-9 MeV energy range. High vacuum conditions, of order 10(-5) Torr, experienced by CR-39 samples at these facilities were emulated. It is shown that vacuum exposure times longer than ~16 h before proton irradiation result in a decrease in proton sensitivity, whereas no effect was observed for up to 67 h of vacuum exposure after proton irradiation. CR-39 sensitivity curves are presented for samples with prolonged exposure to high vacuum before and after proton irradiation.

  16. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Jolliet, Olivier; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Parker, Edith A.; Timothy Dvonch, J.; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  17. School Achievements, Behavioural Adjustments and Health at Nine Years of Age in a Population of Infants Who Were Born Preterm or Required Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohay, Heather; And Others

    The prevalence of subtle handicapping conditions, such as learning disabilities, behavior problems, and recurrent illness, in a population of 88 high-risk infants was investigated when the children reached 9 years of age. Infants had had birthweights of less than 1500 grams or had required prolonged mechanical ventilation in the neonatal period.…

  18. "Exposure Track"-The Impact of Mobile-Device-Based Mobility Patterns on Quantifying Population Exposure to Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Grauwin, Sebastian; Britter, Rex; Misstear, Bruce; McNabola, Aonghus; Laden, Francine; Barrett, Steven R H; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution is now recognized as the world's single largest environmental and human health threat. Indeed, a large number of environmental epidemiological studies have quantified the health impacts of population exposure to pollution. In previous studies, exposure estimates at the population level have not considered spatially- and temporally varying populations present in study regions. Therefore, in the first study of it is kind, we use measured population activity patterns representing several million people to evaluate population-weighted exposure to air pollution on a city-wide scale. Mobile and wireless devices yield information about where and when people are present, thus collective activity patterns were determined using counts of connections to the cellular network. Population-weighted exposure to PM2.5 in New York City (NYC), herein termed "Active Population Exposure" was evaluated using population activity patterns and spatiotemporal PM2.5 concentration levels, and compared to "Home Population Exposure", which assumed a static population distribution as per Census data. Areas of relatively higher population-weighted exposures were concentrated in different districts within NYC in both scenarios. These were more centralized for the "Active Population Exposure" scenario. Population-weighted exposure computed in each district of NYC for the "Active" scenario were found to be statistically significantly (p < 0.05) different to the "Home" scenario for most districts. In investigating the temporal variability of the "Active" population-weighted exposures determined in districts, these were found to be significantly different (p < 0.05) during the daytime and the nighttime. Evaluating population exposure to air pollution using spatiotemporal population mobility patterns warrants consideration in future environmental epidemiological studies linking air quality and human health. PMID:27518311

  19. "Exposure Track"-The Impact of Mobile-Device-Based Mobility Patterns on Quantifying Population Exposure to Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, Marguerite; Grauwin, Sebastian; Britter, Rex; Misstear, Bruce; McNabola, Aonghus; Laden, Francine; Barrett, Steven R H; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Air pollution is now recognized as the world's single largest environmental and human health threat. Indeed, a large number of environmental epidemiological studies have quantified the health impacts of population exposure to pollution. In previous studies, exposure estimates at the population level have not considered spatially- and temporally varying populations present in study regions. Therefore, in the first study of it is kind, we use measured population activity patterns representing several million people to evaluate population-weighted exposure to air pollution on a city-wide scale. Mobile and wireless devices yield information about where and when people are present, thus collective activity patterns were determined using counts of connections to the cellular network. Population-weighted exposure to PM2.5 in New York City (NYC), herein termed "Active Population Exposure" was evaluated using population activity patterns and spatiotemporal PM2.5 concentration levels, and compared to "Home Population Exposure", which assumed a static population distribution as per Census data. Areas of relatively higher population-weighted exposures were concentrated in different districts within NYC in both scenarios. These were more centralized for the "Active Population Exposure" scenario. Population-weighted exposure computed in each district of NYC for the "Active" scenario were found to be statistically significantly (p < 0.05) different to the "Home" scenario for most districts. In investigating the temporal variability of the "Active" population-weighted exposures determined in districts, these were found to be significantly different (p < 0.05) during the daytime and the nighttime. Evaluating population exposure to air pollution using spatiotemporal population mobility patterns warrants consideration in future environmental epidemiological studies linking air quality and human health.

  20. Prolonged L-alanine exposure induces changes in metabolism, Ca(2+) handling and desensitization of insulin secretion in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Neville H; Scullion, Siobhan M; Mion, Brian; Hewage, Chandralal; Malthouse, J Paul G; Flatt, Peter R; Newsholme, Philip; Brennan, Lorraine

    2009-02-01

    Acute insulin-releasing actions of amino acids have been studied in detail, but comparatively little is known about the beta-cell effects of long-term exposure to amino acids. The present study examined the effects of prolonged exposure of beta-cells to the metabolizable amino acid L-alanine. Basal insulin release or cellular insulin content were not significantly altered by alanine culture, but acute alanine-induced insulin secretion was suppressed by 74% (P<0.001). Acute stimulation of insulin secretion with glucose, KCl or KIC (2-oxoisocaproic acid) following alanine culture was not affected. Acute alanine exposure evoked strong cellular depolarization after control culture, whereas AUC (area under the curve) analysis revealed significant (P<0.01) suppression of this action after culture with alanine. Compared with control cells, prior exposure to alanine also markedly decreased (P<0.01) the acute elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) (intracellular [Ca(2+)]) induced by acute alanine exposure. These diminished stimulatory responses were partially restored after 18 h of culture in the absence of alanine, indicating reversible amino-acid-induced desensitization. (13)C NMR spectra revealed that alanine culture increased glutamate labelling at position C4 (by 60%; P<0.01), as a result of an increase in the singlet peak, indicating increased flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. Consistent with this, protein expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases PDK2 and PDK4 was significantly reduced. This was accompanied by a decrease in cellular ATP (P<0.05), consistent with diminished insulin-releasing actions of this amino acid. Collectively, these results illustrate the phenomenon of beta-cell desensitization by amino acids, indicating that prolonged exposure to alanine can induce reversible alterations to metabolic flux, Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion. PMID:18702613

  1. Dietary exposure to aluminium of the Hong Kong population.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waiky W K; Chung, Stephen W C; Kwong, K P; Yin Ho, Yuk; Xiao, Ying

    2010-04-01

    A total of 256 individual food samples were collected in Hong Kong for aluminium testing. Most of food samples were analysed in ready-to-eat form. High aluminium levels were found in steamed bread/bun/cake (mean: 100-320 mg kg(-1)), some bakery products such as muffin, pancake/waffle, coconut tart and cake (mean: 250, 160, 120 and 91 mg kg(-1), respectively), and jellyfish (ready-to-eat form) (mean: 1200 mg kg(-1)). The results demonstrated that aluminium-containing food additives have been widely used in these food products. The average dietary exposure to aluminium for a 60 kg adult was estimated to be 0.60 mg kg(-1) bw week(-1), which amounted to 60% of the new PTWI established by JECFA. The main dietary source was "steamed bread/bun/cake", which contributed to 60% of the total exposure, followed by "bakery products" and "jellyfish", which contributed to 23 and 10% of the total exposure, respectively. However, the estimation did not include the intake of aluminium from natural food sources, food contact materials or other sources (e.g. drinking water). Although the results indicated that aluminium it is unlikely to cause adverse health effect for the general population, the risk to some populations who regularly consume foods with aluminium-containing food additives cannot be ruled out.

  2. Metal induced inhalation exposure in urban population: A probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widziewicz, Kamila; Loska, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    The paper was aimed at assessing the health risk in the populations of three Silesian cities: Bielsko-Biała, Częstochowa and Katowice exposed to the inhalation intake of cadmium, nickel and arsenic present in airborne particulate matter. In order to establish how the exposure parameters affects risk a probabilistic risk assessment framework was used. The risk model was based on the results of the annual measurements of As, Cd and Ni concentrations in PM2.5 and the sets of data on the concentrations of those elements in PM10 collected by the Voivodship Inspectorate of Environmental Protection over 2012-2013 period. The risk was calculated as an incremental lifetime risk of cancer (ILCR) in particular age groups (infants, children, adults) following Monte Carlo approach. With the aim of depicting the effect the variability of exposure parameters exerts on the risk, the initial parameters of the risk model: metals concentrations, its infiltration into indoor environment, exposure duration, exposure frequency, lung deposition efficiency, daily lung ventilation and body weight were modeled as random variables. The distribution of inhalation cancer risk due to exposure to ambient metals concentrations was LN (1.80 × 10-6 ± 2.89 × 10-6) and LN (6.17 × 10-7 ± 1.08 × 10-6) for PM2.5 and PM10-bound metals respectively and did not exceed the permissible limit of the acceptable risk. The highest probability of contracting cancer was observed for Katowice residents exposed to PM2.5 - LN (2.01 × 10-6 ± 3.24 × 10-6). Across the tested age groups adults were approximately one order of magnitude at higher risk compared to infants. Sensitivity analysis showed that exposure duration (ED) and body weight (BW) were the two variables, which contributed the most to the ILCR.

  3. Genotoxic effects in the Eastern mudminnow (Umbra pygmaea) after prolonged exposure to River Rhine water, as assessed by use of the in vivo SCE and Comet assays.

    PubMed

    Penders, E J M; Spenkelink, A; Hoogenboezem, W; Rotteveel, S G P; Maas, J L; Alink, G M

    2012-05-01

    The production of drinking water from river water requires a certain minimal river water quality. The Association of River Rhine Water Works (RIWA), therefore, operates a monitoring network. In vitro mutagenicity studies have shown that the genotoxicity of the River Rhine water steadily decreased from 1981 until 2001. Compared to a study in 1978, a decrease in genotoxicity was also observed in an in vivo genotoxicity study in 2005, in which Eastern mudminnows (Umbra pygmaea) were exposed to River Rhine water, and gill cells were used for the Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE) test and the Comet assay. In this 2005 study, the in vivo genotoxicity increased upon extending exposure of the fish from 3 to 11 days. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate (i) whether new data corroborate that in vivo genotoxicity of River Rhine water is at present lower than in 1978, (ii) whether the Comet assay is a suitable alternative to the SCE assay, and (iii) whether further prolonged exposure results in a further increase in in vivo genotoxicity. The new data corroborate that in vivo genotoxicity of River Rhine water is at present lower than in 1978. The Comet assay is a useful addition but does not provide a substitute for the SCE endpoint in these in vivo genotoxicity studies. Prolonging the exposure time of Eastern mudminnows to River Rhine water from 11 to 42 days did not give a significant increase in SCEs and DNA damage (Comet assay) in gill cells.

  4. Electronic cigarette use and exposure in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Collaco, Joseph M; Drummond, M Bradley; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A

    2015-02-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has gained recent widespread popularity and acceptance in the general population. What effect e-cigarettes may have on pediatric health remains unknown. Although many jurisdictions have laws that prevent the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and the use of e-cigarettes in public places, infants, children, and adolescents are increasingly exposed to them. In this pediatric-focused review, we discuss the history of these devices, user demographics, known health effects, and current legislative efforts to protect minors from exposure.

  5. Electronic cigarette use and exposure in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Collaco, Joseph M; Drummond, M Bradley; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A

    2015-02-01

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has gained recent widespread popularity and acceptance in the general population. What effect e-cigarettes may have on pediatric health remains unknown. Although many jurisdictions have laws that prevent the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and the use of e-cigarettes in public places, infants, children, and adolescents are increasingly exposed to them. In this pediatric-focused review, we discuss the history of these devices, user demographics, known health effects, and current legislative efforts to protect minors from exposure. PMID:25546699

  6. Spatial aspects of building and population exposure data and their implications for global earthquake exposure modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dell’Acqua, F.; Gamba, P.; Jaiswal, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses spatial aspects of the global exposure dataset and mapping needs for earthquake risk assessment. We discuss this in the context of development of a Global Exposure Database for the Global Earthquake Model (GED4GEM), which requires compilation of a multi-scale inventory of assets at risk, for example, buildings, populations, and economic exposure. After defining the relevant spatial and geographic scales of interest, different procedures are proposed to disaggregate coarse-resolution data, to map them, and if necessary to infer missing data by using proxies. We discuss the advantages and limitations of these methodologies and detail the potentials of utilizing remote-sensing data. The latter is used especially to homogenize an existing coarser dataset and, where possible, replace it with detailed information extracted from remote sensing using the built-up indicators for different environments. Present research shows that the spatial aspects of earthquake risk computation are tightly connected with the availability of datasets of the resolution necessary for producing sufficiently detailed exposure. The global exposure database designed by the GED4GEM project is able to manage datasets and queries of multiple spatial scales.

  7. Cumulative dietary exposure of the population of Denmark to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Petersen, Annette; Nielsen, Elsa; Christensen, Tue; Poulsen, Mette Erecius; Andersen, Jens Hinge

    2015-09-01

    We used the Hazard Index (HI) method to carry out a cumulative risk assessment after chronic dietary exposure to all monitored pesticides in fruit, vegetables and cereals for various consumer groups in Denmark. Residue data for all the pesticides were obtained from the Danish monitoring programme during the period 2004-2011. Food consumption data were obtained from DANSDA (the DAnish National Survey of Diet and physical Activity) for the period 2005-2008. The calculations were made using three different models to cope with residues below the limit of reporting (LOR). We concluded that a model that included processing factors and set non-detects to ½ LOR, but limited the correction (Model 3), gave the most realistic exposure estimate. With Model 3 the HI was calculated to be 0.44 for children and 0.18 for adults, indicating that there is no risk of adverse health effects following chronic cumulative exposure to the pesticides found in fruit, vegetables and cereals on the Danish market. The HI was below 1 even for consumers who eat more than 550 g of fruit and vegetables per day, corresponding to 1/3 of the population. Choosing Danish-produced commodities whenever possible could reduce the HI by a factor of 2.

  8. A discrete-time analysis of the effects of more prolonged exposure to neighborhood poverty on the risk of smoking initiation by age 25.

    PubMed

    Kravitz-Wirtz, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that individuals who initiate smoking at younger ages are at increased risk for future tobacco dependence and continued use as well as for numerous smoking-attributable health problems. Identifying individual, household, and to a far lesser extent, contextual factors that predict early cigarette use has garnered considerable attention over the last several decades. However, the majority of scholarship in this area has been cross-sectional or conducted over relatively short windows of observation. Few studies have investigated the effects of more prolonged exposure to smoking-related risk factors, particularly neighborhood characteristics, from childhood through early adulthood. Using the 1970-2011 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics merged with census data on respondents' neighborhoods, this study estimates a series of race-specific discrete-time marginal structural logit models for the risk of smoking initiation as a function of neighborhood poverty, as well as individual and household characteristics, from ages four through 25. Neighborhood selection bias is addressed using inverse-probability-of-treatment weights. Results indicate that more prolonged exposure to high (>20%) as opposed to low (<10%) poverty neighborhoods is associated with an increased risk of smoking onset by age 25, although consistent with prior literature, this effect is only evident among white and not nonwhite youth and young adults.

  9. Effect and mechanism of waterborne prolonged Zn exposure influencing hepatic lipid metabolism in javelin goby Synechogobius hasta.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Luo, Zhi; Hogstrand, Christer; Chen, Feng; Shi, Xi; Chen, Qi-Liang; Song, Yu-Feng; Pan, Ya-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect and mechanism of waterborne Zn exposure influencing hepatic lipid deposition and metabolism in javelin goby Synechogobius hasta. S. hasta were exposed to four waterborne Zn concentrations (Zn 0.005 [control], 0.18, 0.36 and 0.55 mg l(-1) , respectively) for 60 days. Sampling occurred at days 20, 40 and 60, respectively. Zn exposure increased Zn content, declined hepatic lipid content and reduced viscerosomatic and hepatosomatic indices and lipogenic enzyme activities, including 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), malic enzyme (ME) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). At days 20 and 60, Zn exposure decreased hepatic mRNA levels of 6PGD, G6PD, ME, FAS, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)α, ACCβ, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)a, HSLb, sterol-regulator element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR)α and PPARγ. However, the mRNA levels of CPT 1 and adipose triglyceride lipase increased following Zn exposure. On day 40, Zn exposure reduced hepatic mRNA expression of 6PGD, G6PD, ME, FAS, ACCα, ACCβ, HSLa, HSLb, SREBP-1 and PPARγ but increased mRNA expression of CPT 1, adipose triglyceride lipase and PPARα. General speaking, Zn exposure reduced hepatic lipid content by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating lipolysis. For the first time, the present study provided evidence that chronic Zn exposure differentially influenced mRNA expression and activities of genes and enzymes involved in lipogenic and lipolytic metabolism in a duration-dependent manner, and provided new insight into the relationship between metal elements and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26602879

  10. Phenotypic variants of staphylococci and their underlying population distributions following exposure to stress.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Laura A; Hugh Dunstan, R; Roberts, Timothy K; Macdonald, Margaret M; Gottfries, Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether alterations in environmental conditions would induce the formation of small colony variant phenotypes (SCV) with associated changes in cell morphology and ultra-structure in S. aureus, s. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis. Wild-type clinical isolates were exposed to low temperature (4 °C), antibiotic stress (penicillin G and vancomycin; 0-10,000 µg mL(-1)), pH stress (pH 3-9) and osmotic challenge (NaCl concentrations of 0-20%). Changes in cell diameter, cell-wall thickness, and population distribution changes (n ≥ 300) were assessed via scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and compared to control populations. Our analyses found that prolonged exposure to all treatments resulted in the subsequent formation of SCV phenotypes. Observed SCVs manifested as minute colonies with reduced haemolysis and pigmentation (NaCl, pH and 4°C treatments), or complete lack thereof (antibiotic treatments). SEM comparison analyses revealed significantly smaller cell sizes for SCV populations except in S. aureus and S. epidermidis 10% NaCl, and S. epidermidis 4 °C (p<0.05). Shifts in population distribution patterns were also observed with distinct sub-populations of smaller cells appearing for S. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis. TEM analyses revealed significantly thicker cell-walls in all treatments and species except S. lugdunensis exposed to 4 °C. These findings suggest that staphylococci adapted to environmental stresses by altering their cell size and wall thickness which could represent the formation of altered phenotypes which facilitate survival under harsh conditions. The phenotypic response was governed by the type of prevailing environmental stress regime leading to appropriate alterations in ultra-structure and size, suggesting downstream changes in gene expression, the proteome, and metabolome.

  11. Phenotypic variants of staphylococci and their underlying population distributions following exposure to stress.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Laura A; Hugh Dunstan, R; Roberts, Timothy K; Macdonald, Margaret M; Gottfries, Johan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether alterations in environmental conditions would induce the formation of small colony variant phenotypes (SCV) with associated changes in cell morphology and ultra-structure in S. aureus, s. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis. Wild-type clinical isolates were exposed to low temperature (4 °C), antibiotic stress (penicillin G and vancomycin; 0-10,000 µg mL(-1)), pH stress (pH 3-9) and osmotic challenge (NaCl concentrations of 0-20%). Changes in cell diameter, cell-wall thickness, and population distribution changes (n ≥ 300) were assessed via scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and compared to control populations. Our analyses found that prolonged exposure to all treatments resulted in the subsequent formation of SCV phenotypes. Observed SCVs manifested as minute colonies with reduced haemolysis and pigmentation (NaCl, pH and 4°C treatments), or complete lack thereof (antibiotic treatments). SEM comparison analyses revealed significantly smaller cell sizes for SCV populations except in S. aureus and S. epidermidis 10% NaCl, and S. epidermidis 4 °C (p<0.05). Shifts in population distribution patterns were also observed with distinct sub-populations of smaller cells appearing for S. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis. TEM analyses revealed significantly thicker cell-walls in all treatments and species except S. lugdunensis exposed to 4 °C. These findings suggest that staphylococci adapted to environmental stresses by altering their cell size and wall thickness which could represent the formation of altered phenotypes which facilitate survival under harsh conditions. The phenotypic response was governed by the type of prevailing environmental stress regime leading to appropriate alterations in ultra-structure and size, suggesting downstream changes in gene expression, the proteome, and metabolome. PMID:24204894

  12. [Variability of DNA simple sequence repeats in peripheral blood of humans subjected to prolonged exposures of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Lomaeva, M G; Malakhova, L V; Zakharova, M L; Sokolova, S N; Fomenko, L A; Antipova, V N; Soboleva, I Iu; Bezlepkin, V G; Kirillova, E N; Gaziev, A I

    2013-01-01

    Long-term post-radiation changes in the level of microsatellite DNA polymorphism in peripheral blood of the male "Mayak" employees (Ozyorsk, Russia), who had been exposed to prolonged gamma-irradiation during professional activities, were studied. DNA samples were obtained from the Radiobiology Repository of Human Tissue (Southern-Urals Biophysics Institute FMBA) and used as templates for arbitrarily primed PCR. Comparative analysis of the obtained samples of DNA fragments showed a significant increase in the number of high-molecular fragments and reduction in the number of amplified low molecular weight DNA fragments in comparison with the control. However, a direct correlation of the level of DNA polymorphism with the accumulated total dose of radiation was not found. The study of the polymorphism of microsatellite DNA repeats can be used for qualitative assessment of the levels of genetic variability.

  13. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE.

  14. Prolonged exposure to low doses of ozone: short- and long-term changes in behavioral performance in mice.

    PubMed

    Sorace, A; de Acetis, L; Alleva, E; Santucci, D

    2001-02-01

    Two separate experiments were designed to assess the effects of ozone exposure on outbred CD-1 mice. In the first experiment, adult males were exposed continuously to O3 at 0, 0.3, or 0.6 ppm for 30 days and their behavior was assessed in a 5-min open-field test on exposure days 4 and 19 and on day 3 after the end of the exposure phase. In addition, mice performed a Morris water maze task from exposure day 24 to 28. In the second experiment, adult females were exposed from 30 days prior to the formation of breeding pairs until gestational day 17 to the same doses used in the first experiment. Litters were fostered at birth to untreated dams and neurobehavioral development of the offspring was investigated until adulthood. Specifically, somatic and sensorimotor development [postnatal day (PND) 2-20], homing performance (PND 12), motor activity (PND 21), passive avoidance (PND 22-23), water maze performances (PND 70-74), and response to a nociceptive stimulus (PND 100) were assessed. Results from both experiments confirm that exposure to O3 slightly but selectively affected neurobehavioral performance in rodents. Exposure to O3 did not grossly affect neurobehavioral development, whereas it consistently impaired reversal learning in the Morris water maze test in both prenatally and adult exposed mice. Moreover, longer latency to step-through in the first trial of the passive avoidance test and a decrease in wall rearing in the hot-plate test were recorded in O3 prenatally exposed mice. Except for the first open-field test, altered responses were observed only in animals exposed at the intermediate concentration of the gas. Adaptation and/or onset of compensatory mechanisms might be responsible for the lack of linear dose-response relationships.

  15. Prolonged inorganic arsenite exposure suppresses insulin-stimulated AKT S473 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes: Involvement of the adaptive antioxidant response

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Zhang, Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Yarborough, Kathy; Liu, Huiyu; Sun, Guifan; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} In 3T3-L1 adipocytes iAs{sup 3+} decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} attenuates insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT S473. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} activates the cellular adaptive oxidative stress response. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} impairs insulin-stimulated ROS signaling. {yields} iAs{sup 3+} decreases expression of adipogenic genes and GLUT4. -- Abstract: There is growing evidence that chronic exposure of humans to inorganic arsenic, a potent environmental oxidative stressor, is associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). One critical feature of T2D is insulin resistance in peripheral tissues, especially in mature adipocytes, the hallmark of which is decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (ISGU). Despite the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), they have been recognized as a second messenger serving an intracellular signaling role for insulin action. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a central transcription factor regulating cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. This study proposes that in response to arsenic exposure, the NRF2-mediated adaptive induction of endogenous antioxidant enzymes blunts insulin-stimulated ROS signaling and thus impairs ISGU. Exposure of differentiated 3T3-L1 cells to low-level (up to 2 {mu}M) inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) led to decreased ISGU in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Concomitant to the impairment of ISGU, iAs{sup 3+} exposure significantly attenuated insulin-stimulated intracellular ROS accumulation and AKT S473 phosphorylation, which could be attributed to the activation of NRF2 and induction of a battery of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. In addition, prolonged iAs{sup 3+} exposure of 3T3-L1 adipocytes resulted in significant induction of inflammatory response genes and decreased expression of adipogenic genes and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4), suggesting chronic inflammation and reduction in GLUT4

  16. A transient increase in lipid peroxidation primes preadipocytes for delayed mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization and ATP depletion during prolonged exposure to fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Carlyle; Davis, Barbara; Neufer, P. Darrell; Murphy, Michael P.; Anderson, Ethan J; Robidoux, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Preadipocytes are periodically subjected to fatty acid (FA) concentrations that are potentially cytotoxic. We tested the hypothesis that prolonged exposure of preadipocytes of human origin to a physiologically relevant mix of FAs leads to mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) permeabilization and ultimately to mitochondrial crisis. We found that exposure of preadipocytes to FAs led to progressive cyclosporin A-sensitive MIM permeabilization, which in turn caused reduction in MIM potential (ΔΨM), oxygen consumption, ATP synthetic capacity, and ultimately death. Additionally, we showed that FAs induce a transient increase in intramitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxide production lasting roughly 30 and 120 minutes for the ROS and lipid peroxides, respectively. MIM permeabilization and its deleterious consequences including mitochondrial crisis and cell death were prevented by treating the cells with the mitochondrial FA uptake inhibitor, Etomoxir; the mitochondrion selective superoxide and lipid peroxide antioxidants, MitoTempo and MitoQ; or the lipid peroxide and reactive carbonyl scavenger, L-carnosine. FAs also promoted a delayed oxidative stress phase. However, since the beneficial effects of Etomoxir, MitoTempo and L-carnosine were lost by delaying the treatment by 2 hours, it suggested that the initial phase was sufficient to prime the cells for the delayed MIM permeabilization and mitochondrial crisis. It also suggested that the second ROS production phase is a consequence of this loss in mitochondrial health. Altogether, our data suggest that approaches designed to diminish intramitochondrial ROS or lipid peroxide accumulation as well as MIM permeabilization, are valid mechanism-based therapeutic avenues to prevent the loss in preadipocyte metabolic fitness associated with prolonged exposure to elevated FA levels. PMID:24269897

  17. EXPOSURE OF THE SWISS POPULATION BY RADIODIAGNOSTICS: 2013 REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Le Coultre, Régis; Bize, Julie; Champendal, Mélanie; Wittwer, David; Ryckx, Nick; Aroua, Abbas; Trueb, Philipp; Verdun, Francis R.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, a nationwide investigation was conducted in Switzerland to establish the population's exposure from medical X rays. A hybrid approach was used combining the Raddose database accessible on-line by the participating practices and the Swiss medical tariffication system for hospitals. This study revealed that the average annual number of examinations is 1.2 per inhabitant, and the associated annual effective dose is 1.4 mSv. It also showed that computed tomography is the most irradiating modality and that it delivers 70 % of the total dose. The annual effective dose per inhabitant registered a 17 % increase in 5 y and is comparable with what was recently reported in neighbouring countries. PMID:26541187

  18. The Challenges of Limiting Exposure to THS in Vulnerable Populations.

    PubMed

    Samet, Jonathan M; Chanson, Dayana; Wipfli, Heather

    2015-09-01

    Research on active smoking and secondhand smoke exposure has led to policy changes to protect individuals from the adverse health impacts of tobacco smoke. Despite the extensive literature on tobacco, only recently has there been recognition that long-lived tobacco smoke components (known as "thirdhand smoke" or THS) in indoor environments where smoking has taken place may have adverse health consequences. This paper describes THS and addresses the challenges of limiting exposure to THS in vulnerable populations (e.g., nonsmokers and young children). We conducted a limited survey of key stakeholders in the Los Angeles area to better understand approaches to address THS in the real estate and automobile industries. Most respondents indicated concerns about past smoking for property value and reported using various techniques to eliminate THS. We consider examples of other pollutants as case studies, including radon, asbestos, and lead, to help frame policy directions for THS. Based on the information collected from stakeholders and the case studies, we offer policy approaches to managing THS. PMID:26231499

  19. PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PM: THE IMPORTANCE OF MICROENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS AND HUMAN ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) models being developed by the US EPA/NERL use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposures to pollutants. The SHEDS model for particulate matter (SHEDS-PM) estimates the population distribution of PM exposure...

  20. A PROBABILISTIC POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PM10 AND PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    A first generation probabilistic population exposure model for Particulate Matter (PM), specifically for predicting PM10, and PM2.5, exposures of an urban, population has been developed. This model is intended to be used to predict exposure (magnitude, frequency, and duration) ...

  1. Prolonged abstinence from developmental cocaine exposure dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the medial prefrontal cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Giuseppe; Caffino, Lucia; Calabrese, Francesca; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Although evidence exists that chronic cocaine exposure during adulthood is associated with changes in BDNF expression, whether and how cocaine exposure during adolescence modulates BDNF is still unknown. To address this issue, we exposed rats to repeated cocaine injections from post-natal day (PD) 28 to PD 42, a period that roughly approximates adolescence in humans, and we carried out a detailed analysis of the BDNF system in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats sacrificed 3 d (PD 45) and 48 d (PD 90) after the last cocaine treatment. We found that developmental exposure to cocaine altered transcriptional and translational mechanisms governing neurotrophin expression. Total BDNF mRNA levels, in fact, were enhanced in the mPFC of PD 90 rats exposed to cocaine in adolescence, an effect sustained by changes in BDNF exon IV through the transcription factors CaRF and NF-kB. While a profound reduction of specific BDNF-related miRNAs (let7d, miR124 and miR132) may contribute to explaining the increased proBDNF levels, the up-regulation of the extracellular proteases tPA is indicative of increased processing leading to higher levels of released mBDNF. These changes were associated with increased activation of the trkB-Akt pathway resulting in enhanced pmTOR and pS6 kinase, which ultimately produced an up-regulation of Arc and a consequent reduction of GluA1 expression in the mPFC of PD 90 cocaine-treated rats. These findings demonstrate that developmental exposure to cocaine dynamically dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the mPFC of adult rats, providing novel mechanisms that may contribute to cocaine-induced changes in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24345425

  2. Prolonged abstinence from developmental cocaine exposure dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the medial prefrontal cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Giuseppe; Caffino, Lucia; Calabrese, Francesca; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Although evidence exists that chronic cocaine exposure during adulthood is associated with changes in BDNF expression, whether and how cocaine exposure during adolescence modulates BDNF is still unknown. To address this issue, we exposed rats to repeated cocaine injections from post-natal day (PD) 28 to PD 42, a period that roughly approximates adolescence in humans, and we carried out a detailed analysis of the BDNF system in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats sacrificed 3 d (PD 45) and 48 d (PD 90) after the last cocaine treatment. We found that developmental exposure to cocaine altered transcriptional and translational mechanisms governing neurotrophin expression. Total BDNF mRNA levels, in fact, were enhanced in the mPFC of PD 90 rats exposed to cocaine in adolescence, an effect sustained by changes in BDNF exon IV through the transcription factors CaRF and NF-kB. While a profound reduction of specific BDNF-related miRNAs (let7d, miR124 and miR132) may contribute to explaining the increased proBDNF levels, the up-regulation of the extracellular proteases tPA is indicative of increased processing leading to higher levels of released mBDNF. These changes were associated with increased activation of the trkB-Akt pathway resulting in enhanced pmTOR and pS6 kinase, which ultimately produced an up-regulation of Arc and a consequent reduction of GluA1 expression in the mPFC of PD 90 cocaine-treated rats. These findings demonstrate that developmental exposure to cocaine dynamically dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the mPFC of adult rats, providing novel mechanisms that may contribute to cocaine-induced changes in synaptic plasticity.

  3. Prolonged Exposure to HIV Reinforces a Poised Epigenetic Program for PD-1 Expression in Virus-specific CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Youngblood, Ben; Noto, Alessandra; Porichis, Filippos; Akondy, Rama S.; Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Austin, James W.; Bordi, Rebeka; Procopio, Francesco A.; Miura, Toshiyuki; Allen, Todd M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Walker, Bruce D.; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M.; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Kaufmann, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific CD8 T cells play a critical role in controlling HIV infection but eventually lose antiviral functions in part because of expression and signaling through the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. To better understand the impact of prolonged TCR ligation on regulation of PD-1 expression in HIV-specific CD8 T cells we investigated the capacity of virus-specific CD8 T cells to modify the PD-1 epigenetic program following reduction in viral load. We observed that the transcriptional regulatory region was unmethylated in the PD-1hi HIV-specific CD8 T cells while it remained methylated in donor matched naïve cells at acute and chronic stages of infection. Surprisingly, the PD-1 promoter remained unmethylated in HIV-specific CD8 T cells from subjects with a viral load controlled by antiviral therapy for greater than 2 years or from elite controllers. Together these data demonstrate that the epigenetic program at the PD-1 locus becomes fixed following prolonged exposure to HIV virus. PMID:23772031

  4. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODEL FOR AIR TOXICS: A BENZENE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing a human exposure and dose model called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) to characterize population exposure to air toxics in support of the National Air ...

  5. Changes in pulmonary function and airway reactivity due to prolonged exposure to typical ambient ozone (O/sub 3/) levels

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, D.; McConnell, W.; Folinsbee, L.; Abdul-Salaam, S.; Ives, P.

    1988-05-01

    Daily ambient ozone levels between 0.08 and 0.12 ppm for periods exceeding 6 hours often occur in many urban, suburban, and rural areas of the United States and Europe. Substantial decrements in pulmonary functions, moderate to severe respiratory symptoms, and increased airway reactivity have been observed in young men performing moderate to heavy exercise. This study evaluates pulmonary responses of 22 healthy nonsmoking males, resulting from exposures to 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 ppm ozone.

  6. Influenza exposure in United States feral swine populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, J.S.; Minnis, R.B.; Campbell, T.A.; Barras, S.; DeYoung, R.W.; Pabilonia, K.; Avery, M.L.; Sullivan, H.; Clark, L.; McLean, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Swine play an important role in the disease ecology of influenza. Having cellular receptors in common with birds and humans, swine provide opportunities for mixed infections and potential for genetic reassortment between avian, human, and porcine influenza. Feral swine populations are rapidly expanding in both numbers and range and are increasingly coming into contact with waterfowl, humans, and agricultural operations. In this study, over 875 feral swine were sampled from six states across the United States for serologic evidence of exposure to influenza. In Oklahoma, Florida, and Missouri, USA, no seropositive feral swine were detected. Seropositive swine were detected in California, Mississippi, and Texas, USA. Antibody prevalences in these states were 1% in Mississippi, 5% in California, and 14.4% in Texas. All seropositive swine were exposed to H3N2 subtype, the predominant subtype currently circulating in domestic swine. The only exceptions were in San Saba County, Texas, where of the 15 seropositive samples, four were positive for H1N1 and seven for both H1N1 and H3N2. In Texas, there was large geographical and temporal variation in antibody prevalence and no obvious connection to domestic swine operations. No evidence of exposure to avian influenza in feral swine was uncovered. From these results it is apparent that influenza in feral swine poses a risk primarily to swine production operations. However, because feral swine share habitat with waterfowl, prey on and scavenge dead and dying birds, are highly mobile, and are increasingly coming into contact with humans, the potential for these animals to become infected with avian or human influenza in addition to swine influenza is a distinct possibility. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  7. MODELING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO OUTDOOR SOURCES OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate assessment of human exposures is an important part of environmental health effects research. However, most air pollution epidemiology studies rely upon imperfect surrogates of personal exposures, such as information based on available central-site outdoor concentration ...

  8. A PROBABILISTIC MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is modifying their probabilistic Stochastic Human Exposure Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model to assess aggregate exposures to air toxics. Air toxics include urban Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPS) such as benzene from mobile sources, part...

  9. Exposure Assessment of the Tehran Population (Iran) to Zearalenone Mycotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Hassan; Zarghi, Afshin; Shafaati, Ali Reza; Foroutan, Seyyed Mohsen; Aboul-Fathi, Farshid; Khoddam, Arash; Nazari, Firoozeh

    2012-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) mycotoxin is a potent estrogenic metabolite. It is the primary toxin causing infertility, abortion or other breeding problems. A HPLC method was validated for ZEA in foods using a monolithic column with sample clean-up on an immunoaffinity column. A certified reference material (CRM) from FAPAS (UK) was analyzed. A survey of ZEA was performed on the 72 samples of rice, bread, puffed corn snack and wheat flour collected from Tehran retail market. The average recovery and coefficient of variation in different foods ranged 92.7-107.1 and 4.9-13.8%, respectively. The amount of ZEA in corn CRM was in the acceptable range of FAPAS. The limit of quantification was 3 ng/g for rice, bread and wheat flour and 2.7 ng/g for puffed corn snack. The retention time of zearalenone was 2.6 min. All samples had contamination level lower than the maximum tolerated level of ZEA in foods in Iran. The mean intake of ZEA from all samples was much lower than the tolerable daily intake estimated by JECFA. This is the first survey on ZEA contamination in bread and rice in Iran as well as the first study on exposure assessment of Tehran population to ZEA. PMID:24250447

  10. Inferring Population Exposure from Biomonitoring Data on Urinary Concentrations (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biomonitoring studies such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) are valuable to exposure assessment both as sources of data to evaluate exposure models and as training sets to develop heuristics for rapid-exposure-assessment tools. However, linking in...

  11. Effect of prolonged isothermal exposure on elevated-temperature, time-dependent fatigue-crack propagation in INCONEL alloy 783

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Longzhou; Chang, Keh-Minn; Mannan, Sarwan K.; Patel, Shailesh J.

    2002-11-01

    The effect of isothermal exposure on the elevated-temperature, time-dependent fatigue-crack propagation (FCP) in INCONEL Alloy 783 is investigated. Commercially produced Alloy 783 was annealed and aged following the standard heat-treatment procedure. One set of specimens was then isothermally exposed at 500 °C for 3000 hours. All specimens were subjected to FCP tests with various hold-time periods and sustained-loading crack-growth tests at 538 °C and 650 °C in a laboratory-air environment. Without a hold time, the as-produced and isothermally exposed materials had comparable FCP rates at both test temperatures. With hold times of 100 and 300 seconds, the as-produced and isothermally exposed specimens had comparable FCP rates at 538 °C. Hold-time testing of the as-produced material at 650 °C showed abnormal time-dependent FCP and sustained-loading crack-growth retardation. However, hold-time testing of isothermally exposed material at 650 °C showed the steady sustained-loading crack growth and fully time-dependent FCP typically observed in many superalloys. Comparison with Alloy 718 data from the literature shows that FCP rates of as-produced Alloy 718 and isothermally exposed Alloy 783 are comparable at 650 °C. A fully time-dependent FCP model based on the damage-zone concept and a thermal-activation equation is proposed to characterize the FCP behaviors.

  12. Influence of diabetes mellitus type 2 and prolonged estrogen exposure on risk of breast cancer among women in Armenia.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, Lilit; Scharpf, Robert; Kagan, Sarah

    2011-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and breast cancer (BrCa) are prevalent in Armenia. We investigated DM2, reproductive factors, and BrCa in a case control study of 302 women. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed DM2 increased adjusted odds of BrCa by 5.53 (95% CI 1.34-22.81). Any birth was protective (adjusted OR=0.36, 95% CI 0.20-0.66). Each year delay in first pregnancy increased risk (adjusted OR=1.13, 95% CI 1.01-1.27) as did induced abortions (adjusted OR=2.86, 95% CI 1.02-8.04). Odds ratios were adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI), which confounded associations between DM2 and BrCa. We suggest our findings imply the need for further investigation in Armenian and in other populations with similar characteristics.

  13. Conservation of body calcium by increased dietary intake of potassium: A potential measure to reduce the osteoporosis process during prolonged exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nechay, Bohdan R.

    1989-01-01

    During the 1988 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, it was proposed that the loss of skeletal calcium upon prolonged exposure to microgravity could be explained, in part, by a renal maladjustment characterized by an increased urinary excretion of calcium. It was theorized that because the conservation of body fluids and electrolytes depends upon the energy of adenosine triphosphate and enzymes that control the use of its energy for renal ion transport, an induction of renal sodium and potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na + K ATPase) by oral loading with potassium would increase the reabsorption of sodium directly and that of calcium indirectly, leading to improved hydration and to reduced calcium loss. Preliminary studies showed the following. Rats drinking water containing 0.2 M potassium chloride for six to 13 days excreted in urine 22 muEq of calcium and 135 muEq of sodium per 100 grams of body weight per day. The corresponding values for control rats drinking tap water were 43 muEq and 269 muEq respectively. Renal Na + K ATPase activity in potassium loaded rats was higher than in controls. Thus, oral potassium loading resulted in increased Na + K ATPase activity and diminished urinary excretion of calcium and of sodium as predicted by the hypothesis. An extension of these studies to humans has the potential of resulting in development of harmless, non-invasive, drug-free, convenient measures to reduce bone loss and other electrolyte and fluid problems in space travelers exposed to prolonged periods of microgravity.

  14. Beta-lactam antibiotic-induced platelet dysfunction: Evidence for irreversible inhibition of platelet activation in vitro and in vivo after prolonged exposure to penicillin

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, S.F.; Johnson, G.J. )

    1990-04-01

    beta-Lactam antibiotics cause platelet dysfunction with bleeding complications. Previous in vitro studies documented reversible inhibition of agonist-receptor interaction. This mechanism is inadequate to explain the effect of beta-lactam antibiotics in vivo. Platelet function does not return to normal immediately after drug treatment, implying irreversible inhibition of platelet function. We report here evidence of irreversible platelet functional and biochemical abnormalities after in vitro and in vivo exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics. Irreversible binding of (14C)-penicillin (Pen) occurred in vitro. After 24 hours' in vitro incubation with 10 to 20 mmol/L Pen, or ex vivo after antibiotic treatment, irreversible functional impairment occurred; but no irreversible inhibition of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, measured with (3H)-yohimbine, or high-affinity thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptors, measured with agonist (3H)-U46619 and antagonist (3H)-SQ29548, occurred. However, low-affinity platelet TXA2/PGH2 receptors were decreased 40% after Pen exposure in vitro or in vivo, indicating irreversible membrane alteration. Two postreceptor biochemical events were irreversibly inhibited in platelets incubated with Pen for 24 hours in vitro or ex vivo after antibiotic treatment. Thromboxane synthesis was inhibited 28.3% to 81.7%. Agonist-induced rises in cytosolic calcium ((Ca2+)i) were inhibited 40.1% to 67.5% in vitro and 26.6% to 52.2% ex vivo. Therefore, Pen binds to platelets after prolonged exposure, resulting in irreversible dysfunction attributable to inhibition of TXA2 synthesis and impairment of the rise in (Ca2+)i. The loss of low-affinity TXA2/PGH2 receptors suggests that the primary site of action of these drugs is on the platelet membrane.

  15. Prolonged nicotine exposure down-regulates presynaptic NMDA receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Alessia; Zappettini, Stefania; Grilli, Massimo; Olivero, Guendalina; Agostinho, Paula; Tomé, Angelo R; Chen, Jiayang; Pittaluga, Anna; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Marchi, Mario

    2014-04-01

    The presynaptic control of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by glutamate and acetylcholine has a profound impact on reward signaling. Here we provide immunocytochemical and neurochemical evidence supporting the co-localization and functional interaction between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors in dopaminergic terminals of the NAc. Most NAc dopaminergic terminals possessed the nAChR α4 subunit and the pre-exposure of synaptosomes to nicotine (30 μM) or to the α4β2-containing nAChR agonist 5IA85380 (10 nM) selectively inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked, but not the 4-aminopyridine (10 μM)-evoked, [(3)H] dopamine outflow; this inhibition was blunted by mecamylamine (10 μM). Nicotine and 5IA85380 pretreatment also inhibited the NMDA (100 μM)-evoked increase of calcium levels in single nerve terminals, an effect prevented by dihydro-β-erythroidine (1 μM). This supports a functional interaction between α4β2-containing nAChR and NMDA receptors within the same terminal, as supported by the immunocytochemical co-localization of α4 and GluN1 subunits in individual NAc dopaminergic terminals. The NMDA-evoked [(3)H]dopamine outflow was blocked by MK801 (1 μM) and inhibited by the selective GluN2B-selective antagonists ifenprodil (1 μM) and RO 25-6981 (1 μM), but not by the GluN2A-preferring antagonists CPP-19755 (1 μM) and ZnCl2 (1 nM). Notably, nicotine pretreatment significantly decreased the density of biotin-tagged GluN2B proteins in NAc synaptosomes. These results show that nAChRs dynamically and negatively regulate NMDA receptors in NAc dopaminergic terminals through the internalization of GluN2B receptors.

  16. Importance of respiratory exposure to pesticides among agricultural populations.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Kathryn C; Seiber, James N

    2002-01-01

    In the majority of cases, respiratory exposure accounts for a small fraction of total body exposure to pesticides; however, higher volatility pesticides pose a greater risk for exposure, particularly in enclosed spaces and near application sites. In 2000, nearly 22 million pounds of active ingredients designated as toxic air contaminants (TACs) were applied as pesticides in California (combined agricultural and reportable non-agricultural uses; California Department of Pesticide Regulation, 2001a, Summary of Pesticide Use Report Data, 2000, Sacramento, CA: author). Agricultural workers and agricultural community residents are at particular risk for exposure to these compounds. The TAC program in California, and more recently the federal Clean Air Act amendments, have begun to address the exposures of these groups and have promulgated exposure guidelines that are, in general, much more stringent than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) worker exposure guidelines. Choosing lower volatility pesticides, lower concentrations of active ingredients, and handling equipment designed to minimize exposure can often reduce worker respiratory exposures significantly. The use of personal protective equipment, which would be facilitated by the development of more ergonomic alternatives, is important in these higher respiratory exposure situations. Finally, in the case of community residents, measures taken to protect workers often translate to lower ambient air concentrations, but further study and development of buffer zones and application controls in a given area are necessary to assure community protection.

  17. Exposure of Prague's homeless population to lead and cadmium, compared to Prague's general population.

    PubMed

    Hrncírová, Dana; Batáriová, Andrea; Cerná, Milena; Procházka, Bohumír; Dlouhý, Pavel; Andel, Michal

    2008-10-01

    Homelessness is a growing problem in the Czech Republic where homeless people represent a specific minority group beset by many problems linked to their divergent lifestyle. It was therefore expected that the homeless population would be at greater risk of exposure to environmental pollutants than the general population. The aim of our study was to compare blood lead (B-Pb) and blood cadmium (B-Cd) levels in the homeless population (HP) with those obtained from the Human Biomonitoring Project (CZ-HBM), which used blood donors considered representative of the general population (GP). We present data obtained between 2004 and 2006 for B-Pb and B-Cd in 257 Prague homeless adults and compare them to B-Pb and B-Cd levels in 104 Prague adult blood donors from the CZ-HBM project in 2005. The mean (geometric) B-Pb levels in men were 36.5 (HP) and 35.4microg/l (GP), which is not significantly different. However, statistically significant differences were observed between men and women in the GP (P<0.001), but not in HP; B-Pb levels in women (34.8microg/l) did not differ from those of HP men (36.5microg/l), but were significantly (P<0.001) higher than those of GP women (25.8microg/l). B-Pb levels were not influenced by smoking. B-Cd levels in the homeless nonsmokers (geometric means 1.06 and 1.18microg/l in men and women, respectively) were more than 2.5 times higher than in the nonsmoking GP (0.36 and 0.38microg/l for men and women, respectively). B-Cd levels were significantly (P<0.001) influenced by smoking in both groups, but, surprisingly, the values in GP smokers (men=0.96microg/l, women=0.93microg/l) were lower than those in HP nonsmokers (men=1.06microg/l, women=1.18microg/l). A positive correlation was found between cadmium and lead in both men (P<0.05) and women (P<0.01). Our results indicate that the homeless population under study might be exposed to lead and cadmium more extensively than the general population of Prague and that homeless women represent a

  18. An Upper Bound for Population Exposure Variability (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tools for the rapid assessment of exposure potential are needed in order to put the results of rapidly-applied tools for assessing biological activity, such as ToxCast® and other high throughput methodologies, into a quantitative exposure context. The ExpoCast models (Wambaugh et...

  19. Population Based Exposure Assessment of Bioaccessible Arsenic in Carrots

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two predominant arsenic exposure routes are food and water. Estimating the risk from dietary exposures is complicated, owing to the chemical form dependent toxicity of arsenic and the diversity of arsenicals present in dietary matrices. Two aspects of assessing dietary expo...

  20. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT OF PARTICULATE MATTER FOR SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS IN SEATTLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this article we present results from a 2-year comprehensive exposure assessment study that examined the particulate matter (PM) exposures and health effects in 108 individuals with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and as...

  1. The impact of prolonged exposure on PTSD symptoms and associated psychopathology in people living with HIV: a randomized test of concept.

    PubMed

    Pacella, Maria L; Armelie, Aaron; Boarts, Jessica; Wagner, Glenn; Jones, Tracy; Feeny, Norah; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2012-07-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) report elevated levels of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (PTSS) and associated comorbidities. The present study tested the efficacy of prolonged exposure (PE) at reducing PTSS, depression, negative posttraumatic cognitions, and substance use in PLWH. Participants were randomly assigned to receive PE (n = 40) or to a weekly monitoring control group (n = 25). Assessments occurred at baseline, post-intervention and 3-months post-treatment. Following the 3-month assessment, controls were offered the intervention. All PE recipients (whether originally from the PE or control group) completed a 6-month assessment. Intent-to-treat mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted through 3-months post-treatment; within group analyses were conducted through 6-months. PE recipients reported fewer PTSS and negative posttraumatic cognitions and were more likely to achieve good end-state functioning; gains were maintained at 6-months. No between-group differences emerged for substance use. Overall, results support the efficacy of PE in PLWH.

  2. Mechanisms of Change in Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Preliminary Evidence for the Differential Effects of Hopelessness and Habituation

    PubMed Central

    Resick, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined two potential mechanisms of change, hopelessness cognitions and habituation, in a randomized controlled trial of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) and prolonged exposure therapy (PE) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Participants were 171 adult women with a current primary diagnosis of sexual assault related PTSD. The potential mechanisms were examined by evaluating the intraindividual change in hopelessness within the course of both treatments and subjective units distress (SUDS) ratings (a proxy for habituation) within the course of PE. The effects of intraindividual change in the proposed mechanisms were then examined on within-treatment changes in PTSD symptoms. Findings indicated that the participants assigned to the CPT treatment had significantly greater pre-post reductions in hopelessness than those assigned to PE and that the changes in hopelessness predicted changes in PTSD symptoms (R2 = .24). Intraindividual changes in SUDS ratings for participants in the PE treatment condition also predicted changes in PTSD symptoms and did so independently of the effect of changes in hopelessness. Future research should examine these mechanisms using more intensive methods of data collection that would permit the demonstration of temporality of change. PMID:24363472

  3. The Induction of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha , Supeoxide Anion, Myeloperoxidase, and Superoxide Dismutase in the Peritoneal Lavage Cells of Mice after Prolonged Exposure to Dichloroacetate and Trichloroacetate

    PubMed Central

    Spildener, Jessica; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    The induction of phagocytic activation in response to prolonged treatment with different doses of dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) has been investigated in mice. Groups of B6C3F1 male mice were administered 7.7, 77, 154 and 410 mg of DCA or TCA/ kg/day , post orally, for 4- and 13-weeks. Peritoneal lavage cells (PLCs) were isolated and assayed for the different biomarkers of phagocytyic activation, including superoxide anion (SA), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In addition, the role of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the SA production was also assessed. DCA and TCA produced significant and dose-dependent increases in SA and TNF-α production and in MPO activity but the increases in response to the high doses of the compounds (> 77 mg/kg/day) in the 13-week treatment period were less significant than those produced in the 4-week treatment period. Also, dose-dependent increases in SOD activity were observed in both periods of treatments. In general, the results demonstrate significant induction of the biomarkers of phagocytic activation by doses of DCA and TCA that were previously shown to be non carcinogenic, with significantly greater increases observed at the earlier period of exposure, as compared with later period. These findings may argue against the contribution of those mechanisms to the hepatotoxicity/hepatocarcinogenicity of the compounds and suggest them to be early adaptive/ protective mechanisms against their long term effects. PMID:20391627

  4. A dynamic urban air pollution population exposure assessment study using model and population density data derived by mobile phone traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, Claudio; Pelliccioni, Armando; Bolignano, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    A dynamic city-wide air pollution exposure assessment study has been carried out for the urban population of Rome, Italy, by using time resolved population distribution maps, derived by mobile phone traffic data, and modelled air pollutants (NO2, O3 and PM2.5) concentrations obtained by an integrated air dispersion modelling system. More than a million of persons were tracked during two months (March and April 2015) for their position within the city and its surroundings areas, with a time resolution of 15 min and mapped over an irregular grid system with a minimum resolution of 0.26 × 0.34 Km2. In addition, demographics information (as gender and age ranges) were available in a separated dataset not connected with the total population one. Such BigData were matched in time and space with air pollution model results and then used to produce hourly and daily resolved cumulative population exposures during the studied period. A significant mobility of population was identified with higher population densities in downtown areas during daytime increasing of up to 1000 people/Km2 with respect to nigh-time one, likely produced by commuters, tourists and working age population. Strong variability (up to ±50% for NO2) of population exposures were detected as an effect of both mobility and time/spatial changing in pollutants concentrations. A comparison with the correspondent stationary approach based on National Census data, allows detecting the inability of latter in estimating the actual variability of population exposure. Significant underestimations of the amount of population exposed to daily PM2.5 WHO guideline was identified for the Census approach. Very small differences (up to a few μg/m3) on exposure were detected for gender and age ranges population classes.

  5. Complement component 3 deficiency prolongs MHC-II disparate skin allograft survival by increasing the CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells population.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Quan-You; Liang, Shen-Ju; Li, Gui-Qing; Lv, Yan-Bo; Li, You; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Gui-Lian; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that complement system contributes to allograft rejection. However, its underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Herein, we investigate the role of complement component 3 (C3) in a single MHC-II molecule mismatched murine model of allograft rejection using C3 deficient mice (C3(-/-)) as skin graft donors or recipients. Compared with C3(+/+) B6 allografts, C3(-/-) B6 grafts dramatically prolonged survival in MHC-II molecule mismatched H-2(bm12) B6 recipients, indicating that C3 plays a critical role in allograft rejection. Compared with C3(+/+) allografts, both Th17 cell infiltration and Th1/Th17 associated cytokine mRNA levels were clearly reduced in C3(-/-) allografts. Moreover, C3(-/-) allografts caused attenuated Th1/Th17 responses, but increased CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell expression markedly in local intragraft and H-2(bm12) recipients. Depletion of Treg cells by anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody (mAb) negated the survival advantages conferred by C3 deficiency. Our results indicate for the first time that C3 deficiency can prolong MHC-II molecule mismatched skin allograft survival, which is further confirmed to be associated with increased CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cell population expansion and attenuated Th1/Th17 response. PMID:27641978

  6. Complement component 3 deficiency prolongs MHC-II disparate skin allograft survival by increasing the CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells population

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Quan-you; Liang, Shen-ju; Li, Gui-qing; Lv, Yan-bo; Li, You; Tang, Ming; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Gui-lian; Zhang, Ke-qin

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that complement system contributes to allograft rejection. However, its underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Herein, we investigate the role of complement component 3 (C3) in a single MHC-II molecule mismatched murine model of allograft rejection using C3 deficient mice (C3−/−) as skin graft donors or recipients. Compared with C3+/+ B6 allografts, C3−/− B6 grafts dramatically prolonged survival in MHC-II molecule mismatched H-2bm12 B6 recipients, indicating that C3 plays a critical role in allograft rejection. Compared with C3+/+ allografts, both Th17 cell infiltration and Th1/Th17 associated cytokine mRNA levels were clearly reduced in C3−/− allografts. Moreover, C3−/− allografts caused attenuated Th1/Th17 responses, but increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cell expression markedly in local intragraft and H-2bm12 recipients. Depletion of Treg cells by anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody (mAb) negated the survival advantages conferred by C3 deficiency. Our results indicate for the first time that C3 deficiency can prolong MHC-II molecule mismatched skin allograft survival, which is further confirmed to be associated with increased CD4+ CD25+ Treg cell population expansion and attenuated Th1/Th17 response. PMID:27641978

  7. Controlled human exposures to ambient pollutant particles in susceptible populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have established an association between exposures to air pollution particles and human mortality and morbidity at concentrations of particles currently found in major metropolitan areas. The adverse effects of pollution particles are most prominent in suscep...

  8. Prolonged Exposure of Primary Human Muscle Cells to Plasma Fatty Acids Associated with Obese Phenotype Induces Persistent Suppression of Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthase β Subunit.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lee; Hanavan, Paul D; Campbell, Latoya E; De Filippis, Elena; Lake, Douglas F; Coletta, Dawn K; Roust, Lori R; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies show reduced abundance of the β-subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) in skeletal muscle of obese individuals. The β-F1-ATPase forms the catalytic core of the ATP synthase, and it is critical for ATP production in muscle. The mechanism(s) impairing β-F1-ATPase metabolism in obesity, however, are not completely understood. First, we studied total muscle protein synthesis and the translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in obese (BMI, 36±1 kg/m2) and lean (BMI, 22±1 kg/m2) subjects. Both total protein synthesis (0.044±0.006 vs 0.066±0.006%·h-1) and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase (0.0031±0.0007 vs 0.0073±0.0004) were lower in muscle from the obese subjects when compared to the lean controls (P<0.05). We then evaluated these same responses in a primary cell culture model, and tested the specific hypothesis that circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in obesity play a role in the responses observed in humans. The findings on total protein synthesis and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in primary myotubes cultured from a lean subject, and after exposure to NEFA extracted from serum of an obese subject, were similar to those obtained in humans. Among candidate microRNAs (i.e., non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression), we identified miR-127-5p in preventing the production of β-F1-ATPase. Muscle expression of miR-127-5p negatively correlated with β-F1-ATPase protein translation efficiency in humans (r = - 0.6744; P<0.01), and could be modeled in vitro by prolonged exposure of primary myotubes derived from the lean subject to NEFA extracted from the obese subject. On the other hand, locked nucleic acid inhibitor synthesized to target miR-127-5p significantly increased β-F1-ATPase translation efficiency in myotubes (0.6±0.1 vs 1.3±0.3, in control vs exposure to 50 nM inhibitor; P<0.05). Our experiments implicate circulating NEFA in obesity in suppressing muscle protein metabolism, and establish

  9. Prolonged Exposure of Primary Human Muscle Cells to Plasma Fatty Acids Associated with Obese Phenotype Induces Persistent Suppression of Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthase β Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lee; Hanavan, Paul D.; Campbell, Latoya E.; De Filippis, Elena; Lake, Douglas F.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Roust, Lori R.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Carroll, Chad C.; Katsanos, Christos S.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies show reduced abundance of the β-subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) in skeletal muscle of obese individuals. The β-F1-ATPase forms the catalytic core of the ATP synthase, and it is critical for ATP production in muscle. The mechanism(s) impairing β-F1-ATPase metabolism in obesity, however, are not completely understood. First, we studied total muscle protein synthesis and the translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in obese (BMI, 36±1 kg/m2) and lean (BMI, 22±1 kg/m2) subjects. Both total protein synthesis (0.044±0.006 vs 0.066±0.006%·h-1) and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase (0.0031±0.0007 vs 0.0073±0.0004) were lower in muscle from the obese subjects when compared to the lean controls (P<0.05). We then evaluated these same responses in a primary cell culture model, and tested the specific hypothesis that circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in obesity play a role in the responses observed in humans. The findings on total protein synthesis and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in primary myotubes cultured from a lean subject, and after exposure to NEFA extracted from serum of an obese subject, were similar to those obtained in humans. Among candidate microRNAs (i.e., non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression), we identified miR-127-5p in preventing the production of β-F1-ATPase. Muscle expression of miR-127-5p negatively correlated with β-F1-ATPase protein translation efficiency in humans (r = – 0.6744; P<0.01), and could be modeled in vitro by prolonged exposure of primary myotubes derived from the lean subject to NEFA extracted from the obese subject. On the other hand, locked nucleic acid inhibitor synthesized to target miR-127-5p significantly increased β-F1-ATPase translation efficiency in myotubes (0.6±0.1 vs 1.3±0.3, in control vs exposure to 50 nM inhibitor; P<0.05). Our experiments implicate circulating NEFA in obesity in suppressing muscle protein metabolism, and establish

  10. Assessing population exposure for landslide risk analysis using dasymetric cartography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ricardo A. C.; Oliveira, Sergio C.; Zezere, Jose L.

    2015-04-01

    Exposed Population is a major topic that needs to be taken into account in a full landslide risk analysis. Usually, risk analysis is based on an accounting of inhabitants number or inhabitants density, applied over statistical or administrative terrain units, such as NUTS or parishes. However, this kind of approach may skew the obtained results underestimating the importance of population, mainly in territorial units with predominance of rural occupation. Furthermore, the landslide susceptibility scores calculated for each terrain unit are frequently more detailed and accurate than the location of the exposed population inside each territorial unit based on Census data. These drawbacks are not the ideal setting when landslide risk analysis is performed for urban management and emergency planning. Dasymetric cartography, which uses a parameter or set of parameters to restrict the spatial distribution of a particular phenomenon, is a methodology that may help to enhance the resolution of Census data and therefore to give a more realistic representation of the population distribution. Therefore, this work aims to map and to compare the population distribution based on a traditional approach (population per administrative terrain units) and based on dasymetric cartography (population by building). The study is developed in the Region North of Lisbon using 2011 population data and following three main steps: i) the landslide susceptibility assessment based on statistical models independently validated; ii) the evaluation of population distribution (absolute and density) for different administrative territorial units (Parishes and BGRI - the basic statistical unit in the Portuguese Census); and iii) the dasymetric population's cartography based on building areal weighting. Preliminary results show that in sparsely populated administrative units, population density differs more than two times depending on the application of the traditional approach or the dasymetric

  11. The Use of Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Prolonged Exposure to Treat Comorbid Dissociation and Self-Harm: The Case of a Client With Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Granato, Hollie F; Wilks, Chelsey R; Miga, Erin M; Korslund, Kathryn E; Linehan, Marsha M

    2015-08-01

    There is a high rate of comorbidity between borderline personality disorder (BPD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Pagura et al., 2010). Preliminary studies have evaluated the treatment of PTSD in a BPD population and found positive outcomes for the integration of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and prolonged exposure (PE). This case study illustrates the implementation of a PE protocol into standard DBT treatment, specifically focusing on the management of self-harm and severe dissociation for a client with co-occurring PTSD and BPD. The client entered into treatment with severe and persistent dissociation and a recent history of self-harm, and the case includes consideration of two separate pauses in PTSD treatment related to elevated dissociation and self-harm behaviors. The client successfully completed the DBT PE protocol and results indicate significant improvements in PTSD symptoms as well as outcomes related to self-harm and dissociation. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of combining DBT with PE for clients with comorbid BPD and PTSD and exemplify how complex clients with BPD who present with severe dissociation and self-harm behavior can safely and successfully receive treatment for PTSD.

  12. Sunlight Exposure and Breast Density: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; So, Edwin; Lam, Tsz-ping; Woo, Jean; Yuen, PY; Qin, Ling; Ku, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to assess the association of sunlight exposure with breast cancer risk, measured by the breast density assessed from Tabár's mammographic pattern in Chinese women. Methods A total of 676 premenopausal women were recruited to participate in this study, in which 650 completed a validated sunlight exposure questionnaire via telephone. The mammograms were classified according to Tabár's classification for parenchyma, and patterns IV & V and I, II & III indicated respectively high and low risk mammographic patterns for breast cancer. The odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for sun exposure-related variables were estimated using unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results Among 646 participants, women with high breast cancer risk (Tabár's patterns IV &V) had less hours spent in the sun than those with low risk (I, II & III) at any age stage. A higher level of sunlight exposure was associated with a significantly lower risk having high risk Tabár's pattern. Women aged 40 to 44 years who were in the highest tertile of lifetime total hours spent in the sun had a multi-adjusted OR of 0.41 (95% CI, 0.18-0.92; p for trend=0.03) compared with those in the lowest tertile (>2.19 hr/day vs. <1.32 hr/day). For hours spent in the sun across the ages of 6 to 12 years, the comparable OR was 0.37 (95% CI, 0.15-0.91; p for trend=0.03). Conclusion These findings suggest that higher sunlight exposure is related to a lower risk of having high risk breast density pattern in premenopausal women. Our results also suggest the most relevant period of exposure is during earlier life. PMID:23843849

  13. Population exposure to heat-related extremes: Demographic change vs climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; O'Neill, B. C.; Tebaldi, C.; Oleson, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme heat events are projected to increase in frequency and intensity in the coming decades [1]. The physical effects of extreme heat on human populations are well-documented, and anticipating changes in future exposure to extreme heat is a key component of adequate planning/mitigation [2, 3]. Exposure to extreme heat depends not only on changing climate, but also on changes in the size and spatial distribution of the human population. Here we focus on systematically quantifying exposure to extreme heat as a function of both climate and population change. We compare exposure outcomes across multiple global climate and spatial population scenarios, and characterize the relative contributions of each to population exposure to extreme heat. We consider a 2 x 2 matrix of climate and population output, using projections of heat extremes corresponding to RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 from the NCAR community land model, and spatial population projections for SSP 3 and SSP 5 from the NCAR spatial population downscaling model. Our primary comparison is across RCPs - exposure outcomes from RCP 4.5 versus RCP 8.5 - paying particular attention to how variation depends on the choice of SSP in terms of aggregate global and regional exposure, as well as the spatial distribution of exposure. We assess how aggregate exposure changes based on the choice of SSP, and which driver is more important, population or climate change (i.e. does that outcome vary more as a result of RCP or SSP). We further decompose the population component to analyze the contributions of total population change, migration, and changes in local spatial structure. Preliminary results from a similar study of the US suggests a four-to-six fold increase in total exposure by the latter half of the 21st century. Changes in population are as important as changes in climate in driving this outcome, and there is regional variation in the relative importance of each. Aggregate population growth, as well as redistribution of

  14. The management of lead exposure in pediatric populations

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, P.O.; Lewis, D.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Chronically elevated lead levels are a common problem affecting children. Although this problem occurs most frequently in the inner city, no community is safe from excessive pediatric lead exposure. Screening by erythrocyte protoporphyrin is a sensitive early indicator of rising lead levels. A Centers for Disease Control report recommends that all children be screened starting at 9 to 12 months. A classification system of various lead levels helps determine proper treatment. Health care practitioners need to be well-informed about lead exposure and how it occurs in order to educate parents. 10 refs.

  15. Adaptation of visually evoked responses of relay cells in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the cat following prolonged exposure to drifting gratings.

    PubMed

    Shou, T; Li, X; Zhou, Y; Hu, B

    1996-01-01

    Adaptation of visual cortical cells' responses is observed following repeated presentation of grating stimuli. Grating adaptation is believed to exist only at the cortical level. The purpose of this study was to see if grating adaptation also occurs in the lateral geniculate nucleus. We studied the responses of 164 relay cells in layer A and A1 of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNd) to grating stimuli. Normal cats, as well as cats in which visual cortex was ablated, were studied. Adaptation was investigated using repeated presentation of gratings of different contrasts and orientations. The results showed the following: (1) Grating adaptation reduced the responses of 46% of the LGNd cells recorded. The responses normally decreased within 30 s and then stabilized. However, there was heterogeneity in the effects observed. About 38% of the cells studied were not affected by the adapting gratings. Some cells (16%) showed facilitation rather than habituation of their responses to test stimuli. (2) There was no significant difference between X and Y cells in their susceptibility to adaptation. This suggests that grating adaptation is a general property, independent of cell type. (3) The contrast-response curves of 57% of the LGNd cells studied shifted down after exposure to high-contrast adapting gratings. (4) Adapting gratings of the cells' preferred orientation decreased the orientation sensitivity of 56% of the orientation-sensitive cells. Adapting gratings at the nonpreferred orientation did not affect orientation sensitivity. (5) Prolonged grating adaptation also reduced the responses of 49% of the LGNd cells after inactivation of cortical inputs to the LGNd. PMID:8870219

  16. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY OF ADULTS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENT EXPOSURE TO NEUROTOXICANTS: ANOTHER SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is considerable public and regulatory interest in the adverse outcomes of developmental exposure to toxicants. The 1996 Food Quality Protection Act spurred research on understanding potential neurotoxic, immunotoxic, and endocrine outcomes in susceptible populations, parti...

  17. THE CONTRIBUTION OF AMBIENT PM2.5 TO TOTAL PERSONAL EXPOSURES: RESULTS FROM A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is currently developing an integrated human exposure source-to-dose modeling system (HES2D). This modeling system will incorporate population exposure modules that use a probabilistic approach to predict population exposu...

  18. Novel Human Radiation Exposure Biomarker Panel Applicable for Population Triage

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Jose G.; Chang, Polly; Balog, Robert; D'Andrea, Annalisa; Shaler, Thomas; Lin, Hua; Lee, Shirley; Harrison, Travis; Shura, Lei; Schoen, Lucy; Knox, Susan J.; Cooper, David E.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To identify a panel of radiation-responsive plasma proteins that could be used in a point-of-care biologic dosimeter to detect clinically significant levels of ionizing radiation exposure. Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation using radiation therapy (RT) with either total lymphoid irradiation or fractionated total body irradiation were eligible. Plasma was examined from patients with potentially confounding conditions and from normal individuals. Each plasma sample was analyzed for a panel of 17 proteins before RT was begun and at several time points after RT exposure. Paired and unpaired t tests between the dose and control groups were performed. Conditional inference trees were constructed based on panels of proteins to compare the non-RT group with the RT group. Results: A total of 151 patients (62 RT, 41 infection, 48 trauma) were enrolled on the study, and the plasma from an additional 24 healthy control individuals was analyzed. In comparison with to control individuals, tenascin-C was upregulated and clusterin was downregulated in patients receiving RT. Salivary amylase was strongly radiation responsive, with upregulation in total body irradiation patients and slight downregulation in total lymphoid irradiation patients compared with control individuals. A panel consisting of these 3 proteins accurately distinguished between irradiated patients and healthy control individuals within 3 days after exposure: 97% accuracy, 0.5% false negative rate, 2% false positive rate. The accuracy was diminished when patients with trauma, infection, or both were included (accuracy, 74%-84%; false positive rate, 14%-33%, false negative rate: 8%-40%). Conclusions: A panel of 3 proteins accurately distinguishes unirradiated healthy donors from those exposed to RT (0.8-9.6 Gy) within 3 days of exposure. These findings have significant implications in terms of triaging individuals in the case of nuclear or other

  19. RESPIRATORY DOSE TO SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATIONS ASSESSED BY EXPOSURE AND DOSIMETRY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respiratory Dose to Susceptible Populations Assessed by Exposure and Dosimetry Studies

    Chong Kim1 and Ronald Williams2, 1USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and 2USEPA National Exposure Research Laboratory, RTP, NC.

    Rationale: Parti...

  20. Reproductive and tolerance effects of chronic fluoranthene exposure in a laboratory population of fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1994-12-31

    An on-going full life cycle, multigeneration exposure is being conducted to assess the long-term effects of fluoranthene exposure in the presence of solar ultraviolet radiation on the fathead minnow. An experimental population of 200 fish has been exposed to 7.9 {mu}g fluoranthene{sm_bullet}{vert_bar}{sup {minus}1} continuously from juvenile stage through breeding. The Fl generation has been hatched and reared to adult stage within isolation chambers in the exposure tank. During the 16 wk breeding period egg production in the exposed population averaged 75% relative to an identical control population. hatching success of exposed eggs, and larval survivorship to 10 days, were 61% and 44% of controls respectively. No larval growth differences were detected. A test for tolerance acquisition in the exposed population using replicate 96 hr LC50 values revealed no significant difference between the populations. However, the distribution of concentration-mortality values suggested that the two populations responded differently to exposure. To examine this apparent difference eggs were removed from the exposure tank, hatched, and larvae were reared in uncontaminated water. These fish were then simultaneously exposed with identically treated control fish to 27.4{mu}g fluoranthene{sm_bullet}{vert_bar}{sup {minus}1}. The LT50 time for control fish (120 hr) was shorter than the LT50 time exposed fish (146 hr). These results suggest that differential egg production and hatching success, as well as larval survivorship, has resulted in genetic adaptation to fluoranthene exposure.

  1. Adaptation to fluoranthene exposure in a laboratory population of fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-08-01

    Tolerance of toxicant exposure is common in polluted sites in nature. However, in most cases, the processes underlying tolerance acquisition are not well understood. In the case of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in particular, reports are lacking on the capacity for tolerance acquisition. To evaluate the potential for adaptation to this class of contaminants the authors exposed a large laboratory population of fathead minnows to fluoranthene, commonly a major constituent of PAH contamination. The exposure concentration chosen did not cause mortality but was sufficient to diminish reproductive capacity in exposed breeding fish relative to a control population. This level of exposure also significantly diminished hatching success and larval survivorship in the exposed population. The estimated value of selection against susceptibility (the product of all assessments of effect) was 0.67. Tests for tolerance acquisition included comparative larval 96-h LC50 determinations, and comparative juvenile median time to death (LT50) determinations. Enhanced tolerance was not apparent in the LC50 determinations, although an examination of the concentration-response distribution suggested an adverse effect due to egg and larval exposure to fluoranthene prior to the test. In contrast, results of the comparative LT50 determination indicated that the exposed population was approximately 30% more tolerant, relative to the control population, when exposed to an acutely toxic concentration of fluoranthene. These results suggest that tolerance to PAH exposure can occur in nature and that this population-level response needs to be examined relative to other recognized effects in PAH-contaminated areas.

  2. Genocide Exposure and Subsequent Suicide Risk: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Stephen Z.; Levav, Itzhak; Yoffe, Rinat; Becher, Yifat; Pugachova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    The association between periods of genocide-related exposures and suicide risk remains unknown. Our study tests that association using a national population-based study design. The source population comprised of all persons born during1922-1945 in Nazi-occupied or dominated European nations, that immigrated to Israel by 1965, were identified in the Population Register (N = 220,665), and followed up for suicide to 2014, totaling 16,953,602 person-years. The population was disaggregated to compare a trauma gradient among groups that immigrated before (indirect, n = 20,612, 9%); during (partial direct, n = 17,037, 8%); or after (full direct, n = 183,016, 83%) exposure to the Nazi era. Also, the direct exposure groups were examined regarding pre- or post-natal exposure periods. Cox regression models were used to compute Hazard Ratios (HR) of suicide risk to compare the exposure groups, adjusting for confounding by gender, residential SES and history of psychiatric hospitalization. In the total population, only the partial direct exposure subgroup was at greater risk compared to the indirect exposure group (HR = 1.73, 95% CI, 1.10, 2.73; P < .05). That effect replicated in six sensitivity analyses. In addition, sensitivity analyses showed that exposure at ages 13 plus among females, and follow-up by years since immigration were associated with a greater risk; whereas in utero exposure among persons with no psychiatric hospitalization and early postnatal exposure among males were at a reduced risk. Tentative mechanisms impute biopsychosocial vulnerability and natural selection during early critical periods among males, and feelings of guilt and entrapment or defeat among females. PMID:26901411

  3. Genocide Exposure and Subsequent Suicide Risk: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stephen Z; Levav, Itzhak; Yoffe, Rinat; Becher, Yifat; Pugachova, Inna

    2016-01-01

    The association between periods of genocide-related exposures and suicide risk remains unknown. Our study tests that association using a national population-based study design. The source population comprised of all persons born during1922-1945 in Nazi-occupied or dominated European nations, that immigrated to Israel by 1965, were identified in the Population Register (N = 220,665), and followed up for suicide to 2014, totaling 16,953,602 person-years. The population was disaggregated to compare a trauma gradient among groups that immigrated before (indirect, n = 20,612, 9%); during (partial direct, n = 17,037, 8%); or after (full direct, n = 183,016, 83%) exposure to the Nazi era. Also, the direct exposure groups were examined regarding pre- or post-natal exposure periods. Cox regression models were used to compute Hazard Ratios (HR) of suicide risk to compare the exposure groups, adjusting for confounding by gender, residential SES and history of psychiatric hospitalization. In the total population, only the partial direct exposure subgroup was at greater risk compared to the indirect exposure group (HR = 1.73, 95% CI, 1.10, 2.73; P < .05). That effect replicated in six sensitivity analyses. In addition, sensitivity analyses showed that exposure at ages 13 plus among females, and follow-up by years since immigration were associated with a greater risk; whereas in utero exposure among persons with no psychiatric hospitalization and early postnatal exposure among males were at a reduced risk. Tentative mechanisms impute biopsychosocial vulnerability and natural selection during early critical periods among males, and feelings of guilt and entrapment or defeat among females. PMID:26901411

  4. External radiation exposure of the population of Utah from Nevada weapons tests

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, H.L.; Krey, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The external gamma radiation exposure of the population of Utah from nuclear weapons tests carried out at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during 1951 to 1958 has been reconstructed from measurements of residual /sup 137/Cs and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in soil. The maximum time integrated (to infinity) free air exposure in any major population center is estimated to have been approx. 4 R at St. George and Hurricane. Exposures decreased with distance from the NTS to lower than 0.2 R at Richfield and Gunnison in south central Utah, before increasing again to levels of 1 to 2 R in the more populous northern valleys around Provo, Salt Lake City, and Ogden. These relatively higher exposures, coupled with the much larger population, probably resulted in a total population dose (person-rads) to the heretofore supposedly low fallout counties of northern Utah significantly greater than that for the supposedly high fallout areas nearer the NTS. Nevertheless, the total doses incurred from Nevada tests were probably only a few times greater than doses incurred from Nevada tests were probably only a few times greater than the doses which this northern valley population, as well as the rest of the US population, incurred from worldwide weapons fallout from all other atmospheric weapons tests. The mean exposure estimates for towns in southwest Utah nearest the NTS are somewhat lower but reasonably consistent with other retrospective estimates based on radiation surveys made directly after the tests.

  5. General population job exposure matrix applied to a pooled study of prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dale, Ann Marie; Zeringue, Angelique; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Rempel, David; Bao, Stephen; Thiese, Matthew S; Merlino, Linda; Burt, Susan; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Gerr, Fred; Hegmann, Kurt T; Eisen, Ellen A; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-03-15

    A job exposure matrix may be useful for the study of biomechanical workplace risk factors when individual-level exposure data are unavailable. We used job title-based exposure data from a public data source to construct a job exposure matrix and test exposure-response relationships with prevalent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Exposures of repetitive motion and force from the Occupational Information Network were assigned to 3,452 active workers from several industries, enrolled between 2001 and 2008 from 6 studies. Repetitive motion and force exposures were combined into high/high, high/low, and low/low exposure groupings in each of 4 multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for personal factors. Although force measures alone were not independent predictors of CTS in these data, strong associations between combined physical exposures of force and repetition and CTS were observed in all models. Consistent with previous literature, this report shows that workers with high force/high repetition jobs had the highest prevalence of CTS (odds ratio = 2.14-2.95) followed by intermediate values (odds ratio = 1.09-2.27) in mixed exposed jobs relative to the lowest exposed workers. This study supports the use of a general population job exposure matrix to estimate workplace physical exposures in epidemiologic studies of musculoskeletal disorders when measures of individual exposures are unavailable. PMID:25700886

  6. Enzyme genotype and exposure tolerance in fathead minnow populations acutely and chronically exposed to fluoranthene

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.; Oris, J.T.; Guttman, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    Populations residing in contaminated areas often exhibit enhanced genetically based tolerance. Shifts in enzyme genotype frequencies have been suggested as indicators of these adaptive responses. However, the between extant tolerance and enzyme genotype frequencies in affected populations has not been previously reported. The authors report here on attempts, involving acute and chronic exposures, to select for tolerance in populations of fathead minnows. Offspring of survivors of an acutely exposed population were significantly less tolerant relative to naive fish, whereas offspring of fish exposed to a sub-lethal concentration were significantly more tolerant of exposure. Relationships between differential response in the acute exposure were elucidated using failure-time methods. Genotype at one focus, glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI), was significantly related to survival time during this exposure. In addition, significant differences in GPI allele frequency between survivors and their offspring were also apparent. Comparison of offspring of chronically exposed fish with offspring of unexposed fish indicated a significant shift in allele frequencies at the GPI locus. These F1 populations were also exposed acutely to fluoranthene to assess their relative tolerance. Separate failure-time analyses for these populations again indicated a significant relationship between GPI genotype and mortality in the control fish (and at three other loci), but not in the exposure fish. Overall, five loci were significantly related to mortality in the control population, whereas one locus was related to mortality in the exposure offspring. These results suggest that enzyme genotype frequencies can be consistent indicators of population response to exposure and that selection by contaminants may reduce variability in these relationships.

  7. Exposure estimate for FD&C colour additives for the US population.

    PubMed

    Doell, Diana L; Folmer, Daniel E; Lee, Hyoung S; Butts, Kyla M; Carberry, Susan E

    2016-05-01

    Dietary exposures to the seven food, drug, and cosmetic (FD&C) colour additives that are approved for general use in food in the United States were estimated for the US population (aged 2 years and older), children (aged 2-5 years) and teenage boys (aged 13-18 years) based on analytical levels of the FD&C colour additives in foods. Approximately 600 foods were chosen for analysis, based on a survey of product labels, for the levels of FD&C colour additives. Dietary exposure was estimated using both 2-day food consumption data from the combined 2007-10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and 10-14-day food consumption data from the 2007-10 NPD Group, Inc. National Eating Trends - Nutrient Intake Database (NPD NET-NID). Dietary exposure was estimated at the mean and 90th percentile using three different exposure scenarios: low exposure, average exposure and high exposure, to account for the range in the amount of each FD&C colour additive for a given food. For all populations and all exposure scenarios, the highest cumulative eaters-only exposures in food were determined for FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5 and FD&C Yellow No. 6. In addition, the eaters-only exposure was estimated for individual food categories in order to determine which food categories contributed the most to the exposure for each FD&C colour additive. Breakfast Cereal, Juice Drinks, Soft Drinks, and Frozen Dairy Desserts/Sherbet (also referred to as Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt, Sherbet (including Bars, Sticks, Sandwiches)) were the major contributing food categories to exposure for multiple FD&C colour additives for all three populations. PMID:27092991

  8. Exposure estimate for FD&C colour additives for the US population.

    PubMed

    Doell, Diana L; Folmer, Daniel E; Lee, Hyoung S; Butts, Kyla M; Carberry, Susan E

    2016-05-01

    Dietary exposures to the seven food, drug, and cosmetic (FD&C) colour additives that are approved for general use in food in the United States were estimated for the US population (aged 2 years and older), children (aged 2-5 years) and teenage boys (aged 13-18 years) based on analytical levels of the FD&C colour additives in foods. Approximately 600 foods were chosen for analysis, based on a survey of product labels, for the levels of FD&C colour additives. Dietary exposure was estimated using both 2-day food consumption data from the combined 2007-10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and 10-14-day food consumption data from the 2007-10 NPD Group, Inc. National Eating Trends - Nutrient Intake Database (NPD NET-NID). Dietary exposure was estimated at the mean and 90th percentile using three different exposure scenarios: low exposure, average exposure and high exposure, to account for the range in the amount of each FD&C colour additive for a given food. For all populations and all exposure scenarios, the highest cumulative eaters-only exposures in food were determined for FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5 and FD&C Yellow No. 6. In addition, the eaters-only exposure was estimated for individual food categories in order to determine which food categories contributed the most to the exposure for each FD&C colour additive. Breakfast Cereal, Juice Drinks, Soft Drinks, and Frozen Dairy Desserts/Sherbet (also referred to as Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt, Sherbet (including Bars, Sticks, Sandwiches)) were the major contributing food categories to exposure for multiple FD&C colour additives for all three populations.

  9. Probabilistic assessment of exposure to hair cosmetic products by the French population.

    PubMed

    Ficheux, A S; Bernard, A; Chevillotte, G; Dornic, N; Roudot, A C

    2016-06-01

    Cosmetic exposure data are limited in Europe and especially in France. The aim of this study was to assess the exposure to hair cosmetics using recent consumption data (percentage of users, frequency of use and amount per use) generated for the French population (Ficheux et al., 2015, 2016). Exposure was assessed using a probabilistic method for eleven hair products: liquid shampoo, dry shampoo, conditioner, hair mask, hair serum, hair oil, styling lacquer, styling gel, styling foam, styling wax and styling spray. Exposure was assessed by sex and by age classes in adults and children. Pregnant women were also studied. For liquid shampoo, conditioner and some styling products (gel, lacquer and foam), the levels of exposure were higher than the values currently used by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). Exposure values found for styling wax and styling spray were lower than SCCS values. Exposure was assessed for the first time for dry shampoo, hair mask, hair serum and hair oil products. These new French exposure values will be useful for safety assessors and for safety agencies in order to protect the general population and these at-risk populations. PMID:27090106

  10. Probabilistic assessment of exposure to hair cosmetic products by the French population.

    PubMed

    Ficheux, A S; Bernard, A; Chevillotte, G; Dornic, N; Roudot, A C

    2016-06-01

    Cosmetic exposure data are limited in Europe and especially in France. The aim of this study was to assess the exposure to hair cosmetics using recent consumption data (percentage of users, frequency of use and amount per use) generated for the French population (Ficheux et al., 2015, 2016). Exposure was assessed using a probabilistic method for eleven hair products: liquid shampoo, dry shampoo, conditioner, hair mask, hair serum, hair oil, styling lacquer, styling gel, styling foam, styling wax and styling spray. Exposure was assessed by sex and by age classes in adults and children. Pregnant women were also studied. For liquid shampoo, conditioner and some styling products (gel, lacquer and foam), the levels of exposure were higher than the values currently used by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). Exposure values found for styling wax and styling spray were lower than SCCS values. Exposure was assessed for the first time for dry shampoo, hair mask, hair serum and hair oil products. These new French exposure values will be useful for safety assessors and for safety agencies in order to protect the general population and these at-risk populations.

  11. A novel method to assess human population exposure induced by a wireless cellular network.

    PubMed

    Varsier, Nadège; Plets, David; Corre, Yoann; Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Martens, Luc; Wiart, Joe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new metric to evaluate electromagnetic exposure induced by wireless cellular networks. This metric takes into account the exposure induced by base station antennas as well as exposure induced by wireless devices to evaluate average global exposure of the population in a specific geographical area. The paper first explains the concept and gives the formulation of the Exposure Index (EI). Then, the EI computation is illustrated through simple phone call scenarios (indoor office, in train) and a complete macro urban data long-term evolution scenario showing how, based on simulations, radio-planning predictions, realistic population statistics, user traffic data, and specific absorption rate calculations can be combined to assess the index. Bioelectromagnetics. 36:451-463, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26113174

  12. A novel method to assess human population exposure induced by a wireless cellular network.

    PubMed

    Varsier, Nadège; Plets, David; Corre, Yoann; Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Martens, Luc; Wiart, Joe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new metric to evaluate electromagnetic exposure induced by wireless cellular networks. This metric takes into account the exposure induced by base station antennas as well as exposure induced by wireless devices to evaluate average global exposure of the population in a specific geographical area. The paper first explains the concept and gives the formulation of the Exposure Index (EI). Then, the EI computation is illustrated through simple phone call scenarios (indoor office, in train) and a complete macro urban data long-term evolution scenario showing how, based on simulations, radio-planning predictions, realistic population statistics, user traffic data, and specific absorption rate calculations can be combined to assess the index. Bioelectromagnetics. 36:451-463, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Challenges and Successes in Dissemination of Evidence-Based Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress: Lessons Learned From Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Foa, Edna B; Gillihan, Seth J; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) poses monumental public health challenges because of its contribution to mental health, physical health, and both interpersonal and social problems. Recent military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan and the multitude of resulting cases of PTSD have highlighted the public health significance of these conditions. There are now psychological treatments that can effectively treat most individuals with PTSD, including active duty military personnel, veterans, and civilians. We begin by reviewing the effectiveness of these treatments, with a focus on prolonged exposure (PE), a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for PTSD. Many studies conducted in independent research labs have demonstrated that PE is highly efficacious in treating PTSD across a wide range of trauma types, survivor characteristics, and cultures. Furthermore, therapists without prior CBT experience can readily learn and implement the treatment successfully. Despite the existence of highly effective treatments like PE, the majority of individuals with PTSD receive treatments of unknown efficacy. Thus, it is crucial to identify the barriers and challenges that must be addressed in order to promote the widespread dissemination of effective treatments for PTSD. In this review, we first discuss some of the major challenges, such as a professional culture that often is antagonistic to evidence-based treatments (EBTs), a lack of clinician training in EBTs, limited effectiveness of commonly used dissemination techniques, and the significant cost associated with effective dissemination models. Next, we review local, national, and international efforts to disseminate PE and similar treatments and illustrate the challenges and successes involved in promoting the adoption of EBTs in mental health systems. We then consider ways in which the barriers discussed earlier can be overcome, as well as the difficulties involved in effecting sustained organizational change in mental health

  14. Pathogen exposure and blood chemistry in the Washington population of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, C. LeAnn; Schuler, Krysten L.; Thomas, Nancy J.; Webb, Julie L.; Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Ip, Hon S.; Dubey, J.P.; Frame, Elizabeth R.

    2013-01-01

    Northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from Washington State, United States were evaluated in 2011 to determine health status and pathogen exposure. Antibodies to Brucella spp. (10%) and influenza A virus (23%) were detected for the first time in this population in 2011. Changes in clinical pathology values (serum chemistries), exposure to pathogens, and overall health of the population over the last decade were assessed by comparing 2011 data to the data collected on this population in 2001–2002. Several serum chemistry parameters were different between study years and sexes but were not clinically significant. The odds of canine distemper virus exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2001–2002 (80%) compared to 2011 (10%); likelihood of exposure significantly increased with age. Prevalence of exposure to Sarcocystis neurona was also higher in 2001–2002 (29%) than in 2011 (0%), but because testing methods varied between study years the results were not directly comparable. Exposure to Leptospira spp. was only observed in 2001–2002. Odds of Toxoplasma gondii exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2011 (97%) than otters in 2001–2002 (58%). Substantial levels of domoic acid (n = 2) and saxitoxin (n = 2) were found in urine or fecal samples from animals sampled in 2011. No evidence of calicivirus or Coxiella burnetii exposure in the Washington population of northern sea otters was found in either 2001–2002 or 2011. Changes in exposure status from 2001–2002 to 2011 suggest that the Washington sea otter population may be dealing with new disease threats (e.g., influenza) while also increasing their susceptibility to diseases that may be highly pathogenic in naïve individuals (e.g., canine distemper).

  15. Land Use as a Driver of Patterns of Rodenticide Exposure in Modeled Kit Fox Populations.

    PubMed

    Nogeire, Theresa M; Lawler, Joshua J; Schumaker, Nathan H; Cypher, Brian L; Phillips, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Although rodenticides are increasingly regulated, they nonetheless cause poisonings in many non-target wildlife species. Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticide use is common in agricultural and residential landscapes. Here, we use an individual-based population model to assess potential population-wide effects of rodenticide exposures on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica). We estimate likelihood of rodenticide exposure across the species range for each land cover type based on a database of reported pesticide use and literature. Using a spatially-explicit population model, we find that 36% of modeled kit foxes are likely exposed, resulting in a 7-18% decline in the range-wide modeled kit fox population that can be linked to rodenticide use. Exposures of kit foxes in low-density developed areas accounted for 70% of the population-wide exposures to rodenticides. We conclude that exposures of non-target kit foxes could be greatly mitigated by reducing the use of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides in low-density developed areas near vulnerable populations.

  16. Land Use as a Driver of Patterns of Rodenticide Exposure in Modeled Kit Fox Populations.

    PubMed

    Nogeire, Theresa M; Lawler, Joshua J; Schumaker, Nathan H; Cypher, Brian L; Phillips, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    Although rodenticides are increasingly regulated, they nonetheless cause poisonings in many non-target wildlife species. Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticide use is common in agricultural and residential landscapes. Here, we use an individual-based population model to assess potential population-wide effects of rodenticide exposures on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica). We estimate likelihood of rodenticide exposure across the species range for each land cover type based on a database of reported pesticide use and literature. Using a spatially-explicit population model, we find that 36% of modeled kit foxes are likely exposed, resulting in a 7-18% decline in the range-wide modeled kit fox population that can be linked to rodenticide use. Exposures of kit foxes in low-density developed areas accounted for 70% of the population-wide exposures to rodenticides. We conclude that exposures of non-target kit foxes could be greatly mitigated by reducing the use of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides in low-density developed areas near vulnerable populations. PMID:26244655

  17. Land Use as a Driver of Patterns of Rodenticide Exposure in Modeled Kit Fox Populations

    PubMed Central

    Nogeire, Theresa M.; Lawler, Joshua J.; Schumaker, Nathan H.; Cypher, Brian L.; Phillips, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Although rodenticides are increasingly regulated, they nonetheless cause poisonings in many non-target wildlife species. Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticide use is common in agricultural and residential landscapes. Here, we use an individual-based population model to assess potential population-wide effects of rodenticide exposures on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica). We estimate likelihood of rodenticide exposure across the species range for each land cover type based on a database of reported pesticide use and literature. Using a spatially-explicit population model, we find that 36% of modeled kit foxes are likely exposed, resulting in a 7-18% decline in the range-wide modeled kit fox population that can be linked to rodenticide use. Exposures of kit foxes in low-density developed areas accounted for 70% of the population-wide exposures to rodenticides. We conclude that exposures of non-target kit foxes could be greatly mitigated by reducing the use of second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides in low-density developed areas near vulnerable populations. PMID:26244655

  18. Reconstructing population exposures to environmental chemicals from biomarkers: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Panos G.; Sasso, Alan F.; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Lioy, Paul J.; Vallero, Daniel A.; Okino, Miles; Reiter, Larry

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual/computational framework for exposure reconstruction from biomarker data combined with auxiliary exposure-related data is presented, evaluated with example applications, and examined in the context of future needs and opportunities. This framework employs physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) modeling in conjunction with numerical “inversion” techniques. To quantify the value of different types of exposure data “accompanying” biomarker data, a study was conducted focusing on reconstructing exposures to chlorpyrifos, from measurements of its metabolite levels in urine. The study employed biomarker data as well as supporting exposure-related information from the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS), Maryland, while the MENTOR-3P system (Modeling ENvironment for TOtal Risk with Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic modeling for Populations) was used for PBTK modeling. Recently proposed, simple numerical reconstruction methods were applied in this study, in conjunction with PBTK models. Two types of reconstructions were studied using (a) just the available biomarker and supporting exposure data and (b) synthetic data developed via augmenting available observations. Reconstruction using only available data resulted in a wide range of variation in estimated exposures. Reconstruction using synthetic data facilitated evaluation of numerical inversion methods and characterization of the value of additional information, such as study-specific data that can be collected in conjunction with the biomarker data. Although the NHEXAS data set provides a significant amount of supporting exposure-related information, especially when compared to national studies such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), this information is still not adequate for detailed reconstruction of exposures under several conditions, as demonstrated here. The analysis presented here provides a starting point for introducing improved designs

  19. Ecological modelling and toxicity data coupled to assess population recovery of marine amphipod Gammarus locusta: Application to disturbance by chronic exposure to aniline.

    PubMed

    de los Santos, Carmen B; Neuparth, Teresa; Torres, Tiago; Martins, Irene; Cunha, Isabel; Sheahan, Dave; McGowan, Tom; Santos, Miguel M

    2015-06-01

    A population agent-based model of marine amphipod Gammarus locusta was designed and implemented as a basis for ecological risk assessment of chemical pollutants impairing life-history traits at the individual level. We further used the model to assess the toxic effects of aniline (a priority hazardous and noxious substance, HNS) on amphipod populations using empirically-built dose-response functions derived from a chronic bioassay that we previously performed with this species. We observed a significant toxicant-induced mortality and adverse effects in reproductive performance (reduction of newborn production) in G. locusta at the individual level. Coupling the population model with the toxicological data from the chronic bioassay allowed the projection of the ecological costs associated with exposure to aniline that might occur in wild populations. Model simulations with different scenarios indicated that even low level prolonged exposure to the HNS aniline can have significant long-term impacts on G. locusta population abundance, until the impacted population returns to undisturbed levels. This approach may be a useful complement in ecotoxicological studies of chemical pollution to transfer individual-collected data to ecological-relevant levels.

  20. Microenvironmental and total exposures to carbon monoxide for three population subgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Nagda, N.L.; Koontz, M.D.

    1985-02-01

    This study was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute. The purpose was to investigate the practicality of using personal monitors to study relationships between microenvironmental and total exposures for certain population subgroups. Three population subgroups including housewives, office workers, and construction workers were selected, owing to differences in their potential exposures to CO. The study was conducted in the Washington DC area during the fall of 1982. Data was given for average CO exposures during travel, impact of start time and traffic level. Travel by car accounted for 70% of the travel time reported by study subjects. The gradient in exposures with traffic density was most consistent for trips in automobiles - 5 ppM for light traffic, 6.6 ppM for moderate traffic, and 10.6 ppM for heavy traffic. Among alternative transportation modes, the highest average exposures were incurred during travel by bus (6.9 ppM); the lowest average exposures were incurred for travel on foot (3.4 ppM), and by subway (2.9 ppM). By comparison, the EPA study measured average exposures of 5.1 ppM for trips by automobile and 2.4 ppM for walking, jogging, or bicycle. Through a combined microenvironmental and total exposure monitoring approach, information was simultaneously obtained concerning human activity patterns, microenvironmental characteristics, and the contribution of microenvironment types to the total exposure. 8 references, 6 tables.

  1. Disproportionate Exposures in Environmental Justice and Other Populations: The Importance of Outliers

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We examined traditional environmental justice populations and other groups whose exposure to contaminants is often disproportionately high. Risk assessment methods may not identify these populations, particularly if they are spatially dispersed. We suggest using a National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey approach to oversample minority communities and develop methods for assessing exposure at different distances from pollution sources; publishing arithmetic and geometric means and full distributions for minority populations; and paying particular attention to high-end exposures. Means may sufficiently characterize populations as a whole but are inadequate in identifying vulnerable groups and subgroups. The number of individuals above the 95th percentile of any distribution may be small and unrepresentative, but these outliers are the ones who need to be protected. PMID:21551384

  2. Population exposure dose reconstruction for the Urals Region

    SciTech Connect

    Degteva, M.O.; Kozheurov, V.P.; Vorobiova, M.I.; Burmistrov, D.S.; Khokhryakov, V.V.; Suslova, K.G.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.; Bouville, A.

    1996-06-01

    This presentation describes the first preliminary results of an ongoing joint Russian-US pilot feasibility study. Many people participated in workshops to determine what Russian and United States scientists could do together in the area of dose reconstruction in the Urals population. Most of the results presented here came from a joint work shop in St. Petersburg, Russia (11-13 July 1995). The Russians at the workshop represented the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM), the Mayak Industrial Association, and Branch One of the Moscow Biophysics Institute. The US Collaborators were Dr. Anspaugh of LLNL, Dr. Nippier of PNL, and Dr. Bouville of the National Cancer Institute. The objective of the first year of collaboration was to look at the source term and levels of radiation contamination, the historical data available, and the results of previous work carried out by Russian scientists, and to determine a conceptual model for dose reconstruction.

  3. Awareness to sun exposure and use of sunscreen by the general population.

    PubMed

    Al Robaee, Ahmad A

    2010-11-01

    Sun exposure has a pathogenic effect on the development of skin cancer, whose prevalence increases worldwide. Educational programs are carried out to change high risk sun exposure behaviours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of Saudi population regarding sun exposure and the risk of skin cancers, as well as to study their sun-protective attitudes and practices. A cross-sectional population-based survey using specially devised questionnaire on a stratified random sample of general population in Qassim Province between January and March 2010. One thousand three hundred and seventy six persons participated in the study. A high sun exposure of more than 10 hours per week was reported by 661 persons (48%). Fifty six percent of respondents were aware of the association between sun exposure and skin cancer but the rate of sun screen use was only 8.3%. Socio-demographic factors more likely to be associated with sunscreen use were: females, higher social class, higher levels of education, type 4 skin and married individuals. This study has indicated a low rate of sunscreen use by our population despite reasonably good knowledge about the hazards of sun exposure. This necessitates the need for health education program. We hope that the results of our study will be used for setting up a sun policy for Saudi general public.

  4. Applicability of western chemical dietary exposure models to the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shizhen; Price, Oliver; Liu, Zhengtao; Jones, Kevin C; Sweetman, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    A range of exposure models, which have been developed in Europe and North America, are playing an increasingly important role in priority setting and the risk assessment of chemicals. However, the applicability of these tools, which are based on Western dietary exposure pathways, to estimate chemical exposure to the Chinese population to support the development of a risk-based environment and exposure assessment, is unclear. Three frequently used modelling tools, EUSES, RAIDAR and ACC-HUMANsteady, have been evaluated in terms of human dietary exposure estimation by application to a range of chemicals with different physicochemical properties under both model default and Chinese dietary scenarios. Hence, the modelling approaches were assessed by considering dietary pattern differences only. The predicted dietary exposure pathways were compared under both scenarios using a range of hypothetical and current emerging contaminants. Although the differences across models are greater than those between dietary scenarios, model predictions indicated that dietary preference can have a significant impact on human exposure, with the relatively high consumption of vegetables and cereals resulting in higher exposure via plants-based foodstuffs under Chinese consumption patterns compared to Western diets. The selected models demonstrated a good ability to identify key dietary exposure pathways which can be used for screening purposes and an evaluative risk assessment. However, some model adaptations will be required to cover a number of important Chinese exposure pathways, such as freshwater farmed-fish, grains and pork.

  5. Combining a Job-Exposure Matrix with Exposure Measurements to Assess Occupational Exposure to Benzene in a Population Cohort in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Melissa C.; Coble, Joseph B.; Lu, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ji, Bu-Tian; Xue, Shouzheng; Portengen, Lutzen; Chow, Wong-Ho; Gao, Yu-Tang; Yang, Gong; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Generic job-exposure matrices (JEMs) are often used in population-based epidemiologic studies to assess occupational risk factors when only the job and industry information of each subject is available. JEM ratings are often based on professional judgment, are usually ordinal or semi-quantitative, and often do not account for changes in exposure over time. We present an empirical Bayesian framework that combines ordinal subjective JEM ratings with benzene measurements. Our aim was to better discriminate between job, industry, and time differences in exposure levels compared to using a JEM alone. Methods: We combined 63 221 short-term area air measurements of benzene exposure (1954–2000) collected during routine health and safety inspections in Shanghai, China, with independently developed JEM intensity ratings for each job and industry using a mixed-effects model. The fixed-effects terms included the JEM intensity ratings for job and industry (both ordinal, 0–3) and a time trend that we incorporated as a b-spline. The random-effects terms included job (n = 33) and industry nested within job (n = 399). We predicted the benzene concentration in two ways: (i) a calibrated JEM estimate was calculated using the fixed-effects model parameters for calendar year and JEM intensity ratings; (ii) a job-/industry-specific estimate was calculated using the fixed-effects model parameters and the best linear unbiased predictors from the random effects for job and industry using an empirical Bayes estimation procedure. Finally, we applied the predicted benzene exposures to a prospective population-based cohort of women in Shanghai, China (n = 74 942). Results: Exposure levels were 13 times higher in 1965 than in 2000 and declined at a rate that varied from 4 to 15% per year from 1965 to 1985, followed by a small peak in the mid-1990s. The job-/industry-specific estimates had greater differences between exposure levels than the calibrated JEM estimates (97.5th

  6. PM2.5 Population Exposure in New Delhi Using a Probabilistic Simulation Framework.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Arvind; Kandlikar, Milind; Brauer, Michael; Srivastava, Arun

    2016-03-15

    This paper presents a Geographical Information System (GIS) based probabilistic simulation framework to estimate PM2.5 population exposure in New Delhi, India. The framework integrates PM2.5 output from spatiotemporal LUR models and trip distribution data using a Gravity model based on zonal data for population, employment and enrollment in educational institutions. Time-activity patterns were derived from a survey of randomly sampled individuals (n = 1012) and in-vehicle exposure was estimated using microenvironmental monitoring data based on field measurements. We simulated population exposure for three different scenarios to capture stay-at-home populations (Scenario 1), working population exposed to near-road concentrations during commutes (Scenario 2), and the working population exposed to on-road concentrations during commutes (Scenario 3). Simulated annual average levels of PM2.5 exposure across the entire city were very high, and particularly severe in the winter months: ∼200 μg m(-3) in November, roughly four times higher compared to the lower levels in the monsoon season. Mean annual exposures ranged from 109 μg m(-3) (IQR: 97-120 μg m(-3)) for Scenario 1, to 121 μg m(-3) (IQR: 110-131 μg m(-3)), and 125 μg m(-3) (IQR: 114-136 μ gm(-3)) for Scenarios 2 and 3 respectively. Ignoring the effects of mobility causes the average annual PM2.5 population exposure to be underestimated by only 11%. PMID:26885573

  7. A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PARTICULATE MATTER: CASE STUDY RESULTS FOR PM 2.5 IN PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A population exposure model for particulate matter (PM), called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS-PM) model, has been developed and applied in a case study of daily PM2.5 exposures for the population living in Philadelphia, PA. SHEDS-PM is a probabilisti...

  8. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  9. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  10. Benzo(a)pyrene in Europe: Ambient air concentrations, population exposure and health effects.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C B B; Horálek, J; de Leeuw, F; Couvidat, F

    2016-07-01

    This study estimated current benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) concentration levels, population exposure and potential health impacts of exposure to ambient air BaP in Europe. These estimates were done by combining the best available information from observations and chemical transport models through the use of spatial interpolation methods. Results show large exceedances of the European target value for BaP in 2012 over large areas, particularly in central-eastern Europe. Results also show large uncertainties in the concentration estimates in regions with a few or no measurement stations. The estimation of the population exposure to BaP concentrations and its health impacts was limited to 60% of the European population, covering only the modelled areas which met the data quality requirement for modelling of BaP concentrations set by the European directive 2004/107/EC. The population exposure estimate shows that 20% of the European population is exposed to BaP background ambient concentrations above the EU target value and only 7% live in areas with concentrations under the estimated acceptable risk level of 0.12 ng m(-3). This exposure leads to an estimated 370 lung cancer incidences per year, for the 60% of the European population included in the estimation. Emissions of BaP have increased in the last decade with the increase in emissions from household combustion of biomass. At the same time, climate mitigation policies are promoting the use of biomass burning for domestic heating. The current study shows that there is a need for more BaP measurements in areas of low measurement density, particularly where high concentrations are expected, e.g. in Romania, Bulgaria, and other Balkan states. Furthermore, this study shows that the health risk posed by PAH exposure calls for better coordination between air quality and climate mitigation policies in Europe.

  11. SHEDS-PM: A POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR PREDICTING DISTRIBUTIONS OF PM EXPOSURE AND DOSE FROM BOTH OUTDOOR AND INDOOR SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has developed a population exposure and dose model for particulate matter (PM), called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) model. SHEDS-PM uses a probabilistic approach that incorporates both variabi...

  12. Population exposure to power-frequency fields: concepts, components, and control

    SciTech Connect

    Florig, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    There are many sources of population exposures to power-frequency (50/60 Hz) electric and magnetic fields including household appliances and wiring, neighborhood distribution circuits, and high-voltage transmission lines. Bioeffects studies were unable to demonstrate that exposures to power-frequency fields can affect public health. Researcher have likewise been unable to show that the health effects of such exposures are negligible. State and federal regulatory agencies are, therefore, grappling with questions of whether and how to regulate the sitting or design of new extra high-voltage transmission lines so as to control the ground-level fields to which people are exposed. The purpose of this dissertation is to illuminate some of the exposure-related aspects of these question. A taxonomy of the relationship between field encounter and effect is developed to clarify the meaning of terms such as exposure and dose in the power-frequency context. The major inputs to models of population dose from power-frequency electric fields are identified. The inputs that contribute most to uncertainty in population dose are shown to be the population distribution around overhead lines, the degree to which various objects shield people from overhead line electric fields, and the body currents that are induced by the non-uniform fields associated with appliances and other indoor sources.

  13. Correlates of exposure to second-hand smoke in an urban Mediterranean population

    PubMed Central

    Twose, Jorge; Schiaffino, Anna; García, Montse; Borras, Josep Maria; Fernández, Esteve

    2007-01-01

    Background To describe the socio-demographic factors associated with exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS) in different settings (home, leisure, and workplace). Methods We analysed cross-sectional data on self-reported SHS exposure in 1059 non-daily smokers interviewed in the Cornellà Health Interview Survey Follow-up Study in 2002. We calculated age-adjusted prevalence rates and prevalence rate ratios of SHS exposure at home, at the workplace, during leisure time, and in any of these settings. Results The age-standardized prevalence rate of SHS exposure in any setting was 69.5% in men and 62.9% in women. Among men, 25.9% reported passive smoking at home, 55.1% during leisure time, and 34.0% at the workplace. Among women, prevalence rates in these settings were 34.1%, 44.3% and 30.1%, respectively. Overall exposure to SHS decreased with age in both men and women. In men, SHS exposure was related to marital status, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol intake. In women, SHS exposure was related to educational level, marital status, occupational status, self-perceived health, smoking-related illness, and alcohol intake. Conclusion The prevalence of SHS exposure in this population was high. The strongest association with exposure were found for age and occupational status in men, and age and educational level in women. PMID:17683585

  14. Population exposure to ultraviolet radiation in Finland 1920-1995: Exposure trends and a time-series analysis of exposure and cutaneous melanoma incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, Katja . E-mail: katja.kojo@uta.fi; Jansen, Christer T.; Nybom, Pia; Huurto, Laura; Laihia, Jarmo; Ilus, Taina; Auvinen, Anssi

    2006-05-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the principal cause of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). However, the relation between CMM and UVR exposure is not clear. We present the trends of population exposure to UVR and conduct a time-series analysis of the relation between UVR exposure and incidence of CMM. Data on CMM incidence were obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Clothing coverage of the body was scored from archival photographs and the proportion of uncovered skin was used as a measure of solar exposure. Information on the number of sunny resort holidays, duration of annual holidays, and sunscreen sales were obtained from various sources. Exposed skin area doubled from 1920 to 1985. The average duration of annual holidays increased 30-fold. The number of sunny resort holidays and the sales of sunscreens increased rapidly from 1980. CMM was most strongly associated with solar exposure of 5-19 years earlier. There is a considerable decrease in clothing coverage during the 20th century. UVR exposure preceding CMM occurrence 4 years or less does not appear relevant, whereas the period 5-19 years prior to CMM occurrence might be the most relevant period. However, findings of ecological studies may not be applicable at the individual level.

  15. Should I stay or should I go? Fitness costs and benefits of prolonged parent-offspring and sibling-sibling associations in an Arctic-nesting goose population.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Mitch D; Bearhop, Stuart; Hilton, Geoff M; Walsh, Alyn J; Weegman, Kaitlin M; Hodgson, David J; Fox, Anthony David

    2016-07-01

    Theory predicts persistence of long-term family relationships in vertebrates will occur until perceived fitness costs exceed benefits to either parents or offspring. We examined whether increased breeding probability and survival were associated with prolonged parent-offspring and sibling-sibling relationships in a long-lived Arctic migrant herbivore, the Greenland white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons flavirostris). Although offspring associated with parents for 1-13 years, 79 % of these associations lasted two or less years. Only 65 (9.9 %) of the 656 marked offspring bred once in their lifetime, and just 16 (2.4 %) bred twice or more. The probability of birds with siblings breeding successfully in a subsequent year was credibly greater than that of independent birds at ages 5, 6, and 7. Survival of offspring with parents was credibly greater than that of independent/nonbreeder birds at all possible ages (i.e., ages 2-7+). A cost-benefit matrix model utilizing breeding and survival probabilities showed that staying with family groups was favored over leaving until age 3, after which there were no credible differences between staying and leaving strategies until the oldest ages, when leaving family groups was favored. Thus, most birds in this study either departed family groups early (e.g., at age 2, when the "stay" strategy was favored) or as predicted by our cost-benefit model (i.e., at age 3). Although extended family associations are a feature of this population, we contend that the survival benefits are not sufficient enough to yield clear fitness benefits, and associations only persist because parents and offspring mutually benefit from their persistence. PMID:26995680

  16. Should I stay or should I go? Fitness costs and benefits of prolonged parent-offspring and sibling-sibling associations in an Arctic-nesting goose population.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Mitch D; Bearhop, Stuart; Hilton, Geoff M; Walsh, Alyn J; Weegman, Kaitlin M; Hodgson, David J; Fox, Anthony David

    2016-07-01

    Theory predicts persistence of long-term family relationships in vertebrates will occur until perceived fitness costs exceed benefits to either parents or offspring. We examined whether increased breeding probability and survival were associated with prolonged parent-offspring and sibling-sibling relationships in a long-lived Arctic migrant herbivore, the Greenland white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons flavirostris). Although offspring associated with parents for 1-13 years, 79 % of these associations lasted two or less years. Only 65 (9.9 %) of the 656 marked offspring bred once in their lifetime, and just 16 (2.4 %) bred twice or more. The probability of birds with siblings breeding successfully in a subsequent year was credibly greater than that of independent birds at ages 5, 6, and 7. Survival of offspring with parents was credibly greater than that of independent/nonbreeder birds at all possible ages (i.e., ages 2-7+). A cost-benefit matrix model utilizing breeding and survival probabilities showed that staying with family groups was favored over leaving until age 3, after which there were no credible differences between staying and leaving strategies until the oldest ages, when leaving family groups was favored. Thus, most birds in this study either departed family groups early (e.g., at age 2, when the "stay" strategy was favored) or as predicted by our cost-benefit model (i.e., at age 3). Although extended family associations are a feature of this population, we contend that the survival benefits are not sufficient enough to yield clear fitness benefits, and associations only persist because parents and offspring mutually benefit from their persistence.

  17. Implications of persistent exposure to treated wastewater effluent for breeding in wild roach (Rutilus rutilus) populations.

    PubMed

    Lange, Anke; Paull, Gregory C; Hamilton, Patrick B; Iguchi, Taisen; Tyler, Charles R

    2011-02-15

    Feminized responses are widespread in wild populations of roach, Rutilus rutilus, living in UK rivers, and some of these responses have been shown to arise as a consequence of exposure to wastewater treatment works (WwTW) effluent discharges and the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) they contain. The causation of the ovotestis condition in wild roach, however, has yet to be established. Furthermore, the impact of long-term exposure to WwTW effluents on the reproductive fitness of wild fish populations is not known, and this information is crucial for population level effect assessments. We undertook a chronic exposure of roach to a treated estrogenic wastewater effluent for up to 3.5 years to assess principally for effects on subsequent reproductive fitness, as determined through parentage analysis on offspring from a competitive breeding study. In generating the fish for the breeding study we found that exposure to full strength WwTW effluent until sexual maturity resulted in sex reversal in almost all males in the population; 98% of the exposed fish were phenotypic females, containing ovaries. Furthermore, fish exposed to a 50% dilution of WwTW effluent contained ovotestis (21% of the male roach) that was absent from the control population. In competitive breeding studies, and applying DNA microsatellites to assess parentage, we show that presumptive females exposed to sexual maturity to WwTW effluent bred normally, albeit in the absence of nonexposed females, but putative sex-reversed males breeding as females contributed poorly, if at all, in a breeding population, depending on the competition. These novel findings on sex reversal add a new dimension for impact assessments of exposure to WwTW effluents on fish populations.

  18. Estimating the long-term historic evolution of exposure to flooding of coastal populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. J.; Clarke, D.; Nicholls, R. J.; Wadey, M. P.

    2015-02-01

    Coastal managers face the task of assessing and managing flood risk. This requires knowledge of the area of land, the number of people, properties and other infrastructure potentially affected by floods. Such analyses are usually static; i.e. they only consider a snapshot of the current situation. This misses the opportunity to learn about the role of key drivers of historical changes in flood risk, such as development and population rise in the coastal flood plain and sea-level rise. In this paper, we develop and apply a method to analyse the temporal evolution of residential population exposure to coastal flooding. It uses readily available data in a GIS environment. We examine how population and sea level change modify exposure over two centuries in two neighbouring coastal sites: Portsea and Hayling Islands on the UK south coast. The analysis shows that flood exposure changes as a result of increases in population, changes in coastal population density and sea level rise. The results indicate that to date, population change is the dominant driver of the increase in exposure to flooding in the study sites, but climate change may outweigh this in the future. A full analysis of flood risk is not possible as data on historic defences and wider vulnerability are not available. Hence, the historic evolution of flood exposure is as close as we can get to a historic evolution of flood risk. The method is applicable anywhere that suitable floodplain geometry, sea level and population datasets are available and could be widely applied, and will help inform coastal managers of the time evolution in coastal flood drivers.

  19. Estimating the long-term historic evolution of exposure to flooding of coastal populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. J.; Clarke, D.; Nicholls, R. J.; Wadey, M. P.

    2015-06-01

    Coastal managers face the task of assessing and managing flood risk. This requires knowledge of the area of land, the number of people, properties and other infrastructure potentially affected by floods. Such analyses are usually static; i.e. they only consider a snapshot of the current situation. This misses the opportunity to learn about the role of key drivers of historical changes in flood risk, such as development and population rise in the coastal flood plain, as well as sea-level rise. In this paper, we develop and apply a method to analyse the temporal evolution of residential population exposure to coastal flooding. It uses readily available data in a GIS environment. We examine how population and sea-level change have modified exposure over two centuries in two neighbouring coastal sites: Portsea and Hayling Islands on the UK south coast. The analysis shows that flood exposure changes as a result of increases in population, changes in coastal population density and sea level rise. The results indicate that to date, population change is the dominant driver of the increase in exposure to flooding in the study sites, but climate change may outweigh this in the future. A full analysis of changing flood risk is not possible as data on historic defences and wider vulnerability are not available. Hence, the historic evolution of flood exposure is as close as we can get to a historic evolution of flood risk. The method is applicable anywhere that suitable floodplain geometry, sea level and population data sets are available and could be widely applied, and will help inform coastal managers of the time evolution in coastal flood drivers.

  20. The effects of different ozone exposures on three contrasting populations of Plantago major.

    PubMed

    Pearson, S; Davison, A W; Reiling, K; Ashenden, T; Ollerenshaw, J H

    1996-03-01

    Plantago major grows throughout Britain in a range of ozone climates. Because populations have been shown to differ in ozone resistance, the aim of the experiment was to compare the reaction of populations from contrasting ozone climates to different types of ozone exposure. Three populations were grown under controlled conditions in five different ozone treatments (including controls for 10 wk. Development, growth, stomatal conductance and seed production were recorded. Populations were from the south coast of England (Lullington), near a mountain summit (Great Dun Fell) and lowland Scotland (Bush). Ozone treatments were: charcoal and Purafil filtered air (CF); 35 nl l(-1) for 24 h every day: 70 nl l(-1) h for 7 h everyday: CF then three episodes each week of 70 nl l(-1) for 7 h; and 35 nl l(-1) continuously plus three 7 h episodes each week of 70 nl l(-1) . The different ozone treatments resulted in different responses in each population. Ozone promoted senescence in the Great Dun Fell population but not in the others; it reduced root growth more in the Lullington population than in the others but those from Lullington and Great Dun Fell maintained seed production to a much greater extent than the Bush population. The reproductive effort (number of seeds g(-1) of vegetative weight) actually increased in ozone in the Lullington and Great Dun Fell populations. It is suggested that this might he a general stress response rather than being specifically related to ozone. Effects on stomatal conductance were similar to those previously reported and the converse of effects on seed production. The relative responses of the populations varied according to the ozone treatment. Continuous exposure to 35 n1 l(-l) reduced leaf size only in the Great Dun Fell population, but seed output was reduced in the Bush population. In some cases, giving 3-d episodes of 70 n1 l(-1) had a greater effect than giving the dose every day but the effects varied with the population. This

  1. The effects of different ozone exposures on three contrasting populations of Plantago major.

    PubMed

    Pearson, S; Davison, A W; Reiling, K; Ashenden, T; Ollerenshaw, J H

    1996-03-01

    Plantago major grows throughout Britain in a range of ozone climates. Because populations have been shown to differ in ozone resistance, the aim of the experiment was to compare the reaction of populations from contrasting ozone climates to different types of ozone exposure. Three populations were grown under controlled conditions in five different ozone treatments (including controls for 10 wk. Development, growth, stomatal conductance and seed production were recorded. Populations were from the south coast of England (Lullington), near a mountain summit (Great Dun Fell) and lowland Scotland (Bush). Ozone treatments were: charcoal and Purafil filtered air (CF); 35 nl l(-1) for 24 h every day: 70 nl l(-1) h for 7 h everyday: CF then three episodes each week of 70 nl l(-1) for 7 h; and 35 nl l(-1) continuously plus three 7 h episodes each week of 70 nl l(-1) . The different ozone treatments resulted in different responses in each population. Ozone promoted senescence in the Great Dun Fell population but not in the others; it reduced root growth more in the Lullington population than in the others but those from Lullington and Great Dun Fell maintained seed production to a much greater extent than the Bush population. The reproductive effort (number of seeds g(-1) of vegetative weight) actually increased in ozone in the Lullington and Great Dun Fell populations. It is suggested that this might he a general stress response rather than being specifically related to ozone. Effects on stomatal conductance were similar to those previously reported and the converse of effects on seed production. The relative responses of the populations varied according to the ozone treatment. Continuous exposure to 35 n1 l(-l) reduced leaf size only in the Great Dun Fell population, but seed output was reduced in the Bush population. In some cases, giving 3-d episodes of 70 n1 l(-1) had a greater effect than giving the dose every day but the effects varied with the population. This

  2. Effects of historic PCB exposures on the reproductive success of the Hudson River striped bass population.

    PubMed

    Barnthouse, Lawrence W; Glaser, David; Young, John

    2003-01-15

    Scientists and regulatory agencies have expressed concern that exposures to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) might be contributing to reductions in the abundance of fish populations exposed to these chemicals. The specific effects of concern involve impairment of fish reproduction, including both reduced egg production and decreased viability of eggs and larvae. We tested hypotheses concerning the effects of PCBs on fish populations using long-term data sets available for the striped bass population of the Hudson River, NY, a population that has long been a subject of regulatory concern because of potential effects of PCB exposures. The data sets examined include both measurements of PCB concentrations in adult female striped bass over the period from 1976 through 1997 and estimates of the numbers of striped bass eggs, larvae, and juveniles produced annually during this same period. We found strong correlations between estimates of the abundance of spawners and the number of eggs and larvae produced by those spawners and also between independent estimates of year-class strength derived from different sampling programs. However, we found no relationships between PCB exposure and any measure of striped bass abundance or reproduction. Although inconsistent with the expected effects of PCB exposures, trends in all measures of striped bass abundance and reproductive success were consistent with the expected effects of striped bass harvest restrictions that were imposed during the 1980s. Our results demonstrate a need for caution in inferring risks to populations in nature from effects observed in laboratory studies.

  3. Sensitivity of population smoke exposure to fire locations in Equatorial Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Patrick S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Koplitz, Shannon N.; Marlier, Miriam E.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Myers, Samuel S.; Chew, Boon Ning; Mao, Yuhao H.

    2015-02-01

    High smoke concentrations in Equatorial Asia, primarily from land conversion to oil palm plantations, affect a densely populated region and represent a serious but poorly quantified air quality concern. Continued expansion of the oil palm industry is expected but the resulting population exposure to smoke is highly dependent on where this expansion takes place. We use the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to map the sensitivity of smoke concentrations in major Equatorial Asian cities, and for the population-weighted region, to the locations of the fires. We find that fires in southern Sumatra are particularly detrimental, and that a land management policy protecting peatswamp forests in Southeast Sumatra would be of great air quality benefit. Our adjoint sensitivities can be used to immediately infer population exposure to smoke for any future fire emission scenario.

  4. Blood pressure, the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, and exposure to cadmium: A population study

    SciTech Connect

    Staessen, J.; Amery, A.; Bernard, A.; Bruaux, P.; Buchet, J.P.; Bulpitt, C.J.; Claeys, F.; De Plaen, P.; Ducoffre, G.; Fagard, R. )

    1991-08-01

    In a population study conducted from 1985 to 1989 in Belgium, the authors investigated whether exposure to cadmium is associated with blood pressure elevation and with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. The participants, aged 20-88 years, constituted a random sample of the households living in two low exposure areas (n = 803) and two high exposure areas (n = 1,283). For each exposure level, a rural and an urban district were selected. The cadmium levels in blood (8.5 vs. 11.0 nmol/liter) and urine (7.2 vs. 8.7 nmol/24 hours) were significantly (p less than 0.001) raised in the two high exposure areas compared with the two low exposure areas (p less than 0.001). Systolic pressure was similar in both rural areas, but in the urban area with high exposure systolic pressure was 5 mmHg (p less than 0.001) higher than in the control town. Diastolic pressure was similar in the four districts and the same was true for the prevalence of hypertension and of other cardiovascular diseases. Adjustment of systolic pressure for blood and urinary cadmium did not remove the difference in systolic pressure between both urban areas, suggesting that it was not related to the cadmium burden on the environment. Further analyses in individual subjects showed that neither blood pressure nor the presence of cardiovascular diseases were significantly and positively correlated with blood and urinary cadmium. Thus, the present population study did not confirm the hypothesis that increased exposure of the population to cadmium is associated with blood pressure elevation and with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Assessment of occupational exposures in a general population: comparison of different methods

    PubMed Central

    Tielemans, E.; Heederik, D.; Burdorf, A.; Vermeulen, R.; Veulemans, H.; Kromhout, H.; Hartog, K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relative merits of job specific questionnaires and various alternative assessment methods of occupational exposures often used in general population studies. METHODS: Subjects were participants in a hospital based case-control study of risk factors for male infertility. Estimates of exposure to organic solvents and chromium, based on job specific questionnaires, generic questionnaires, self reports of exposure, an external job exposure matrix (JEM), and a population specific JEM were compared with passive diffuse dosimeter results and measurements in urine. Urine samples from the end of the shift were analysed for metabolites of toluene, xylene, several glycol ethers, trichloroethylene, and chromium. Passive dosimeter date, metabolites of specific solvents, and urinary chromium concentrations were available for 89, 267, and 156 subjects, respectively. The alternative methods and measurements in urine were compared by means of the Cohen's kappa statistic and by computing the positive predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity of the alternative methods against measurements in urine. RESULTS: Passive dosimeter results indicated that exposure classifications with job specific questionnaire information could discriminate between high and low exposures. The kappa coefficients were < 0.4, so agreement between the various methods and measurements in urine was poor. Sensitivity of the methods ranged from 0.21 to 0.85, whereas specificity ranged from 0.34 to 0.94. Positive predictive values ranged from 0.19 to 0.58, with the highest values for job specific questionnaires. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the implementation of job specific questionnaires in a general population study might be worth the extra expense it entails, bearing in mind the paramount importance of avoiding false positive exposure estimates when exposure prevalence is low.   PMID:10448321

  6. Assessment of Population and Microenvironmental Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Wan

    A positive relationship exists between fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) exposure and adverse health effects. PM2.5 concentration-response functions used in the quantitative risk assessment were based on findings from human epidemiological studies that relied on areawide ambient concentrations as surrogate for actual ambient exposure, which cannot capture the spatial and temporal variability in human exposures. The goal of the study is to assess inter-individual, geographic and seasonal variability in population exposures to inform the interpretation of available epidemiological studies, and to improve the understanding of how exposure-related factors in important exposure microenvironments contribute to the variability in individual PM2.5 exposure. Typically, the largest percentage of time in which an individual is exposed to PM2.5 of ambient origin occurs in indoor residence, and the highest ambient PM2.5 concentrations occur in transportation microenvironments because of the proximity to on-road traffic emissions. Therefore, indoor residence and traffic-related transportation microenvironments were selected for further assessment in the study. Population distributions of individual daily PM2.5 exposures were estimated for the selected regions and seasons using the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Particulate Matter (SHEDS-PM). For the indoor residence, the current practice by assuming the entire residence to be one large single zone for calculating the indoor residential PM 2.5 concentration was evaluated by applying an indoor air quality model, RISK, to compare indoor PM2.5 concentrations between single-zone and multi-zone scenarios. For the transportation microenvironments, one field data collection focused on in-vehicle microenvironment and was conducted to quantify the variability in the in-vehicle PM2.5 concentration with respect to the outside vehicle concentration for a wide range of conditions that affect intra-vehicle variability

  7. From Exposures to Population Interventions: Pregnancy and Response to HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Westreich, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiologic studies identify contrasts between an “always-exposed” population and a “never-exposed” population. Such “exposure effects” are perhaps most valuable in discussing individual lifestyle changes, or in clinical care; they may be less valuable in estimating the potential effects of realistic public health interventions. Various methods, among them population attributable fractions and generalized impact fractions, attempt to obtain more policy-relevant estimates of “population intervention” effects, but such methods remain rare in the epidemiologic literature. Here, we describe the use of the parametric g-formula as a tool for the estimation of population intervention effects in longitudinal data. Our discussion is motivated by a previous study of the effect of incident pregnancy on time to virological failure among human immunodeficiency virus-positive women initiating antiretroviral therapy in South Africa between 2004 and 2011. We show that 1) interventional estimates of effect can be estimated in longitudinal data using the parametric g-formula and 2) exposure effects and population interventional effects can have dramatically different interpretations and magnitudes in real-world data. Epidemiologists should consider estimating interventional effects in addition to exposure effects; doing so would allow the results of epidemiologic studies to be more immediately relevant to policy-makers and to implementation science efforts. PMID:24573538

  8. The impact of urban street canyons on population exposure to traffic-related primary pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Levy, Jonathan I.

    The relationship between emissions and population exposures to traffic-related air pollutants is a necessary component of any assessment of mobile source control strategies. In this analysis, part of the New York Metropolitan Exposure to Traffic Study (NYMETS), we simulated atmospheric dispersion and population exposure in densely populated street canyons in mid-town Manhattan. We estimated population exposure using the concept of an intake fraction (iF), defined as the fraction of material released from a source that is eventually inhaled or ingested by a population. We applied the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) for inert pollutants (e.g., CO, PM 2.5), reactive pollutants (e.g., NO and NO 2), and ultrafine particles. Concentrations were linked with different subpopulations, including residents, workers, and pedestrians, incorporating time-activity patterns and differential breathing rates. For the base case scenario, the total iF for a 100-m-long street canyon including the contribution of different subpopulations is on the order of 10 -3. Daytime office workers and pedestrians contribute most to the overall iF, together contributing over 80% for all pollutants. Univariate sensitivity analyses show that iFs are sensitive to the street configuration and slightly sensitive to traffic volume, speed, and percent of trucks. Our iF estimates are similar in magnitude to those found for indoor environmental tobacco smoke and are substantially higher than previous mobile source estimates, mainly due to the higher population density in street canyons. Our findings emphasize the importance of controlling emissions in urban street canyons, and the need to study high-resolution near-source exposures for primary pollutants in urban settings to inform cost-benefit analyses.

  9. Evaluation of World Population-Weighted Effective Dose due to Cosmic Ray Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-09-21

    After the release of the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR2000), it became commonly accepted that the world population-weighted effective dose due to cosmic-ray exposure is 0.38 mSv, with a range from 0.3 to 2 mSv. However, these values were derived from approximate projections of altitude and geographic dependences of the cosmic-ray dose rates as well as the world population. This study hence re-evaluated the population-weighted annual effective doses and their probability densities for the entire world as well as for 230 individual nations, using a sophisticated cosmic-ray flux calculation model in tandem with detailed grid population and elevation databases. The resulting world population-weighted annual effective dose was determined to be 0.32 mSv, which is smaller than the UNSCEAR's evaluation by 16%, with a range from 0.23 to 0.70 mSv covering 99% of the world population. These values were noted to vary with the solar modulation condition within a range of approximately 15%. All assessed population-weighted annual effective doses as well as their statistical information for each nation are provided in the supplementary files annexed to this report. These data improve our understanding of cosmic-ray radiation exposures to populations globally.

  10. Evaluation of World Population-Weighted Effective Dose due to Cosmic Ray Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    After the release of the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR2000), it became commonly accepted that the world population-weighted effective dose due to cosmic-ray exposure is 0.38 mSv, with a range from 0.3 to 2 mSv. However, these values were derived from approximate projections of altitude and geographic dependences of the cosmic-ray dose rates as well as the world population. This study hence re-evaluated the population-weighted annual effective doses and their probability densities for the entire world as well as for 230 individual nations, using a sophisticated cosmic-ray flux calculation model in tandem with detailed grid population and elevation databases. The resulting world population-weighted annual effective dose was determined to be 0.32 mSv, which is smaller than the UNSCEAR's evaluation by 16%, with a range from 0.23 to 0.70 mSv covering 99% of the world population. These values were noted to vary with the solar modulation condition within a range of approximately 15%. All assessed population-weighted annual effective doses as well as their statistical information for each nation are provided in the supplementary files annexed to this report. These data improve our understanding of cosmic-ray radiation exposures to populations globally. PMID:27650664

  11. Evaluation of World Population-Weighted Effective Dose due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    After the release of the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR2000), it became commonly accepted that the world population-weighted effective dose due to cosmic-ray exposure is 0.38 mSv, with a range from 0.3 to 2 mSv. However, these values were derived from approximate projections of altitude and geographic dependences of the cosmic-ray dose rates as well as the world population. This study hence re-evaluated the population-weighted annual effective doses and their probability densities for the entire world as well as for 230 individual nations, using a sophisticated cosmic-ray flux calculation model in tandem with detailed grid population and elevation databases. The resulting world population-weighted annual effective dose was determined to be 0.32 mSv, which is smaller than the UNSCEAR’s evaluation by 16%, with a range from 0.23 to 0.70 mSv covering 99% of the world population. These values were noted to vary with the solar modulation condition within a range of approximately 15%. All assessed population-weighted annual effective doses as well as their statistical information for each nation are provided in the supplementary files annexed to this report. These data improve our understanding of cosmic-ray radiation exposures to populations globally. PMID:27650664

  12. Evaluation of World Population-Weighted Effective Dose due to Cosmic Ray Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-09-01

    After the release of the Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee of the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 2000 (UNSCEAR2000), it became commonly accepted that the world population-weighted effective dose due to cosmic-ray exposure is 0.38 mSv, with a range from 0.3 to 2 mSv. However, these values were derived from approximate projections of altitude and geographic dependences of the cosmic-ray dose rates as well as the world population. This study hence re-evaluated the population-weighted annual effective doses and their probability densities for the entire world as well as for 230 individual nations, using a sophisticated cosmic-ray flux calculation model in tandem with detailed grid population and elevation databases. The resulting world population-weighted annual effective dose was determined to be 0.32 mSv, which is smaller than the UNSCEAR’s evaluation by 16%, with a range from 0.23 to 0.70 mSv covering 99% of the world population. These values were noted to vary with the solar modulation condition within a range of approximately 15%. All assessed population-weighted annual effective doses as well as their statistical information for each nation are provided in the supplementary files annexed to this report. These data improve our understanding of cosmic-ray radiation exposures to populations globally.

  13. Radiofrequency exposure in the French general population: band, time, location and activity variability.

    PubMed

    Viel, Jean-François; Cardis, Elisabeth; Moissonnier, Monika; de Seze, René; Hours, Martine

    2009-11-01

    Information on the exposure of individual persons to radiofrequency (RF) fields is scarce, although such data are crucial in order to develop a suitable exposure assessment method, and frame the hypothesis and design of future epidemiological studies. The main goal of this survey is to assess individual RF exposure on a population basis, while clarifying the relative contribution of different sources to the total exposure. A total of 377 randomly selected people were analyzed. Each participant was supplied with a personal exposure meter for 24-hour measurements (weekday), and kept a time-location-activity diary. Electric field strengths were recorded in 12 different RF bands every 13s. Summary statistics were calculated with the robust regression on order statistics method. Most of the time, recorded field strengths were not detectable with the exposure meter. Total field, cordless phones, WiFi-microwave, and FM transmitters stood apart with a proportion above the detection threshold of 46.6%, 17.2%, 14.1%, and 11.0%, respectively. The total field mean value was 0.201V/m, higher in urban areas, during daytime, among adults, and when moving. When focusing on specific channels, the highest mean exposure resulted from FM sources (0.044V/m), followed by WiFi-microwaves (0.038V/m), cordless phones (0.037V/m), and mobile phones (UMTS: 0.036V/m, UMTS: 0.037V/m). Various factors, however, contributed to a high variability in RF exposure assessment. These population-based estimates should therefore be confirmed by further surveys to better characterize the exposure situation in different microenvironments.

  14. Is chrysotile asbestos exposure a significant health risk to the general population?

    PubMed

    Valić, F; Beritic-Stahuljak, D

    1993-06-01

    The main unresolved issues concerning environmental exposure to chrysotile asbestos of the general population are discussed. A review of the results of the measurement of airborne chrysotile fibres in buildings is presented showing that the results have been consistently low with the exception of buildings with damaged friable asbestos-containing material. Quantitative risk assessments are presented indicating that the lifetime risk is small compared to many other environmental risks. Possible adverse health effects of paraoccupational exposures in the case of high domestic airborne asbestos levels cannot be excluded. Both on the basis of electron microscopy analyses of asbestos exposures at locations with heavy traffic, and the very shallow slopes in the exposure-response relationships for increased lung cancer risk, the conclusion is drawn that exposure to airborne asbestos-containing friction materials has not been proven to pose a significant health risk to the general population. Reviewing animal ingestion studies published and all the available epidemiological studies related to asbestos in drinking water, the conclusion is drawn that the carcinogenic risk in the general population is low even in the case of drinking water containing elevated concentrations of chrysotile asbestos.

  15. Dietary acrylamide exposure of the French population: results of the second French Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Sirot, Véronique; Hommet, Frédéric; Tard, Alexandra; Leblanc, Jean-Charles

    2012-03-01

    Acrylamide is a heat-induced carcinogen compound that is found in some foods consequently to cooking or other thermal processes. In the second French Total Diet Study (TDS), acrylamide was analysed in 192 food samples collected in mainland France to be representative of the population diet and prepared "as consumed". Highest mean concentrations were found in potato chips/crisps (954 μg/kg), French fries and other fried potatoes (724 μg/kg), and salted biscuits other than potato chips (697 μg/kg). Exposure of general adult and child populations was assessed by combining analytical results with national consumption data. Mean acrylamide exposure was assessed to be 0.43±0.33 μg/kg of body weight (bw) per day for adults and 0.69±0.58 μg/kg bw/day for children. Although the exposure assessed is lower than in previous evaluations, the calculated margins of exposure, based on benchmark dose limits defined for carcinogenic effects, remain very low especially for young children (below 100 at the 95th percentile of exposure), indicating a health concern. It is therefore advisable to continue efforts in order to reduce dietary exposure to acrylamide.

  16. Matrix Population Model for Estimating Effects from Time-Varying Aquatic Exposures: Technical Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Pesticide Programs models daily aquatic pesticide exposure values for 30 years in its risk assessments. However, only a fraction of that information is typically used in these assessments. The population model employed herein is a deterministic, density-dependent pe...

  17. COMPARISONS OF PESTICIDE LEVELS AND EXPOSURES IN NHEXAS ARIZONA AND ARIZONA-MEXICO BORDER POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distributions of organophosphate (OP) insecticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon in exposure matrices such as indoor air, house dust, food, and water have been determined for 416 homes in the general Arizona population, and for 87 homes along the Arizona-Mexico border. The con...

  18. ASSESSING EXPOSURES TO MOBILE SOURCE AIR TOXIC EMISSIONS FOR POPULATIONS LIVING NEAR ROADWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A growing number of epidemiological studies have identified an increase in occurrence of adverse health effects for populations living near major roads. However, the biological mechanism(s) leading to the adverse effects have not been identified. Limitations in exposure assessm...

  19. Pathogen exposure and blood chemistry in the Washington population of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from Washington State were evaluated in 2011 to determine health status and pathogen exposure. Antibodies to Brucella spp. (10%) and influenza A (23%) were detected for the first time in this population in 2011. Changes in clinical pathology values (serum...

  20. Human lead exposure in a late 19th century mental asylum population.

    PubMed

    Bower, Nathan W; McCants, Sarah A; Custodio, Joseph M; Ketterer, Michael E; Getty, Stephen R; Hoffman, J Michael

    2007-01-01

    Lead isotope ratios and lead (Pb) levels were analyzed in 33 individuals from a forgotten cemetery at the Colorado Mental Health Institute at Pueblo, Colorado dating to 1879-1899. Isotopic ratios from healing bone fractures, cortical bone, and tooth dentine provide information about sources of Pb exposures over a range of time that illuminates individual's life histories and migration patterns. Historical records and Pb production data from the 19th century were used to create a database for interpreting Pb exposures for these African, Hispanic and European Americans. The analysis of these individuals suggests that Pb exposure noticeably impacted the mental health of 5-10% of the asylum patients in this frontier population, a high number by standards today, and that differences exist in the three ancestral groups' exposure histories.

  1. THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PERSONAL PM EXPOSURES FOR ELDERLY POPULATIONS AND INDOOR AND OUTDOOR CONCENTRATIONS FOR THREE RETIREMENT CENTER SCENARIOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure, indoor and outdoor concentration, "physical factor", and questionnaire data were collected in three retirement center settings, supporting broader PM-health studies of elderly populations. The studies varied geographically and temporally, with popul...

  2. Simulation of population-based commuter exposure to NO₂ using different air pollution models.

    PubMed

    Ragettli, Martina S; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; de Nazelle, Audrey; Schindler, Christian; Ineichen, Alex; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Perez, Laura; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C

    2014-05-12

    We simulated commuter routes and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution during commute in a representative population sample in Basel (Switzerland), and evaluated three air pollution models with different spatial resolution for estimating commute exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Our approach includes spatially and temporally resolved data on actual commuter routes, travel modes and three air pollution models. Annual mean NO2 commuter exposures were similar between models. However, we found more within-city and within-subject variability in annual mean (±SD) NO2 commuter exposure with a high resolution dispersion model (40 ± 7 µg m(-3), range: 21-61) than with a dispersion model with a lower resolution (39 ± 5 µg m(-3); range: 24-51), and a land use regression model (41 ± 5 µg m(-3); range: 24-54). Highest median cumulative exposures were calculated along motorized transport and bicycle routes, and the lowest for walking. For estimating commuter exposure within a city and being interested also in small-scale variability between roads, a model with a high resolution is recommended. For larger scale epidemiological health assessment studies, models with a coarser spatial resolution are likely sufficient, especially when study areas include suburban and rural areas.

  3. Simulation of Population-Based Commuter Exposure to NO2 Using Different Air Pollution Models

    PubMed Central

    Ragettli, Martina S.; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; de Nazelle, Audrey; Schindler, Christian; Ineichen, Alex; Ducret-Stich, Regina E.; Perez, Laura; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Künzli, Nino; Phuleria, Harish C.

    2014-01-01

    We simulated commuter routes and long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution during commute in a representative population sample in Basel (Switzerland), and evaluated three air pollution models with different spatial resolution for estimating commute exposures to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution. Our approach includes spatially and temporally resolved data on actual commuter routes, travel modes and three air pollution models. Annual mean NO2 commuter exposures were similar between models. However, we found more within-city and within-subject variability in annual mean (±SD) NO2 commuter exposure with a high resolution dispersion model (40 ± 7 µg m−3, range: 21–61) than with a dispersion model with a lower resolution (39 ± 5 µg m−3; range: 24–51), and a land use regression model (41 ± 5 µg m−3; range: 24–54). Highest median cumulative exposures were calculated along motorized transport and bicycle routes, and the lowest for walking. For estimating commuter exposure within a city and being interested also in small-scale variability between roads, a model with a high resolution is recommended. For larger scale epidemiological health assessment studies, models with a coarser spatial resolution are likely sufficient, especially when study areas include suburban and rural areas. PMID:24823664

  4. A behavioral model for estimating population exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Determining the variability of solar UV exposure of different members of a population by direct measurement demands high compliance over an extended period of time by a large number of people. An alternative approach is to model the variables that affect personal exposure and this is the basis of the method reported here, which uses a random sampling technique to explore variability of exposure at different times of the year by habitués. It is shown that there are large variations in daily personal erythemal exposure, more so for indoor workers living in northern Europe than those resident in Florida, which are due not only to seasonal changes in ambient, but just as importantly to seasonal variation in behavior. Not surprisingly, holiday and summer weekend exposure account for the largest daily UV doses. Northern Europeans who take their summer vacation in Florida can double their exposure during this period compared with holidaying at home and this illustrates just how important sun protection measures should be during recreational exposure in areas of high insolation if the annual UV burden is to be sensibly controlled. PMID:18208455

  5. Variations in population exposure and sensitivity to lahar hazards from Mount Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Nathan; Soulard, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    Although much has been done to understand, quantify, and delineate volcanic hazards, there are fewer efforts to assess societal vulnerability to these hazards, particularly demographic differences in exposed populations or spatial variations in exposure to regional hazards. To better understand population diversity in volcanic hazard zones, we assess the number and types of people in a single type of hazard zone (lahars) for 27 communities downstream of Mount Rainier, Washington (USA). Using various socioeconomic and hazard datasets, we estimate that there are more than 78 000 residents, 59 000 employees, several dependent-population facilities (e.g., child-day-care centers, nursing homes) and numerous public venues (e.g., churches, hotels, museums) in a Mount Rainier lahar-hazard zone. We find that communities vary in the primary category of individuals in lahar-prone areas—exposed populations are dominated by residents in some communities (e.g., Auburn), employees in others (e.g., Tacoma), and tourists likely outnumber both of these groups in yet other areas (e.g., unincorporated Lewis County). Population exposure to potential lahar inundation varies considerably—some communities (e.g., Auburn) have large numbers of people but low percentages of them in hazard zones, whereas others (e.g., Orting) have fewer people but they comprise the majority of a community. A composite lahar-exposure index is developed to help emergency managers understand spatial variations in community exposure to lahars and results suggest that Puyallup has the highest combination of high numbers and percentages of people and assets in lahar-prone areas. Risk education and preparedness needs will vary based on who is threatened by future lahars, such as residents, employees, tourists at a public venue, or special-needs populations at a dependent-care facility. Emergency managers must first understand the people whom they are trying to prepare before they can expect these people to take

  6. Inhalation exposure to ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and lung cancer risk of Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanxu; Tao, Shu; Shen, Huizhong; Ma, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    An Euler atmospheric transport model (Canadian Model for Environmental Transport of Organochlorine Pesticides, CanMETOP) was applied and validated to estimate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ambient air concentrations at ground level in China based on a high-resolution emission inventory. The results were used to evaluate lung cancer risk for the Chinese population caused by inhalation exposure to PAHs. The uncertainties of the transport model, exposure, and risk analysis were assessed by using Monte Carlo simulation, taking into consideration the variation in PAH emission, aerosol and OH radical concentrations, dry deposition, respiration rate, and genetic susceptibility. The average benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration (B[a]Peq) was 2.43 [≈1.29–4.50 as interquartile range (IR)] ng/m3. The population-weighted B[a]Peq was 7.64 (IR, ≈4.05–14.1) ng/m3 because of the spatial overlap of the emissions and population density. It was estimated that 5.8% (IR, ≈2.0–11%) of China's land area, where 30% (IR, ≈17–43%) of the population lives, exceeded the national ambient B[a]Peq standard of 10 ng/m3. Taking into consideration the variation in exposure concentration, respiration rate, and susceptibility, the overall population attributable fraction (PAF) for lung cancer caused by inhalation exposure to PAHs was 1.6% (IR, ≈0.91–2.6%), corresponding to an excess annual lung cancer incidence rate of 0.65 × 10−5. Although the spatial variability was high, the lung cancer risk in eastern China was higher than in western China, and populations in major cities had a higher risk of lung cancer than rural areas. An extremely high PAF of >44% was estimated in isolated locations near small-scale coke oven operations. PMID:19995969

  7. Variations in population exposure and sensitivity to lahar hazards from Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, N.; Soulard, C.

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been done to understand, quantify, and delineate volcanic hazards, there are fewer efforts to assess societal vulnerability to these hazards, particularly demographic differences in exposed populations or spatial variations in exposure to regional hazards. To better understand population diversity in volcanic hazard zones, we assess the number and types of people in a single type of hazard zone (lahars) for 27 communities downstream of Mount Rainier, Washington (USA). Using various socioeconomic and hazard datasets, we estimate that there are more than 78 000 residents, 59 000 employees, several dependent-population facilities (e.g., child-day-care centers, nursing homes) and numerous public venues (e.g., churches, hotels, museums) in a Mount Rainier lahar-hazard zone. We find that communities vary in the primary category of individuals in lahar-prone areas-exposed populations are dominated by residents in some communities (e.g., Auburn), employees in others (e.g., Tacoma), and tourists likely outnumber both of these groups in yet other areas (e.g., unincorporated Lewis County). Population exposure to potential lahar inundation varies considerably-some communities (e.g., Auburn) have large numbers of people but low percentages of them in hazard zones, whereas others (e.g., Orting) have fewer people but they comprise the majority of a community. A composite lahar-exposure index is developed to help emergency managers understand spatial variations in community exposure to lahars and results suggest that Puyallup has the highest combination of high numbers and percentages of people and assets in lahar-prone areas. Risk education and preparedness needs will vary based on who is threatened by future lahars, such as residents, employees, tourists at a public venue, or special-needs populations at a dependent-care facility. Emergency managers must first understand the people whom they are trying to prepare before they can expect these people to take

  8. Inhalation exposure to ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and lung cancer risk of Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxu; Tao, Shu; Shen, Huizhong; Ma, Jianmin

    2009-12-15

    An Euler atmospheric transport model (Canadian Model for Environmental Transport of Organochlorine Pesticides, CanMETOP) was applied and validated to estimate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ambient air concentrations at ground level in China based on a high-resolution emission inventory. The results were used to evaluate lung cancer risk for the Chinese population caused by inhalation exposure to PAHs. The uncertainties of the transport model, exposure, and risk analysis were assessed by using Monte Carlo simulation, taking into consideration the variation in PAH emission, aerosol and OH radical concentrations, dry deposition, respiration rate, and genetic susceptibility. The average benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration (B[a]P(eq)) was 2.43 [ approximately 1.29-4.50 as interquartile range (IR)] ng/m(3). The population-weighted B[a]P(eq) was 7.64 (IR, approximately 4.05-14.1) ng/m(3) because of the spatial overlap of the emissions and population density. It was estimated that 5.8% (IR, approximately 2.0-11%) of China's land area, where 30% (IR, approximately 17-43%) of the population lives, exceeded the national ambient B[a]P(eq) standard of 10 ng/m(3). Taking into consideration the variation in exposure concentration, respiration rate, and susceptibility, the overall population attributable fraction (PAF) for lung cancer caused by inhalation exposure to PAHs was 1.6% (IR, approximately 0.91-2.6%), corresponding to an excess annual lung cancer incidence rate of 0.65 x 10(-5). Although the spatial variability was high, the lung cancer risk in eastern China was higher than in western China, and populations in major cities had a higher risk of lung cancer than rural areas. An extremely high PAF of >44% was estimated in isolated locations near small-scale coke oven operations. PMID:19995969

  9. The public health exposome: a population-based, exposure science approach to health disparities research.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Paul D; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Hood, Darryl B; Im, Wansoo; Levine, Robert S; Kilbourne, Barbara J; Langston, Michael A; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z; Crosson, William L; Estes, Maurice G; Estes, Sue M; Agboto, Vincent K; Robinson, Paul; Wilson, Sacoby; Lichtveld, Maureen Y

    2014-01-01

    The lack of progress in reducing health disparities suggests that new approaches are needed if we are to achieve meaningful, equitable, and lasting reductions. Current scientific paradigms do not adequately capture the complexity of the relationships between environment, personal health and population level disparities. The public health exposome is presented as a universal exposure tracking framework for integrating complex relationships between exogenous and endogenous exposures across the lifespan from conception to death. It uses a social-ecological framework that builds on the exposome paradigm for conceptualizing how exogenous exposures "get under the skin". The public health exposome approach has led our team to develop a taxonomy and bioinformatics infrastructure to integrate health outcomes data with thousands of sources of exogenous exposure, organized in four broad domains: natural, built, social, and policy environments. With the input of a transdisciplinary team, we have borrowed and applied the methods, tools and terms from various disciplines to measure the effects of environmental exposures on personal and population health outcomes and disparities, many of which may not manifest until many years later. As is customary with a paradigm shift, this approach has far reaching implications for research methods and design, analytics, community engagement strategies, and research training. PMID:25514145

  10. The public health exposome: a population-based, exposure science approach to health disparities research.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Paul D; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Hood, Darryl B; Im, Wansoo; Levine, Robert S; Kilbourne, Barbara J; Langston, Michael A; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z; Crosson, William L; Estes, Maurice G; Estes, Sue M; Agboto, Vincent K; Robinson, Paul; Wilson, Sacoby; Lichtveld, Maureen Y

    2014-01-01

    The lack of progress in reducing health disparities suggests that new approaches are needed if we are to achieve meaningful, equitable, and lasting reductions. Current scientific paradigms do not adequately capture the complexity of the relationships between environment, personal health and population level disparities. The public health exposome is presented as a universal exposure tracking framework for integrating complex relationships between exogenous and endogenous exposures across the lifespan from conception to death. It uses a social-ecological framework that builds on the exposome paradigm for conceptualizing how exogenous exposures "get under the skin". The public health exposome approach has led our team to develop a taxonomy and bioinformatics infrastructure to integrate health outcomes data with thousands of sources of exogenous exposure, organized in four broad domains: natural, built, social, and policy environments. With the input of a transdisciplinary team, we have borrowed and applied the methods, tools and terms from various disciplines to measure the effects of environmental exposures on personal and population health outcomes and disparities, many of which may not manifest until many years later. As is customary with a paradigm shift, this approach has far reaching implications for research methods and design, analytics, community engagement strategies, and research training.

  11. The public health exposome: a population-based, exposure science approach to health disparities research.

    PubMed

    Juarez, Paul D; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Hood, Darryl B; Im, Wansoo; Levine, Robert S; Kilbourne, Barbara J; Langston, Michael A; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z; Crosson, William L; Estes, Maurice G; Estes, Sue M; Agboto, Vincent K; Robinson, Paul; Wilson, Sacoby; Lichtveld, Maureen Y

    2014-12-01

    The lack of progress in reducing health disparities suggests that new approaches are needed if we are to achieve meaningful, equitable, and lasting reductions. Current scientific paradigms do not adequately capture the complexity of the relationships between environment,personal health and population level disparities. The public health exposome is presented as a universal exposure tracking framework for integrating complex relationships between exogenous and endogenous exposures across the lifespan from conception to death. It uses a social-ecological framework that builds on the exposome paradigm for conceptualizing how exogenous exposures “get under the skin”. The public health exposome approach hasled our team to develop a taxonomy and bioinformatics infrastructure to integrate health outcomes data with thousands of sources of exogenous exposure, organized in four broad domains: natural, built, social, and policy environments. With the input of a transdisciplinary team, we have borrowed and applied the methods, tools and terms from various disciplines to measure the effects of environmental exposures on personal and population health outcomes and disparities, many of which may not manifest until many years later. As is customary with a paradigm shift, this approach has far reaching implications for research methods and design, analytics, community engagement strategies, and research training.

  12. The Public Health Exposome: A Population-Based, Exposure Science Approach to Health Disparities Research

    PubMed Central

    Juarez, Paul D.; Matthews-Juarez, Patricia; Hood, Darryl B.; Im, Wansoo; Levine, Robert S.; Kilbourne, Barbara J.; Langston, Michael A.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad Z.; Crosson, William L.; Estes, Maurice G.; Estes, Sue M.; Agboto, Vincent K.; Robinson, Paul; Wilson, Sacoby; Lichtveld, Maureen Y.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of progress in reducing health disparities suggests that new approaches are needed if we are to achieve meaningful, equitable, and lasting reductions. Current scientific paradigms do not adequately capture the complexity of the relationships between environment, personal health and population level disparities. The public health exposome is presented as a universal exposure tracking framework for integrating complex relationships between exogenous and endogenous exposures across the lifespan from conception to death. It uses a social-ecological framework that builds on the exposome paradigm for conceptualizing how exogenous exposures “get under the skin”. The public health exposome approach has led our team to develop a taxonomy and bioinformatics infrastructure to integrate health outcomes data with thousands of sources of exogenous exposure, organized in four broad domains: natural, built, social, and policy environments. With the input of a transdisciplinary team, we have borrowed and applied the methods, tools and terms from various disciplines to measure the effects of environmental exposures on personal and population health outcomes and disparities, many of which may not manifest until many years later. As is customary with a paradigm shift, this approach has far reaching implications for research methods and design, analytics, community engagement strategies, and research training. PMID:25514145

  13. Implications for Social Support on Prolonged Sleep Difficulties among a Disaster-Affected Population: Second Report from a Cross-Sectional Survey in Ishinomaki, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Shoko; Yamaoka, Kazue; Inoue, Machiko; Inoue, Mariko; Muto, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives This study aimed to investigate the role of social factors, especially social support for sleep, among victims living at home around 1–2 years after the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami. Design A cross-sectional household survey was conducted between May and December 2012 (14–21 months after the disaster) in the Ishinomaki area, Japan. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the association between social factors, including social support, and prolonged sleep difficulties (persisting over 1 month). Social support was divided into three functions: emotional, informational, and instrumental support. Participants Data were obtained on 2,593 individuals who were living at home after the disaster. Results The prevalence of prolonged sleep difficulties was 6.9% (5.8% male, 7.7% female). This study showed that lack of social support has a stronger association with prolonged sleep difficulties than non-modifiable or hardly modifiable consequences caused directly by the disaster, i.e., severity of home damage, change in family structure and income. Among the three dimensions of social support, lack of emotional support showed the strongest association with prolonged sleep difficulties. Conclusions Social support, especially emotional support, may positively affect sleep among victims living at home around 1–2 years after a disaster. PMID:26087305

  14. Homologous recombination repair signaling in chemical carcinogenesis: prolonged particulate hexavalent chromium exposure suppresses the Rad51 response in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S; Browning, Cynthia L; Thompson, Kelsey N; Holmes, Amie L; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on hexavalent chromium, [Cr(VI)], a chemical carcinogen and major public health concern, and consider its ability to impact DNA double strand break repair. We further focused on particulate Cr(VI), because it is the more potent carcinogenic form of Cr(VI). DNA double strand break repair serves to protect cells against the detrimental effects of DNA double strand breaks. For particulate Cr(VI), data show DNA double strand break repair must be overcome for neoplastic transformation to occur. Acute Cr(VI) exposures reveal a robust DNA double strand break repair response, however, longer exposures have not been considered. Using the comet assay, we found longer exposures to particulate zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in DNA double strand breaks indicating breaks were occurring throughout the exposure time. Acute (24 h) exposure induced DNA double strand break repair signaling by inducing Mre11 foci formation, ATM phosphorylation and phosphorylated ATM foci formation, Rad51 protein levels and Rad51 foci formation. However, longer exposures reduced the Rad51 response. These data indicate a major chemical carcinogen can simultaneously induce DNA double strand breaks and alter their repair and describe a new and important aspect of the carcinogenic mechanism for Cr(VI). PMID:25173789

  15. Effects of prolonged, sequential exposure to acid fog and ozone on pulmonary function in exercising, normal subjects. Final report, 28 Feb 89-28 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Balmes, J.

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-nine apparently healthy and asymptomatic subjects were selected for a study that screened for sensitivity to ozone. After three hours of ozone exposure (at 0.20 ppm), eighteen of the subjects (46 percent) experienced a 10 percent reduction in forced expiratory volume, an indicator of exhaling ability. After four hours of exposure, 62 percent of the subjects experienced a similar reduction in expiratory volume. Further, narrowing of airways among the sensitive subjects was suggested by results of the methacholine challenge test, a standard test for measuring airway resistance. The lung capacity of all subjects decreased progressively during ozone exposures. Capacity was unchanged during acidic fog and pollutant-free air exposures. No statistically significant differences in airway resistance, airway responsiveness and symptoms that could be attributed to acid fog exposure were observed. The study indicates that exposue to fog containing nitric acid followed by exposure to ozone does not have additive or synergistic acute effects. However, the study confirms earlier indications that many apparently healthy and asymptomatic individuals are susceptible to and adversely affected by ozone at relatively low concentrations.

  16. Usage patterns of aromatherapy among the French general population: A descriptive study focusing on dermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Dornic, N; Ficheux, A S; Roudot, A C; Saboureau, D; Ezzedine, K

    2016-04-01

    Although likely benefits of aromatherapy are well documented, little is known about essential oils consumption and exposure to molecules present in the oils. The aim of our study was to determine usage patterns of 12 types of essential oils among a quite large panel, sorted per sex and quintile of age from birth to 70. A survey was conducted in September 2014 among 1507 French individuals, selected to build a representative panel of the general population. The key point of our study, apart from the fact that it has never been done among general population, was the focus on dermal exposure. Information about types of essential oils used, skin areas exposed, frequencies and quantities were collected. Our work revealed that some sub-populations could be significantly exposed to molecules of toxicological concern, especially in terms of skin sensitization. This work is the first step to assess human exposure to these molecules, and will help safety authorities and risk managers to protect the population. PMID:26826550

  17. Trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder and depression in an African-American primary care population.

    PubMed Central

    Alim, Tanya N.; Graves, Elaine; Mellman, Thomas A.; Aigbogun, Notalelomwan; Gray, Ekwenzi; Lawson, William; Charney, Dennis S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Trauma exposure is high in African Americans who live in stressful urban environments. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression are common outcomes of trauma exposure and are understudied in African Americans. African Americans are more likely to seek treatment for psychiatric disorders in a primary care setting. Our study evaluated trauma exposure, PTSD and major depression in African Americans attending primary care offices. METHOD: Six-hundred-seventeen patients (96% African Americans) were surveyed for trauma exposure in the waiting rooms of four primary care offices. Those patients reporting significant traumatic events were invited to a research interview. Of the 403 patients with trauma exposure, 279 participated. RESULTS: Of the 617 participants, 65% reported > or = 1 clearly traumatic event. The most common exposures were transportation accidents (42%), sudden unexpected death of a loved one (39%), physical assault (30%), assault with a weapon (29%) and sexual assault (25%). Lifetime prevalence of PTSD and a major depressive episode (MDE) among those with trauma exposure (n=279) was 51% and 35%, respectively. The percent of lifetime PTSD cases (n=142) with comorbid MDE was 46%. Lifetime PTSD and MDE in the trauma-exposed population were approximately twice as common in females than males, whereas current PTSD rates were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Our rate of PTSD (approximately 33% of those screened) exceeds estimates for the general population. Rates of MDE comorbid with PTSD were comparable to other studies. These findings suggest the importance of screening African Americans for PTSD, in addition to depression, in the primary care setting. PMID:17052054

  18. Serological Evidence of Exposure to Globally Relevant Zoonotic Parasites in the Estonian Population

    PubMed Central

    Viltrop, Arvo; Neare, Kädi; Hütt, Pirje; Golovljova, Irina; Tummeleht, Lea; Jokelainen, Pikka

    2016-01-01

    We investigated Estonian population and its selected subgroups for serological evidence of exposure to Ascaris lumbricoides, Echinococcus spp., Taenia solium, Toxocara canis, Toxoplasma gondii, and Trichinella spiralis. Serum samples from 999 adults representing general population, 248 children aged 14–18, 158 veterinarians, 375 animal caretakers, and 144 hunters were tested for specific immunoglobulin G antibodies against the selected parasites using commercial enzyme immunoassays (ELISA). Sera yielding positive or twice grey zone Echinococcus spp, T. solium, T. canis, and T. spiralis results were subjected to western blot (WB) analysis. In the general population, based on the ELISA results, the A. lumbricoides seroprevalence was 12.7%, Echinococcus spp. seroprevalence was 3.3%, T. solium seroprevalence was 0.7%, T. canis seroprevalence was 12.1%, T. gondii seroprevalence was 55.8%, and T. spiralis seroprevalence was 3.1%. Ascaris lumbricoides seroprevalences were higher in children and in animal caretakers than in the general population, and T. canis seroprevalence was higher in animal caretakers than in the general population. Compared with the general population, Echinococcus spp. seroprevalence was higher in children. By contrast, T. gondii seroprevalence was higher in animal caretakers, and lower in children, than in the general population. In the general population, the WB-confirmed Echinococcus spp. seroprevalence was 0.5%, T. solium cysticercosis seroprevalence was 0.0%, Toxocara spp. seroprevalence was 14.5%, and Trichinella spp. seroprevalence was 2.7%. WB-confirmed Toxocara spp. seroprevalence was higher in animal caretakers than in the general population. We found serological evidence of exposure to zoonotic parasites in all tested groups. This calls for higher awareness of zoonotic parasitic infections in Estonia. PMID:27723790

  19. FURTHER REFINEMENTS AND TESTING OF APEX3.0: EPA'S POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR CRITERIA AND AIR TOXIC INHALATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollutants Exposure Model (APEX(3.0)) is a PC-based model that was derived from the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model for carbon monoxide (pNEM/CO). APEX will be one of the tools used to estimate human population exposure for criteria and air toxic pollutants as part ...

  20. Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and fetal growth in a general population.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie N; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2010-05-01

    Occupational exposure to organic solvents during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. Though organic solvents in the form of paint fumes are also found in the home environment, no studies have investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. We studied associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and fetal growth within the Danish National Birth Cohort which consecutively recruited pregnant women from 1996 to 2002 from all over Denmark. Around the 30th pregnancy week, 19,000 mothers were interviewed about use of paint in their residence during pregnancy. The mothers were also asked about smoking habits and alcohol consumption during pregnancy, pre-pregnancy weight, height, parity and occupation. Information on birth weight and gestational age was obtained from national registers. We found that 45% of the mothers had been exposed to paint fumes in their residence during pregnancy. We found a statistically significant inverse relationship between exposure to paint fumes and the risk of being small for gestational age. There were no statistically significant associations between exposure to paint fumes and birth weight and risk of preterm birth after adjustment for potential confounders. Our results suggest that there are no causal relationship between non-occupational exposure to paint fumes in the residence during pregnancy and fetal growth.

  1. An analysis of mercury exposures among the adult population in New York State.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Alicia M; Gelberg, Kitty H

    2013-06-01

    The extent of methylmercury exposures among adults in New York State (NYS) has not been well characterized. Over the past few years, the NYS Heavy Metals Registry (HMR) has seen an increase in both blood mercury tests being reported, and nonoccupational exposures to mercury, which appear primarily due to fish consumption. This study will, (1) Characterize the adults who are tested for blood mercury in NYS; (2) Examine the circumstances for blood mercury testing; and (3) Characterize this population in terms of exposure history, specifically those individuals who are non-occupationally exposed through a diet of seafood consumption in reference to blood mercury levels. Data available from HMR laboratory results, including basic demographics and test results, were combined with data from telephone interviews. The interview contains information on the reasons for testing, possible sources of exposure, and the individual's work and home environment. Approximately 99 % of adults reported to the HMR, with identifiable exposures to mercury, had non-occupational exposures resulting from seafood consumption. Common types of fish consumed include salmon, tuna, and swordfish, with 90 % of adults eating seafood a few times or more per week. Information will be provided on the reasons for being tested and the range of blood mercury levels in relation to their seafood consumption. NYS residents who frequently eat fish should be aware of what types of fish contain mercury and avoid or reduce consumption of fish with high mercury levels. PMID:23264151

  2. Induction of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 contributes to the cross-talk between mu and ORL1 receptors following prolonged agonist exposure.

    PubMed

    Thakker, D R; Standifer, K M

    2002-11-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) underlying cross-tolerance between mu and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1) receptor agonists were investigated using two human neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Prolonged (24 h) activation of the mu receptor desensitized both mu and ORL1 receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and upregulated GRK2 levels in SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-C cells. Prolonged ORL1 activation increased GRK2 levels and desensitized both receptors in SH-SY5Y cells. Upregulation of GRK2 correlated with increases in levels of transcription factors Sp1 or AP-2. PD98059, an upstream inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), reversed all these events. Pretreatment with orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N) also upregulated GRK3 levels in both cell lines, and desensitized both receptors in BE(2)-C cells. Protein kinase C (PKC), but not ERK1/2, inhibition blocked OFQ/N-mediated GRK3 induction and mu and ORL1 receptor desensitization in BE(2)-C cells. Antisense DNA treatment confirmed the involvement of GRK2/3 in mu and ORL1 desensitization. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a role for ERK1/2-mediated GRK2 induction in the development of tolerance to mu agonists, as well as cross-tolerance to OFQ/N. We also demonstrate that chronic OFQ/N-mediated desensitization of ORL1 and mu receptors occurs via cell-specific pathways, involving ERK1/2-dependent GRK2, or PKC-dependent and ERK1/2-independent GRK3 induction.

  3. Induction of G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 contributes to the cross-talk between mu and ORL1 receptors following prolonged agonist exposure.

    PubMed

    Thakker, D R; Standifer, K M

    2002-11-01

    The molecular mechanism(s) underlying cross-tolerance between mu and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1) receptor agonists were investigated using two human neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing these receptors and G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Prolonged (24 h) activation of the mu receptor desensitized both mu and ORL1 receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and upregulated GRK2 levels in SH-SY5Y and BE(2)-C cells. Prolonged ORL1 activation increased GRK2 levels and desensitized both receptors in SH-SY5Y cells. Upregulation of GRK2 correlated with increases in levels of transcription factors Sp1 or AP-2. PD98059, an upstream inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), reversed all these events. Pretreatment with orphanin FQ/nociceptin (OFQ/N) also upregulated GRK3 levels in both cell lines, and desensitized both receptors in BE(2)-C cells. Protein kinase C (PKC), but not ERK1/2, inhibition blocked OFQ/N-mediated GRK3 induction and mu and ORL1 receptor desensitization in BE(2)-C cells. Antisense DNA treatment confirmed the involvement of GRK2/3 in mu and ORL1 desensitization. Here, we demonstrate for the first time a role for ERK1/2-mediated GRK2 induction in the development of tolerance to mu agonists, as well as cross-tolerance to OFQ/N. We also demonstrate that chronic OFQ/N-mediated desensitization of ORL1 and mu receptors occurs via cell-specific pathways, involving ERK1/2-dependent GRK2, or PKC-dependent and ERK1/2-independent GRK3 induction. PMID:12423667

  4. Arsenic and ultraviolet radiation exposure: melanoma in a New Mexico non-Hispanic white population.

    PubMed

    Yager, Janice W; Erdei, Esther; Myers, Orrin; Siegel, Malcolm; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-06-01

    Cases of cutaneous melanoma and controls were enrolled in a New Mexico population-based study; subjects were administered questionnaires concerning ultraviolet (UV) and inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure. Historical iAs exposure was estimated. UV exposure estimates were also derived using geospatial methods. Drinking water samples were collected for iAs analysis. Blood samples were collected for DNA repair (Comet) and DNA repair gene polymorphism assays. Arsenic concentrations were determined in urine and toenail samples. UV exposures during the previous 90 days did not vary significantly between cases and controls. Mean (±SD) current home iAs drinking water was not significantly different for cases and controls [3.98 μg/L (±3.67) vs. 3.47 μg/L (±2.40)]. iAs exposure showed no effect on DNA repair or association with melanoma. Results did not corroborate a previously reported association between toenail As and melanoma risk. Arsenic biomarkers in urine and toenail were highly significantly correlated with iAs in drinking water. A UV-DNA repair interaction for UV exposure over the previous 7-90 days was shown; cases had higher DNA damage than controls at low UV values. This novel finding suggests that melanoma cases may be more sensitive to low-level UV exposure than are controls. A UV-APEX1 interaction was shown. Subjects with the homozygous rare APEX1 DNA repair gene allele had a higher risk of early melanoma diagnosis at low UV exposure compared with those with the homozygous wild type or the heterozygote. Notably, a UV-arsenic interaction on inhibition of DNA repair was not observed at iAs drinking water concentrations below 10 ppb (μg/L).

  5. Effects of long-term chronic exposure to radionuclides in plant populations.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, S; Evseeva, T; Oudalova, A

    2013-07-01

    The results of field studies carried out on different plant species (winter rye and wheat, spring barley, oats, Scots pine, wild vetch, crested hairgrass) in various radioecological situations (nuclear weapon testing, the Chernobyl accident, uranium and radium processing) to investigate the effects of long-term chronic exposure to radionuclides are discussed. Plant populations growing in areas with relatively low levels of pollution are characterized by an increased level of both cytogenetic disturbances and genetic diversity. Although ionizing radiation causes primary damage at the molecular level, there are emergent effects at the level of populations, non-predictable from the knowledge of elementary mechanisms of cellular effects formation. Accumulation of cellular alterations may afterward influence biological parameters important for populations such as health and reproduction. Presented data provide evidence that in plant populations inhabiting heavily contaminated territories cytogenetic damage could be accompanied by a decrease in reproductive capacity. However, in less contaminated sites, because of the scarcity of data available, a steady relationship between cytogenetic effects and reproductive capacity was not revealed. Under radioactive contamination of the plant's environment, a population's resistance to exposure may increase. However, there are radioecological situations where an enhanced radioresistance has not evolved or has not persisted. PMID:22483340

  6. Variability in biological monitoring of solvent exposure. I. Development of a population physiological model.

    PubMed Central

    Droz, P O; Wu, M M; Cumberland, W G; Berode, M

    1989-01-01

    Biological indicators of exposure to solvents are often characterised by a high variability that may be due either to fluctuations in exposure or individual differences in the workers. To describe and understand this variability better a physiological model for differing workers under variable industrial environments has been developed. Standard statistical distributions are used to simulate variability in exposure concentration, physical workload, body build, liver function, and renal clearance. For groups of workers exposed daily, the model calculates air monitoring indicators and biological monitoring results (expired air, blood, and urine). The results obtained are discussed and compared with measured data, both physiological (body build, cardiac output, alveolar ventilation) and toxicokinetic for six solvents: 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, benzene, toluene, styrene, and their main metabolites. Possible applications of this population physiological model are presented. PMID:2765418

  7. Population and business exposure to twenty scenario earthquakes in the State of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan; Ratliff, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the results of an initial analysis of population and business exposure to scenario earthquakes in Washington. This analysis was conducted to support the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Pacific Northwest Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) and an ongoing collaboration between the State of Washington Emergency Management Division (WEMD) and the USGS on earthquake hazards and vulnerability topics. This report was developed to help WEMD meet internal planning needs. A subsequent report will provide analysis to the community level. The objective of this project was to use scenario ground-motion hazard maps to estimate population and business exposure to twenty Washington earthquakes. In consultation with the USGS Earthquake Hazards Program and the Washington Division of Geology and Natural Resources, the twenty scenario earthquakes were selected by WEMD (fig. 1). Hazard maps were then produced by the USGS and placed in the USGS ShakeMap archive.

  8. Seismic Risk Assessment of Active Faults in Japan in Terms of Population Exposure to Seismic Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Nobuoto; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Nobuyuki; Ishikawa, Yutaka; Okumura, Toshihiko; Miyakoshi, Junichi

    This study evaluates and compares seismic risks associated with inland crustal earthquakes in Japan on the basis of published data available on the Japan Seismic Hazard Information Station (J-SHIS). First, taking account of prediction uncertainty of the attenuation law of seismic intensity, the evaluation method for population exposure (PEX) to seismic intensity is presented. The method is applied to 333 seismic events potentially caused by main active faults (154 cases) and other active faults (179 cases). The relationship between population exposure and the probability of occurrence of seismic events ("P-PEX relation") and the resultant seismic risk curves are obtained. Generalized risk index which incorporates the effects of focusing on urgency (probability) or significance (PEX) is defined, producing various risk rankings of active faults.

  9. Ochratoxin a contamination in italian wine samples and evaluation of the exposure in the italian population.

    PubMed

    Brera, Carlo; Debegnach, Francesca; Minardi, Valentina; Prantera, Elisabetta; Pannunzi, Elena; Faleo, Silvia; de Santis, Barbara; Miraglia, Marina

    2008-11-26

    The scope of this study was to evaluate the exposure of the Italian population to ochratoxin A (OTA) attributable to wine consumption. With this aim 1166 wine samples (773 red wines, 290 white, 75 rose, and 28 dessert wines), collected in 19 different Italian regions and mostly produced between 1988 and 2004, were analyzed for OTA content. The obtained results are reported by year of harvest, geographical area of production, and type of wine. Red wine showed the highest maximum level of contamination (7.50 ng/mL), even though rose wines were characterized by a higher mean value (0.01 ng/mL). A gradually increasing mean concentration was also observed from the north (0.05 ng/mL) to south of Italy (0.54 ng/mL). Exposure calculations, performed using two different consumption databases, indicate a daily intake for consumer only of 0.59 up to 1.24 ng/(kg of b.w.)/day and of 0.33 up to 0.90 ng/(kg of b.w.)/day for the total population. Even in the worst case, corresponding to the calculation of the intake for consumers only in southern Italy and Islands and considering the mean consumption data increased by 1 standard deviation, a quite low exposure (1.68 ng/(kg of b.w.)/day, accounting for 9.8% of TDI) was obtained. Considering the overall OTA dietary exposure, obtained exposure rates indicate that wine did not pose a risk to the Italian population health.

  10. Assessment of population exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) using integrated models and evaluation of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, Claudio; Lamberti, Mafalda; Hänninen, Otto; Silibello, Camillo; Pelliccioni, Armando; Porta, Daniela; Cecinato, Angelo; Gherardi, Monica; Forastiere, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are considered among the most dangerous air pollutants due to their carcinogenic and mutagenic characteristics. Populations living in urban area are exposed to these pollutants because of their proximity to the emission sources. However, the spatial and temporal characteristics of PAHs concentrations in such areas are not well known. An integrated modeling approach is here presented to estimate exposure to PAHs content in PM2.5 of children and elderly people living in the city of Rome, Italy. It is based on a microenvironment approach in which exposure is estimated by accounting for PAHs concentrations experienced by the target population in the most visited living environments. The model uses data provided by the EU LIFE + EXPAH project: indoor/outdoor PAHs concentrations collected in homes, schools, cars, buses and offices to derive PAHs infiltration factors for the specific environments; time activity to identify daytime profiles of the target population and information on the prevailing living environments; ambient PAHs concentration fields. The latter have been obtained by integrating Chemical Transport Model (CTM) results with measurements collected by the EXPAH project. Uncertainties in the estimation of PAHs exposure has been evaluated by applying a Monte Carlo statistical approach using probability density function based on observed exposure parameters. Results were calculated for one year (June 2011-May 2012). The downtown area was found to be the most contaminated one with concentrations up to 2 ± 1 and 0.6 ± 0.2 ng/m3, on an annual basis, respectively for ∑4PAHs (e.g. B[a]P, B[b]F, B[k]F and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene) and B[a]P. Results do not exhibit significant differences on ∑4PAHs exposure between children and elderly people, mainly due to the prevalence of indoor microenvironments in the time activity data, and to the little difference in the indoor/outdoor infiltration. Seasonality was identified as an

  11. Phthalates Biomarker Identification and Exposure Estimates in a Population of Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyong; Calafat, Antonia; Lashley, Susan; Smulian, John; Ananth, Cande; Barr, Dana; Silva, Manori; Ledoux, Thomas; Hore, Paromita; Robson, Mark G

    2009-05-01

    Phthalates are known reproductive and developmental toxicants in experimental animals. However, in humans, there are few data on the exposure of pregnant women that can be used to assess the potential developmental exposure experienced by the fetus. We measured several phthalate metabolites in maternal urine, maternal serum, and cord serum samples collected at the time of delivery from 150 pregnant women from central New Jersey. The urinary concentrations of most metabolites were comparable to or less than among the U.S. general population, except for mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP), mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate (MEHHP), and mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate (MEOHP), three metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). The median urinary concentrations of MEHHP (109 mug/l) and MEOHP (95.1 mug/l) were more than 5 times their population-based concentrations, whereas the median urinary concentration of MEHP was more than 20 times higher. High concentration of MEHP may indicate a recent exposure to the parent chemical DEHP in the hospital shortly before the collection of the samples. Calculation of daily intakes using the urinary biomarker data reveals that none of the pregnant women tested had integrated exposures to DEHP greater than the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's minimal risk levels (MRLs chronic 60, intermediate 100 mug/kg/day). No abnormal birth outcomes (e .g., birth weight, Apgar Score, and gestational age) were noted in those newborns whose mothers had relatively greater exposure to DEHP during the perinatal period than others in this study. Significantly greater concentrations and detection frequencies in maternal urine than in maternal serum and cord serum suggest that the urinary concentrations of the phthalate metabolites may be more reliable biomarkers of exposure than their concentrations in other biological specimens.

  12. PRKCZ methylation is associated with sunlight exposure in a North American but not a Mediterranean population.

    PubMed

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Dashti, Hassan S; Tanaka, Toshiko; Sha, Jin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhi, Degui; Bandinelli, Stefania; Borecki, Ingrid B; Absher, Devin M; Arnett, Donna K; Ordovas, Jose M

    2014-11-01

    Sunlight exposure has been shown to alter DNA methylation patterns across several human cell-types, including T-lymphocytes. Since epigenetic changes establish gene expression profiles, changes in DNA methylation induced by sunlight exposure warrant investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of sunlight exposure on CD4+ T-cell methylation patterns on an epigenome-wide scale in a North American population of European origin (n=991). In addition, we investigated the genetic contribution to epigenetic variation (methylQTL). We used linear regression to test the associations between methylation scores at 461,281 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites and sunlight exposure, followed by a genome-wide association analysis (methylQTL) to test for associations between methylation at the top CpG locus and common genetic variants, assuming an additive genetic model. We observed an epigenome-wide significant association between sunlight exposure and methylation status at cg26930596 (p=9.2×10(-8)), a CpG site located in protein kinase C zeta (PRKCZ), a gene previously shown to be entrained by light. MethylQTL analysis resulted in significant associations between cg26930596 and two intergenic single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 3, rs4574216 (p=1.5×10(-10)) and rs4405858 (p=1.9×10(-9)). These common genetic variants reside downstream of WWTR1, a transcriptional co-activator of PRKCZ. Associations observed in the North American population, however, did not replicate in an independent Mediterranean cohort. Our preliminary results support the role of sunlight exposure in epigenetic processes, and lay the groundwork for future studies of the molecular link between sunlight and physiologic processes such as tumorigenesis and metabolism.

  13. PRKCZ methylation is associated with sunlight exposure in a North American but not a Mediterranean population

    PubMed Central

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Dashti, Hassan S.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Sha, Jin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhi, Degui; Bandinelli, Stefania; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Absher, Devin M.; Arnett, Donna K.; Ordovas, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Sunlight exposure has been shown to alter DNA methylation patterns across several human cell-types, including T-lymphocytes. Since epigenetic changes establish gene expression profiles, changes in DNA methylation induced by sunlight exposure warrant investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of sunlight exposure on CD4+ T-cell methylation patterns on an epigenome-wide scale in a North American population of European origin (n = 991). In addition, we investigated the genetic contribution to epigenetic variation (methylQTL). We used linear regression to test the associations between methylation scores at 461 281 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites and sunlight exposure, followed by a genome-wide association analysis (methylQTL) to test for associations between methylation at the top CpG locus and common genetic variants, assuming an additive genetic model. We observed an epigenome-wide significant association between sunlight exposure and methylation status at cg26930596 (p = 9.2 × 10−8), a CpG site located in protein kinase C zeta (PRKCZ), a gene previously shown to be entrained by light. MethylQTL analysis resulted in significant associations between cg26930596 and two intergenic single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 3, rs4574216 (p = 1.5 × 10−10) and rs4405858 (p = 1.9 × 10−9). These common genetic variants reside downstream of WWTR1, a transcriptional co-activator of PRKCZ. Associations observed in the North American population, however, did not replicate in an independent Mediterranean cohort. Our preliminary results support the role of sunlight exposure in epigenetic processes, and lay the groundwork for future studies of the molecular link between sunlight and physiologic processes such as tumorigenesis and metabolism. PMID:25075435

  14. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  15. Climate-related hazards: a method for global assessment of urban and rural population exposure to cyclones, droughts, and floods.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Elizabeth; Elliott, Mark; Banerjee, Ovik; Hamrick, Laura; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-02-21

    Global climate change (GCC) has led to increased focus on the occurrence of, and preparation for, climate-related extremes and hazards. Population exposure, the relative likelihood that a person in a given location was exposed to a given hazard event(s) in a given period of time, was the outcome for this analysis. Our objectives were to develop a method for estimating the population exposure at the country level to the climate-related hazards cyclone, drought, and flood; develop a method that readily allows the addition of better datasets to an automated model; differentiate population exposure of urban and rural populations; and calculate and present the results of exposure scores and ranking of countries based on the country-wide, urban, and rural population exposures to cyclone, drought, and flood. Gridded global datasets on cyclone, drought and flood occurrence as well as population density were combined and analysis was carried out using ArcGIS. Results presented include global maps of ranked country-level population exposure to cyclone, drought, flood and multiple hazards. Analyses by geography and human development index (HDI) are also included. The results and analyses of this exposure assessment have implications for country-level adaptation. It can also be used to help prioritize aid decisions and allocation of adaptation resources between countries and within a country. This model is designed to allow flexibility in applying cyclone, drought and flood exposure to a range of outcomes and adaptation measures.

  16. Climate-Related Hazards: A Method for Global Assessment of Urban and Rural Population Exposure to Cyclones, Droughts, and Floods

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Elizabeth; Elliott, Mark; Banerjee, Ovik; Hamrick, Laura; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Global climate change (GCC) has led to increased focus on the occurrence of, and preparation for, climate-related extremes and hazards. Population exposure, the relative likelihood that a person in a given location was exposed to a given hazard event(s) in a given period of time, was the outcome for this analysis. Our objectives were to develop a method for estimating the population exposure at the country level to the climate-related hazards cyclone, drought, and flood; develop a method that readily allows the addition of better datasets to an automated model; differentiate population exposure of urban and rural populations; and calculate and present the results of exposure scores and ranking of countries based on the country-wide, urban, and rural population exposures to cyclone, drought, and flood. Gridded global datasets on cyclone, drought and flood occurrence as well as population density were combined and analysis was carried out using ArcGIS. Results presented include global maps of ranked country-level population exposure to cyclone, drought, flood and multiple hazards. Analyses by geography and human development index (HDI) are also included. The results and analyses of this exposure assessment have implications for country-level adaptation. It can also be used to help prioritize aid decisions and allocation of adaptation resources between countries and within a country. This model is designed to allow flexibility in applying cyclone, drought and flood exposure to a range of outcomes and adaptation measures. PMID:24566046

  17. Sun exposure, vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms, and breast cancer risk in a multiethnic population.

    PubMed

    John, Esther M; Schwartz, Gary G; Koo, Jocelyn; Wang, Wei; Ingles, Sue A

    2007-12-15

    Considerable evidence indicates that vitamin D may reduce the risk of several cancers, including breast cancer. This study examined associations of breast cancer with sun exposure, the principal source of vitamin D, and vitamin D receptor gene (VDR) polymorphisms (FokI, TaqI, BglI) in a population-based case-control study of Hispanic, African-American, and non-Hispanic White women aged 35-79 years from the San Francisco Bay Area of California (1995-2003). In-person interviews were obtained for 1,788 newly diagnosed cases and 2,129 controls. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the upper underarm (a sun-protected site that measures constitutive pigmentation) and on the forehead (a sun-exposed site) using reflectometry. Biospecimens were collected for a subset of the study population (814 cases, 910 controls). A high sun exposure index based on reflectometry was associated with reduced risk of advanced breast cancer among women with light constitutive skin pigmentation (odds ratio = 0.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.31, 0.91). The association did not vary with VDR genotype. No associations were found for women with medium or dark pigmentation. Localized breast cancer was not associated with sun exposure or VDR genotype. This study supports the hypothesis that sunlight exposure reduces risk of advanced breast cancer among women with light skin pigmentation.

  18. Neospora caninum exposure in overlapping populations of coyotes (Canis latrans) and feral swine (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Bevins, Sarah; Blizzard, Emily; Bazan, Luis; Whitley, Pat

    2013-10-01

    Limited information exists on Neospora caninum transmission dynamics in wildlife. This coccidian parasite, whose presence can lead to substantial economic losses in cattle operations, requires a canid definitive host for reproduction. We examined exposure in a definitive host, coyotes (Canis latrans), and in overlapping populations of feral swine (Sus scrofa) to determine if spatial proximity between a definitive and incidental host influences the likelihood of parasite exposure. Eighteen percent of coyotes (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.2-21.8) and 15.8% of feral swine (95% CI = 12.5-19.2) had been exposed to N. caninum, and this is the first report of exposure in US feral swine populations. Analyses suggest that the parasite is present throughout the environment and that exposure is not temporally or spatially linked to antibody-positive coyotes. Antibody-positive feral swine were found in an area where the only definitive host is domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), indicating that wild canids are not required to maintain the parasite in the environment.

  19. Changes in B Cell Populations and Merozoite Surface Protein-1-Specific Memory B Cell Responses after Prolonged Absence of Detectable P. falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ayieko, Cyrus; Maue, Alexander C.; Jura, Walter G. Z. O.; Noland, Gregory S.; Ayodo, George; Rochford, Rosemary; John, Chandy C.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical immunity to malaria declines in the absence of repeated parasite exposure. However, little is known about how B cell populations and antigen-specific memory B cells change in the absence of P. falciparum infection. A successful indoor residual insecticide spraying campaign in a highland area of western Kenya, led to an absence of blood-stage P. falciparum infection between March 2007 and April 2008. We assessed memory B cell responses in 45 adults at the beginning (April 2008) and end (April 2009) of a subsequent 12-month period during which none of the adults had evidence of asymptomatic parasitemia or clinical disease. Antibodies and memory B cells to the 42-kDa portion of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-142) were measured using ELISA and ELISPOT assays, respectively. B cell populations were characterized by flow cytometry. From 2008 to 2009, the prevalence of MSP-142-specific memory B cells (45% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.32) or antibodies (91% vs. 82%, respectively, P = 0.32) did not differ significantly, although specific individuals did change from positive to negative and vice versa, particularly for memory B cells, suggesting possible low-level undetected parasitemia may have occurred in some individuals. The magnitude of MSP-142-specific memory B cells and levels of antibodies to MSP-142 also did not differ from 2008 to 2009 (P>0.10 for both). However, from 2008 to 2009 the proportions of both class-switched atypical (CD19+IgD-CD27-CD21-IgM-) and class-switched activated (CD19+IgD-CD27+CD21-IgM-) memory B cells decreased (both P<0.001). In contrast, class-switched resting classical memory B cells (CD19+IgD-CD27+CD21+IgM-) increased (P<0.001). In this area of seasonal malaria transmission, a one- year absence of detectable P. falciparum infection was not associated with changes in the prevalence or level of MSP-142 specific memory B cells, but was associated with major changes in overall memory B cell subsets. PMID:23826242

  20. Pathogen exposure varies widely among sympatric populations of wild and domestic felids across the United States.

    PubMed

    Carver, Scott; Bevins, Sarah N; Lappin, Michael R; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; Alldredge, Mathew; Logan, Kenneth A; Sweanor, Linda L; Riley, Seth P D; Serieys, Laurel E K; Fisher, Robert N; Vickers, T Winston; Boyce, Walter; Mcbride, Roy; Cunningham, Mark C; Jennings, Megan; Lewis, Jesse; Lunn, Tamika; Crooks, Kevin R; Vandewoude, Sue

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how landscape, host, and pathogen traits contribute to disease exposure requires systematic evaluations of pathogens within and among host species and geographic regions. The relative importance of these attributes is critical for management of wildlife and mitigating domestic animal and human disease, particularly given rapid ecological changes, such as urbanization. We screened > 1000 samples from sympatric populations of puma (Puma concolor), bobcat (Lynx rufus), and domestic cat (Felis catus) across urban gradients in six sites, representing three regions, in North America for exposure to a representative suite of bacterial, protozoal, and viral pathogens (Bartonella sp., Toxoplasma gondii, feline herpesvirus-1, feline panleukopenea virus, feline calicivirus, and feline immunodeficiency virus). We evaluated prevalence within each species, and examined host trait and land cover determinants of exposure; providing an unprecedented analysis of factors relating to potential for infections in domesticated and wild felids. Prevalence differed among host species (highest for puma and lowest for domestic cat) and was greater for indirectly transmitted pathogens. Sex was inconsistently predictive of exposure to directly transmitted pathogens only, and age infrequently predictive of both direct and indirectly transmitted pathogens. Determinants of pathogen exposure were widely divergent between the wild felid species. For puma, suburban land use predicted increased exposure to Bartonella sp. in southern California, and FHV-1 exposure increased near urban edges in Florida. This may suggest interspecific transmission with domestic cats via flea vectors (California) and direct contact (Florida) around urban boundaries. Bobcats captured near urban areas had increased exposure to T. gondii in Florida, suggesting an urban source of prey Bobcats captured near urban areas in Colorado and Florida had higher FIV exposure, possibly suggesting increased intraspecific

  1. Pathogen exposure varies widely among sympatric populations of wild and domestic felids across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carver, Scott; Bevins, Sarah N.; Lappin, Michael R.; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Alldredge, Mathew W.; Logan, Kenneth A.; Sweanor, Linda L.; Riley, Seth P.D.; Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Fisher, Robert N.; Vickers, T. Winston; Boyce, Walter M.; McBride, Roy; Cunnigham, Mark C.; Jennings, Megan; Lewis, Jesse S.; Lunn, Tamika; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how landscape, host, and pathogen traits contribute to disease exposure requires systematic evaluations of pathogens within and among host species and geographic regions. The relative importance of these attributes is critical for management of wildlife and mitigating domestic animal and human disease, particularly given rapid ecological changes, such as urbanization. We screened >1,000 samples from sympatric populations of puma (Puma concolor), bobcat (Lynx rufus) and domestic cat (Felis catus) across urban gradients in six sites, representing three regions, in North America for exposure to a representative suite of bacterial, protozoal and viral pathogens (Bartonella sp., Toxoplasma gondii, feline herpesvirus-1, feline panleukopenea virus, feline calicivirus, feline immunodeficiency virus). We evaluated prevalence within each species, and examined host trait and land cover determinants of exposure-providing an unprecedented analysis of factors relating to potential for infections in domesticated and wild felids. Prevalence differed among host species (highest for puma and lowest for domestic cat) and was greater for indirectly transmitted pathogens. Sex was inconsistently predictive of exposure to directly transmitted pathogens only, and age infrequently predictive of both direct and indirectly transmitted pathogens. Determinants of pathogen exposure were widely divergent between the wild felid species. For puma, suburban landuse predicted increased exposure to Bartonella sp. in southern California, and FHV-1 exposure increased near urban edges in Florida. This may suggest inter-specific transmission with domestic cats via flea vectors (California) and direct contact (Florida) around urban boundaries. Bobcats captured near urban areas had increased exposure to T. gondii in Florida, suggesting an urban source of prey. Bobcats captured near urban areas in Colorado and Florida had higher FIV exposure, possibly suggesting increased intra

  2. Pathogen exposure varies widely among sympatric populations of wild and domestic felids across the United States.

    PubMed

    Carver, Scott; Bevins, Sarah N; Lappin, Michael R; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; Alldredge, Mathew; Logan, Kenneth A; Sweanor, Linda L; Riley, Seth P D; Serieys, Laurel E K; Fisher, Robert N; Vickers, T Winston; Boyce, Walter; Mcbride, Roy; Cunningham, Mark C; Jennings, Megan; Lewis, Jesse; Lunn, Tamika; Crooks, Kevin R; Vandewoude, Sue

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how landscape, host, and pathogen traits contribute to disease exposure requires systematic evaluations of pathogens within and among host species and geographic regions. The relative importance of these attributes is critical for management of wildlife and mitigating domestic animal and human disease, particularly given rapid ecological changes, such as urbanization. We screened > 1000 samples from sympatric populations of puma (Puma concolor), bobcat (Lynx rufus), and domestic cat (Felis catus) across urban gradients in six sites, representing three regions, in North America for exposure to a representative suite of bacterial, protozoal, and viral pathogens (Bartonella sp., Toxoplasma gondii, feline herpesvirus-1, feline panleukopenea virus, feline calicivirus, and feline immunodeficiency virus). We evaluated prevalence within each species, and examined host trait and land cover determinants of exposure; providing an unprecedented analysis of factors relating to potential for infections in domesticated and wild felids. Prevalence differed among host species (highest for puma and lowest for domestic cat) and was greater for indirectly transmitted pathogens. Sex was inconsistently predictive of exposure to directly transmitted pathogens only, and age infrequently predictive of both direct and indirectly transmitted pathogens. Determinants of pathogen exposure were widely divergent between the wild felid species. For puma, suburban land use predicted increased exposure to Bartonella sp. in southern California, and FHV-1 exposure increased near urban edges in Florida. This may suggest interspecific transmission with domestic cats via flea vectors (California) and direct contact (Florida) around urban boundaries. Bobcats captured near urban areas had increased exposure to T. gondii in Florida, suggesting an urban source of prey Bobcats captured near urban areas in Colorado and Florida had higher FIV exposure, possibly suggesting increased intraspecific

  3. Variable population exposure and distributed travel speeds in least-cost tsunami evacuation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, S. A.; Wood, N. J.; Johnston, D. M.; Leonard, G. S.; Greening, P. D.; Rossetto, T.

    2014-11-01

    Evacuation of the population from a tsunami hazard zone is vital to reduce life-loss due to inundation. Geospatial least-cost distance modelling provides one approach to assessing tsunami evacuation potential. Previous models have generally used two static exposure scenarios and fixed travel speeds to represent population movement. Some analyses have assumed immediate departure or a common evacuation departure time for all exposed population. Here, a method is proposed to incorporate time-variable exposure, distributed travel speeds, and uncertain evacuation departure time into an existing anisotropic least-cost path distance framework. The method is demonstrated for hypothetical local-source tsunami evacuation in Napier City, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand. There is significant diurnal variation in pedestrian evacuation potential at the suburb level, although the total number of people unable to evacuate is stable across all scenarios. Whilst some fixed travel speeds approximate a distributed speed approach, others may overestimate evacuation potential. The impact of evacuation departure time is a significant contributor to total evacuation time. This method improves least-cost modelling of evacuation dynamics for evacuation planning, casualty modelling, and development of emergency response training scenarios. However, it requires detailed exposure data, which may preclude its use in many situations.

  4. Variable population exposure and distributed travel speeds in least-cost tsunami evacuation modelling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraser, Stuart A.; Wood, Nathan J.; Johnston, David A.; Leonard, Graham S.; Greening, Paul D.; Rossetto, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Evacuation of the population from a tsunami hazard zone is vital to reduce life-loss due to inundation. Geospatial least-cost distance modelling provides one approach to assessing tsunami evacuation potential. Previous models have generally used two static exposure scenarios and fixed travel speeds to represent population movement. Some analyses have assumed immediate departure or a common evacuation departure time for all exposed population. Here, a method is proposed to incorporate time-variable exposure, distributed travel speeds, and uncertain evacuation departure time into an existing anisotropic least-cost path distance framework. The method is demonstrated for hypothetical local-source tsunami evacuation in Napier City, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand. There is significant diurnal variation in pedestrian evacuation potential at the suburb level, although the total number of people unable to evacuate is stable across all scenarios. Whilst some fixed travel speeds approximate a distributed speed approach, others may overestimate evacuation potential. The impact of evacuation departure time is a significant contributor to total evacuation time. This method improves least-cost modelling of evacuation dynamics for evacuation planning, casualty modelling, and development of emergency response training scenarios. However, it requires detailed exposure data, which may preclude its use in many situations.

  5. Mercury Exposure in a Riverside Amazon Population, Brazil: A Study of the Ototoxicity of Methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ana; Pacheco-Ferreira, Heloisa; Sanches, Seisse Gabriela G.; Carvallo, Renata; Cardoso, Nathália; Perez, Maurício; Câmara, Volney de Magalhães

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mercury poisoning causes hearing loss in humans and animals. Acute and long-term exposures produce irreversible peripheral and central auditory system damage, and mercury in its various forms of presentation in the environment is ototoxic. Objective We investigated the otoacoustic emissions responses in a riverside population exposed to environmental mercury by analyzing the inhibitory effect of the medial olivocochlear system (MOCS) on transient otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE). Methods The purpose of the research was to evaluate the entire community independently of variables of sex and age. All of the participants were born and lived in a riverside community. After otolaryngologic evaluation, participants were received tympanometry, evaluation of contralateral acoustic reflexes, pure tone audiometry, and recording of TEOAEs with nonlinear click stimulation. Hair samples were collect to measure mercury levels. Results There was no significant correlation between the inhibitory effect of the MOCS, age, and the level of mercury in the hair. Conclusions The pathophysiological effects of chronic exposure may be subtle and nonspecific and can have a long period of latency; therefore, it will be important to monitor the effects of mercury exposure in the central auditory system of the Amazon population over time. Longitudinal studies should be performed to determine whether the inhibitory effect of the MOCS on otoacoustic emissions can be an evaluation method and diagnostic tool in populations exposed to mercury. PMID:25992169

  6. Impulsivity is relevant for trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in a non-clinical population.

    PubMed

    Netto, Liana R; Pereira, Juliana L; Nogueira, José F; Cavalcanti-Ribeiro, Patrícia; Santana, Rejane Conceição; Teles, Carlos A; Koenen, Karestan C; Quarantini, Lucas C

    2016-05-30

    Impulsivity is a relevant construct for explaining both normal individual differences in personality and more extreme personality disorder, and is often investigated within clinical populations. This study aims to explore the college students' impulsivity patterns and to investigate the association across levels of impulsivity with trauma exposure and PTSD development in a non-clinical population. A one-phase census survey of seven college institutions assessed 2213 students in three metropolitan regions of Northeastern Brazil. All subjects anonymously completed a self-applied protocol consisting of: a socio-demographic questionnaire, Trauma History Questionnaire (THQ), PTSD Checklist (PCL-C), and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). The median for frequency of trauma exposure was 4 events for people with low and normal impulsivity, and 6 for highly impulsive ones. Individuals with higher impulsivity presented earlier exposition than non-impulsive ones, and worst outcome: 12.4% with PTSD, against 8.4% and 2.3% (normal and low impulsivity). Of the three factors of impulsivity, the Attentional factor conferred the strongest association with PTSD development. Results suggest that impulsivity is also a relevant trait in a non-clinical population and is associated with trauma exposure and PTSD. Strategies to promote mental health in adolescents may be pertinent, especially with the aim of managing impulsivity. PMID:27016879

  7. Agricultural adjuvants: acute mortality and effects on population growth rate of Daphnia pulex after chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Stark, John D; Walthall, William K

    2003-12-01

    Acute and chronic toxicity of eight agricultural adjuvants (Bond, Kinetic, Plyac, R-11, Silwet L-77, Sylgard 309, X-77, and WaterMaxx) to Daphnia pulex were evaluated with 48-h acute lethal concentration estimates (LC50) and a 10-d population growth-rate measurement, the instantaneous rate of increase (r1). Based on LC50, the order of toxicity was R-11 > X-77 = Sylgard 309 = Silwet L-77 > Kinetic > Bond > Plyac > WaterMaxx; all LC50 estimates were higher than the expected environmental concentration (EEC) of 0.79 mg/L, indicating that none of these adjuvants should cause high levels of mortality in wild D. pulex populations. Extinction, defined as negative population growth rate, occurred after exposure to 0.9 mg/L R-11, 13 mg/L X-77, 25 mg/L Kinetic, 28 mg/L Silwet, 18 mg/L Sylgard, 450 mg/L Bond, 610 mg/L Plyac, and 1,600 mg/L WaterMaxx. Concentrations that caused extinction were substantially below the acute LC50 for R-11, Kinetic, Plyac, X-77, and Bond. The no-observable-effects concentration (NOEC) and lowest-observable-effects concentration (LOEC) for the number of offspring per surviving female after exposure to R-11 were 0.5 and 0.75 mg/L, respectively. The NOEC and LOEC for population size after exposure to R-11 were (1.25 and 0.5 mg/L, respectively. Both of these values were lower than the EEC, indicating that R-11 does have the potential to cause damage to D. pulex populations after application at recommended field rates. The wide range of concentrations causing extinction makes it difficult to generalize about the potential impacts that agricultural adjuvants might have on aquatic ecosystems. Therefore, additional studies that examine effects on other nontarget organisms and determine residues in aquatic ecosystems may be warranted.

  8. Biologically based modeling of multimedia, multipathway, multiroute population exposures to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Panos G.; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Yang, Yu-Ching; Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G.; Mccurdy, Thomas; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an integrated, biologically based, source-to-dose assessment framework for modeling multimedia/multipathway/multiroute exposures to arsenic. Case studies demonstrating this framework are presented for three US counties (Hunderton County, NJ; Pima County, AZ; and Franklin County, OH), representing substantially different conditions of exposure. The approach taken utilizes the Modeling ENvironment for TOtal Risk studies (MENTOR) in an implementation that incorporates and extends the approach pioneered by Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS), in conjunction with a number of available databases, including NATA, NHEXAS, CSFII, and CHAD, and extends modeling techniques that have been developed in recent years. Model results indicate that, in most cases, the food intake pathway is the dominant contributor to total exposure and dose to arsenic. Model predictions are evaluated qualitatively by comparing distributions of predicted total arsenic amounts in urine with those derived using biomarker measurements from the NHEXAS — Region V study: the population distributions of urinary total arsenic levels calculated through MENTOR and from the NHEXAS measurements are in general qualitative agreement. Observed differences are due to various factors, such as interindividual variation in arsenic metabolism in humans, that are not fully accounted for in the current model implementation but can be incorporated in the future, in the open framework of MENTOR. The present study demonstrates that integrated source-to-dose modeling for arsenic can not only provide estimates of the relative contributions of multipathway exposure routes to the total exposure estimates, but can also estimate internal target tissue doses for speciated organic and inorganic arsenic, which can eventually be used to improve evaluation of health risks associated with exposures to arsenic from multiple sources, routes, and pathways. PMID:18073786

  9. Changes in protein expression in the salt marsh mussel Geukensia demissa: evidence for a shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism during prolonged aerial exposure.

    PubMed

    Fields, Peter A; Eurich, Chris; Gao, William L; Cela, Bekim

    2014-05-01

    During aerial exposure (emersion), most sessile intertidal invertebrates experience cellular stress caused by hypoxia, and the amount and types of hypoxia-induced stress will differ as exposure time increases, likely leading to altered metabolic responses. We examined proteomic responses to increasing emersion times and decreasing recovery (immersion) times in the mussel Geukensia demissa, which occurs in salt marshes along the east coast of North America. Individuals are found above mean tide level, and can be emersed for over 18 h during spring tides. We acclimated mussels to full immersion at 15°C for 4 weeks, and compared changes in gill protein expression between groups of mussels that were continually immersed (control), were emersed for 6 h and immersed during recovery for 18 h (6E/18R), were emersed for 12 h and recovered for 12 h (12E/12R), or were emersed for 18 h with a 6 h recovery (18E/6R). We found clear differences in protein expression patterns among the treatments. Proteins associated with anaerobic fermentation increased in abundance in 6E/18R but not in 12E/12R or 18E/6R. Increases in oxidative stress proteins were most apparent in 12E/12R, and in 18E/6R changes in cytoskeletal protein expression predominated. We conclude that G. demissa alters its strategy for coping with emersion stress over time, relying on anaerobic metabolism for short- to medium-duration exposure, but switching to an air-gaping strategy for long-term exposure, which reduces hypoxia stress but may cause structural damage to gill tissue.

  10. Incidence of nephrolithiasis in relation to environmental exposure to lead and cadmium in a population study.

    PubMed

    Hara, Azusa; Yang, Wen-Yi; Petit, Thibault; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Gu, Yu-Mei; Wei, Fang-Fei; Jacobs, Lotte; Odili, Augustine N; Thijs, Lutgarde; Nawrot, Tim S; Staessen, Jan A

    2016-02-01

    Whether environmental exposure to nephrotoxic agents that potentially interfere with calcium homeostasis, such as lead and cadmium, contribute to the incidence of nephrolithiasis needs further clarification. We investigated the relation between nephrolithiasis incidence and environmental lead and cadmium exposure in a general population. In 1302 participants randomly recruited from a Flemish population (50.9% women; mean age, 47.9 years), we obtained baseline measurements (1985-2005) of blood lead (BPb), blood cadmium (BCd), 24-h urinary cadmium (UCd) and covariables. We monitored the incidence of kidney stones until October 6, 2014. We used Cox regression to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for nephrolithiasis. At baseline, geometric mean BPb, BCd and UCd was 0.29µmol/L, 9.0nmol/L, and 8.5nmol per 24h, respectively. Over 11.5 years (median), nephrolithiasis occurred in 40 people. Contrasting the low and top tertiles of the distributions, the sex- and age-standardized rates of nephrolithiasis expressed as events per 1000 person-years were 0.68 vs. 3.36 (p=0.0016) for BPb, 1.80 vs. 3.28 (p=0.11) for BCd, and 1.65 vs. 2.95 (p=0.28) for UCd. In continuous analysis, with adjustments applied for sex, age, serum magnesium, and 24-h urinary volume and calcium, the hazard ratios expressing the risk associated with a doubling of the exposure biomarkers were 1.35 (p=0.015) for BPb, 1.13 (p=0.22) for BCd, and 1.23 (p=0.070) for UCd. In conclusion, our results suggest that environmental lead exposure is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis in the general population. PMID:26613344

  11. Mercury exposure and risks from dental amalgam in the US population, post-2000.

    PubMed

    Richardson, G M; Wilson, R; Allard, D; Purtill, C; Douma, S; Gravière, J

    2011-09-15

    Dental amalgam is 50% metallic mercury (Hg) by weight and Hg vapour continuously evolves from in-place dental amalgam, causing increased Hg content with increasing amalgam load in urine, faeces, exhaled breath, saliva, blood, and various organs and tissues including the kidney, pituitary gland, liver, and brain. The Hg content also increases with maternal amalgam load in amniotic fluid, placenta, cord blood, meconium, various foetal tissues including liver, kidney and brain, in colostrum and breast milk. Based on 2001 to 2004 population statistics, 181.1 million Americans carry a grand total of 1.46 billion restored teeth. Children as young as 26 months were recorded as having restored teeth. Past dental practice and recently available data indicate that the majority of these restorations are composed of dental amalgam. Employing recent US population-based statistics on body weight and the frequency of dentally restored tooth surfaces, and recent research on the incremental increase in urinary Hg concentration per amalgam-filled tooth surface, estimates of Hg exposure from amalgam fillings were determined for 5 age groups of the US population. Three specific exposure scenarios were considered, each scenario incrementally reducing the number of tooth surfaces assumed to be restored with amalgam. Based on the least conservative of the scenarios evaluated, it was estimated that some 67.2 million Americans would exceed the Hg dose associated with the reference exposure level (REL) of 0.3 μg/m(3) established by the US Environmental Protection Agency; and 122.3 million Americans would exceed the dose associated with the REL of 0.03 μg/m(3) established by the California Environmental Protection Agency. Exposure estimates are consistent with previous estimates presented by Health Canada in 1995, and amount to 0.2 to 0.4 μg/day per amalgam-filled tooth surface, or 0.5 to 1 μg/day/amalgam-filled tooth, depending on age and other factors.

  12. Modeling Population-Level Consequences of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Exposure in East Greenland Polar Bears.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Viola; Grimm, Volker; Dietz, Rune; Sonne, Christian; Vorkamp, Katrin; Rigét, Frank F; Letcher, Robert J; Gustavson, Kim; Desforges, Jean-Pierre; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can cause endocrine disruption, cancer, immunosuppression, or reproductive failure in animals. We used an individual-based model to explore whether and how PCB-associated reproductive failure could affect the dynamics of a hypothetical polar bear (Ursus maritimus) population exposed to PCBs to the same degree as the East Greenland subpopulation. Dose-response data from experimental studies on a surrogate species, the mink (Mustela vision), were used in the absence of similar data for polar bears. Two alternative types of reproductive failure in relation to maternal sum-PCB concentrations were considered: increased abortion rate and increased cub mortality. We found that the quantitative impact of PCB-induced reproductive failure on population growth rate depended largely on the actual type of reproductive failure involved. Critical potencies of the dose-response relationship for decreasing the population growth rate were established for both modeled types of reproductive failure. Comparing the model predictions of the age-dependent trend of sum-PCBs concentrations in females with actual field measurements from East Greenland indicated that it was unlikely that PCB exposure caused a high incidence of abortions in the subpopulation. However, on the basis of this analysis, it could not be excluded that PCB exposure contributes to higher cub mortality. Our results highlight the necessity for further research on the possible influence of PCBs on polar bear reproduction regarding their physiological pathway. This includes determining the exact cause of reproductive failure, i.e., in utero exposure versus lactational exposure of offspring; the timing of offspring death; and establishing the most relevant reference metrics for the dose-response relationship. PMID:26289812

  13. Incidence of nephrolithiasis in relation to environmental exposure to lead and cadmium in a population study.

    PubMed

    Hara, Azusa; Yang, Wen-Yi; Petit, Thibault; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Gu, Yu-Mei; Wei, Fang-Fei; Jacobs, Lotte; Odili, Augustine N; Thijs, Lutgarde; Nawrot, Tim S; Staessen, Jan A

    2016-02-01

    Whether environmental exposure to nephrotoxic agents that potentially interfere with calcium homeostasis, such as lead and cadmium, contribute to the incidence of nephrolithiasis needs further clarification. We investigated the relation between nephrolithiasis incidence and environmental lead and cadmium exposure in a general population. In 1302 participants randomly recruited from a Flemish population (50.9% women; mean age, 47.9 years), we obtained baseline measurements (1985-2005) of blood lead (BPb), blood cadmium (BCd), 24-h urinary cadmium (UCd) and covariables. We monitored the incidence of kidney stones until October 6, 2014. We used Cox regression to calculate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for nephrolithiasis. At baseline, geometric mean BPb, BCd and UCd was 0.29µmol/L, 9.0nmol/L, and 8.5nmol per 24h, respectively. Over 11.5 years (median), nephrolithiasis occurred in 40 people. Contrasting the low and top tertiles of the distributions, the sex- and age-standardized rates of nephrolithiasis expressed as events per 1000 person-years were 0.68 vs. 3.36 (p=0.0016) for BPb, 1.80 vs. 3.28 (p=0.11) for BCd, and 1.65 vs. 2.95 (p=0.28) for UCd. In continuous analysis, with adjustments applied for sex, age, serum magnesium, and 24-h urinary volume and calcium, the hazard ratios expressing the risk associated with a doubling of the exposure biomarkers were 1.35 (p=0.015) for BPb, 1.13 (p=0.22) for BCd, and 1.23 (p=0.070) for UCd. In conclusion, our results suggest that environmental lead exposure is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis in the general population.

  14. Environmental heavy metal exposure and chronic kidney disease in the general population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Hyun, Young Youl; Lee, Kyu-Beck; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Rhu, Seungho; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Ahn, Curie

    2015-03-01

    Lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and cadmium (Cd) are common heavy metal toxins and cause toxicological renal effects at high levels, but the relevance of low-level environmental exposures in the general population is controversial. A total of 1,797 adults who participated in the KNHANES (a cross-sectional nationally representative survey in Korea) were examined, and 128 of them (7.1%) had chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our study assessed the association between Pb, Hg, Cd exposure, and CKD. Blood Pb and Cd levels were correlated with CKD in univariate logistic regression model. However, these environmental heavy metals were not associated with CKD after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and these metals in multivariate logistic regression models. We stratified the analysis according to hypertension or diabetes. In the adults with hypertension or diabetes, CKD had a significant association with elevated blood Cd after adjustment, but no association was present with blood Pb and Hg. The corresponding odds ratio [OR] of Cd for CKD were 1.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-2.19, P=0.026) in adults with hypertension and 1.92 (95% CI, 1.14-3.25, P=0.014) in adults with diabetes. Environmental low level of Pb, Hg, Cd exposure in the general population was not associated with CKD. However, Cd exposure was associated with CKD, especially in adults with hypertension or diabetes. This finding suggests that environmental low Cd exposure may be a contributor to the risk of CKD in adults with hypertension or diabetes.

  15. An integrated exposure assessment of phthalates for the general population in China based on both exposure scenario and biomonitoring estimation approaches.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jie; Hao, Xuewen

    2016-02-01

    The representativeness of available studies on integrated exposure assessment of phthalates for the general population in China is lacking. Based on an exhaustive review of the extensive monitoring data available for China, this study presents a large-scale estimation of exposure levels to three typical phthalates, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP), by applying both exposure scenario and biomonitoring estimation approaches. The respective median exposure levels from the exposure scenario and biomonitoring estimation approaches were 3.80, 3.02 and 1.00 μg/kg bw/day and 3.38, 3.21 and 3.32 μg/kg bw/day for DEHP, DBP and DiBP, which are acceptable levels of exposure with respect to current international guidelines. Evaluation results from the two approaches showed both similarities and differences among the different phthalates, making the exposure assessment comparable and more comprehensive. In terms of sources of exposure, food intake was the largest contributor, while indoor air exposure had greater contribution to the estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of DiBP than that of the other phthalates. Moreover, more attention should be paid to the higher exposure levels of phthalates in several intensively industrialized and urbanized areas, and the causes of the different exposure levels in the different regions need to be further explored.

  16. Iodine Status in Turkish Populations and Exposure to Iodide Uptake Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ozpinar, Aysel; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Songur, Yildiran; Can, Ozge; Valentin, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen; Arikan, Ender; Unsal, Ibrahim; Serteser, Mustafa; Inal, Tamer; Erdemgil, Yigit; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Bakirci, Nadi; Sezgin, Ozlem; Blount, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate are competitive inhibitors of the sodium iodide symporter of the thyroid membrane. These inhibitors can decrease iodine uptake by the symporter into the thyroid gland and may disrupt thyroid function. This study assesses iodine status and exposure to iodide uptake inhibitors of non-pregnant and non-lactating adult women living in three different cities in Turkey (Istanbul, Isparta and Kayseri). We measured iodine and iodide uptake inhibitors in 24-hr urines collected from study participants (N = 255). All three study populations were mildly iodine deficient, with median urinary iodine (UI) levels of 77.5 µg/L in Istanbul, 58.8 µg/L in Isparta, and 69.8 µg/L in Kayseri. Perchlorate doses were higher in the study population (median 0.13 µg/kg/day), compared with a reference population (median 0.059 µg/kg/day), but lower than the U.S. EPA reference dose (0.7 µg/kg/day). Urinary thiocyanate levels increased with increasing exposure to tobacco smoke, with non-smokers (268 µg/L) significantly lower than light smokers (1110 µg/L), who were significantly lower than heavy smokers (2410 µg/L). This pilot study provides novel data indicating that study participants were moderately iodine deficient and had higher intakes of the iodide uptake inhibitor perchlorate compared with a reference population. Further investigation is needed to characterize the thyroid impact resulting from iodine deficiency coupled with exposure to iodide uptake inhibitors such as perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate. PMID:24505430

  17. Advancing Environmental Noise Pollution Analysis in Urban Areas by Considering the Variation of Population Exposure in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, S.; Gomes, N.

    2013-05-01

    Ambient noise is a subtle form of pollution in large urban areas, degrading human health and well-being. In Europe, directives require that urban environmental noise be measured and mapped for the main periods of the daily cycle. Subsequent analyses of human exposure to noise in those periods is usually conducted using resident (i.e., nighttime) population from the census and assuming constant densities within the enumeration units. However, population distribution and densities vary considerably from night to day in metropolitan areas, and disregard for that process results in gross misestimation of exposure to ambient noise in the daytime period. This study considers the spatio-temporal variation of population distribution in assessing exposure to ambient noise in a major urban area, the city of Lisbon, Portugal. Detailed and compatible day- and nighttime population distribution maps were used, developed by means of "intelligent dasymetric mapping". After categorizing noise levels in existing maps in each period, classified according to current legislation, human exposure to ambient noise was assessed with temporally matching population surfaces. Population exposure to noise in 2000 and 2009 was compared and further analyzed in regards to main source of noise, i.e. road traffic vs. aircraft.. Results show that human exposure to noise shifts substantially in time and space, with a significant increase in exposed population from the nighttime to daytime period, especially in the higher noise levels. This is due to the combined effects of the daily variation of noise patterns and population distribution.

  18. Radiation exposures of cancer patients from medical X-rays: how relevant are they for individual patients and population exposure?

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Nissen-Meyer, Sven; Lechel, Ursula; Nissen-Meyer, Johannes; Griebel, Jürgen; Nekolla, Elke A; Becker, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian

    2009-11-01

    X-ray procedures have a substantial impact not only on patient care but also on man-made radiation exposure. Since a reliable risk-benefit analysis of medical X-rays can only be performed for diagnosis-related groups of patients, we determined specific exposure data for patients with the ten most common types of cancer. For all patients with the considered cancers undergoing medical X-ray procedures in a maximum-care hospital between 2000 and 2005, patient- and examination-specific data were retrieved from the hospital/radiology information system. From this data, the cumulative 5-year effective dose was estimated for each patient as well as the mean annual effective dose per patient and the mean patient observation time for each cancer site. In total, 151,439 radiographic, fluoroscopic, and CT procedures, carried out in 15,866 cancer patients (age, 62+/-13 years), were evaluated. The mean 5-year cumulative dose varied between 8.6 mSv (prostate cancer) and 68.8 mSv (pancreas cancer). Due to an increasing use of CT scans, the mean annual effective dose per patient increased from 13.6 to 18.2 mSv during the 6-year period. Combining the results obtained in this study for a particular hospital with cancer incidence data for Germany, we estimated that cancer patients having X-ray studies constitute at least 1% of the population but receive more than 10% of the total effective dose related to all medical X-ray procedures performed nationwide per year. A large fraction of this dose is radiobiologically ineffective due to the reduced life expectancy of cancer patients.

  19. Environmental Risks for Nontuberculous Mycobacteria. Individual Exposures and Climatic Factors in the Cystic Fibrosis Population

    PubMed Central

    Adjemian, Jennifer; Fernandez, Aisling G.; Knowles, Michael R.; Olivier, Kenneth N.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Persons with cystic fibrosis are at high risk of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infection, with a national prevalence estimated at 13%. The risk of nontuberculous mycobacteria associated with specific environmental exposures, and the correlation with climatic conditions in this population has not been described. Objectives: To describe the association of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria with individual exposures to water and soil aerosols, and the population associations of these infections with climatic factors. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study within a cohort study of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria prevalence at 21 geographically diverse national cystic fibrosis centers. Incident nontuberculous mycobacterial infection cases (at least one prior negative culture followed by one positive culture) were age- and sex-matched to culture-negative controls. Exposures to water and soil were assessed by administering a standardized questionnaire. Cohort prevalence at each of the 21 centers was correlated with climatic conditions in the same area through linear regression modeling. Measurements and Main Results: Overall, 48 cases and 85 control subjects were enrolled. Indoor swimming was associated with incident infection (adjusted odds ratio, 5.9, 95% confidence interval, 1.3–26.1), although only nine cases (19%) and five control subjects (6%) reported indoor swimming in the 4 months prior to infection. Exposure to showering and municipal water supply was common among both cases and control subjects: 77% of cases and 76% of control subjects reported showering at least daily. In linear regression, average annual atmospheric water vapor content was significantly predictive of center prevalence (P = 0.0019), with R2 = 0.40. Conclusions: Atmospheric conditions explain more of the variation in disease prevalence than individual behaviors. The risk of specific exposures may vary by geographic region due to differences in

  20. An Atlas of ShakeMaps and population exposure catalog for earthquake loss modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, T.I.; Wald, D.J.; Earle, P.S.; Marano, K.D.; Hotovec, A.J.; Lin, K.; Hearne, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present an Atlas of ShakeMaps and a catalog of human population exposures to moderate-to-strong ground shaking (EXPO-CAT) for recent historical earthquakes (1973-2007). The common purpose of the Atlas and exposure catalog is to calibrate earthquake loss models to be used in the US Geological Survey's Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER). The full ShakeMap Atlas currently comprises over 5,600 earthquakes from January 1973 through December 2007, with almost 500 of these maps constrained-to varying degrees-by instrumental ground motions, macroseismic intensity data, community internet intensity observations, and published earthquake rupture models. The catalog of human exposures is derived using current PAGER methodologies. Exposure to discrete levels of shaking intensity is obtained by correlating Atlas ShakeMaps with a global population database. Combining this population exposure dataset with historical earthquake loss data, such as PAGER-CAT, provides a useful resource for calibrating loss methodologies against a systematically-derived set of ShakeMap hazard outputs. We illustrate two example uses for EXPO-CAT; (1) simple objective ranking of country vulnerability to earthquakes, and; (2) the influence of time-of-day on earthquake mortality. In general, we observe that countries in similar geographic regions with similar construction practices tend to cluster spatially in terms of relative vulnerability. We also find little quantitative evidence to suggest that time-of-day is a significant factor in earthquake mortality. Moreover, earthquake mortality appears to be more systematically linked to the population exposed to severe ground shaking (Modified Mercalli Intensity VIII+). Finally, equipped with the full Atlas of ShakeMaps, we merge each of these maps and find the maximum estimated peak ground acceleration at any grid point in the world for the past 35 years. We subsequently compare this "composite ShakeMap" with existing global

  1. Effects of prolonged ethanol vapor exposure on forced swim behavior, and neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing factor levels in rat brains.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brendan M; Drimmer, David A; Walker, Jennifer L; Liu, Tianmin; Mathé, Aleksander A; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2010-09-01

    Depressive symptoms in alcohol-dependent individuals are well-recognized and clinically relevant phenomena. The etiology has not been elucidated although it is clear that the depressive symptoms may be alcohol independent or alcohol induced. To contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of chronic ethanol use, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure on behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) levels in specific brain regions. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 h on/10 h off) or air exposure for 2 weeks and were then tested at three time points corresponding to acute withdrawal (8-12 h into withdrawal) and protracted withdrawal (30 and 60 days of withdrawal) in the FST. The behaviors that were measured in the five-min FST consisted of latency to immobility, swim time, immobility time, and climbing time. The FST results showed that the vapor-exposed animals displayed depressive-like behaviors; for instance, decreased latency to immobility in acute withdrawal and decreased latency to immobility, decreased swim time and increased immobility time in protracted withdrawal, with differences between air- and vapor-exposed animals becoming more pronounced over the 60-day withdrawal period. NPY levels in the frontal cortex of the vapor-exposed animals were decreased compared with the control animals, and CRF levels in the amygdala were correlated with increased immobility time. Thus, extended ethanol vapor exposure produced long-lasting changes in FST behavior and NPY levels in the brain. PMID:20705420

  2. Effects of prolonged ethanol vapor exposure on forced swim behavior, and neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing factor levels in rat brains.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brendan M; Drimmer, David A; Walker, Jennifer L; Liu, Tianmin; Mathé, Aleksander A; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2010-09-01

    Depressive symptoms in alcohol-dependent individuals are well-recognized and clinically relevant phenomena. The etiology has not been elucidated although it is clear that the depressive symptoms may be alcohol independent or alcohol induced. To contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of chronic ethanol use, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure on behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) levels in specific brain regions. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 h on/10 h off) or air exposure for 2 weeks and were then tested at three time points corresponding to acute withdrawal (8-12 h into withdrawal) and protracted withdrawal (30 and 60 days of withdrawal) in the FST. The behaviors that were measured in the five-min FST consisted of latency to immobility, swim time, immobility time, and climbing time. The FST results showed that the vapor-exposed animals displayed depressive-like behaviors; for instance, decreased latency to immobility in acute withdrawal and decreased latency to immobility, decreased swim time and increased immobility time in protracted withdrawal, with differences between air- and vapor-exposed animals becoming more pronounced over the 60-day withdrawal period. NPY levels in the frontal cortex of the vapor-exposed animals were decreased compared with the control animals, and CRF levels in the amygdala were correlated with increased immobility time. Thus, extended ethanol vapor exposure produced long-lasting changes in FST behavior and NPY levels in the brain.

  3. Effects of Prolonged Ethanol Vapor Exposure on Forced Swim Behavior, and Neuropeptide Y and Corticotropin Releasing Factor Levels in Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Brendan M.; Drimmer, David A.; Walker, Jennifer L.; Liu, Tianmin; Mathé, Aleksander A.; Ehlers, Cindy L.

    2010-01-01

    Depressive symptoms in alcohol-dependent individuals are well recognized and clinically relevant phenomena. The etiology has not been elucidated although it is clear that the depressive symptoms may be alcohol independent or alcohol-induced. In order to contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of chronic ethanol use, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure on behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) levels in specific brain regions. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 hours on / 10 hours off) or air exposure for two weeks and were then tested at three time points corresponding to acute withdrawal (8–12 hours into withdrawal) and protracted withdrawal (30 and 60 days of withdrawal) in the FST. The behaviors that were measured in the five minute FST consisted of latency to immobility, swim time, immobility time and climbing time. The FST results showed that the vapor-exposed animals displayed depressive-like behaviors, for instance decreased latency to immobility in acute withdrawal and decreased latency to immobility, decreased swim time and increased immobility time in protracted withdrawal, with differences between air- and vapor-exposed animals becoming more pronounced over the 60 day withdrawal period. NPY levels in the frontal cortex of the vapor-exposed animals were decreased compared to the control animals and CRF levels in the amygdala were correlated with increased immobility time. Thus, extended ethanol vapor exposure produced long-lasting changes in FST behavior and NPY levels in the brain. PMID:20705420

  4. Exposure of the population of Catalonia (Spain) to musk fragrances through seafood consumption: Risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Trabalón, Laura; Cano-Sancho, German; Pocurull, Eva; Nadal, Martí; Domingo, José L; Borrull, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of ten synthetic musks in samples of 10 widely consumed fish and shellfish species from Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain) was determined. The most used nitro and polycyclic musks, as well as a well-known transformation product in tissues, were analyzed. Furthermore, the human health risks derived from the musk exposure through seafood consumption were characterized. None of the nitro musks were detected in any of the analyzed samples. In contrast, most of the polycyclic musks were found, being galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN) present in all the samples. HHCB was the greatest contributor, with maximum levels in sardine and mackerel (367 and 304 ng g(-1) (d.w.) (dry weight), respectively). The highest exposure to individual musks was estimated for HHCB and HHCB-Lactone, with average values of 19.7 and 6.8 ng kg(-1)bw day(-1), respectively, in adults. A notably lower mean exposure was calculated for AHTN, cashmeran (DPMI) and traseolide (ATII), being ranged between 1.1 and 3.7 ng kg(-1)bw day(-1). The current concentrations of musks in fish and shellfish should not mean human health risks for the adult population living in Tarragona. However, a continuous monitoring would be desirable to assure that the exposure does not follow increasing temporal trends.

  5. Exposure of the population of Catalonia (Spain) to musk fragrances through seafood consumption: Risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Trabalón, Laura; Cano-Sancho, German; Pocurull, Eva; Nadal, Martí; Domingo, José L; Borrull, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of ten synthetic musks in samples of 10 widely consumed fish and shellfish species from Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain) was determined. The most used nitro and polycyclic musks, as well as a well-known transformation product in tissues, were analyzed. Furthermore, the human health risks derived from the musk exposure through seafood consumption were characterized. None of the nitro musks were detected in any of the analyzed samples. In contrast, most of the polycyclic musks were found, being galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN) present in all the samples. HHCB was the greatest contributor, with maximum levels in sardine and mackerel (367 and 304 ng g(-1) (d.w.) (dry weight), respectively). The highest exposure to individual musks was estimated for HHCB and HHCB-Lactone, with average values of 19.7 and 6.8 ng kg(-1)bw day(-1), respectively, in adults. A notably lower mean exposure was calculated for AHTN, cashmeran (DPMI) and traseolide (ATII), being ranged between 1.1 and 3.7 ng kg(-1)bw day(-1). The current concentrations of musks in fish and shellfish should not mean human health risks for the adult population living in Tarragona. However, a continuous monitoring would be desirable to assure that the exposure does not follow increasing temporal trends. PMID:25913711

  6. Longitudinal changes of nerve conduction velocity, distal motor latency, compound motor action potential duration, and skin temperature during prolonged exposure to cold in a climate chamber.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Zscheile, Julia; Gabor, Kai-Steffen; Lindemann, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Changes of nerve conduction velocity (NCV), distal motor latency (DML), compound motor action potential (CMAP) duration, and skin temperature with regard to cold have been investigated by use of ice packs or cold water baths, but not after cooling of environmental temperature which has higher ecological validity. The aim of this study was to investigate these parameters during cooled room temperature. NCV, DML, and CMAP duration of the common fibular nerve, and skin temperature were measured in 20 healthy young females during exposure to 15°C room temperature, coming from 25°C room. We found that NCV decreased and DML increased linearly during 45 min observation time, in contrast to CMAP duration and skin temperature which changes followed an exponential curve. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating changes of these parameters during exposure to environmental cold. The results may pilot some new hypotheses and studies on physiological and pathological changes of the peripheral nervous system and skin to environmental cold, e.g., in elderly with peripheral neuropathies. PMID:22510085

  7. Variable population exposure and distributed travel speeds in least-cost tsunami evacuation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, S. A.; Wood, N. J.; Johnston, D. M.; Leonard, G. S.; Greening, P. D.; Rossetto, T.

    2014-06-01

    Evacuation of the population from a tsunami hazard zone is vital to reduce life-loss due to inundation. Geospatial least-cost distance modelling provides one approach to assessing tsunami evacuation potential. Previous models have generally used two static exposure scenarios and fixed travel speeds to represent population movement. Some analyses have assumed immediate evacuation departure time or assumed a common departure time for all exposed population. In this paper, a method is proposed to incorporate time-variable exposure, distributed travel speeds, and uncertain evacuation departure time into an existing anisotropic least-cost path distance framework. The model is demonstrated for a case study of local-source tsunami evacuation in Napier City, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand. There is significant diurnal variation in pedestrian evacuation potential at the suburb-level, although the total number of people unable to evacuate is stable across all scenarios. Whilst some fixed travel speeds can approximate a distributed speed approach, others may overestimate evacuation potential. The impact of evacuation departure time is a significant contributor to total evacuation time. This method improves least-cost modelling of evacuation dynamics for evacuation planning, casualty modelling, and development of emergency response training scenarios.

  8. [Dopplerometry at prolonged pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Salii-Prenichi, L; Milchev, N; Markova, D; Apiosjan, Zh

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged pregnancy, associated with low amniotic fluid is a reason for the increase of fetal mortality and morbidity. There is no a define test at prolonged pregnancy which can determine which pregnancy are at a risk for adverse outcome and complications. Dopplerometry as a noninvasive method for examination of blood circulation, and especially a. cerebri media and a. umbilicalis can be used for the prediction of the outcome of prolonged pregnancy.

  9. Application of ILO classification to a population without industrial exposure: findings to be differentiated from pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D.M.; Miller, W.T.; Bresnitz, E.A.; Levine, M.S.; Gefter, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    The International Labour Office (ILO) classification for radiographs of pneumoconiosis is a standard means of assessing the presence or absence of pneumoconiosis in workers exposed to mineral dusts. Using this classification, 200 admission chest radiographs were reviewed on hospitalized patients in an urban university medical center to determine the prevalence and possible significance of ''small opacities'' in a population without known industrial exposure. Seventy-one men and 129 women were screened with the mean age of 44.2 years (range, 15-84). Thirty-six (18%) of the 200 patients had small opacities at profusion level 1/0 or greater, and this constituted the ''positive radiographs'' group. Twenty-two patients (11%) with positive radiographs had no documentable dust exposure or other specific medical etiology that would explain the presence of their lung opacities. The high prevalence of small opacities in ''normal'' older individuals has important implications in the assessment of patients with suspected pneumoconiosis.

  10. Dietary exposure to aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and deoxynivalenol from a total diet study in an adult urban Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Raad, F; Nasreddine, L; Hilan, C; Bartosik, M; Parent-Massin, D

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins may be associated with carcinogenic, immunosuppressant and estrogenic effects. In the Middle-East, studies investigating food contamination and dietary exposure to mycotoxins are particularly scarce. This study aims at evaluating the dietary exposure of an adult Lebanese urban population to four mycotoxins (AFB1, AFM1, OTA, DON) classified as priority food contaminants by the WHO. Dietary exposure assessment was performed by means of the total diet study approach. Average and excessive consumer exposure estimates (p95) were calculated and compared with appropriate toxicological reference values (TRVs). Average dietary exposure levels to OTA and DON represented 29.9% and 156.8% of the respective TRVs, with the p95 exposure estimates approaching or exceeding the TRVs for these mycotoxins (95.1% and 355.8%, respectively). Based on the mean dietary exposure level to AFB1, cancer risk was estimated at 0.0527-0.0545cases/100,000persons/year, while mean exposure to AFM1 was associated with a population risk of 0.0018-0.0027cases/100,000persons/year. The study's findings place Lebanon among countries that are highly exposed to mycotoxins through the diet and call for larger-scale studies aiming at providing a comprehensive assessment of the dietary exposure of the Lebanese population to mycotoxins as well as to other food contaminants.

  11. Incidence of prenatal alcohol exposure in Prince Edward Island: a population-based descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Bryanton, Janet; Boswall, Diane; McCarthy, Mary Jean; Fraser, Bonnie; Walsh, Donna; Freeman, Bridget; Koren, Gideon; Bigsby, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a leading preventable cause of neurodevelopmental disability in North America. The stigma associated with alcohol use and abuse during pregnancy makes it difficult to obtain information on prenatal alcohol use through self-reporting. We assessed the incidence of prenatal alcohol exposure in Prince Edward Island to facilitate future public health initiatives addressing FASD. Methods Prenatal alcohol exposure was examined via population-based collection of meconium and analysis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs). Fatty acid ethyl esters are nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol that are produced in the fetus. Meconium FAEE concentrations of 2.0 nmol/g or greater are indicative of frequent prenatal alcohol exposure during the last 2 trimesters of pregnancy. Samples were collected from 1307 neonates between Nov. 8, 2010, and Nov. 8, 2011, in hospitals in PEI, or from those born to mothers who resided in PEI but gave birth in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Samples were frozen and shipped for analysis. Fatty acid ethyl esters were analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and quantified by means of deuterated internal standards. Results Of the 1307 samples collected, 1271 samples were successfully analyzed. Positive results for FAEEs were obtained in 3.1% (n = 39) of samples collected within the first 24 hours after birth. Interpretation Not all neonates exposed to heavy prenatal alcohol in utero will exhibit FASD; based on current estimates of predictive value for disease by exposure, our findings suggest that 1.3% of neonates born in PEI during this 1-year period will have FASD. In its application to an entire provincial birth cohort, this study successfully implemented a public health–centred approach for evaluating population-based risk of FASD, with implications for practice across Canada. PMID:25077128

  12. Brominated flame retardants - Exposure and risk assessment for the general population.

    PubMed

    Fromme, H; Becher, G; Hilger, B; Völkel, W

    2016-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large group of different substances used in numerous products to prevent fire hazards. Some of them are persistent in the environment, accumulate in the food chain and are of toxicological concern, while for others current data are limited. Meanwhile, BFRs have been found in many environmental media, foods, and biota including humans. This review presents recent findings obtained from monitoring data in environmental media relevant for human exposure, as well as dietary exposure. In this context, concentrations in indoor and ambient air and in house dust are outlined. Furthermore, we summarize human biomonitoring data on BFR levels in blood and breast milk. Current estimates of the overall exposure of the general population using different relevant subsets are also addressed. All of these data are discussed in relation to currently available toxicological reference values used for risk assessment purposes. Obviously, the exposure of the general population varies considerably in different parts of the world and even within countries. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) show the highest intake during infancy. While the highest intake for BDE 47 for all groups was observed in the US, the total BDE 209 and HBCD intake was highest in the UK. For HBCD and all PBDEs except BDE 209, diet accounts for a large proportion of the total intake during infancy in all countries. With regard to toddlers and adults, the contribution of diet to total intake is high in Germany and the UK, while in the US, the high concentrations of PBDE in dust resulted in a notably smaller proportion of the intake being attributed to diet.

  13. Lung Cancer in a U.S. Population with Low to Moderate Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Julia E.; Andrew, Angeline S.; Onega, Tracy; Rigas, James R.; Jackson, Brian P.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Duell, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the carcinogenic potential of arsenic in areas with low to moderate concentrations of arsenic (< 100 μg/L) in drinking water. Objectives We examined associations between arsenic and lung cancer. Methods A population-based case–control study of primary incident lung cancer was conducted in 10 counties in two U.S. states, New Hampshire and Vermont. The study included 223 lung cancer cases and 238 controls, each of whom provided toenail clippings for arsenic exposure measurement by inductively coupled–plasma mass spectrometry. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) of the association between arsenic exposure and lung cancer using unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders (age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking pack-years, education, body mass index, fish servings per week, and toenail selenium level). Results Arsenic exposure was associated with small-cell and squamous-cell carcinoma of the lung [OR = 2.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00–7.57] for toenail arsenic concentration ≥ 0.114 μg/g, versus < 0.05 μg/g. A history of lung disease (bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or fibrosis) was positively associated with lung cancer (OR = 2.86; 95% CI, 1.39–5.91). We also observed an elevated risk of lung cancer among participants with a history of lung disease and toenail arsenic ≥ 0.05 μg/g (OR = 4.78; 95% CI, 1.87–12.2) than among individuals with low toenail arsenic and no history of lung disease. Conclusion Although this study supports the possibility of an increased risk of specific lung cancer histologic types at lower levels of arsenic exposure, we recommend large-scale population-based studies. PMID:20049123

  14. Maternal exposure to methotrexate and birth defects: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Dawson, April L; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Reefhuis, Jennita; Arena, J Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Methotrexate is an anti-folate medication that is associated with increased risk of multiple birth defects. Using data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a case-control study of major birth defects in the United States, we examined mothers exposed to methotrexate. The study population included mothers of live-born infants without major birth defects (controls) and mothers of fetuses or infants with a major birth defect (cases), with expected dates of delivery between October 1997 and December 2009. Mothers of cases and controls were asked detailed questions concerning pregnancy history, demographic information, and exposures in a telephone interview. Approximately 0.06% (n = 16/27,623) of case and 0.04% (n = 4/10,113) of control mothers reported exposure to methotrexate between 3 months prior to conception through the end of pregnancy. Of the 16 case infants, 11 (68.8%) had a congenital heart defect (CHD). The observed CHDs included atrial septal defects, tetralogy of Fallot, valvar pulmonary stenosis, ventricular septal defects (VSDs), and total anomalous pulmonary venous return. One case infant had microtia in addition to a VSD and another had VACTER association. Exposed cases without a CHD had one of the following birth defects: cleft palate, hypospadias, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or craniosynostosis. Based on a limited number of methotrexate-exposed mothers, our findings support recent case reports suggesting an association between early pregnancy exposure to methotrexate and CHDs. Because of the rarity of maternal periconceptional exposure to methotrexate, long-term, population-based case-control studies are needed to confirm these findings and better evaluate the association between methotrexate and birth defects.

  15. THE 1998 BALTIMORE PARTICULATE MATTER EPIDEMIOLOGY-EXPOSURE STUDY: PART 2-PERSONAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT ASSOCIATED WITH AN ELDERLY STUDY POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated epidemiological-exposure panel study was conducted during the summer of 1998 which focused upon establishing relationships between potential human exposures to particulate matter (PM) and related co-pollutants with detectable health effects. The study design incor...

  16. Solvent exposure and malignant lymphoma: a population-based case-control study in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Andreas; Möhner, Matthias; Berger, Jürgen; Mester, Birte; Deeg, Evelin; Elsner, Gine; Nieters, Alexandra; Becker, Nikolaus

    2007-01-01

    Aims To analyze the relationship between exposure to chlorinated and aromatic organic solvents and malignant lymphoma in a multi-centre, population-based case-control study. Methods Male and female patients with malignant lymphoma (n = 710) between 18 and 80 years of age were prospectively recruited in six study regions in Germany (Ludwigshafen/Upper Palatinate, Heidelberg/Rhine-Neckar-County, Würzburg/Lower Frankonia, Hamburg, Bielefeld/Gütersloh, and Munich). For each newly recruited lymphoma case, a gender, region and age-matched (± 1 year of birth) population control was drawn from the population registers. In a structured personal interview, we elicited a complete occupational history, including every occupational period that lasted at least one year. On the basis of job task-specific supplementary questionnaires, a trained occupational physician assessed the exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons (trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, dichloromethane, carbon tetrachloride) and aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, xylene, styrene). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking (in pack years) and alcohol consumption. To increase the statistical power, patients with specific lymphoma subentities were additionally compared with the entire control group using unconditional logistic regression analysis. Results We observed a statistically significant association between high exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons and malignant lymphoma (Odds ratio = 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.1–4.3). In the analysis of lymphoma subentities, a pronounced risk elevation was found for follicular lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma. When specific substances were considered, the association between trichloroethylene and malignant lymphoma was of borderline statistical significance. Aromatic hydrocarbons were not significantly associated with the lymphoma diagnosis. Conclusion In

  17. Chinese population exposure to triclosan and triclocarban as measured via human urine and nails.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Wei, Ling; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Qingqing; Shao, Bing

    2016-10-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) exposures are highly concerned due to their suspected endocrine-disrupting effects. The present study investigated TCS and TCC exposure levels in the general Chinese population by biomonitoring human urine and nail samples. TCS (69-80 %) and TCC (99-100 %) were frequently detected, which demonstrates that the general Chinese population has extensive exposure to these chemicals. The geometric mean (GM) urinary concentrations were 0.40 μg/g creatinine (creat), 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.30-0.56, for TCS and 0.40 μg/g creat, 95 % CI 0.29-0.56, for TCC. On the other hand, the GM levels of TCS and TCC were 13.57 (5.67 μg/kg) and 84.66 μg/kg (41.50 μg/kg) in fingernail (toenail) samples, respectively, indicating that the levels in fingernails were approximately twice as high as those in toenails. Pearson's correlation coefficients between the urine and fingernail (toenail) samples were 0.715 (0.614) for TCS and 0.829 (0.812) for TCC. These data suggest that nail samples can be applied to the biomonitoring for TCS and TCC in the general population. We observed that the levels of both chemicals were higher in females than in males for urine and fingernail samples, but no significant differences were found between different genders for either compound in toenails. Nineteen- to 29-year-olds had the highest TCS levels in their nail samples, whereas TCC levels did not differ with regard to age. Region of residence significantly influenced TCS and TCC concentrations in the three biological matrices measured.

  18. Increased excitability of medium-sized dorsal root ganglion neurons by prolonged interleukin-1β exposure is K+ channel dependent and reversible

    PubMed Central

    Stemkowski, Patrick L; Noh, Myung-chul; Chen, Yishen; Smith, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constriction injury of rat sciatic nerve promotes signs of neuropathic pain. This is associated with an increase in the level of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in primary afferents that peaks at 7 days. This initial cytokine exposure has been proposed to trigger an enduring alteration in neuronal phenotype that underlies chronic hyper-excitability in sensory nerves, which initiates and maintains chronic neuropathic pain. We have shown previously that 5–6 days of exposure of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) to 100 pm IL-1β increases the excitability of medium-sized neurons. We have now found using whole-cell recording that this increased excitability reverts to control levels within 3–4 days of cytokine removal. The effects of IL-1β were dominated by changes in K+ currents. Thus, the amplitudes of A-current, delayed rectifier and Ca2+-sensitive K+ currents were reduced by ∼68%, ∼64% and ∼36%, respectively. Effects of IL-1β on other cation currents were modest by comparison. There was thus a slight decrease in availability of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel current, a small increase in rates of activation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel current (IH), and a shift in the voltage dependence of activation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current (TTX-S INa) to more negative potentials. It is unlikely, therefore, that direct interaction of IL-1β with DRG neurons initiates an enduring phenotypic shift in their electrophysiological properties following sciatic nerve injury. Persistent increases in primary afferent excitability following nerve injury may instead depend on altered K+ channel function and on the continued presence of slightly elevated levels IL-1β and other cytokines. PMID:26110238

  19. Human Fetal Exposure to Triclosan and Triclocarban in an Urban Population from Brooklyn, New York

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are antimicrobial agents formulated in a wide variety of consumer products (including soaps, toothpaste, medical devices, plastics, and fabrics) that are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In late 2014, the FDA will consider regulating the use of both chemicals, which are under scrutiny regarding lack of effectiveness, potential for endocrine disruption, and potential contribution to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Here, we report on body burdens of TCS and TCC resulting from real-world exposures during pregnancy. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the concentrations of TCS, TCC, and its human metabolites (2′-hydroxy-TCC and 3′-hydroxy-TCC) as well as the manufacturing byproduct (3′-chloro-TCC) as total concentrations (Σ−) after conjugate hydrolysis in maternal urine and cord blood plasma from a cohort of 181 expecting mother/infant pairs in an urban multiethnic population from Brooklyn, NY recruited in 2007–09. TCS was detected in 100% of urine and 51% of cord blood samples after conjugate hydrolysis. The interquartile range (IQR) of detected TCS concentrations in urine was highly similar to the IQR reported previously for the age-matched population of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2004, but typically higher than the IQR reported previously for the general population (detection frequency = 74.6%). Urinary levels of TCC are reported here for the first time from real-world exposures during pregnancy, showing a median concentration of 0.21 μg/L. Urinary concentrations of TCC correlated well with its phase-I metabolite ∑-2′-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.49) and the manufacturing byproduct ∑-3′-chloro-TCC C (r = 0.79), and ∑-2′-hydroxy-TCC correlated strongly with ∑-3′-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.99). This human biomonitoring study presents the first body burden data for TCC

  20. Human fetal exposure to triclosan and triclocarban in an urban population from Brooklyn, New York.

    PubMed

    Pycke, Benny F G; Geer, Laura A; Dalloul, Mudar; Abulafia, Ovadia; Jenck, Alizee M; Halden, Rolf U

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and triclocarban (TCC) are antimicrobial agents formulated in a wide variety of consumer products (including soaps, toothpaste, medical devices, plastics, and fabrics) that are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In late 2014, the FDA will consider regulating the use of both chemicals, which are under scrutiny regarding lack of effectiveness, potential for endocrine disruption, and potential contribution to bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Here, we report on body burdens of TCS and TCC resulting from real-world exposures during pregnancy. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we determined the concentrations of TCS, TCC, and its human metabolites (2'-hydroxy-TCC and 3'-hydroxy-TCC) as well as the manufacturing byproduct (3'-chloro-TCC) as total concentrations (Σ-) after conjugate hydrolysis in maternal urine and cord blood plasma from a cohort of 181 expecting mother/infant pairs in an urban multiethnic population from Brooklyn, NY recruited in 2007-09. TCS was detected in 100% of urine and 51% of cord blood samples after conjugate hydrolysis. The interquartile range (IQR) of detected TCS concentrations in urine was highly similar to the IQR reported previously for the age-matched population of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2003 to 2004, but typically higher than the IQR reported previously for the general population (detection frequency = 74.6%). Urinary levels of TCC are reported here for the first time from real-world exposures during pregnancy, showing a median concentration of 0.21 μg/L. Urinary concentrations of TCC correlated well with its phase-I metabolite ∑-2'-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.49) and the manufacturing byproduct ∑-3'-chloro-TCC C (r = 0.79), and ∑-2'-hydroxy-TCC correlated strongly with ∑-3'-hydroxy-TCC (r = 0.99). This human biomonitoring study presents the first body burden data for TCC from exposures

  1. An estimation of Canadian population exposure to cosmic rays from air travel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Newton, Dustin

    2013-03-01

    Based on air travel statistics in 1984, it was estimated that less than 4 % of the population dose from cosmic ray exposure would result from air travel. In the present study, cosmic ray doses were calculated for more than 3,000 flights departing from more than 200 Canadian airports using actual flight profiles. Based on currently available air travel statistics, the annual per capita effective dose from air transportation is estimated to be 32 μSv for Canadians, about 10 % of the average cosmic ray dose received at ground level (310 μSv per year).

  2. Dietary exposure to mycotoxins of the Hong Kong adult population from a Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Yau, Arthur Tin-Chung; Chen, Melva Yung-Yung; Lam, Chi-Ho; Ho, Yuk-Yin; Xiao, Ying; Chung, Stephen Wai-Cheung

    2016-06-01

    Dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to mycotoxins and their metabolites including aflatoxins (AFs), ochratoxin A (OTA), fumonisins (FNs), deoxynivalenol (DON), acetyldeoxynivalenols (AcDONs) and zearalenone (ZEA) was estimated using the Total Diet Study (TDS) approach to assess the associated health risk to the local people. Sixty commonly consumed food items, collected in four seasons, were sampled and prepared as consumed. These mycotoxins were primarily found at low levels. The highest mean levels (upper bound) were: AFs, 1.50 µg kg(-)(1) in legumes, nuts and seed; OTA, 0.22 µg kg(-)(1) in sugars and confectionery; FNs, 9.76 µg kg(-)(1) in cereals and their products; DON and AcDONs, 33.1 µg kg(-)(1) in cereals and their products; and ZEA, 53.8 µg kg(-)(1) in fats and oils. The estimated dietary exposures of Hong Kong adults to the mycotoxins analysed were well below the respective health-based guidance values, where available. For AFs, the upper-bound exposure for high consumers is 0.0049 µg kg bw(-)(1) day(-)(1), which was estimated to contribute to about 7.7 (< 1%) of liver cancer cases when compared with 1222 liver cancer cases per year in Hong Kong. The percentage contributions of the estimated 95th percentile dietary exposures (lower and upper bound) to the health-based guidance values of individual mycotoxins were: ochratoxin A, 3.6-9.2%; fumonisins, 0.04-8.5%; deoxynivalenol and acetyldeoxynivalenols, 21.7-28.2%; and zearalenone 3.3-34.5%. The findings indicate that dietary exposures to all the mycotoxins analysed in this study were unlikely to pose an unacceptable health risk to the Hong Kong population. PMID:27144988

  3. Metabolic profiling detects early effects of environmental and lifestyle exposure to cadmium in a human population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 'exposome' represents the accumulation of all environmental exposures across a lifetime. Top-down strategies are required to assess something this comprehensive, and could transform our understanding of how environmental factors affect human health. Metabolic profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics) defines an individual's metabolic phenotype, which is influenced by genotype, diet, lifestyle, health and xenobiotic exposure, and could also reveal intermediate biomarkers for disease risk that reflect adaptive response to exposure. We investigated changes in metabolism in volunteers living near a point source of environmental pollution: a closed zinc smelter with associated elevated levels of environmental cadmium. Methods High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy (metabonomics) was used to acquire urinary metabolic profiles from 178 human volunteers. The spectral data were subjected to multivariate and univariate analysis to identify metabolites that were correlated with lifestyle or biological factors. Urinary levels of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine were also measured, using mass spectrometry, as a marker of systemic oxidative stress. Results Six urinary metabolites, either associated with mitochondrial metabolism (citrate, 3-hydroxyisovalerate, 4-deoxy-erythronic acid) or one-carbon metabolism (dimethylglycine, creatinine, creatine), were associated with cadmium exposure. In particular, citrate levels retained a significant correlation to urinary cadmium and smoking status after controlling for age and sex. Oxidative stress (as determined by urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine levels) was elevated in individuals with high cadmium exposure, supporting the hypothesis that heavy metal accumulation was causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Conclusions This study shows evidence that an NMR-based metabolic profiling study in an uncontrolled human population is capable of identifying intermediate biomarkers of response to toxicants at true environmental concentrations, paving the way

  4. Direct Measurement of Perchlorate Exposure Biomarkers in a Highly Exposed Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  5. Estimate of dietary exposure to sulphites using Brazilian students as a sample population.

    PubMed

    Popolim, W D; De V C Penteado, M

    2005-11-01

    In Brazil, there is neither a register of the use of sulphites by the food industry nor is research being undertaken on their dietary exposure to the population. The objective of the work reported here was to estimate the dietary exposure to sulphites in two different groups of high school students, a fee-paying school group and a state school group. The data were collected through a 24-hour dietary recall, which provided estimates of sulphited foods and beverages in the diet. The Maximum Permitted Level (MPL), established by the Brazilian legislation for each of the sulphited food and beverages, was used to measure the dietary exposure to this additive. On this basis none of the students could have exceeded the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of 0.70 mg SO2/kg bw/day, with a average dietary exposure of 0.07 mg SO2/kg bw/day (p<0.001), with no significant statistical difference (p=0.643) between fee-paying and state school students. Highly exposed consumers (dietary exposure to more than 50% of the ADI, or either, 0.35 mg SO2/kg bw/day, to the maximum of 0.52 mg SO2/kg bw/dia) represented 4.5% of the researched samples and reached these levels of intake due to a consumption beyond 500 ml/day of industrialized packaged fruit juices, and, in the fee-paying school, for associating its consumption with alcoholic beverages like beer and wine.

  6. Direct measurement of perchlorate exposure biomarkers in a highly exposed population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    English, Paul; Blount, Ben; Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-03-04

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment.

  7. Direct measurement of perchlorate exposure biomarkers in a highly exposed population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    English, Paul; Blount, Ben; Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  8. Population growth rate and genetic variability of small and large populations of Red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) following multigenerational exposure to copper.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Ryszard; Radwan, Jacek; Kuduk, Katarzyna; Mendrok, Magdalena; Kramarz, Paulina

    2015-07-01

    We reared large (1000 individuals) and small (20 individuals) populations of Tribolium castaneum on diet contaminated with copper in order to determine if the size of a population affects its ability to adapt to adverse environmental conditions. After 10 generations, we used microsatellite markers to estimate and subsequently compare the genetic variability of the copper-treated populations with that of the control populations, which were reared on uncontaminated medium. Additionally, we conducted a full cross-factorial experiment which evaluated the effects of 10 generations of "pre-exposure" to copper on a population's fitness in control and copper-contaminated environments. In order to distinguish results potentially arising from genetic adaptation from those due to non-genetic effects associated to parental exposure to copper, we subjected also F11 generation, originating from parents not exposed to copper, to the same cross-factorial experiment. The effects of long-term exposure to copper depended on population size: the growth rates of small populations that were pre-exposed to copper were inhibited compared to those of small populations reared in uncontaminated environments. Large Cu-exposed populations had a higher growth rate in the F10 generation compared to the control groups, while the growth rate of the F11 generation was unaffected by copper exposure history. The only factor that had a significant effect on genetic variability was population size, but this was to be expected given the large difference in the number of individuals between large and small populations. Neither copper contamination nor its interaction with population size affected the number of microsatellite alleles retained in the F10 generation.

  9. Systematic review of differential inorganic arsenic exposure in minority, low-income, and indigenous populations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Joca, Lauren; Sacks, Jason D; Moore, Danielle; Lee, Janice S; Sams, Reeder; Cowden, John

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a human carcinogen and associated with cardiovascular, respiratory, and skin diseases. Natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to low concentrations of iAs in water, food, soil, and air. Differential exposure to environmental hazards in minority, indigenous, and low income populations is considered an environmental justice (EJ) concern, yet it is unclear if higher iAs exposure occurs in these populations. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate evidence for differential iAs exposure in the United States (US). The peer-reviewed literature was searched for studies that (1) estimated iAs exposure based on environmental concentrations of iAs in water, food, soil, or iAs biomarkers and (2) examined iAs exposure in minority, indigenous, and low income US populations. Five studies were identified that estimated exposures and provided demographic information about EJ populations. These studies reported arsenic concentrations in water, soil, or food to estimate exposure, with varied evidence of differential exposure. Additionally, six studies were identified that suggested potential arsenic exposure from environmental sources including soil, rice, private well-water, and fish, but did not report data stratified by demographic information. Evidence across these 11 studies was qualitatively integrated to draw conclusions about differential iAs exposure. The total body of evidence is limited by lack of individual exposure measures, lack of iAs concentration data, and insufficient comparative demographic data. Based upon these data gaps, there is inadequate evidence to conclude whether differential exposure to iAs is an EJ concern in the US. PMID:26896853

  10. Systematic review of differential inorganic arsenic exposure in minority, low-income, and indigenous populations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Joca, Lauren; Sacks, Jason D; Moore, Danielle; Lee, Janice S; Sams, Reeder; Cowden, John

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a human carcinogen and associated with cardiovascular, respiratory, and skin diseases. Natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to low concentrations of iAs in water, food, soil, and air. Differential exposure to environmental hazards in minority, indigenous, and low income populations is considered an environmental justice (EJ) concern, yet it is unclear if higher iAs exposure occurs in these populations. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate evidence for differential iAs exposure in the United States (US). The peer-reviewed literature was searched for studies that (1) estimated iAs exposure based on environmental concentrations of iAs in water, food, soil, or iAs biomarkers and (2) examined iAs exposure in minority, indigenous, and low income US populations. Five studies were identified that estimated exposures and provided demographic information about EJ populations. These studies reported arsenic concentrations in water, soil, or food to estimate exposure, with varied evidence of differential exposure. Additionally, six studies were identified that suggested potential arsenic exposure from environmental sources including soil, rice, private well-water, and fish, but did not report data stratified by demographic information. Evidence across these 11 studies was qualitatively integrated to draw conclusions about differential iAs exposure. The total body of evidence is limited by lack of individual exposure measures, lack of iAs concentration data, and insufficient comparative demographic data. Based upon these data gaps, there is inadequate evidence to conclude whether differential exposure to iAs is an EJ concern in the US.

  11. Evaluation of Observation-Fused Regional Air Quality Model Results for Population Air Pollution Exposure Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Li, Jingyi; Ying, Qi; Sherman, Seth; Perkins, Neil; Rajeshwari, Sundaram; Mendola, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was applied to predict ambient gaseous and particulate concentrations during 2001 to 2010 in 15 hospital referral regions (HRRs) using a 36-km horizontal resolution domain. An inverse distance weighting based method was applied to produce exposure estimates based on observation-fused regional pollutant concentration fields using the differences between observations and predictions at grid cells where air quality monitors were located. Although the raw CMAQ model is capable of producing satisfying results for O3 and PM2.5 based on EPA guidelines, using the observation data fusing technique to correct CMAQ predictions leads to significant improvement of model performance for all gaseous and particulate pollutants. Regional average concentrations were calculated using five different methods: 1) inverse distance weighting of observation data alone, 2) raw CMAQ results, 3) observation-fused CMAQ results, 4) population-averaged raw CMAQ results and 5) population-averaged fused CMAQ results. It shows that while O3 (as well as NOx) monitoring networks in the HRR regions are dense enough to provide consistent regional average exposure estimation based on monitoring data alone, PM2.5 observation sites (as well as monitors for CO, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 components) are usually sparse and the difference between the average concentrations estimated by the inverse distance interpolated observations, raw CMAQ and fused CMAQ results can be significantly different. Population-weighted average should be used to account spatial variation in pollutant concentration and population density. Using raw CMAQ results or observations alone might lead to significant biases in health outcome analyses. PMID:24747248

  12. Internal migration and urbanization in China: impacts on population exposure to household air pollution (2000-2010).

    PubMed

    Aunan, Kristin; Wang, Shuxiao

    2014-05-15

    Exposure to fine particles ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) from incomplete combustion of solid fuels in household stoves, denoted household air pollution (HAP), is a major contributor to ill health in China and globally. Chinese households are, however, undergoing a massive transition to cleaner household fuels. The objective of the present study is to establish the importance of internal migration when it comes to the changing household fuel use pattern and the associated exposure to PM2.5 for the period 2000 to 2010. We also estimate health benefits of the fuel transition in terms of avoided premature deaths. Using China Census data on population, migration, and household fuel use for 2000 and 2010 we identify the size, place of residence, and main cooking fuel of sub-populations in 2000 and 2010, respectively. We combine these data with estimated exposure levels for the sub-populations and estimate changes in population exposure over the decade. We find that the population weighted exposure (PWE) for the Chinese population as a whole was reduced by 52 (36-70) μg/m(3) PM2.5 over the decade, and that about 60% of the reduction can be linked to internal migration. During the same period the migrant population, in total 261 million people, was subject to a reduced population weighted exposure (ΔPWE) of 123 (87-165) μg/m(3) PM2.5. The corresponding figure for non-migrants is 34 (23-47) μg/m(3). The largest ΔPWE was estimated for rural-to-urban migrants (138 million people), 214 (154-283) μg/m(3). The estimated annual health benefit associated with the reduced exposure in the total population is 31 (26-37) billion USD, corresponding to 0.4% of the Chinese GDP.

  13. Particulate matter pollution and population exposure assessment over mainland China in 2010 with remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ling; Lu, Ning

    2014-05-01

    The public is increasingly concerned about particulate matter pollution caused by respirable suspended particles (PM10) and fine particles (PM2.5). In this paper, PM10 and PM2.5 concentration are estimated with remote sensing and individual air quality indexes of PM10 and PM2.5 (IPM10 and IPM2.5) over mainland China in 2010 are calculated. We find that China suffered more serious PM2.5 than PM10 pollution in 2010, and they presented a spatial differentiation. Consequently, a particulate-based air quality index (PAQI) based on a weighting method is proposed to provide a more objective assessment of the particulate pollution. The study demonstrates that, in 2010, most of mainland China faced a lightly polluted situation in PAQI case; there were three areas obviously under moderate pollution (Hubei, Sichuan-Chongqing border region and Ningxia-Inner Mongolia border region). Simultaneously, two indicators are calculated with the combination of population density gridded data to reveal Chinese population exposure to PM2.5. Comparing per capita PM2.5 concentration with population-weighted PM2.5 concentration, the former shows that the high-level regions are distributed in Guangdong, Shanghai, and Tianjin, while the latter are in Hebei, Chongqing, and Shandong. By comparison, the results demonstrate that population-weighted PM2.5 concentration is more in line with the actual situation.

  14. Conceptual Environmental Justice Model for Evaluating Chemical Pathways of Exposure in Low-Income, Minority, Native American, and Other Unique Exposure Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gochfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment determines pathways, and exposures that lead to poor health. For exposures that fall disproportionately on urban low-income communities, minorities, and Native Americans, these pathways are often more common than in the general population. Although risk assessors often evaluate these pathways on an ad hoc basis, a more formal way of addressing these nonstandard pathways is needed to adequately inform public health policy. A conceptual model is presented for evaluating nonstandard, unique, or excessive exposures, particularly for environmental justice communities that have an exposure matrix of inhalation, dermal, ingestion, and injection. Risk assessment can be improved by including nonstandard and unique exposure pathways as described in this conceptual model. PMID:21551379

  15. Occupational noise exposure and hearing loss characteristics of a blue-collar population

    SciTech Connect

    Helmkamp, J.C.; Talbott, E.O.; Margolis, H.

    1984-12-01

    Recent studies of health effects from chronic exposure to noise in the workplace have not consistently addressed nonoccupational variables. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 197 randomly selected male hourly workers from a noisy plant ( greater than or equal to 89 dBA) in Pittsburgh to fully assess noise exposure and hearing loss, incorporating information on duration of exposure, noise level, occupational and medical histories, audiometric evaluation, and external noise sources. Population audiometric profiles are characteristic of noise-induced hearing loss; mean hearing thresholds for press room men were significantly higher at 2, 3, and 6 kHz (p less than or equal to .05). Only 40% of the men consistently wore hearing protection. Recent use of ototoxic drugs, noisy hobbies/second jobs, military service, family history of hearing loss, and ear-related problems were not found to have a significant effect on hearing levels at high frequencies, suggesting that observed hearing losses were of an occupational origin. 31 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Whole body exposure at 2100 MHz induced by plane wave of random incidences in a population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, Emmanuelle; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; El Habachi, Aimad; Wiart, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this article, the whole body exposure induced by plane wave coming from a random direction of arrival is analyzed at 2100 MHz. This work completes previous studies on the influence of different parameters on the whole body exposure (such as morphology, frequency or usage in near field). The Visible Human phantom has been used to build a surrogate model to predict the whole body exposure depending on the highlighted surface of the phantom and on the direction of arrival of the incident plane wave. For the Visible Human, the error on the whole body averaged Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is on average 4%. The surrogate model is applied to other 3D anthropomorphic phantoms for a frontal incidence with an averaged error of 10%. The great interest of the surrogate model is the possibility to apply a Monte Carlo process to assess probability distribution function of a population. A recent French anthropometric database of more than 3500 adults is used to build the probability distribution function of the whole body SAR for a random direction of arrival.

  17. Chronic lead exposure is epidemic in obligate scavenger populations in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Behmke, Shannon; Fallon, Jesse; Duerr, Adam E; Lehner, Andreas; Buchweitz, John; Katzner, Todd

    2015-06-01

    Lead is a prominent and highly toxic contaminant with important impacts to wildlife. To understand the degree to which wildlife populations are chronically exposed, we quantified lead levels within American black vultures (Coragyps atratus; BLVU) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura; TUVU), two species that are useful as environmental sentinels in eastern North America. Every individual sampled (n=108) had bone lead levels indicative of chronic exposure to anthropogenic lead (BLVU: x¯=36.99 ± 55.21 mg Pb/kg tissue (±SD); TUVU: x¯=23.02 ± 18.77 mg/kg). Only a few showed evidence of recent lead exposure (BLVU liver: x¯=0.78 ± 0.93 mg/kg; TUVU liver: x¯=0.55 ± 0.34 mg/kg). Isotopic ratios suggested multiple potential sources of lead including ammunition, gasoline, coal-fired power plants, and zinc smelting. Black and turkey vultures range across eastern North America, from Quebec to Florida and individuals may traverse thousands of kilometers annually. The extent to which vultures are exposed suggests that anthropogenic lead permeates eastern North American ecosystems to a previously unrecognized degree. Discovery of an epidemic of chronic lead exposure in such widespread and common species and the failure of soft-tissue sampling to diagnose this pattern has dramatic implications for understanding modern wildlife and human health concerns.

  18. Medication type modifies inflammatory response to traffic exposure in a population with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rioux, Christine L; Tucker, Katherine L; Brugge, Doug; Mwamburi, Mkaya

    2015-07-01

    The association between residential traffic exposure and change in C-reactive protein over 2-years was evaluated using multivariate linear regression including interaction models for traffic and diabetes medication use/type (insulin vs. oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs)). The study population was Puerto Rican adults (n = 356) residing in greater Boston with type 2 diabetes. Traffic was characterized as proximity to roads with >20,000 weekday traffic volumes, and multi-directional traffic density. Increases in CRP concentration were significantly associated with residence ≤100 m of a roadway (p = 0.009) or near multiple roadways (p < 0.001), vs. further away, for individuals using insulin in stratified models, with consistent results in interaction models (p = 0.071 and p = 0.002). CRP was significantly lower with highest traffic density exposure in stratified (p = 0.03) and interaction models (p = 0.024) for individuals using OHAs. Individuals on insulin experienced increased CRP concentrations with traffic exposure over a 2-year study period, while those using OHAs did not experience increases.

  19. Chronic lead exposure is epidemic in obligate scavenger populations in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Behmke, Shannon; Fallon, Jesse; Duerr, Adam E; Lehner, Andreas; Buchweitz, John; Katzner, Todd

    2015-06-01

    Lead is a prominent and highly toxic contaminant with important impacts to wildlife. To understand the degree to which wildlife populations are chronically exposed, we quantified lead levels within American black vultures (Coragyps atratus; BLVU) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura; TUVU), two species that are useful as environmental sentinels in eastern North America. Every individual sampled (n=108) had bone lead levels indicative of chronic exposure to anthropogenic lead (BLVU: x¯=36.99 ± 55.21 mg Pb/kg tissue (±SD); TUVU: x¯=23.02 ± 18.77 mg/kg). Only a few showed evidence of recent lead exposure (BLVU liver: x¯=0.78 ± 0.93 mg/kg; TUVU liver: x¯=0.55 ± 0.34 mg/kg). Isotopic ratios suggested multiple potential sources of lead including ammunition, gasoline, coal-fired power plants, and zinc smelting. Black and turkey vultures range across eastern North America, from Quebec to Florida and individuals may traverse thousands of kilometers annually. The extent to which vultures are exposed suggests that anthropogenic lead permeates eastern North American ecosystems to a previously unrecognized degree. Discovery of an epidemic of chronic lead exposure in such widespread and common species and the failure of soft-tissue sampling to diagnose this pattern has dramatic implications for understanding modern wildlife and human health concerns. PMID:25795925

  20. Population Exposure to PM2.5 in the Urban Area of Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, An; Qi, Qingwen; Jiang, Lili; Zhou, Fang; Wang, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    The air quality in Beijing, especially its PM2.5 level, has become of increasing public concern because of its importance and sensitivity related to health risks. A set of monitored PM2.5 data from 31 stations, released for the first time by the Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau, covering 37 days during autumn 2012, was processed using spatial interpolation and overlay analysis. Following analyses of these data, a distribution map of cumulative exceedance days of PM2.5 and a temporal variation map of PM2.5 for Beijing have been drawn. Computational and analytical results show periodic and directional trends of PM2.5 spreading and congregating in space, which reveals the regulation of PM2.5 overexposure on a discontinuous medium-term scale. With regard to the cumulative effect of PM2.5 on the human body, the harm from lower intensity overexposure in the medium term, and higher overexposure in the short term, are both obvious. Therefore, data of population distribution were integrated into the aforementioned PM2.5 spatial spectrum map. A spatial statistical analysis revealed the patterns of PM2.5 gross exposure and exposure probability of residents in the Beijing urban area. The methods and conclusions of this research reveal relationships between long-term overexposure to PM2.5 and people living in high-exposure areas of Beijing, during the autumn of 2012. PMID:23658832

  1. Chronic exposure to gamma radiation of wild populations of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus).

    PubMed

    Mihok, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Free-ranging, wild meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were exposed to gamma radiation from a (137)Cs irradiator in a series of experiments conducted on six 1-ha meadows within a mixed deciduous forest in Manitoba, Canada. Over a period of 1-1.5 years in each of three experiments, vole populations were monitored with capture-mark-release techniques at nominal exposure rates of 200x, 9000x and 40,000x background. No effects on population or individual characteristics were detected up to the highest exposure rate (81 mGy/d). At this level, third generation voles were monitored up to a lifetime dose of about 5.7 Gy, at a measured dose rate of 44 mGy/d. Smaller numbers of overwintered animals survived and reproduced normally at doses up to 10 Gy. These results are discussed in terms of low-LET, external chronic radiation effects on rodents in the laboratory and the field, relative to current views on appropriate benchmarks for the protection of biota.

  2. Evaluation of factors associated with cadmium exposure and kidney function in the general population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingai; Choi, Seong-Jin; Kim, Dong-Won; Kim, Na-Young; Bae, Hye-Sun; Yu, Seung-Do; Kim, Dae-Seon; Kim, Heon; Choi, Byung-Sun; Yu, Il-Je; Park, Jung-Duck

    2013-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential toxic metal which is widely distributed in the environment. The general population is exposed to low levels of Cd and the kidney is the organ most sensitive to Cd toxicity. This study was performed to simultaneously evaluate Cd exposure, kidney function, and oxidative stress biomarkers in the general population. A total of 643 adults were interviewed to document demographic characteristics, lifestyles, past-medical history, and diet during the last 24 h. We estimated daily Cd intake based on the diet of study subjects who had not been exposed to Cd occupationally. Whole blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed to determine Cd concentrations and kidney function indices (β₂ -microglobulin [β₂-MG], N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase [NAG], metallothionein [MT]). The oxidative stress index (malondialdehyde [MDA]) was determined from the urine. The daily Cd intake from diet was established as 7.07 μg/day. The mean concentration of Cd measured in the blood was 1.22 μg/L and urine was 0.95 μg/g creatinine. The concentrations of Cd in blood and urine were higher in females than in males. The blood levels of Cd were affected by sex, age, and smoking, and urine Cd was influenced by sex, age, and blood Cd. The urine Cd was positively correlated with MT, NAG activity, and MDA in females, but with NAG only in males. The blood Cd was associated with MT in males. Increased NAG activity was observed when Cd in urine reached 1.0 μg Cd/g creatinine and was also affected by age, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Urinary MT only responded to Cd in urine or blood. In summary, exposure to Cd in the general population was influenced by various factors including sex, age, and smoking habits. Such exposure might eventually cause tubular damage in the kidneys through the oxidative stress mechanism, and females might be more susceptible than males to Cd exposure under the environment.

  3. Population-Based Biomonitoring of Exposure to Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Pesticides in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, J. Bryan; Kass, Daniel; Barr, Dana Boyd; Davis, Mark; Calafat, Antonia M.; Aldous, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Organophosphates and pyrethroids are the most common classes of insecticides used in the United States. Widespread use of these compounds to control building infestations in New York City (NYC) may have caused higher exposure than in less-urban settings. Objectives: The objectives of our study were to estimate pesticide exposure reference values for NYC and identify demographic and behavioral characteristics that predict exposures. Methods: The NYC Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was a population-based, cross-sectional study conducted in 2004 among adults ≥ 20 years of age. It measured urinary concentrations of organophosphate metabolites [dimethylphosphate (DMP), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), dimethyldithiophosphate, diethylphosphate, diethylthiophosphate, and diethyldithiophosphate] in 883 participants, and pyrethroid metabolites [3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (trans-DCCA), 4-fluoro-3-phenoxybenzoic acid, and cis-3-(2,2-dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid] in 1,452 participants. We used multivariable linear regression to estimate least-squares geometric mean total dialkylphospate (ΣDAP) and 3-PBA concentrations across categories of predictors. Results: The dimethyl organophosphate metabolites had the highest 95th percentile concentrations (87.4 μg/L and 74.7 μg/L for DMP and DMTP, respectively). The highest 95th percentiles among pyrethroid metabolites were measured for 3-PBA and trans-DCCA (5.23 μg/L and 5.94 μg/L, respectively). Concentrations of ΣDAP increased with increasing age, non-Hispanic white or black compared with Hispanic race/ethnicity, professional pesticide use, and increasing frequency of fruit consumption; they decreased with non-green vegetable consumption. Absolute differences in geometric mean urinary 3-PBA concentrations across categories of predictors were too small to be meaningful. Conclusion: Estimates of exposure to

  4. Background levels of key biomarkers of chemical exposure within the UK general population--pilot study.

    PubMed

    Levy, L S; Jones, K; Cocker, J; Assem, F L; Capleton, A C

    2007-05-01

    The use of biomarkers is now an accepted measure of chemical uptake (possibly exposure) in risk assessment. However, information on background exposures and biomarker concentrations of many environmental chemicals in the general UK population is limited. This study aims to determine reference ranges for eleven biomarkers of chemical exposure, measurable in urine, within the general adult UK population. The study will involve 400 volunteers throughout the UK and is currently underway. Described here is a pilot study, carried out during August and September 2005 to test the study methodology. The initial results of the postal survey and urinary concentrations for cadmium (UCd) and mercury (UHg) are reported. A total of 78 individuals were recruited by post from the UK Electoral Register, to take part in the pilot study. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire and provide a urine sample. The overall response rate was 16%, of which 60.3% were female and 39.7% male. Those living in suburban areas accounted for 60% of respondents, current smokers 12.8% and vegetarians 1.3%. Levels of UCd were higher in females compared to males and smoking status influenced levels; smokers displayed higher levels of UCd than individuals who had previously smoked or who had never smoked. The mean, median and range of UHg was 1.12, 0.55 (

  5. Impacts of stage-specific acute pesticide exposure on predicted population structure of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, S.; Chasse, J.; Butler, R.A.; Morrill, W.; Van Beneden, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    A combined laboratory and modeling approach was used to assess the impact of selected pesticides on early life stages of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria. Clams were exposed for 24 h as veligers or pediveligers to the broad-spectrum herbicide hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4 (1h,3h)-dione; (Velpar®)], the phenoxyacetic acid herbicide, 2,4-D (2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid; Agway® Super BK 32), or phosmet (Imidan®). In addition, juvenile clams were exposed for 24 h to 2,4-D and their growth monitored for 21 months. Laboratory experiments indicated veligers were more sensitive to acute pesticide exposure than pediveligers, with 2,4-D exposed veligers exhibiting the lowest survival among all treatments. Relative to controls, juvenile clams exposed to 0.5 ppm 2,4-D had enhanced survival following the initial 3 months of grow out. Juveniles exposed to 0.5 ppm, 5 ppm and 10 ppm 2,4-D showed an initial growth delay relative to control clams, but at 21 months post exposure these clams were significantly larger than control clams. Data from the larval and juvenile exposures were used to generate a stage-specific matrix model to predict the effect of pesticide exposure on clam populations. Impacts on simulated clam populations varied with the pesticide and stage exposed. For example, 2,4-D exposure of veligers and pediveligers significantly reduced predicted recruitment as well as population growth rate compared to controls, but juvenile exposure to 2,4-D did not significantly reduce population growth rate. With the exception of veligers exposed to 10 ppm, hexazinone exposure at the both veliger and pediveliger stages significantly reduced predicted recruitment success compared to 0 ppm controls. Hexazinone exposure also reduced modeled population growth rates, but these reductions were only slight in the pediveliger exposure simulations. Veliger and pediveliger exposure to phosmet reduced modeled population growth rate in a dose

  6. Exposure to persistent organic pollutants and sperm DNA methylation changes in Arctic and European populations.

    PubMed

    Consales, Claudia; Toft, Gunnar; Leter, Giorgio; Bonde, Jens Peter E; Uccelli, Raffaella; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Eleuteri, Patrizia; Jönsson, Bo A G; Giwercman, Aleksander; Pedersen, Henning S; Struciński, Paweł; Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Zviezdai, Valentyna; Spanò, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane], are environmental contaminants with potential endocrine disrupting activity. DNA methylation levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes have been associated with serum concentrations of POPs in Greenland Inuit and Korean populations. Greenland Inuits are characterized by the highest worldwide POP levels. In this cross-sectional study we evaluated the relationship between serum POP concentrations and DNA methylation levels in sperm of non-occupationally exposed fertile men from Greenland, Warsaw (Poland), and Kharkiv (Ukraine). Serum levels of PCB-153 [1,2,4-trichloro-5-(2,4,5-trichlorophenyl)benzene], as a proxy of the total PCBs body burden, and of p,p'-DDE [1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene], the main metabolite of DDT were measured. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed globally by flow cytometric (FCM) immunodetection of 5-methyl-cytosines and at specific repetitive DNA sequences (Alu, LINE-1, Satα) by PCR-pyrosequencing after bisulfite conversion. Multivariate linear regression analysis was applied to investigate correlations between serum POP concentrations and DNA methylation. No consistent associations between exposure to POPs and sperm DNA methylation at repetitive DNA sequences were detected. A statistically significant global decrease in methylation was associated with exposure to either POP by FCM analysis. This is the first study to investigate environmental exposure to POPs and DNA methylation levels considering sperm as the target cells. Although POP exposure appears to have a limited negative impact on sperm DNA methylation levels in adult males, the global hypomethylation detected by one of the methods applied suggests that further investigation is warranted. PMID:26801515

  7. Critical exposure level of cadmium for elevated urinary metallothionein-An occupational population study in China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Liang; Jin Taiyi . E-mail: tyjin@shmu.edu.cn; Huang, Bo; Nordberg, Gunnar; Nordberg, Monica

    2006-08-15

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxic agent with extremely long biological half-time of 15-30 years in humans. To prevent nephrotoxicity induced by cadmium, it is necessary to identify specific and sensitive biomarkers of cadmium exposure and renal damage, and to define critical exposure levels related to minimal nephrotoxicity in humans. In this study, urinary cadmium (UCd) and blood cadmium (BCd) were used as cadmium exposure indicators, urinary {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin (UB2M), N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase (UNAG) and albumin (UALB) were applied as the effect biomarkers of tubular and glomerular dysfunction. The relationship between urinary metallothionein (UMT) and cadmium exposure biomarkers as well as effect biomarkers was examined. Significant correlations were found between the UMT and BCd, and UCd. At the same time, UB2M, UALB and UNAG showed positive correlation with UMT as well. According to this result, cadmium-exposed individuals with renal dysfunction excreted more metallothionein than those without. Dose-response relationships between UCd and urinary indicators of renal dysfunction were studied. The critical concentration of UCd was quantitatively estimated by the benchmark dose (BMD) method. The lower confidence limit of the BMD-10 (BMDL) of UCd (3.1 {mu}g/g Cr) related to increased excretion of urinary metallothionein was slightly higher than that for UNAG (2.7 {mu}g/g Cr), but lower than those of UB2M (3.4 {mu}g/g Cr) and UALB (4.2 {mu}g/g Cr). The results demonstrate that UMT may be used as a sensitive biomarker of renal tubular dysfunction in cadmium-exposed populations.

  8. Important deficits of lung function in three modern colliery populations. Relations with dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Soutar, C.; Campbell, S.; Gurr, D.; Lloyd, M.; Love, R.; Cowie, H.; Cowie, A.; Seaton, A. )

    1993-04-01

    To determine whether dust-related clinically important deficits of lung function still occur in British coal miners we have analyzed the relationship between lifetime cumulative exposure to respirable dust and risk of defined functional deficits in a population of miners who were examined between 1981 and 1986. The study group consisted of a sample of men who had worked at any one of three collieries (South Wales, Yorkshire, and North East England) between 1970, when new dust standards were introduced, and date of medical survey. There were 1,671 men studied, including men who had left the collieries. Clinically important deficits of FEV1 from predicted values derived in this population were defined by comparisons with questionnaire data on exercise tolerance limited by breathlessness. The mean FEV1 of men in the South Wales colliery, for example, who said they had to stop for breath when walking at their own pace on level ground was 942 ml less than the predicted value for nonsmokers after taking age and stature into account. Individual cumulative exposures to respirable dust were calculated from a long-term program of measurements of dust concentrations and occupational records commencing in 1953. In the three colliery populations, 24, 24, and 12% in South Wales, Yorkshire, and the North East, respectively, had FEV1 deficits that were at least as severe as the average deficit associated with the severe grade of exertional dyspnea described above. In all collieries deficits were more common in smokers than in nonsmokers, and more common in men who had left the industry than in men still within it.

  9. Dietary exposure to non-dioxin-like PCBs of different population groups in Austria.

    PubMed

    Mihats, Daniela; Moche, Wolfgang; Prean, Michael; Rauscher-Gabernig, Elke

    2015-05-01

    The dietary exposure to the sum of the six indicator PCBs (Σ6 PCBs; PCB 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, and 180) across different Austrian population groups was assessed in this study by combining data on occurrence from food of the Austrian market (n=157) analysed during 2006-2011 with national food consumption data. The most contaminated food group was meat, poultry, game and offal with average levels of ndl-PCBs of 5.20 ng g(-1) fat. In fish and fish products and eggs, mean concentrations of 3.89 ng g(-1) fresh weight (fw) and 4.00 ng g(-1) fat, respectively, were found. In milk and dairy products average concentrations ranged from 3.07 to 4.44 ng g(-1) fat. The mean dietary intake of Σ6 PCBs was estimated to be 3.37 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for children (6-15 years old), 3.19 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for women (19-65 years) and 2.64 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for men (19-65 years). In all three population groups, milk and dairy products was the major contributing food group to the total dietary intake (50-55%) followed by fish and fish products (23-27%). The exposure of all Austrian population groups is well below the tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 10 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) proposed by WHO, accounting for 34% in children, 32% in women and 26% in men.

  10. Sun Exposure Prevalence and Associated Skin Health Habits: Results from the Austrian Population-Based UVSkinRisk Survey

    PubMed Central

    Haluza, Daniela; Simic, Stana; Moshammer, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Recreational sun exposure accounts for a large number of acute and chronic dermatological diseases, including skin cancer. This study aimed at estimating the one-year prevalence of sun exposure and skin health-associated knowledge and attitudes among Austrian citizens. The population-based UVSkinRisk survey investigated a representative sample of Austrian adults using a structured questionnaire. In total, 1500 study subjects (median age 33.0 years, 50.5% females) participated in this questionnaire survey. Among study participants, prevalence of sun exposure was 47%, with slightly higher rates in males (48%) compared to females (46%). Younger age, lower professional category, darker skin type, motives to tan, sunbed use, sunburn, and outdoor sport activity increased the odds for prevalent sun exposure. This is the first population-based study evaluating the prevailing sun exposure and recreational habits influencing skin health among Austrian citizens. Despite public media campaigns educating on the harmful effects of sunlight exposure, we found a high prevalence of self-reported sunlight exposure. The results suggest that multifaceted socio-cultural characteristics stimulate recreational sun exposure and tanning habits. Communicating individualized Public (Skin) Health messages might be the key to prevent photo-induced skin health hazards in light-skinned populations. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26797627

  11. Sun Exposure Prevalence and Associated Skin Health Habits: Results from the Austrian Population-Based UVSkinRisk Survey.

    PubMed

    Haluza, Daniela; Simic, Stana; Moshammer, Hanns

    2016-01-01

    Recreational sun exposure accounts for a large number of acute and chronic dermatological diseases, including skin cancer. This study aimed at estimating the one-year prevalence of sun exposure and skin health-associated knowledge and attitudes among Austrian citizens. The population-based UVSkinRisk survey investigated a representative sample of Austrian adults using a structured questionnaire. In total, 1500 study subjects (median age 33.0 years, 50.5% females) participated in this questionnaire survey. Among study participants, prevalence of sun exposure was 47%, with slightly higher rates in males (48%) compared to females (46%). Younger age, lower professional category, darker skin type, motives to tan, sunbed use, sunburn, and outdoor sport activity increased the odds for prevalent sun exposure. This is the first population-based study evaluating the prevailing sun exposure and recreational habits influencing skin health among Austrian citizens. Despite public media campaigns educating on the harmful effects of sunlight exposure, we found a high prevalence of self-reported sunlight exposure. The results suggest that multifaceted socio-cultural characteristics stimulate recreational sun exposure and tanning habits. Communicating individualized Public (Skin) Health messages might be the key to prevent photo-induced skin health hazards in light-skinned populations. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26797627

  12. Effects of Lead Exposure, Environmental Conditions, and Metapopulation Processes on Population Dynamics of Spectacled Eiders.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, Paul L.; Grand, James B.; Petersen, Margaret; Robert Rockwell,

    2016-01-01

    Spectacled eider Somateria fischeri numbers have declined and they are considered threatened in accordance with the US Endangered Species Act throughout their range. We synthesized the available information for spectacled eiders to construct deterministic, stochastic, and metapopulation models for this species that incorporated current estimates of vital rates such as nest success, adult survival, and the impact of lead poisoning on survival. Elasticities of our deterministic models suggested that the populations would respond most dramatically to changes in adult female survival and that the reductions in adult female survival related to lead poisoning were locally important. We also examined the sensitivity of the population to changes in lead exposure rates. With the knowledge that some vital rates vary with environmental conditions, we cast stochastic models that mimicked observed variation in productivity. We also used the stochastic model to examine the probability that a specific population will persist for periods of up to 50 y. Elasticity analysis of these models was consistent with that for the deterministic models, with perturbations to adult female survival having the greatest effect on population projections. When used in single population models, demographic data for some localities predicted rapid declines that were inconsistent with our observations in the field. Thus, we constructed a metapopulation model and examined the predictions for local subpopulations and the metapopulation over a wide range of dispersal rates. Using the metapopulation model, we were able to simulate the observed stability of local subpopulations as well as that of the metapopulation. Finally, we developed a global metapopulation model that simulates periodic winter habitat limitation, similar to that which might be experienced in years of heavy sea ice in the core wintering area of spectacled eiders in the central Bering Sea. Our metapopulation analyses suggested that no

  13. Pathogen exposure and blood chemistry in the Washington, USA population of northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni).

    PubMed

    White, C LeAnn; Schuler, Krysten L; Thomas, Nancy J; Webb, Julie L; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Ip, Hon S; Dubey, J P; Frame, Elizabeth R

    2013-10-01

    Northern sea otters (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) from Washington State, United States were evaluated in 2011 to determine health status and pathogen exposure. Antibodies to Brucella spp. (10%) and influenza A virus (23%) were detected for the first time in this population in 2011. Changes in clinical pathology values (serum chemistries), exposure to pathogens, and overall health of the population over the last decade were assessed by comparing 2011 data to the data collected on this population in 2001-2002. Several serum chemistry parameters were different between study years and sexes but were not clinically significant. The odds of canine distemper virus exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2001-2002 (80%) compared to 2011 (10%); likelihood of exposure significantly increased with age. Prevalence of exposure to Sarcocystis neurona was also higher in 2001-2002 (29%) than in 2011 (0%), but because testing methods varied between study years the results were not directly comparable. Exposure to Leptospira spp. was only observed in 2001-2002. Odds of Toxoplasma gondii exposure were higher for otters sampled in 2011 (97%) than otters in 2001-2002 (58%). Substantial levels of domoic acid (n = 2) and saxitoxin (n = 2) were found in urine or fecal samples from animals sampled in 2011. No evidence of calicivirus or Coxiella burnetii exposure in the Washington population of northern sea otters was found in either 2001-2002 or 2011. Changes in exposure status from 2001-2002 to 2011 suggest that the Washington sea otter population may be dealing with new disease threats (e.g., influenza) while also increasing their susceptibility to diseases that may be highly pathogenic in naïve individuals (e.g., canine distemper).

  14. Changes in exposure to ‘life stressors’ in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, 2002 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Negative Life Events Scale (NLES) has been included in nationally representative surveys of the Indigenous and Australian population since 2002 as a measure of exposure to a range of ‘life stressors’. There has been limited reporting or analysis of estimates of the NLES from these surveys. This paper reports changes in exposure to stressors from 2002 to 2008 for the Indigenous population, and examines inter-relationships between eleven NLES items. Data for the 2006 Australian population is also included for comparative purposes. Methods Data from the 2002 and 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Surveys (NATSISS) and the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS) were accessed from the Australia Bureau of Statistics in order to determine significant changes in exposure to stressors for the 2002 and 2008 Indigenous population by remoteness and to compare this with the 2006 Australian population. Factor analysis was used to assess the inter-relationships between stressors for the Indigenous and Australian population by remoteness. Results In remote locations, between 2002 and 2008, exposure to life stressors decreased significantly for the Indigenous population across seven of the eleven stressors. In non-remote locations, exposure to four of the stressors increased significantly. Exposure to stressors in the 2002 and 2008 non-remote Indigenous population were significantly higher than those for the 2006 Australian population for all items, except ‘alcohol and/or drug problems’ and ‘trouble with the police’, which showed no evidence of a difference. The factor analysis of the NLES for the 2002 and 2008 remote and non-remote Indigenous populations and the 2006 Australian population showed a consistent clustering of items into three groups: social transgressions; grief and trauma; and labour market stressors. Conclusions The reduction in exposure to life stressors for the remote Indigenous population may be related to policy and

  15. Tolerance of benethic macroinvertebrate populations and communities to heavy metals: The influence of previous exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, W.H.

    1995-06-01

    I tested the hypothesis that benthic macroinvertebrate populations and communities from a stream polluted by historic mining operations developed tolerance to heavy metals. Benthic communities obtained from a reference (Cache la Poudre River) and a chronically-polluted (Arkansas River) stream in Colorado were transferred to the CSU Stream Research Laboratory and placed into one of 16 experimental streams. Communities in treated experimental streams were exposed to 220 {mu}g Zn/L, 24 {mu}g Cu/L and 2.2 {mu}g Cd/L for 10 d. I used a two-way factorial design (location x treatment) to measure the effects on population-level (abundance of dominant taxa) and community-level (species richness, community composition) responses to metals. Effects of metals were significantly greater on the mayflies Rhithrogena hageni, Baetis sp., and Ephemerella infrequens from the Cache la Poudre River than from the Arkansas River. In addition, effects of metals on some community-level variables, such as species richness and abundance of mayflies, were greater in the Cache la Poudre streams. My results demonstrate that macroinvertebrate populations and communities are capable of acclimation and/or adaptation to low-level metal exposures.

  16. Comparing population exposure to multiple Washington earthquake scenarios for prioritizing loss estimation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Ratliff, Jamie L.; Schelling, John; Weaver, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Scenario-based, loss-estimation studies are useful for gauging potential societal impacts from earthquakes but can be challenging to undertake in areas with multiple scenarios and jurisdictions. We present a geospatial approach using various population data for comparing earthquake scenarios and jurisdictions to help emergency managers prioritize where to focus limited resources on data development and loss-estimation studies. Using 20 earthquake scenarios developed for the State of Washington (USA), we demonstrate how a population-exposure analysis across multiple jurisdictions based on Modified Mercalli Intensity (MMI) classes helps emergency managers understand and communicate where potential loss of life may be concentrated and where impacts may be more related to quality of life. Results indicate that certain well-known scenarios may directly impact the greatest number of people, whereas other, potentially lesser-known, scenarios impact fewer people but consequences could be more severe. The use of economic data to profile each jurisdiction’s workforce in earthquake hazard zones also provides additional insight on at-risk populations. This approach can serve as a first step in understanding societal impacts of earthquakes and helping practitioners to efficiently use their limited risk-reduction resources.

  17. Arsenic Exposure and Impaired Lung Function. Findings from a Large Population-based Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mahbub; Olopade, Christopher; Segers, Stephanie; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; Hasan, Rabiul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Akter, Mahmud M.; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Exposure to arsenic through drinking water has been linked to respiratory symptoms, obstructive lung diseases, and mortality from respiratory diseases. Limited evidence for the deleterious effects on lung function exists among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. Objectives: To determine the deleterious effects on lung function that exist among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. Methods: In 950 individuals who presented with any respiratory symptom among a population-based cohort of 20,033 adults, we evaluated the association between arsenic exposure, measured by well water and urinary arsenic concentrations measured at baseline, and post-bronchodilator–administered pulmonary function assessed during follow-up. Measurements and Main Results: For every one SD increase in baseline water arsenic exposure, we observed a lower level of FEV1 (−46.5 ml; P < 0.0005) and FVC (−53.1 ml; P < 0.01) in regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, socioeconomic status, betel nut use, and arsenical skin lesions status. Similar inverse relationships were observed between baseline urinary arsenic and FEV1 (−48.3 ml; P < 0.005) and FVC (−55.2 ml; P < 0.01) in adjusted models. Our analyses also demonstrated a dose-related decrease in lung function with increasing levels of baseline water and urinary arsenic. This association remained significant in never-smokers and individuals without skin lesions, and was stronger in male smokers. Among male smokers and individuals with skin lesions, every one SD increase in water arsenic was related to a significant reduction of FEV1 (−74.4 ml, P < 0.01; and −116.1 ml, P < 0.05) and FVC (−72.8 ml, P = 0.02; and −146.9 ml, P = 0.004), respectively. Conclusions: This large population-based study confirms that arsenic exposure is associated with impaired lung function and the deleterious effect is evident at low- to moderate-dose range. PMID:23848239

  18. Exposure to PM2.5 and Blood Lead Level in Two Populations in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Enkhbat, Undarmaa; Rule, Ana M.; Resnick, Carol; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Olkhanud, Purevdorj; Williams, D’Ann L.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 60% of the households in Ulaanbaatar live in gers (a traditional Mongolian dwelling) in districts outside the legal limits of the city, without access to basic infrastructure, such as water, sewage systems, central heating, and paved roads, in contrast to apartment residents. This stark difference in living conditions creates different public health challenges for Ulaanbaatar residents. Through this research study we aim to test our hypothesis that women living in gers burning coal in traditional stoves for cooking and heating during the winter are exposed to higher concentrations of airborne PM2.5 than women living in apartments in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, and this exposure may include exposures to lead in coal with effects on blood lead levels. This cross-sectional study recruited a total of 50 women, 40–60 years of age, from these two settings. Air sampling was carried out during peak cooking and heating times, 5:00 p.m.–11:00 p.m., using a direct-reading instrument (TSI SidePak™) and integrated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters using the SKC Personal Environmental Monitor. Blood lead level (BLL) was measured using a LeadCare II rapid field test method. In our study population, measured PM2.5 geometric mean (GM) concentrations using the SidePak™ in the apartment group was 31.5 (95% CI:17–99) μg/m3, and 100 (95% CI: 67–187) μg/m3 in ger households (p < 0.001). The GM integrated gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations in the apartment group were 52.8 (95% CI: 39–297) μg/m3 and 127.8 (95% CI: 86–190) μg/m3 in ger households (p = 0.004). The correlation coefficient for the SidePak™ PM2.5 concentrations and filter based PM2.5 concentrations was r = 0.72 (p < 0.001). Blood Lead Levels were not statistically significant different between apartment residents and ger residents (p = 0.15). The BLL is statistically significant different (p = 0.01) when stratified by length of exposures outside of the home. This statistically significant

  19. Exposure to PM2.5 and Blood Lead Level in Two Populations in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Enkhbat, Undarmaa; Rule, Ana M; Resnick, Carol; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Olkhanud, Purevdorj; Williams, D'Ann L

    2016-02-15

    Approximately 60% of the households in Ulaanbaatar live in gers (a traditional Mongolian dwelling) in districts outside the legal limits of the city, without access to basic infrastructure, such as water, sewage systems, central heating, and paved roads, in contrast to apartment residents. This stark difference in living conditions creates different public health challenges for Ulaanbaatar residents. Through this research study we aim to test our hypothesis that women living in gers burning coal in traditional stoves for cooking and heating during the winter are exposed to higher concentrations of airborne PM2.5 than women living in apartments in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, and this exposure may include exposures to lead in coal with effects on blood lead levels. This cross-sectional study recruited a total of 50 women, 40-60 years of age, from these two settings. Air sampling was carried out during peak cooking and heating times, 5:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m., using a direct-reading instrument (TSI SidePak™) and integrated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters using the SKC Personal Environmental Monitor. Blood lead level (BLL) was measured using a LeadCare II rapid field test method. In our study population, measured PM2.5 geometric mean (GM) concentrations using the SidePak™ in the apartment group was 31.5 (95% CI:17-99) μg/m³, and 100 (95% CI: 67-187) μg/m³ in ger households (p < 0.001). The GM integrated gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations in the apartment group were 52.8 (95% CI: 39-297) μg/m³ and 127.8 (95% CI: 86-190) μg/m³ in ger households (p = 0.004). The correlation coefficient for the SidePak™ PM2.5 concentrations and filter based PM2.5 concentrations was r = 0.72 (p < 0.001). Blood Lead Levels were not statistically significant different between apartment residents and ger residents (p = 0.15). The BLL is statistically significant different (p = 0.01) when stratified by length of exposures outside of the home. This statistically significant difference

  20. Exposure to PM2.5 and Blood Lead Level in Two Populations in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Enkhbat, Undarmaa; Rule, Ana M; Resnick, Carol; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Olkhanud, Purevdorj; Williams, D'Ann L

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 60% of the households in Ulaanbaatar live in gers (a traditional Mongolian dwelling) in districts outside the legal limits of the city, without access to basic infrastructure, such as water, sewage systems, central heating, and paved roads, in contrast to apartment residents. This stark difference in living conditions creates different public health challenges for Ulaanbaatar residents. Through this research study we aim to test our hypothesis that women living in gers burning coal in traditional stoves for cooking and heating during the winter are exposed to higher concentrations of airborne PM2.5 than women living in apartments in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, and this exposure may include exposures to lead in coal with effects on blood lead levels. This cross-sectional study recruited a total of 50 women, 40-60 years of age, from these two settings. Air sampling was carried out during peak cooking and heating times, 5:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m., using a direct-reading instrument (TSI SidePak™) and integrated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters using the SKC Personal Environmental Monitor. Blood lead level (BLL) was measured using a LeadCare II rapid field test method. In our study population, measured PM2.5 geometric mean (GM) concentrations using the SidePak™ in the apartment group was 31.5 (95% CI:17-99) μg/m³, and 100 (95% CI: 67-187) μg/m³ in ger households (p < 0.001). The GM integrated gravimetric PM2.5 concentrations in the apartment group were 52.8 (95% CI: 39-297) μg/m³ and 127.8 (95% CI: 86-190) μg/m³ in ger households (p = 0.004). The correlation coefficient for the SidePak™ PM2.5 concentrations and filter based PM2.5 concentrations was r = 0.72 (p < 0.001). Blood Lead Levels were not statistically significant different between apartment residents and ger residents (p = 0.15). The BLL is statistically significant different (p = 0.01) when stratified by length of exposures outside of the home. This statistically significant difference

  1. Effects on life history variables and population dynamics following maternal metal exposure in the live-bearing fish Gambusia affinis.

    PubMed

    Cazan, Alfy Morales; Klerks, Paul L

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of maternal copper and maternal cadmium exposure on life history variables and population dynamics in a live-bearing fish species. Gravid females were exposed to copper, cadmium, or background metal levels (control); maternal transfer of the metals was previously demonstrated using the exact same design. Each female's first brood, born after the exposure, was subdivided into two groups. One group was raised in the laboratory, to assess time-to and size-at sexual maturity, reproductive output and other life history variables. Offspring from the other group were used to start four mesocosm populations for each treatment. These populations were sampled monthly, for about 18 months, to assess population dynamics. For the laboratory-reared fish, offspring of copper-exposed females reached sexual maturity at a smaller size than did offspring from the other treatments. Maternal copper exposure and maternal cadmium exposure both resulted in fewer broods and an increase in gestation time. No impacts were detected for brood size, inter-brood interval, time-to-sexual-maturity, or life span. In the greenhouse population study, no effect of maternal copper or cadmium exposure was evident for population parameters, other than that the relative abundance of juveniles and/or newborns was reduced in populations established with offspring of the exposed females. This study provided evidence that a short-term metal exposure of gravid females can negatively affect their offspring's life history variables and potentially influence population dynamics in a life-bearing fish species.

  2. Personal exposure to benzene of selected population groups and impact of commuting modes in Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Liem, Ngo Quang; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh

    2013-04-01

    Personal exposure to benzene of selected population groups, and impacts of traffic on commuters in Ho Chi Minh City were investigated. The study was carried out in June, July and November 2010. The preliminary data showed that on average, personal exposure to benzene for non-occupational people in Ho Chi Minh is ~18 μg/m(3) and most of the exposure is due to commuting. Benzene exposure during travelling by bus, taxi and motorcycle is, respectively, 22-30, 22-39 and 185-240 μg/m(3). Motorcycle-taxi drivers, petrol filling employees and street vendors suffer high daily exposures at 116, 52, 32 μg/m(3), respectively. Further measurements are needed for a better risk assessment and finding effective measures to reduce exposure.

  3. Maternal and fetal exposure to parabens in a multiethnic urban U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Pycke, Benny F G; Geer, Laura A; Dalloul, Mudar; Abulafia, Ovadia; Halden, Rolf U

    2015-11-01

    Fetal exposure to five parabens was investigated due to their endocrine-disrupting potential and possible impact on fetal development. Body burdens occurring from real-world exposures were determined typically as total concentrations after conjugate hydrolysis in 181 maternal urine and 38 umbilical cord blood plasma samples from a multiethnic cohort of 185 predominantly-black, pregnant women recruited in Brooklyn, New York between 2007/9. For 33 participants, both sample types (maternal urine and cord blood) were available. Methyl- (MePB), ethyl- (EtPB), propyl- (PrPB), butyl- (BuPB), and benzylparaben (BePB) were detected in 100, 73.5, 100, 66.3 and 0.0% of the urine samples at median concentrations of 279, 1.44, 75.3, 0.39, and <0.02μg/L, respectively. Median concentrations of MePB and PrPB were, respectively 4.4- and 8.7-fold higher compared to those reported previously for the general U.S. population (NHANES, 2005/6). Listed in the order above, the five parabens were detected in 97.4, 94.7, 47.4, 47.4, and 44.7% of cord blood plasma samples at median total concentrations of 25.0, 0.36, <0.27, <0.09, and <0.10μg/L, respectively. Free MePB, EtPB, and PrPB were detected in a subset of cord blood plasma samples at, respectively, 3.9, 71.7, and 6.4% of their total concentrations, whereas free BuPB and BePB were not detected. Literature data and those reported here show the urban community studied here to rank highest in the world for MePB and PrPB exposure in pregnant women, whereas it ranks among the lowest for EtPB and BuPB. This study is the first to report the occurrence of parabens in human umbilical cord blood. Maternal exposure to parabens is widespread, and substantial differences were found to exist between communities and countries both in the spectrum and degree of paraben exposures.

  4. Increased risk of QT prolongation associated with atherosclerotic diseases in arseniasis-endemic area in southwestern coast of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Chi-Ling; Hsiao, Chuhsing Kate; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Hsu, Lin-I; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Wu, Meei-Maan; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2009-09-15

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been documented to be associated with various cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate 1) the increased risk of QT prolongation in chronic arsenic exposure, and 2) the relationships of cardiac repolarization (QT interval duration) with ischemic heart disease and carotid atherosclerosis. We studied 280 men and 355 women living in the endemic area of arseniasis in southwestern Taiwan. QT intervals in electrocardiogram and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) by ultrasonography were measured. Ischemic heart disease was diagnosed by history or abnormal electrocardiogram. Significant associations of the corrected QT interval (QTc) duration with ischemic heart disease and carotid intima-medium thickness and plaque were observed after adjustment for various risk factors in the multiple linear regression analysis (all p values <0.05). Three indices of chronic arsenic exposure were all significantly associated with the risk of QTc prolongation showing dose-response relationships (p<0.001). Chronic arsenic exposure was dose-dependently associated with the risk of QTc prolongation. Ischemic heart disease and carotid atherosclerosis were significantly associated with QTc intervals in chronic arsenic exposure. QTc prolongation might be suggested as an early biomarker for ischemic heart disease or carotid atherosclerosis in population with previous exposure to arsenic.

  5. Increased risk of QT prolongation associated with atherosclerotic diseases in arseniasis-endemic area in southwestern coast of Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-H.; Chen, C.-L.; Hsiao, C.K.; Chiang, F.-T.; Hsu, L.-I; Chiou, H.-Y.; Hsueh, Y.-M.; Wu, M.-M.; Chen, C.-J.

    2009-09-15

    Chronic arsenic exposure has been documented to be associated with various cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate 1) the increased risk of QT prolongation in chronic arsenic exposure, and 2) the relationships of cardiac repolarization (QT interval duration) with ischemic heart disease and carotid atherosclerosis. We studied 280 men and 355 women living in the endemic area of arseniasis in southwestern Taiwan. QT intervals in electrocardiogram and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) by ultrasonography were measured. Ischemic heart disease was diagnosed by history or abnormal electrocardiogram. Significant associations of the corrected QT interval (QTc) duration with ischemic heart disease and carotid intima-medium thickness and plaque were observed after adjustment for various risk factors in the multiple linear regression analysis (all p values < 0.05). Three indices of chronic arsenic exposure were all significantly associated with the risk of QTc prolongation showing dose-response relationships (p < 0.001). Chronic arsenic exposure was dose-dependently associated with the risk of QTc prolongation. Ischemic heart disease and carotid atherosclerosis were significantly associated with QTc intervals in chronic arsenic exposure. QTc prolongation might be suggested as an early biomarker for ischemic heart disease or carotid atherosclerosis in population with previous exposure to arsenic.

  6. Occupational exposures and risk of systemic lupus erythematosus: a review of the evidence and exposure assessment methods in population- and clinic-based studies.

    PubMed

    Parks, C G; Cooper, G S

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental research suggests a potential role of occupational exposures in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A plausible association has been identified in studies of occupational silica exposure and SLE, complemented by experimental studies in lupus-prone mice exploring potential mechanisms related to apoptosis and immune dysregulation. Experimental studies of the solvent trichloroethylene in lupus-prone mice provide evidence of effects on immune function, including increased production of autoantibodies and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, few studies of occupational solvent exposure and SLE have been conducted, and those that are available show little evidence of an association. There is some suggestion from the available studies of the potential influence of pesticides on SLE, but as with solvents, the specific type of pesticides that may be implicated is not known. Our understanding of the role of occupational exposures in SLE could be advanced by the development of larger, multisite or parallel studies that utilize similar questionnaire and exposure evaluation methods. Multiple studies using comparable exposure measures are needed to provide sufficient sample size for examining gene-environment interactions. We provide a general overview of data requirements and methods available for the assessment and evaluation of occupational exposures in clinical and population-based studies of SLE.

  7. Analysis of volcanic threat from Nisyros Island, Greece, with implications for aviation and population exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinvig, H. S.; Winson, A.; Gottsmann, J.

    2010-06-01

    Nisyros island in the South Aegean volcanic arc, Greece, is a Quaternary composite volcano with a 3.8 km wide caldera that in 1996 entered a volcano-seismic crisis, which heralded the islands' return to a state of unrest. The caldera has been the locus of at least thirteen phreatic eruptions in historical times, the most recent in 1888, and the system is still presently affected by considerable hydrothermal activity. Although the recent unrest waned off without eruption, there are still open questions relating to the current threat of volcanic activity from the island. Here, we perform a detailed and systematic assessment of the volcanic threat of Nisyros using a threat analysis protocol established as part of the USGS National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS). The evaluation involves a methodical assessment of fifteen hazard and exposure factors, and is based on a score system, whereby the higher the score, the higher the threat is. Uncertainty in assessment criteria are expressed by allowing for a conservative and an extreme score for each factor. We draw our analysis from published data as well as from results of our research on Nisyros over the past years. Our analysis yields a conservative threat score of 163 and an extreme score of 262. The most adverse exposure factors include significant scores relating to aviation and population exposure to volcanic hazards from Nisyros. When looked at in comparison to US volcanoes both scores place Nisyros in the "Very High Threat (VHT)" category, grouping it with volcanoes such as Redoubt, Mount Ranier and Crater Lake. We identify a short-fall in recommended surveillance efforts for VHT volcanoes given existing monitoring capabilities on the island. We discuss potential pitfalls of applying the NVEWS scheme to Nisyros and suggest potential adaptation of analysis scheme to match industrial and societal conditions in Europe. At the same time, our findings indicate that that volcanic threat posed by Nisyros volcano may

  8. Modeling population exposure to community noise and air pollution in a large metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wen Qi; McLean, Kathleen; Brauer, Michael; Chiarello, Sarah A; Davies, Hugh W

    2012-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that both air pollution and community noise are associated with cardiovascular disease mortality. Because road traffic is a major contributor to these environmental pollutants in metropolitan areas, it is plausible that the observed associations may be confounded by coexistent pollutants. As part of a large population-based cohort study to address this concern, we used a noise prediction model to assess annual average community noise levels from transportation sources in metropolitan Vancouver, Canada. The modeled annual average noise level was 64 (inter quartile range 60-68) dB(A) for the region. This model was evaluated by comparing modeled annual daytime A-weighted equivalent continuous noise levels (L(day)) with measured 5-min daytime A-weighted equivalent continuous noise levels (L(eq,day,5 min)) at 103 selected roadside sites in the study region. On average, L(day) was 6.2 (95% CI, 6.0-7.9) dB(A) higher than, but highly correlated (r=0.62; 95% CI, 0.48-0.72) with, L(eq,day,5 min). These results suggest that our model-based noise exposure assessment could approximately reflect actual noise exposure in the study region. Overall, modeled noise levels were not strongly correlated with land use regression estimates of traffic-related air pollutants including black carbon, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM(2.5)), NO(2) and NO; the highest correlation was with black carbon (r=0.48), whereas the lowest correlation was with PM(2.5) (r=0.18). There was no consistent effect of traffic proximity on the correlations between community noise levels and traffic-related air pollutant concentrations. These results, consistent with previous studies, suggest that it is possible to assess potential adverse cardiovascular effects from long-term exposures to community noise and traffic-related air pollution in prospective epidemiologic studies.

  9. Modeling the contribution of toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic processes to the recovery of Gammarus pulex populations after exposure to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Galic, Nika; Ashauer, Roman; Baveco, Hans; Nyman, Anna-Maija; Barsi, Alpar; Thorbek, Pernille; Bruns, Eric; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Because aquatic macroinvertebrates may be exposed regularly to pesticides in edge-of-the-field water bodies, an accurate assessment of potential adverse effects and subsequent population recovery is essential. Standard effect risk assessment tools are not able to fully address the complexities arising from multiple exposure patterns, nor can they properly address the population recovery process. In the present study, we developed an individual-based model of the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex to evaluate the consequences of exposure to 4 compounds with different modes of action on individual survival and population recovery. Effects on survival were calculated using concentration-effect relationships and the threshold damage model (TDM), which accounts for detailed processes of toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. Delayed effects as calculated by the TDM had a significant impact on individual survival and population recovery. We also evaluated the standard assessment of effects after short-term exposures using the 96-h concentration-effect model and the TDM, which was conservative for very short-term exposure. An integration of a TKTD submodel with a population model can be used to explore the ecological relevance of ecotoxicity endpoints in different exposure environments.

  10. Serosurvey of Entamoeba Histolytica Exposure among Tepehuanos Population in Durango, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Francisco Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    The seroepidemiology of Entamoeba histolytica infection in Tepehuanos population in Mexico is largely unknown. This study aimed to study the seroprevalence and correlates of E. histolytica antibodies in Tepehuanos in Durango, Mexico. Through a cross-sectional study, we determined the frequency of E. histolytica IgG antibodies in 156 Tepehuanos people in Durango, Mexico using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Furthermore, we studied the association of E. histolytica seroprevalence with the socio-demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of the Tepehuanos studied. Forty-four (28.2%) Tepehuanos with mean age of 31.03 ± 16.71 years old had anti- E. histolytica IgG antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that E. histolytica exposure was positively associated with laborer occupation (Odds ratio=2.77; 95% CI: 1.15, 6.66; p=0.02), and history of lymphadenopathy (Odds ratio=4.97; 95% CI: 1.74, 14.13; p=0.002), and negatively associated with soil contact (Odds ratio=0.13; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.53; p=0.004). Other behavioral characteristics including drinking untreated water or unpasteurized milk, and consumption of unwashed raw vegetables or fruits were not associated with E. histolytica exposure. The seroprevalence of E. histolytica infection in Tepehuanos in Durango is higher thanseroprevalences reported in national surveys. The factors associated with E. histolytica seropositivity reported in the present study might aid for the planning and implementation of effective measures against E. histolytica infection.

  11. Serosurvey of Entamoeba Histolytica Exposure among Tepehuanos Population in Durango, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Francisco Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Entamoeba histolytica infection in Tepehuanos population in Mexico is largely unknown. This study aimed to study the seroprevalence and correlates of E. histolytica antibodies in Tepehuanos in Durango, Mexico. Through a cross-sectional study, we determined the frequency of E. histolytica IgG antibodies in 156 Tepehuanos people in Durango, Mexico using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Furthermore, we studied the association of E. histolytica seroprevalence with the socio-demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of the Tepehuanos studied. Forty-four (28.2%) Tepehuanos with mean age of 31.03 ± 16.71 years old had anti- E. histolytica IgG antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that E. histolytica exposure was positively associated with laborer occupation (Odds ratio=2.77; 95% CI: 1.15, 6.66; p=0.02), and history of lymphadenopathy (Odds ratio=4.97; 95% CI: 1.74, 14.13; p=0.002), and negatively associated with soil contact (Odds ratio=0.13; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.53; p=0.004). Other behavioral characteristics including drinking untreated water or unpasteurized milk, and consumption of unwashed raw vegetables or fruits were not associated with E. histolytica exposure. The seroprevalence of E. histolytica infection in Tepehuanos in Durango is higher thanseroprevalences reported in national surveys. The factors associated with E. histolytica seropositivity reported in the present study might aid for the planning and implementation of effective measures against E. histolytica infection. PMID:26199578

  12. Organochlorine exposure and bioaccumulation in the endangered northwest Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) population

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, A.V.; Shea, D.; Moore, M.J.; Stegeman, J.J.

    2000-03-01

    Exposure to toxicants is one factor hypothesized to influence population growth of the northern right whale. Organochlorines in right whale skin, feces, and prey were measured and used to identify factors influencing exposure and bioaccumulation. Concentrations of 30 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 20 pesticides in skin biopsies were consistent with other baleenopterids. Concentrations in feces and prey were two orders of magnitude less than in biopsies. In principal component analysis, organochlorines in biopsies matched those from Bay of Fundy, Canada, zooplankton, whereas feces were like Cape Cod, USA, copepods. Year of biopsy collection was the principal factor associated with differential accumulation of nonmetabolizable PCBs, 4,4{prime}-DDE, and dieldrin. Biopsies collected during winter had lower concentrations of lipid and metabolizable compounds than biopsies collected during summer. Concentrations of metabolizable PCBs increased with age in males. The bioaccumulation patterns implied that blubber burdens change annually because of the ingestion of different prey or prey from distinct locations and the release of some organochlorines stored in blubber during lipid depletion in winter. Because biopsy concentrations were lower than those found in marine mammals affected by PCBs and DDTs, the authors do not have evidence that the endangered whales bioaccumulate hazardous concentrations of organochlorines.

  13. Renal effects evolution in a Chinese population after reduction of cadmium exposure in rice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xunwei; Liang Yihuai; Jin Taiyi Ye Tingting; Kong Qinghu; Wang Zaijuan; Lei Lijian; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Nordberg, Gunnar F.

    2008-10-15

    Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxic agent with extremely long biological half-time of 10-30 years in human. To investigate the evolution of cadmium-induced renal effects in the population, a number of 148 residents who lived in cadmium-polluted area were followed-up for 3 years after the reduction of cadmium exposure in rice. Urinary cadmium (UCd), {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin (B2M) and albumin (ALB) were analyzed in 1995 and 1998, respectively. The results demonstrated that the changes of renal effects of residents depended on the levels of UCd before inflow of cadmium to human body declined. In cases where UCd were less than 10 {mu}g/g creatinine in 1995, evidence was found indicating significant decreases in proteinuria (i.e., B2M and ALB) 3 years later, whereas, in cases where the excretion of UCd exceeded 10 {mu}g/g creatinine in 1995, progression was observed. The study of dose-response relationships between UCd and B2M or ALB also showed that the cadmium-induced renal dysfunction might be reversible if UCd concentration was low-level before exposure decreasing, otherwise it might be irreversible or aggravated.

  14. Myocardial infarction and occupational exposure to motor exhaust: a population-based case-control study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ilar, Anna; Lewné, Marie; Plato, Nils; Hallqvist, Johan; Alderling, Magnus; Bigert, Carolina; Hogstedt, Christer; Gustavsson, Per

    2014-07-01

    There is a well-established association between particulate urban air pollution and cardiovascular disease, but few studies have investigated the risk associated with occupational exposure to particles from motor exhaust. This study investigated the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) after occupational exposure to motor exhaust, using elemental carbon (EC) as a marker of exposure. A population-based case-control study of first-time non-lethal MI was conducted among Swedish citizens in ages 45-70 living in Stockholm County 1992-1994, including 1,643 cases and 2,235 controls. Working histories and data on potential confounders were collected by questionnaire and medical examination. The exposure to EC was assessed through a job-exposure matrix. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. We investigated various exposure metrics: intensity, cumulative exposure and years since exposure. There was an exposure-response relation between the highest average exposure intensity during the work history and the risk of MI when adjusting for smoking and alcohol drinking (p for trend 0.034), with an OR of 1.30 (95% CI 0.99-1.71) in the highest tertile of exposure compared to the unexposed. An exposure-response pattern was observed in the analysis of years since exposure cessation among formerly exposed. Additional adjustments for markers of the metabolic syndrome reduced ORs and trends to non-significant levels, although this might be an over-adjustment since the metabolic syndrome may be part of the causal pathway. Occupational exposure to motor exhaust was associated with a moderately increased risk of MI. PMID:24981789

  15. Determinants of personal exposure to some carcinogenic substances and nitrogen dioxide among the general population in five Swedish cities.

    PubMed

    Hagenbjörk-Gustafsson, Annika; Tornevi, Andreas; Andersson, Eva M; Johannesson, Sandra; Bellander, Tom; Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Westberg, Håkan; Forsberg, Bertil; Sallsten, Gerd

    2014-07-01

    Environmental levels of airborne carcinogenic and related substances are comparatively better known than individual exposure and its determinants. We report on a personal monitoring program involving five Swedish urban populations. The aim of the program was to investigate personal exposure to benzene, 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The measurements were performed among 40 inhabitants during seven consecutive days, in one urban area each year, during 2000-2008. The estimated population exposure levels were 1.95 μg/m(3) for benzene, 0.56 μg/m(3) for 1,3-butadiene, 19.4 μg/m(3) for formaldehyde, and 14.1 μg/m(3) for NO2. Statistical analysis using a mixed-effects model revealed that time spent in traffic and time outdoors contributed to benzene and 1,3- butadiene exposure. For benzene, refueling a car was an additional determinant influencing the exposure level. Smoking or environmental tobacco smoke were significant determinants of exposure to NO2, benzene, and 1,3-butadiene. Those with a gas stove had higher NO2 exposure. Living in a single-family house increased the exposure to formaldehyde significantly. In a variance component model, the between-subject variance dominated for 1,3-butadiene and formaldehyde, whereas the between-city variance dominated for NO2. For benzene, the between-subject and between-cities variances were similar.

  16. Population exposure to atmospheric particles (PM) caused by emissions in Stockholm - local and regional/European scale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, R.; Johansson, C.

    2009-04-01

    Local and regional-scale model calculations have been performed to estimate the effects of emissions in Stockholm on the population exposure to particulate matter (PM) within the city, in surrounding areas, and in the rest of Europe. The impacts of five different emission sources were investigated: Road traffic exhaust, split into Light Duty Vehicles (LDV) and Heavy Duty Vehicles (HDV), Sea Traffic, Power Plants and Residential Heating. The emissions from non-exhaust (mainly road wear due to use of studded tyres) were also treated, in addition to combustion sources. The calculated impact of the Stockholm emissions on atmospheric concentrations of particles were weighted by the population distribution and the calculated yearly average total European population exposures for the different sources are summarised below (unit: person μg/m3). Wear particles: Road Traffic 2 520 000 Directly emitted PM: LDV-exhaust 150 000, HDV-exhaust 55 000, Sea Traffic 17 000, Power Plants 87 000, Residential Heating 178 000 - 886 000 Secondarily formed inorganic particles (nitrate, sulphate, ammonium): LDV 315 000, HDV 117 000, Sea Traffic 70 000, Power Plants 193 000, Residential Heating 26 000 - 70 000 Non-exhaust (road wear) particles dominate the total impact on PM10 exposure, contributing about 60-70% to the total exposure, due to all the studied sources in Stockholm. The calculated population exposure to the wear particles is to a very large extent (87%) occurring within the Stockholm area. The uncertainties in the emission estimates for Residential Heating using biomass (wood) are very large but it seems to be an important PM source in Stockholm. Two different estimates of the emissions were used; in the lowest estimate, which seems more realistic, the contribution to population exposure of directly emitted combustion particles from residential heating is of similar magnitude (178 000 person μg/m3) as the contribution from road traffic exhaust (205 000 person μg/m3). For all

  17. Analysis of intervention strategies for inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and associated lung cancer risk based on a Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to evaluate and compare interventions for reducing exposure to air pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a widely found air pollutant in both indoor and outdoor air. This study presents the first application of the Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model to quantify the effects of different intervention strategies on inhalation exposure to PAHs and the associated lung cancer risk. The method was applied to the population in Beijing, China, in the year 2006. Several intervention strategies were designed and studied, including atmospheric cleaning, smoking prohibition indoors, use of clean fuel for cooking, enhancing ventilation while cooking and use of indoor cleaners. Their performances were quantified by population attributable fraction (PAF) and potential impact fraction (PIF) of lung cancer risk, and the changes in indoor PAH concentrations and annual inhalation doses were also calculated and compared. The results showed that atmospheric cleaning and use of indoor cleaners were the two most effective interventions. The sensitivity analysis showed that several input parameters had major influence on the modeled PAH inhalation exposure and the rankings of different interventions. The ranking was reasonably robust for the remaining majority of parameters. The method itself can be extended to other pollutants and in different places. It enables the quantitative comparison of different intervention strategies and would benefit intervention design and relevant policy making.

  18. Analysis of Intervention Strategies for Inhalation Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Associated Lung Cancer Risk Based on a Monte Carlo Population Exposure Assessment Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bin; Zhao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult to evaluate and compare interventions for reducing exposure to air pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a widely found air pollutant in both indoor and outdoor air. This study presents the first application of the Monte Carlo population exposure assessment model to quantify the effects of different intervention strategies on inhalation exposure to PAHs and the associated lung cancer risk. The method was applied to the population in Beijing, China, in the year 2006. Several intervention strategies were designed and studied, including atmospheric cleaning, smoking prohibition indoors, use of clean fuel for cooking, enhancing ventilation while cooking and use of indoor cleaners. Their performances were quantified by population attributable fraction (PAF) and potential impact fraction (PIF) of lung cancer risk, and the changes in indoor PAH concentrations and annual inhalation doses were also calculated and compared. The results showed that atmospheric cleaning and use of indoor cleaners were the two most effective interventions. The sensitivity analysis showed that several input parameters had major influence on the modeled PAH inhalation exposure and the rankings of different interventions. The ranking was reasonably robust for the remaining majority of parameters. The method itself can be extended to other pollutants and in different places. It enables the quantitative comparison of different intervention strategies and would benefit intervention design and relevant policy making. PMID:24416436

  19. Urinary porphyrins as biomarkers for arsenic exposure among susceptible populations in Guizhou Province, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, J.C.; Wang, J.P.; Zheng, B.S.; Zhai, C.; Maddalena, R.; Liu, F.; Moore, M.R.

    2005-08-07

    Coal from some areas in Guizhou Province contains elevated levels of arsenic. This has caused arsenicosis in individuals who use arsenic-contaminated coal for the purposes of heating, cooking and drying of food in poorly ventilated dwellings. The population at risk has been estimated to be approximately 200,000 people. We analyzed the porphyrin excretion profile using a HPLC method in urine samples collected from 113 villagers who lived in Xing Ren district, a coal-borne arsenicosis endemic area and from 30 villagers from Xing Yi where arsenicosis is not prevalent. Urinary porphyrins were higher in the arsenic exposed group than those in the control group. The correlation between urinary arsenic and porphyrin concentrations demonstrated the effect of arsenic on heme biosynthesis resulting in increased porphyrin excretion. Both uroporphyrin and coproporphyrin III showed significant increases in the excretion profile of the younger age ({lt} 20 years) arsenic-exposed group, suggesting that porphyrins could be used as early warning biomarkers of chronic arsenic exposure in humans. Greater increases of urinary arsenic and porphyrins in women, children and older age groups who spend much of their time indoors suggest that they might be at a higher risk. Whether elevated porphyrins could predict adverse health effects associated with both cancer and non-cancer end-points in chronically arsenic-exposed populations need further investigation.

  20. Participatory Risk Mapping of Malaria Vector Exposure in Northern South America using Environmental and Population Data

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, D.O.; Troyo, A.; Alimi, T.O.; Beier, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria elimination remains a major public health challenge in many tropical regions, including large areas of northern South America. In this study, we present a new high spatial resolution (90 × 90 m) risk map for Colombia and surrounding areas based on environmental and human population data. The map was created through a participatory multi-criteria decision analysis in which expert opinion was solicited to determine key environmental and population risk factors, different fuzzy functions to standardize risk factor inputs, and variable factor weights to combine risk factors in a geographic information system. The new risk map was compared to a map of malaria cases in which cases were aggregated to the municipio (municipality) level. The relationship between mean municipio risk scores and total cases by muncípio showed a weak correlation. However, the relationship between pixel-level risk scores and vector occurrence points for two dominant vector species, Anopheles albimanus and An. darlingi, was significantly different (p < 0.05) from a random point distribution, as was a pooled point distribution for these two vector species and An. nuneztovari. Thus, we conclude that the new risk map derived based on expert opinion provides an accurate spatial representation of risk of potential vector exposure rather than malaria transmission as shown by the pattern of malaria cases, and therefore it may be used to inform public health authorities as to where vector control measures should be prioritized to limit human-vector contact in future malaria outbreaks. PMID:24976656

  1. Occurrence of fumonisins in Catalonia (Spain) and an exposure assessment of specific population groups.

    PubMed

    Cano-Sancho, G; Ramos, A J; Marín, S; Sanchis, V

    2012-01-01

    Fumonisin B₁ (FB₁) and B₂ (FB₂) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium verticillioides and F. proliferatum and common contaminants of cereal crops. The objectives of this study were to (1) study the occurrence of fumonisins in Catalonia (north-eastern region of Spain) and (2) assess the exposure of the Catalonian population to these mycotoxins. Contamination data was provided by a wide survey where 928 individual samples were pooled to analyse 370 composite samples. Fumonisins were extracted and purified using immunoaffinity columns and determined by HPLC with fluorescence detection. The raw consumption data came from a nutritional study specifically designed to assess the dietary intake of the main foodstuffs related to fumonisin contamination for all population age groups. In addition, two specific groups were selected with respect to maize consumption: immigrants and celiac sufferers. Contamination and consumption data were combined by simulation using an essentially parametric-parametric (P-P) method. The P-P method draws sampling values from distribution functions fitted to consumption and contamination datasets. Moreover, to quantify the accuracy and reliability of the statistical estimates, we built related confidence intervals using a Pseudo-Parametric bootstrap method. The results of this study show that fumonisins are commonly found in some commodities on the Catalonian market, such as beer, corn snacks and ethnic foods; however, the values were well below the permitted maximum EU levels. The most exposed group were infants followed by immigrants but, in all cases, they were below the TDI of 2 µg/kg bw/day.

  2. A population-based study on welding exposures at work and respiratory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lillienberg, L; Zock, J-P; Kromhout, H; Plana, E; Jarvis, D; Torén, K; Kogevinas, M

    2008-03-01

    In the first European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS I), an excess asthma risk was associated with high exposure to gases and fumes, mineral and biological dusts. In a 9-year follow-up study (ECRHS II), the aim was to study if welding at work increases the risk of asthma symptoms, wheeze and chronic bronchitis symptoms. The study also aimed to identify specific welding risk factors. In a random population sample of individuals from 22 European centres in 10 countries, 316 males reported welding at work during the follow-up period. These individuals responded to a supplemental questionnaire about frequency of welding, use of different methods and materials, welding environment and respiratory protection. Cumulative exposure to welding fumes for the follow-up period was estimated by using a database on welding fume exposures. Log-binomial regression models were used to estimate prevalence ratios (PR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prevalence of asthma symptoms or asthma medication, wheeze and chronic bronchitis symptoms in relation to welding methods and welded materials as well as estimated cumulative welding fume exposure compared to an external reference group. In the study population of 316 males, 62% performed welding <1 h day(-1), 23% 1-3 h day(-1) and 15% >4 h day(-1). Welding was a common task in many occupations and only 7% of the individuals actually called themselves welders and flame cutters, while the largest groups doing welding worked in construction or were motor, agricultural and industrial mechanics and fitters. Welding at work was not associated with an increased prevalence of asthma symptoms or wheeze but there was an association with chronic bronchitis symptoms (PR = 1.33, 1.00-1.76). Using assigned cumulative exposure in tertiles showed that the lowest exposed tertile had the highest PR of bronchitis symptoms. Chronic bronchitis symptoms was significantly higher in those frequently welding in galvanized steel or iron (PR = 2

  3. Prenatal Antidepressant Exposure and Risk of Spontaneous Abortion – A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kjaersgaard, Maiken Ina Siegismund; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Vestergaard, Mogens; Sørensen, Merete Juul; Olsen, Jørn; Christensen, Jakob; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the risk of spontaneous abortion after use of antidepressant medication during pregnancy. Methods From the Danish Medical Birth Registry and the Danish National Hospital Registry, we identified all pregnancies leading to in- or outpatient contacts in Denmark from February 1997 to December 2008. The Danish Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics provided information on the women's prescriptions for antidepressants during pregnancy. We obtained information on women who were diagnosed with depression from the Danish Psychiatric Central Registry. Adjusted relative risks (aRR) of spontaneous abortion were estimated according to exposure to antidepressants or maternal depression using binomial regression. Results Of the 1,005,319 pregnancies (547,300 women) identified, 114,721 (11.4%) ended in a spontaneous abortion. We identified 22,061 pregnancies exposed to antidepressants and 1,843 with a diagnosis of depression with no antidepressant use, of which 2,637 (12.0%) and 205 (11.1%) ended in a spontaneous abortion, respectively. Antidepressant exposure was associated with an aRR of 1.14 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10–1.18) for spontaneous abortion compared with no exposure to antidepressants. Among women with a diagnosis of depression, the aRR for spontaneous abortion after any antidepressant exposure was 1.00 (95% CI 0.80–1.24). No individual selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) was associated with spontaneous abortions. In unadjusted analyses, we found that mirtazapine, venlafaxine, and duloxetine were associated with spontaneous abortions among women with depression but we had no information on potential differences in disease severity and only few pregnancies were exposed in the population. Conclusion We identified a slightly increased risk of spontaneous abortion associated with the use of antidepressants during pregnancy. However, among women with a diagnosis of depression, antidepressants in general or individual SSRI in

  4. PREDICTING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO PM10 AND PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    An improved model for human exposure to particulate matter (PM), specifically PM10 and PM2.5 is under development by the U.S. EPA/NERL. This model will incorporate data from new PM exposure measurement and exposure factors research. It is intended to be used to predict exposure...

  5. Using a representative sample of workers for constructing the SUMEX French general population based job-exposure matrix

    PubMed Central

    Gueguen, A; Goldberg, M; Bonenfant, S; Martin, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Job-exposure matrices (JEMs) applicable to the general population are usually constructed by using only the expertise of specialists. Aims: To construct a population based JEM for chemical agents from data based on a sample of French workers for surveillance purposes. Methods: The SUMEX job-exposure matrix was constructed from data collected via a cross-sectional survey of a sample of French workers representative of the main economic sectors through the SUMER-94 survey: 1205 occupational physicians questioned 48 156 workers, and inventoried exposure to 102 chemicals. The companies' economic activities and the workers' occupations were coded according to the official French nomenclatures. A segmentation method was used to construct job groups that were homogeneous for exposure prevalence to chemical agents. The matrix was constructed in two stages: consolidation of occupations according to exposure prevalence; and establishment of exposure indices based on individual data from all the subjects in the sample. Results: An agent specific matrix could be constructed for 80 of the chemicals. The quality of the classification obtained for each was variable: globally, the performance of the method was better for less specific and therefore more easy to assess agents, and for exposures specific to certain occupations. Conclusions: Software has been developed to enable the SUMEX matrix to be used by occupational physicians and other prevention professionals responsible for surveillance of the health of the workforce in France. PMID:15208374

  6. A comprehensive assessment of mercury exposure in penguin populations throughout the Southern Hemisphere: Using trophic calculations to identify sources of population-level variation.

    PubMed

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Chiaradia, André; Polito, Michael J; Raya Rey, Andrea; Emslie, Steven D

    2015-08-15

    The wide geographic distribution of penguins (Order Sphenisciformes) throughout the Southern Hemisphere provided a unique opportunity to use a single taxonomic group as biomonitors of mercury among geographically distinct marine ecosystems. Mercury concentrations were compared among ten species of penguins representing 26 geographically distinct breeding populations. Mercury concentrations were relatively low (⩽2.00ppm) in feathers from 18/26 populations considered. Population-level differences in trophic level explained variation in mercury concentrations among Little, King, and Gentoo penguin populations. However, Southern Rockhopper and Magellanic penguins breeding on Staten Island, Tierra del Fuego, had the highest mercury concentrations relative to their conspecifics despite foraging at a lower trophic level. The concurrent use of stable isotope and mercury data allowed us to document penguin populations at the greatest risk of exposure to harmful concentrations of mercury as a result of foraging at a high trophic level or in geographic 'hot spots' of mercury availability.

  7. A study of thorium exposure during tungsten inert gas welding in an airline engineering population.

    PubMed

    McElearney, N; Irvine, D

    1993-07-01

    To investigate the theoretic possibility of excessive exposure to thorium during the process of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding using thoriated rods we carried out a cross-sectional study of TIG welders and an age- and skill-matched group. We measured the radiation doses from inhaled thorium that was retained in the body and investigated whether any differences in health or biologic indices could have been attributable to the welding and tip-grinding process. Sixty-four TIG welders, 11 non-TIG welders, and 61 control subjects from an airline engineering population participated. All of the subjects were interviewed for biographic, occupational history and morbidity details. All of the welders and eight control subjects carried out large-volume urine sampling to recover thorium 232 and thorium 228; this group also had chest radiographs. All of the subjects had a blood sample taken to estimate liver enzymes, and they provided small-volume urine samples for the estimation of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin. We found no excess of morbidity among the TIG or non-TIG welding groups, and the levels of retinol-binding protein and beta 2-microglobulin were the same for both groups. There was a higher aspartate aminotransferase level in the control group. The internal radiation doses were estimated at less than an annual level of intake in all cases, and considerably less if the exposure (as was the case) was assumed to be chronic over many years. Some additional precautionary measures are suggested to reduce further any potential hazard from this process. PMID:8396174

  8. A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, M.G.

    1997-09-01

    Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

  9. The negative effect of prolonged somatotrophic/insulin signaling on an adult bone marrow-residing population of pluripotent very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs).

    PubMed

    Kucia, Magda; Masternak, Michal; Liu, Riu; Shin, Dong-Myung; Ratajczak, Janina; Mierzejewska, Katarzyna; Spong, Adam; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that attenuated insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) has a positive effect on longevity in several animal species, including mice. Here, we demonstrate that a population of murine pluripotent very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that reside in bone marrow (BM) is protected from premature depletion during aging by intrinsic parental gene imprinting mechanisms and the level of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Accordingly, an increase in the circulating level of IGF-I, as seen in short-lived bovine growth hormone (bGH)-expressing transgenic mice, which age prematurely, as well as in wild-type animals injected for 2 months with bGH, leads to accelerated depletion of VSELs from bone marrow (BM). In contrast, long-living GHR-null or Ames dwarf mice, which have very low levels of circulating IGF-I, exhibit a significantly higher number of VSELs in BM than their littermates at the same age. However, the number of VSELs in these animals decreases after GH or IGF-I treatment. These changes in the level of plasma-circulating IGF-I corroborate with changes in the genomic imprinting status of crucial genes involved in IIS, such as Igf-2-H19, RasGRF1, and Ig2R. Thus, we propose that a chronic increase in IIS contributes to aging by premature depletion of pluripotent VSELs in adult tissues. PMID:22218782

  10. [Results of health risk assessment due to exposure to contaminants in drinking water in Russia population (review of literature)].

    PubMed

    Unguryanu, T N; Novikov, S M

    2014-01-01

    With the purpose of the analysis of general trends in the development of risk assessment methodology in Russia the results obtained with the her help, as well as existing methodological problems, there was performed a review of 68 published works concerning the assessment of the health risk for population under the exposure to chemicals in drinking water carried out in 42 cities and regions of the country. There was made the grouping of Russian cities on individual carcinogenic risk level and ranking on the values for the population carcinogenic risk. A list of prioritized carcinogens in tap water has been made. By the values of the risk indices to adverse effects of chemicals tap water there are exposed central nervous system, kidneys, liver, skin and mucous membranes, blood, bone, immune system, hormone homeostasis, blood circulation and digestion organs. There are identified methodological problems leading to an underestimation of the actual risk to public health under exposure of chemicals in drinking water: there are no used regional and age differences in exposure factors, virtually there is no assessed health risk for children population; there is ignored age sensitivity to carcinogens, there is rarely estimated exposure for all the real exposing routes of income and there are no carried out risk calculations at the upper limit (90- 95th percentile) of the exposure.

  11. Prolong Exposure of NSAID in Patients With RA Will Decrease the Risk of Dementia: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuang-Hsi; Hsu, Yi-Chao; Hsu, Chih-Chao; Lin, Cheng-Li; Hsu, Chung Y; Lee, Chang-Yin; Chong, Lee-Won; Liu, Hui-Chuan; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder, primarily affects joints. Several studies have indicated that early inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and depression in patients were associated with a considerably increased risk of dementia. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used for treating RA. NSAIDs facilitate alleviating RA-associated chronic pain, inflammation, and swelling. Therefore, we conducted this nationwide study for evaluating the association between the dementia risk and NSAID treatment in patients with RA.The RA cohort comprised patients aged 20 years and older who were newly diagnosed with RA between 2000 and 2011, with data obtained from the Registry of Catastrophic Illnesses Patient Database (RCIPD). Patients without RA were frequency matched with the RA cohort at a 1:4 ratio according to age, sex, and year of RA diagnosis. The relative risks of dementia were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models.The risk of dementia in the RA cohort was not significantly higher than that in the non-RA cohort (adjusted HR [hazard ratio] = 0.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87-1.02). Regarding the duration of NSAID treatment, the risk of dementia was significantly lower when the RA cohort used NSAIDs for >2191 days (HR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.45-0.68).A longer duration of NSAID treatment possibly reduces the risk of dementia. Additional studies are warranted for verifying the association of dementia risk with NSAID treatment in patients with RA.

  12. RECONSTRUCTING POPULATION EXPOSURES FROM DOSE BIOMARKERS: INHALATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-established toxicological tool designed to relate exposure to a target tissue dose. The emergence of federal and state programs for environmental health tracking and the availability of exposure monitoring through bi...

  13. ASSESSING POPULATION EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE AIR POLLUTANTS USING A MECHANISTIC SOURCE-TO-DOSE MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Modeling Environment for Total Risks studies (MENTOR) system, combined with an extension of the SHEDS (Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation) methodology, provide a mechanistically consistent framework for conducting source-to-dose exposure assessments of multiple pol...

  14. MODELED ESTIMATES OF CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE FOR THE MINNESOTA AND ARIZONA NHEXAS POPULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a probabilistic, multimedia, multipathway exposure model and assessment for chlorpyrifos developed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS). The model was constructed using available information prior to completion of the NHEXAS stu...

  15. Reconstructing Population Exposures to Environmental Chemicals from Biomarkers: Challenges and Opportunities

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptual/computational framework for exposure reconstruction from biomarker data combined with auxiliary exposure-related data is presented, evaluated with example applications, and examined in the context of future needs and opportunities. This framework employs Physiologica...

  16. Exposure and accumulation of cadmium in populations from Japan, the United States, and Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Kjellström, Tord

    1979-01-01

    Studies were carried out in Japan, United States, and Sweden regarding comparability of analytical methods for cadmium, daily intake of cadmium via food, daily amount of cadmium in feces, concentrations of cadmium in different tissues and the body burden of cadmium, urinary excretion of cadmium and cadmium concentrations in blood. It was found that the cadmium intake via food among adults is about 35 μg/day in Japan (Tokyo) and about 17 μg/day in the U.S. (Dallas) and Sweden (Stockholm). It varies with age in a way similar to calorie intake. Body burden increases rapidly with age. The half-time of cadmium is longer in muscles than in liver or kidneys. In the cross-sectional population samples studied (smokers and nonsmokers mixed) the average cadmium body burden at age 45 was about 21 mg in Japan, 9 mg in the U.S., and 6 mg in Sweden. Among nonsmokers in the U.S. and Sweden the body burden at age 45 was about 5–6 mg. The difference in average body burden for smokers and nonsmokers is explained by differences in smoking habits. Cadmium excretion in urine was closely correlated with body burden and about 0.005–0.01% of body burden is excreted daily in urine. Cadmium concentration in the blood was a good indicator of average recent intake over a 3-month period. Neither blood cadmium nor urine cadmium changed immediately after an increase of exposure level. PMID:226355

  17. Exposure to manganese: health effects on the general population, a pilot study in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Santos-Burgoa, C; Rios, C; Mercado, L A; Arechiga-Serrano, R; Cano-Valle, F; Eden-Wynter, R A; Texcalac-Sangrador, J L; Villa-Barragan, J P; Rodriguez-Agudelo, Y; Montes, S

    2001-02-01

    To support a risk assessment of manganese exposure in two communities living within a manganese mining district a cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of the adult population of long-term residents. One community was exposed to a point source from an ore primary refining plant. Manganese is an essential mineral for human life. It is also the fourth in importance for industrial metal making. Data were collected on socioeconomic living conditions, emission sources, environmental media concentrations (air, water, soil, dust, food), respiratory symptomatology, and a neuropsychological examination (Mini-Mental Screening test, the Hooper Visual Organization test, the Ardila-Ostroski, and others). We examined 73 subjects (52 women), most of low socioeconomic status. Environmental air concentrations were 2 to 3 times higher than those in other urban concentrations. Manganese blood concentrations ranged from 7.5 to 88 microg/L, with a median concentration of 15, the upper quartile starting at 20 microg/L; the upper 10% was above 25 microg/L. Lead and manganese were highly correlated; there was an inverse relation to hemoglobin. Reduced levels of plasma lipid peroxidation were associated with blood manganese. Using multivariate logistic regression, we identified B-Mn as increasing the risk of deficient cognitive performance 12 times (Mini-Mental score of less than 17).

  18. Health risk assessment of urban population exposure to contaminants in the soils of the Southern Kuzbass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipova, N. A.; Tarasova, N. P.; Osipov, K. Yu.; Maximova, D. I.

    2015-11-01

    This study concerns the human health risk due to exposure of Co, Cu, As, Mn contained in soils of the Southern Kuzbass, where the coal industry is developed. Soil samples of 200 were taken in Mezhdurechensk - city with intensive coal mining and processing industries. The content of heavy metals in samples were determined using the electron spectroscopy. Several samples were also investigated by methods of the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With regard to the effects of heavy metals on the adult population health the total Hazard Index (HI) for ingestion and inhalation routes was 0.87×10-1 and 7.8×10-1 respectively. According to the contribution of Co, Cu, As, Mn to the total HI the elements form the decreasing series Mn (0,42-0,50)> Co (0.18-0.20)> Cu (0,13-0,19 )> As (0,05-0,09). These chemical elements are present in the organic and inorganic forms in coals and coal wastes. Ranking the city territory has shown that administrative districts have different HI values (8.4 10-1 - 8.8 10-1). When analyzing the human health risks of coal mining and coal-processing enterprises the impact of heavy metals as components of coals and combustion products should be taken into account.

  19. Exposure assessment of phthalates in non-occupational populations in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Zhao, Yan; Li, Luxi; Chen, Bingheng; Zhang, Yunhui

    2012-06-15

    Phthalates have been used worldwide and are ubiquitous in environmental media and human bodies. Based on existing data on phthalate concentrations, distributions of phthalates in the environment and their exposure assessment to non-occupational populations in China can be evaluated. Fifty-three studies, published from January 2000 to October 2010, were reviewed and their data were analyzed in this study. Geographic information system (GIS) was used in mapping the published data of phthalate concentrations and their distributions in environmental media, while scatter diagrams were applied to show the time trends for phthalate concentrations in various environmental media. Results showed that there was a time-dependent increase in ∑phthalates (total phthalates) and DEHP concentrations in air during the past 10 years; phthalate concentrations varied in different areas, among which Guangdong and northeast China were the most polluted. Using Clark's equations, daily intake of ∑phthalates and DEHP in the Pearl River Delta and the Yangtze River Delta was estimated from consumption of contaminated food, water and air. Results showed that daily intake of ∑phthalates and DEHP was 128.63 and 61.29 μg/kg BW/d for adults in the Pearl River Delta, which is significantly higher than those residing in the Yangtze River Delta (33.87 and 24.68 μg/kg BW/d).

  20. Estimating population food and nutrient exposure: a comparison of store survey data with household panel food purchases.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Helen; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Yannan; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2016-05-28

    Population exposure to food and nutrients can be estimated from household food purchases, but store surveys of foods and their composition are more available, less costly and might provide similar information. Our aim was to compare estimates of nutrient exposure from a store survey of packaged food with those from household panel food purchases. A cross-sectional store survey of all packaged foods for sale in two major supermarkets was undertaken in Auckland, New Zealand, between February and May 2012. Longitudinal household food purchase data (November 2011 to October 2012) were obtained from the nationally representative, population-weighted New Zealand Nielsen HomeScan® panel. Data on 8440 packaged food and non-alcoholic beverage products were collected in the store survey. Food purchase data were available for 1229 households and 16 812 products. Store survey data alone produced higher estimates of exposure to Na and sugar compared with estimates from household panel food purchases. The estimated mean difference in exposure to Na was 94 (95 % CI 72, 115) mg/100 g (20 % relative difference; P<0·01), to sugar 1·6 (95 % CI 0·8, 2·5) g/100 g (11 %; P<0·01), to SFA -0·3 (95 % CI -0·8, 0·3) g/100 g (6 %; P=0·3) and to energy -18 (-71, 35) kJ/100 g (2 %; P=0·51). Compared with household panel food purchases, store survey data provided a reasonable estimate of average population exposure to key nutrients from packaged foods. However, caution should be exercised in using such data to estimate population exposure to Na and sugar and in generalising these findings to other countries, as well as over time.

  1. Estimating population food and nutrient exposure: a comparison of store survey data with household panel food purchases.

    PubMed

    Eyles, Helen; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Yannan; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2016-05-28

    Population exposure to food and nutrients can be estimated from household food purchases, but store surveys of foods and their composition are more available, less costly and might provide similar information. Our aim was to compare estimates of nutrient exposure from a store survey of packaged food with those from household panel food purchases. A cross-sectional store survey of all packaged foods for sale in two major supermarkets was undertaken in Auckland, New Zealand, between February and May 2012. Longitudinal household food purchase data (November 2011 to October 2012) were obtained from the nationally representative, population-weighted New Zealand Nielsen HomeScan® panel. Data on 8440 packaged food and non-alcoholic beverage products were collected in the store survey. Food purchase data were available for 1229 households and 16 812 products. Store survey data alone produced higher estimates of exposure to Na and sugar compared with estimates from household panel food purchases. The estimated mean difference in exposure to Na was 94 (95 % CI 72, 115) mg/100 g (20 % relative difference; P<0·01), to sugar 1·6 (95 % CI 0·8, 2·5) g/100 g (11 %; P<0·01), to SFA -0·3 (95 % CI -0·8, 0·3) g/100 g (6 %; P=0·3) and to energy -18 (-71, 35) kJ/100 g (2 %; P=0·51). Compared with household panel food purchases, store survey data provided a reasonable estimate of average population exposure to key nutrients from packaged foods. However, caution should be exercised in using such data to estimate population exposure to Na and sugar and in generalising these findings to other countries, as well as over time. PMID:27050626

  2. Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Bereavement and Childbirths in the Offspring: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Olsen, Jørn; Andersen, Per Kragh; Gómez, Guadalupe; Cnattingius, Sven; Li, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The decline in birth rates is a concern in public health. Fertility is partly determined before birth by the intrauterine environment and prenatal exposure to maternal stress could, through hormonal disturbance, play a role. There has been such evidence from animal studies but not from humans. We aimed to examine the association between prenatal stress due to maternal bereavement following the death of a relative and childbirths in the offspring. Materials and Methods This population-based cohort study included all subjects born in Denmark after 1968 and in Sweden after 1973 and follow-up started at the age of 12 years. Subjects were categorized as exposed if their mothers lost a close relative during pregnancy or the year before and unexposed otherwise. The main outcomes were age at first child and age-specific mean numbers of childbirths. Data was analyzed using Cox Proportional Hazards models stratified by gender and adjusted for several covariates. Subanalyses were performed considering the type of relative deceased and timing of bereavement. Results A total of 4,121,596 subjects were followed-up until up to 41 years of age. Of these subjects, 93,635 (2.3%) were exposed and 981,989 (23.8%) had at least one child during follow-up time. Compared to unexposed, the hazard ratio (HR) [95% confidence interval] of having at least one child for exposed males and females were 0.98 [0.96–1.01] and 1.01 [0.98–1.03], respectively. We found a slightly reduced probability of having children in females born to mothers who lost a parent with HR = 0.97 [0.94–0.99] and increased probability in females born to mothers who lost another child (HR = 1.09 [1.04–1.14]), the spouse (HR = 1.29 [1.12–1.48]) or a sibling (HR = 1.13 [1.01–1.27]). Conclusions Our results suggested no overall association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and having a child in early adulthood but a longer time of follow-up is necessary in order to reach a

  3. Algal populations controlled by fish herbivory across a wave exposure gradient on southern temperate shores.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David I; Schiel, David R

    2010-01-01

    Consumers that forage across habitats can affect communities by altering the abundance and distribution of key species. In marine communities, studies of trophic interactions have generally focused on the effects of herbivorous and predatory invertebrates on benthic algae and mussel populations. However, large mobile consumers that move across habitats, such as fishes, can strongly affect community dynamics through consumption of habitat-dominating species, but their effects often vary over environmental gradients. On temperate rocky shores, herbivorous fishes are generally a small part of the fish fauna compared to the tropics, and there is sparse evidence that they play a major direct role in algal community dynamics, particularly of large brown algae that dominate many reefs. In New Zealand, however, a wide-ranging herbivorous fish, Odax pullus, feeds exclusively on macroalgae, including Durvillaea antarctica, a large low-intertidal fucoid reaching 10 m in length and 70 kg in mass. In four experiments we tested the extent of fish herbivory and how it was affected by algal canopy structure across a gradient of wave exposure at multiple sites. Exclusion experiments showed that fish impacts greatly reduced the cover and biomass of Durvillaea and that these effects decreased with increasing wave stress and algal canopy cover, effectively restricting the alga to exposed conditions. Almost all plants were entirely removed by fish where there was a sparse algal canopy in sheltered a