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Sample records for prominent spasmodic dysphonia

  1. [Acoustic characteristics of adductor spasmodic dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Li-Ping

    2008-06-01

    To explore the acoustic characteristics of adductor spasmodic dysphonia. The acoustic characteristics, including acoustic signal of recorded voice, three-dimensional sonogram patterns and subjective assessment of voice, between 10 patients (7 women, 3 men) with adductor spasmodic dysphonia and 10 healthy volunteers (5 women, 5 men), were compared. The main clinical manifestation of adductor spasmodic dysphonia included the disorders of sound quality, rhyme and fluency. It demonstrated the tension dysphonia when reading, acoustic jitter, momentary fluctuation of frequency and volume, voice squeezing, interruption, voice prolongation, and losing normal chime. Among 10 patients, there were 1 mild dysphonia (abnormal syllable number < 25%), 6 moderate dysphonia (abnormal syllable number 25%-49%), 1 severe dysphonia (abnormal syllable number 50%-74%) and 2 extremely severe dysphonia (abnormal syllable number > or = 75%). The average reading time in 10 patients was 49 s, with reading time extension and aphasia area interruption in acoustic signals, whereas the average reading time in health control group was 30 s, without voice interruption. The aphasia ratio averaged 42%. The respective symptom syllable in different patients demonstrated in the three-dimensional sonogram. There were voice onset time prolongation, irregular, interrupted and even absent vowel formants. The consonant of symptom syllables displayed absence or prolongation of friction murmur in the block-friction murmur occasionally. The acoustic characteristics of adductor spasmodic dysphonia is the disorders of sound quality, rhyme and fluency. The three-dimensional sonogram of the symptom syllables show distinctive changes of proportional vowels or consonant phonemes.

  2. Mutations in THAP1 (DYT6) and generalised dystonia with prominent spasmodic dysphonia: a genetic screening study.

    PubMed

    Djarmati, Ana; Schneider, Susanne A; Lohmann, Katja; Winkler, Susen; Pawlack, Heike; Hagenah, Johann; Brüggemann, Norbert; Zittel, Simone; Fuchs, Tania; Raković, Aleksandar; Schmidt, Alexander; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Wilcox, Robert; Kostić, Vladimir S; Siebner, Hartwig; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Ozelius, Laurie J; Klein, Christine

    2009-05-01

    DYT6 is a primary, early-onset torsion dystonia; however, unlike in DYT1 dystonia, the symptoms of DYT6 dystonia frequently involve the craniocervical region. Recently, two mutations in THAP1, the gene that encodes THAP (thanatos-associated protein) domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1), have been identified as a cause of DYT6 dystonia. We screened THAP1 by sequence analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 160 white patients of European ancestry who had dystonia with an early age at onset (n=64), generalised dystonia (n=35), a positive family history of dystonia (n=56), or facial or laryngeal dystonia. Another 160 patients with dystonia were screened for reported and novel variants in THAP1. 280 neurologically healthy controls were screened for the newly identified and previously reported changes in THAP1 and these and an additional 75 controls were screened for a rare non-coding mutation. We identified two mutations in THAP1 (388_389delTC and 474delA), respectively, in two (1%) German patients from the 160 patients with dystonia. Both mutation carriers had laryngeal dystonia that started in childhood and both went on to develop generalised dystonia. Thus, two of three patients with early-onset generalised dystonia with orobulbar involvement had mutations in THAP1. One of the identified patients with DYT6 dystonia had two family members with subtle motor signs who also carried the same mutation. A rare substitution in the 5'untranslated region (-236_235GA-->TT) was found in 20 of 320 patients and in seven of 355 controls (p=0.0054). Although mutations in THAP1 might have only a minor role in patients with different, but mainly focal, forms of dystonia, they do seem to be associated with early-onset generalised dystonia with spasmodic dysphonia. This combination of symptoms might be a characteristic feature of DYT6 dystonia and could be useful in the differential diagnosis of DYT1, DYT4, DYT12, and DYT17 dystonia. In

  3. Speech Intelligibility in Severe Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Brenda K.; Cannito, Michael P.; Murry, Thomas; Woodson, Gayle E.

    2004-01-01

    This study compared speech intelligibility in nondisabled speakers and speakers with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (Botox) injection. Standard speech samples were obtained from 10 speakers diagnosed with severe ADSD prior to and 1 month following Botox injection, as well as from 10 age- and gender-matched…

  4. Speech Intelligibility in Severe Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Brenda K.; Cannito, Michael P.; Murry, Thomas; Woodson, Gayle E.

    2004-01-01

    This study compared speech intelligibility in nondisabled speakers and speakers with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (Botox) injection. Standard speech samples were obtained from 10 speakers diagnosed with severe ADSD prior to and 1 month following Botox injection, as well as from 10 age- and gender-matched…

  5. Disfluency in Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Multivariate Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannito, Michael P.; Burch, Annette Renee; Watts, Christopher; Rappold, Patrick W.; Hood, Stephen B.; Sherrard, Kyla

    1997-01-01

    This study examined visual analog scaling judgments of disfluency by normal listeners in response to oral reading by 20 adults with spasmodic dysphonia (SD) and nondysphonic controls. Findings suggest that although dysfluency is not a defining feature of SD, it does contribute significantly to the overall clinical impression of severity of the…

  6. Consideration of genetic contributions to the risk for spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nutan; Franco, Ramon A

    2011-09-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia, a form of the neurologic condition known as dystonia, results from involuntary spasms of the larynx, producing interruptions of speech and changes in voice quality. The pathogenesis of spasmodic dysphonia is not well understood. However, several genetic mutations have been identified that cause different forms of dystonia. In some individuals, these genetic mutations result in spasmodic dysphonia, either with no other signs of dystonia or as part of a broader dystonia phenotype. Thus, research in the growing field of dystonia genetics may help to inform our understanding of the pathogenesis of spasmodic dysphonia.

  7. Spasmodic dysphonia: let's look at that again.

    PubMed

    Murry, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    G. Paul Moore influenced the study of spasmodic dysphonia (SD) with his 1960 publication that examined the neurological, medical, and vocal fold behavior in a group of patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). This review of advances in the diagnosis and treatment of SD follows a time line of research that can be traced in part to the early work of Moore et al. This article reviews the research in ADSD over the past 50 plus years. The capstone events that brought SD to its present day level of management by laryngologists and speech-language pathologists are highlighted. A look to the future to understand more of the disorder is offered for this debilitating disorder.

  8. Botulinum toxin therapy for abductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Gayle; Hochstetler, Heidi; Murry, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Botulinum toxin has been widely accepted as an effective therapy for controlling the symptoms of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Reported experience with botulinum treatment for abductor spasmodic dysphonia (ABSD) has been less impressive. Factors that may impair outcomes for ABSD include differences in the pathophysiology of ADSD and ABSD and limitation of maximal dose from airway restriction with posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA) weakness. We report our experience with botulinum injection of the PCA with an asymmetric dose escalation protocol, based on clinical observations that in ABSD, abductor spasms are often stronger on one side, usually the left. The nondominant side was injected with 1.25 units. Dominant side dose began at 5 units, with step-wise increments of 5 units per week until one of three endpoints was reached: Elimination of breathy voice breaks, complete abductor paralysis of the dominant side, or airway compromise. Fourteen of 17 patients achieved good or fair voice, with dominant-side doses ranging from 10 to 25 units. Exercise intolerance limited PCA dose in two patients. One patient had persisting breathiness that improved with medialization thyroplasty. Asymmetric botulinum toxin injection into PCA muscles can suppress abductor spasm in patients with ABSD, but breathiness may persist, because of inadequate glottal closure.

  9. [Analysis of phonosurgical methods of treatment in spasmodic dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Kosztyła-Hojna, Bożena; Berger, Greta; Zdrojkowski, Maciej

    2017-02-20

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is rather a rare voice disorder. It is most often seen in woman aged 40-50. The disease is caused by deep emotional and neurological disorders of extrapyramidal system. Two main clinical forms of SD are distinguished: about 90% of cases - adductor spasmodic dysphonia and abductor spasmodic dysphonia roughly 10%. Conservative therapy does not always yield sufficient effects. Botulinum toxin - type A injections into the thyroarytenoid muscle are also used in therapy. Though results are temporary and reversible. Among phonosurgical methods thyroplasty type II according to Isshiki and tyroarytenoid muscle myectomy (TAM) should be also mentioned among phonosurgical methods. The aim of the work is to evaluate results of conservative and phonosurgical treatment of SD. Spasmodic dysphonia markedly restricts communication process of patients and public relations both social and occupational.

  10. Comparing health locus of control in patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia, Functional Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Haselden, Karen; Powell, Theresa; Drinnan, Mike; Carding, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Locus of Control (LoC) refers to an individuals' perception of whether they are in control of life events. Health Locus of Control refers to whether someone feels they have influence over their health. Health Locus of Control has not been studied in any depth in voice-disordered patients. The objective of this study was to examine Health Locus of Control in three patient groups: (1) Spasmodic Dysphonia, (2) Functional Dysphonia and (3) a nondysphonic group with Nonlaryngeal Dystonia. LoC was measured and compared in a total of 57 patients using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales (diagnostic specific) Form C. Internal, Chance, and Powerful others LoC were measured and comparisons were made using one-way analysis of variance. Contrary to expectations Internal LoC was found to be significantly higher in the Functional Dysphonia group when compared to the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in Chance or Powerful others LoC. The two organic groups, Spasmodic Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia, were more alike in Internal Health Locus of Control than the Functional Dysphonia group. The diagnostic nature of the groups was reflected in their LoC scores rather than their voice loss. These results contribute to the debate about the etiology of Spasmodic Dysphonia and will be of interest to those involved in the psychology of voice and those managing voice-disordered patients.

  11. Acoustic correlate of vocal effort in spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Eadie, Tanya L; Stepp, Cara E

    2013-03-01

    This study characterized the relationship between relative fundamental frequency (RFF) and listeners' perceptions of vocal effort and overall spasmodic dysphonia severity in the voices of 19 individuals with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Twenty inexperienced listeners evaluated the vocal effort and overall severity of voices using visual analog scales. The squared correlation coefficients (R2) between average vocal effort and overall severity and RFF measures were calculated as a function of the number of acoustic instances used for the RFF estimate (from 1 to 9, of a total of 9 voiced-voiceless-voiced instances). Increases in the number of acoustic instances used for the RFF average led to increases in the variance predicted by the RFF at the first cycle of voicing onset (onset RFF) in the perceptual measures; the use of 6 or more instances resulted in a stable estimate. The variance predicted by the onset RFF for vocal effort (R2 range, 0.06 to 0.43) was higher than that for overall severity (R2 range, 0.06 to 0.35). The offset RFF was not related to the perceptual measures, irrespective of the sample size. This study indicates that onset RFF measures are related to perceived vocal effort in patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. These results have implications for measuring outcomes in this population.

  12. Emotional Considerations in Spasmodic Dysphonia: Psychometric Quantification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannito, Michael P.

    1991-01-01

    This study examined emotional characteristics of 18 female spasmodic dysphonic subjects in comparison to matched normal controls across psychometric measures of depression, anxiety, and somatic complaints. Statistically significant differences were noted between groups for all measures and over half of the dysphonic subjects exhibited clinically…

  13. Cortical silent period reveals differences between adductor spasmodic dysphonia and muscle tension dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Samargia, Sharyl; Schmidt, Rebekah; Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), like other focal dystonias, is largely unknown. Objective The purposes of this study were to determine 1) cortical excitability differences between AdSD, muscle tension dysphonia (MTD) and healthy controls 2) distribution of potential differences in cranial or skeletal muscle, and 3) if cortical excitability measures assist in the differential diagnosis of AdSD and MTD. Methods 10 participants with adductor spasmodic dysphonia, 8 with muscle tension dysphonia and 10 healthy controls received single and paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the primary motor cortex contralateral to tested muscles, first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and masseter. We tested the hypothesis that cortical excitability measures in AdSD would be significantly different than in MTD and healthy. In addition, we hypothesized there would be a correlation between cortical excitability measures and clinical voice severity in AdSD. Results Cortical silent period (CSP) duration in masseter and FDI was significantly shorter in AdSD than MTD and healthy controls. Other measures failed to demonstrate differences. Conclusion There are differences in cortical excitability between AdSD, MTD and healthy controls. These differences in the cortical measure of both the FDI and masseter muscles in AdSD suggest widespread dysfunction of the GABAB mechanism may be a pathophysiologic feature of AdSD, similar to other forms of focal dystonia. Further exploration of the use of TMS to assist in the differential diagnosis of AdSD and MTD is warranted. PMID:26089309

  14. Adductor spasmodic dysphonia: Relationships between acoustic indices and perceptual judgments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannito, Michael P.; Sapienza, Christine M.; Woodson, Gayle; Murry, Thomas

    2003-04-01

    This study investigated relationships between acoustical indices of spasmodic dysphonia and perceptual scaling judgments of voice attributes made by expert listeners. Audio-recordings of The Rainbow Passage were obtained from thirty one speakers with spasmodic dysphonia before and after a BOTOX injection of the vocal folds. Six temporal acoustic measures were obtained across 15 words excerpted from each reading sample, including both frequency of occurrence and percent time for (1) aperiodic phonation, (2) phonation breaks, and (3) fundamental frequency shifts. Visual analog scaling judgments were also obtained from six voice experts using an interactive computer interface to quantify four voice attributes (i.e., overall quality, roughness, brokenness, breathiness) in a carefully psychoacoustically controlled environment, using the same reading passages as stimuli. Number and percent aperiodicity and phonation breaks correlated significanly with perceived overall voice quality, roughness, and brokenness before and after the BOTOX injection. Breathiness was correlated with aperidocity only prior to injection, while roughness also correlated with frequency shifts following injection. Factor analysis reduced perceived attributes to two principal components: glottal squeezing and breathiness. The acoustic measures demonstrated a strong regression relationship with perceived glottal squeezing, but no regression relationship with breathiness was observed. Implications for an analysis of pathologic voices will be discussed.

  15. Parry-Romberg syndrome (progressive hemifacial atrophy) with spasmodic dysphonia--a rare association.

    PubMed

    Mugundhan, K; Selvakumar, C J; Gunasekaran, K; Thiruvarutchelvan, K; Sivakumar, S; Anguraj, M; Arun, S

    2014-04-01

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare clinical entity characterised by progressive hemifacial atrophy with appearance of 'saber'. Various neurological and otorhinolaryngological disorders are associated with this syndrome. The association of Parry -Romberg syndrome with Spasmodic dysphonia has rarely been reported. A 37 year old female presented with progressive atrophy of tissues of left side of face for 10 years and change in voice for 1 year. On examination, wasting and atrophy of tissues including tongue was noted on left side of the face. ENT examination revealed adductor spasmodic dysphonia. We report the rare association of Parry -Romberg syndrome with spasmodic dysphonia.

  16. Botulinum Toxin in Secondarily Nonresponsive Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christopher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Chemodenervation with botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been effective and well tolerated for all types of dystonia for >30 years. We reviewed outcomes of our patients treated with BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A) for spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who became secondarily nonresponsive. We found that 8 of 1400 patients became nonresponsive to BoNT-A (0.57%), which is lower than the secondary nonresponse rate in other dystonias. After a cessation period, 4 of our patients resumed BoNT-A injections, and recurrence of immunoresistance was not seen in any of them. When compared with patients with other dystonias, patients with SD receive extremely low doses of BoNT. Small antigen challenge may explain the lower rate of immunoresistance and long-lasting efficacy after BoNT-A is restarted among secondary nonresponsive patients with SD.

  17. Treatment of spasmodic dysphonia with a neuromodulating electrical implant.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of an implantable electrical stimulation device to treat spasmodic dysphonia (SD) by neuromodulation of the muscle spindle gamma loop. Prospective case series. Five subjects underwent daily stimulation of the left thyroarytenoid muscle (TA) below the level of α-motor neuron activation (AMNA) for 5 consecutive days. Professional and patient voice evaluations were performed. Transcartilagenous placement of an implantable stimulation device lead was investigated in anesthetized porcine and cadaveric human models. Three of 5 subjects improved in all categories of evaluation. One subject improved in three of four categories. These four subjects described significant carryover of effect after treatment. The fifth subject evidenced improvement until contracting an upper respiratory infection on day 3. Transcartilagenous electrode placement into the porcine TA with muscle stimulation was successful. The electrode lead was passed from the cadaveric larynx to the mastoid tip in the subplatysma layer with an absence of tension. The symptoms of SD improve after electrical stimulation of the TA at levels below AMNA. This is likely through neuromodulation of the muscle spindle gamma loop. Implantation of an electrode into the TA with a postauricular implanted stimulator is feasible with modifications of an already existing device. With further investigation, such a device has the potential to deliver an alternative treatment for SD. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Botulinum toxin injection and airflow stability in spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, Giovanna; Berlusconi, Alessandra; Maraschi, Barbara; Ghio, Alain; Barbieri, Sergio

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of botulinum toxin (BT) injection on airflow stability, by measuring mean phonatory oral airflow and its coefficient of variation (CV), in subjects with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Twenty-four subjects with SD (aged 31-78 years) and 23 controls (aged 29-63 years) were evaluated for mean airflow and its CV during sustained phonation. Fifteen of the subjects with SD were also evaluated within 3 weeks after BT injection. BT increased airflow in subjects (P = 0.0130) but neither the preinjection nor postinjection values differed significantly from those of controls. Conversely, airflow CV was invariably higher in subjects than in controls (P < 0.0001). In 13 subjects in whom phonation perceptually improved, including 3 in whom airflow did not increase, airflow CV decreased significantly after BT treatment (P = 0.0232). Subjects with SD have highly unstable phonatory airflow; its CV is a valid measure for assessing the outcome of a BT injection. A reduced airflow CV probably does not depend solely on increased airflow due to thyroarytenoid muscle paresis, and may indicate a change in laryngeal motoneuronal activity. B-3b.

  19. Diagnosis of spasmodic dysphonia manifested by swallowing difficulty in videofluoroscopic swallowing study.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Han Gyeol; Lee, Seong Jae; Hyun, Jung Keun; Kim, Tae Uk

    2015-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia is defined as a focal laryngeal disorder characterized by dystonic spasms of the vocal cord during speech. We described a case of a 22-year-old male patient who presented complaining of idiopathic difficulty swallowing that suddenly developed 6 months ago. The patient also reported pharyngolaryngeal pain, throat discomfort, dyspnea, and voice change. Because laryngoscopy found no specific problems, an electrodiagnostic study and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) were performed to find the cause of dysphagia. The VFSS revealed continuous twitch-like involuntary movement of the laryngeal muscle around the vocal folds. Then, he was diagnosed with spasmodic dysphonia by VFSS, auditory-perceptual voice analysis, and physical examination. So, we report the first case of spasmodic dysphonia accompanied with difficulty swallowing that was confirmed by VFSS.

  20. Phonatory air flow characteristics of adductor spasmodic dysphonia and muscle tension dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M B; Chait, D H; Schulte, L

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if phonatory air flow characteristics differed among women with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), and normal phonation. Phonatory air flow signals were gathered during [pa] syllable repetitions. Mean phonatory air flow, coefficients of variation, and the presence of large air flow perturbations (75 ml/s or more) were examined for the three groups of speakers. There was no significant difference in mean phonatory air flow across groups, and very large intersubject variation in mean phonatory air flow occurred for both the AdSD and MTD groups. Coefficients of variation were similar for the groups of women with MTD and normal phonation but were significantly larger for the group with AdSD. Air flow perturbations were common with AdSD and rare with MTD. Relatively large coefficients of variation and air flow perturbations of at least 75 ml/s did occur for some women with normal voices who were 70 years of age or older. It appears that intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow may aid in the differentiation of AdSD and MTD when used in conjunction with other elements of a thorough voice evaluation. However, the potential contribution of aging to increased intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow must be considered when interpreting findings.

  1. Abnormal striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission during rest and task production in spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Berman, Brian D; Herscovitch, Peter; Hallett, Mark

    2013-09-11

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a primary focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speech production. The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia is thought to involve structural and functional abnormalities in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry; however, neurochemical correlates underpinning these abnormalities as well as their relations to spasmodic dysphonia symptoms remain unknown. We used positron emission tomography with the radioligand [(11)C]raclopride (RAC) to study striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission at the resting state and during production of symptomatic sentences and asymptomatic finger tapping in spasmodic dysphonia patients. We found that patients, compared to healthy controls, had bilaterally decreased RAC binding potential (BP) to striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors on average by 29.2%, which was associated with decreased RAC displacement (RAC ΔBP) in the left striatum during symptomatic speaking (group average difference 10.2%), but increased RAC ΔBP in the bilateral striatum during asymptomatic tapping (group average difference 10.1%). Patients with more severe voice symptoms and subclinically longer reaction time to initiate the tapping sequence had greater RAC ΔBP measures, while longer duration of spasmodic dysphonia was associated with a decrease in task-induced RAC ΔBP. Decreased dopaminergic transmission during symptomatic speech production may represent a disorder-specific pathophysiological trait involved in symptom generation, whereas increased dopaminergic function during unaffected task performance may be explained by a compensatory adaptation of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system possibly due to decreased striatal D2/D3 receptor availability. These changes can be linked to the clinical and subclinical features of spasmodic dysphonia and may represent the neurochemical basis of basal ganglia alterations in this disorder.

  2. Effects of type II thyroplasty on adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yumoto, Eiji; Minoda, Ryosei; Kodama, Narihiro

    2010-04-01

    Type II thyroplasty, or laryngeal framework surgery, is based on the hypothesis that the effect of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) on the voice is due to excessively tight closure of the glottis, hampering phonation. Most of the previous, partially effective treatments have aimed to relieve this tight closure, including recurrent laryngeal nerve section or avulsion, extirpation of the adductor muscle, and botulinum toxin injection, which is currently the most popular. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of type II thyroplasty on aerodynamic and acoustic findings in patients with AdSD. Case series. University hospital. Ten patients with AdSD underwent type II thyroplasty between August 2006 and December 2008. Aerodynamic and acoustic analyses were performed prior to and six months after surgery. Mean flow rates (MFRs) and voice efficiency were evaluated with a phonation analyzer. Jitter, shimmer, the harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), standard deviation of the fundamental frequency (SDF0), and degree of voice breaks (DVB) were measured from each subject's longest sustained phonation sample of the vowel /a/. Voice efficiency improved significantly after surgery. No significant difference was found in the MFRs between before and after surgery. Jitter, shimmer, HNR, SDF0, and DVB improved significantly after surgery. Treatment of AdSD with type II thyroplasty significantly improved aerodynamic and acoustic findings. The results of this study suggest that type II thyroplasty provides relief from voice strangulation in patients with AdSD. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Botulinum Toxin and Surgery among Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients.

    PubMed

    van Esch, Babette F; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-02-01

    Objective The effect of botulinum toxin among patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) is temporary. To optimize long-term treatment outcome, other therapy options should be evaluated. Alternative treatment options for AdSD comprise several surgical treatments, such as thyroarytenoid myotomy, thyroplasty, selective laryngeal adductor denervation-reinnervation, laryngeal nerve crush, and recurrent laryngeal nerve resection. Here, we present the first systematic review comparing the effect of botulinum toxin with surgical treatment among patients diagnosed with AdSD. Data Sources MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Methods Articles were reviewed by 2 independent authors, and data were compiled in tables for analysis of the objective outcome (voice expert evaluation after voice recording), the subjective outcome (patient self-assessment scores), and voice-related quality of life (Voice Health Index scores). Results No clinical trials comparing both treatment modalities were identified. Single-armed studies evaluated either the effect of botulinum toxin or surgical treatment. Thirteen studies reported outcomes after botulinum toxin treatment (n = 419), and 9 studies reported outcomes after surgical treatment (n = 585 patients). A positive effect of bilateral botulinum toxin injections was found for the objective voice outcome, subjective voice outcome, and quality of life. The duration of the beneficial effect ranged from 15 to 18 weeks. Surgical treatment had an overall positive effect on objective voice improvement, subjective voice improvement, and quality of live. Conclusion No preference for one treatment could be demonstrated. Prospective clinical trials comparing treatment modalities are recommended to delineate the optimal outcomes by direct comparison.

  4. Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Walton, Suzanne; Murry, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), a focal laryngeal dystonia that disturbs phonatory function, and compared with those of 14 age-matched women with no vocal dysfunction. Findings indicated ADSD subjects produced more aberrant acoustic events than controls during tasks of…

  5. Abnormal activation of the primary somatosensory cortex in spasmodic dysphonia: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Ludlow, Christy L

    2010-11-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a task-specific focal dystonia of unknown pathophysiology, characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speaking. Our aim was to identify symptom-specific functional brain activation abnormalities in adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) and abductor spasmodic dysphonia (ABSD). Both SD groups showed increased activation extent in the primary sensorimotor cortex, insula, and superior temporal gyrus during symptomatic and asymptomatic tasks and decreased activation extent in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum during asymptomatic tasks. Increased activation intensity in SD patients was found only in the primary somatosensory cortex during symptomatic voice production, which showed a tendency for correlation with ADSD symptoms. Both SD groups had lower correlation of activation intensities between the primary motor and sensory cortices and additional correlations between the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum during symptomatic and asymptomatic tasks. Compared with ADSD patients, ABSD patients had larger activation extent in the primary sensorimotor cortex and ventral thalamus during symptomatic task and in the inferior temporal cortex and cerebellum during symptomatic and asymptomatic voice production. The primary somatosensory cortex shows consistent abnormalities in activation extent, intensity, correlation with other brain regions, and symptom severity in SD patients and, therefore, may be involved in the pathophysiology of SD.

  6. Tridimensional assessment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia pre- and post-treatment with Botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Dejonckere, P H; Neumann, K J; Moerman, M B J; Martens, J P; Giordano, A; Manfredi, C

    2012-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia voices form, in the same way as substitution voices, a particular category of dysphonia that seems not suited for a standardized basic multidimensional assessment protocol, like the one proposed by the European Laryngological Society. Thirty-three exhaustive analyses were performed on voices of 19 patients diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (SD), before and after treatment with Botulinum toxin. The speech material consisted of 40 short sentences phonetically selected for constant voicing. Seven perceptual parameters (traditional and dedicated) were blindly rated by a panel of experienced clinicians. Nine acoustic measures (mainly based on voicing evidence and periodicity) were achieved by a special analysis program suited for strongly irregular signals and validated with synthesized deviant voices. Patients also filled in a VHI-questionnaire. Significant improvement is shown by all three approaches. The traditional GRB perceptual parameters appear to be adequate for these patients. Conversely, the special acoustic analysis program is successful in objectivating the improved regularity of vocal fold vibration: the basic jitter remains the most valuable parameter, when reliably quantified. The VHI is well suited for the voice-related quality of life. Nevertheless, when considering pre-therapy and post-therapy changes, the current study illustrates a complete lack of correlation between the perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment dimensions. Assessment of SD-voices needs to be tridimensional.

  7. The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed Central

    Whurr, R; Lorch, M; Fontana, H; Brookes, G; Lees, A; Marsden, C D

    1993-01-01

    Botulinum toxin injections have been used to treat 31 patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Injections of 3.00-3.75 units of botulinum toxin were performed bilaterally into the thyroarytenoid muscle. This treatment significantly decreased the standard deviation of the fundamental frequency of the speech sample, indicating a reduction in the variability of pitch amongst patients. A total of 96% of patients' subjective diary reports showed an improvement with a median of 7 days to peak effect and a 5 week duration of peak effect. Images PMID:8505645

  8. Vocal aging and adductor spasmodic dysphonia: Response to botulinum toxin injection

    PubMed Central

    Cannito, Michael P; Kahane, Joel C; Chorna, Lesya

    2008-01-01

    Aging of the larynx is characterized by involutional changes which alter its biomechanical and neural properties and create a biological environment that is different from younger counterparts. Illustrative anatomical examples are presented. This natural, non-disease process appears to set conditions which may influence the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection and our expectations for its success. Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, a type of laryngeal dystonia, is typically treated using botulinum toxin injections of the vocal folds in order to suppress adductory muscle spasms which are disruptive to production of speech and voice. A few studies have suggested diminished response to treatment in older patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. This retrospective study provides a reanalysis of existing pre-to-post treatment data as function of age. Perceptual judgments of speech produced by 42 patients with ADSD were made by two panels of professional listeners with expertise in voice or fluency of speech. Results demonstrate a markedly reduced positive response to botulinum toxin treatment in the older patients. Perceptual findings are further elucidated by means of acoustic spectrography. Literature on vocal aging is reviewed to provide a specific set of biological mechanisms that best account for the observed interaction of botulinum toxin treatment with advancing age. PMID:18488884

  9. The Consequences of Spasmodic Dysphonia on Communication-Related Quality of Life: A Qualitative Study of the Insider's Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, C.R.; Yorkston, K.M.; Eadie, T.L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the biopsychosocial consequences of spasmodic dysphonia (SD) as experienced by people with SD. Qualitative research methods were used to investigate the insider's perspective of living with SD. Six adults with SD participated in face-to-face phenomenological interviews. The results are summarized in a model…

  10. Nonpharmacologic effects of botulinum toxin on the life quality of patients with spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Anari, Shahram; Carding, Paul N; Hawthorne, Maurice R; Deakin, Jayne; Drinnan, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) injection improves objective and subjective voice measurements in spasmodic dysphonia; however, it is not clear whether the results are entirely caused by the neuromuscular blocking effects of BT or whether other factors (e.g., psychological or emotional) play a part. The aim of this study is to investigate whether nonpharmacologic factors contribute to the changes observed in the quality of life (QoL) after BT treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. Prospective cohort study. Thirty-eight consecutive spasmodic dysphonic patients attending for repeat BT injections were investigated by recording their Voice Handicap Index (VHI) scores at three time points: 1) immediately prior to injection (baseline), 2) 1 day postinjection (when least pharmacologic change is expected), and 3) 2 weeks postinjection (when most pharmacologic change is expected). The changes in the total and domain VHI scores were compared between the two postinjection scores and the baseline value using two-way analysis of variance and the post hoc Bonferroni test. Most of the change in VHI score occurred between the baseline and first postinjection measurement. For two of the domains (total and emotional), the change was statistically significant. The change between the two postinjection assessments was minimal, and no domain showed statistically significant change. Our data indicate that the early improvements in QoL after BT injection can only in small part be attributed to the neurotoxic effects of the agent. We cannot say whether the reported effects in our study are attributable to a strong placebo response or are a real consequence of the patient's changing emotional state.

  11. Liquid-type Botulinum Toxin Type A in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Cha, Wonjae; Jang, Jeon Yeob; Wang, Soo-Geun; Kang, Ji-Heon; Jo, Min-Gyu

    2017-05-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) has been widely used to treat adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Most commercially available forms of BTX require reconstitution before use, which may increase the risk of contamination and requires careful titration. Recently, a liquid-type BTX type A (BTX-A) has been developed, which should simplify the procedure and enhance its efficacy. Herein, we present a prospective pilot study to investigate the efficacy and safety of liquid-type BTX-A in the treatment of ADSD. Twenty-six consecutive liquid-type BTX-A injections were performed in 12 patients with ADSD. We included as a control group 34 consecutive patients with ADSD who had previously undergone 52 vocal fold injection procedures with freeze-dried-type BTX-A. All patients in both groups had improvement of symptoms related to ADSD and period of normal voice. Most patients experienced breathiness, and the onset time, the peak response time, and the duration of breathiness were similar in both groups. The duration of effect (days) was 96.96 ± 18.91 and 77.38 ± 18.97 in the freeze-dried-type and the liquid-type groups, and the duration of benefit (days) was 80.02 ± 18.24 and 62.69 ± 19.73 in the freeze-dried-type and the liquid-type groups. To compare the efficacy between the freeze-dried-type and the liquid-type BTX-A, the sessions of the unilateral vocal fold injection were included and were categorized as group A (1 ~ 2 units BTX-A) and group B (2 ~ 3 units BTX-A), according to the dose per vocal fold. There was no significant difference of effect time between freeze-dried-type and liquid-type BTX-A groups. No adverse events related to BTX or vocal fold injection were reported. Liquid-type BTX-A is safe and effective for the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. With the advantages of simple preparation, storage, and reuse and animal protein-free constituents, liquid-type BTX-A may be a good option in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia. Copyright © 2017 The

  12. Treatment of spasmodic dysphonia with homeopathic medicine: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Xue, Steve An; de Schepper, Luc; Hao, Grace Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Botox) injection is the only conventional medical treatment available for patients with spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Some patients are reluctant to receive Botox treatment due to concerns about unknown long-term side effects, expense, and dependence on repeated injections. The purpose of the study was to report the perceptual and physiological changes in the vocal functions of an SD patient treated with classical homeopathy. The results were similar to a previous case report: classical homeopathy seems to be capable of amelioratiny SD symptoms beyond the short-term effects of Botox injections. Although the physiological mechanism of homeopathic healing is not fully accounted for by the current bio-medical models, it may be an effective therapeutic alternative for some SD patients.

  13. Vocal outcome after endoscopic thyroarytenoid myoneurectomy in patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sachin; Remacle, Marc; Mishra, Prasun; Desai, Vrushali

    2014-12-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) remains one of the most difficult of laryngeal pathologies to treat. With limited role for speech therapy, various surgical modalities have been tried with various success rates. The objective of the study is to report the results of vocal outcome after thyroarytenoid myoneurectomy in patients of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ASD). 15 patients of ASD were selected. GRBAS, and voice handicap index (VHI) were used for perceptual evaluation of voice. Thyroarytenoid myoneurectomy was performed by vaporizing the muscular layer of the vocal fold with CO2 laser, at an intensity of 6 W with 1.2 mm diameter in scanner mode. Voice analysis was repeated at 12, 24 and 48 months follow-up. Preoperative GRBAS scores and VHI score of all the patients were poor. At 12 months 12/15 (80 %) patients having strain score of 0. There was marked improvement in VHI scores at 6 months. 10/15 (67 %) patients have been followed up for 24 months. 5/10 (50 %) patients have strain (S) value of 0. VHI scoring of 5/10 (50 %) patients was <30. Two of the four patients completed 48 months follow-up had a strain (S) value of 0, one patient has strain value of 1 and one patient had strain value of 2. 2/4 patients had VHI score of <30; one patient had that of 40. Trans-oral CO2 laser thyroarytenoid myoneurectomy shows significant long-term improvement in voice quality in terms of reduced speech brakes, effort and strain in voice.

  14. Spasmodic Dysphonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurological disorder affecting the voice muscles in the larynx, or voice box. When we speak, air from ... also have vocal tremor, a shaking of the larynx and vocal folds that causes the voice to ...

  15. Spasmodic dysphonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... light and camera to view the voice box (larynx) Voice testing by a speech-language provider ... Sadoughi B, Guardiani E. Neurologic disorders of the larynx. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund VJ, et ...

  16. Spasmodic dysphonia follow-up with videolaryngoscopy and voice spectrography during treatment with botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marcello; Dubbioso, R; Apisa, P; Allocca, R; Santoro, L; Cesari, U

    2015-09-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a focal dystonia of laryngeal muscles seriously impairing quality of voice. Adductor SD (ADSD) is the most common presentation of this disorder that can be identified by specialized phoniatricians and neurologists firstly on a clinical evaluation and then confirmed by videolaryngoscopy (VL). Botulinum toxin (BTX) injection with electromyographic guidance in muscles around vocal cords is the most effective treatment. Voice Handicap Index (VHI) questionnaire is the main tool to assess dysphonia and response to treatment. Objective of this study is to perform VL and voice spectrography (VS) to confirm the efficacy of BTX injections over time. 13 patients with ADSD were studied with VHI, VL and VS before and after 4 consecutive treatment with onobotulinumtoxin-A. For each treatment vocal improvement was proved by a significant reduction of VHI score and increase of maximum time phonation and harmonic-to-noise ratio while VL showed the absence of spasm in most of patients. No change of the response to BTX was found between injections. This study supports the efficacy of the treatment of SD with BTX with objective measurements and suggests that the efficacy of recurring treatments is stable over time.

  17. [Results of using botulism toxin in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Larrosa, F; Idígora, A; Aguilar, F; Riera, L; Martí, M J; Valls, J

    2002-01-01

    Spasmodic Dysphonia (SD) is a dystonia involving laryngeal musculature thus causing a characteristic voice disorder. Two main types of SD have been described. The adductor type is the commonest and it is characterized by a strain-strangle, choked voice. The abductor type can be distinguished from the previous one by episodes of a blown and whispering voice, interrupting speech. Botulism toxin (BTX) has demonstrated to be the most effective treatment for this condition. Thirty patients diagnosed of SD (twenty-nine adductor type/one abductor type) were included. Their degree of dysphonia was evaluated using both functional and visual-analogue scales. They were treated with BTX vocal cord injections using a percutaneous technique under EMG guidance. Improvements up to a 100% of the normal vocal function were obtained, with an average of 82% in the adductor type. The adverse effects were mild and transient. Hypophonia affected 61.3% of patients lasting an average of 11.3 days. Dysphagia was reported in 44.1% of cases lasting an average of 5.8 days.

  18. Developing the Communicative Participation Item Bank: Rasch Analysis Results From a Spasmodic Dysphonia Sample

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Eadie, Tanya L.; Miller, Robert M.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to conduct the initial psychometric analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank—a new self-report instrument designed to measure the extent to which communication disorders interfere with communicative participation. This item bank is intended for community-dwelling adults across a range of communication disorders. Method A set of 141 candidate items was administered to 208 adults with spasmodic dysphonia. Participants rated the extent to which their condition interfered with participation in various speaking communication situations. Questionnaires were administered online or in a paper version per participant preference. Participants also completed the Voice Handicap Index (B. H. Jacobson et al., 1997) and a demographic questionnaire. Rasch analyses were conducted using Winsteps software (J. M. Linacre, 1991). Results The results show that items functioned better when the 5-category response format was recoded to a 4-category format. After removing 8 items that did not fit the Rasch model, the remaining 133 items demonstrated strong evidence of sufficient unidimensionality, with the model accounting for 89.3% of variance. Item location values ranged from −2.73 to 2.20 logits. Conclusions Preliminary Rasch analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank show strong psychometric properties. Further testing in populations with other communication disorders is needed. PMID:19717652

  19. Developing the communicative participation item bank: Rasch analysis results from a spasmodic dysphonia sample.

    PubMed

    Baylor, Carolyn R; Yorkston, Kathryn M; Eadie, Tanya L; Miller, Robert M; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct the initial psychometric analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank-a new self-report instrument designed to measure the extent to which communication disorders interfere with communicative participation. This item bank is intended for community-dwelling adults across a range of communication disorders. A set of 141 candidate items was administered to 208 adults with spasmodic dysphonia. Participants rated the extent to which their condition interfered with participation in various speaking communication situations. Questionnaires were administered online or in a paper version per participant preference. Participants also completed the Voice Handicap Index (B. H. Jacobson et al., 1997) and a demographic questionnaire. Rasch analyses were conducted using Winsteps software (J. M. Linacre, 1991). The results show that items functioned better when the 5-category response format was recoded to a 4-category format. After removing 8 items that did not fit the Rasch model, the remaining 133 items demonstrated strong evidence of sufficient unidimensionality, with the model accounting for 89.3% of variance. Item location values ranged from -2.73 to 2.20 logits. Preliminary Rasch analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank show strong psychometric properties. Further testing in populations with other communication disorders is needed.

  20. Shortened cortical silent period in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: evidence for widespread cortical excitability.

    PubMed

    Samargia, Sharyl; Schmidt, Rebekah; Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson

    2014-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to compare cortical inhibition in the hand region of the primary motor cortex between subjects with focal hand dystonia (FHD), adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), and healthy controls. Data from 28 subjects were analyzed (FHD n=11, 53.25 ± 8.74 y; AdSD: n=8, 56.38 ± 7.5 y; and healthy controls: n=941.67 ± 10.85 y). All subjects received single pulse TMS to the left motor cortex to measure cortical silent period (CSP) in the right first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle. Duration of the CSP was measured and compared across groups. A one-way ANCOVA with age as a covariate revealed a significant group effect (p<0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed significantly longer CSP duration in the healthy group vs. AdSD group (p<0.001) and FHD group (p<0.001). These results suggest impaired intracortical inhibition is a neurophysiologic characteristic of FHD and AdSD. In addition, the shortened CSP in AdSD provides evidence to support a widespread decrease in cortical inhibition in areas of the motor cortex that represent an asymptomatic region of the body. These findings may inform future investigations of differential diagnosis as well as alternative treatments for focal dystonias.

  1. Everyday listeners' impressions of speech produced by individuals with adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Kathleen F; Eadie, Tanya L; Yorkston, Kathryn M

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) have reported that unfamiliar communication partners appear to judge them as sneaky, nervous or not intelligent, apparently based on the quality of their speech; however, there is minimal research into the actual everyday perspective of listening to ADSD speech. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impressions of listeners hearing ADSD speech for the first time using a mixed-methods design. Everyday listeners were interviewed following sessions in which they made ratings of ADSD speech. A semi-structured interview approach was used and data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Three major themes emerged: (1) everyday listeners make judgments about speakers with ADSD; (2) ADSD speech does not sound normal to everyday listeners; and (3) rating overall severity is difficult for everyday listeners. Participants described ADSD speech similarly to existing literature; however, some listeners inaccurately extrapolated speaker attributes based solely on speech samples. Listeners may draw erroneous conclusions about individuals with ADSD and these biases may affect the communicative success of these individuals. Results have implications for counseling individuals with ADSD, as well as the need for education and awareness about ADSD.

  2. Perioperative complications and safety of type II thyroplasty (TPII) for adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Kenji; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Saori; Nishizawa, Noriko; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Satoshi; Homma, Akihiro

    2017-02-22

    Type II thyroplasty (TPII) is one of the surgical options offered in the management of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD); however, there have been no detailed reports of its safety and associated complications during the perioperative period. Our aim was to assess the complications and safety of TPII. TPII was performed for consecutive 15 patients with AdSD from April 2012 through May 2014. We examined retrospectively the perioperative complications, the degree of surgical invasion, and recovery process from surgery. All patients underwent successful surgery under only local anesthesia. Vocal fold erythema was observed in 14 patients and vocal fold edema in 10 patients; however, all of them showed complete resolution within 1 month. No patient experienced severe complications such as acute airway distress or hemorrhage. Fourteen patients were able to have oral from the 1st postoperative morning, with the remaining patient able to have oral intake from the 2nd postoperative day. In addition, no patient experienced aspiration postoperatively. In conclusion, only minor complications were observed in association with TPII in this study. No dysphagia was observed postoperatively, which is an advantage over other treatments. The results of our study suggest that TPII is a safe surgical treatment for AdSD.

  3. Botulinum toxin treatment of cranial-cervical dystonia, spasmodic dysphonia, other focal dystonias and hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, J; Schwartz, K; Donovan, D T

    1990-01-01

    In the past five years, 477 patients with various focal dystonias and hemifacial spasm received 3,806 injections of botulinum A toxin for relief of involuntary spasms. A definite improvement with a global rating greater than or equal to 2 on a 0-4 scale, was obtained in all 13 patients with spasmodic dysphonia, 94% of 70 patients with blepharospasm, 92% of 13 patients with hemifacial spasm, 90% of 195 patients with cervical dystonia, 77% of 22 patients with hand dystonia, 73% of 45 patients with oromandibular dystonia, and in 90% of 21 patients with other focal dystonia who had adequate follow up. While the average duration of maximum improvement lasted about 11 weeks after an injection (range seven weeks in patients with hand dystonia to 15 weeks in patients with hemifacial spasm), some patients benefited for over a year. Only 16% of the 941 treatment visits with follow up were not successful. Except for transient focal weakness, there were very few complications or systemic effects attributed to the injections. This study supports the conclusion that botulinum toxin injections are a safe and effective therapy for patients with focal dystonia and hemifacial spasm. Images PMID:2213039

  4. The Effect of Information and Severity on Perception of Speakers With Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Eadie, Tanya L; Rajabzadeh, Reyhaneh; Isetti, Derek D; Nevdahl, Martin T; Baylor, Carolyn R

    2017-05-17

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of severity of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) and information about it on unfamiliar listeners' attitudes about speakers' personal characteristics, perceived vocal effort, and listener comfort on the basis of ratings of speech recordings. Fifteen women with ADSD and 5 controls provided speech samples. Forty-five unfamiliar listeners were randomized into 3 groups. Listeners in Group 1 received no information, listeners in Group 2 were told that some speakers had voice disorders or had no voice concerns, and listeners in Group 3 were provided diagnostic labels for each speaker and information about ADSD. Listeners then rated speech samples for attitudes, perceived vocal effort, and listener comfort. Speakers with ADSD were judged significantly worse than controls for attitudes related to "social desirability" and "intellect." There was no effect of severity on "personality" attributes. However, provision of a diagnostic label resulted in significantly more favorable personality ratings than when no label was provided. Perceived vocal effort and comfort became significantly more negative as ADSD severity increased. Finally, most listener ratings were unaffected by provision of additional information about ADSD. Listeners' perceptions about speakers with ADSD are difficult to change. Directions for counseling and public education need future study.

  5. Evaluation of voice quality in adductor spasmodic dysphonia before and after botulinum toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Langeveld, T P; van Rossum, M; Houtman, E H; Zwinderman, A H; Briaire, J J; Baatenburg de Jong, R J

    2001-07-01

    In this prospective study, the efficacy of botulinum toxin (Botox) injections in patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) was assessed by 3 different modalities: perceptual and acoustic analyses and subjective self-assessment. This was done by comparing AdSD patients' pretreatment and posttreatment values and comparing these values with those of normal control speakers. In contrast to most other studies, the posttreatment status was defined as the optimal voice quality as judged by the patient. The aim of the study was to assess to what extent Botox injections actually improve voice quality and function. The AdSD subjects rated a significantly improved voice quality and function after Botox treatment. However, the results were never within normal limits. Perceptually, the characteristic and severely impaired AdSD voice improved, but another "type" of pathological voice was detected after Botox treatment. Acoustic analyses demonstrated a significant improvement, as well. Nevertheless, the "optimally" treated AdSD voice still remained significantly deviant as compared to normal voice production. Currently, Botox injection is the therapy of first choice for AdSD. Although significant improvement could be measured in our study perceptually, acoustically, and subjectively, the optimal voice that was achieved never fully matched normal voice quality or function.

  6. [A study on vowel duration and word length of adductor spasmodic dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Ge, Pingjiang

    2016-03-01

    To understand the vowel duration and statement reading of the adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) patients compared with their normal controls, and provide ideas for clinical diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-nine ADSD patients were included in the research, with 31 normal controls. All subjects filled in form voice handicap index (VHI) by themselves. Maximum phonetic time (MPT) and maximum loudness phonetic time(MLPT) were tested on /a/ sound for all patients. Also, all the patients were required to read aloud a standard mandarin assay named , duration were measured with Praat5. 0 software after sounds were collected. A one-way t-test was performed to compare spasmodic group with control group on VHI, MPT, MLPT and duration for reading standard sentences. Pearson/Spearman correlation was tested. Result: The VHI of the 29 ADSD patients is 89±12, and their normal controls 15±16, indicating that the VHI in ADSD group is significantly higher than in the control group(P<0. 01). The MPT of the ADSD group is(16. 9±9. 8 s), and the control group is (25. 3±10.0)s, indicating that MPT in the ADSD group is significantly shorter than the control group(P<0. 01). The MLPT of the ADSD group is (15.7±7. 6)s, and the control group is (26. 5±11. 4)s, indicating that MLPT in the ADSD group is significantly shorter than the control group (P<0. 01). The duration of standard sentence reading of the ADSD group is (55.0±14. 2)s, and the control group is (37. 8±4. 8)s, indicating that the duration of standard sentence reading in the ADSD group is significantly longer than the control group (P<0. 01). Correlation analysis showed that MPT and MLPT are related within the ADSD group(r=0. 697,P< 0.01), other indexes being tested have no significant correlations. The voice disorder condition of the ADSD patients is significantly worse than normal people. Their pronunciations on continuous vowels are not lasting compared with normal people. In the meantime, their ability to

  7. Voice disorders in the workplace: productivity in spasmodic dysphonia and the impact of botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Tanya K; Hu, Amanda; Hillel, Allen D

    2013-11-01

    The impact of the disordered voice on standard work productivity measures and employment trends is difficult to quantify; this is in large part due to the heterogeneity of the disease processes. Spasmodic dysphonia (SD), a chronic voice disorder, may be a useful model to study this impact. Self-reported work measures (worked missed, work impairment, overall work productivity, and activity impairment) were studied among patients receiving botulinum toxin (BTX) treatments for SD. It was hypothesized that there would be a substantial difference in work-related measures between the best and worst voicing periods. In addition, job types, employment shifts, and vocal requirements during the course of vocal disability from SD were investigated for each individual, and the impact of SD on these patterns was studied. A total of 145 patients with SD, either adductor or abductor, who were established in routine therapeutic BTX injections agreed to participate in a self-administered questionnaire study. Seventy-two participants were currently working and provided highly detailed information on work-related measures. Their answers characterized the effect of SD on their employment status, productivity at work, activity impairment outside of work, employment retention or change, and whether the individual perceived that BTX therapy affected these measures. Patients were asked to complete the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI) instrument to determine these measures for their best and worst voicing weeks over the duration since their previous BTX injection. Voice-specific quality of life instruments (Voice Handicap Index-10) and perceptual assessments (Consensus Auditory Perceptual Evaluation of Voice) were elicited to provide correlations of work measures with patient-perceived voice handicap and clinician-perceived voice quality. Cross-sectional analysis using self-administered questionnaire. A total of 108 patients reported ever working during their diagnosis and

  8. The Psychosocial Consequences of BOTOX Injections for Spasmodic Dysphonia: A Qualitative Study of Patients’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Eadie, Tanya L.; Maronian, Nicole C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objectives/Hypothesis The purpose of this study is to examine the psychosocial consequences of BOTOX® (Allergan, Inc. Irvine, CA) treatment for spasmodic dysphonia (SD). This article also explores how patients judge the success of treatment and make decisions about future treatment based on psychosocial issues relevant to them. Study Design This study follows the phenomenological tradition of qualitative inquiry in which the objective is to explore the lived experiences of a group of persons who share a common phenomenon, in this case receiving BOTOX injections for SD. Methods Six adults with SD who had been receiving BOTOX injections on a long-term basis participated in face-to-face interviews. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed according to phenomenological guidelines to identify consistent themes as well as differences among participants’ experiences. Results The results are summarized in three primary themes that suggest (1) participants’ experiences vary over time based on changes in factors such as lifestyle and personal priorities; (2) BOTOX has multidimensional psychosocial implications in physical, personal, and social domains; and (3) participants individualize their treatment regimens, taking into consideration the burden of treatment, scheduling priorities, and other strategies to maximize the benefits of BOTOX. Conclusions Based on this study, suggestions are provided for future research into a psychosocial outcome measurement, including longitudinal evaluations that accommodate changing patient priorities over time; multidimensional evaluations that incorporate physical, personal, and social issues; evaluations that include a measure of the burden of treatment; and evaluations that support a shared decision-making model with the voice clinicians. PMID:16564675

  9. Long-term Evaluation of Type 2 Thyroplasty with Titanium Bridges for Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yumoto, Eiji

    2017-07-01

    Objectives Standard treatments of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) provide temporary relief of symptoms. Type 2 thyroplasty offers a long-term solution; however, long-term voice outcome data are lacking. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term voice outcomes of type 2 thyroplasty with titanium bridges through use of a validated voice questionnaire. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting University hospital. Subjects and Methods Forty-seven consecutively enrolled patients with AdSD underwent type 2 thyroplasty with titanium bridges between August 2006 and November 2014. Questionnaires were completed during regularly scheduled follow-ups and, in some cases, were sent to patients who missed follow-up appointments. In 2015, questionnaires were mailed to all 47 patients and included a Voice Handicap Index-10 evaluation, as well as questions on postoperative vocal symptoms, surgical site, and status of the implanted titanium bridges. Results Of 47 patients with AdSD, 31 (66%) completed the questionnaires. The average follow-up interval was 41.3 months. No patient reported experiencing an adverse event around the surgical site, and almost all were satisfied with their voices postoperatively. The mean postoperative (>3 years) Voice Handicap Index-10 score improved significantly, from 26.3 to 9.4 (n = 17, P = .0009). Conclusions Type 2 thyroplasty for AdSD significantly improved patient quality of life and voice symptoms and continued to do so long after the surgery. The results of this study suggest that type 2 thyroplasty provides relief from vocal symptoms in patients with AdSD for >3 years.

  10. Neural correlates of dystonic tremor: a multimodal study of voice tremor in spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Kirke, Diana N; Battistella, Giovanni; Kumar, Veena; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Rumbach, Anna; Simonyan, Kristina

    2016-02-03

    Tremor, affecting a dystonic body part, is a frequent feature of adult-onset dystonia. However, our understanding of dystonic tremor pathophysiology remains ambiguous as its interplay with the main co-occurring disorder, dystonia, is largely unknown. We used a combination of functional MRI, voxel-based morphometry and diffusion-weighted imaging to investigate similar and distinct patterns of brain functional and structural alterations in patients with dystonic tremor of voice (DTv) and isolated spasmodic dysphonia (SD). We found that, compared to controls, SD patients with and without DTv showed similarly increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex, inferior frontal (IFG) and superior temporal gyri, putamen and ventral thalamus, as well as deficient activation in the inferior parietal cortex and middle frontal gyrus (MFG). Common structural alterations were observed in the IFG and putamen, which were further coupled with functional abnormalities in both patient groups. Abnormal activation in left putamen was correlated with SD onset; SD/DTv onset was associated with right putaminal volumetric changes. DTv severity established a significant relationship with abnormal volume of the left IFG. Direct patient group comparisons showed that SD/DTv patients had additional abnormalities in MFG and cerebellar function and white matter integrity in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Our findings suggest that dystonia and dystonic tremor, at least in the case of SD and SD/DTv, are heterogeneous disorders at different ends of the same pathophysiological spectrum, with each disorder carrying a characteristic neural signature, which may potentially help development of differential markers for these two conditions.

  11. Workplace productivity and voice disorders: a cognitive interviewing study on presenteeism in individuals with spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Isetti, Derek; Meyer, Tanya

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain initial reactions and suggested modifications to two existing presenteeism scales: the Stanford Presenteeism Scale 6 (SPS-6) and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire-Specific Health Problem (WPAI-SHP) among a cohort of employed individuals with a focal laryngeal dystonia, spasmodic dysphonia (SD). The study design is a qualitative study. Nine speakers with SD underwent cognitive interviews, during which they were asked to evaluate the relevance of statements and clarity of wording on the SPS-6, the WPAI-SHP, and an additional set of voice-related statements designed by the researchers. Participants were asked to complete the scales, rank order statements in terms of perceived importance, and suggest additional statements of relevance. Although all participants noted that their SD did have an effect on their jobs, there were suggestions for modifying both the WPAI-SHP and the SPS-6. Participants regarded specific voice-related statements that were generated by the researchers to be of greater importance than the majority of the statements on the SPS-6. Minor changes in the wording of the instructions on the WPAI-SHP were recommended. Presenteeism is an important construct to measure in individuals with a chronic voice disorder such as SD. However, existing presenteeism scales might best be administered in conjunction with additional statements that are more voice related so that clinicians can be made aware of specific difficulties encountered in the workplace. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Onabotulinum toxin A dosage trends over time for adductor spasmodic dysphonia: A 15-year experience.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christopher G; Novakovic, Daniel; Mor, Niv; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Although onabotulinum neurotoxin A (BoNTA) has been used for over three decades for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia, no study has been performed to look at the trend of BoNTA dosages across time. The goal of this study is to evaluate the dosage trends to determine if the dosage necessary for voice improvement in patients increases over time. Charts were reviewed for patients with 15 years or more of experience. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine correlation coefficients and trends. Fifty-five patients receiving BoNTA injections by the senior author (a.b.) for over 15 years were evaluated. Thirty-nine patients (82% female) met inclusion criteria. Patients received injections over an average of 18.6 years ± 1.36 years, with the longest follow-up of 21.5 years. Of 39 patients, 16 (41%) had a negative correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) suggesting a decrease over time, whereas 23 (59%) had a positive correlation coefficient suggesting an increase over time. The mean correlation coefficient was 0.139 ± 0.534 and P < 0.05 in 19 patients and P > 0.05 in 20 patients. R(2) for all patients were less than 0.75. Onabotulinum neurotoxin A injection dosage trends vary depending on the individual over time. Overall, the dose range appears to be stable in the majority of patients, suggesting that tolerance does not play a significant part in dose variation over time. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:678-681, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Abnormal motor cortex excitability during linguistic tasks in adductor-type spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Suppa, A; Marsili, L; Giovannelli, F; Di Stasio, F; Rocchi, L; Upadhyay, N; Ruoppolo, G; Cincotta, M; Berardelli, A

    2015-08-01

    In healthy subjects (HS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied during 'linguistic' tasks discloses excitability changes in the dominant hemisphere primary motor cortex (M1). We investigated 'linguistic' task-related cortical excitability modulation in patients with adductor-type spasmodic dysphonia (ASD), a speech-related focal dystonia. We studied 10 ASD patients and 10 HS. Speech examination included voice cepstral analysis. We investigated the dominant/non-dominant M1 excitability at baseline, during 'linguistic' (reading aloud/silent reading/producing simple phonation) and 'non-linguistic' tasks (looking at non-letter strings/producing oral movements). Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the contralateral hand muscles. We measured the cortical silent period (CSP) length and tested MEPs in HS and patients performing the 'linguistic' tasks with different voice intensities. We also examined MEPs in HS and ASD during hand-related 'action-verb' observation. Patients were studied under and not-under botulinum neurotoxin-type A (BoNT-A). In HS, TMS over the dominant M1 elicited larger MEPs during 'reading aloud' than during the other 'linguistic'/'non-linguistic' tasks. Conversely, in ASD, TMS over the dominant M1 elicited increased-amplitude MEPs during 'reading aloud' and 'syllabic phonation' tasks. CSP length was shorter in ASD than in HS and remained unchanged in both groups performing 'linguistic'/'non-linguistic' tasks. In HS and ASD, 'linguistic' task-related excitability changes were present regardless of the different voice intensities. During hand-related 'action-verb' observation, MEPs decreased in HS, whereas in ASD they increased. In ASD, BoNT-A improved speech, as demonstrated by cepstral analysis and restored the TMS abnormalities. ASD reflects dominant hemisphere excitability changes related to 'linguistic' tasks; BoNT-A returns these excitability changes to normal.

  14. Longitudinal variations of laryngeal overpressure and voice-related quality of life in spasmodic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jeffrey C; Fung, Kevin; Davis, Eric; Rai, Sunita K; Day, Adam M B; Dzioba, Agnieszka; Bornbaum, Catherine; Doyle, Philip C

    2015-03-01

    Adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) is a voice disorder characterized by variable symptom severity and voice disability. Those with the disorder experience a wide spectrum of symptom severity over time, resulting in varied degrees of perceived voice disability. This study investigated the longitudinal variability of AdSD, with a focus on auditory-perceptual judgments of a dimension termed laryngeal overpressure (LO) and patient self-assessments of voice-related quality of life (V-RQOL). Longitudinal, correlational study. Ten adults with AdSD were followed over three time periods. At each, both voice samples and self-ratings of V-RQOL were gathered prior to their scheduled Botox injection. Voice recordings subsequently were perceptually evaluated by eight listeners for LO using a visual analog scale. LO ratings for all-voiced and Rainbow Passage sentence stimuli were found to be highly correlated. However, only the LO ratings obtained from judgments of AV stimuli were found to correlate moderately with self-ratings of voice disability for both the physical functioning and social-emotional subscores, as well as the total V-RQOL score. Based on perceptual judgments, LO appears to provide a reliable means of quantifying the severity of voice abnormalities in AdSD. Variability in self-ratings of the V-RQOL suggest that perceived disability related to AdSD should be actively monitored. Further, auditory-perceptual judgments may provide an accurate index of the potential impact of the disorder on the speaker. Similarly, LO was supported as a simple clinical measure that serves as a reliable index of voice change over time. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Alterations in CNS Activity Induced by Botulinum Toxin Treatment in Spasmodic Dysphonia: An H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, S. Omar; Thomassen, Michael; Schulz, Geralyn M.; Hosey, Lara A.; Varga, Mary; Ludlow, Christy L.; Braun, Allen R.

    2006-01-01

    Speech-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured using H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O positron-emission tomography in 9 adults with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (BTX) injection and 10 age- and gender-matched volunteers without neurological disorders. Scans were acquired at rest…

  16. Alterations in CNS Activity Induced by Botulinum Toxin Treatment in Spasmodic Dysphonia: An H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, S. Omar; Thomassen, Michael; Schulz, Geralyn M.; Hosey, Lara A.; Varga, Mary; Ludlow, Christy L.; Braun, Allen R.

    2006-01-01

    Speech-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured using H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O positron-emission tomography in 9 adults with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (BTX) injection and 10 age- and gender-matched volunteers without neurological disorders. Scans were acquired at rest…

  17. Multidimensional assessment of strongly irregular voices such as in substitution voicing and spasmodic dysphonia: a compilation of own research.

    PubMed

    Moerman, Mieke; Martens, Jean-Pierre; Dejonckere, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    This article is a compilation of own research performed during the European COoperation in Science and Technology (COST) action 2103: 'Advance Voice Function Assessment', an initiative of voice and speech processing teams consisting of physicists, engineers, and clinicians. This manuscript concerns analyzing largely irregular voicing types, namely substitution voicing (SV) and adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD). A specific perceptual rating scale (IINFVo) was developed, and the Auditory Model Based Pitch Extractor (AMPEX), a piece of software that automatically analyses running speech and generates pitch values in background noise, was applied. The IINFVo perceptual rating scale has been shown to be useful in evaluating SV. The analysis of strongly irregular voices stimulated a modification of the European Laryngological Society's assessment protocol which was originally designed for the common types of (less severe) dysphonia. Acoustic analysis with AMPEX demonstrates that the most informative features are, for SV, the voicing-related acoustic features and, for AdSD, the perturbation measures. Poor correlations between self-assessment and acoustic and perceptual dimensions in the assessment of highly irregular voices argue for a multidimensional approach.

  18. The consequences of spasmodic dysphonia on communication-related quality of life: A qualitative study of the insider's experiences

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Eadie, Tanya L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the biopsychosocial consequences of spasmodic dysphonia (SD) as experienced by people with SD. Qualitative research methods were used to investigate the insider's perspective of living with SD. Six adults with SD participated in face-to-face phenomenological interviews. The results are summarized in a model of personal experiences of SD which shows that communication-related quality of life (QOL) is shaped by experiences with multiple physiologic (voice quality, effort, voice dependability); personal (affective responses, changes in self-view, coping strategies) and social (physical environment, other people, participation in social roles) factors. Communication-related QOL is a complex and individualized construct with multidimensional contributors. This study suggests that understanding the nature of communication-related QOL for each individual requires exploration of each component of the model, exploration of the unique relationships among components for each person, and recognition of the multidimensional factors that shape the experience of SD. Learning outcomes As a result of this activity the reader will be able to (1) identify general features of the phenomenological research method; (2) identify the three general categories of psychosocial consequences of SD; (3) identify those psychosocial consequences of SD that are under-represented in the literature; and (4) identify key conclusions of the communication-related quality of life model. PMID:15963338

  19. Objective dysphonia measures in the program Praat: smoothed cepstral peak prominence and acoustic voice quality index.

    PubMed

    Maryn, Youri; Weenink, David

    2015-01-01

    A version of the "smoothed cepstral peak prominence" (i.e., CPPS) has recently been implemented in the program Praat. The present study therefore estimated the correspondence between the original CPPS from the program SpeechTool and Praat's version of the CPPS. Because the CPPS is the main factor in the multivariate Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI), this study also investigated the proportional relationship between the AVQI with the original and the second version of the CPPS. Comparative cohort study. Clinical recordings of sustained vowel phonation and continuous speech from 289 subjects with various voice disorders were analyzed with the two versions of the CPPS and the AVQI. Pearson correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination were calculated between both CPPS-methods and between both AVQI-methods. Quasi-perfect correlations and coefficients of determination approaching hundred percent were found. The findings of this study demonstrate that the outcomes of the two CPPS-methods and the two AVQI-methods are highly comparable, increasing the clinical feasibility of both methods as measures of dysphonia severity. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. National Spasmodic Torticollis Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... alone anymore. Welcome to National Spasmodic Torticollis Association web site The mission of the National Spasmodic Torticollis ... Signs and Symptoms Treatment Options Medications Botulinum Toxin Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) Selective Denervation Surgery Physical Therapy ...

  1. Cervical Dystonia (Spasmodic Torticollis)

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical dystonia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is a painful condition in which your neck muscles contract involuntarily, causing your head to twist or turn ...

  2. Dysphonia in performers: toward a clinical definition of laryngology of the performing voice.

    PubMed

    Guss, Joel; Sadoughi, Babak; Benson, Brian; Sulica, Lucian

    2014-05-01

    To identify causes of dysphonia in performers and compare causes and aspects of treatment of dysphonia in performers and nonperformers. Case-control study. A chart review of all new patients presenting with a chief complaint of dysphonia over a 1-year period was performed. The prevalence of laryngeal disorders was reviewed and differences between performers and nonperformers were analyzed. The odds ratio of the prevalence of each disorder was computed against performer status as a risk factor. Four hundred seventy-six new patients complaining of dysphonia presented over 12 months; 74 were vocal performers. The median duration of symptoms in performers was 90 days. Phonotraumatic lesions were significantly more prevalent in performers (63.5% vs. 28.6%, P < 0.001), particularly bilateral mid-fold swelling (4-fold increase in performers), pseudocysts (3-fold increase), and vocal fold hemorrhage/ectasia. Neurologic disorders (vocal fold paralysis and spasmodic dysphonia), neoplastic pathologies, and age-related phenomena (atrophy/presbyphonia) were significantly more common in nonperformers. Overall and diagnosis-specific rates of surgical intervention were equal between the two groups. Phonotraumatic injury is responsible for the majority of dysphonia in vocal performers, to a significantly greater extent than in nonperformers and requires the implementation of standard therapeutic strategies. Awareness of the specific risks and management needs of the performer is of paramount importance to the practice of laryngology of the performing voice. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dysphonia risk screening protocol

    PubMed Central

    Nemr, Katia; Simões-Zenari, Marcia; da Trindade Duarte, João Marcos; Lobrigate, Karen Elena; Bagatini, Flavia Alves

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To propose and test the applicability of a dysphonia risk screening protocol with score calculation in individuals with and without dysphonia. METHOD: This descriptive cross-sectional study included 365 individuals (41 children, 142 adult women, 91 adult men and 91 seniors) divided into a dysphonic group and a non-dysphonic group. The protocol consisted of 18 questions and a score was calculated using a 10-cm visual analog scale. The measured value on the visual analog scale was added to the overall score, along with other partial scores. Speech samples allowed for analysis/assessment of the overall degree of vocal deviation and initial definition of the respective groups and after six months, the separation of the groups was confirmed using an acoustic analysis. RESULTS: The mean total scores were different between the groups in all samples. Values ranged between 37.0 and 57.85 in the dysphonic group and between 12.95 and 19.28 in the non-dysphonic group, with overall means of 46.09 and 15.55, respectively. High sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated when discriminating between the groups with the following cut-off points: 22.50 (children), 29.25 (adult women), 22.75 (adult men), and 27.10 (seniors). CONCLUSION: The protocol demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating groups of individuals with and without dysphonia in different sample groups and is thus an effective instrument for use in voice clinics. PMID:27074171

  4. Dysphonia risk screening protocol.

    PubMed

    Nemr, Katia; Simões-Zenari, Marcia; Duarte, João Marcos da Trindade; Lobrigate, Karen Elena; Bagatini, Flavia Alves

    2016-03-01

    To propose and test the applicability of a dysphonia risk screening protocol with score calculation in individuals with and without dysphonia. This descriptive cross-sectional study included 365 individuals (41 children, 142 adult women, 91 adult men and 91 seniors) divided into a dysphonic group and a non-dysphonic group. The protocol consisted of 18 questions and a score was calculated using a 10-cm visual analog scale. The measured value on the visual analog scale was added to the overall score, along with other partial scores. Speech samples allowed for analysis/assessment of the overall degree of vocal deviation and initial definition of the respective groups and after six months, the separation of the groups was confirmed using an acoustic analysis. The mean total scores were different between the groups in all samples. Values ranged between 37.0 and 57.85 in the dysphonic group and between 12.95 and 19.28 in the non-dysphonic group, with overall means of 46.09 and 15.55, respectively. High sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated when discriminating between the groups with the following cut-off points: 22.50 (children), 29.25 (adult women), 22.75 (adult men), and 27.10 (seniors). The protocol demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating groups of individuals with and without dysphonia in different sample groups and is thus an effective instrument for use in voice clinics.

  5. Hereditary whispering dysphonia.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, N

    1985-01-01

    An Australian family group is described where at least twenty members have inherited torsion dystonia and two siblings with an affected mother have similar clinical manifestations, but have also the biochemical and pathological changes found in Wilson's disease. Whispering dysphonia was the commonest presenting symptom, and a diagnosis of hysteria was invariably made if the family history was not known. This group emphasises the enormously varied ways in which torsion dystonia may be manifested in one family, and raises the possibility of a disturbance in copper transport in diseases of the basal ganglia other than Wilson's disease. Images PMID:3156966

  6. Vocal therapy of hyperkinetic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Mumović, Gordana; Veselinović, Mila; Arbutina, Tanja; Škrbić, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Hyperkinetic (hyperfunctional) dysphonia is a common pathology. The disorder is often found in vocal professionals faced with high vocal requirements. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of vocal therapy on voice condition characterized by hyperkinetic dysphonia with prenodular lesions and soft nodules. The study included 100 adult patients and 27 children aged 4-16 years with prenodular lesions and soft nodules. A subjective acoustic analysis using the GIRBAS scale was performed prior to and after vocal therapy. Twenty adult patients and 10 children underwent objective acoustic analysis including several acoustic parameters. Pathological vocal qualities (hoarse, harsh and breathy voice) were also obtained by computer analysis. The subjective acoustic analysis revealed a significant (p<0.01) reduction in all dysphonia parameters after vocal treatment in adults and children. After treatment, all levels of dysphonia were lowered in 85% (85/100) of adult patients and 29% (29/100) had a normal voice. Before vocal therapy 9 children had severe, 13 had moderate and 8 slight dysphonia. After vocal therapy only 1 child had severe dysphonia, 7 had moderate, 10 had slight levels of dysphonia and 9 were without voice disorder. The objective acoustic analysis in adults revealed a significant improvement (p≤0.025) in all dysphonia parameters except SD FO and jitter %. In children, the acoustic parameters SD FO, jitter % and NNE (normal noise energy) were significantly improved (p=0.003-0.03). Pathological voice qualities were also improved in adults and children (p<0.05). Vocal therapy effectively improves the voice in hyperkinetic dysphonia with prenodular lesions and soft nodules in both adults and children, affectinq diverse acoustic parameters.

  7. Spasmodic torticollis: the dental connection.

    PubMed

    Sims, Anthony B; Stack, Brendan C; Demerjian, G Gary

    2012-07-01

    Spasmodic torticollis or cervical dystonia (CD) is the most common form of focal dystonia and is characterized by sustained abnormal muscle contractions in the head and neck area resulting in abnormal positioning or posturing of the head. The dystonic muscle spasms associated with spasmodic torticollis may affect any combination of neck muscles. Three cases are reported of spasmodic torticollis that were treated by a dental appliance with individual varying occlusal heights to open the maxillomandibular vertical dimension. Upon increasing the vertical dimension of occlusion, there was a slowing and/or discontinuance of the symptoms of cervical dystonia. The proposed hypothesis for this reversal is that there may be neuritis of the auriculotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve, which has direct input into the reticular formation (RF), and it may activate the cells of the pontine region of the RF known for the control and deviation of head posture. There is growing clinical evidence that temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction may be a factor in this neurological and painful disorder when it coexists.

  8. Attitudes of children with dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Connor, Nadine P; Cohen, Stacy B; Theis, Shannon M; Thibeault, Susan L; Heatley, Diane G; Bless, Diane M

    2008-03-01

    Because voice disorders in childhood may have a negative impact on communicative effectiveness, social development, and self-esteem, the objective was to determine the impact of voice disorders on lives of children from the perspective of chronically dysphonic children and their parents. This study consisted of focused interviews with chronically dysphonic children and their caregivers. Focused interviews were conducted with 10 children in each of the following age groups: Toddler (2-4 years old), Young Child (5-7 years old), School-Aged Child (8-12 years old), and Adolescent (13-18 years old). Interview questions were formulated to elicit attitudes in the following conceptual domains: emotional, social/functional, and physical. Interviews were transcribed and subjected to systematic qualitative analyses that identified common themes within each age group for each conceptual domain. For Toddlers, interviews relied heavily on parents and the biggest concerns were found in the physical and functional domains. Young Children expressed that their biggest issues related to voice were physical ("run out of air," "sometimes voice does not work"). Ninety percent of Young Children were repeatedly asked to use a quieter voice. Emotional factors and physical factors were prominent in the interviews of School-Aged Children and Adolescents. Children and Adolescents often felt that their dysphonic voice received undue attention and also limited their participation in important events. Anger, sadness, and frustration were also expressed. Chronic dysphonia negatively affects the lives of children. This work will serve as the basis for development of a valid, reliable, and age-appropriate measure of voice-related quality of life in children.

  9. Dysphonia in children.

    PubMed

    Martins, Regina Helena Garcia; Hidalgo Ribeiro, Caio Bosquê; Fernandes de Mello, Bruno Marcos Zeponi; Branco, Anete; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes

    2012-09-01

    Vocal symptoms are common among the pediatric population and are often caused by vocal abuse. Laryngoscopy is essential for their diagnosis because it helps differentiate several laryngeal lesions, leading to a decision for suitable treatments considering each case. This study aims to present the clinical characteristics, and the laryngoscopic diagnosis of a dysphonic child population. The parents of 304 children, aged from 4 to 18 years and presenting prolonged hoarseness, answered a questionnaire about their children's voice, and all children were subjected to videolaryngostroboscopy. Male children aged from 7 to 12 years (64%) were predominant. Vocal abuse (n-162) and nasal obstruction symptoms (n-10) were the most frequent associated symptoms. The vocal symptoms had a chronic evolution (over 1 year) and were reported by most parents (n-200). The most commonly diagnosed lesions in the laryngoscopic exams were vocal nodules (n-175) and epidermal cysts (n-47). Furthermore, there was an association of some lesions, especially minor structural alterations. In the present study, dysphonia occurred mainly in children aged from 7 to 12 years, predominantly males. Vocal abuse and nasal obstruction symptoms were frequently reported. Vocal nodules and cysts were the most commonly diagnosed laryngeal lesions in the laryngoscopic exams. Copyright © 2012 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Spasmodic torticollis and vertebral hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Durán, E; Chacón, J R

    Spasmodic torticollis in young patients should give rise to a clinical suspicion that this is secondary to another primary disorder. Therefore a series of diagnostic tests should be carried out before it is labelled as idiopathic. The patient was a thirty year old man who had had difficulty in writing with his right hand since childhood. At the age of 20 years he was diagnosed as having writer's cramp and idiopathic spasmodic torticollis. On general physical examination no abnormalities were found. On neurological examination he had: absence of reflexes of both arms, limited but painless rotation of the neck towards the left and hypertrophy of the left trapezius muscle. Laboratory, neurophysiological and neuroimaging investigations seeking a secondary cause for the torticollis were all normal. There were no Keyser-Fleischer rings. Chest X-ray showed, dorsal scoliosis with convexity to the left. CAT and MR of the spine showed a hemangioma in the body of T1. On arteriography of the supra-aortic and vertebral trunks a hemangioma was found at T1 which received contrast material via a branch of the right thyro-bi-cervico-scapular trunk. Various treatments were tried (diazepam, Botox, Dysport, tetrabenazine, baclofen, etc.) with no improvement. A definite diagnosis of secondary torticollis could not be made since the hemangioma was supplied by a very narrow vascular pedicle, so embolization was contraindicated. Cervical spinal cord alterations may cause focal dystonia due to increased excitability of the spinal motor neurone, due to dysfunction of the disinhibitory descending reciprocal paths.

  11. Spasmodic torticollis: a behavioral perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.R.

    1982-06-01

    The literature on spasmodic torticollis is critically reviewed. The currently most popular etiological hypothesis characterizes torticollis as an extrapyramidal disorder, the symptoms of which are aggravated by stress, but there is no unequivocal evidence available to support this view. Psychological mechanisms have been suggested but not elaborated or tested in any detail. A wide range of treatments has been advocated but controlled studies have not been reported, and the problems of assessing outcome have never been tackled adequately. Behavioral treatments have been evaluated more rigorously than other approaches (particularly EMG feedback training), and the literature suggests that they benefit some patients. It is argued that psychologists have the potential for making a very significant contribution to the understanding and management of torticollis. In discussing outcome measures, the more promising techniques that have been used are summarized and a list is presented of the factors which must be considered when assessing torticollis symptoms. Directions for future research are outlined and priorities suggested.

  12. [Dysphonia in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M; Meuret, S; Stuhrmann, N C; Schade, G

    2009-06-01

    Hoarseness is the leading symptom of dysphonia among children and adolescents. The incidence is evaluated internationally to be 6-25%. In an overview the hereditary and acquired organic and functional causes including secondary organic lesions of the vocal folds, the pathomechanisms and the symptoms typical for this age group are presented. In clinical routine, symptoms of dysphonia in children and adolescents should be consciously looked for and any long-term hoarseness should be examined by specialized physicians, even in this age group, using methods suitable to the age group and the developmental stage. When the appropriate indications are present all therapeutic options currently available should be taken into consideration. Furthermore, this paper provides information for the parents concerning the imminent phoniatric examination.

  13. Management of dysphonia in children.

    PubMed

    Connelly, A; Clement, W A; Kubba, H

    2009-06-01

    Dysphonia is common in children, but practice varies considerably regarding what, if any, investigations are performed and how the condition is managed. Although childhood dysphonia is mostly due to non-serious causes such as voice misuse, very serious pathology such as papillomatosis or malignancy needs occasionally to be excluded, and treatable congenital anomalies such as webs and cysts can be missed. Voice clinics and voice therapy services are now well established in most adult health services in the developed world, but equivalent services for children are less common, at least in the UK. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all children presenting to our large children's hospital with a primary complaint of dysphonia between January 2001 and October 2007, in order to determine their management, investigations and final diagnosis. We identified 142 children. Case records were found for 137 (97 per cent). Eight-three children were male (61 per cent) and 54 female (39 per cent). Ages ranged from two months to 15 years (median 5.3 years). In 10 children (7 per cent), hoarseness was congenital, presenting as a hoarse, weak cry at birth. In 15 children (11 per cent), onset of hoarseness was related to a specific surgical procedure. The larynx was visualised by mirror alone in 23 children (17 per cent), by awake fibre-optic laryngoscopy in 27 (20 per cent) and by microlaryngoscopy-bronchoscopy under anaesthesia in 42 (31 per cent). Forty children (29 per cent) did not undergo laryngeal visualisation at any time and were diagnosed based on history alone. A further five (4 per cent) were scheduled for direct laryngoscopy but this was not performed due to resolution of symptoms. Voice abuse accounted for 62 (45 per cent) of all diagnoses. Childhood dysphonia accounts for a large number of referrals. There is considerable variation in how these children are managed. A more structured approach to diagnosis and investigation would be beneficial, perhaps within the

  14. Prominence Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kucera, Terry; Kawashima, Rei; DeVore, C.; Karpen, Judy; Antiochos, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Fine structure prominence dynamics are visible in the majority of high-spatial resolution data from Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). We present the results of a study investigating the nature of these horizontal and vertical flows and discuss them in the context of ion-neutral coupling in a partially ionized prominence plasma. We also discuss how models can help in the interpretation of these observations.

  15. Hedgerow Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-30

    A solar prominence at the sun's edge put on quite a display of plasma being pushed and pulled by unstable magnetic fields (May 22-24, 2017). We call them hedgerow prominences because they look somewhat like a hedge of bushes. This is one of the better examples of this type of solar phenomenon than any we have seen in quite some time. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21650

  16. Prominence Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregui, I.; Ballester, J. L.; Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.

    2012-05-01

    Given the difficulty in directly determining prominence physical parameters from observations, prominence seismology stands as an alternative method to probe the nature of these structures. We show recent examples of the application of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seismology techniques to infer physical parameters in prominence plasmas. They are based on the application of inversion techniques using observed periods, damping times, and plasma flow speeds of prominence thread oscillations. The contribution of Hinode to the subject has been of central importance. We show an example based on data obtained with Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope. Observations show an active region limb prominence, composed by a myriad of thin horizontal threads that flow following a path parallel to the photosphere and display synchronous vertical oscillations. The coexistence of waves and flows can be firmly established. By making use of an interpretation based on transverse MHD kink oscillations, a seismological analysis of this event is performed. It is shown that the combination of high quality Hinode observations and proper theoretical models allows flows and waves to become two useful characteristics for our understanding of the nature of solar prominences.

  17. Developing the Communicative Participation Item Bank: Rasch Analysis Results from a Spasmodic Dysphonia Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Eadie, Tanya L.; Miller, Robert M.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct the initial psychometric analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank--a new self-report instrument designed to measure the extent to which communication disorders interfere with communicative participation. This item bank is intended for community-dwelling adults across a range of…

  18. Developing the Communicative Participation Item Bank: Rasch Analysis Results from a Spasmodic Dysphonia Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Carolyn R.; Yorkston, Kathryn M.; Eadie, Tanya L.; Miller, Robert M.; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct the initial psychometric analyses of the Communicative Participation Item Bank--a new self-report instrument designed to measure the extent to which communication disorders interfere with communicative participation. This item bank is intended for community-dwelling adults across a range of…

  19. Social phobia in spasmodic torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, H; Wolf, A; Xidara, V; Busch, R; Ceballos-Baumann, A

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity assessed by the use of a structured clinical interview in a large, representative sample of patients with spasmodic torticollis (ST) and to test the hypothesis that social phobia would be highly prevalent.
METHODS—In a consecutive cohort of 116 patients with ST treated with botulinum toxin overall psychiatric comorbidity was studied prospectively with the structured clinical interview (SCID) for DSM-IV axis I disorders. Physical disability and psychosocial variables were also assessed with standardised self rating questionnaires.
RESULTS—41.3% of the subjects met DSM-IV clinical criteria A-G for current social phobia as the primary psychiatric diagnosis. This figure rose to 56% including secondary and tertiary psychiatric diagnosis. There was no correlation between severity of disease (Tsui score, severity of pain, body image dissatisfaction score) and psychiatric comorbidity. The only significant predictor of psychiatric comorbidity was depressive coping behaviour (logistic regression analysis, p<0.01; OR=10.8). Compared with a representative sample of the general adult population, in the patients with ST the prevalence of clinically relevant social phobia is 10-fold, of mood disorders 2.4-fold, and of lifetime psychiatric comorbidity 2.6-fold increased.
CONCLUSIONS—A particularly high prevalence of social phobia was found in the cohort of patients with ST. The finding of a high prevalence of social phobia and depressive coping behaviour as the main predictor of psychiatric comorbidity may make a subgroup of patients with ST particularly amenable to specific psychotherapeutic interventions.

 PMID:11561034

  20. Churning Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-30

    On Jan. 23-24, 2017, NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory watched as a solar prominence rose up along the edge of the sun and twisted and churned for about two days before falling apart. The dynamic action was generated by competing magnetic forces. The images were taken in a wavelength extreme ultraviolet light that observes activity close to the solar surface, perfect for capturing prominences, which are notoriously unstable clouds of plasma suspended above the sun. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA11237

  1. Bendable Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-04

    A prominence observed along the right edge of the sun rose up and then most of it bent back down to the surface (Oct. 4, 2016). Prominences are clouds of plasma, usually elongated, that are suspended above the sun by magnetic forces. They are notably unstable. A review of SOHO's coronagraph videos shows that some of the particles did break away into space. The video clip, which covers eight hours of activity, was taken in a wavelength of extreme UV light. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21106

  2. Streaming Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-05

    A prominence at the edge of the sun provided us with a splendid view of solar plasma as it churned and streamed over less than one day (June 25-26, 2017). The charged particles of plasma were being manipulated by strong magnetic forces. When viewed in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light, we can trace the movements of the particles. Such occurrences are fairly common but much easier to see when they are near the sun's edge. For a sense of scale, the arch of prominence in the still image has risen up several times the size of Earth. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21768

  3. Saddled Prominent

    Treesearch

    Peter A. Rush; Douglas C. Allen

    1987-01-01

    The saddled prominent, Heterocampa guttivitta (Walker), defoliates hardwoods in the Northeastern United States and Southeastern Canada. Outbreaks of this native insect have occurred in the United States and Canada at intervals of approximately 10 years since they were first recorded in the early 1900's. Populations, characterized by their instability, build...

  4. Assessment of chronic childhood dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Mornet, E; Coulombeau, B; Fayoux, P; Marie, J-P; Nicollas, R; Robert-Rochet, D; Marianowski, R

    2014-11-01

    Chronic childhood dysphonia is a common condition in the school-age period. Perceived functional disorder is subjective and the alert is usually given by a person not belonging to the child's immediate environment. History-taking often suggests a malformation or acquired lesion. Functional assessment helps measure and diagnose the vocal impairment. Physical and endoscopic assessment in consultation is the key examination: it is only rarely impossible in children and can often found diagnosis. Additional examinations are sometimes necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Is perceived dysphonia related to perceived healthiness?

    PubMed

    Maryn, Youri; Debo, Kim

    2015-10-01

    Literature has shown that voice-disordered persons are at higher risk for negative attitudes on several personality and physical appearance traits than vocally normal persons. This study investigated general perceptions of health in subjects with various degrees of dysphonia. Recordings from 100 normophonic and dysphonic subjects were auditorily rated on dysphonia severity by five experienced clinicians and on degree of healthiness/unhealthiness by seven unexperienced listeners. Results revealed strong correlation between auditory ratings of dysphonia severity and unhealthiness severity. Dysphonic subjects are rated significantly unhealthier than normophonic subjects, and the receiver-operating characteristics curve showed that even slight dysphonia induces negative attributions of unhealthiness. This study provides additional evidence for the negative attitudes with which dysphonic speakers are confronted, especially in terms of health.

  6. Vocal dose in teachers: correlation with dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Gama, Ana Cristina Côrtes; Santos, Juliana Nunes; Pedra, Elisângela de Fátima Pereira; Rabelo, Alessandra Terra Vasconcelos; Magalhães, Max de Castro; Casas, Estevam Barbosa de Las

    2016-04-01

    Teachers are professionals with high prevalence of dysphonia, whose main risk factors are the large work hours in classrooms with the presence of background noise. The purpose of the study was to calculate the phonation time and the cycle dose of teachers with dysphonia and teachers without voice disorders during the class. There were two groups analyzed: five teachers with functional dysphonia were the first group and five teachers without voice disorders were the second group. For the data was used the VoxLog® dosimeter and the parameters were: intensity; fundamental frequency; phonation time and cycle dose. The statistical analysis used ANOVA, Student's T-test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Dysphonic teachers showed major values of phonation time and cycle dose compared with teachers without voice disorders. The dysphonia is related to extended period of speech time and greater exposure of the tissue of the vocal fold to phonotrauma.

  7. FURTHER STUDY OF SPASTIC DYSPHONIA

    PubMed Central

    Landes, Bernard A.

    1962-01-01

    Seven women and two men with spastic dysphonia, ranging in age from 20 to 59 years, were studied to determine the cause and the means of development of the condition. The patients were examined by a laryngologist and, when feasible, by a psychiatrist or other medical specialist for coordination and corroboration of the diagnosis. Psychiatric observations were significant. A background of conflict with a parent or spouse was frequent and typical. In almost every case there were deep guilt feelings associated with something the patient had said to the person with whom he was in conflict. Similarities with the psychic elements in these cases and in cases of stuttering were noted. The results of vocal reeducation and psychotherapy together were comparatively successful. Hypnosis and the use of tranquilizing drugs did not help. PMID:14461963

  8. Solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Aulanier, Guillaume; Török, Tibor

    2009-03-01

    Solar filaments (or prominences) are magnetic structures in the corona. They can be represented by twisted flux ropes in a bipolar magnetic environment. In such models, the dipped field lines of the flux rope carry the filament material and parasitic polarities in the filament channel are responsible for the existence of the lateral feet of prominences. Very simple laws do exist for the chirality of filaments, the so-called “filament chirality rules”: commonly dextral/sinistral filaments corresponding to left- (resp. right) hand magnetic twists are in the North/South hemisphere. Combining these rules with 3D weakly twisted flux tube models, the sign of the magnetic helicity in several filaments were identified. These rules were also applied to the 180° disambiguation of the direction of the photospheric transverse magnetic field around filaments using THEMIS vector magnetograph data (López Ariste et al. 2006). Consequently, an unprecedented evidence of horizontal magnetic support in filament feet has been observed, as predicted by former magnetostatic and recent MHD models. The second part of this review concerns the role of emerging flux in the vicinity of filament channels. It has been suggested that magnetic reconnection between the emerging flux and the pre-existing coronal field can trigger filament eruptions and CMEs. For a particular event, observed with Hinode/XRT, we observe signatures of such a reconnection, but no eruption of the filament. We present a 3D numerical simulation of emerging flux in the vicinity of a flux rope which was performed to reproduce this event and we briefly discuss, based on the simulation results, why the filament did not erupt.

  9. Ventricular dysphonia: clinical aspects and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Maryn, Youri; De Bodt, Marc S; Van Cauwenberge, Paul

    2003-05-01

    Ventricular dysphonia, also known as dysphonia plica ventricularis, refers to the pathological interference of the false vocal folds during phonation. Despite its low incidence and prevalence, Vd is a well-known phenomenon in voice clinics. The present report reviews symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and therapeutic options regarding this voice disorder. Literature review and case studies. The literature pertaining to all clinical aspects of V(D) was reviewed to define diagnostic and therapeutic clinical decision making. Ventricular dysphonia is characterized by a typical rough, low-pitched voice quality resulting from false vocal fold vibration. Ventricular dysphonia may be compensatory when true vocal folds are affected (resection, paralysis). Noncompensatory types may be of habitual, psychoemotional, or idiopathic origin. Because perceptual symptoms may vary considerably, diagnosis should rely on a meticulous voice assessment, including laryngeal videostroboscopic, perceptual, aerodynamic, and acoustic evaluation. Various therapeutic approaches for the noncompensatory type of ventricular dysphonia may be considered: voice therapy, psychotherapy, anesthetic or botulinum toxin injections, or surgery. The study presents the state of the art with respect to ventricular dysphonia and may be helpful in diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making.

  10. Relationship between fatigue, perfectionism, and functional dysphonia.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, James; Miller, Tracey; Carding, Paul; Wilson, Janet; Deary, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Increased levels of fatigue and perfectionism were noted during evaluation of cognitive behavioral therapy for the treatment of functional dysphonia. The investigators thus aimed to explore levels of general fatigue and perfectionism in patients with functional dysphonia and controls. Case-control study. Teaching hospital, United Kingdom. Patients recruited through speech therapy were asked to recruit a friend as a control, of the same sex and within 5 years of their age. An 11-point fatigue questionnaire, previously validated on a normal population, was analyzed using both Likert (0123) and bimodal (0011) systems, with a score greater than 4 on the bimodal system implying substantial fatigue. A 35-point perfectionism questionnaire was also completed and analyzed for "healthy" and "unhealthy" perfectionist traits. There were 75 cases and 62 controls. The mean fatigue score in patients with functional dysphonia was 17.0 and 14.4 for the controls (Likert, P = .009). Under the bimodal scoring system, the mean fatigue scores in functional dysphonia (5.10) and controls (3.01) were also significantly different (P = .003). The mean perfectionism scores were 98.9 for patients with functional dysphonia and 91.2 for controls (P = 0.043). To the investigators' knowledge, this is the first substantial report that fatigue and perfectionism scores are significantly elevated in functional dysphonia. Functional dysphonia is shown to be analogous to other medically unexplained physical symptoms that are also marked by generic somatopsychic distress and for which multiple factors are implicated in their onset and maintenance. This has implications for both research and treatment.

  11. Dysphonia and dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Hanna; Niemelä, Mika; Lauri, Eija-Riitta; Back, Leif; Juvas, Anja; Räsänen, Pirjo; Roine, Risto P; Sintonen, Harri; Salmi, Tapani; Vilkman, S Erkki; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the effects of anterior cervical decompression (ACD) on swallowing and vocal function. The study comprised 114 patients who underwent ACD. The early group (50 patients) was examined immediately pre- and postoperatively, and the late group (64 patients) was examined at only 3 to 9 months postoperatively. Fifty age- and sex-matched patients from the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery who had not been intubated in the previous 5 years were used as a control group. All patients in the early and control groups were examined by a laryngologist; patients in the late group were examined by a laryngologist and a neurosurgeon. Videolaryngostroboscopy was performed in all members of the patient and control groups, and the function of the ninth through 12th cranial nerves were clinically evaluated. Data were collected concerning swallowing, voice quality, surgery results, and health-related quality of life. Patients with persistent dysphonia were referred for phoniatric evaluation and laryngeal electromyography (EMG). Those with persistent dysphagia underwent transoral endoscopic evaluation of swallowing function and videofluorography. Sixty percent of patients in the early group reported dysphonia and 69% reported dysphagia at the immediate postoperative visit. Unilateral vocal fold paresis occurred in 12%. The prevalence of both dysphonia and dysphagia decreased in both groups 3 to 9 months postoperatively. All six patients with vocal fold paresis in the early group recovered, and in the late group there were two cases of vocal fold paresis. The results of laryngeal EMG were abnormal in 14 of 16 patients with persistent dysphonia. Neither intraoperative factors nor age or sex had any effect on the occurrence of dysphonia, dysphagia, or vocal fold paresis. Most patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. Dysphonia, dysphagia, and vocal fold paresis are common but usually transient complications of ACD

  12. Long term results of childhood dysphonia treatment.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz-Nartowicz, Hanna; Sinkiewicz, Anna; Bielecka, Arleta; Owczarzak, Hanna; Mackiewicz-Milewska, Magdalena; Winiarski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the long term results of treatment and rehabilitation of childhood dysphonia. This study included a group of adolescents (n=29) aged from 15 to 20 who were treated due to pediatric hyperfunctional dysphonia and soft vocal fold nodules during their pre-mutational period (i.e. between 5 and 12 years of age). The pre-mutational therapy was comprised of proper breathing pattern training, voice exercises and psychological counseling. Laryngostroboscopic examination and perceptual analysis of voice were performed in each patient before treatment and one to four years after mutation was complete. The laryngostroboscopic findings, i.e. symmetry, amplitude, mucosal wave and vocal fold closure, were graded with NAPZ scale, and the GRBAS scale was used for the perceptual voice analysis. Complete regression of the childhood dysphonia was observed in all male patients (n=14). Voice disorders regressed completely also in 8 out of 15 girls, but symptoms of dysphonia documented on perceptual scale persisted in the remaining seven patients. Complex voice therapy implemented in adolescence should be considered as either the treatment or preventive measure of persistent voice strain, especially in girls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Parkinson's disease detection based on dysphonia measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2017-04-01

    Assessing dysphonic symptoms is a noninvasive and effective approach to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of different dysphonia measurements on PD detection by support vector machine (SVM). Seven categories of dysphonia measurements are considered. Experimental results from ten-fold cross-validation technique demonstrate that vocal fundamental frequency statistics yield the highest accuracy of 88 % ± 0.04. When all dysphonia measurements are employed, the SVM classifier achieves 94 % ± 0.03 accuracy. A refinement of the original patterns space by removing dysphonia measurements with similar variation across healthy and PD subjects allows achieving 97.03 % ± 0.03 accuracy. The latter performance is larger than what is reported in the literature on the same dataset with ten-fold cross-validation technique. Finally, it was found that measures of ratio of noise to tonal components in the voice are the most suitable dysphonic symptoms to detect PD subjects as they achieve 99.64 % ± 0.01 specificity. This finding is highly promising for understanding PD symptoms.

  14. Laryngeal myofascial pain syndrome as a new diagnostic entity of dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo Yeon; Park, Hae Sang; Bae, Hasuk; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Park, Hyung Jun; Park, Kee Duk; Kim, Han Su; Chung, Sung Min

    2017-04-01

    To consider the feasibility of diagnosing intrinsic laryngeal muscle myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in dysphonic patients who demonstrated immediate symptom and stroboscopic finding improvement after laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) without further treatment. A chart review of patients who showed subtle vocal fold movement abnormalities on a stroboscopic examination and underwent ultrasonography (US)-guided LEMG was performed. Patients with vocal fold paralysis, mucosal lesions, spasmodic dysphonia, and vocal tremor on stroboscopic examination were excluded. Among them, patients with normal EMG findings were included in this study. The patients who reported voice symptom improvement after LEMG without further treatment were placed in laryngeal MPS (LMPS) group and the other patients were placed in non-laryngeal MPS (non-MPS) group. Predisposing factors, voice symptom, symptom-duration, and stroboscopic findings of these patients were reviewed. Among the 16 patients, LEMG findings were normal, five (31%) were included in the LMPS group and the other 11 patients (69%) were included in the non-MPS group. All LMPS group patients had a history of voice abuse and reported odynophonia. The Korean Voice Handicap Index-10 score decreased significantly after US-guided LEMG without additional treatment in the LMPS group. The stroboscopic findings revealed that vocal fold hypomobility was the most common finding in the LMPS group, and two patients showed a muscle tension dysphonia pattern. The LMPS groups showed improvement of vocal fold mobility on 1-week stroboscopic evaluation. LMPS is a potential diagnosis for patients with vocal fold hypomobility finding on stroboscopic findings but with normal EMG results. Diagnosis of LMPS could be considered in patients who showed symptom and vocal fold movement improvement after LEMG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [How to render an expert opinion on dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Nawka, T; Rosanowski, F; Gross, M

    2014-09-01

    In Germany, parameters for medicolegal evaluation of dysphonia have to be revised against the background of communication disorders getting more important in a modern communication society. In this work, up-to-date diagnostic tools are reviewed and evaluated for medicolegal purposes. Parametrization is -performed according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health ICF. Following this schema, -dysphonia is graded as follows: 1) No dysphonia (no problem, percentile 0-4) impairment of the whole person 0%, 2) Slight, strain-induced dysphonia (slight problem, percentile 5-24) -impairment of the whole person 0-10%, 3) Moderate dysphonia (moderate problem, percentile 25-49) impairment of the whole person 20-30%, 4) Severe dysphonia (severe problem, percentile 50-95) impairment of the whole person 40-50%, 5) Complete loss of voice (extreme problem, percentile 96-100%) impairment of the whole person 50%. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Describing pediatric dysphonia with nonlinear dynamic parameters.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Morgan L; Theis, Shannon M; McMurray, J Scott; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J

    2008-12-01

    Nonlinear dynamic analysis has emerged as a reliable and objective tool for assessing voice disorders. However, it has only been tested on adult populations. In the present study, nonlinear dynamic analysis was applied to normal and dysphonic pediatric populations with the goal of collecting normative data. Jitter analysis was also applied in order to compare nonlinear dynamic and perturbation measures. This study's findings will be useful in creating standards for the use of nonlinear dynamic analysis as a tool to describe dysphonia in the pediatric population. The study included 38 pediatric subjects (23 children with dysphonia and 15 without). Recordings of sustained vowels were obtained from each subject and underwent nonlinear dynamic analysis and percent jitter analysis. The resulting correlation dimension (D2) and percent jitter values were compared across the two groups using t-tests set at a significance level of p=0.05. It was shown that D2 values covary with the presence of pathology in children. D2 values were significantly higher in dysphonic children than in normal children (p=0.002). Standard deviations indicated a higher level of variation in normal children's D2 values than in dysphonic children's D2 values. Jitter analysis showed markedly higher percent jitter in dysphonic children than in normal children (p=0.025) and large standard deviations for both groups. This study indicates that nonlinear dynamic analysis could be a viable tool for the detection and assessment of dysphonia in children. Further investigations and more normative data are needed to create standards for using nonlinear dynamic parameters for the clinical evaluation of pediatric dysphonia.

  17. Describing pediatric dysphonia with nonlinear dynamic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Morgan L.; Theis, Shannon M.; McMurray, J. Scott; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Nonlinear dynamic analysis has emerged as a reliable and objective tool for assessing voice disorders. However, it has only been tested on adult populations. In the present study, nonlinear dynamic analysis was applied to normal and dysphonic pediatric populations with the goal of collecting normative data. Jitter analysis was also applied in order to compare nonlinear dynamic and perturbation measures. This study’s findings will be useful in creating standards for the use of nonlinear dynamic analysis as a tool to describe dysphonia in the pediatric population. Methods The study included 38 pediatric subjects (23 children with dysphonia and 15 without). Recordings of sustained vowels were obtained from each subject and underwent nonlinear dynamic analysis and percent jitter analysis. The resulting correlation dimension (D2) and percent jitter values were compared across the two groups using t-tests set at a significance level of p = 0.05. Results It was shown that D2 values covary with the presence of pathology in children. D2 values were significantly higher in dysphonic children than in normal children (p = 0.002). Standard deviations indicated a higher level of variation in normal children’s D2 values than in dysphonic children’s D2 values. Jitter analysis showed markedly higher percent jitter in dysphonic children than in normal children (p = 0.025) and large standard deviations for both groups. Conclusion This study indicates that nonlinear dynamic analysis could be a viable tool for the detection and assessment of dysphonia in children. Further investigations and more normative data are needed to create standards for using nonlinear dynamic parameters for the clinical evaluation of pediatric dysphonia. PMID:18947887

  18. Coronal and Prominence Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, Arthur I. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Various aspects of solar prominences and the solar corona are discussed. The formation of prominences, prominence diagnostics and structure, prominence dissappearance, large scale coronal structure, coronal diagnostics, small scale coronal structure, and non-equilibrium/coronal heating are among the topics covered.

  19. Exploration on the underlying mechanism of female predominance in spasmodic dysphonia: an anatomical study of nodose ganglion in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zengrui; Li, Ge; Feng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    To study the gender differences of amount of neurons in the nodose ganglions of rats. Fourteen Sprague-Dawley rats (7 males and 7 females) were selected. Bilateral nodose ganglions were dissected and serial sections of nodose ganglion were cut in a cryostat, followed by Cresyl-violet staining for neurons. Eight to ten consecutive sections from mid-portion of each nodose ganglion sample, which represent the most neuron number per section, were counted and averaged. Gender difference in the amount of neurons in the nodose ganglions was compared. No gender difference of neuron numbers was found in either side of nodose ganglion (p > 0.05). However, average neuron number of nodose ganglions on the left side of male (654 ± 60) and female (616 ± 37) were significantly more than that on the right side of male (470 ± 22) and female (453 ± 40) respectively (p < 0.05). There is no gender difference in total neuron number of nodose ganglions between male and female rat. However, the neuron number in the left nodose ganglion is greater than that in the right one. The difference may be due to the fact that left and right nodose ganglion is receiving different visceral sensory impulses separately, which is associated with different physiological functions. Further work should be carried out with retrograde tracing on neurons of nodose ganglions in an animal model, which are directly related to laryngeal sensory transmission, in order to determine the gender difference in the neuron number and morphology related to laryngeal functions.

  20. [The outcome of hydration in functional dysphonia].

    PubMed

    García Real, T; García Real, A; Díaz Román, T; Cañizo Fernández Roldán, A

    2002-01-01

    Functional dysphonia has high prevalence among professional voice users. Different aspects should be considered in vocal therapy. One of them is hydration. The aim of the present study is to assess the effect of hydration on a few aspect of vocal dysfunction. 75 subjects were distributed into three different groups. 23 participated as a control group, 27 received hydration treatment and 25 received hydration treatment plus voice training. Dryness, mucosity, phonatory effort, hoarseness, fundamental frequency (Fo), maximum phonatory time (MPT), time of speech and laryngeal status were the variables evaluated at time 0 and 14 days later, immediately after the completion of the treatment of each group. Statistical differences regarding dryness (p = 0.003) and hoarseness (p = 0.033) were found between the control group and the groups receiving treatment. There were no statistical differences in severity and frequency of variables measured at time 0 at 14 days later in the control group. However, all variables except laryngeal status, improved significantly in the groups receiving hydration alone. Only clinical variables improved in the combined group. These findings indicated a therapeutic benefit of hydration, with or without voice training, for functional dysphonia. Further studies using acoustic and stroboscopic analysis are required in order to define the effect of hydration on the compliance of glottic sphincter.

  1. Handle-shaped Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-02-17

    NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope aboard ESA’s SOHO spacecraft took this image of a huge, handle-shaped prominence in 1999. Prominences are huge clouds of relatively cool dense plasma suspended in the Sun hot, thin corona.

  2. Factors Associated with Dysphonia in High School Cheerleaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Shari L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaire responses from 146 high school cheerleaders indicated that acute, cheering-related dysphonia may be preceded or accompanied by a set of clinical signs that could be incorporated easily into a screening protocol for prospective cheerleaders. (Author/DB)

  3. Dysphonia in very preterm children: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Victoria; Meldrum, Suzanne; Simmer, Karen; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; French, Noel

    2014-01-01

    Intubation is a known risk factor for dysphonia yet is essential in the perinatal care of many very preterm infants. Children born preterm, who are frequently resuscitated with endotracheal intubation, may be at risk of dysphonia at school age and beyond. To identify and describe the evidence pertaining to long-term voice outcomes and risk factors for developing dysphonia in preterm children. In addition to case studies and series, three larger-scale studies have reported on dysphonia and voice outcomes in preterm children. Studies reporting treatment outcomes were not available. Factors associated with poor voice outcomes included female gender, birth weight <1,000 g, birth at <27 weeks' gestation, surgical closure of patent ductus arteriosus, emergency versus elective intubations and multiple intubations. Adverse voice outcomes were associated with laryngeal pathology and compensatory supraglottic compression. Dysphonia is a newly reported, long-term complication of preterm birth, yet the number of relevant studies remains limited. Further research is required to confirm the risk factors for developing dysphonia, which will inform future voice treatment studies.

  4. Quiescent Prominence Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong; Lin, Lupin C. C.

    1999-06-01

    With a new analytical method, we present a static model for quiescent solar prominences of inverse polarity. These prominences have a plasma β slightly below unity and correspond to those located in the lower corona. Although this static model cannot address the helmet-like features at the top of the prominences, which are believed to be associated with the open-field topology and driven by outflows, the model may nevertheless capture several characteristic features of the solar prominences. These features include the sheetlike gas condensation hanging above an asymptotically weak magnetic cusp, the sheared magnetic arcades/loops, the coronal cavity, radio dark strips cospatial with the Hα filaments, bright radio ribbons located on both sides of the dense prominence sheet, and the increasing magnetic field strength with height along the prominence sheet. In our model, the densest gas is contained within a narrow field-free tube immediately above the prominence sheet. Thermally insulated by the surrounding strong fields, this narrow tube may be a natural site for housing the cool gas (>=104 K) siphoned from the lower solar atmosphere. We also find that there are hot spots (<=107 K) located on the sides of the prominence loop, which might be the source of thermal X-ray emission in the quiet Sun.

  5. Dysphonia in preterm children: assessing incidence and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Victoria; Meldrum, Suzanne; Simmer, Karen; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; French, Noel P

    2014-03-01

    Mild dysphonia in childhood is surprisingly common, yet moderate to severe dysphonia is rare. The latter has been associated with complex medical conditions and congenital abnormalities. Intubation injury has also been documented as a cause of childhood dysphonia. Children born very preterm may be intubated as part of the intensive care administered in the perinatal and neonatal periods, yet there are few studies investigating dysphonia in this population. This study will be the first to: use an objective acoustic voice assessment in a paediatric study, document the incidence of dysphonia in very preterm children at school age, and conduct a controlled trial of behavioural voice therapy in this population. This study will consist of three phases: assessment of voice quality and its impact on quality of life in up to 200 children born at less than 32 weeks' gestation: assessment of the nature and extent of laryngeal pathology in children with moderate to severe dysphonia; and a non-blinded, randomised controlled trial of behavioural voice therapy in children with moderate to severe dysphonia. This study will be the first to use clinical assessment to examine the voice quality of very preterm children, and to use fibre optic endoscopic evaluation of laryngeal function to determine the nature and extent of any laryngeal pathology in such children. Those participants with significant voice difficulties will be randomised to receive treatment immediately or after the eight week assessment. This study is registered on the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613001015730/ACTRN12613001012763). Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Two Prominences Unraveling

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-16

    At the edge of the sun, a large prominence and a small prominence began to shift, turn and fall apart in less than one day (May 8-9, 2017). Prominences are notoriously unstable. Competing magnetic forces pulled the plasma back and forth until they dissipated. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. The 18-second video clip is comprised of almost 600 frames being shown at 30 frames per second. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21634

  7. First Light Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Soon after the instruments opened their doors, the Sun began performing for SDO with this beautiful prominence eruption. This AIA data is from March 30, 2010, showing a wavelength band that is cent...

  8. Prominent Rocks - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image from NASA Mars Pathfinder. Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  9. Arching Solar Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA’s STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft watched as an eruptive prominence rose up and arched out in a horseshoe shape far above the Sun’s surface (Aug. 25, 2010). The image and movie show the action in a...

  10. Solar Prominences: Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    Solar prominences are one of the most common features of the solar atmosphere. They are found in the corona but they are one hundred times cooler and denser than the coronal material, indicating that they are thermally and pressure isolated from the surrounding environment. Because of these properties they appear at the limb as bright features when observed in the optical or the EUV cool lines. On the disk they appear darker than their background, indicating the presence of a plasma absorption process (in this case they are called filaments). Prominence plasma is embedded in a magnetic environment that lies above magnetic inversion lines, denoted a filament channel. This paper aims at providing the reader with the main elements that characterize these peculiar structures, the prominences and their environment, as deduced from observations. The aim is also to point out and discuss open questions on prominence existence, stability and disappearance. The review starts with a general introduction of these features and the instruments used for their observation. Section 2 presents the large scale properties, including filament morphology, thermodynamical parameters, magnetic fields, and the properties of the surrounding coronal cavity, all in stable conditions. Section 3 is dedicated to small-scale observational properties, from both the morphological and dynamical points of view. Section 4 introduces observational aspects during prominence formation, while Section 5 reviews the sources of instability leading to prominence disappearance or eruption. Conclusions and perspectives are given in Section 6.

  11. Hefty Prominence Eruption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-13

    A mass of plasma gathered itself into a twisting mass, spun around for a bit, then rose up and broke apart over a 10-hour period Oct. 13, 2015 as observed by NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory. The image and video were produced with a combination of two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light. Prominences are unstable clouds of gas tethered above the surface of the Sun by magnetic forces. Much of the jittering and odd jumping motions above the surface were artifacts caused by brightening and contrast changes used to bring out the detail and structure of the prominence. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20008

  12. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  13. Prominence Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  14. Dysphonia in extremely preterm children: A longitudinal observation.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Victoria; Meldrum, Suzanne; Simmer, Karen; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; French, Noel

    2016-12-01

    Dysphonia is a potential long-term complication of preterm birth. Childhood voice disorders caused by vocal hyperfunction resolve with pubertal changes to the vocal mechanism in many cases. In extremely preterm children, whose voice quality is affected by supraglottic hyperfunction adapted secondary to underlying structural laryngeal pathology sustained during neonatal intubation, the prognosis is unknown. A pilot study was conducted to assess the incidence and severity of dysphonia in children born at < 25 weeks' gestation. Ten individuals, aged between 9.67 and 17.08 years, presented for repeat assessment in a replication and extension of the original study. The mean period between assessments was 2.85 (SD 0.38) years. The primary outcome measure was the severity score on the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V), with the Acoustic Voice Quality Index score as the secondary outcome measure. Scores on the Pediatric Voice Handicap Index were also compared. Perceptual dysphonia severity scores were significantly lower on repeat assessment, but no differences were observed in objective or quality of life scores. Individual variation was observed: the difference in CAPE-V scores ranged from -36 to + 1. No participant presented with normal voice quality on repeat assessment. Analysis of group data masked individual variability in this series. Mechanisms underlying such individual variation are currently unknown. These data suggest that dysphonia is persistent in extremely preterm children. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the progression of voice disorders in extremely preterm children, to inform prognostic predictors and treatment decisions.

  15. Dysphonia Detected by Pattern Recognition of Spectral Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Lea; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzed production of a long vowel sound within Finnish words by normal or dysphonic voices, using the Self-Organizing Map, the artificial neural network algorithm of T. Kohonen which produces two-dimensional representations of speech. The method was found to be both sensitive and specific in the detection of dysphonia. (Author/JDD)

  16. Aerodynamic Profiles of Women with Muscle Tension Dysphonia/Aphonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Amanda I.; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie; Rubinstein, Elaine N.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to (a) determine whether phonatory airflows and estimated subglottal pressures (est-P[subscript sub]) for women with primary muscle tension dysphonia/aphonia (MTD/A) differ from those for healthy speakers; (b) identify different aerodynamic profile patterns within the MTD/A subject group; and (c) determine…

  17. Aerodynamic Profiles of Women with Muscle Tension Dysphonia/Aphonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Amanda I.; Gartner-Schmidt, Jackie; Rubinstein, Elaine N.; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to (a) determine whether phonatory airflows and estimated subglottal pressures (est-P[subscript sub]) for women with primary muscle tension dysphonia/aphonia (MTD/A) differ from those for healthy speakers; (b) identify different aerodynamic profile patterns within the MTD/A subject group; and (c) determine…

  18. [Incidence of dysphonia in teaching staff of schools].

    PubMed

    Bellia, S; Serafino, L; Luca, N; Farruggia, E; Bellia, M

    2007-01-01

    Some categories of workers (actors, teachers, singers) use a particular working tool: their voice. In order to assess the spread of dysphonia and its possible causes across a specific class of workers--the teachers of some schools in the city of Catania--we have set up a ad hoc questionnaire. A special database has been subsequently arranged, aimed at the statistical analysis of the responses obtained. The analysis of the responses shows that the phenomenon is more present in female than male teachers, 48% versus 30%. The dysphonia occurs mainly at the end of the working day, lasts throughout the school year and improves in summer, demonstrating the importance of teaching activity in its pathogenesis. One aspect especially stands out: dysphonia occurs exclusively in those individuals suffering from diseases with possible alterations of the voice, such as allergopathies, tireopathies and gastropathies. Therefore, work activity alone does not seem able to cause a chronic dysphonia, whereas the presence of diseases causing disability of vocal cords appears to play an important role.

  19. Dysphonia Detected by Pattern Recognition of Spectral Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinonen, Lea; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzed production of a long vowel sound within Finnish words by normal or dysphonic voices, using the Self-Organizing Map, the artificial neural network algorithm of T. Kohonen which produces two-dimensional representations of speech. The method was found to be both sensitive and specific in the detection of dysphonia. (Author/JDD)

  20. Exploring Genetic and Environmental Effects in Dysphonia: A Twin Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simberg, Susanna; Santtila, Pekka; Soveri, Anna; Varjonen, Markus; Sala, Eeva; Sandnabba, N. Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the existence of genetic effects as well as the interaction between potential genetic effects and a voice-demanding occupation on dysphonia. Method: One thousand seven hundred and twenty-eight Finnish twins (555 male; 1,173 female) born between 1961 and 1989 completed a questionnaire concerning vocal symptoms and occupation.…

  1. Solar Prominence Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    The prominence that erupts in a prominence eruption is a magnetic structure in the chromosphere and corona. It is visible in chromospheric images by virtue of chromospheric-temperature plasma suspended in the magnetic field, and belongs to that large class of magnetic structures appropriately called filaments because of their characteristic sinewy sigmoidal form. Hence, the term "filament eruption" is used interchangeably with the term "prominence eruption". The magnetic field holding a filament is prone to undergo explosive changes in configuration. In these upheavals, because the filament material is compelled by its high conductivity to ride with the magnetic field that threads it, this material is a visible tracer of the field motion. The part of the magnetic explosion displayed by the entrained filament material is the phenomenon known as a filament eruption, the topic of this article. This article begins with a description of basic observed characteristics of filament eruptions, with attention to the magnetic fields, flares, and coronal mass ejections in which erupting filaments are embedded. The present understanding of these characteristics in terms of the form and action of the magnetic field is then laid out by means of a rudimentary three-dimensional model of the field. The article ends with basic questions that this picture leaves unresolved and with remarks on the observations needed to probe these questions.

  2. Prominence Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judy T.

    2009-01-01

    Nonerupting prominences are not dull, static objects. Rather, they are composed of fine-scale blobs and threads that are highly dynamic, often appearing to travel in opposite directions on adjacent tracks (denoted counterstreaming). Because the plasma is largely constrained to travel along the magnetic field, these cool, dense features can serve as tracers of the prominence magnetic structure, a valuable resource in view of the long-standing difficulty of observing the coronal field. Conversely, greater understanding of the fundamental magnetic geometry of filament channels can provide important constraints on the physical processes governing the accumulation, support, motion, and eruption of the cool plasma. Despite over a century of detailed observations, large gaps remain in our knowledge of filament channel/plasma formation and evolution. Resolving these issues will shed light on the physics of coronal heating, helicity transport throughout the solar cycle, and the origins of eruptive activity on the Sun. I will discuss the leading models for the magnetic and plasma structure, and outline how new observations and theory /modeling could solve long-standing uncertainties regarding this majestic solar phenomenon.

  3. Formation and support of prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    A short introduction is given to the concepts discussed by the group on the formation and support of prominences. Only quiescent and long-lived active region prominences were considered, since transient prominence phenomena, such as sprays, surges, H alpha flare-loops, and coronal rain, are dynamically distinct from long-lived, prominences. Stable prominences (which are often referred to as filaments when seen against the disk) can be subdivided into three categories, namely active region prominences, quiescent prominences and polar crown prominences. The third category is closely related to the second since a quiescent prominence will eventually evolve into a polar crown prominence if it lasts long enough. The distinction between the first and second categories is not sharp either since intermediates exist here as well (Martin, 1973).

  4. [Dysphonia in children due to congenital laryngeal web. Case series].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Hugo; Cuestas, Giselle; Zanetta, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    Dysphonia is common in children. Its main cause is the abuse or misuse of the voice. Congenital, neoplastic, infectious, neurological or iatrogenic causes are less frequent. The laryngeal web is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from an incomplete recanalization of the primitive larynx. This condition should be suspected in any newborn with dysphonic cry with or without stridor and respiratory distress. The diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic examination. Therapy depends on the extent and thickness of the membrane and the severity of the symptoms. We describe our experience with 8 patients suffering this condition, and we emphasize the need to recognize voice disorders and to evaluate the airway for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment in every newborn, infant or child with persistent dysphonia.

  5. Voice therapy in pediatric functional dysphonia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Trani, Margherita; Ghidini, Angelo; Bergamini, Giuseppe; Presutti, Livio

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of voice therapy according to Borragan's method associated to S. Magnani's vocal counselling in functional dysphonia in children. We prospectively treated 16 patients with vocal fold nodules (10 males, 6 females). Age ranged from 6 to 11 years with a mean age of 9 years. We performed a full screening phoniatric evaluation. In addition psychological tests were carried out to investigate psychological background. We lost three patients at follow-up; one patient received surgery, eight patients healed (43.75%), four improved (25%). There was no statistical difference in the analysis of electroacoustical parameters while MPT significatively raised after therapy. If patients have motivation voice therapy could improve functional dysphonia in children. It is also important psychological background. Further studies on bigger populations with long-term follow-up are needed.

  6. Managing dysphonia in paediatric patients with complex airway conditions.

    PubMed

    Ojha, S; Setlur, J; Bunting, G; Hartnick, C J

    2015-08-01

    To suggest a phonosurgical management strategy that can be used for children who have previously undergone laryngotracheal reconstruction. This cases series describes three children who presented with complex, multi-level airway stenosis and marked dysphonia. Phonosurgical intervention involved endoscopic and open approaches, and was combined with voice therapy. A phonosurgical reconstruction management algorithm is suggested for evaluating and treating these complex conditions. Pre-operative assessment is critical, and should involve voice analysis and glottal anatomy assessment using office laryngoscopy and stroboscopy. The risks must be weighed up against the benefit of vocal improvement. Surgical intervention should involve combined endoscopic and open approaches. Voice restoration after paediatric airway reconstruction is a complex challenge. Surgical intervention should be conducted in a step-by-step manner to reduce the risk of worsening dysphonia and airway compromise. The risks and benefits must be carefully explored and discussed.

  7. Dysphonia Severity Index in Typically Developing Indian Children.

    PubMed

    Pebbili, Gopi Kishore; Kidwai, Juhi; Shabnam, Srushti

    2017-01-01

    Dysphonia is a variation in an individual's quality, pitch, or loudness from the voice characteristics typical of a speaker of similar age, gender, cultural background, and geographic location. Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) is a recognized assessment tool based on a weighted combination of maximum phonation time, highest frequency, lowest intensity, and jitter (%) of an individual. Although dysphonia in adults is accurately evaluated using DSI, standard reference values for school-age children have not been studied. This study aims to document the DSI scores in typically developing children (8-12 years). A total of 42 typically developing children (8-12 years) without complaint of voice problem on the day of testing participated in the study. DSI was computed by substituting the raw scores of substituent parameters: maximum phonation time, highest frequency, lowest intensity, and jitter% using various modules of CSL 4500 software. The average DSI values obtained in children were 2.9 (1.23) and 3.8 (1.29) for males and females, respectively. DSI values are found to be significantly higher (P = 0.027) for females than those for males in Indian children. This could be attributed to the anatomical and behavioral differences among females and males. Further, pubertal changes set in earlier for females approximating an adult-like physiology, thereby leading to higher DSI values in them. The mean DSI value obtained for male and female Indian children can be used as a preliminary reference data against which the DSI values of school-age children with dysphonia can be compared. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dysphagia and dysphonia in a patient with cancer.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami; Mate, Andras; Lahav, Gil; Adi, Meital

    2009-09-01

    A patient with cancer undergoing chemotherapy via Portacath presented with severe progressive dysphagia and dysphonia. Unilateral paresis of the 9, 10, 11, and 12th cranial nerves was found (Collet-Sicard's syndrome or Villaret's syndrome), associated with ipsilateral jugular vein thrombosis identified by imaging. The use of central venous catheters is increasing, and even rare, hitherto unreported, complications need to be recognized. After catheter removal, the patient slowly improved with low-molecular weight heparin treatment and time.

  9. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. The prevalence of childhood dysphonia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Carding, Paul N; Roulstone, Sue; Northstone, Kate

    2006-12-01

    There is only very limited information on the prevalence of voice disorders, particularly for the pediatric population. This study examined the prevalence of dysphonia in a large cohort of children (n = 7389) at 8 years of age. Data were collected within a large prospective epidemiological study and included a formal assessment by one of five research speech and language therapists as well as a parental report of their child's voice. Common risk factors that were also analyzed included sex, sibling numbers, asthma, regular conductive hearing loss, and frequent upper respiratory infection. The research clinicians identified a dysphonia prevalence of 6% compared with a parental report of 11%. Both measures suggested a significant risk of dysphonia for children with older siblings. Other measures were not in agreement between clinician and parental reports. The clinician judgments also suggested significant risk factors for sex (male) but not for any common respiratory or otolaryngological conditions that were analyzed. Parental report suggested significant risk factors with respect to asthma and tonsillectomy. These results are discussed in detail.

  11. Dysphonia – the single symptom of rifampicin resistant laryngeal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mickevičienė, Vaiva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tuberculosis is still the most frequent granulomatous laryngeal disease. Absence of pathognomonic symptoms and change in clinical pattern frequently leads to misdiagnosis and delayed treatment. Hoarseness is the commonest symptom of laryngeal tuberculosis and constitutional symptoms are usually rare. However dysphonia can be caused by many other more common conditions. Hoarseness can be a symptom of organic (nodules and polyps of vocal folds, tumors, vocal fold paresis) or functional (functional dysphonia, laryngeal conversion disorder, paradoxical vocal folds motion) conditions. Rarely systemic diseases as amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, Wegener’s granulomatosis or tuberculosis can cause vocal dysfunction too. That is why laryngeal tuberculosis is often forgotten in case of persistent hoarseness. In this article, we present a case of a young previously healthy woman, complaining of persistent hoarseness with no other leading symptoms. Though endoscopic image suggested a malignancy, histology showed granulomatous lesion. Detailed examination revealed laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis resistant to rifampicin. Conclusion: Dysphonia can be the only one symptom of laryngeal tuberculosis. The disease should be taken into consideration when a patient complains of persistent hoarseness in order to avoid delays in treatment and spread of infection. PMID:28352769

  12. Self-reported impact of dysphonia in a primary care population: an epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth M

    2010-10-01

    This study's objectives are to 1) to assess the prevalence of dysphonia in the primary care community, 2) evaluate the severity of dysphonia, 3) explore potential risk factors for dysphonia, 4) examine the treatment of dysphonic patients, and 5) assess treatment-related barriers. The hypotheses are that 1) dysphonia is common in the primary care community, 2) it adversely impacts patients' quality of life (QOL), and 3) patients are underevaluated and experience obstacles with respect to seeking treatment. Cross-sectional, practice-based study in the primary care population. English-speaking patients 18 years of age and older were recruited from a primary care research network. Patients presenting to their primary care practices were given a packet of questionnaires to complete that documented demographic information, risk factors, presence of dysphonia, prior treatment, and reasons for not seeking treatment. The Voice-Related Quality of Life (VRQOL) and Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) served as quality-of-life outcome measures. A priori sample size calculations were performed indicating a sample size of 780. Univariate analyses, descriptive statistics, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, and multivariate analyses were performed. A total of 789 patients with a mean age of 49.9 years and range of 18 to 94 years participated. Lifetime prevalence of dysphonia was 29.1%, point prevalence of dysphonia 7.5%, and 4.3% had had dysphonia for >4 weeks. Of those with current dysphonia, only 46% had not missed work. Of those with current dysphonia, 73.3% had had dysphonia more than once. Patients with dysphonia had lower VRQOL scores and higher CES-D scores (t test, P ≤.001). Risk factors for dysphonia and impaired VRQOL on multivariate analysis included neurologic disease, dry mouth, family history of dysphonia, college or postgraduate level education, allergies or sinus problems, neck pain, medication for depression/anxiety, more than three

  13. Solar Prominence - Sept 24, 2013

    NASA Image and Video Library

    These movies show the highly dynamic motions in solar prominences. The movie on the right side shows the prominence motions of material at 65,000K. The vertical stripe in the center of the image is...

  14. Dysphonia in nursing home and assisted living residents: prevalence and association with frailty

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Brent; Varadarajan, Varun; Bock, Jonathan M.; Blumin, Joel H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies of geriatric dysphonia prevalence have been limited to ambulatory outpatient and senior communities. Our goal was to identify prevalence of dysphonia in nursing home residents and assisted living residents and search for correlations between indices of dysphonia and indices of frailty. Study Design Prospective epidemiological survey. Methods Residents of a vertically integrated senior care organization who were 65 or older and able to understand and complete the questionnaire were recruited to complete the Voice Handicap Index 10 (VHI-10) to assess for dysphonia (VHI-10 > 10 = dysphonia) and Vulnerable Elders Survey 13 (VES-13), a validated instrument to assess for frailty (VES >3 = frailty). Results A total of 119 residents were surveyed. Thirty-three percent of nursing home residents, and 25% of assisted living residents reported dysphonia with 29% of all respondents reporting dysphonia. The mean VHI-10 was 7.4, the median was 5, and the interquartile range was 2 – 12.5. There was a significant relationship between VHI-10 and VES-13 score (p = 0.029). There were no statistically significant relationships between frailty, age, or type of living and dysphonia or VHI-10. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of voice dysfunction in assisted living and nursing home residents. The correlation between VHI-10 and VES-13 suggests that voice declines as frailty increases. PMID:25499517

  15. The Effect of Listener Experience and Anchors on Judgments of Dysphonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadie, Tanya L.; Kapsner-Smith, Mara

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of auditory anchors on judgments of overall severity (OS) and vocal effort (VE) in dysphonic speech when judgments are made by experienced and inexperienced listeners, and when self-rated by individuals with dysphonia (speaker-listeners). Method: Twenty individuals with dysphonia and 4 normal controls provided…

  16. Toward the Development of an Objective Index of Dysphonia Severity: A Four-Factor Acoustic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    During assessment and management of individuals with voice disorders, clinicians routinely attempt to describe or quantify the severity of a patient's dysphonia. This investigation used acoustic measures derived from sustained vowel samples to predict dysphonia severity (as determined by auditory-perceptual ratings), for a diverse set of voice…

  17. Magnetically Controlled Spasmodic Accretion during Star Formation. II. Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The problem of the late accretion phase of the evolution of an axisymmetric, isothermal magnetic disk surrounding a forming star has been formulated in a companion paper. The ``central sink approximation'' is used to circumvent the problem of describing the evolution inside the opaque central region for densities greater than 1011 cm-3 and radii smaller than a few AU. Only the electrons are assumed to be attached to the magnetic field lines, and the effects of both negatively and positively charged grains are accounted for. After a mass of 0.1 Msolar accumulates in the central cell (forming star), a series of magnetically driven outflows and associated outward-propagating shocks form in a quasi-periodic fashion. As a result, mass accretion onto the protostar occurs in magnetically controlled bursts. We refer to this process as spasmodic accretion. The shocks propagate outward with supermagnetosonic speeds. The period of dissipation and revival of the outflow decreases in time, as the mass accumulated in the central sink increases. We evaluate the contribution of ambipolar diffusion to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation during the accretion phase, and we find it to be very significant albeit not sufficient to resolve the entire problem yet. Ohmic dissipation is completely negligible in the disk during this phase of the evolution. The protostellar disk is found to be stable against interchange-like instabilities, despite the fact that the mass-to-flux ratio has temporary local maxima.

  18. Unilateral vocal fold agenesis: an unusual cause of dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, A; Celenk, F; Yilmaz, M

    2008-01-01

    Unilateral vocal fold agenesis: an unusual cause of dysphonia. Unilateral vocal fold agenesis is a rare congenital laryngeal anomaly. To our knowledge, there have been no published reports about this clinical entity to date. A 6-year-old female patient was referred to our practice for persistent hoarseness of voice since birth. On physical examination, her voice was hoarse and reduced in volume. She had facial features typical of Down syndrome and macroglossia. Laryngeal examination revealed the absence of the right vocal fold. She had no further evaluation or treatment.

  19. Description and Classification of Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engvold, Oddbjørn

    Solar prominences are bright cloud-like structures when observed beyond the solar limb and they appear as dark filamentary objects which are termed filaments when seen against the solar disk. The aims of prominence classifications were from the start to establish references and frameworks for understanding the physical conditions for their formation and development through interplay with the solar magnetic environment. The multi-thermal nature of solar prominences became fully apparent once observations from space in UV, VUV, EUV and X-rays could be made. The cool prominence plasma is thermally shielded from the much hotter corona and supported in the field of gravity by small- and large-scale magnetic fields of the filament channels. High cadence, subarcsecond observing facilities on ground and in space have firmly proven the highly dynamic nature of solar prominences down to the smallest observed structural sizes of 100 km. The origin of the ubiquitous oscillations and flowing of the plasma over a variety of spatial and temporal scales, whether the cool dense plasma originates from below via levitation, injections by reconnection or results from condensation processes, are central issues in prominence research today. The unveiling of instabilities leading to prominences eruptions and Coronal Mass Ejections is another important challenge. The objective of this chapter is to review the main characteristics of various types of prominences and their associated magnetic environments, which will all be addressed in details in the following chapters of this book.

  20. Recent progress in prominence seismology.

    PubMed

    Ballester, José Luis

    2006-02-15

    Prominence seismology is a rapidly developing topic which seeks to infer the internal structure and properties of solar prominences from the study of their oscillations. An extense observational background about oscillations in quiescent solar prominences has been gathered during the last 70 years. These observations point out the existence of two different types of oscillations: flare-induced oscillations (winking filaments) which affect the whole prominence and are of large amplitude and small amplitude oscillations which seem to be of local nature. From the theoretical point of view, few models have been set up to explain the phenomenon of winking filaments while, on the contrary, for small amplitude oscillations a large number of models trying to explain the observed features have been proposed. Here, recent theoretical and observational developments on both types of oscillations are reviewed, and suggestions about future research topics which should provide us with a more in-depth knowledge of solar prominences are made.

  1. [Persistent dysphonia showing a laryngeal foreign body in a child].

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, K; Bakhos, D; Bakhos-Merieau, E; Pondaven, S; Lescanne, E

    2011-07-01

    Inhalation of a laryngotracheobronchial foreign body is a common pediatric emergency situation. It is a source of morbidity and even mortality, especially among children under 3 years of age. A 14-month-old child presented suddenly combining bitonal dysphonia and dyspnea. Given the persistence of symptoms after 1.5 months and the normality of examinations requested by his doctor (pH, cervical ultrasonography, cervical and thoracic radiography), an ENT opinion was sought. An aerodigestive tract endoscopy was carried out in the emergency setting, finding a glottic foreign body associated with subglottic granulomas. The foreign body extraction led to the immediate disappearance of dyspnea. Dysphonia gradually improved under Budesonide aerosols. The lack of penetration syndrome in the interrogation and non specific symptoms may lead to an important diagnosis and treatment delay with dramatic consequences in case of airway foreign body. Endoscopy under general anesthesia must be practiced if there is any doubt for a thorough examination of the airways. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Dyspnea, Dysphonia, and Cough: Varied Presentations of Tracheobronchopathia Osteochondroplastica.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Skyler W; Stevens, Jayne R; Dion, Gregory R; Howard, N Scott

    2015-10-01

    Tracheobronchopathia osteochondroplastica (TPO) is an uncommon, benign disease consisting of submucosal, osteocartilaginous nodules that project into the tracheal lumen. Far less commonly, these nodules can occur outside the tracheal cartilage. This case series discusses the wide range of symptoms and treatments of the disease. Three patients presented to the laryngology clinic with 3 varied presentations of TPO, including dyspnea, dysphonia, and cough. These patients were evaluated, subsequently diagnosed with TPO, and treated accordingly. Two of the 3 patients presented with extratracheal lesions presenting in the cricoid and thyroid cartilages. The patient presenting with symptoms of dysphonia was found to have bilateral TPO exclusively within the thyroid cartilage, which has never been reported previously. After undergoing a partial thyroid cartilage resection removing the bulk of the lesion, the patient's symptoms drastically improved. While TPO may be a rare diagnosis in the general otolaryngologist practice, symptoms frequently bring patients into the otolaryngologist's clinic, and an awareness of the disease can help minimize unnecessary interventions and allow the surgeon to appropriately counsel patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy for functional dysphonia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Daniilidou, Paressa; Carding, Paul; Wilson, Janet; Drinnan, Michael; Deary, Vincent

    2007-10-01

    We sought to investigate whether a brief period of training in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can improve the treatment of functional dysphonia by a speech and language therapist and ameliorate the psychological distress associated with this condition. In a consecutive cohort design, a speech and language therapist treated a small cohort (n = 15) of dysphonic patients with voice therapy alone. After a brief period of CBT training, she treated the next cohort of dysphonic patients (n = 13) with CBT-enhanced voice therapy. Pretreatment and posttreatment measures were taken of voice quality and voice-related quality of life. The General Health Questionnaire 28 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess psychological distress and general well-being. All voice measures improved significantly in both cohorts. Both groups improved significantly on the General Health Questionnaire 28, with the CBT group improving significantly more than the control group. Only the CBT group improved significantly on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (depression subscale). Despite limitations of size, design, and between-group baseline differences, the results support the hypothesis that the addition of CBT skills to existing voice therapy is both feasible and clinically effective in the treatment of functional dysphonia.

  4. Large Amplitude Oscillations in Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, D.; Isobe, H.; Jain, R.

    2009-12-01

    Since the first reports of oscillations in prominences in the 1930s, there have been major theoretical and observational developments to understand the nature of these oscillatory phenomena, leading to the whole new field of the so-called “prominence seismology”. There are two types of oscillatory phenomena observed in prominences; “small-amplitude oscillations” (2-3 km s-1), which are quite common, and “large-amplitude oscillations” (>20 km s-1) for which observations are scarce. Large-amplitude oscillations have been found as “winking filament” in H α as well as motion in the plane-of-sky in H α, EUV, micro-wave and He 10830 observations. Historically, it has been suggested that the large-amplitude oscillations in prominences were triggered by disturbances such as fast-mode MHD waves (Moreton wave) produced by remote flares. Recent observations show, in addition, that near-by flares or jets can also create such large-amplitude oscillations in prominences. Large-amplitude oscillations, which are observed both in transverse as well as longitudinal direction, have a range of periods varying from tens of minutes to a few hours. Using the observed period of oscillation and simple theoretical models, the obtained magnetic field in prominences has shown quite a good agreement with directly measured one and, therefore, justifies prominence seismology as a powerful diagnostic tool. On rare occasions, when the large-amplitude oscillations have been observed before or during the eruption, the oscillations may be applied to diagnose the stability and the eruption mechanism. Here we review the recent developments and understanding in the observational properties of large-amplitude oscillations and their trigger mechanisms and stability in the context of prominence seismology.

  5. The dynamics of funnel prominences

    SciTech Connect

    Keppens, R.; Xia, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present numerical simulations in 2.5D settings where large-scale prominences form in situ out of coronal condensation in magnetic dips, in close agreement with early as well as recent reporting of funnel prominences. Our simulation uses full thermodynamic magnetohydrodynamics with anisotropic thermal conduction, optically thin radiative losses, and parameterized heating as main ingredients to establish a realistic arcade configuration from chromosphere to corona. The chromospheric evaporation, especially from transition region heights, ultimately causes thermal instability, and we witness the growth of a prominence suspended well above the transition region, continuously gaining mass and cross-sectional area. Several hours later, the condensation has grown into a structure connecting the prominence-corona transition region with the underlying transition region, and a continuous downward motion from the accumulated mass represents a drainage that matches observational findings. A more dynamic phase is found as well, with coronal rain, induced wave trains, and even a reconnection event when the core prominence plasma weighs down the field lines until a flux rope is formed. The upper part of the prominence is then trapped in a flux-rope structure, and we argue for its violent kink-unstable eruption as soon as the (ignored) length dimension would allow for ideal kink deformations.

  6. [The impact of vibratory stimulation therapy on voice quality in hyperfunctional occupational dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Kosztyła-Hojna, Bożena; Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Rogowski, Marek; Moskal, Diana; Dakowicz, Agnieszka; Falkowski, Dawid; Kasperuk, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Hyperfunctional dysphonia is the most frequent type of occupational functional dysphonia. Pharmacotherapy, physiotherapy and psychotherapy are used in the treatment of occupational dysphonia. Vibratory massages of the regions of the larynx relax the external muscles of neck, which have an indirect impact on the tension of the vocal folds. The aim of the study is to assess the impact of vibratory stimulation therapy on voice quality in patients with hyperfunctional occupational dysphonia treated pharmacologically. Forty patients with hyperfunctional occupational dysphonia treated phoniatrically in the Phoniatric Outpatient Clinic were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I consisted of 20 patients treated pharmacologically. In group II, including 20 patients, apart from pharmacotherapy the vibratory stimulation therapy by the device of VR type (CyberBioMed LLC) was used. In the analysis of voice quality the evaluation of the vocal folds vibration using videolaryngostroboscopy and acoustic assessment of voice were conducted. The perceptual assessment of voice, the visualization of the vocal folds vibration in stroboscopic examination of the larynx and the acoustic assessment of voice enable the appropriate diagnostics of the clinical type and voice quality in hyperfunctional dysphonia. The tension of superficial and deep muscles of neck has the impact on the phonatory function of the larynx. Pharmacological treatment improves the voice quality in hyperfunctional occupational dysphonia. Pharmacological treatment combines with the relaxation of muscles of neck using the device of VR type significantly improve voice quality in hyperfunctional occupational dysphonia. Copyright © 2012 Polish Otolaryngology Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  7. Medicolegal Aspects of Iatrogenic Dysphonia and Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Ta, Jennifer H; Liu, Yuan F; Krishna, Priya

    2016-01-01

    To examine aspects of litigation involving iatrogenic dysphonia and injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve in the adult population. Legal database review. Medicolegal judicial system. Jury verdicts and settlement reports listing voice impairment or recurrent laryngeal nerve dysfunction as a primary injury in adult patients were identified in the Westlaw Database. Reports were examined for plaintiff demographics, defendant specialty, procedure performed, rates of settlements and verdicts, monetary awards, primary plaintiff symptoms, and common allegations. A total of 123 jury verdict and settlement reports were identified. General surgeons (24%), otolaryngologists (20%), and anesthesiologists (18%) were involved in the majority of cases. The procedure causing the alleged injury was primarily thyroidectomy (34%), followed by intubation (18%) and spinal instrumentation (10%). The majority of cases (70%) were decided in favor of the defendant. Where monetary awards were recorded, settlements and jury verdicts in favor of the plaintiff ranged between $4250 and $3,000,000, with a mean of $788,713. In addition to voice disturbances, complaints of dyspnea and dysphagia were commonly listed alleged injuries. The only factors associated with plaintiff verdicts were general surgery specialty (odds ratio, 6.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-23.2) and claims of loss of consortium (odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-60.7). Dysphonia is a common complication in a number of procedures across multiple specialties. Although the majority of cases are decided in favor or the defendant, payments awarded can be considerable. Awareness of factors involved in these medical malpractice cases can help limit physician liability. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  8. Intensified voice therapy: a new model for the rehabilitation of patients suffering from functional dysphonias.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Ptok, Martin

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a new intervention for chronic dysphonias, consisting of a 2-week outpatient treatment period using intensified voice therapy combined with elements of physical medicine, including physiotherapy (orthotherapy, detonisation and training of the trunk muscles, respiratory therapy and others), manual therapy (mobilization of the cervical spine), inhalations, vibration massages, thermotherapy, classical massages and active relaxation (e.g. autogenic training, progressive muscle relaxation). In addition, the autonomous regulation was influenced by hydrotherapy according to Kneipp. A handicap questionnaire was given to 37 patients with diverse aetiologies of dysphonia before and after intervention. The change score was compared between baseline handicap levels (none, mild, moderate, severe), and between patients with organic and functional dysphonias. The questionnaire was also given to 40 healthy volunteers for comparison with patients' baseline values. Overall handicap was significantly reduced in patients with moderate baseline handicap values, whereas no significant changes could be detected in patients with severe handicap; patients with mild handicap values did receive some benefit. A significant difference in the intervention outcome was found between patients with organic and functional dysphonias. In conclusion, the results suggest that ambulatory rehabilitative measures are most effective in patients with moderate functional dysphonias, and that severe dysphonias with organic backgrounds may require longer rehabilitation phases.

  9. [Clinical-psychological components in the consideration of functional dysphonia--a review].

    PubMed

    Kiese-Himmel, C

    2015-03-01

    The etiopathogenesis of functional dysphonia is complex; it is not sufficient to look solely at vocal behavior aspects. The predisposing basis for functional dysphonia can lie in the constitution of an individual, his/her professional speaking and speech behavior and/or may be personality-based. (Prolonged) psychosocial stress, vocal overstressing, unfavorable speaking habits, infection of the upper respiratory tract, inflammatory processes in the larynx, emotional life events and COSO events are considered as possible triggers. The interaction of predisposed and causal factors is unknown. Stress, overall fatigue, anxiety, depression and/or certain personality traits (which complicate or hamper coping) are considered as perpetuating factors. In any case, overlaps between voice symptoms and reactive psychic as well as social problems have to be kept in mind (e. g. the burden of suffering, depressive processing, speaking anxiety, socially withdrawal). Because the association of multiple psychosocial factors with functional dysphonia is not distinct--such are always existent in organ medically unexplained symptoms--functional dysphonia has to be diagnostically differentiated. For the purpose of the article, a psycho-diagnostic path following the ICD-10 chapter V along general lines is presented. Until now, it is unknown which psychosocial factors discriminate a psychogenic dysphonia from muscle tension dysphonia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. The perception of prominence patterns.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Klaus J

    2008-01-01

    The term 'stress' is used to refer to the perceptual salience at certain places in strings of syllables, but it has several different referents: (a) relative syllable salience in an utterance; this is syllable-, not word-oriented; (b) stress in a word; this is part of the lexical phonology; (c) stressing of words in utterances for various aspects of propositional and expressive meaning, often called 'accent(uation)'. Referents b and c are word- and meaning-oriented. In this article, the terms are more stringently defined. 'Stress' is only used to refer to a lexical stress position (referent b), i.e. a syllable in a word that becomes the docking place for various types of 'accent' to weight words in utterances (referent c). 'Stress' has no physical attributes by itself. 'Prominence' refers to the patterns of salience in syllable strings (referent a). The article reports results of an experiment in prominence perception of the logatome baba, in which the physical parameters F0, syllabic duration, and overall acoustic energy were systematically varied across the bisyllable. Sixteen German subjects had to indicate, by pressing buttons of a computerized reaction time device, whether the first or the second syllable was more prominent. F(0) was a more powerful cue than the other two. Equal syllable duration on a monotone resulted in more first-syllable judgements, which could be counteracted by a slightly falling F(0) contour on the second syllable to reach equal response frequencies for the two syllables. This ties in with Lehiste's earlier findings that F(0) movement increases the perception of duration. Extrapolating from the results, a research programme for prominence perception is developed that will eventually shed new light on the investigation into the nature and manifestation of speech rhythm. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Featured Image: Solar Prominence Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    In these images from the Solar Dynamics Observatorys AIA instrument (click for the full resolution!), two solar prominence eruptions (one from June 2011 and one from August 2012) are shown in pre- and post-eruption states. The images at the top are taken in the Fe XII 193 bandpass and the images at the bottom are taken in the He II 304 bandpass. When a team of scientists searched through seven years of solar images taken by the STEREO (Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory) spacecraft, these two eruptions were found to extend all the way out to a distance of 1 AU. They were the only two examples of clear, bright, and compact prominence eruptions found to do so. The scientists, led by Brian Wood (Naval Research Laboratory), used these observations to reconstruct the motion of the eruption and model how prominences expand as they travel away from the Sun. Theimage to the rightshowsa STEREO observation compared to the teams 3D model of theprominences shape and expansion. To learn more about theresults from this study, check out the paper below.CitationBrian E. Wood et al 2016 ApJ 816 67. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/816/2/67

  12. [Neuronal mechanisms of motor signal transmission in thalamic Voi nucleus in spasmodic torticollis patients].

    PubMed

    Sedov, A S; Raeva, S N; Pavlenko, V B

    2014-01-01

    Neural mechanisms of motor signal transmission in ventrooral (Voi) nucleus of motor thalamus during the realization-of voluntary and involuntary abnormal (dystonic) movements in patients with spasmodic torticollis were investigated by means of microelectrode technique. The high reactivity of the cellular Voi elements to various functional (mainly motor) tests was proved. Analysis of neuronal activity showed: (1) the difference of neural mechanisms of motor signal transmission in the realization of voluntary movement with and without the involvement of the pathological axial neck muscles, as well as passive and abnormal involuntary dystonic movements; (2) significance of sensory component in the mechanisms of sensorimotor interactions during realization of voluntary and involuntary dystonic head and neck movements, causing the activation of the axial neck muscles; (3) important role of the rhythmic and synchronized neuronal activity in motor signal transmission during the realization of active and passive movements. Participation of Voi nucleus in pathological mechanisms of spasmodic torticollis was shown. The data obtained can be used for identificatiori of Voi thalamic nucleus during stereotactic neurosurgical operations in patients with spasmodic torticollis for selection the optimum destruction (stimulation) target and reduction of postoperative effects.

  13. Psychogenic dysphonia: diversity of clinical and vocal manifestations in a case series.

    PubMed

    Martins, Regina Helena Garcia; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Ranalli, Paula Ferreira; Branco, Anete; Pessin, Adriana Bueno Benito

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic dysphonia is a functional disorder with variable clinical manifestations. To assess the clinical and vocal characteristics of patients with psychogenic dysphonia in a case series. The study included 28 adult patients with psychogenic dysphonia, evaluated at a University hospital in the last ten years. Assessed variables included gender, age, occupation, vocal symptoms, vocal characteristics, and videolaryngostroboscopic findings. 28 patients (26 women and 2 men) were assessed. Their occupations included: housekeeper (n=17), teacher (n=4), salesclerk (n=4), nurse (n=1), retired (n=1), and psychologist (n=1). Sudden symptom onset was reported by 16 patients and progressive symptom onset was reported by 12; intermittent evolution was reported by 15; symptom duration longer than three months was reported by 21 patients. Videolaryngostroboscopy showed only functional disorders; no patient had structural lesions or changes in vocal fold mobility. Conversion aphonia, skeletal muscle tension, and intermittent voicing were the most frequent vocal emission manifestation forms. In this case series of patients with psychogenic dysphonia, the most frequent form of clinical presentation was conversion aphonia, followed by musculoskeletal tension and intermittent voicing. The clinical and vocal aspects of 28 patients with psychogenic dysphonia, as well as the particularities of each case, are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Patient perspectives on dysphonia after thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Maggie A; Bloom, Gary; Myssiorek, David

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency and consequences of patient-reported post-thyroidectomy voice disorder (PTVD) after surgery for thyroid cancer. Retrospective review of data gathered from a survey. Members of the Thyroid Cancer Survivors' Association (ThyCa). ThyCa members were asked about their thyroid disease and surgery, voice disturbance, impact on quality of life, treatment, and non-identifying demographics in a 36-item electronic questionnaire. Patients with preoperative voice disturbance or vocal fold immobility and those reporting postoperative vocal fold paralysis were excluded. A total of 4426 members responded (37% response rate), and PTVD was reported by 51.1% of responders. Most were temporary (85.9%), with a minority reporting permanent hoarseness. Rates of postoperative dysphonia were similar between the extent of surgery and histology. Patients with PTVD predominantly characterized their impairment as loss of loudness and an inability to shout or sing. Nearly a quarter of patients reporting PTVD identified detrimental impact to their professional or personal lives. Only 57 patients (3.4%) were offered voice therapy; however, more than two-thirds of them (73.7%) experienced at least partial improvement. We report the results of a large-scale patient survey to underscore the commonness of postoperative hoarseness and its impact on patients. 4. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Determining Prominent Subdomains in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Powell J.; Humphrey, Susanne M.; Rindflesch, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss an automated method for identifying prominent subdomains in medicine. The motivation is to enhance the results of natural language processing by focusing on sublanguages associated with medical specialties concerned with prevalent disorders. At the core of our approach is a statistical system for topical categorization of medical text. A method based on epidemiological evidence is compared to another that considers frequency of occurrence of Medline citations. We suggest the isolation of UMLS terminology peculiar to individual medical specialties as a way of enhancing natural language processing systems in the biomedical domain. PMID:16778999

  16. Dysphonia associated with lingual thyroid gland and hypothyroidism: improvement after lingual thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Orbelo, Diana; Ekbom, Dale C; Thompson, Dana M

    2011-12-01

    We present a unique and medically complex case of improved voice after lingual thyroidectomy. A 10-year-old boy with multifactorial dysphonia presented with bilateral vocal fold lesions and sulci in the context of hypothyroidism as a result of a congenital lingual thyroid gland. Despite hormone replacement, medical treatment for asthma, allergy, cough, and possible reflux, as well as voice therapy, the dysphonia persisted. Significant improvement in both subjective and objective voice measures was achieved after surgical removal of the lingual thyroid gland, which allowed for maintenance of a consistent euthyroid state. Lingual thyroidectomy is typically reserved for cases of bleeding and dysphagia. This case supports dysphonia as a possible additional indication for lingual thyroidectomy.

  17. Prevalence and causes of dysphonia in a large treatment-seeking population.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth M; Kim, Jaewhan; Roy, Nelson; Asche, Carl; Courey, Mark

    2012-02-01

    To determine the prevalence and common causes of dysphonia as diagnosed by primary care physicians (PCPs) and otolaryngologists and to evaluate differences in etiologies offered by these providers. Retrospective analysis of data from a large, nationally representative administrative U.S. claims database. Patients were identified as dysphonic based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2008. Data regarding age, sex, geographic location, and type of physician providing the dysphonia diagnosis were collected. Overall and age-related prevalence rates, as well as frequency of specific etiologies by provider type, were calculated. Of the almost 55 million individuals in the database, 536,943 patients (ages 0 to >65 years) were given a dysphonia diagnosis (point prevalence rate of 0.98%). The prevalence rate was higher among females as compared to males (1.2% vs. 0.7%) and among those >70 years of age (2.5%). The most frequent diagnoses overall were acute laryngitis, nonspecific dysphonia, benign vocal fold lesions, and chronic laryngitis. PCPs more commonly diagnosed acute laryngitis, whereas otolaryngologists more commonly diagnosed nonspecific dysphonia and laryngeal pathology. Gastroesophageal reflux was more commonly diagnosed as a comorbid condition by otolaryngologists than by PCPs. Overall laryngeal cancer prevalence in this treatment-seeking population was 2.2% and was greatest among males >70 years of age. This analysis of insurance claims data from a nationally representative database represents the largest study of its kind. Important differences in dysphonia prevalence related to age, sex, diagnosis, and physician type were identified. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. [Functional dysphonia and vocal cord nodules in teachers in Navarra, Spain].

    PubMed

    Palomino Moreno, María Prado; Hoyo Rodríguez, Asier; García López, Vega; Losantos Martínez, Juan Tomás

    2013-01-01

    To describe teachers treated for dysphonia and vocal cord nodules by the public health system in Navarra (Spain), to describe associated factors and to identify the proportion of these cases registered as occupational diseases. Cases of dysphonia occurring in persons between the age of 18 and 65 years, registered between May 2010 and June 2011, and treated in a specific unit (Speech Unit) of Otorhinolaryngology Services were identified. Information on occupation, sex and clinical diagnosis was collected. For teachers, additional information was obtained on smoking habits, teaching level and prior training in speech disorders and their prevention. Cases declared as occupational diseases were identified from the official Register of Occupational Diseases of Navarra. 135 teachers (18% of all dysphonia patients in the sample) were treated for dysphonia in the Speech Unit (87% women). Being female was 3-fold higher among teachers than other occupations (crude prevalence odds ratio = 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 95%CI, 2.1-5.9). Female teachers were also 6.5 years (95%CI, 1.7-11.4) younger than male teachers. No association was found between smoking and risk of vocal cord nodules or dysphonia. Only 20% of teachers treated had received training on speech disorders and their prevention. Nine out of 83 cases of vocal cord nodules diagnosed in professional voice users were officially declared as occupational diseases; in all cases, these were teachers. Dysphonia in teachers is a frequent reason for visiting a specialty clinic. Among these professionals, women showed a higher risk of suffering from vocal cord nodules. Most cases of vocal cord nodules in our sample were not reported as occupational diseases. Copyright belongs to the Societat Catalana de Seguretat i Medicina del Treball.

  19. Multiple cervical levels: increased risk of dysphagia and dysphonia during anterior cervical discectomy.

    PubMed

    Danto, Joseph; DiCapua, John; Nardi, Dominic; Pekmezaris, Renee; Moise, Gregory; Lesser, Martin; Dimarzio, Paola

    2012-10-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy (ACD) is widely used for symptomatic cervical spine pathologies. The most common complications associated with this type of surgery are dysphagia and dysphonia; however, the risk factors associated with them have not been adequately elucidated. The purpose of this study is to assess the incidence of self-reported dysphagia and dysphonia and the associated risk factors after ACD. This study used a retrospective chart review of 149 patients who underwent ACD at a tertiary care facility operating in the New York metropolitan area over a period of 2½ years. Charts for ACD patients were reviewed by 6 trained researchers. Incidence rates for self-reported dysphagia and dysphonia were calculated using 95% exact confidence intervals (CI). Risk factors such as age, sex, surgical hours, number of disc levels, airway class, American Society of Anesthesiologists class, fiberoptic intubation, and intubation difficulty were assessed using logistic regression. The incidence of self-reported dysphagia was 12.1% (95% exact CI, 7.3%-18.4%); for dysphonia the self-reported incidence was 5.4% (95% exact CI, 2.3%-10.3%). Patients who underwent surgery at ≥4 cervical levels had a significant 4-fold increased risk (odds ratio=4; 95% CI, 1.1-13.8) of developing dysphonia and/or dysphagia compared with patients who underwent surgery at a single surgical level. This study confirms previous findings that the risk of developing dysphagia and/or dysphonia increases with the number of surgical levels, with multiple cervical levels representing a significantly higher postoperative risk, as compared with surgery at 1 level.

  20. Dysphonia--a rare early symptom of Ehlers--Danlos syndrome?

    PubMed

    Rimmer, J; Giddings, C E B; Cavalli, L; Hartley, B E J

    2008-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a connective tissue disorder characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and cutaneous fragility. It usually presents in young adults and is rarely diagnosed in children. Voice involvement in young children, to our knowledge, has not been reported in the literature. We present two cases with dysphonia from birth and an eventual diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The syndrome and its relevance to voice pathology are discussed. We suggest that Ehlers-Danlos syndrome should be considered as an underlying diagnosis in atypical presentations of dysphonia in young children.

  1. Voice disorders (dysphonia) in public school female teachers working in Belo Horizonte: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Adriane Mesquita; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Assunção, Ada Avila

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to establish the prevalence of dysphonia and associated factors in public school female teachers working in Belo Horizonte. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of schools between May 2004 and July 2005. There were 2103 elementary education daytime teachers from 83 schools included in the study. Self-applied questionnaires were used for data collection. These included questions on social and demographic matters, general health and mental health (General Health Questionnaire-12 [GHQ-12]), the environment and organization of work, and voice-related aspects. The variable dysphonia was classified as absent, possible, or probable based on the association between frequency of fatigue when speaking and worsened voice quality during the past 15 days. Multinomial logistic regression was used to analyze factors independently associated with dysphonia in each response subgroup and in total. One third of the female teachers did not report voice symptoms during the past 15 days (33%). The prevalence of probable dysphonia was 15%, and the prevalence for possible dysphonia was 52%. Factors associated with probable dysphonia were presence of recent upper airway problems (odds ratio [OR]=5.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]=4.06-8.71), problems at work because of voice (OR=65.30, 95% CI=19.33-220.59), other activities with intense voice use (OR=1.71, 95% CI=1.08-2.71), high noise levels (OR=2.55, 95% CI=1.72-3.76), poor ventilation in the classroom (OR=2.00, 95% CI=1.24-3.22), current mental disorder (OR=3.20, 95% CI=2.18-4.70), sedentary life style (OR=1.94, 95% CI=1.21-3.09), and marriage (OR=1.70, 95% CI=1.16-2.47). Associations between probable dysphonia, poor working conditions, health-related aspects, and professional jeopardy indicate the complexity of dysphonia in female teachers and the need for collective intervention strategies.

  2. The Temperature of Quiescent Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehr, E.; Stellmacher, G.

    We simultaneously observed in solar prominences faint metallic emission lines together with Hγand two He I lines from the singlet and triplet systems, respectively. We find that the reduced widths ΔλD/λ0 are not linearly related to the square-root of the inverse atomic mass, as is expected from the Doppler formula. Instead, each emission line is individually broadened. The gradients in the VD2(1/μ) diagrams correspond to unrealistically high Tkin≥104 K, which contradict values deduced from line radiance observations yielding temperatures down to at most 5000 K. A scenario of down-falling gas clumps by Low et al. (2012) offers a plausible explanation for these discrepancies.

  3. Observations of loops and prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.

    1994-01-01

    We review recent observations by the Yohkoh-SXT (Soft X-ray Telescope) in collaboration with other spacecraft and ground-based observatories of coronal loops and prominences. These new results point to problems that SoHO will be able to address. With a unique combination of rapid-cadence digital imaging (greater than or equal to 32 s full-disk and greater than or equal to 2 s partial-frame images), high spatial resolution (greater than or equal to 2.5 arcsec pixels), high sensitivity (EM less than or equal to 10(exp 42) cm(exp -3)), a low-scatter mirror, and large dynamic range, SXT can observe a vast range of targets on the Sun. Over the first 21 months of Yohkoh operations SXT has taken over one million images of the corona and so is building up an invaluable long-term database on the large-scale corona and loop geometry. The most striking thing about the SXT images is the range of loop sizes and shapes. The active regions are a bright tangle of magnetic field lines, surrounded by a network of large-scale quiet-Sun loops stretching over distances in excess of 105 km. The cross-section of most loops seems to be constant. Loops displaying significant Gamma's are the exception, not the rule, implying the presence of widespread currents in the corona. All magnetic structures show changes. Time scales range from seconds to months. The question of how these structures are formed, become filled with hot plasma, and are maintained is still open. While we see the propagation of brightenings along the length of active-region loops and in X-ray jets with velocities of several hundred km/s, much higher velocities are seen in the quiet Sun. In XBP flares, for example, velocities of over 1000 km/s are common. Active-region loops seem to be in constant motion, moving slowly outward, carrying plasma with them. During flares, loops often produce localized brightenings at the base and later at the apex of the loop. Quiescent filaments and prominences have been observed regularly

  4. Cepstral analysis of normal and pathological voice in Spanish adults. Smoothed cepstral peak prominence in sustained vowels versus connected speech.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Hernández, Jonathan; León-Gómez, Nieves M; Izquierdo-Arteaga, Laura M; Llanos-Fumero, Yanira

    2017-08-31

    In recent years, the use of cepstral measures for acoustic evaluation of voice has increased. One of the most investigated parameters is smoothed cepstral peak prominence (CPPs). The objectives of this paper are to establish the usefulness of this acoustic measure in the objective evaluation of alterations of the voice in Spanish and to determine what type of voice sample (sustained vowels or connected speech) is the most sensitive in evaluating the severity of dysphonia. Forty subjects participated in this study 40, 20 controls and 20 with dysphonia. Two voice samples were recorded for each subject (one sustained vowel/a/and four phonetically balanced sentences) and the CPPs was calculated using the Praat programme. Three raters perceptually evaluated the voice sample with the Grade parameter of GRABS scale. Significantly lower values were found in the dysphonic voices, both for/a/(t[38]= 4.85, P<.000) and for phrases (t[38] = 5,75, P<.000). In relation to the type of voice sample most suitable for evaluating the severity of voice alterations, a strong correlation was found with the acoustic-perceptual scale of CPPs calculated from connected speech (rs = -0.73) and moderate correlation with that calculated from the sustained vowel (rs = -0,56). The results of this preliminary study suggest that CPPs is a good measure to detect dysphonia and to objectively assess the severity of alterations in the voice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  5. Articulatory Changes in Muscle Tension Dysphonia: Evidence of Vowel Space Expansion Following Manual Circumlaryngeal Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nelson; Nissen, Shawn L.; Dromey, Christopher; Sapir, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    In a preliminary study, we documented significant changes in formant transitions associated with successful manual circumlaryngeal treatment (MCT) of muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), suggesting improvement in speech articulation. The present study explores further the effects of MTD on vowel articulation by means of additional vowel acoustic…

  6. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Behavioral Voice Therapy for Dysphonia Related to Prematurity of Birth.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Victoria; Meldrum, Suzanne; Simmer, Karen; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; French, Noel

    2017-03-01

    Dysphonia is a potential complication of prematurity. Preterm children may sustain iatrogenic laryngeal damage from medical intervention in the neonatal period, and further, adopt compensatory, maladaptive voicing behaviors. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the effects of a voice therapy protocol on voice quality in school-aged, very preterm (VP) children. Twenty-seven VP children with dysphonia were randomized to an immediate intervention group (n = 7) or a delayed-intervention, waiting list control group (n = 14). Following analysis of these data, a secondary analysis was conducted on the pooled intervention data (n = 21). Six participants did not complete the trial. Change to voice quality was measured via pre- and posttreatment assessments using the Consensus Auditory Perceptual Evaluation of Voice. The intervention group did not demonstrate statistically significant improvements in voice quality, whereas this was observed in the control group (P = 0.026). However, when intervention data were pooled including both the immediate and delayed groups following intervention, dysphonia severity was significantly lower (P = 0.026) in the treatment group. Dysphonia in most VP children in this cohort was persistent. These pilot data indicate that some participants experienced acceptable voice outcomes on spontaneous recovery, whereas others demonstrated a response to behavioral intervention. Further research is needed to identify the facilitators of and barriers to intervention success, and to predict those who may experience spontaneous recovery. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  7. The prevalence of laryngeal pathology in a treatment-seeking population with dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Van Houtte, Evelyne; Van Lierde, Kristiane; D'Haeseleer, Evelien; Claeys, Sofie

    2010-02-01

    This article describes the prevalence of laryngeal pathology in a treatment-seeking population with dysphonia in the Flemish part of Belgium. Retrospective investigation. During a period of 5 years (2004-2008), data were collected from 882 patients who consulted with dysphonia at the ear, nose, and throat department of the University Hospital in Ghent (Belgium). Laryngeal pathology was diagnosed using videostroboscopy. Ages ranged from 4 years to 90 years. Functional voice disorders were most frequently diagnosed (30%), followed by vocal fold nodule (15%), and pharyngolaryngeal reflux (9%). The role of age, gender, and occupation was investigated. Pathologies were significantly more common in females than in males, representing 63.8% and 36.2% of the population, respectively. Professional voice users accounted for 41% of the workforce population, with teachers as main subgroup. In professional voice users, functional dysphonia occurred in 41%, vocal fold nodules in 15%, and pharyngolaryngeal reflux in 11%. Our data were compared with data from other countries. Functional voice disorders were overall the most common cause of voice disorders (except in childhood), followed by vocal fold nodules and pharyngolaryngeal reflux. Professional voice users accounted for almost one half of the active population, with functional voice disorders as the main cause of dysphonia.

  8. Epidemiological study of dysphonia in 4-12 year-old children.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Brasolotto, Alcione; Santana, Marcela Ferreira; Padovan, Carlos Alberto; Martins, Regina Helena Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Children dysphonia studies have reported an incidence of 4.4 to 30.3%. To establish the prevalence of dysphonia in children, based on the opinion of the parents, acoustic and vocal-perceptual assessments, associated symptoms, risk factors and videolaryngoscopy findings. The parents from 2,000 children answered a questionnaire about the vocal quality of their children, and these children were submitted to perceptual vocal, acoustic and videolaryngoscopy assessments. We had 1,007 boys and 993 girls; sporadic symptoms were reported by 206 parents and permanent symptoms were reported by 123. In the perceptual assessment, the G parameter (degree of dysphonia) had a score of 0 in 694 voices; 1 in 1,065 and 2 in 228. There was f0 reduction with age and the remaining acoustic parameters were high in children with a G score of 2. Nodules, thickening and inflammation were the most common in the videolaryngoscopy exams. Parental judgment indicated a prevalence of dysphonia in 6.15%, and perceptual analysis yielded a value of 11.4%. Vocal symptoms were associated with a phonatory overload. sinonasal disorders, vocal abuse and noise were considered relevant risk factors. The acoustic analysis kept a direct association with the perceptual-auditory. Laryngeal lesions were found in the videolaryngoscopy exams, stressing nodules, thickening and inflammation.

  9. Intensified Voice Therapy: A New Model for the Rehabilitation of Patients Suffering from Functional Dysphonias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Michael J.; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Ptok, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a new intervention for chronic dysphonias, consisting of a 2-week outpatient treatment period using intensified voice therapy combined with elements of physical medicine, including physiotherapy (orthotherapy, detonisation and training of the trunk muscles, respiratory therapy and others), manual therapy…

  10. Early Motor Unit Disease Masquerading as Psychogenic Breathy Dysphonia: A Clinical Case Presentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Arnold E.

    1971-01-01

    Presented is a study of a 20-year-old girl with mild, breathy dysphonia, previously diagnosed as psychogenic. In actuality, her voice change was a sign of early myasthenia gravis. It is pointed out that voice changes can be a first and only sign of early neurologic disease. (Author/KW)

  11. Functional Dysphonia during Mental Imagery: Testing the Trait Theory of Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mersbergen, Miriam; Patrick, Christopher; Glaze, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research has proposed that persons with functional dysphonia (FD) present with temperamental traits that predispose them to their voice disorder. We investigated this theory in a controlled experiment and compared them with social anxiety (SA) and healthy control (HC) groups. Method: Twelve participants with FD, 19 participants…

  12. Articulatory Changes Following Treatment of Muscle Tension Dysphonia: Preliminary Acoustic Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dromey, Christopher; Nissen, Shawn L.; Roy, Nelson; Merrill, Ray M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Primary muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a voice disturbance that occurs in the absence of structural or neurological pathology, may respond to manual circumlaryngeal techniques, which ostensibly alter the posture of the larynx and/or the configuration of the vocal folds without directly targeting supralaryngeal articulatory structures.…

  13. Articulatory Changes in Muscle Tension Dysphonia: Evidence of Vowel Space Expansion Following Manual Circumlaryngeal Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nelson; Nissen, Shawn L.; Dromey, Christopher; Sapir, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    In a preliminary study, we documented significant changes in formant transitions associated with successful manual circumlaryngeal treatment (MCT) of muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), suggesting improvement in speech articulation. The present study explores further the effects of MTD on vowel articulation by means of additional vowel acoustic…

  14. Intensified Voice Therapy: A New Model for the Rehabilitation of Patients Suffering from Functional Dysphonias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Michael J.; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Ptok, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a new intervention for chronic dysphonias, consisting of a 2-week outpatient treatment period using intensified voice therapy combined with elements of physical medicine, including physiotherapy (orthotherapy, detonisation and training of the trunk muscles, respiratory therapy and others), manual therapy…

  15. [The place of speech therapy in the dysfunctional dysphonias with gastro-esophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Yana, M; Renard, M C; Stroebel, V

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the association between dysfunctional dysphonia and gastro-oesophageal reflux. Joint medical and speech therapy management, adapted daily, would seem to be necessary. The authors report the results of a clinical assessment by questionnaire in six patients.

  16. Dysphonia as a sign of HPV laryngeal infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Longubuco, Carlos Eduardo Gama; dos Reis, Helena Lucia Barroso; Cavalcante, Fernanda Sampaio; de Pinho, Carla Renata Petillo; Oliveira, Nathalia Silva; Nicol, Alcina Frederica; Zamolyi, Renata Quintella; Ferreira, Dennis de Carvalho

    2014-12-11

    Voice dysfunction or dysphonia may be associated with several clinical conditions. Among these, laryngeal human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced lesions should be considered as a possible causative factor. We report a case of dysphonia in a patient presenting with an HPV laryngeal lesion. We also discuss the clinical features of the disease, its histopathological findings, and treatment and rigorous follow-up. We report a case of laryngeal papilloma in a 29-year-old, Afro-descendant, male patient with dysphonia. He was a non-smoker and was not a drug user. Videolaryngostroboscopy revealed signs suggestive of pharyngolaryngeal reflux. The right vocal fold presented with a papillomatous aspect in the posterior third, which underwent excision. Histopathological examination showed a nodular lesion of the right vocal fold, conclusive of squamous papilloma with absence of malignancy. Patients presenting with persistent voice dysfunction or dysphonia should be investigated for possible laryngeal HPV infection. Diagnostic confirmation by HPV genotyping is important for follow-up of potential recurrence.

  17. Articulatory Changes Following Treatment of Muscle Tension Dysphonia: Preliminary Acoustic Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dromey, Christopher; Nissen, Shawn L.; Roy, Nelson; Merrill, Ray M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Primary muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a voice disturbance that occurs in the absence of structural or neurological pathology, may respond to manual circumlaryngeal techniques, which ostensibly alter the posture of the larynx and/or the configuration of the vocal folds without directly targeting supralaryngeal articulatory structures.…

  18. Functional Dysphonia during Mental Imagery: Testing the Trait Theory of Voice Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Mersbergen, Miriam; Patrick, Christopher; Glaze, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research has proposed that persons with functional dysphonia (FD) present with temperamental traits that predispose them to their voice disorder. We investigated this theory in a controlled experiment and compared them with social anxiety (SA) and healthy control (HC) groups. Method: Twelve participants with FD, 19 participants…

  19. Spasmodic growth during the rapid solidification of undercooled Ag-Cu eutectic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clopet, C. R.; Cochrane, R. F.; Mullis, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    A melt fluxing technique has been used to undercool Ag-Cu eutectic alloy by 10-70 K and the subsequent recalescence has been studied using high speed imaging. Spasmodic growth of the solidification front was observed, in which the growth front would make a series of quasi-periodic jumps separated by extended periods during which time growth appeared to arrest. Evidence of this previously unreported mode of growth is presented. The high speed images and microstructural evidence support the theory that anomalous eutectics form by the growth and subsequent remelting of eutectic dendrites.

  20. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  1. Association between anxiety, type A personality, and treatment outcome of dysphonia due to benign causes.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jia Hui; Lo, Stephen; Lim, Francoise; Goh, Susan; Kanagalingam, Jeeve

    2013-01-01

    Dysphonia has been linked to psychosocial factors such as anxiety and personality type. The aim of this study is to determine whether these factors also affect the treatment outcome of benign dysphonia. Prospective case series. Voice clinic of a tertiary otolaryngology clinic. Thirty-seven patients diagnosed with benign dysphonia over a 3-month period were included. Demographic data, the Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10), Reflux Symptom Index (RSI), Clinical Anxiety Scale (CAS), and Bortner Personality Scale were recorded at presentation. After a period of treatment with lifestyle advice, proton pump inhibitors, and/or speech therapy, the VHI-10 and RSI were repeated. After standard dysphonia treatment, 18 patients who reported complete recovery were found to be significantly less anxious (lower CAS scores) than those who did not recover completely (P = .023). However, there was no significant difference in number of complete recoveries between patients of personality types A and B (P > .05). Multivariate regression showed that higher CAS scores had a negative influence on the amount of improvement of VHI-10 (P = .026) but had no impact on RSI (P = .148). Again, personality type had no influence on either RSI or VHI-10 improvement (both P > .05). An additional factor, older age, was found to predict negatively for the amount of RSI improvement (P = .017), but no other predictive variables were identified. This is the first study to show that psychosomatic factors may affect treatment outcome in patients with dysphonia due to benign causes. The benefit of adjunctive psycho-cognitive measures warrants further investigation.

  2. Re-interpreting Prominences Classified as Tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sara F.; Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    2015-04-01

    Some papers in the recent literature identify tornado prominences with barbs of quiescent prominences while papers in the much older historic literature include a second category of tornado prominence that does not correspond to a barb of a quiescent prominence. The latter are described as prominence mass rotating around a nearly vertical axis prior to its eruption and the rotation was verified by spectral measurements. From H alpha Doppler-shifted mass motions recorded at Helio Research or the Dutch Open Telescope, we illustrate how the apparent tornado-like motions, identified with barbs, are illusions in our mind’s eye resulting from poorly resolved counterstreaming threads of mass in the barbs of quiescent prominences. In contrast, we confirm the second category of rotational motion in prominences shortly before and during eruption. In addition, we identify this second category as part of the late phase of a phenomenon called the roll effect in erupting prominences. In these cases, the eruption begins with the sideways rolling of the top of a prominence. As the eruption proceeds the rolling motion propagates down one leg or both legs of the prominence depending on whether the eruption is asymmetric or symmetric respectively. As an asymmetric eruption continues, the longer lasting leg becomes nearly vertical and its rotational motion also continues. If only this phase of the eruption was observed, as in some historic cases, it was called a tornado prominence. However, when we now observe entire eruptions in time-lapse sequences, the similarity to terrestrial tornadoes is lost. We conclude that neither prominence barbs, that give the illusion of rotation, nor the cases of true rotational motion, in the legs of erupting prominences, are usefully described as tornado prominences when the complete prominence structure or complete erupting event is observed.

  3. Probing glycine receptor stoichiometry in superficial dorsal horn neurones using the spasmodic mouse.

    PubMed

    Graham, B A; Tadros, M A; Schofield, P R; Callister, R J

    2011-05-15

    Inhibitory glycine receptors (GlyRs) are pentameric ligand gated ion channels composed of α and β subunits assembled in a 2:3 stoichiometry. The α1/βheteromer is considered the dominant GlyR isoform at 'native' adult synapses in the spinal cord and brainstem. However, the α3 GlyR subunit is concentrated in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH: laminae I-II), a spinal cord region important for processing nociceptive signals from skin, muscle and viscera. Here we use the spasmodic mouse, which has a naturally occurring mutation (A52S) in the α1 subunit of the GlyR, to examine the effect of the mutation on inhibitory synaptic transmission and homeostatic plasticity, and to probe for the presence of various GlyR subunits in the SDH.We usedwhole cell recording (at 22-24◦C) in lumbar spinal cord slices obtained from ketamine-anaesthetized (100 mg kg⁻¹, I.P.) spasmodic and wild-type mice (mean age P27 and P29, respectively, both sexes). The amplitude and decay time constants of GlyR mediated mIPSCs in spasmodic micewere reduced by 25% and 50%, respectively (42.0 ± 3.6 pA vs. 31.0 ± 1.8 pA, P <0.05 and 7.4 ± 0.5 ms vs. 5.0 ± 0.4 ms, P <0.05; means ± SEM, n =34 and 31, respectively). Examination of mIPSC amplitude versus rise time and decay time relationships showed these differences were not due to electrotonic effects. Analysis of GABAAergic mIPSCs and A-type potassium currents revealed altered GlyR mediated neurotransmission was not accompanied by the synaptic or intrinsic homeostatic plasticity previously demonstrated in another GlyR mutant, spastic. Application of glycine to excised outside-out patches from SDH neurones showed glycine sensitivity was reduced more than twofold in spasmodic GlyRs (EC50 =130 ± 20 μM vs. 64 ± 11 μM, respectively; n =8 and 15, respectively). Differential agonist sensitivity and mIPSC decay times were subsequently used to probe for the presence of α1-containing GlyRs in SDHneurones.Glycine sensitivity, based on the response

  4. Apparent Solar Tornado-Like Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Martin, Sara F.; Velli, Marco

    2014-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado-like prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by Pettit ( Astrophys. J. 76, 9, 1932), who studied them over many years. Observations of tornado prominences similar to the ones seen by SDO had already been documented by Secchi ( Le Soleil, 1877). High-resolution and high-cadence multiwavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like appearance of these prominences is mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We discuss two different cases where prominences on the limb might appear to have a tornado-like behavior. One case of apparent vortical motions in prominence spines and barbs arises from the (mostly) 2D counterstreaming plasma motion along the prominence spine and barbs together with oscillations along individual threads. The other case of apparent rotational motion is observed in a prominence cavity and results from the 3D plasma motion along the writhed magnetic fields inside and along the prominence cavity as seen projected on the limb. Thus, the "tornado" impression results either from counterstreaming and oscillations or from the projection on the plane of the sky of plasma motion along magnetic-field lines, rather than from a true vortical motion around an (apparent) vertical or horizontal axis. We discuss the link between tornado-like prominences, filament barbs, and photospheric vortices at their base.

  5. Critical Height for the Unstabilization of Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, K.; Wang, Y.; Shen, C.

    2010-12-01

    At which altitude will a prominence probably erupt? This question is statistically studied based on the 10072 solar limb prominences recognized by SLIPCAT from 2007 April to the end of 2009. We manually check all the prominences with leading edge greater than 1.2 Rs, and find that there are 256 disrupted prominences (DPs) and 106 stable prominences (SPs). Among the DPs, there are 149 prominences (EPs) showing a clear and successful eruption process in the STEREO/EUVI field of view and 107 prominences (FPs) presenting a failed eruption. The eruption process of EPs can be further classified into 3 types, single eruption (SE), multiple eruptions (ME) and gradual eruption (GE). When the main body of a EP first begins to ascend rapidly with a uniform velocity, we define the height of the prominence’s leading edge at this moment as the unstabilization height. FPs also have unstabilization heights as well. All the unstabilization heights are identified by hands. It is found that 65% DPs are unstabilized between 49 and 90 Mm. The comparison of the number of DPs with all the well-tracked prominences suggests that the ratio between them is a double-peak distribution with the most probable heights for a prominence being unstable at 83 and 125 Mm. The above two results suggest that there are two critical heights for the unstabilization of prominences: the primary height is 83 Mm and the secondary height is 125 Mm. We think two different heights present two kinds of prominences, the primary one corresponding to DPs around or at active region and the secondary one corresponding to DPs at quiet region. We also find eruption velocity of DPs is anti-correlated with the unstabilization height and the total brightness, which means that prominences with less mass and lower unstabilization height would require larger inputting energy and large eruption velocity. The association of EPs with CME in this study is 49%.

  6. Prominence mass supply and the cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, Donald J.; Innes, D.; Gibson, S.; Luna, M.; Karpen, J.

    2013-12-20

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system: the cavity is under-dense because it is evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolution of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model with diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prominence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å bandpass near the prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset between emission enhancements in the other EUV bandpasses. While these predictions match well a subset of the horn observations, the range of variations in the observed structures is not captured by the model. We discuss the implications of our one-dimensional loop simulations for the three-dimensional time-averaged equilibrium in the prominence and the cavity. Evidence suggests that horns are likely caused by condensing prominence plasma, but the larger question of whether this process produces a density-depleted cavity requires a more tightly constrained model of heating and better knowledge of the associated magnetic structure.

  7. Formation and Plasma Circulation of Solar Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-05-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous downflows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret because plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward, dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The circulation of prominence plasma is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromosphere and the formation of prominence plasma via continuous condensation. Plasma evaporates from the chromosphere, condenses into the prominence in the corona, and drains back to the chromosphere, establishing a stable chromosphere-corona plasma cycle. Synthetic images of the modeled prominence with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly closely resemble actual observations, with many dynamical threads underlying an elliptical coronal cavity.

  8. Prominence Seismology Using Small Amplitude Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Ramón

    2009-12-01

    Quiescent prominences can be modeled as thin slabs of cold, dense plasma embedded in the much hotter and rarer solar corona. Although their global shape is rather irregular, they are often characterised by an internal structure consisting of a large number of thin, parallel threads piled together. Prominences often display periodic disturbances mostly observed in the Doppler displacement of spectral lines and with an amplitude typically of the order of or smaller than 2-3 km s-1, a value which seems to be much smaller than the characteristic speeds of the prominence plasma (namely the Alfvén and sound velocities). Two particular features of these small amplitude prominence oscillations are that they seem to damp in a few periods and that they seem not to affect the whole prominence structure. In addition, in high spatial resolution observations, in which threads can be discerned, small amplitude oscillations appear to be clearly associated to these fine structure constituents. Prominence seismology tries to bring together the results from these observations (e.g. periods, wavelengths, damping times) and their theoretical modeling (by means of the magnetohydrodynamic theory) to gain insight into physical properties of prominences that cannot be derived from direct observation. In this paper we discuss works that have not been described in previous reviews, namely the first seismological application to solar prominences and theoretical advances on the attenuation of prominence oscillations.

  9. Tornados and Transverse Oscillations during Prominence Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipankar; Chandrashekhar, K.; Morton, Richard; Pant, Vaibhav; Datta, Ajanta

    2016-07-01

    We report and analyse different phases of a prominence eruption. The winding-unwinding of two footpoints and a tornado like swirling motion is studied. The prominence eruption is observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This prominence eruption is associated with a CME at a central principal angle of 340 degree, according to the SOHO/LASCO CME catalogue. We can observe the prominence threads and the time distance maps reveal that the loop threads are entangled. We also study the transverse oscillations in the threads. Swirling motions after the eruptions are also quantified and its possible link with the CME kinematics is also studied

  10. Quiescent prominences - Where are they formed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Frances

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of two years of quiescent prominences shows that substantially more (20 percent in 1973 and 96 percent in 1979) quiescent prominences were formed on neutral lines between bipolar regions than on neutral lines inside bipolar regions. An examination of the associated solar activity of the seven white light coronal transients observed by Skyklab indicates that regardless of where the prominences were formed, their eruptions can cause observable coronal mass ejections. The present results suggest that a prominence model is needed in which the evolution begins at the boundary of two adjacent bipolar regions.

  11. Effectiveness of voice therapy in functional dysphonia: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Bos-Clark, Marianne; Carding, Paul

    2011-06-01

    To review the recent literature since the 2009 Cochrane review regarding the effectiveness of voice therapy for patients with functional dysphonia. A range of articles report on the effects of voice therapy treatment for functional dysphonia, with a wide range of interventions described. Only one study is a randomized controlled trial. A number of excellent review articles have extended the knowledge base. In primary research, methodological issues persist: studies are small, and not adequately controlled. Studies show improved standards of outcome measurement and of description of the content of voice therapy. There is a continued need for larger, methodologically sound clinical effectiveness studies. Future studies need to be replicable and generalizable in order to inform and elucidate clinical practice.

  12. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, Donald J.; Gibson, S.; Luna, M.; Karpen, J.; Innes, D.

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system; the cavity is under-dense because it it evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolutin of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model and diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prminence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 A badpass near he prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset between emission enhancements in the other EUV bandpasses. While these predictions match well a subset of the horn observations, the range of variations in the observed structures is not captured by the model. We discuss the implications of one-dimensional loop simulations for the three-dimensional time-averaged equilibrium in the prominence and the cavity. Evidence suggests that horns are likely caused by condensing prominence plasma, but the larger question of whether this process produces a density-depleted cavity requires a more tightly constrained model of heating and better knowledge of the associated magnetic structure.

  13. MAGNETIC TOPOLOGY OF BUBBLES IN QUIESCENT PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Dudik, J.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Zapior, M.; Heinzel, P.

    2012-12-10

    We study a polar-crown prominence with a bubble and its plume observed in several coronal filters by the SDO/AIA and in H{alpha} by the MSDP spectrograph in Bialkow (Poland) to address the following questions: what is the brightness of prominence bubbles in EUV with respect to the corona outside of the prominence and the prominence coronal cavity? What is the geometry and topology of the magnetic field in the bubble? What is the nature of the vertical threads seen within prominences? We find that the brightness of the bubble and plume is lower than the brightness of the corona outside of the prominence, and is similar to that of the coronal cavity. We constructed linear force-free models of prominences with bubbles, where the flux rope is perturbed by inclusion of parasitic bipoles. The arcade field lines of the bipole create the bubble, which is thus devoid of magnetic dips. Shearing the bipole or adding a second one can lead to cusp-shaped prominences with bubbles similar to the observed ones. The bubbles have complex magnetic topology, with a pair of coronal magnetic null points linked by a separator outlining the boundary between the bubble and the prominence body. We conjecture that plume formation involves magnetic reconnection at the separator. Depending on the viewing angle, the prominence can appear either anvil-shaped with predominantly horizontal structures, or cusp-shaped with predominantly vertical structuring. The latter is an artifact of the alignment of magnetic dips with respect to the prominence axis and the line of sight.

  14. Comparison of voice quality in patients with GERD-related dysphonia or chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Domeracka-Kołodziej, Anna; Grabczak, Elżbieta M; Dąbrowska, Marta; Arcimowicz, Magdalena; Lachowska, Magdalena; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to compare a voice quality in patients with GERD-related dysphonia or chronic cough and to determine whether there is a relationship between the main symptom reported and voice quality. 249 consecutive patients diagnosed with GERD-related chronic cough or dysphonia were involved in this retrospective study and were divided into two main groups of men and women, and furthermore into groups of chronic cough and dysphonia. Laryngeal lesions were evaluated with videolaryngostroboscopy using Reflux Finding Score. Voice quality was assessed using GRBAS scale, sonograms, and multidimensional voice program (MDVP). All subjects were found to have vocal abnormalities both in subjective and objective voice analysis. Perceptual assessment of voice (GRBAS) did not reveal any differences between analyzed groups depending on the reported symptom. In MDVP analysis, the group of women with cough as the main symptom demonstrated significantly less abnormalities in VTI value. In men with cough as their main complaint, significantly less MDVP abnormalities were found in Jita, Jitt, RAP, PPQ, and sPPQ parameters. The comparison of voice perceptual assessment in patients with GERD-related dysphonia or chronic cough revealed no differences between analyzed groups. In objective voice analysis, the latter group presented lower degree of hoarseness in Yanagihara's scale. In objective MDVP analysis, the chronic cough group presented lower degree of abnormalities only in one of the noise related parameters in females and five frequency perturbation parameters in males. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Laryngeal involvement causing dysphonia in a 29 year old nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Fwoloshi, Sombo; Machona, Sharon Musonda; Mudenda, Victor; Ngalamika, Owen

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a granulomatous disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nerves. It is caused by infection with mycobacterium leprae or mycobacterium lepromatosus. In most instances, diagnosis of leprosy can easily be made based on the clinical signs and symptoms. However, when patients present with atypical features, clinical diagnosis can be a challenge. We report a case of a nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy who presented with dysphonia and skin lesions initially thought to be a deep cutaneous mycosis. PMID:26327983

  16. IMAGING PROMINENCE ERUPTIONS OUT TO 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Brian E.; Howard, Russell A.; Linton, Mark G.

    2016-01-10

    Views of two bright prominence eruptions trackable all the way to 1 AU are here presented, using the heliospheric imagers on the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. The two events first erupted from the Sun on 2011 June 7 and 2012 August 31, respectively. Only these two examples of clear prominence eruptions observable this far from the Sun could be found in the STEREO image database, emphasizing the rarity of prominence eruptions this persistently bright. For the 2011 June event, a time-dependent 3D reconstruction of the prominence structure is made using point-by-point triangulation. This is not possible for the August event due to a poor viewing geometry. Unlike the coronal mass ejection (CME) that accompanies it, the 2011 June prominence exhibits little deceleration from the Sun to 1 AU, as a consequence moving upwards within the CME. This demonstrates that prominences are not necessarily tied to the CME's magnetic structure far from the Sun. A mathematical framework is developed for describing the degree of self-similarity for the prominence's expansion away from the Sun. This analysis suggests only modest deviations from self-similar expansion, but close to the Sun the prominence expands radially somewhat more rapidly than self-similarity would predict.

  17. Eruptive Solar Prominence at 37 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallunki, J.; Tornikoski, M.

    2017-07-01

    On 27 June 2012, an eruptive solar prominence was observed in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and radio wavebands. At the Aalto University Metsähovi Radio Observatory (MRO) it was observed at 37 GHz. It was the first time that the MRO followed a radio prominence with dense sampling in the millimetre wavelengths. This prompted us to study the connection of the 37 GHz event with other wavelength domains. At 37 GHz, the prominence was tracked to a height of around 1.6 R_{⊙}, at which the loop structure collapsed. The average velocity of the radio prominence was 55 ± 6 km s^{-1}. The brightness temperature of the prominence varied between 800 ± 100 K and 3200 ± 100 K. We compared our data with the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO)/ Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument's 304 Å EUV data, and found that the prominence behaves very similarly in both wavelengths. The EUV data also reveal flaring activity nearby the prominence. We present a scenario in which this flare works as a trigger that causes the prominence to move from a stable stage to an acceleration stage.

  18. Effectiveness of laryngostroboscopy for monitoring the evolution of functional dysphonia after rehabilitator treatment.

    PubMed

    Halawa, Wasim Elhendi; Muñoz, Irene Vázquez; Perez, Sofía Santos

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the laryngostroboscopy for monitoring the evolution of patients with functional dysphonia before and after the logopedic vocal treatment. We performed a prospective observational study of 65 dysphonic patients diagnosed of functional dysphonia, where we analyzed four stroboscopic parameters (glottal closure, vocal fold vibration, mucosal wave and phase symmetry) by a protocol based on systematic subjective evaluation of the stroboscopic images before and after the rehabilitator treatment; and the results were stratified according to the clinical course. All patients, before the treatment, had some abnormality in at least one of the four analyzed aspects. After the vocal treatment, we found improvement of the four parameters in different degrees, and we just found a statistically significant relationship between the evolution of the glottal closure and the clinical course. We believe that the laryngostroboscopy, systematized through a protocol, is a useful technique for the diagnosis of functional abnormalities in patients with functional dysphonia but it is not a very useful technique for evaluating the results after the rehabilitator treatment, as there is not a statistically significant relationship between clinical course and the change in the most stroboscopic parameters, so it shouldn't be the only technique used for these proposes.

  19. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, H.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J.; Kucera, T.; Antiochos, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between ions and neutrals in magnetized plasmas is fundamentally important to many aspects of heliophysics, including our ionosphere, the solar chromosphere, the solar wind interaction with planetary atmospheres, and the interface between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Ion-neutral coupling also plays a major role in the physics of solar prominences. By combining theory, modeling, and observations we are working toward a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of partially ionized prominence plasma. Two key questions are addressed in the present work: 1) what physical mechanism(s) sets the cross-field scale of prominence threads? 2) Are ion-neutral interactions responsible for the vertical flows and structure in prominences? We present initial results from a study investigating what role ion-neutral interactions play in prominence dynamics and structure. This research was supported by NASA.

  20. Prominences: The Key to Understanding Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judy T.

    2011-01-01

    Prominences are spectacular manifestations of both quiescent and eruptive solar activity. The largest examples can be seen with the naked eye during eclipses, making prominences among the first solar features to be described and catalogued. Steady improvements in temporal and spatial resolution from both ground- and space-based instruments have led us to recognize how complex and dynamic these majestic structures really are. Their distinguishing characteristics - cool knots and threads suspended in the hot corona, alignment along inversion lines in the photospheric magnetic field within highly sheared filament channels, and a tendency to disappear through eruption - offer vital clues as to their origin and dynamic evolution. Interpreting these clues has proven to be contentious, however, leading to fundamentally different models that address the basic questions: What is the magnetic structure supporting prominences, and how does so much cool, dense plasma appear in the corona? Despite centuries of increasingly detailed observations, the magnetic and plasma structures in prominences are poorly known. Routine measurements of the vector magnetic field in and around prominences have become possible only recently, while long-term monitoring of the underlying filament-channel formation process also remains scarce. The process responsible for prominence mass is equally difficult to establish, although we have long known that the chromosphere is the only plausible source. As I will discuss, however, the motions and locations of prominence material can be used to trace the coronal field, thus defining the magnetic origins of solar eruptions. A combination of observations, theory, and numerical modeling must be used to determine whether any of the competing theories accurately represents the physics of prominences. I will discuss the criteria for a successful prominence model, compare the leading models, and present in detail one promising, comprehensive scenario for

  1. Is voice therapy an effective treatment for dysphonia? A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Kenneth; Millar, Audrey; Wilson, Janet A; Sellars, Cameron; Deary, Ian J

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To assess the overall efficacy of voice therapy for dysphonia. Design Single blind randomised controlled trial. Setting Outpatient clinic in a teaching hospital. Participants 204 outpatients aged 17-87 with a primary symptom of persistent hoarseness for at least two months. Interventions After baseline assessments, patients were randomised to six weeks of either voice therapy or no treatment. Assessments were repeated at six weeks on the 145 (71%) patients who continued to this stage and at 12-14 weeks on the 133 (65%) patients who completed the study. The assessments at the three time points for the 70 patients who completed treatment and the 63 patients in the group given no treatment were compared. Main outcome measures Ratings of laryngeal features, Buffalo voice profile, amplitude and pitch perturbation, voice profile questionnaire, hospital anxiety and depression scale, clinical interview schedule, SF-36. Results Voice therapy improved voice quality as assessed by rating by patients (P=0.001) and rating by observer (P<0.001). The treatment effects for these two outcomes were 4.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 6.6) points and 0.82 (0.50 to 1.13) points. Amplitude perturbation showed improvement at six weeks (P=0.005) but not on completion of the study. Patients with dysphonia had appreciable psychological distress and lower quality of life than controls, but voice therapy had no significant impact on either of these variables. Conclusion Voice therapy is effective in improving voice quality as assessed by self rated and observer rated methods. What is already known on this topicMany patients with dysphonia are treated by voice therapyThe effectiveness of voice therapy in a diverse group of patients is unknownWhat this study addsVoice therapy is an effective treatment for dysphonia in terms of report by patients and perceptual ratings by an expertPsychological distress and reduction in general health status are common in patients with dysphonia but

  2. Synthetic polarimetric spectra from stellar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe, T.; Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.

    2017-02-01

    Stellar prominences detected in rapidly rotating stars serve as probes of the magnetism in the corona of cool stars. We have synthesized the temporal evolution of the Stokes profiles generated in the He I 10 830 and 5876 Å triplets during the rotation of a prominence around a star. The synthesis was performed with the HAZEL code using a cloud model in which the prominence is characterized by a slab located at a fixed latitude and height. It accounts for the scattering polarization and Zeeman and Hanle effects. Several cases with different prominence magnetic field strengths and orientations have been analysed. The results show an emission feature that drifts across the profile while the prominence is out of the stellar disc. When the prominence eclipses the star, the intensity profile shows an absorption. The scattering induced by the prominence generates linear polarization signals in Stokes Q and U profiles, which are modified by the Hanle effect when a magnetic field is present. Due to the Zeeman effect, Stokes V profiles show a signal with very low amplitude when the magnetic field along the line of sight is different from zero. The estimated linear polarization signals could potentially be detected with the future spectropolarimeter Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph, to be attached to Gran Telescopio Canarias telescope.

  3. TANGLED MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Cranmer, S. R.

    2010-03-01

    Solar prominences are an important tool for studying the structure and evolution of the coronal magnetic field. Here we consider so-called hedgerow prominences, which consist of thin vertical threads. We explore the possibility that such prominences are supported by tangled magnetic fields. A variety of different approaches are used. First, the dynamics of plasma within a tangled field is considered. We find that the contorted shape of the flux tubes significantly reduces the flow velocity compared to the supersonic free fall that would occur in a straight vertical tube. Second, linear force-free models of tangled fields are developed, and the elastic response of such fields to gravitational forces is considered. We demonstrate that the prominence plasma can be supported by the magnetic pressure of a tangled field that pervades not only the observed dense threads but also their local surroundings. Tangled fields with field strengths of about 10 G are able to support prominence threads with observed hydrogen density of the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Finally, we suggest that the observed vertical threads are the result of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Simulations of the density distribution within a prominence thread indicate that the peak density is much larger than the average density. We conclude that tangled fields provide a viable mechanism for magnetic support of hedgerow prominences.

  4. Solar prominences: formation, force balance, internal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppens, R.; Xia, C.; Chen, P.; Blokland, J. W. S.

    2013-01-01

    Prominences represent fascinating large-scale, cool and dense structures, suspended in the hot and tenuous solar corona above magnetic neutral lines. Starting from magnetohydrostatic force balance arguments, their differing magnetic topology distinguishes Kippenhahn-Schlüter (1957) versus Kuperus-Raadu (1974) types. In both, the concave-upward parts of magnetic field lines or ‘dips’ host and support prominence material via the magnetic tension force against gravity. We highlight recent insights into prominence physics, where we start from modern magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium computations, allowing to mimic flux-rope embedded multi-layer prominence configurations of Kuperus-Raadu type. These can be analysed for linear stability, and by quantifying the eigenfrequencies of flux-surface localized modes, charting out the continuous parts of the MHD spectrum, we pave the way for more detailed prominence seismology. Perhaps the most elusive aspect of prominence physics is their sudden formation, and we demonstrate recent achievements in both rigid field, and fully multi-dimensional simulation efforts. The link with the thermal instability of optically thin radiative plasmas is clarified, and we show the first evaporation-condensation model study where we can demonstrate how the formed prominence stays in a force balanced state, which can be compared to the original Kippenhahn-Schlüter type magnetohydrostatic model.

  5. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  6. NONLINEAR MHD WAVES IN A PROMINENCE FOOT

    SciTech Connect

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-10

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ∼ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5–11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5–14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ∼20 km s{sup −1}, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  7. Nonlinear MHD Waves in a Prominence Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, L.; Knizhnik, K.; Kucera, T.; Schmieder, B.

    2015-11-01

    We study nonlinear waves in a prominence foot using a 2.5D MHD model motivated by recent high-resolution observations with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope in Ca ii emission of a prominence on 2012 October 10 showing highly dynamic small-scale motions in the prominence material. Observations of Hα intensities and of Doppler shifts show similar propagating fluctuations. However, the optically thick nature of the emission lines inhibits a unique quantitative interpretation in terms of density. Nevertheless, we find evidence of nonlinear wave activity in the prominence foot by examining the relative magnitude of the fluctuation intensity (δI/I ˜ δn/n). The waves are evident as significant density fluctuations that vary with height and apparently travel upward from the chromosphere into the prominence material with quasi-periodic fluctuations with a typical period in the range of 5-11 minutes and wavelengths <2000 km. Recent Doppler shift observations show the transverse displacement of the propagating waves. The magnetic field was measured with the THEMIS instrument and was found to be 5-14 G. For the typical prominence density the corresponding fast magnetosonic speed is ˜20 km s-1, in qualitative agreement with the propagation speed of the detected waves. The 2.5D MHD numerical model is constrained with the typical parameters of the prominence waves seen in observations. Our numerical results reproduce the nonlinear fast magnetosonic waves and provide strong support for the presence of these waves in the prominence foot. We also explore gravitational MHD oscillations of the heavy prominence foot material supported by dipped magnetic field structure.

  8. Topological Analyses of Symmetric Eruptive Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, O.; Martin, S. F.

    Erupting prominences (filaments) that we have analyzed from Hα Doppler data at Helio Research and from SOHO/EIT 304 Å, show strong coherency between their chirality, the direction of the vertical and lateral motions of the top of the prominences, and the directions of twisting of their legs. These coherent properties in erupting prominences occur in two patterns of opposite helicity; they constitute a form of dynamic chirality called the ``roll effect." Viewed from the positive network side as they erupt, many symmetrically-erupting dextral prominences develop rolling motion toward the observer along with right-hand helicity in the left leg and left-hand helicity in the right leg. Many symmetricaly-erupting sinistral prominences, also viewed from the positive network field side, have the opposite pattern: rolling motion at the top away from the observer, left-hand helical twist in the left leg, and right-hand twist in the right leg. We have analysed the motions seen in the famous movie of the ``Grand Daddy" erupting prominence and found that it has all the motions that define the roll effect. From our analyses of this and other symmetric erupting prominences, we show that the roll effect is an alternative to the popular hypothetical configuration of an eruptive prominence as a twisted flux rope or flux tube. Instead we find that a simple flat ribbon can be bent such that it reproduces nearly all of the observed forms. The flat ribbon is the most logical beginning topology because observed prominence spines already have this topology prior to eruption and an initial long magnetic ribbon with parallel, non-twisted threads, as a basic form, can be bent into many more and different geometrical forms than a flux rope.

  9. EUV observations of quiescent prominences from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, O. K.; Cook, J. W.; Mango, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of line intensities and line widths for three quiescent prominences observed with Naval Research Laboratory slit spectrograph on ATM/Skylab are reported. The wavelengths of the observed lines cover the range 1175 A to 1960 A. The measured intensities have been calibrated to within approximately a factor 2 and are average intensities over a 2 arcsec by 60 arcsec slit. Nonthermal velocities from the measured line widths are derived. The nonthermal velocity is found to increase with temperature in the prominence transition zone. Electron densities and pressures are derived from density sensitive line ratios. Electron pressures for two of the prominences are found to lie in the range 0.04-0.08 dyn/sq cm, while values for the third and most intense and active of the three prominences are in the range 0.07-0.22 dyn/sq cm.

  10. Ring-shaped Prominence Erupts from Sun

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A coronal mass ejection (CME) on Jan. 31, 2013 was accompanied by a large prominence eruption best visible in light with a wavelength of 304 angstroms. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured ...

  11. A distinctive type of ascending prominence - 'Fountain'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Riddle, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    Cinematographic observations of solar prominences made at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, during the past few years suggest that there is a well-defined subclass of ascending prominences characterized by closed-system transference of chromospheric material along an arch or loop (up one leg and down the other). While this occurs, the entire prominence envelope steadily rises upward and expands through the corona. These prominences are denoted as 'fountains'. Several examples are described. Fountains appear to be well contained by coronal magnetic fields. Their total kinetic energy is of the order of 10 to the 30th power erg, but dissipation is typically quite slow (over time periods of 100 min or so), so that the correlative disturbances (radio bursts, coronal transients, chromospheric brightenings) are generally not spectacular or nonexistent.

  12. NASA's SDO Sees Unraveling Solar Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An elongated solar prominence rose up above the sun’s surface and slowly unraveled on Feb. 3, 2016, as seen in this video by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. The sun appears to move in th...

  13. EUV observations of quiescent prominences from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, O. K.; Cook, J. W.; Mango, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of line intensities and line widths for three quiescent prominences observed with Naval Research Laboratory slit spectrograph on ATM/Skylab are reported. The wavelengths of the observed lines cover the range 1175 A to 1960 A. The measured intensities have been calibrated to within approximately a factor 2 and are average intensities over a 2 arcsec by 60 arcsec slit. Nonthermal velocities from the measured line widths are derived. The nonthermal velocity is found to increase with temperature in the prominence transition zone. Electron densities and pressures are derived from density sensitive line ratios. Electron pressures for two of the prominences are found to lie in the range 0.04-0.08 dyn/sq cm, while values for the third and most intense and active of the three prominences are in the range 0.07-0.22 dyn/sq cm.

  14. Hefty Prominence Eruption Observed by SDO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A mass of solar material gathered itself into a twisting mass, spun around for a bit, then rose up and broke apart over a 10-hour period on Oct. 13, 2015. Prominences are unstable clouds of gas tet...

  15. A DROPLET MODEL OF QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DOWNFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Haerendel, G.; Berger, T.

    2011-04-20

    Observations of quiescent prominences with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite have revealed the ubiquitous existence of downflows forming coherent thin and highly structured vertically oriented threads with velocities between 10 and 20 km s{sup -1}. Their widths range between 300 and 500 km. They are often initiated at the top of the visible prominence, but sometimes also at intermediate level. We propose that the downflows are made of plasma packets that squeeze themselves through the dominantly horizontal field under the action of gravity. Their origin is assumed to be hot plasma supplied from either inside or the immediate vicinity of the prominence and condensing at its top. Under compression and further cooling, the matter overflows to the flanks of the prominence dragging its magnetic field with it. Under the increasing action of gravity, vertical structures are forming which eventually disconnect from the field of the inflow channel thus forming finite plasma packets. This process is reminiscent of water flowing over a mountain ridge and breaking up into a multitude of droplets. Like water droplets being subject to air drag, the falling plasma droplets experience a drag force by the horizontal prominence field and assume a steady vertical velocity. This happens via the excitation of Alfven waves. Lateral confinement by the prominence field determines their spatial extent. The small scales of the droplets and the directional balance of their internal tangled magnetic fields can explain the absence of appreciable vertical components in magnetic field measurements. On the basis of the observed width and vertical speed of the downflows and by adopting a prominence field of about 8 G, we derive central density and temperature of the droplets, which turn out to be quite consistent with known prominence characteristics. In the formulation of the drag force a dimensionless 'magnetic drag coefficient' has been introduced with a value well below unity.

  16. An arcade-like eruptive prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shu-Hua; Zhan, La-Sheng

    2004-12-01

    An eruptive prominence happened on the east-northern limb of the Sun on March 7, 1991. It appeared in a relatively quiet region where any activity phenomena such as flare, filament and sunspot etc. was not found. The maximum height reachable of the prominence was 6.97×104km and its maximum length reached as 11.6×104km. The eruptive prominence might belong to the one of the middle-smaller scale according to its size in morphology. The course of the eruption exhibited some properties: ascending rapidly and descending slowly just like the process of the flare eruption. After the eruption, the most material in the prominence basically moved along a parabola under the action of magnetic force lines forming the arcade-like shape and keeping it till to the disappearance of the prominence. Before and after descending, a little matter came from the top part was ejected and divorced from the main body of the prominence and diffused into the interplanetary space.

  17. The value of the acoustic voice quality index as a measure of dysphonia severity in subjects speaking different languages.

    PubMed

    Maryn, Youri; De Bodt, Marc; Barsties, Ben; Roy, Nelson

    2014-06-01

    The Acoustic Voice Quality Index (AVQI) is a relatively new clinical method to quantify dysphonia severity. Since it partially relies on continuous speech, its performance may vary with voice-related phonetic differences and thus across languages. The present investigation therefore assessed the AVQI's performance in English, Dutch, German, and French. Fifty subjects were recorded reading sentences in the four languages, as well as producing a sustained vowel. These recordings were later edited to calculate the AVQI. The samples were also perceptually rated on overall dysphonia severity by three experienced voice clinicians. The AVQI's cross-linguistic concurrent validity and diagnostic precision were assessed. The results support earlier data, and confirm good cross-linguistic validity and diagnostic accuracy. Although no statistical differences were observed between languages, the AVQI performed better in English and German and less well in French. These results validate the AVQI as a potentially robust and objective dysphonia severity measure across languages.

  18. DIAGNOSING THE PROMINENCE-CAVITY CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, Donald J.; Gibson, Sarah

    2013-06-10

    Prominences and cavities are ubiquitously observed together, but the physical link between these disparate structures has not been established. We address this issue by using dynamic emission in the extreme ultraviolet to probe the connections of these structures. The SDO/AIA observations show that the cavity exhibits excessive emission variability compared to the surrounding quiet-Sun streamer, particularly in the 171 A bandpass. We find that this dynamic emission takes the form of coherent loop-like brightening structures which emanate from the prominence into the central cavity. The geometry of these structures, dubbed prominence horns, generally mimics the curvature of the cavity boundary. We use a space-time statistical analysis of two cavities in multiple AIA bandpasses to constrain the energetic properties of 45 horns. In general, we find there is a positive correlation between the light curves of the horns in the 171 A and 193 A bandpasses; however, the 193 A emission is a factor of five weaker. There is also a strong correlation between structural changes to the prominence as viewed in the He II 304 A bandpass and the enhanced 171 A emission. In that bandpass, the prominence appears to extend several megameters along the 171 A horn where we observe co-spatial, co-temporal 304 A and 171 A emission dynamics. We present these observations as evidence of the magnetic and energetic connection between the prominence and the cavity. Further modeling work is necessary to explain the physical source and consequences of these events, particularly in the context of the traditional paradigm: the cavity is underdense because it supplies mass to the overdense prominence.

  19. A siphon mechanism for supplying prominence mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Mariska, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    A siphonlike mechanism for moving mass from the chromosphere to a gravitational well at the top of a magnetic loop to form a prominence is examined. The calculations assume no a priori flow velocity at the loop base. Instead, heating in the loop legs drives the flow. The prominence formation process requires two steps. First, the background heating rate must be reduced to on the order of 1 percent of the initial heating rate required to maintain the coronal loop. This forms an initial condensation at the top of the loop. Second, the heating must take place only in the loop legs in order to produce a pressure differential which drives mass up into the well at the top of the loop. The heating rate in the loop must be increased once the prominence has begun to form, or full prominence densities cannot be achieved in a reasonable time. It is concluded that this heating driven siphonlike mechanism is feasible for producing and maintaining prominences.

  20. Laryngeal Manual Therapies for Behavioral Dysphonia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Vanessa Veis; Pedrosa, Vanessa; Silverio, Kelly Cristina Alves; Behlau, Mara

    2017-08-24

    The aim of this study was to review systematically the literature and to analyze the effectiveness of laryngeal manual therapy in addressing the overall severity of vocal deviation, the intensity of vocal and laryngeal symptoms, and musculoskeletal pain in adults with behavioral dysphonia. This is a systematic review and meta-analysis. Two independent authors selected clinical trials that analyzed the effectiveness of laryngeal manual therapy compared with other interventions in the treatment of adults with behavioral dysphonia from the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Web of Science, and LILACS. The analyzed outcomes were the overall severity of vocal deviation, the intensity of vocal and laryngeal symptoms, and musculoskeletal pain. Data analysis was conducted based on the following steps: the assessment of the risk of bias, the measures of treatment effect and descriptive data analysis, the assessment of heterogeneity, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and the assessment of reporting biases. A total of 2135 studies were identified, three of which met the selection criteria. Data analysis showed an unclear risk of 100% of performance bias and 66% of detection bias, in addition to a 33% high risk of selection bias. Low statistical and clinical heterogeneities were found. In addition, no significant difference was found in the relative risk of improvement with laryngeal manual therapy and with other interventions in the analyzed outcomes. Various types of laryngeal manual therapies are available with similar objectives and effects, but their effectiveness is equivalent to that of other interventions involving direct voice therapy in the rehabilitation of adults with behavioral dysphonia. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Application of the acoustic voice quality index for objective measurement of dysphonia severity.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Batalla, Faustino; Díaz-Fresno, Estefanía; Álvarez-Fernández, Andrea; Muñoz Cordero, Gabriela; Llorente Pendás, José Luis

    Over the past several decades, many acoustic parameters have been studied as sensitive to and to measure dysphonia. However, current acoustic measures might not be sensitive measures of perceived voice quality. A meta-analysis which evaluated the relationship between perceived overall voice quality and several acoustic-phonetic correlates, identified measures that do not rely on the extraction of the fundamental period, such the measures derived from the cepstrum, and that can be used in sustained vowel as well as continuous speech samples. A specific and recently developed method to quantify the severity of overall dysphonia is the acoustic voice quality index (AVQI) that is a multivariate construct that combines multiple acoustic markers to yield a single number that correlates reasonably with overall vocal quality. This research is based on one pool of voice recordings collected in two sets of subjects: 60 vocally normal and 58 voice disordered participants. A sustained vowel and a sample of connected speech were recorded and analyzed to obtain the six parameters included in the AVQI using the program Praat. Statistical analysis was completed using SPSS for Windows, version 12.0. Correlation between perception of overall voice quality and AVQI: A significant difference exists (t(95) = 9.5; p<.000) between normal and dysphonic voices. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of the AVQI as a measure of dysphonia severity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  2. The assessment methods of laryngeal muscle activity in muscle tension dysphonia: a review.

    PubMed

    Khoddami, Seyyedeh Maryam; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Izadi, Farzad; Talebian Moghadam, Saeed

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this paper is to review the methods used for the assessment of muscular tension dysphonia (MTD). The MTD is a functional voice disorder associated with abnormal laryngeal muscle activity. Various assessment methods are available in the literature to evaluate the laryngeal hyperfunction. The case history, laryngoscopy, and palpation are clinical methods for the assessment of patients with MTD. Radiography and surface electromyography (EMG) are objective methods to provide physiological information about MTD. Recent studies show that surface EMG can be an effective tool for assessing muscular tension in MTD.

  3. The Hot Skin of Prominence Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiehr, E.; Stellmacher, G.; Ramelli, R.; Bianda, M.

    We observe various emission lines in solar prominences and compare the widths of He II 4686 Å, He I 4472 Å (triplet) and He I 5015 Å (singlet) with those of the optically thin Hγ and Mg b_2 lines. The latter two yield a thermal line broadening of 9000prominence regions. He II 4686 Å is 1.65 times broader and thus emitted in 2.73 times hotter regions of the prominence-corona transition layer, PCTR. The linear radiance relations He tripl/He II=50 and Hγ/He tripl=11.8 suggest a PCTR between each fine-structure thread and the surrounding hot coronal gas.

  4. Magnetic Reconnection Models of Prominence Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that prominences form by magnetic reconnection between initially distinct flux systems in the solar corona, we simulate coronal magnetic field evolution when two flux systems are driven together by boundary motions. In particular, we focus on configurations similar to those in the quiescent prominence formation model of Martens & Zwaan. We find that reconnection proceeds very weakly, if at all, in configurations driven with global shear flows (i.e., differential rotation); reconnection proceeds much more efficiently in similar configurations that are driven to collide directly, with converging motions along the neutral line that lead to flux cancellation; reconnected fields from this process can exhibit sheared, dipped field lines along the neutral line, consistent with prominence observations. Our field configurations do not possess the ``breakout'' topology, and eruptions are not observed, even though a substantial amount of flux is canceled in some runs.

  5. THE THERMAL INSTABILITY OF SOLAR PROMINENCE THREADS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Goossens, M.; Ballester, J. L.

    2011-04-10

    The fine structure of solar prominences and filaments appears as thin and long threads in high-resolution images. In H{alpha} observations of filaments, some threads can be observed for only 5-20 minutes before they seem to fade and eventually disappear, suggesting that these threads may have very short lifetimes. The presence of an instability might be the cause of this quick disappearance. Here, we study the thermal instability of prominence threads as an explanation of their sudden disappearance from H{alpha} observations. We model a prominence thread as a magnetic tube with prominence conditions embedded in a coronal environment. We assume a variation of the physical properties in the transverse direction so that the temperature and density continuously change from internal to external values in an inhomogeneous transitional layer representing the particular prominence-corona transition region (PCTR) of the thread. We use the nonadiabatic and resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations, which include terms due to thermal conduction parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, radiative losses, heating, and magnetic diffusion. We combine both analytical and numerical methods to study linear perturbations from the equilibrium state, focusing on unstable thermal solutions. We find that thermal modes are unstable in the PCTR for temperatures higher than 80,000 K, approximately. These modes are related to temperature disturbances that can lead to changes in the equilibrium due to rapid plasma heating or cooling. For typical prominence parameters, the instability timescale is of the order of a few minutes and is independent of the form of the temperature profile within the PCTR of the thread. This result indicates that thermal instability may play an important role for the short lifetimes of threads in the observations.

  6. Automated image based prominent nucleoli detection

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon K.; Kalaw, Emarene M.; Singh, Malay; Chong, Kian T.; Giron, Danilo M.; Huang, Chao-Hui; Cheng, Li; Law, Yan N.; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nucleolar changes in cancer cells are one of the cytologic features important to the tumor pathologist in cancer assessments of tissue biopsies. However, inter-observer variability and the manual approach to this work hamper the accuracy of the assessment by pathologists. In this paper, we propose a computational method for prominent nucleoli pattern detection. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five hematoxylin and eosin stained images were acquired from prostate cancer, breast cancer, renal clear cell cancer and renal papillary cell cancer tissues. Prostate cancer images were used for the development of a computer-based automated prominent nucleoli pattern detector built on a cascade farm. An ensemble of approximately 1000 cascades was constructed by permuting different combinations of classifiers such as support vector machines, eXclusive component analysis, boosting, and logistic regression. The output of cascades was then combined using the RankBoost algorithm. The output of our prominent nucleoli pattern detector is a ranked set of detected image patches of patterns of prominent nucleoli. Results: The mean number of detected prominent nucleoli patterns in the top 100 ranked detected objects was 58 in the prostate cancer dataset, 68 in the breast cancer dataset, 86 in the renal clear cell cancer dataset, and 76 in the renal papillary cell cancer dataset. The proposed cascade farm performs twice as good as the use of a single cascade proposed in the seminal paper by Viola and Jones. For comparison, a naive algorithm that randomly chooses a pixel as a nucleoli pattern would detect five correct patterns in the first 100 ranked objects. Conclusions: Detection of sparse nucleoli patterns in a large background of highly variable tissue patterns is a difficult challenge our method has overcome. This study developed an accurate prominent nucleoli pattern detector with the potential to be used in the clinical settings. PMID:26167383

  7. Measurements of magnetic fields in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deglinnocenti, Egidio Landi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be measured, in solar prominences, by means of two different basic mechanisms that are responsible for the introduction (or the reduction) of a given amount of polarization in spectral lines: these are the Zeeman effect and the Hanle effect. Through the splitting of the magnetic components of a spectral line, the Zeeman effect is capable of introducing a certain amount of circular polarization across the line profile. The Hanle effect consist of a modification of the linear polarization that is induced in spectral lines by the anisotropic illumination of the prominence plasma by the photospheric radiation field. These two effects are briefly discussed.

  8. Exploring the properties of Solar Prominence Tornados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, E.; Panesar, N. K.; Sterling, A. C.; Moore, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Solar prominences consist of relatively cool and dense plasma embedded in the hotter solar corona above the solar limb. They form along magnetic polarity inversion lines, and are magnetically supported against gravity at heights of up to ~100 Mm above the chromosphere. Often, parts of prominences visually resemble Earth-based tornados, with inverted-cone-shaped structures and internal motions suggestive of rotation. These "prominence tornados" clearly possess complex magnetic structure, but it is still not certain whether they actually rotate around a ''rotation'' axis, or instead just appear to do so because of composite internal material motions such as counter-streaming flows or lateral (i.e. transverse to the field) oscillations. Here we study the structure and dynamics of five randomly selected prominences, using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) 171 Å images obtained with high spatial and temporal resolution by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft. All of the prominences resided in non-active-region locations, and displayed what appeared to be tornado-like rotational motions. Our set includes examples oriented both broadside and end-on to our line-of-sight. We created time-distance plots of horizontal slices at several different heights of each prominence, to study the horizontal plasma motions. We observed patterns of oscillations at various heights in each prominence, and we measured parameters of these oscillations. We find the oscillation time periods to range over ~50 - 90 min, with average amplitudes of ~6,000 km, and with average velocities of ~7 kms-1. We found similar values for prominences viewed either broadside or end-on; this observed isotropy of the lateral oscillatory motion suggests that the apparent oscillations result from actual rotational plasma motions and/or lateral oscillations of the magnetic field, rather than to counter-streaming flows. This research was supported by the National

  9. [Typical Patterns of Neuronal Activity in Relay and Nonspecific Thalamic Nuclei in Patients with Spasmodic Torticollis].

    PubMed

    Devetiarov, D A; Semenova, U N; Butiaeva, L I; Sedov, A S

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity of 50 neurons in nonspecific (Rt, MD) and relay (Voi, Voa) thalamic nuclei was analyzed. Data were obtained by microelectrode technique during 14 stereotactic operations in patients with spasmodic torticollis. Application of Poincare maps and Gap-statistics allowed to reveal 3 main patterns of neuronal activity: irregular single spikes, low-threshold Ca(2+)-dependent rhythmic (3-5 Hz) bursts and combination of bursts and single spikes. In some cases, grouping (in Voi and Rt nuclei) and long burst (in Voa nucleus) patterns were observed. Grouping pattern consist of low-density groups of spikes with tendency to periodicity in range 1-1.5 Hz. Long burst pattern consist of long dense groups of spikes with random length and invariant interburst intervals. Main numerical estimations of 3 most spread patterns of neuronal activity were obtained by parametric analysis. In results, investigated thalamic nuclei significantly distinguished from each other by characteristics of burst activity but average firing rate of these nuclei hadn't significant differences. These data may be useful for functional identification of thalamic nuclei during stereotactic neurosurgery operation in patients with movement disorders.

  10. Studies on prokinetic, laxative and spasmodic activities of Phyllanthus emblica in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Malik Hassan; Rehman, Abdul; Rehman, Najeeb-Ur; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2013-07-01

    This study was aimed to provide pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of Phyllanthus emblica fruit in indigestion and constipation using the in-vivo and in-vitro assays. The crude extract of the dried fruits of Phyllanthus emblica (Pe.Cr) and its fractions were tested positive for alkaloids, saponins, tannins, terpenes, flavonoids, sterols and coumarins. Pe.Cr at the doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg exhibited the prokinetic and laxative activities in mice, which were found partially sensitive to atropine. In isolated guinea-pig ileum and rabbit jejunum, the crude extract and its aqueous fraction (Pe.Aq) caused concentration-dependent and partially atropine-sensitive stimulatory effects followed by relaxation at higher tested concentrations, being more efficacious in guinea pig, while more potent in rabbit tissues. The petroleum fraction (0.003-0.1 mg/mL) exhibited fully atropine-sensitive contractions in both guinea-pig and rabbit tissues. However, the ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions (0.003-1.0 mg/mL) showed only spasmolytic activity when studied in spontaneously contracting rabbit jejunum. This study showed that the Phyllanthus emblica possesses prokinetic and laxative activities in mice along with spasmodic effect in the isolated tissues of guinea pig and rabbit, mediated partially through activation of muscarinic receptors; thus, this study provides a rationale for the medicinal use of Phyllanthus emblica fruits in indigestion and constipation.

  11. Calibrating the Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lewis; Casini, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Prominence Magnetometer (ProMag) is a dual-channel, dual-beam, slit-scanning, full Stokes spectro-polarimeter designed by the High Altitude Observatory at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (HAO/NCAR) for the study of the magnetism of solar prominences and filaments. It was deployed in August 2009 at the 40 cm coronagraph of the Evans Solar Facility (ESF) of the National Solar Observatory on Sacramento Peak (NSO/SP). In its standard mode of operation it acquires spectro-polarimetric maps of solar targets simultaneously in the two chromospheric lines of He I at 587.6 nm and 1083.0 nm. Since August 2011 ProMag has operated in “patrol mode” with a dedicated observer. We aim to routinely measure the vector magnetic field in prominences. The electro-optic modulator and polarization analyzer are integrated into a single mechanical unit located at the coude feed of the telescope. This location was necessary for proper co-alignment of the dual beams, but complicates the precise polarimeter calibration necessary to achieve the sensitivity required for prominence measurements (< 10^-3). At this sensitivity, small variations in optical alignment can become significant. We present a calibration method for ProMag, using a polarizer and retarder at coronagraph prime focus. Calibrations are recorded before and after observations. We discuss the success of this method and its limitations.

  12. Topic Prominence in Chinese EFL Learners' Interlanguage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shaopeng; Yang, Lianrui

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the general characteristics of topicprominent typological interlanguage development of Chinese learners of English in terms of acquiring subject-prominent English structures from a discourse perspective. Topic structures mainly appear in Chinese discourse in the form of topic chains (Wang, 2002; 2004). The…

  13. Vertical Localization of the Malar Prominence

    PubMed Central

    Kaptein, John S.; Markarian, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background: During reconstruction or augmentation, it is important to localize the malar complex in a symmetrical and aesthetically pleasing position. Few studies have determined the location of this feature and none related the location to gender, age, or ethnicity. Some of these have attempted to relate the position to the aesthetically pleasing Golden Ratio φ. Methods: We assessed the vertical location of the malar prominence relative to other facial landmarks, determined consistency among individuals, and compared this with values used in artistry. Study population consisted of a convenience sample of 67 patients taken from an otolaryngology practice at a large urban medical center. Coordinates of the malar prominence were referenced to distinct facial landmarks from which the ratio of chin-to-malar prominence to chin-to-eye canthus was determined. Results: Average chin-to-malar prominence distance was 0.793 ± 0.023 (SD) of the chin-to-eye canthus distance. Variability due to the specific image chosen [coefficient of variation (CV) = 1.19%] and combined inter/intrareader variability (CV = 1.71%) validate the methodology. Variability among individuals (CV = 2.84%) indicates population consistency. No difference was found between gender and age groups or between whites and Hispanics. Individuals of other/unknown ethnicities were within the range common to whites and Hispanics. Our population’s value is not different from the value of 0.809 used in artistry, which is based on the Golden Ratio φ. Conclusions: The vertical position of the malar prominence is consistent among individuals, is clinically well-approximated by the value based on the Golden Ratio, and may be useful as a reference for surgical reconstruction or augmentation. PMID:26180712

  14. PROMINENCE ACTIVATION BY CORONAL FAST MODE SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Takuya; Asai, Ayumi; Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-03-01

    An X5.4 class flare occurred in active region NOAA11429 on 2012 March 7. The flare was associated with a very fast coronal mass ejection (CME) with a velocity of over 2500 km s{sup −1}. In the images taken with the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory-B/COR1, a dome-like disturbance was seen to detach from an expanding CME bubble and propagated further. A Type-II radio burst was also observed at the same time. On the other hand, in extreme ultraviolet images obtained by the Solar Dynamic Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the expanding dome-like structure and its footprint propagating to the north were observed. The footprint propagated with an average speed of about 670 km s{sup −1} and hit a prominence located at the north pole and activated it. During the activation, the prominence was strongly brightened. On the basis of some observational evidence, we concluded that the footprint in AIA images and the ones in COR1 images are the same, that is, the MHD fast mode shock front. With the help of a linear theory, the fast mode Mach number of the coronal shock is estimated to be between 1.11 and 1.29 using the initial velocity of the activated prominence. Also, the plasma compression ratio of the shock is enhanced to be between 1.18 and 2.11 in the prominence material, which we consider to be the reason for the strong brightening of the activated prominence. The applicability of linear theory to the shock problem is tested with a nonlinear MHD simulation.

  15. [Proposal of a rating scale of posture for simple dysfunctional dysphonia: "S-TRAV"].

    PubMed

    Lobryeau-Desnus, C; Lamy, A; Amiel, J

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to create a scale to evaluate posture, quick and easy to perform during the assessment of voice in patients with simple dysfunctional dysphonia. The "S-TRAV" scale was evaluated on 60 subjects with dysphonia and 60 control subjects. It assesses "the overall severity" of the alteration of posture, the "Tension", the "Breathing", the "Ground anchoring" and the "Verticality" both quantitatively (score 0-3) and qualitatively. The patient also assesses his voice disorder and his posture. Postural observation was carried out in five conditions: at rest, conversational voice, reading, projected voice and singing voice. The comparison between the dysphonic subjects and control subjects was used to assess the sensitivity of this tool. Two reviewers rated the scale to determine its reproducibility. The scale is sensible for the majority of criteria with a significance coefficient less than 0.05. The most discriminate criteria relate to the cervical spine, the overall score of postural severity assessed by the therapist and verticality. All criteria have a low level of variability between the reviewers under all conditions. Most criteria are correlated with the criterion "Overall Severity" of postural alterations under all conditions. Non-sensible criteria were eliminated from the final scale). This tool is sensitive, reproducible and relevant in assessing the severity of postural alterations and their location. Further studies will validate the scale on a consistent population.

  16. Dysphonia as the primary complaint in a case of myasthenia gravis: diagnosis and speech therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemr, Nair Kátia; Simões-Zenari, Marcia; Ferreira, Tainá Soares; Fernandes, Heloisa Regina; Mansur, Letícia Lessa

    2013-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease, manifested by progressive muscular weakness and fatigue. There are frequent ocular and bulbar symptoms, among them, dysphonia. This article reports a case of dysphonia that contributed to the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis through a speech evaluation. The patient sought speech therapy with the ENT diagnosis of presbyphonia. The perceptual voice assessment and acoustic analysis pointed out respiration, glottal voice source and resonance affections. Considering that some of the data obtained from anamnesis and vocal assessments were not directly related to presbyphonia, the speech therapist discussed the case with the physician and they both concluded it was necessary to refer the patient to a neurological evaluation. The neurologist then raised the diagnostic hypotheses of myasthenia gravis and requested further examinations. The patient underwent speech therapy and drug treatment. A vocal reassessment, which occurred two months after the initial treatment, showed improvement in voice quality, with great impact on quality of life. This article shows the importance of detailed clinical speech evaluation and participation of a speech therapist in an interdisciplinary team.

  17. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox - larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography - guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy - ...

  18. Investigating prominence turbulence with Hinode SOT Dopplergrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    2017-01-01

    Quiescent prominences host a diverse range of flows, including Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven upflows and impulsive downflows, and so it is no surprise that turbulent motions also exist. As prominences are believed to have a mean horizontal guide field, investigating any turbulence they host could shed light on the nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a wide range of astrophysical systems. In this paper we have investigated the nature of the turbulent prominence motions using structure function analysis on the velocity increments estimated from Hα Dopplergrams constructed with observational data from Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The probability density function of the velocity increments shows that as we look at increasingly small spatial separations the distribution displays greater departure from a reference Gaussian distribution, hinting at intermittency in the velocity field. Analysis of the even order structure functions for both the horizontal and vertical separations showed the existence of two distinct regions displaying different exponents of the power law with the break in the power law at approximately 2000 km. We hypothesise this to be a result of internal turbulence excited in the prominence by the dynamic flows of the system found at this spatial scale. We found that the scaling exponents of the pth order structure functions for these two regions generally followed the p/ 2 (smaller scales) and p/ 4 (larger scales) laws that are the same as those predicted for weak MHD turbulence and Kraichnan-Iroshnikov turbulence respectively. However, the existence of the p/ 4 scaling at larger scales than the p/ 2 scaling is inconsistent with the increasing nonlinearity expected in MHD turbulence. We also found that as we went to higher order structure functions, the dependence of the scaling exponent on the order p is nonlinear implying that intermittency may be playing an important role in the turbulent cascade. Estimating the heating

  19. Measuring vector magnetic fields in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2013-05-01

    We present spectropolarimetric observations in the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet of a quiescent, hedgerow solar prominence. The data were taken with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter attached to the German Vacuum Tower Telescope at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife; Canary Islands; Spain). The observed He I circular and linear polarization signals are dominated by the Zeeman effect and by atomic level polarization and the Hanle effect, respectively. These observables are sensitive to the strength and orientation of the magnetic field vector at each spatial point of the field of view. We determine the magnetic field vector of the prominence by applying the HAZEL inversion code to the observed Stokes profiles. We briefly discuss the retrieved magnetic field vector configuration.

  20. [Impacts on tiptoe deformity and intelligent development in spasmodic cerebral palsy treated with acupuncture at naoqing xue (extra)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Lan, Rui; Liu, Zhen-Huan

    2013-07-01

    To assess the impacts on tiptoe deformity and intelligent development in spasmodic cerebral palsy treated with acupuncture at Naoqing Xue (Extra). One hundred and forty-six children with spasmodic cerebral palsy were randomized into a Naoqing Xue group (74 cases) and a control group (72 cases). On the basic treatment (scalp acupuncture, sport therapy), in the Naoqing Xue group, acupuncture at Naoqing Xue (Extra) was applied. In the control group, acupuncture was given at Jiexi (ST 41), Yanglingquan (GB 34) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6). In the two groups, acupuncture was given once every two days, 10 treatments made one session, at the interval of 15 days between two sessions. Three sessions of treatment were given continuously. Before treatment and after 3 sessions of treatment, the angle measurement of ankle passive dorsiflexion, comprehensive spasm scale (CSS) and Gesell intelligence test were adopted for the rehabilitation assessment. Additionally, 30 min after the end of the first acupuncture treatment, the angle measurement of ankle passive dorsiflexion and CSS were applied to assess the immediate effect of the therapeutic methods of the two groups. The immediate effect of the angle measurement of ankle passive dorsiflexion and CSS as well as the effect after 3 sessions of treatment in the Naoqing Xue group were all superior to those in the control group (all P < 0.05). In 3 sessions of treatment, the development quotients of social adaptive behavior and personal social activation function in Gesell intelligence test in the Naoqing Xue group were all higher than those in the control group (all P < 0.05). The development quotients of major movement, fine motion and language were not different significantly as compared with those in the control group (P > 0.05). Acupuncture at Naoqing Xue (Extra) relieves tiptoe deformity and promotes intelligent development for the children with spasmodic cerebral palsy.

  1. [Observation on the efficacy of acupuncture at key acupoints combined with rehabilitation therapy for spasmodic hemiplegia after cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Tong, Shuai; Su, Li; Lü, Hai-Bo; Liu, Jian-Qiao

    2013-05-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture at key acupoints combined with the routine rehabilitation training of limb function on spasmodic hemiplegia after cerebral infarction. Eighty-six cases were randomized into an acupuncture combined with rehabilitation group (group A, 44 cases) and a rehabilitation group (group B, 42 cases). In group A, the key acupoints were selected from head, face, chest, abdomen, shoulder, back, hands, feet and ankles such as Cuanzhu (BL 2), Danzhong (CV 17), Jianyu (LI 15) and Yanglao (SI 16) were stimulated with acupuncture. In combination, the routine limb rehabilitation training was applied, once every day. In group B, the routine limb rehabilitation training was applied alone. In both groups, 10 treatments made one session and 2 sessions were required totally. Before and after treatment, Fugl-Meyer scale and functional independent measurement (FIM) scale were adopted to assess the limb motor level and the activity of daily life in the patients respectively. The modified Ashworth scale was used to assess the effect of anti-spasm. The total effective rate of anti-spasm was 90.9% (40/44) in the group A, which was superior to 73.8% (32/42) in the group B (P < 0.05). After 2 sessions of treatment, Fugl-Meyer score and FIM score were all improved in both groups (all P < 0.05) and the results in the group A were better than those in the group B (all P < 0.05). Additionally, the improvement of FIM score after the 1st session of treatment in the group A was better as compared with the group B, indicating the significant difference (P < 0.05). Acupuncture at key acupoints combined with rehabilitation therapy effectively relieves the spasmodic condition of the patients with post-stroke spasmodic hemiplegia, improves the limb function and the life activity of the patients.

  2. Full Stokes Spectropolarimetry of Hα in Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Ariste, A.; Casini, R.; Paletou, F.; Tomczyk, S.; Lites, B. W.; Semel, M.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2005-03-01

    We report on spectropolarimetric observations of Hα in prominences made with the Télescope Héliographique pour l'Etude du Magnétisme et des Instabilités Solaires and the High Altitude Observatory/Advanced Stokes Polarimeter. Stokes Q and U show the expected profile shape from resonance scattering polarization and the Hanle effect. In contrast, most of the time, Stokes V does not show the antisymmetric profile shape typical of the Zeeman effect but a profile that indicates the presence of strong atomic orientation in the hydrogen levels, to an extent that cannot be explained by invoking the alignment-to-orientation transfer mechanism induced by the prominence magnetic field. We found that the largest signal amplitudes of Stokes V (comparable to that of Stokes Q and U) could be produced by a process of selective absorption of circularly polarized radiation from the photosphere, which requires that the prominence be in the vicinity of an active region. Although recent observations of active region filaments indicate such a selective absorption mechanism as a plausible explanation of the anomalous signals observed, the particular set of conditions that must be met suggest that a different explanation may be required to explain the almost ubiquitous symmetric V signal observed in Hα prominences. Therefore, we speculate that an alternative mechanism inducing strong atomic orientation at the observed level could be due to the presence of electric fields inducing an electric Hanle effect on Hα. Although we are still working toward a careful modeling of this effect, including both electric and magnetic fields, we present some preliminary considerations that seem to support this possibility.

  3. Inference of magnetic fields in inhomogeneous prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milić, I.; Faurobert, M.; Atanacković, O.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Most of the quantitative information about the magnetic field vector in solar prominences comes from the analysis of the Hanle effect acting on lines formed by scattering. As these lines can be of non-negligible optical thickness, it is of interest to study the line formation process further. Aims: We investigate the multidimensional effects on the interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations, particularly on the inference of the magnetic field vector. We do this by analyzing the differences between multidimensional models, which involve fully self-consistent radiative transfer computations in the presence of spatial inhomogeneities and velocity fields, and those which rely on simple one-dimensional geometry. Methods: We study the formation of a prototype line in ad hoc inhomogeneous, isothermal 2D prominence models. We solve the NLTE polarized line formation problem in the presence of a large-scale oriented magnetic field. The resulting polarized line profiles are then interpreted (i.e. inverted) assuming a simple 1D slab model. Results: We find that differences between input and the inferred magnetic field vector are non-negligible. Namely, we almost universally find that the inferred field is weaker and more horizontal than the input field. Conclusions: Spatial inhomogeneities and radiative transfer have a strong effect on scattering line polarization in the optically thick lines. In real-life situations, ignoring these effects could lead to a serious misinterpretation of spectropolarimetric observations of chromospheric objects such as prominences.

  4. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING. II. PROMINENCE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-10-20

    We use the new three-dimensional (3D) whole-prominence fine structure model to study the evolution of prominences and their fine structures in response to changes in the underlying photospheric magnetic flux distribution. The applied model combines a detailed 3D prominence magnetic field configuration with a realistic description of the prominence plasma distributed along multiple fine structures. In addition, we utilize an approximate Hα visualization technique to study the evolution of the visible cool prominence plasma both in emission (prominence) and absorption (filament). We show that the initial magnetic field configuration of the modeled prominence is significantly disturbed by the changing position of a single polarity of a magnetic bipole as the bipole is advected toward the main body of the filament. This leads to the creation of a barb, which becomes the dominant feature visible in the synthetic Hα images of both the prominence and filament views. The evolution of the bipole also creates conditions that lead to the disappearance and reappearance of large portions of the main body. We also show that an arch-like region containing a dark void (a bubble) can be naturally produced in the synthetic prominence Hα images. While not visible in terms of the magnetic field lines, it is due to a lack of Hα emission from low-pressure, low-density plasma located in shallow magnetic dips lying along the lines of sight intersecting the dark void. In addition, a quasi-vertical small-scale feature consisting of short and deep dips, piled one above the other, is produced.

  5. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials in a case of 'Manto syndrome', or spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Disertori, B; Ducati, A; Piazza, M; Pavani, M

    1982-12-01

    A case of spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome observed for over 18 months is presented and discussed. Maximal head rotation (determining backward gaze) was associated with compression of the brachial plexus between the scaleni muscles and motor, sensory and trophic troubles in the hand. This new syndrome is called after the diviner Manto, quoted by Dante Alighieri in his 'Divina Commedia' (Inferno, XX, 52-56). The etiology was ascribed to subacute toxic effects of methylparathion. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) demonstrated severe brainstem involvement, maximal in the mesencephalic structures. Clinical and neurophysiological data improved on treatment with L-5-hydroxytryptophan. Finally, BAEPs returned to normal.

  6. Sexual Well-Being in Patients with Blepharospasm, Spasmodic Torticollis, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Perozzo, Paola; Salatino, Adriana; Cerrato, Paolo; Ricci, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory, a reduced form of the Golombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson's disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2) were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e., altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits). Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS, and comparable data are not available.

  7. Sexual Well-Being in Patients with Blepharospasm, Spasmodic Torticollis, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Perozzo, Paola; Salatino, Adriana; Cerrato, Paolo; Ricci, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory, a reduced form of the Golombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2) were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e., altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits). Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS, and comparable data are not available. PMID:27761118

  8. On the thermal durability of solar prominences, or how to evaporate a prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malherbe, J. M.; Forbes, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal disappearance of solar prominences under strong perturbations due to wave heating, Ohmic heating, viscous heating or conduction was investigated. Specifically, how large a thermal perturbation is needed to destroy a stable thermal equilibrium was calculated. It was found that the prominence plasma appears to be thermally very rugged. Its cold equilibrium may most likely be destroyed by either strong magnetic heating or conduction in a range of parameters which is relevant to flares.

  9. Normal mode behaviours in solar prominence plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohain, M.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of normal modes, non-adiabatic magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) waves, in the prominence plasmas in the presence of kinematic viscosity and inertia-dependent species stratification is herein explored. It judiciously implements a new energy equation devised to describe optically thin radiation losses, thermal conduction, viscosity, heating mechanisms, and so forth. The dispersion analysis demonstrates that the thermal conduction plays as a primary sink for both the wave classes of fast and slow spectral groups. Finally, asynoptic indication to further refinements and scopes is concisely stressed.

  10. Dysphonia secondary to traumatic avulsion of the vocal fold in infants.

    PubMed

    Bray, D; Cavalli, L; Eze, N; Mills, N; Hartley, B E J

    2010-11-01

    Airway compromise due to paediatric intubation injuries is well documented; however, intubation injuries may also cause severe voice disorders. We report our experience and review the world literature on the voice effects of traumatic paediatric intubation. We report five cases of children referred to Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children who suffered traumatic avulsion of the vocal fold at the time of, or secondary to, endotracheal intubation. All children had significant dysphonia and underwent specialist voice therapy. The mechanisms of injury, risk factors and management of the condition are discussed. Children suffering traumatic intubation require follow up throughout childhood and beyond puberty as their vocal needs and abilities change. At the time of writing, none of the reported patients had yet undergone reconstructive or medialisation surgery. However, regular specialist voice therapy evaluation is recommended for such patients, with consideration of phonosurgical techniques including injection laryngoplasty or thyroplasty.

  11. Inharmonicity Analysis: A Novel Physical Method for Acoustic Screening of Dysphonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, Sam; Lu, Fang-Ling

    2008-10-01

    In the United States 6.8% of men, women, and children report current voice problems and approximately 29% will report some problems during their lifetime. Often this dysphonia is due to pathologies of the vocal folds. The authors (a physicist and a speech pathologist) describe an interdisciplinary approach that shows promise of detecting physiological abnormalities of the vocal folds from an analysis of the Fourier spectrum of spoken ``tokens.'' The underlying principle maintains that the normal human vocal fold is a linear oscillator that emits overtones that are very nearly precise integral values of the fundamental. Physiological problems of the vocal folds, however, introduce mechanical non-linearities that manifest themselves as frequency deviations from the ideal harmonic (that is, integral) values. The authors quantify this inharmonicity, describing and illustrating how one can obtain and analyze such data. They outline, as well, a proposed program to assess the clinical sensitivity and significance of the analysis discussed in this work.

  12. Dysphagia, dysphonia and sore throat following cerebral infarction: an unexpected cause.

    PubMed

    Slade, Peter Michael Edward; Larsen, Matthew Peter

    2015-07-06

    A 75-year-old woman presented with left-sided weakness. There was no speech disturbance or reported swallowing difficulties. CT of the head revealed infarction in the territory of the right middle cerebral artery. The patient was transferred to the acute stroke unit and a nasogastric tube was placed following a failed swallow screening test. The following day, on assessment, there was considerable pain on swallowing. The tone and quality of the patient's voice had deteriorated and there was significant dysphagia. Seven days later a plastic item, later identified as the patient's denture, was expectorated. Following this, the dysphagia, dysphonia and sore throat rapidly resolved. The case highlights the importance of considering foreign body in the differential, and oral cavity examination in the assessment of a patient with dysphagia and sore throat is essential. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Voice care knowledge among clinicians and people with healthy voices or dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen M; Drinnan, Michael J; Carding, Paul N

    2007-01-01

    An important clinical component in the prevention and treatment of voice disorders is voice care and hygiene. Research in voice care knowledge has mainly focussed on specific groups of professional voice users with limited reporting on the tool and evidence base used. In this study, a questionnaire to measure voice care knowledge was developed based on "best evidence." The questionnaire was validated by measuring specialist voice clinicians' agreement. Preliminary data are then presented using the voice care knowledge questionnaire with 17 subjects with nonorganic dysphonia and 17 with healthy voices. There was high (89%) agreement among the clinicians. There was a highly significant difference between the dysphonic and the healthy group scores (P = 0.00005). Furthermore, the dysphonic subjects (63% agreement) presented with less voice care knowledge than the subjects with healthy voices (72% agreement). The questionnaire provides a useful and valid tool to investigate voice care knowledge. The findings have implications for clinical intervention, voice therapy, and health prevention.

  14. The use of anti-spasmodics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: focus on otilonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Forte, E; Pizzoferrato, M; Lopetuso, L; Scaldaferri, F

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this review is to summarize the studies carried out, with particular interest in those who dealt with otilonium bromide in treatment of IBS. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a frequent gastrointestinal disease, characterized by a combination of several symptoms including abdominal pain or discomfort, flatulence and problems related to bowel habits (constipation and/or diarrhea). It affects about 15% of the western population, with a negative impact on the quality of life and also on health care costs. Face to such important complexity and negative impact, therapeutic options are still very limited and most of the pharmacological compounds mostly validated for short term use, are only partially controlling symptoms. Among those, anti-spasmodics are commonly used in clinical settings. Despite a discrete literature in support of these drugs, systematic collections of clinical evidence to support the use of anti-spasmodics and in particular the use of otilonium bromide in course of IBS are scarce. Otilonium bromide is a systemically poorly absorbed antispasmodic, which has shown clear efficacy compared to placebo, in controlling symptoms related to IBS. Otilonium bromide was effective also in comparison to other drugs, such as pinaverium bromide and mebeverine, with a favorable tolerability profile. Further studies are necessary to better define duration of treatment and maximum therapeutic dose.

  15. Objective dysphonia quantification in vocal fold paralysis: comparing nonlinear with classical measures.

    PubMed

    Little, Max A; Costello, Declan A E; Harries, Meredydd L

    2011-01-01

    Clinical acoustic voice-recording analysis is usually performed using classical perturbation measures, including jitter, shimmer, and noise-to-harmonic ratios (NHRs). However, restrictive mathematical limitations of these measures prevent analysis for severely dysphonic voices. Previous studies of alternative nonlinear random measures addressed wide varieties of vocal pathologies. Here, we analyze a single vocal pathology cohort, testing the performance of these alternative measures alongside classical measures. We present voice analysis pre- and postoperatively in 17 patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). The patients underwent standard medialization thyroplasty surgery, and the voices were analyzed using jitter, shimmer, NHR, nonlinear recurrence period density entropy (RPDE), detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), and correlation dimension. In addition, we similarly analyzed 11 healthy controls. Systematizing the preanalysis editing of the recordings, we found that the novel measures were more stable and, hence, reliable than the classical measures on healthy controls. RPDE and jitter are sensitive to improvements pre- to postoperation. Shimmer, NHR, and DFA showed no significant change (P>0.05). All measures detect statistically significant and clinically important differences between controls and patients, both treated and untreated (P<0.001, area under curve [AUC]>0.7). Pre- to postoperation grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain (GRBAS) ratings show statistically significant and clinically important improvement in overall dysphonia grade (G) (AUC=0.946, P<0.001). Recalculating AUCs from other study data, we compare these results in terms of clinical importance. We conclude that, when preanalysis editing is systematized, nonlinear random measures may be useful for monitoring UVFP-treatment effectiveness, and there may be applications to other forms of dysphonia. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  16. Laryngeal reinnervation for paralytic dysphonia in children younger than 10 years.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marshall E; Roy, Nelson; Houtz, Dan

    2012-12-01

    To study the effectiveness of ansa-recurrent laryngeal nerve laryngeal reinnervation to improve glottal incompetence causing dysphonia and dysphagia for children with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. DESIGN We reviewed a series of consecutive cases treated from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2011. Otolaryngology division of a children's hospital. PATIENTS Thirteen children with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Surgical complications, parent surrogate quality-of-life measures, global overall assessment of improvement, and auditory perceptual assessment. Thirteen children underwent laryngeal reinnervation. Ages ranged from 2.2 to 8.8 years (mean [SD] age, 5.3 [2.6] years). No major complications were identified. Nine children had preoperative and 6- to 12-month postoperative data on voice and swallowing. Mean parental global voice rating (0 indicates no voice; 100%, normal voice) changed from 43% (range, 20%-65%) preoperatively to 79% (range, 50%-100%) postoperatively. Regarding perceptual assessment, the mean GRBAS (Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain) Rating Scale sum score (0 indicates normal voice; 15, profoundly abnormal voice) improved from 6.3 to 2.9. Parental assessment of dysphagia with liquids also improved for all children with preoperative symptoms and worsened for none. Our early experience suggests that ansa-recurrent laryngeal nerve laryngeal reinnervation is a safe and effective treatment for unilateral vocal fold paralysis with symptomatic dysphonia and dysphagia in young children. The procedure has advantages compared with other treatments. This option should be discussed with parents when the paralysis is identified. The child should be observed for several years in the event that voice and swallowing symptoms from glottal incompetence do not improve.

  17. Filament-Prominence-Cme Magnetic Evolution Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagala', L. G.; Mandrini, C. H.; Fernandez Borda, R.; de Pontieu, B.; Rovira, M. G.; Rank, G.

    1999-10-01

    The first results of the SOHO Joint Observation Program JOP 99 are outlined. JOP 99 involve several SOHO instruments (CDS, LASCO, MDI), together with TRACE, and two new ground-based instruments: HASTA (Hα Solar Telescope for Argentina) and MICA (Mirror Coronagraph for Argentina). The proposed program have a new motivation in taking advantage of the capabilities of the TRACE instrument, together with our experience in magnetic reconnection. The objective here is focused on the investigation of the conditions of the eruption of a prominence, often associated with the CME. JOP 99 is running at the moment that this abstract is submitted. It is a 5-days study of the filament/prominence, with 3-4 days observing the disk and 1-2 days observing the limb. While on disk, we will look for the eruption signatures in two ways: by studying the physical conditions in the filament and its surroundings (densities, temperature, abundances), and by looking at the magnetic topology changes. While at the limb, we will wait with luck for an eruption. If it does happen, LASCO and MICA observations will study if there exists an associated CME.

  18. A Solar Prominence, Elbow-Prominence, Image From Skylab-3 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Some of the prominences that float like lazy clouds above the solar surface suddenly erupt and break away from the Sun in cataclysmic action. The trigger of this coronal transient, like many others seen by Skylab's coronagraph, was an eruptive prominence that surged outward from the limb of the Sun, ejecting matter that disturbed the outer corona. This image is of the surge in action in ultraviolet light of ionized helium. Simultaneous observations like this made possible an almost immediate understanding of the new-found cosmic phenomenon. The elbow prominence was accidentally photographed by Astronaut Garriott (Skylab-3) while observing a small flare near the limb of the Sun beneath the mighty arch on August 9, 1973.

  19. Explosive Instability of Prominence Flux Ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O; Fong, R H L; Cowley, S C

    2002-09-04

    The rapid, Alfvenic, time scale of erupting solar-prominences has been an enigma ever since they where first identified. Investigators have proposed a variety of different mechanisms in an effort to account for the abrupt reconfiguration observed. No one mechanism clearly stands out as the single cause of these explosive events. Recent analysis has demonstrated that field lines in the solar atmosphere are metastable to ballooning type instabilities. It has been found previously that in ideal MHD plasmas marginally unstable ballooning modes inevitably become ''explosive'' evolving towards a finite time singularity via a nonlinear 3D instability called ''Nonlinear Magnetohydrodynamic Detonation.'' Thus, this mechanism is a good candidate to explain explosive events observed in the solar atmosphere of our star or in others.

  20. Spasmodic muscle cramps and weakness as presenting symptoms in Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Rosen, John M; Kuntz, Nancy; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Bass, Lee M

    2013-10-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of hepatic copper metabolism that has tremendous variability in its presentation. Phenotypic diversity of the disease can lead to delayed diagnosis. We describe a case of WD in a 10-year-old boy presenting with 3 months of increasingly intense, spasmodic lower extremity muscle cramps. Physical examination revealed tenderness on calf palpation and dark flat lesions over his ankles, knees, and elbows. Initial testing revealed creatine kinase of 302 IU/L (normal 24-248 IU/L), hemoglobin of 8.9 g/dL (11.5-15.5 g/dL), aspartate aminotransferase of 114 IU/L (16-52 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase of 54 IU/L (2-30 IU/L), and myoglobinuria. Extensive evaluation of his myopathy, including MRI and muscle biopsy, was negative. Additional laboratory tests revealed a prothrombin time of 21.3 seconds (11.8-15.5 seconds), total bilirubin of 1.4 mg/dL (<1 mg/dL), direct bilirubin of 0.5 mg/dL (<0.3 mg/dL), albumin of 2.1 g/dL (3.1-4.6 g/dL), a reticulocyte percentage of 4.5% (0.5%-2.5%), a negative Coombs direct antibody test, ceruloplasmin of 3 mg/dL (21-51 mg/dL), and 24-h urine copper of 393 μg/24 h (15-60 μg/24 h). Liver biopsy showed patchy advanced fibrosis, mild inflammation, positive staining for copper, and a tissue copper concentration of 768 µg/g (10-35 μg/g). Brain MRI revealed symmetric intrinsic T1 shortening within bilateral basal ganglia. Trientene therapy was initiated for WD. Symptoms and laboratory abnormalities resolved and remain normal at 21 months' follow-up. Musculoskeletal involvement in WD is uncommon and typically defined as bone demineralization, arthropathy, or hypokalemic muscle weakness. In patients with unexplained musculoskeletal symptoms and hepatic abnormalities, a diagnosis of WD should be considered and appropriate evaluation initiated.

  1. Species and tissue-specificity of prokinetic, laxative and spasmodic effects of Fumaria parviflora

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fumaria parviflora Linn. (Fumariaceae), is a small branched annual herb found in many parts of the world including Saudi Arabia and Pakistan. This study was designed to provide pharmacological basis for the medicinal use of Fumaria parviflora in gut motility disorders. Methods The in-vivo prokinetic and laxative assays were conducted in mice. Isolated intestinal preparations (ileum and jejunum) from different animal species (mouse, guinea-pig and rabbit) were separately suspended in tissue baths containing Tyrode's solution bubbled with carbogen and maintained at 37°C. The spasmogenic responses were recorded using isotonic transducers coupled with PowerLab data acquisition system. Results The aqueous-methanol extract of Fumaria parviflora (Fp.Cr), which tested positive for the presence of alkaloids, saponins, tannins and anthraquinones showed partially atropine-sensitive prokinetic and laxative activities in the in-vivo in mice at 30 and 100 mg/kg. In the in-vitro studies, Fp.Cr (0.01-1 mg/ml) caused a concentration-dependent atropine-sensitive stimulatory effect both in mouse tissues (jejunum and ileum), and rabbit jejunum but had no effect in rabbit ileum. In guinea-pig tissues (ileum and jejunum), the crude extract showed a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect with higher efficacy in ileum and the effect was partially blocked by atropine, indicating the involvement of more than one types of gut-stimulant components (atropine-sensitive and insensitive). This could be a plausible reason for the greater efficacy of Fp.Cr in gut preparations of guinea-pig than in rabbit or mouse. Conclusions This study shows the prokinetic, laxative and spasmodic effects of the plant extract partially mediated through cholinergic pathways with species and tissue-selectivity, and provides a sound rationale for the medicinal use of Fumaria parviflora in gut motility disorders such as, indigestion and constipation. This study also suggests using different species to

  2. From dysphonia to dysphoria: Mokken scaling shows a strong, reliable hierarchy of voice symptoms in the Voice Symptom Scale questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Deary, Ian J; Wilson, Janet A; Carding, Paul N; Mackenzie, Kenneth; Watson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of hoarseness (dysphonia) are common and often associated with psychological distress. The Voice Symptom Scale (VoiSS) is a 30-item self-completed questionnaire concerning voice and throat symptoms. Psychometric and clinical studies on the VoiSS show that it has good reliability and validity, and a clear factorial structure. The present article presents a further advance in voice measurement from the patient's point of view. To date, there has been no examination of whether voice-related symptoms form a hierarchy; that is, whether people who suffer voice problems progress through a reliable set of problems from mild to severe. To address this question, the technique of Mokken scaling was applied to the VoiSS in 480 patients with dysphonia. A strong and reliable Mokken scale--a symptom hierarchy--was found, which included 17 of the 30 items. This new information on dysphonia shows that voice symptoms progress from voice-oriented difficulties, through practical problems, to disturbances of social relationships and mood (dysphoria). The results add information about the structured phenomenology of voice problems, further establish the relationship between voice impairment and psychosocial impairment, and suggest practical applications in the assessment of dysphonic voices.

  3. Properties of the prominence magnetic field and plasma distributions as obtained from 3D whole-prominence fine structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We analyze distributions of the magnetic field strength and prominence plasma (temperature, pressure, plasma β, and mass) using the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. Methods: The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence, obtained from non-linear force-free field simulations, with a detailed semi-empirically derived description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Results: We show that in the modeled prominence, the variations of the magnetic field strength and its orientation are insignificant on scales comparable to the smallest dimensions of the observed prominence fine structures. We also show the ability of the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to reveal the distribution of the prominence plasma with respect to its temperature within the prominence volume. This provides new insights into the composition of the prominence-corona transition region. We further demonstrate that the values of the plasma β are small throughout the majority of the modeled prominences when realistic photospheric magnetic flux distributions and prominence plasma parameters are assumed. While this is generally true, we also find that in the region with the deepest magnetic dips, the plasma β may increase towards unity. Finally, we show that the mass of the modeled prominence plasma is in good agreement with the mass of observed non-eruptive prominences.

  4. A Study of quiescent prominences using SDO and STEREO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep Kaur

    2014-05-01

    In this dissertation, we have studied the structure, dynamics and evolution of two quiescent prominences. Quiescent prominences are large structures and mainly associated with the quiet Sun region. For the analysis, we have used the high spatial and temporal cadence data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO), and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). We combined the observations from two different directions and studied the prominence in 3D. In the study of polar crown prominence, we mainly investigated the prominence flows on limb and found its association with on-disk brightenings. The merging of diffused active region flux in the already formed chain of prominence caused the several brightenings in the filament channel and also injected the plasma upward with an average velocity of 15 km/s. In another study, we investigated the triggering mechanism of a quiescent tornado-like prominence. Flares from the neighboring active region triggered the tornado-like motions of the top of the prominence. Active region field contracts after the flare which results in the expansion of prominence cavity. The prominence helical magnetic field expands and plasma moves along the field lines which appear as a tornado-like activity. In addition, the thermal structure of the tornado-like prominence and neighbouring active region was investigated by analysing emission in six of the seven EUV channels from the SDO. These observational investigations led to our understanding of structure and dynamics of quiescent prominences, which could be useful for theoretical prominence models.

  5. An examination of variations in the cepstral spectral index of dysphonia across a single breath group in connected speech.

    PubMed

    Watts, Christopher R; Awan, Shaheen N

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use spectral and cepstral analyses of speech to investigate whether underlying physiological changes in voice result in changes in acoustic estimates of dysphonia severity in continuous speech contexts within a single breath group. The effect of dysphonia on acoustic estimates of dysphonia severity, frequency, relative intensity, and vocalization time across initial and terminal segments of a single breath group using a common clinical stimulus was investigated. Prospective quasi-experimental controlled design. Digitized recordings of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice sentence "We were away a year ago" were obtained from 20 treatment-seeking dysphonic individuals (females, mean age = 39 years) and 20 normal controls (females, mean age = 39 years). Each recorded sample was separated into the first four syllables ("We were away … ") and second four syllables ("…a year ago.") of the breath group. Cepstral and spectral measures, intensity measures, and temporal analyses were obtained and used in calculations of the Cepstral Spectral Index of Dysphonia (CSID, an acoustic estimate of dysphonia severity), fundamental frequency (F0), vocalization time, and relative vocal intensity (dB SLP). Statistical analyses were applied to calculations of change (delta [Δ]) in these measures from one breath group segment to the next. Results revealed a significant effect of group on measures of CSID and F0, but not relative intensity or vocalization time. Dysphonic speakers exhibited a significant increase in the CSID from the first to second breath group segment and limited variation in F0 compared with controls. These results may support the hypothesis that voice impairment increases in severity toward the termination of a breath group even within a short temporal frame (i.e., 2 seconds or less of connected speech), and that this portion of the breath group may be an important determinant of perceptual impressions. Further

  6. Short-term spasmodic switching of volcanic tremor source activation in a conduit of the 2011 Kirishima eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, S.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, T.; Uehira, K.; Yamashita, Y.; Nakamoto, M.; Miyazaki, M.; Chikura, H.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic tremors are seismic indicators providing clues for magma behavior, which is related to volcanic eruptions and activity. Detection of spatial and temporal variations of volcanic tremors is important for understanding the mechanism of volcanic eruptions. However, temporal variations of tremor activity in short-term than a minute have not been previously detected by seismological observations around volcanoes. Here, we show that volcanic tremor sources were activated at the top of the conduit (i.e. the crater) and at its lower end by analyzing seismograms from a dense seismic array during the 2011 Kirishima eruption. We observed spasmodic switching in the seismic ray direction during a volcanic tremor sequence. Such fine volcanic tremor structure suggests an interaction between tremor sources located in both deep and shallow depths. Our result suggests that seismic array observations can monitor the magma behavior and contribute to the evaluation of the activity's transition.

  7. Preliminary considerations on the application of the Voice Handicap Index to paediatric dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, A; Capaccio, P; Maruzzi, P; Ginocchio, D; Bottero, A; Ottaviani, F

    2007-01-01

    Summary Dysphonia is a common paediatric condition. Adult voices are usually evaluated using a set of minimal basic measurements including: endoscopic examination, aerodynamics, perception, acoustics, and self-assessment by the patient. The Voice Handicap Index is the most widely used self-assessment tool, but its use in the paediatric setting has never been reported. Aim of this study was to report Voice Handicap Index ratings in a group of dysphonic children, multi-modally assessed before and after voice therapy. The study involved 28 children (16 female, 12 male, mean age 10.9 years (range 6-12)) presenting chronic hoarseness due to vocal fold nodules (18 cases), unilateral localised oedema (6 cases) or recurrent laryngeal paralysis (4 cases). All received voice therapy for 5-6 months, and underwent voice assessments based on video-endoscopy ratings (size of nodule/oedema or glottic closure in the case of recurrent laryngeal paralysis), maximum phonation time, GIRBAS scale, spectrograms and a perturbation analysis. All patients also completed the Voice Handicap Index. Aerodynamic, acoustic, perceptual and self-assessment data, before and after voice therapy, were compared using Wilcoxon’s test and Student’s t test. Correlations between the Voice Handicap Index domains were measured by means of Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Post-treatment measurements showed that the nodules/oedema had decreased in size in 18 children following therapy, and two subjects with recurrent laryngeal paralysis showed improved glottic closure. Mean maximum phonation time increased slightly, but the difference was not significant. There was a general reduction in perceptual severity, but this was only significant for parameters G, B and A. Spectrographic analysis showed no significant improvement and, although the mean perturbation analysis values improved, only the difference in jitter values was significant (p = 0.016). Voice Handicap Index was applicable in all cases, and

  8. The global structure of magnetic fields which support quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences were observed, but only recently has it become possible to measure the full magnetic field vector. The component of the field along the line of sight, B (parallel) can be uniquely determined, whereas for the component perpendicular to the line of sight B (perpendicular) and -B (perpendicular) are indistinguishable. An ambiguity remains in the actual magnetic field vector, in particular with respect to its orientation relative to the prominence axis. A sample of more than 100 prominences were studied. A more detailed analysis of 10 prominences are presented, and then set these prominence fields into relation to the underlying photospheric fields. It is found from statistical analysis of several hundred prominences that in 25% of the cases the field penetrates the prominence directly, whereas in 75% the field orientation in the prominence is reversed.

  9. Assessment of Grade of Dysphonia and Correlation With Quality of Life Protocol.

    PubMed

    Spina, Ana Lúcia; Crespo, Agrício Nubiato

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of this study is to check the correlation between vocal self-assessment and results of the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) protocol, and whether there is a correlation between perceptual vocal assessment made by voice therapists and the results from the V-RQOL protocol. The study included 245 subjects with vocal complaints. This was a prospective analytical clinical study. Vocal perceptual assessment of each subject with dysphonia was made by three voice therapists, followed by self-assessment made by the subjects themselves, and the application of the V-RQOL protocol. The results have shown poor level of agreement between vocal assessment made by the voice therapists and self-assessment made by the subjects. The statistical analysis indicated that the results of V-RQOL protocol showed significant correlation with the vocal assessment made by the voice therapists and the self-assessment by the subjects. The agreement between the assessments was low and variable; age, gender, professional voice use, and clinical laryngoscopic diagnosis did not influence the agreement level. Protocol V-RQOL is sensitive to vocal assessment made by the voice therapists and self-assessment made by the patient. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison of trained and untrained vocalists on the Dysphonia Severity Index.

    PubMed

    Awan, Shaheen N; Ensslen, Anysia J

    2010-11-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to compare trained and untrained singers on the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) and its component measures, and (2) to contribute to normative DSI data for trained singers. This study included 36 untrained participants (15 males and 21 females) and 30 participants (15 males and 15 females) with singing experience between the ages of 18 and 30 years. Measures of maximum phonation time (MPT), highest phonational frequency, lowest intensity, and jitter were obtained for each subject and incorporated into the previously published multivariate DSI formula. Results indicated that vocally trained subjects have significantly higher DSI scores than untrained subjects (mean DSI: 6.48 vs 4.00, respectively), with significant differences observed between trained and untrained groups for three of the four components of the DSI (F(0) high; I low; jitter). The findings of this study are consistent with previous reports that indicate significant increases in the DSI with vocal training, and with various studies that have observed increased vocal capability in trained singers versus their untrained counterparts. The results of this study indicate that alternative normative expectations for the DSI may need to be taken into account when using the DSI with patients who have participated in directed vocal training, such as choral participation and voice/singing lessons. Copyright © 2010 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Position of the hyoid and larynx in people with muscle tension dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Lowell, Soren Y; Kelley, Richard T; Colton, Raymond H; Smith, Patrick B; Portnoy, Joel E

    2012-02-01

    To determine whether radiographic measures of hyoid position, laryngeal position, and hyolaryngeal space during phonation were different for people with primary muscle tension dysphonia (MTD) as compared to control participants without voice disorders. Prospective, quasi-experimental research design. Twenty participants, 10 with primary MTD and 10 without voice disorders who were age and sex matched were studied radiographically while producing phonation. Lateral x-ray images were obtained for each participant during three tasks: resting state, sustained phonation, and a swallow-hold maneuver. Vertical positions of the hyoid and larynx were measured on a Cartesian coordinate system and were normalized to reflect change from rest during phonation. Normalized, vertical hyoid, and laryngeal positions during phonation were significantly higher for people with MTD than for control participants. Normalized hyolaryngeal space during phonation did not show differences between groups. A low to moderate significant correlation for radiographically measured hyoid and laryngeal position and the total score from a subjective laryngeal palpatory scale were evidenced, but no relationship was evidenced for radiographic laryngeal position and the laryngeal position subscore of the palpatory examination. Objective determinants of physiology are critical for the differential diagnosis of MTD and its effective treatment. Radiographic findings from this study indicate that hyoid and laryngeal positions during phonation are higher in people with primary MTD as compared to people without voice disorders. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Prominent Optic Disc Featured in Inherited Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Todorova, M G; Bojinova, R I; Valmaggia, C; Schorderet, D F

    2017-02-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between prominent optic disc (POD) and inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD). Patients and Methods A cross-sectional consecutive study was performed in 10 children and 11 adults of 7 non-related families. We performed clinical phenotyping, including a detailed examination, fundus autofluorescence, and colour fundus and OCT imaging. Genetic testing was subsequently performed for all family members presenting retinal pathology. Results In 4 members of a 3-generation family, hyperfluorescent deposits on the surface of POD were related to a p.(L224M) heterozygous mutation in BEST1. In the second family, one member presented deposits located on the surface on hyperaemic OD and a compound p.(R141H);(A195V) mutation in BEST1. In the third family, POD was observed in father and child with early onset cone-rod dystrophy and a novel autosomal recessive p.(W31*) homozygous mutation in ABCA4. In the fourth family, POD with "mulberry-like" deposits and attenuated vessels were observed in a 7-year old girl, with a mutation in USH1A, and with early onset rod-cone dystrophy, associated with hearing loss. In the fifth family, blurry OD with tortuous vessels was observed in 4 consanguineous female carriers and a hemizygous boy with a p.(R200H) mutation in the X-linked retinoschisis RS1. In the sixth family, a mother and her son were both affected with POD and attenuated peripapillary vessels, and presented with a p.(Y836C) heterozygous mutation in TOPORS, thus confirming autosomal dominant RP. In the seventh family, in 3 family members with POD, compound p.(L541P;A1038 V);(G1961E) mutations in ABCA4 confirmed the diagnosis of Stargardt disease. Conclusions A variety of OD findings are found in a genetically heterogeneous group of IRDs. In the presence of POD, an inherited progressive photoreceptor disease should be ruled out.

  13. PROMINENCE FORMATION ASSOCIATED WITH AN EMERGING HELICAL FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Tsuneta, Saku; Katsukawa, Yukio; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Lites, Bruce W.; Kubo, Masahito; Yokoyama, Takaaki; Berger, Thomas E.; Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M.; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2009-05-20

    The formation and evolution process and magnetic configuration of solar prominences remain unclear. In order to study the formation process of prominences, we examine continuous observations of a prominence in NOAA AR 10953 with the Solar Optical Telescope on the Hinode satellite. As reported in our previous Letter, we find a signature suggesting that a helical flux rope emerges from below the photosphere under a pre-existing prominence. Here we investigate more detailed properties and photospheric indications of the emerging helical flux rope, and discuss their relationship to the formation of the prominence. Our main conclusions are: (1) a dark region with absence of strong vertical magnetic fields broadens and then narrows in Ca II H-line filtergrams. This phenomenon is consistent with the emergence of the helical flux rope as photospheric counterparts. The size of the flux rope is roughly 30,000 km long and 10,000 km wide. The width is larger than that of the prominence. (2) No shear motion or converging flows are detected, but we find diverging flows such as mesogranules along the polarity inversion line. The presence of mesogranules may be related to the emergence of the helical flux rope. (3) The emerging helical flux rope reconnects with magnetic fields of the pre-existing prominence to stabilize the prominence for the next several days. We thus conjecture that prominence coronal magnetic fields emerge in the form of helical flux ropes that contribute to the formation and maintenance of the prominence.

  14. SIMULATING THE IN SITU CONDENSATION PROCESS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Antolin, P.; Porth, O.

    2014-09-10

    Prominences in the solar corona are a hundredfold cooler and denser than their surroundings, with a total mass of 10{sup 13} up to 10{sup 15} g. Here, we report on the first comprehensive simulations of three-dimensional, thermally and gravitationally stratified magnetic flux ropes where in situ condensation to a prominence occurs due to radiative losses. After a gradual thermodynamic adjustment, we witness a phase where runaway cooling occurs while counter-streaming shearing flows drain off mass along helical field lines. After this drainage, a prominence-like condensation resides in concave upward field regions, and this prominence retains its overall characteristics for more than two hours. While condensing, the prominence establishes a prominence-corona transition region where magnetic field-aligned thermal conduction is operative during the runaway cooling. The prominence structure represents a force-balanced state in a helical flux rope. The simulated condensation demonstrates a right-bearing barb, as a remnant of the drainage. Synthetic images at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths follow the onset of the condensation, and confirm the appearance of horns and a three-part structure for the stable prominence state, as often seen in erupting prominences. This naturally explains recent Solar Dynamics Observatory views with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on prominences in coronal cavities demonstrating horns.

  15. The executive prominent/memory prominent spectrum in Alzheimer’s disease is highly heritable

    PubMed Central

    Mez, Jesse; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Thornton, Timothy; Fardo, David W.; Trittschuh, Emily; Sutti, Sheila; Sherva, Richard; Kauwe, John S.; Naj, Adam C.; Beecham, Gary W.; Gross, Alden; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Crane, Paul K.

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) can present heterogeneously, with several subtypes recognized, including dysexecutive AD. One way to identify people with dysexecutive AD is to consider the difference between memory and executive functioning, which we refer to as the executive prominent/memory prominent spectrum. We aimed to determine if this spectrum was heritable. We used neuropsychological and genetic data from people with mild LOAD (Clinical Dementia Rating 0.5 or 1.0) from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center and the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We cocalibrated the neuropsychological data to obtain executive functioning and memory scores and used their difference as a continuous phenotype to calculate its heritability overall and by chromosome. Narrow-sense heritability of the difference between memory and executive functioning scores was 0.68 (standard error 0.12). Single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 11, 12, and 18 explained the largest fraction of phenotypic variance, with signals from each chromosome accounting for 5%–7%. The chromosomal pattern of heritability differed substantially from that of LOAD itself. PMID:27103524

  16. The executive prominent/memory prominent spectrum in Alzheimer's disease is highly heritable.

    PubMed

    Mez, Jesse; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Thornton, Timothy; Fardo, David W; Trittschuh, Emily; Sutti, Sheila; Sherva, Richard; Kauwe, John S; Naj, Adam C; Beecham, Gary W; Gross, Alden; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Crane, Paul K

    2016-05-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) can present heterogeneously, with several subtypes recognized, including dysexecutive AD. One way to identify people with dysexecutive AD is to consider the difference between memory and executive functioning, which we refer to as the executive prominent/memory prominent spectrum. We aimed to determine if this spectrum was heritable. We used neuropsychological and genetic data from people with mild LOAD (Clinical Dementia Rating 0.5 or 1.0) from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We cocalibrated the neuropsychological data to obtain executive functioning and memory scores and used their difference as a continuous phenotype to calculate its heritability overall and by chromosome. Narrow-sense heritability of the difference between memory and executive functioning scores was 0.68 (standard error 0.12). Single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 11, 12, and 18 explained the largest fraction of phenotypic variance, with signals from each chromosome accounting for 5%-7%. The chromosomal pattern of heritability differed substantially from that of LOAD itself.

  17. Acoustic and capacity analysis of voice academic teachers with diagnosed hyperfunctional dysphonia by using DiagnoScope Specialist software.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Bliźniewska, Hanna; Pietkiewicz, Piotr; Miłoński, Jarosław; Urbaniak, Joanna; Olszewski, Jurek

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the acoustic and capacity analyses of voice in academic teachers with hyperfunctional dysphonia using DiagnoScope Specialist software. The study covered 46 female academic teachers aged 34-48 years. The women were diagnosed with hyperfunctional dysphonia (with absence of organic pathologies). Having obtained the informed consent, a primary medical history was taken, videolaryngoscopic and stroboscopic examinations were performed and diagnostic voice acoustic and capacity analyses were carried out using DiagnoScope Specialist software. The acoustic analysis carried out of academic teachers with diagnosed hyperfunctional dysphonia showed enhancement in the following parameters: fundamental frequency (FO) by 1.2%; relative average perturbation (Jitter by 100.0% and RAP by 81.8%); relative amplitude perturbation quotient (APQ) by 2.9%; non-harmonic to harmonic ratio (U2H) by 16.0%; and noise to harmonic ratio (NHR) by 13.4%. A decrease of 2.5% from normal values was noted in relative amplitude perturbation (Shimmer). Formant frequencies also showed reduction (F1 by 10.7%, F2 by 5.1%, F3 by 2.2%, and F4 by 3.5%). The harmonic perturbation quotient (HPQ) was 0.8% lower and the residual harmonic perturbation quotient (RHPQ) 16.8% lower, with the residual to harmonic (R2H) decreasing by 35.1 per cent; the sub-harmonic to harmonic (S2H) by 2.4%; and the Yanagihara coefficient by 20.2%. The capacity analysis with the DiagnoScope Specialist software showed figures significantly lower than normal values of the following parameters: phonation time, true phonation time, phonation break coefficients, vocal capacity coefficient and mean vocal capacity. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. The association between lifetime cigarette smoking and dysphonia in the Korean general population: findings from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Haewon

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between current smoking and lifetime amount smoked and the incidence of dysphonia using data from a national cross-sectional survey that represents the Korean population. Subjects were 3,600 non-institutionalised civilian adults over the age of 19 (1,501 males and 2,099 females) who completed the laryngeal examination of the 2008 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). For lifetime amount smoked, subjects were classified as light smokers (≤26.7 pack years), medium smokers (26.7-40.5 pack years), heavy smokers (40.5-55.5 pack years), and very heavy smokers (55.5-156 pack years) based on pack years (packs smoked per day × years as a smoker). The odds ratio (OR) for the statistical test was presented using hierarchical logistic regression. When adjusted for covariates (age, gender, level of education, income, occupation, alcohol consumption and pain/discomfort during the last two weeks), current smokers had a 1.8 times (OR = 1.77, 95% CI [1.17-2.68]) higher risk for self-reported voice problems than non-smokers. Moreover, current smokers had a 1.6 times (OR = 1.56, 95% CI [1.02-2.38]) higher risk of laryngeal disorder (p < 0.05). In terms of pack years, very heavy smokers were significantly more likely to have laryngeal disorder, while self-reported voice problems were significantly more likely for heavy smokers but not very heavy smokers. The results of this study imply that chronic smoking has a significant relationship with dysphonia. Longitudinal studies are required in future work to verify the causality between lifetime smoking amount and dysphonia.

  19. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  20. Formation of active region and quiescent prominence magnetic field configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.; Bao, J. J.; Wu, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the formation of prominences, researchers studied chromospheric mass injection into an overlying coronal dipole magnetic field using a 2-D ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model. Researchers propose that active region prominences are formed by chromospheric plasmas injected directly into the overlying coronal magnetic field and that quiescent prominences are formed by plasmas evaporated at the interface between spicules and corona. Hence, for the simulation of an active region prominence magnetic field we inject the mass from one side, but use a symmetric mass injection to form a quiescent prominence field configuration. Researchers try to find optimum conditions for the formation of Kippenhahn-Schuluter(K-S)type field configuration for stable support of the injection plasmas. They find that the formation of K-S type field configuration by mass injection requires a delicate balance between injection velocity, density, and overlying magnetic fields. These results may explain why a prominence does not form on every neutral line.

  1. Derivations and Observations of Prominence Bulk Motions and Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Terry A.

    In this chapter we review observations and techniques for measuring both bulk flows in prominences and prominence mass. Measuring these quantities is essential to development and testing of models discussed throughout this book. Prominence flows are complex and various, ranging from the relatively linear flows along prominence spines to the complex, turbulent patterns exhibited by hedgerow prominences. Techniques for measuring flows include time slice and optical flow techniques used for motions in the plane of the sky and the use of spectral line profiles to determine Doppler velocities along the line of sight. Prominence mass measurement is chiefly done via continuum absorption measurements, but mass has also been estimated using cloud modeling and white light measurements.

  2. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  3. Acoustic and perceptual analysis of modal and falsetto registers in females with dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Li, Nicole Y K; Yiu, Edwin M-L

    2006-08-01

    Modal and falsetto registers are the basic vocal qualities used in female speaking voices. The purpose of this study was to identify the frequency at which modal register changed to falsetto register and the frequency range of each modal and falsetto register produced under three loudness levels: soft, comfortable and loud phonations in normal and dysphonic speakers. These data provide information on the relationship between vocal registers. It is hypothesized that vocal pathologies affect the frequency at which register change from one mode to another mode. Fifteen dysphonic and 15 non-dysphonic females were assessed on their ability to produce tone series from the lowest to the highest frequency at soft, comfortable and loud phonations. Fourteen listeners served as judges to identify the first production of falsetto voice in each tone series. The first falsetto tone perceived was considered to represent the frequency at which the modal-falsetto register change occurred perceptually. The change from modal to falsetto register in the tone series occurred between G4 (360.74 Hz) and B4 (485.23 Hz) in the dysphonic group and between A4 (421.00 Hz) and B4 (476.13 Hz) in the non-dysphonic group among the three loudness levels. The results showed that the presence of dysphonia affected the production of vocal registers The dysphonic group demonstrated the modal-falsetto register change at a significantly lower frequency and reduced frequency range in the modal register than those of the non-dysphonic group in the soft and comfortable phonations. In producing falsetto register, the dysphonic group demonstrated reduced ability in producing falsetto register in soft and loud phonations when compared to the non-dysphonic group. Physiological explanations are used to account for the observations.

  4. Combining Voice Therapy and Physical Therapy: A Novel Approach to Treating Muscle Tension Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Jennifer; Tomlinson, Carey; Stevens, Kristin; Kotagal, Kiran; Fornadley, Judith; Jacobson, Barbara; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Francis, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the role of a specialized physical therapy program for muscle tension dysphonia patients as an adjunct to standard of care voice therapy. Study Design Retrospective Cohort Study Methods Adult MTD patients seen between 2007 and 2012 were identified from the clinical database. They were prescribed voice therapy and, if concomitant neck pain, adjunctive physical therapy. In a pragmatic observational cohort design, patients underwent one of four potential treatment approaches: voice therapy alone (VT), voice therapy and physical therapy (VT+PT), physical therapy alone (PT), or incomplete/no treatment. Voice handicap outcomes were compared between treatment approaches. Results Of 153 patients meeting criteria (Median age 48 years, 68% female, and 30% had fibromyalgia, chronic pain, chronic fatigue, depression, and/or anxiety), there was a similar distribution of patients with moderate or severe pre-treatment VHI scores across treatment groups (VT 45.5%, VT+PT 43.8%, PT 50%, no treatment 59.1%; p=0.45). Patients treated with VT alone had significantly greater median improvement in VHI than those not treated: 10-point vs. 2-point (p=0.02). Interestingly, median VHI improvement in patients with baseline moderate-severe VHI scores was no different between VT (10), VT+PT (8) and PT alone (10; p=0.99). Conclusions Findings show voice therapy to be an effective approach to treating MTD. Importantly, other treatment modalities incorporating physical therapy had a similar, albeit not significant, improvement in VHI. This preliminary study suggests that physical therapy techniques may have a role in the treatment of a subset of MTD patients. Larger, comparative studies are needed to better characterize the role of physical therapy in this population. PMID:26012419

  5. Parents' Evaluations of Their Children's Dysphonia: The Mamas and the Papas.

    PubMed

    Amir, Ofer; Wolf, Michael; Mick, Liron; Levi, Omer; Primov-Fever, Adi

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the validity and reliability of a Hebrew translation of the Pediatric Voice Handicap Index (pVHI). It also examined differences between mothers and fathers in evaluating their child's dysphonia. Observational design. The pVHI was first translated and adapted to Hebrew. The translated version was, then, administered to a group of 141 parents of children aged younger than 14 years. Fifty-eight parents had a dysphonic child, and 83 had a nondysphonic child. Based on the parents' responses to the pVHI, statistical analyses were performed, evaluating validity and reliability, as well as group differences. Following, a subset of the participants, in which only cases where the responses of both parents were available, was examined for evaluating differences between the responses of mothers (n = 46) and fathers (n = 46). Statistical analyses revealed high reliability of the Hebrew version of the pVHI (Cronbach alpha = .97). Parents of the dysphonic children rated their children significantly higher than parents of the nondysphonic group (P < 0.001). Mothers of the dysphonic children rated their children significantly higher than the fathers, on all subscales of the questionnaire (≥0.001 P < 0.047). In contrast, no significant differences were found between mothers and fathers of the nondysphonic children (P > 0.05). The Hebrew version of the pVHI is a reliable tool for quantifying parents' perception of their child's voice handicap. Mothers of dysphonic children evaluate their children's voice handicap more severely than fathers, whereas both parents of nondysphonic children perform this evaluation similarly. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  7. Reliability of speaking and maximum voice range measures in screening for dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Estella; Robertson, Jennie; Radford, Claire; Vagne, Sarah; El-Halabi, Ruba; Yiu, Edwin

    2007-07-01

    Speech range profile (SRP) is a graphical display of frequency-intensity occurring interactions during functional speech activity. Few studies have suggested the potential clinical applications of SRP. However, these studies are limited to qualitative case comparisons and vocally healthy participants. The present study aimed to examine the effects of voice disorders on speaking and maximum voice ranges in a group of vocally untrained women. It also aimed to examine whether voice limit measures derived from SRP were as sensitive as those derived from voice range profile (VRP) in distinguishing dysphonic from healthy voices. Ninety dysphonic women with laryngeal pathologies and 35 women with normal voices, who served as controls, participated in this study. Each subject recorded a VRP for her physiological vocal limits. In addition, each subject read aloud the "North Wind and the Sun" passage to record SRP. All the recordings were captured and analyzed by Soundswell's computerized real-time phonetogram Phog 1.0 (Hitech Development AB, Täby, Sweden). The SRPs and the VRPs were compared between the two groups of subjects. Univariate analysis results demonstrated that individual SRP measures were less sensitive than the corresponding VRP measures in discriminating dysphonic from normal voices. However, stepwise logistic regression analyses revealed that the combination of only two SRP measures was almost as effective as a combination of three VRP measures in predicting the presence of dysphonia (overall prediction accuracy: 93.6% for SRP vs 96.0% for VRP). These results suggest that in a busy clinic where quick voice screening results are desirable, SRP can be an acceptable alternate procedure to VRP.

  8. Outcomes of structural fat grafting for paralytic and non-paralytic dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Cantarella, G; Baracca, G; Forti, S; Gaffuri, M; Mazzola, R F

    2011-06-01

    Aims of this prospective study were to evaluate the results of vocal fold structural fat grafting for glottic insufficiency and to compare the outcomes obtained in unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) and congenital or acquired soft tissue defects in vocal folds. Sixty-six consecutive patients with breathy dysphonia, in 43 cases (aged 16-79 years) related to UVFP and in 23 cases (aged 16-67 years) related to vocal fold iatrogenic scar or sulcus vocalis, underwent autologous structural fat grafting into vocal folds. Lipoaspirates were centrifuged at 1200 g for 3 min to separate and remove blood, cell debris and the oily layer. The refined fat was injected under direct microlaryngoscopy in a multilayered way. The main outcome measures were grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenicity and strain (GRBAS) perceptual evaluation, maximum phonation time (MPT), self-assessed Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and voice acoustic analysis, considered pre-operatively and at 3 and 6 months after fat grafting. After surgery, MPT, VHI, G and B improved in both groups (p < 0.05). In particular, G and VHI functional subscales showed a significantly greater decrease in patients with UVFP (p < 0.05). The acoustic variables improved significantly only in the UVFP group (p < 0.005). From 3 to 6 months postoperatively, most variables showed a trend with further improvement. Vocal fold structural fat grafting was significantly effective in treating glottic insufficiency due to UVFP or soft tissue defects. Perceptual, acoustic and subjective assessments confirmed that patients with UVFP had better outcomes than those with soft tissue defects.

  9. Coronal transient--eruptive prominence of 1980 August 5

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.; Garcia, C.J.; Seagraves, P.

    1981-06-15

    A coronal transient was observed in association with an eruptive prominence event using the Mauna Loa experiment system. The transient, a rarefaction, formed before the acceleration of the eruptive prominence. Upward velocities of various features, as seen in the plane of the sky, show a marked difference as a function of time between the transient and the eruptive prominence. A region of enhanced electron density formed slowly in front of the rarefaction.

  10. Quiescent Prominences in the Era of ALMA: Simulated Observations Using the 3D Whole-prominence Fine Structure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, Stanislav; Heinzel, Petr; Mackay, Duncan H.; Anzer, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    We use the detailed 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to produce the first simulated high-resolution ALMA observations of a modeled quiescent solar prominence. The maps of synthetic brightness temperature and optical thickness shown in the present paper are produced using a visualization method for synthesis of the submillimeter/millimeter radio continua. We have obtained the simulated observations of both the prominence at the limb and the filament on the disk at wavelengths covering a broad range that encompasses the full potential of ALMA. We demonstrate here extent to which the small-scale and large-scale prominence and filament structures will be visible in the ALMA observations spanning both the optically thin and thick regimes. We analyze the relationship between the brightness and kinetic temperature of the prominence plasma. We also illustrate the opportunities ALMA will provide for studying the thermal structure of the prominence plasma from the cores of the cool prominence fine structure to the prominence-corona transition region. In addition, we show that detailed 3D modeling of entire prominences with their numerous fine structures will be important for the correct interpretation of future ALMA observations of prominences.

  11. Energy considerations for solar prominences with mass inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzer, U.; Heinzel, P.

    2000-06-01

    In this Letter we study the inflow of enthalpy and ionisation energy into solar prominences. We use 1D stationary slab models for the prominence to calculate this inflow. We compare the resulting energy gain with the integrated radiative losses obtained for such slab models. We find that for reasonable inflow velocities many of our models can be in energy equilibrium; only the very massive prominences will either require some additional heating or they have to cool down to low central temperatures. We also discuss the possibility or heating the prominence by vertical downflows.

  12. Internal Dynamics of a Twin-layer Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    Modern observations revealed rich dynamics within solar prominences. The globally stable quiescent prominences, characterized by the presence of thin vertical threads and falling knobs, are frequently invaded by small rising dark plumes. These dynamic phenomena are related to magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability, since prominence matter, 100 times denser than surrounding coronal plasma, is lifted against gravity by weak magnetic field. To get a deeper understanding of the physics behind these phenomena, we use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the nonlinear magnetoconvective motions in a twin-layer prominence in a macroscopic model from chromospheric layers up to 30 Mm height. The properties of simulated falling “fingers” and uprising bubbles are consistent with those in observed vertical threads and rising plumes in quiescent prominences. Both sheets of the twin-layer prominence show a strongly coherent evolution due to their magnetic connectivity, and demonstrate collective kink deformation. Our model suggests that the vertical threads of the prominence as seen in an edge-on view, and the apparent horizontal threads of the filament when seen top-down are different appearances of the same structures. Synthetic images of the modeled twin-layer prominence reflect the strong degree of mixing established over the entire prominence structure, in agreement with the observations.

  13. Stage of readiness of patients with behavioral dysphonia in pre and post-group voice therapy assessments.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bianca Oliveira Ismael da; Silva, Priscila Oliveira Costa; Pinheiro, Renata Serrano de Andrade; Silva, Hêmmylly Farias da; Almeida, Anna Alice Figueirêdo de

    2017-08-10

    To verify the efficacy of group voice therapy in the stage of readiness and identify which items of the URICA-Voice range are more sensitive to post-therapy change in patients with behavioral dysphonia. An intervention study was conducted on 49 patients with behavioral dysphonia. An eclectic approach to group therapy was implemented over eight sessions, the first and last sessions consisting of assessments. The URICA-Voice range was used to evaluate the stage of readiness at pre- and post-therapy assessments. A descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was implemented for the results. Most participants were female, did not make professional use of voice, and had membranous vocal fold lesions. Most of them were in the Contemplation stage at in both moments, pre- and post-therapy. There was no significant change in the comparison of pre- and post-therapy scores. The majority of patients showed a reduction in the stage of readiness and some advanced to a higher stage. In the comparison of URICA-V range items, seven questions had equal or inferior responses in the post-therapy assessment. There was no statistical difference when comparing the pre- and post-therapy total average score of the URICA-Voice range. There were significant changes in the stage of readiness of patients in pre- and post-group speech therapy assessments.

  14. [Diagnostics and therapy of dysphonia suitable for the ages and developmental stages of children and adolescents (part 2)].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M

    2008-02-01

    The incidence of dysphonia among children and adolescents is evaluated internationally at 6 % to 25 %. Nonetheless, hoarseness as a leading symptom among children is often insufficiently recognized by their parents/attachment figures, by the young patients themselves, and even by physicians. In an overview, the hereditary and acquired organic and functional causes - including secondary organic lesions of the vocal folds - their pathomechanisms and the symptoms typical for this age group are presented. For diagnostics suitable for these age groups and developmental stages, modern methods of laryngoscopy (including stoboscopy and real-time laryngoscopy), of functional diagnostics of vocal capacity and quality as well as anamnestic and psychometric procedures for the investigation of possible psychosomatic genesis are available. Frequent therapeutic measures are vocal hygienic counseling and psycho- and family dynamic therapies. Vocal exercise treatments are particularly employed for the consequences of laryngeal surgery and with voice techniques unfavorable as a precondition for increased vocal activity. Operative measures in the sound-producing areas of the vocal apparatus and in the framework of plastic reconstruction concentrate on the optimizing of vocal capacity and quality. In clinical routine, symptoms of dysphonia in children and adolescents should be consciously registered, and any long-term hoarseness, in this age group as well, should be examined by specialized physicians using the methods suitable to the age group and the developmental stage. When the appropriate indications are present, all of the therapeutic options currently available should be discussed.

  15. Formation and plasma circulation of solar prominences and coronal rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.

    2016-12-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous down flows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret as plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in-situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The prominence plasma circulation is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromosphere and the formation of prominence plasma via continuous condensation. Plasma evaporates from the chromosphere, condenses into the prominence in the corona, and drains back to the chromosphere, establishing a stable chromosphere-corona plasma cycle. Another form of cool and dense plasma in the corona is coronal rain, which forms in-situ and drain down arched pathways along loops near active regions. We present 3D simulations of coronal rain in a bipolar arcade and compare it with observational results.

  16. 21 CFR 101.15 - Food; prominence of required statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food; prominence of required statements. 101.15 Section 101.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING General Provisions § 101.15 Food; prominence of required...

  17. 21 CFR 101.15 - Food; prominence of required statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food; prominence of required statements. 101.15 Section 101.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING General Provisions § 101.15 Food; prominence of required...

  18. 21 CFR 101.15 - Food; prominence of required statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food; prominence of required statements. 101.15 Section 101.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING General Provisions § 101.15 Food; prominence of...

  19. On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

    This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

  20. 21 CFR 101.15 - Food; prominence of required statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food; prominence of required statements. 101.15 Section 101.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING General Provisions § 101.15 Food; prominence of required...

  1. A prominence eruption driven by flux feeding from chromospheric fibrils

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Quanhao; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, S.

    2014-07-10

    We present multi-wavelength observations of a prominence eruption originating from a quadrupolar field configuration, in which the prominence was embedded in a side arcade. Within the two-day period prior to its eruption on 2012 October 22, the prominence was perturbed three times by chromospheric fibrils underneath, which rose upward, became brightened, and merged into the prominence, resulting in horizontal flows along the prominence axis, suggesting that the fluxes carried by the fibrils were incorporated into the magnetic field of the prominence. These perturbations caused the prominence to oscillate and to rise faster than before. The absence of intense heating within the first two hours after the onset of the prominence eruption, which followed an exponential increase in height, indicates that ideal instability played a crucial role. The eruption involved interactions with the other side arcade, leading up to a twin coronal mass ejection, which was accompanied by transient surface brightenings in the central arcade, followed by transient dimmings and brightenings in the two side arcades. We suggest that flux feeding from chromospheric fibrils might be an important mechanism to trigger coronal eruptions.

  2. Prominent Feature Analysis: What It Means for the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Sherry Seale; Graves, Richard L.; Morse, David T.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of a prominent feature analysis is to describe the stylistic flexibility that a young writer, or a group of young writers, exhibits on a given day, with a given prompt. In prominent feature analysis, there are no guidebooks, no rubrics--just student papers and the expertise of teachers. Teachers come to the papers individually and yet…

  3. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-04-20

    We present the first 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence obtained from nonlinear force-free field simulations, with a detailed description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Through the use of a novel radiative transfer visualization technique for the Hα line such plasma-loaded magnetic field model produces synthetic images of the modeled prominence comparable with high-resolution observations. This allows us for the first time to use a single technique to consistently study, in both emission on the limb and absorption against the solar disk, the fine structures of prominences/filaments produced by a magnetic field model.

  4. Effect of Laryngopharyngeal Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Dysphonia Accompanied by Dysphagia in Post-stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of laryngopharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on dysphonia in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods Eighteen patients participated in this study. The subjects were divided into NMES (n=12) and conventional swallowing training only (CST, n=6) groups. The NMES group received NMES combined with CST for 2 weeks, followed by CST without NMES for the next 2 weeks. The CST group received only CST for 4 weeks. All of the patients were evaluated before and at 2 and 4 weeks into the study. The outcome measurements included perceptual, acoustic and aerodynamic analyses. The correlation between dysphonia and swallowing function was also investigated. Results There were significant differences in the GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain scale) total score and sound pressure level (SPL) between the two groups over time. The NMES relative to the CST group showed significant improvements in total GRBAS score and SPL at 2 weeks, though no inter-group differences were evident at 4 weeks. The improvement of the total GRBAS scores at 2 weeks was positively correlated with the improved pharyngeal phase scores on the functional dysphagia scale at 2 weeks. Conclusion The results demonstrate that laryngopharyngeal NMES in post-stroke or TBI patients with dysphonia can have promising effects on phonation. Therefore, laryngopharyngeal NMES may be considered as an additional treatment option for dysphonia accompanied by dysphagia after stroke or TBI. PMID:27606266

  5. Quantifying Dysphonia Severity Using a Spectralcepstral-Based Acoustic Index: Comparisons with Auditory-Perceptual Judgements from the CAPE-V

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Roy, Nelson; JettE, Marie E.; Meltzner, Geoffrey S.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between acoustic spectral/cepstral measures and listener severity ratings in normal and disordered voice samples. CAPE-V sentence samples and the vowel /[script]/were elicited from eight normal speakers and 24 patients with varying degrees of dysphonia severity. Samples were analysed for measures of the…

  6. Parker Lecture - Prominences: the key to understanding solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Judith T.

    2011-05-01

    Prominences are spectacular manifestations of both quiescent and eruptive solar activity. The largest examples can be seen with the naked eye during eclipses, making prominences among the first solar features to be described and catalogued. Steady improvements in temporal and spatial resolution from both ground- and space-based instruments have led us to recognize how complex and dynamic these majestic structures really are. Their distinguishing characteristics - cool knots and threads suspended in the hot corona, alignment along inversion lines in the photospheric magnetic field within highly sheared filament channels, and a tendency to disappear through eruption - offer vital clues as to their origin and dynamic evolution. Interpreting these clues has proven to be contentious, however, leading to fundamentally different models that address the basic questions: What is the magnetic structure supporting prominences, and how does so much cool, dense plasma appear in the corona? Despite centuries of increasingly detailed observations, the magnetic and plasma structures in prominences are poorly known. Routine measurements of the vector magnetic field in and around prominences have become possible only recently, while long-term monitoring of the underlying filament-channel formation process remains scarce. The process responsible for prominence mass is equally difficult to establish, although we have long known that the chromosphere is the only plausible source. As I will discuss, however, the motions and locations of prominence material can be used to trace the coronal field, thus defining the magnetic origins of solar eruptions. A combination of observations, theory, and numerical modeling must be used to determine whether any of the competing theories accurately represents the physics of prominences. I will discuss the criteria for a successful prominence model, compare the leading models, and present in detail one promising, comprehensive scenario for prominence

  7. Magnetic Field in Atypical Prominence Structures: Bubble, Tornado, and Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, P. J.; Schmieder, B.; López Ariste, A.; Labrosse, N.; Dalmasse, K.; Gelly, B.

    2016-08-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations of prominences have been obtained with the THEMIS telescope during four years of coordinated campaigns. Our aim is now to understand the conditions of the cool plasma and magnetism in “atypical” prominences, namely when the measured inclination of the magnetic field departs, to some extent, from the predominantly horizontal field found in “typical” prominences. What is the role of the magnetic field in these prominence types? Are plasma dynamics more important in these cases than the magnetic support? We focus our study on three types of “atypical” prominences (tornadoes, bubbles, and jet-like prominence eruptions) that have all been observed by THEMIS in the He i D3 line, from which the Stokes parameters can be derived. The magnetic field strength, inclination, and azimuth in each pixel are obtained by using the inversion method of principal component analysis on a model of single scattering in the presence of the Hanle effect. The magnetic field in tornadoes is found to be more or less horizontal, whereas for the eruptive prominence it is mostly vertical. We estimate a tendency toward higher values of magnetic field strength inside the bubbles than outside in the surrounding prominence. In all of the models in our database, only one magnetic field orientation is considered for each pixel. While sufficient for most of the main prominence body, this assumption appears to be oversimplified in atypical prominence structures. We should consider these observations as the result of superposition of multiple magnetic fields, possibly even with a turbulent field component.

  8. Strong rotation of an erupting quiescent polar crown prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William

    On 5-6 June 2007, a large quiescent polar crown prominence was observed to erupt by the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This eruption was particularly visible in the 304A channel of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) telescopes. A detailed analysis of the fine structures in the images allows the three-dimensional structure of the erupt-ing prominence to be derived. The prominence is seen to undergo substantial rotation of at least 90 degrees along the radial axis as it rises, with indications that additional rotation oc-curred before the prominence rose into the STEREO fields of view. Two temporary structures ("spurs") are seen to form at an angle to the main spine of the prominence, and are interpreted as signs of reconnection. These reconnection events contribute to the overall rotation of the prominence. A significant fraction of the prominence material is drained through new field lines caused by one of the reconnection events, resulting in only a weak coronal mass ejection event observed by the STEREO and SOHO coronagraphs. The eruption is interpreted as be-ing initiated by the helical kink instability, with subsequent modification by the reconnection events.

  9. Dynamical Formation and Stability of Helical Prominence Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2000-08-01

    We numerically simulated an initially bipolar magnetic field subjected to shear motions concentrated near and parallel to the photospheric polarity inversion line. The simulations yield three principal results: (1) For footpoint displacements comparable to the bipole's depth, the sheared core field acquires a dipped geometry that can support cool prominence material against gravity. This confirms previous force-free equilibrium models for forming dipped prominence fields by differential shear and extends them to much larger applied shears and time-dependent dynamics with dissipation. (2) At larger shears, we discover a new mechanism for forming the helical magnetic fields of prominences. It entails a two-step process of magnetic reconnection in the corona. First, flux in the sheared core reconnects with flux in the unsheared, restraining arcade, producing new pairs of interlinked field lines. Second, as these interlinked fields continue to be sheared, they are brought together and reconnect again, producing helical field threading and enveloping the body of the prominence. This mechanism can account for the twist that is often observed in both quiescent and erupting prominences. (3) Even for very large shears, the dipped, helical structure settles into an apparently stable equilibrium, despite the substantial amount of reconnection and twist in the magnetic field. We conclude that neither a kink instability of the helical core field, nor a tether-cutting instability of the restraining arcade, is operating in our low-lying model prominence. This concurs with both observations and a theoretical model for prominence stability.

  10. Observation of Intense Streams of Plasma from Laboratory Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. K. P.; Bellan, P. M.

    2004-11-01

    The evolution of two adjacent solar prominences has been simulated in a laboratory plasma experiment [1]. In this experiment, two side-by-side solar prominence-like plasma structures are produced using a four-electrode magnetized plasma source in a large vacuum chamber (1.4 m diameter, 2.0 m long). This plasma source is used to produce single prominences with either left or right handed twists. An ultra-high speed intensified CCD camera records visual images of the prominence-evolution. Except for the sense of the twists, the left and the right-handed single laboratory prominences produced by hydrogen have similar features. However, the left and the right-handed prominences produced by argon show a remarkable difference, namely, the emergence of a strong stream of plasma from the apex of only the left-handed argon single prominence. A magnetic loop probe array has been designed to map the 3-D magnetic field. It is expected that preliminary results on the magnetic field topology and the effect of the gas on these plasma-streams will be presented. [1] J. F. Hansen, S. K. P. Tripathi, and P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas 11(6), 3177 (2004)

  11. Mass composition and dynamics in quiet sun prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilper, Gary K.

    2009-06-01

    Solar prominences are transient phenomena in the solar atmosphere that display highly dynamic activity and can result in dramatic eruptions, ejecting a large amount of material into the heliosphere. The dynamics of the prominence plasma reveal information about its interaction with the magnetic field of the prominence, while the eruptions are associated with coronal mass ejections, which greatly affect space weather near Earth and throughout the solar system. My research on these topics was conducted via observational analyses of the partially-ionized prominence material, its composition, and the dynamics over time in prominences that range in activity from quiescent to highly active. The main results are evidence that (1) in quiescent prominences, neutral He is located more in the lower part of the structure, (2) a higher level of activity in prominences is related to a mixing of the material, and (3) an extended period of high activity and mixing occurs prior to eruptions, possibly due to mass loading. In addition, innovative modifications to analytical techniques led to measurements of the material's mass, composition, and small-scale dynamics.

  12. Strong Rotation of an Erupting Quiescent Polar Crown Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    On 5-6 June 2007, a large quiescent polar crown prominence was observed to erupt by the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This eruption was particularly visible in the 304 A channel of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) telescopes. A detailed analysis of the fine structures in the images allows the three-dimensional structure of the erupting prominence to be derived. The prominence is seen to undergo substantial rotation of at least 90 along the radial axis as it rises, with indications that additional rotation occurred before the prominence rose into the STEREO fields of view. Two temporary structures ("spurs") are seen to form at an angle to the main spine of the prominence, and are interpreted as signs of reconnection. These reconnection events contribute to the overall rotation of the prominence. A significant fraction of the prominence material is drained through new field lines caused by one of the reconnection events, resulting in only a weak coronal mass ejection event observed by the STEREO and SOHO coronagraphs. The eruption is interpreted as being initiated by the helical kink instability, with subsequent modification by the reconnection events.

  13. Formation of prominences by condensation modes in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1985-01-01

    Condensation modes in a magnetized cylindrical plasma are studied to shed light on the formation and stability of solar prominences. A rigorous mathematical derivation of the perturbation equation is developed, and the effect of field twist on the stability is studied for an equilibrium with uniform field twist, in which temperature increases, but density does not, as pressure increases. The results imply that prominences may form in globally magnetohydrodynamic-stable magnetic loops with very low field twist. Also, prominences are more likely to form in a region of weaker area-averaged magnetic field.

  14. Dynamic formation and magnetic support of loop or arcade prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, Gerard; Mok, Y.; Drake, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of model dynamic simulations of the formation and support of a narrow prominence at the apex of a coronal magnetic loop or arcade are described. The condensation process proceeds via an initial radiative cooling and pressure drop, and a secondary siphon flow from the dense chromospheric ends. The antibuoyancy effect as the prominence forms causes a bending of a confining magnetic field, which propagates toward the semirigid ends of the magnetic loop. Thus, a wide magnetic 'hammock' or well (of a normal polarity Kippenhahn-Schlueter type) is formed, which supports the prominence at or near the field apex.

  15. The iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) model of persistent spasmodic dyskinesias: regional serotonin metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cadet, J L; Jackson-Lewis, V; Fahn, S

    1988-07-26

    Chronic administration of iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) in rats causes a persistent behavioral syndrome which consists of lateral and vertical twitches, random circling, and hyperactivity. These abnormalities are very similar to those induced by the acute injection of serotonin (5-HT) agonists. The present study reveals significant increases in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the caudate-putamen and in the nucleus accumbens during treatment with IDPN. In the striatum, these changes lasted up to one month after the last injection of the drug. There were less prominent increases in 5-HT and decreases in 5-HIAA in the brainstem of these animals. These data are consistent with our previous study in which we found significant decreases in the number of 5-HT2 receptors in both the striatum and the accumbens of rats which were suffering from the IDPN-induced syndrome for a period of one month. These results are discussed in terms of their support for a possible role of the serotonin system in both the appearance and the persistence of this dyskinetic syndrome.

  16. Clinical study of botulinum toxin A injection combined with spasmodic muscle therapeutic instrument on lower limb spasticity in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xudong; Huang, Li; Wang, Qingsong; Liu, Yanping; Zhong, Jing; Chen, Huaxian

    2017-01-01

    The clinical effect of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection combined with spasmodic muscle therapeutic instrument with simple BTX-A injection was compared. Eighty patients with stroke were randomly divided into the treatment and control groups of 41 and 39 cases, respectively. The two groups of patients were given routine rehabilitation therapy. Ultrasound-guide positioning technology was used; treatment group was administered BTX-A injection combined spasmodic muscle therapeutic instrument while the control group received only BTX-A injection. Muscle tension and motor function were evaluated at 1, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after treatments by rehabilitation physician who was not aware of the grouping of the patients. Muscle tension was significantly reduced after BTX-A injection in the treatment and control groups. Modified Ashworth scale scores of the treatment and control groups 1 and 4 weeks after treatment were significantly lower than those before treatment. Motor function of lower limbs of patients, 1 and 4 weeks after treatment improved significantly. The comparison of step size and walking speed of the groups showed obvious differences with statistical significance (P<0.01). In conclusion, ultrasonic guidance BTX-A injection is easy to operate with good safety. It can effectively improve extensor myospasm of lower limb of patients with rapid onset and the spasm relief can last for three months. Spasmodic muscle therapeutic instrument can improve the spasm condition of lower limb muscle after stroke as well as motor function of lower limbs and activity of daily living, which can make spasmolysis of BTX-A last for a longer period of time. PMID:28587407

  17. An Investigation of the Physical Properties of Erupting Solar Prominences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-30

    Solar physics Chromosphere Solar corona Solar magnetic fields Coronal mass ejections...polarimeter deployed at the ESF. It is mainly conceived to do spectro-polarimetry of the chromosphere (in particular prominences and filaments

  18. Prominence condensation and magnetic levitation in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.; Drake, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a model dynamic simulation of the formation and support of a narrow prominence at the apex of a coronal magnetic loop or arcade are described. The condensation process proceeds via an initial radiative cooling and pressure drop, and a secondary siphon flow from the dense chromospheric ends. The antibuoyancy effect as the prominence forms causes a bending of the confining magnetic field, which propagates toward the semirigid ends of the magnetic loop. Thus, a wide magnetic 'hammock' or well (of the normal-polarity Kippenhahn-Schlueter-type) is formed, which supports the prominence at or near the field apex. The simplicity of this 1.5-dimensional model, with its accompanying diagnostics, elucidates the various contributions to the nonlinear dynamics of prominence condensation and levitation.

  19. Mass flows in a prominence spine as observed in EUV

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze a quiescent prominence observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with a focus on mass and energy flux in the spine, measured using Lyman continuum absorption. This is the first time this type of analysis has been applied with an emphasis on individual features and fluxes in a quiescent prominence. The prominence, observed on 2010 September 28, is detectable in most AIA wavebands in absorption and/or emission. Flows along the spine exhibit horizontal bands 5''-10'' wide and kinetic energy fluxes on the order of a few times 10{sup 5} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}, consistent with quiet sun coronal heating estimates. For a discrete moving feature we estimate a mass of a few times 10{sup 11} g. We discuss the implications of our derived properties for a model of prominence dynamics, the thermal non-equilibrium model.

  20. A Closer View of Prominent Rocks - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, from NASA Mars Pathfinder. Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin, Flat Top and Frog are at center 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  1. Solar Prominence Eruption Marks 1 Million on Helioviewer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This movie of a prominence eruption on April 20, 2013, was the millionth movie made on Helioviewer.org. The wispy eruption seen here eventually blossomed into a much larger cloud of solar material,...

  2. Formation of Intense Plasma Outflows from Laboratory Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. K. P.

    2005-10-01

    Solar prominences have been simulated in a laboratory experiment using a four-electrode magnetized plasma source [1]. An ultra-high speed intensified CCD camera records visual images of the laboratory prominence evolution and a magnetic probe array measures internal magnetic fields. Laboratory prominences produced using low pressure argon and krypton form localized outflow from the main structure. These outflows appear immediately after Ar and Kr prominences become unstable and contact surrounding metal structures. Within a few microseconds after this event, the main structure disappears and the outflow becomes extremely intense and elongated. An analytic model based on Hamiltonian formalism predicts the existence of a critical parameter below which ions lose confinement in a force-free magnetic field and subsequently form intense outflows. This escape of ions from force-free magnetic fields has been verified in numerical computations of ion trajectories.[1] J. F. Hansen, S. K. P. Tripathi, and P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas 11(6), 3177 (2004)

  3. Common ground and cultural prominence: how conversation reinforces culture.

    PubMed

    Fast, Nathanael J; Heath, Chip; Wu, George

    2009-07-01

    Why do well-known ideas, practices, and people maintain their cultural prominence in the presence of equally good or better alternatives? This article suggests that a social-psychological process whereby people seek to establish common ground with their conversation partners causes familiar elements of culture to increase in prominence, independently of performance or quality. Two studies tested this hypothesis in the context of professional baseball, showing that common ground predicted the cultural prominence of baseball players better than their performance, even though clear performance metrics are available in this domain. Regardless of performance, familiar players, who represented common ground, were discussed more often than lesser-known players, both in a dyadic experiment (Study 1) and in natural discussions on the Internet (Study 2). Moreover, these conversations mediated the positive link between familiarity and a more institutionalized measure of prominence: All-Star votes (Study 2). Implications for research on the psychological foundations of culture are discussed.

  4. Prominence condensation and magnetic levitation in a coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Mok, Y.; Drake, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a model dynamic simulation of the formation and support of a narrow prominence at the apex of a coronal magnetic loop or arcade are described. The condensation process proceeds via an initial radiative cooling and pressure drop, and a secondary siphon flow from the dense chromospheric ends. The antibuoyancy effect as the prominence forms causes a bending of the confining magnetic field, which propagates toward the semirigid ends of the magnetic loop. Thus, a wide magnetic 'hammock' or well (of the normal-polarity Kippenhahn-Schlueter-type) is formed, which supports the prominence at or near the field apex. The simplicity of this 1.5-dimensional model, with its accompanying diagnostics, elucidates the various contributions to the nonlinear dynamics of prominence condensation and levitation.

  5. Evidence for systematic flows in the transition region around prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engvold, O.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Reichmann, E.

    1985-01-01

    The solar transition region in the neighborhood of prominences has been studied from observations with the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter of NASA's Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Dopplergrams from observations of the transition-region lines C IV 1548 A and Si IV 1393 A, which are formed at about 100,000 K, give velocity amplitudes typically in the range + or - 15 km/s. Prominences are found to be located very close to dividing lines between areas of up- and down-drafts in the transition-region. The observed pattern suggests that the 100,000 K gas flows take place within arcades of magnetic loops, which most likely are part of the supporting magnetic structure for the prominence matter. An additional band of blue-ward Doppler shifts is frequently seen close to quiescent prominences. This may be the source of outward flowing matter along the helmet streamers above filament channels.

  6. Hinode and IRIS Observations of a Prominence-Cavity System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jibben, Patricia R.; Reeves, Kathy; Su, Yingna

    2016-05-01

    Long-lived solar prominences often have a coronal cavity enclosing the prominence. Within the cavity, hot X-ray emission can persist above the prominence and in the central regions of the cavity. We present the results of an Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Hinode coordinated Observation Program (IHOP 264) study of a prominence-cavity system. The X-ray Telescope (XRT) observes an inflow of bright X-ray emission that strikes and envelops the prominence-cavity system causing an eruption of chromospheric plasma near the base of the prominence. During and after the eruption, an increase in X-ray emission forms within the cavity and above the prominence. IRIS and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observe strong blue shifts in both chromosphere and coronal lines during the eruption. The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) Ca II H-line data show bright emission along the eruption path with complex turbulent plasma motions. The IRIS Si IV 1394 Angstrom spectra along the on-disk portion of the prominence show a region of decreased emission near the base of the prominence, suggesting a magnetic field bald-patch topology along the Polarity Inversion Line (PIL). Combined, these observations imply a cylindrical flux rope best represents the prominence-cavity system. A model of the magnetic structure of the prominence-cavity system comprised of a weakly twisted flux rope can explain the observed loops in the X-ray and EUV data. Observations from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) are compared to predicted models and are inconclusive. We find that more sensitive measurements of the magnetic field strength along the line-of-sight are needed to verify this configuration.Patricia Jibben and Kathy Reeves are supported by under contract 80111112705 from Lockheed-Martin to SAO, contract NNM07AB07C from NASA to SAO, grant number NNX12AI30G from NASA to SAO, and contract Z15-12504 from HAO to SAO under a grant from AFOSR. Yingna Su is supported by the Youth Fund of

  7. An Acoustic Measure for Word Prominence in Spontaneous Speech

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dagen; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm for automatic speech prominence detection is reported in this paper. We describe a comparative analysis on various acoustic features for word prominence detection and report results using a spoken dialog corpus with manually assigned prominence labels. The focus is on features such as spectral intensity and speech rate that are directly extracted from speech based on a correlation-based approach without requiring explicit linguistic or phonetic knowledge. Additionally, various pitch-based measures are studied with respect to their discriminating ability for prominence detection. A parametric scheme for modeling pitch plateau is proposed and this feature alone is found to outperform the traditional local pitch statistics. Two sets of experiments are used to explore the usefulness of the acoustic score generated using these features. The first set focuses on a more traditional way of word prominence detection based on a manually-tagged corpus. A 76.8% classification accuracy was achieved on a corpus of role-playing spoken dialogs. Due to difficulties in manually tagging speech prominence into discrete levels (categories), the second set of experiments focuses on evaluating the score indirectly. Specifically, through experiments on the Switchboard corpus, it is shown that the proposed acoustic score can discriminate between content word and function words in a statistically significant way. The relation between speech prominence and content/function words is also explored. Since prominent words tend to be predominantly content words, and since content words can be automatically marked from text-derived part of speech (POS) information, it is shown that the proposed acoustic score can be indirectly cross-validated through POS information. PMID:20454538

  8. Magnetic Shear, Rayleigh-Taylor Instability, And Prominence Threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard

    2012-05-01

    One striking feature of solar prominences is their very long, narrow threads of cool plasma that are observed in emission above the limb (and in absorption against the disk in filaments). It is generally accepted that this structure illuminates the prominence magnetic field, which both mechanical supports the cool mass against gravity and thermally insulates it against conduction from the surrounding hot corona. A mystery yet to be resolved is the origin of the narrow widths of prominence threads. We are investigating the hypothesis that it is fixed by a competition between the gravitational instability of a dense fluid (the prominence) residing above a dilute fluid (the corona) and the stabilizing influence of magnetic tension forces when the prominence field is distorted. It is well known (e.g., Stone & Gardiner 2007) that this process leads to the formation of ropes of dense fluid whose characteristic lengths are long parallel to the field (minimizing the increase in magnetic energy) but arbitrarily short perpendicular to the field (maximizing the release of gravitational energy). A key issue that has yet to be addressed is the effect on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of shear in a magnetic field whose direction rotates continuously through the body of the prominence. Linear analysis indicates that marginal stability is reached for aspect ratios (parallel to perpendicular wavelengths) of about 25:1 for solar parameters; unstable modes have still larger ratios. High-resolution numerical simulations of initially monolithic slab prominences show developing fragmentation of the prominence/corona interface driven by the early, linear growth of the shear-modified Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our investigation also is probing the nonlinear consequences of this evolution. This work was supported by NASA’s LWS TR&T program.

  9. A droplet model for downflows in hedgerow prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard; Berger, Thomas

    Observations of hedgerow prominences with the Solar Optical Telescope of the Hinode mission have revealed the ubiquitous existence of downflows forming coherent thin and highly structured near-vertical threads with velocities between 10 and 20 km/s. Their widths range between 300 and 500 km. They are often initiated at the top of the visible prominence, but sometimes also at intermediate level. We propose that the downflows are made of plasma packets that squeeze themselves through the dominantly horizontal field under the action of gravity. Their origin is assumed to be hot plasma either supplied from outside along the arcade field overarching the prominence and condensing at its top, or along the spine field of the prominence itself. Under compression and further cooling, the matter sinks into the prominence dragging its magnetic field with it, but eventually disconnecting it from the arcade field thus forming finite packets. The horizontal prominence field exerts a drag force on the downward moving packets like air on a falling droplet. Balancing the gravitational and drag forces yields an upper limit on their length of the order of 1000 km. Lateral pressure balance limits their width to about 500 km. Pushing themselves at high speed through the horizontal field, the plasma "droplets" excite a multitude of incoherent Alfvén waves. Nonlinear interactions of these waves fill the prominence with a spectrum of oscillatory and propagating wave modes. Absorption of part of that wave energy, whose ultimate source is gravitational energy, and radiative cooling constitute the energy balance of the falling matter and determine the mean fall speed ( 14 km/s). The small scales of the "droplets" and thus of their frozen-in magnetic fields explain the absence of vertical components in magnetic field measurements. The above estimates of the droplet characteristics rest on prominence parameters with mean density of 2.5x1012 cm-3, temperature of 7500 K, and horizontal fields of

  10. Physical Properties of Erupting Solar Prominences (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    interaction with the magnetic fields responsible for their support in the solar corona , until such time as they may erupt. The anticipated future result...AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2013-0097 TR-2013-0097 PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ERUPTING SOLAR PROMINENCES J. Lewis Fox and Roberto Casini...Physical Properties of Erupting Solar Prominences 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S

  11. Physical Processes in the "Feet" of Solar Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikharulidze, M.; Chigladze, R.; Khutsishvili, D.; Kvernadze, T.; Khutshishvili, E.; Kakhiani, V.; Kurkhuli, G.

    2017-09-01

    Spectrograms of hydrogen Hα and helium D3 were obtained with a large non-eclipsing coronagraph on November 21, 2012 and July 20, 2015 for a study of the velocities of the plasma in prominences at the Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory. An analysis of this data yielded the following major results: an asymmetry is observed in the time variations in the Doppler velocities and half widths of the Hα prominences. This asymmetry appears in roughly 40% of the 227 spectrograms that were studied. This kind of asymmetry is observed in 70% of the 320 D3 spectrograms that were studied. In the "feet" of the Hα prominences, the Doppler velocities vary over a range of approximately -9 to -15 km/s, and in the "feet" of the D3 prominences, from -8 to -18 km/s. For the Hα prominences the period of the oscillations in the velocity varies over 3-5 min and the period of the oscillations in the half width ranges from 5 to 12 min. For the D3 prominences the period of the oscillations in the Doppler velocities varies over 7-10 min, and the period of the oscillations in the half width ranges from 5-10 min.

  12. Numerical simulations of a siphon mechanism for quiescent prominence formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Mariska, J. T.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Quiescent prominences represent a significant challenge to our understanding of the flow of mass and energy in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. A small number of quiescent prominences contain as much mass as the entire corona (Athay, 1976). The problem then is how to get that much material into the relatively small volume of a prominence and maintain it at a temperature of 10,000 K in close proximity to material at one million K. The thermal insulation to conduction provided by the magnetic field explains the disparate temperatures. The mass source problem is less well understood. One method for supplying mass to the prominence is to siphon it from the chromosphere. The siphon mechanism begins with a magnetic loop that evolves into a configuration with a gravitational well, such as that described by Kippenhahn and Schluter (1957). This could be formed, for example, by a twist in the magnetic field. A gravitational well could also be formed by a condensation induced sag in the field. This could further enhance the condensation process. Once this well has formed, or as it is forming, the material in the well area of the loop must cool and condense to the point where radiative losses exceed any heat input. Additional material must also flow into the well from the underlying chromosphere to supply the mass required to form the prominence. One example from a series of numerical simulations that were performed to study the formation of quiescent prominences is presented.

  13. Cross-linguistic evidence for gender as a prominence feature.

    PubMed

    Esaulova, Yulia; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses recent findings in the online sentence processing research that suggest to consider gender information a prominence feature. Prominence features are hierarchically ordered information types that interact with formal features of arguments (e.g., grammatical functions, thematic roles) and thus determine the readers' ability to efficiently interpret linguistic ambiguities. While previous research addressed a number of prominence features (e.g., animacy, definiteness, person), there is now first empirical evidence indicating that gender information also influences the assignment of thematic roles across languages. Grammatically masculine role nouns are processed faster as agents than patients compared to feminine ones. Stereotypically male role nouns (e.g., electrician) are integrated with an agent role easier than neutral ones (e.g., musician), which in turn are integrated easier than female ones (e.g., beautician). Conceptualizing gender as a prominence feature will not only expand our knowledge about information types relevant for online comprehension but also uncover subtle gender biases present in language. The present work explores the possibility for a theoretical integration of social psychological and psycholinguistic research focusing on gender with research on prominence. Potential advantages an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender as a prominence feature, open questions and future directions are discussed.

  14. Cross-linguistic evidence for gender as a prominence feature

    PubMed Central

    Esaulova, Yulia; von Stockhausen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses recent findings in the online sentence processing research that suggest to consider gender information a prominence feature. Prominence features are hierarchically ordered information types that interact with formal features of arguments (e.g., grammatical functions, thematic roles) and thus determine the readers’ ability to efficiently interpret linguistic ambiguities. While previous research addressed a number of prominence features (e.g., animacy, definiteness, person), there is now first empirical evidence indicating that gender information also influences the assignment of thematic roles across languages. Grammatically masculine role nouns are processed faster as agents than patients compared to feminine ones. Stereotypically male role nouns (e.g., electrician) are integrated with an agent role easier than neutral ones (e.g., musician), which in turn are integrated easier than female ones (e.g., beautician). Conceptualizing gender as a prominence feature will not only expand our knowledge about information types relevant for online comprehension but also uncover subtle gender biases present in language. The present work explores the possibility for a theoretical integration of social psychological and psycholinguistic research focusing on gender with research on prominence. Potential advantages an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender as a prominence feature, open questions and future directions are discussed. PMID:26441732

  15. SOLAR PROMINENCES: “DOUBLE, DOUBLE… BOIL AND BUBBLE”

    SciTech Connect

    Keppens, R.; Xia, C.; Porth, O.

    2015-06-10

    Observations revealed rich dynamics within prominences, the cool (10{sup 4} K), macroscopic (sizes of order 100 Mm) “clouds” in the million degree solar corona. Even quiescent prominences are continuously perturbed by hot, rising bubbles. Since prominence matter is hundredfold denser than coronal plasma, this bubbling is related to Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities. Here we report on true macroscopic simulations well into this bubbling phase, adopting an MHD description from chromospheric layers up to 30 Mm height. Our virtual prominences rapidly establish fully nonlinear (magneto)convective motions where hot bubbles interplay with falling pillars, with dynamical details including upwelling pillars forming within bubbles. Our simulations show impacting Rayleigh–Taylor fingers reflecting on transition region plasma, ensuring that cool, dense chromospheric material gets mixed with prominence matter up to very large heights. This offers an explanation for the return mass cycle mystery for prominence material. Synthetic views at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths show remarkable agreement with observations, with clear indications of shear-flow induced fragmentations.

  16. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS IN A QUIESCENT PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hillier, A.; Morton, R. J.; Erdélyi, R.

    2013-12-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed for seeing-free observations at high-resolution and high-cadence making it well suited to study the dynamics of quiescent prominences. In recent years it has become clear that quiescent prominences support small-amplitude transverse oscillations, however, sample sizes are usually too small for general conclusions to be drawn. We remedy this by providing a statistical study of transverse oscillations in vertical prominence threads. Over a 4 hr period of observations it was possible to measure the properties of 3436 waves, finding periods from 50 to 6000 s with typical velocity amplitudes ranging between 0.2 and 23 km s{sup –1}. The large number of observed waves allows the determination of the frequency dependence of the wave properties and derivation of the velocity power spectrum for the transverse waves. For frequencies less than 7 mHz, the frequency dependence of the velocity power is consistent with the velocity power spectra generated from observations of the horizontal motions of magnetic elements in the photosphere, suggesting that the prominence transverse waves are driven by photospheric motions. However, at higher frequencies the two distributions significantly diverge, with relatively more power found at higher frequencies in the prominence oscillations. These results highlight that waves over a large frequency range are ubiquitous in prominences, and that a significant amount of the wave energy is found at higher frequency.

  17. Two Categories of Apparent Tornado-like Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sara F.; Venkataramanasastry, Aparna

    2014-06-01

    Two categories of solar prominences have been described in the literature as having a pattern of mass motions and/or a shape similar to terrestrial tornados. We first identify the two categories associated with prominences in the historic literature and then show that counterparts do exist for both in recent literature but one has not been called a tornado prominence. One category described as being similar to tornados is associated with the barbs of quiescent filaments but barbs appear to have rotational motion only under special conditions. H alpha Doppler observations from Helio Research confirm that this category is an illusion in our mind’s eye resulting from counterstreaming in the large barbs of quiescent filaments. The second category is a special case of rotational motion occurring during the early stages of some erupting prominences, in recent years called the roll effect in erupting prominences. In these cases, the eruption begins with the sideways rolling of the top of a prominence. As the eruption proceeds the rolling motion propagates down one leg or both legs of an erupting prominence depending on whether the eruption is asymmetric or symmetric respectively. As an asymmetric eruption proceeds, the longer lasting leg becomes nearly vertical and has true rotational motion. If only this phase of the eruption was observed, as in the historic cases, it was called a tornado prominence and spectra recorded in these cases provide proof of the rotational motion. When one observes an entire eruption which exhibits the rolling motion, as accomplished at Helio Research, the similarity to a tornado is lost because the event as a whole has quite a different nature and the analogy to a terrestrial tornado not longer appears suitable or helpful in understanding the observed and deduced physical processes. Our conclusion is that there are no solar prominences with motions that are usefully described as tornado or tornado-like events aside from the fun of observing

  18. [Evaluation of the notification of dysphonia on the voice profesionals as a sentinel event in Navarra. Period 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Arrizabalaga Baigorri, Sara; García López, Vega

    2017-07-07

    Among the lesions produced by the professional use of the voice since 2007, the Vocal Nodules (VN) are recognized in Spain as an Occupational Disease. With the aim of promoting its notification in Navarre, the Sentinel Program was incorporated in 2013 and, with this study, we seek to verify its efficacy. The study population were voice professionals reported for dysphonia as sentinel events during the years 2013 to 2015 in Navarre. Its effectiveness was validated by the cumulative incidence of 100,000 workers for each of the years and Positive Predictive Value as an indicator of suspicion. The declaration was verified as an occupational disease. In the period April 2013 to December, 110 cases were reported, 71 nominal and 39 non-nominal. The annual incidence increased from 9.0 cases per 100,000 to 13.4. Of the cases investigated, 63 were women and 8 men. The mean age was 40.8 years (38.5-43.1 95% CI). 58 cases (81.7%) corresponded to teachers. In 22 of the 71 nodules (31%) and 9 coincidences were notified as an occupational disease. We found a greater presence of nodules in professionals with extra work use of voice (OR 4.2 IC 1.3-14.3) and better evolution of pathologies other than VN (OR = 2.5 CI 1.1-5.8 ). The suspicion was confirmed as occupational in 54 cases (positive predictive value 76.1%). The centinel program is effective in reporting dysphonia although it is important to highlight the low declaration as occupational disease of the cases detected.

  19. Nonlinear dynamic-based analysis of severe dysphonia in patients with vocal fold scar and sulcus vocalis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong Hee; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Jack J.; Bless, Diane M.; Welham, Nathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The primary goal of this study was to evaluate a nonlinear dynamic approach to the acoustic analysis of dysphonia associated with vocal fold scar and sulcus vocalis. Study Design Case-control study. Methods Acoustic voice samples from scar/sulcus patients and age/sex-matched controls were analyzed using correlation dimension (D2) and phase plots, time-domain based perturbation indices (jitter, shimmer, signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]), and an auditory-perceptual rating scheme. Signal typing was performed to identify samples with bifurcations and aperiodicity. Results Type 2 and 3 acoustic signals were highly represented in the scar/sulcus patient group. When data were analyzed irrespective of signal type, all perceptual and acoustic indices successfully distinguished scar/sulcus patients from controls. Removal of type 2 and 3 signals eliminated the previously identified differences between experimental groups for all acoustic indices except D2. The strongest perceptual-acoustic correlation in our dataset was observed for SNR; the weakest correlation was observed for D2. Conclusions These findings suggest that D2 is inferior to time-domain based perturbation measures for the analysis of dysphonia associated with scar/sulcus; however, time-domain based algorithms are inherently susceptible to inflation under highly aperiodic (i.e., type 2 and 3) signal conditions. Auditory-perceptual analysis, unhindered by signal aperiodicity, is therefore a robust strategy for distinguishing scar/sulcus patient voices from normal voices. Future acoustic analysis research in this area should consider alternative (e.g., frequency- and quefrency-domain based) measures alongside additional nonlinear approaches. PMID:22516315

  20. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  1. On the Magnetism and Dynamics of Prominence Legs Hosting Tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez González, M. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Arregui, I.; Collados, M.; Beck, C.; de la Cruz Rodríguez, J.

    2016-07-01

    Solar tornadoes are dark vertical filamentary structures observed in the extreme ultraviolet associated with prominence legs and filament barbs. Their true nature and relationship to prominences requires an understanding of their magnetic structure and dynamic properties. Recently, a controversy has arisen: is the magnetic field organized forming vertical, helical structures or is it dominantly horizontal? And concerning their dynamics, are tornadoes really rotating or is it just a visual illusion? Here we analyze four consecutive spectro-polarimetric scans of a prominence hosting tornadoes on its legs, which helps us shed some light on their magnetic and dynamical properties. We show that the magnetic field is very smooth in all the prominence, which is probably an intrinsic property of the coronal field. The prominence legs have vertical helical fields that show slow temporal variation that is probably related to the motion of the fibrils. Concerning the dynamics, we argue that (1) if rotation exists, it is intermittent, lasting no more than one hour, and (2) the observed velocity pattern is also consistent with an oscillatory velocity pattern (waves).

  2. SDO/AIA observations of a partially erupting prominence

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Durgesh; Reeves, Katharine K.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Joshi, Navin C.

    2013-12-01

    We report an observation of a partially erupting prominence and its associated dynamical plasma processes based on observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The prominence first went through a slow rise (SR) phase followed by a fast rise (FR) phase. The SR phase began after a couple of small brightenings were seen toward the footpoints. When the prominence had transitioned from SR to FR, it had already become kinked. The prominence shows strong brightening at the central kink location during the start of FR. We interpret this as an internal magnetic reconnection occurring at a vertical current sheet forming between the two legs of the erupting prominence (flux rope). The brightening at the central kink location is seen in all EUV channels of AIA. The contributions of differential emission at higher temperatures are larger compared to that for typical coronal temperatures supporting a reconnection scenario at the central kink location. The plasma above the brightening location is ejected as a hot plasmoid-like structure embedded in a coronal mass ejection, and those below the brightening move down in the form of blobs moving toward the Sun's surface. The unique time resolution of the AIA has allowed these eruptive aspects, including SR-to-FR, kinking, central current sheet formation, plasmoid-like eruption, and filament 'splitting', to be observed in a single event, providing strong and comprehensive evidence in favor of the model of partially erupting flux ropes.

  3. ON THE SUPPORT OF NEUTRALS AGAINST GRAVITY IN SOLAR PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2015-04-01

    Cool and dense prominences found in the solar atmosphere are known to be partially ionized because of their relatively low temperature. In this Letter, we address the long-standing problem of how the neutral component of the plasma in prominences is supported against gravity. Using the multiple-fluid approach, we solve the time-dependent equations in two dimensions considering the frictional coupling between the neutral and ionized components of the magnetized plasma representative of a solar prominence embedded in a hot coronal environment. We demonstrate that given an initial density enhancement in the two fluids, representing the body of the prominence, the system is able to relax in the vicinity of magnetic dips to a stationary state in which both neutrals and ionized species are dynamically suspended above the photosphere. Two different coupling processes are considered in this study: collisions between ions and neutrals and charge exchange interactions. We find that for realistic conditions, ions are essentially static, while neutrals have a very small downflow velocity. The coupling between ions and neutrals is so strong at the prominence body that the behavior is similar to that of a single fluid with an effective density equal to the sum of the ion and neutral species. We also find that the charge exchange mechanism is about three times more efficient at sustaining neutrals than elastic scattering of ions with neutrals.

  4. Can bubbles in quiescent prominences be purely magnetic phenomena?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Schmieder, Brigitte; Aulanier, Guillaume; Zapior, Maciej; Heinzel, Petr

    2012-07-01

    We present a model of the magnetic field constituting quiescent prominences. The model assumes a linear force-free field with a weakly twisted flux-tube in an OX/OF topology perturbed by presence of parasitic polarities within the filament channel. The parasitic polarities locally create the cusp-shaped prominences with bubbles exactly as those observed by the SDO/AIA and Bialkow Observatory. We find that the observations are best reproduced if the parasitic bipoles are sheared with respect to the main inversion line. We show that the bubbles are in fact constituted by the arcade-like field lines, as opposed to that of the prominence, which is created by magnetic dips. A pair of null points is always associated with the parasitic bipole. These null points are connected by a separator passing through the prominence bubble. We show how the presence of an additional parasitic bipole moves the separator to the boundary between the bubble and the rest of the prominence, producing a topology favorable for reconnection and possibly for the formation of plumes.

  5. Magnetic Field and Plasma Diagnostics from Coordinated Prominence Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Levens, P.; Dalmasse, K.; Mein, N.; Mein, P.; Lopez-Ariste, A.; Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.

    2016-04-01

    We study the magnetic field in prominences from a statistical point of view, by using THEMIS in the MTR mode, performing spectropolarimetry of the He I D3 line. Combining these measurements with spectroscopic data from IRIS, Hinode/EIS as well as ground-based telescopes, such as the Meudon Solar Tower, we infer the temperature, density, and flow velocities of the plasma. There are a number of open questions that we aim to answer: - What is the general direction of the magnetic field in prominences? Is the model using a single orientation of magnetic field always valid for atypical prominences? %- Does this depend on the location of the filament on the disk (visible in Hα, in He II 304 Å) over an inversion line between weak or strong network ? - Are prominences in a weak environment field dominated by gas pressure? - Measuring the Doppler shifts in Mg II lines (with IRIS) and in Hα can tell us if there are substantial velocities to maintain vertical rotating structures, as has been suggested for tornado-like prominences. We present here some results obtained with different ground-based and space-based instruments in this framework.

  6. Investigating the Thermal Evolution of Solar Prominence Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Viall, Nicholeen M.; Karpen, Judith T.

    2015-04-01

    We present a study of prominence formation using time series analysis of Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) data. In evaporation-condensation models of prominence formation, heating at the foot-points of sheared coronal flux-tubes results in evaporation of hot (a few MK) material into the corona and subsequent catastrophic cooling of the hot material to form the cool (~10,000 K) prominence material. We present the results of a time-lag analysis that tracks the thermal evolution using emission formed at different temperatures. This analysis is made possible by AIA's many wavebands and high time resolution, and it allows us to look for signs of the evaporation-condensation process and to study the heating time scales involved. Supported by NASA’s Living with a Star program.

  7. Reconnection-Condensation Model for Solar Prominence Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takafumi; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2017-08-01

    We propose a reconnection-condensation model in which topological change in a coronal magnetic field via reconnection triggers radiative condensation, thereby resulting in prominence formation. Previous observational studies have suggested that reconnection at a polarity inversion line of a coronal arcade field creates a flux rope that can sustain a prominence; however, they did not explain the origin of cool dense plasmas of prominences. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, including anisotropic nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiative cooling, we demonstrate that reconnection can lead not only to flux rope formation but also to radiative condensation under a certain condition. In our model, this condition is described by the Field length, which is defined as the scale length for thermal balance between radiative cooling and thermal conduction. This critical condition depends weakly on the artificial background heating. The extreme ultraviolet emissions synthesized with our simulation results have good agreement with observational signatures reported in previous studies.

  8. THE FORMATION AND ERUPTION OF SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. Z.

    2013-11-01

    Following the two-stage catastrophic flux rope model presented by Zhang et al., we investigate how magnetic flux emergence affects the formation and evolution of solar quiescent prominences. The magnetic properties of the flux rope are described with its toroidal magnetic flux per radian Φ{sub p} and poloidal flux Φ{sub ψ}, and Φ{sub p} is defined as the emerging strength (ES) of the magnetic flux. After the first catastrophe, the quiescent prominences are supported by the vertical current sheet and located in cavities below the curved transverse current sheet in the inner corona, for which both ES and Φ{sub ψ} are in the certain ranges. We calculate the strength range as 0.25 < ES < 0.50 for the quadrupolar field, and obtain the equation Φ{sub p}Φ{sub ψ} = const., that is, the relationship between Φ{sub p} and Φ{sub ψ} of the emerging flux for which the quiescent prominences are formed in the inner corona. After the second catastrophe, the quiescent prominences would either fall down onto the solar surface or erupt as an important part of coronal mass ejections. During the eruption of the quiescent prominences, most of the magnetic energy in the flux rope is lost, and less than half of the energy loss of the rope is released in the form of Alfvèn waves. We argue that there would be two important conditions required for the formation and eruption of solar quiescent prominences, a complicated source region and emerging toroidal magnetic flux that exceeds a critical strength.

  9. Solar Prominence Modelling and Plasma Diagnostics at ALMA Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodger, Andrew; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2017-09-01

    Our aim is to test potential solar prominence plasma diagnostics as obtained with the new solar capability of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We investigate the thermal and plasma diagnostic potential of ALMA for solar prominences through the computation of brightness temperatures at ALMA wavelengths. The brightness temperature, for a chosen line of sight, is calculated using the densities of electrons, hydrogen, and helium obtained from a radiative transfer code under non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) conditions, as well as the input internal parameters of the prominence model in consideration. Two distinct sets of prominence models were used: isothermal-isobaric fine-structure threads, and large-scale structures with radially increasing temperature distributions representing the prominence-to-corona transition region. We compute brightness temperatures over the range of wavelengths in which ALMA is capable of observing (0.32 - 9.6 mm), however, we particularly focus on the bands available to solar observers in ALMA cycles 4 and 5, namely 2.6 - 3.6 mm (Band 3) and 1.1 - 1.4 mm (Band 6). We show how the computed brightness temperatures and optical thicknesses in our models vary with the plasma parameters (temperature and pressure) and the wavelength of observation. We then study how ALMA observables such as the ratio of brightness temperatures at two frequencies can be used to estimate the optical thickness and the emission measure for isothermal and non-isothermal prominences. From this study we conclude that for both sets of models, ALMA presents a strong thermal diagnostic capability, provided that the interpretation of observations is supported by the use of non-LTE simulation results.

  10. Back-and-Forth Methodology for Objective Voice Quality Assessment: From/to Expert Knowledge to/from Automatic Classification of Dysphonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredouille, Corinne; Pouchoulin, Gilles; Ghio, Alain; Revis, Joana; Bonastre, Jean-François; Giovanni, Antoine

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses voice disorder assessment. It proposes an original back-and-forth methodology involving an automatic classification system as well as knowledge of the human experts (machine learning experts, phoneticians, and pathologists). The goal of this methodology is to bring a better understanding of acoustic phenomena related to dysphonia. The automatic system was validated on a dysphonic corpus (80 female voices), rated according to the GRBAS perceptual scale by an expert jury. Firstly, focused on the frequency domain, the classification system showed the interest of 0-3000 Hz frequency band for the classification task based on the GRBAS scale. Later, an automatic phonemic analysis underlined the significance of consonants and more surprisingly of unvoiced consonants for the same classification task. Submitted to the human experts, these observations led to a manual analysis of unvoiced plosives, which highlighted a lengthening of VOT according to the dysphonia severity validated by a preliminary statistical analysis.

  11. Physical conditions in the cool parts of prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A spectral analysis of the cool parts of seven prominences reported by Shin-Huei (1961) and Yakovkin and Zel'dina (1964) is presented. The analysis requires only measurements of the Na and Sr(+) resonance lines and the middle H Balmer lines, all of which are optically thin, and uses the Na and Sr(+) statistical equilibrium solutions of Landman (1983). It is shown that the Na/H integrated intensity ratios alone are sufficient to determine the degree of H ionization. The major result of this investigation is that the degree of H ionization in the cool prominence parts is very low and the total gas pressure very high.

  12. Physical conditions in the cool parts of prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, D. A.

    1983-07-01

    A spectral analysis of the cool parts of seven prominences reported by Shin-Huei (1961) and Yakovkin and Zel'dina (1964) is presented. The analysis requires only measurements of the Na and Sr(+) resonance lines and the middle H Balmer lines, all of which are optically thin, and uses the Na and Sr(+) statistical equilibrium solutions of Landman (1983). It is shown that the Na/H integrated intensity ratios alone are sufficient to determine the degree of H ionization. The major result of this investigation is that the degree of H ionization in the cool prominence parts is very low and the total gas pressure very high.

  13. Aggressive Cue Prominence and Gender Participation in MTV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalis, Pamela; Neuendorf, Kimberly A.

    1989-01-01

    Explores the content and structure of music videos, focusing on the pervasiveness of aggressive cues (objects or events representing physical harm or the threat of harm), gender portrayals within a context of aggression, and the pacing of music videos. Finds that aggressive cues in music videos are less prominent than critics indicate. (MM)

  14. 21 CFR 101.15 - Food; prominence of required statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...(s) is the name of the food. (3) If any article of labeling (other than a label) contains any... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food; prominence of required statements. 101.15 Section 101.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  15. The Most Prominent Roles of an ESP Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghafournia, Narjes; Sabet, Shokoofeh Ahmadian

    2014-01-01

    One prominent feature of many ESP (English for Specific Purposes) courses, which make them rather different from EGP (English for General Purposes) courses, is the presence of adult learners, who are primary workers and secondary learners. As ESP is a highly learner-cantered approach, paying close attention to the multidimensional needs of…

  16. A Prominence/filament eruption triggered by eight homologous flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse; Innes, Davina; Moore, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    Eight homologous flares occurred in active region NOAA 11237 over 16 - 17 June 2011. A prominence system with a surrounding coronal cavity was adjacent to, but still magnetically connected to the active region. The eight eruptions expelled hot material from the active region into the prominence/filament cavity system (PFCS) where the ejecta became confined. We mainly aim to diagnose the 3D dynamics of the PFCS during the series of eight homologous eruptions by using data from two instruments: SDO/AIA and STEREO/EUVI-B, covering the Sun from two directions. The field containing the ejected hot material interacts with the PFCS and causes it to inflate, resulting in a discontinuous rise of the prominence/filament approximately in steps with the homologous eruptions. The eighth eruption triggers the PFCS to move outward slowly, accompanied by a weak coronal dimming. Subsequently the prominence/filament material drains to the solar surface. This PFCS eruption evidently slowly opens field overlying the active region, which results in a final ‘ejective’ eruption from the core of the active region. A strong dimming appears adjacent to the final eruption’s flare loops in the EUVI-B images, followed by a CME. We propose that the eight homologous flares gradually disrupted the PFCS and removed the overlying field above the active region, leading to the CME via the ‘lid removal’ mechanism.

  17. UV Observations of Prominence Activation and Cool Loop Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of dynamic structures in and around a prominence channel observed on the limb on 17 April 2003. Observations were taken with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SOHO/SUMER) in lines formed at temperatures from 80,000 to 1.6 MK. The instrument was pointed to a single location and took a series of 90 s exposures. Two-dimensional context was provided by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in the UV and EUV and the Kanzelhohe Solar Observatory in H-alpha. Two dynamic features were studied in depth: an activated prominence and repeated motions in a loop near the prominence. We calculated three-dimensional geometries and trajectories, differential emission measure, and limits on the mass, pressure, average density, and kinetic and thermal energies. These observations provide important tests for models of dynamics in prominences and cool (approx. 10(exp 5) K)loops, which will ultimately lead to a better understanding the mechanism(s) leading to energy and mass flow in these solar features.

  18. Non-thermal line-broadening in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellmacher, G.; Wiehr, E.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We show that the line broadening in quiescent solar prominences is mainly due to non-thermal velocities. Methods: We have simultaneously observed a wide range of optically thin lines in quiescent prominences, selected for bright and narrow Mg b emission without line satellites from macro-shifts. Results: We find a ratio of reduced widths, ΔλD/λ0, of Hγ and Hδ of 1.05 ± 0.03, which can hardly be attributed to saturation, since both are optically thin for the prominences observed: τγ ≤ 0.3, τδ ≤ 0.15. We confirm the ratio of reduced widths of He 4772 (triplet) and He 5015 (singlet) of 1.1 ± 0.05 at higher significance and detect a width ratio of Mg b2 and Mg 4571 (both from the triplet system) of 1.3 ± 0.1. Conclusions: The discrepant widths of lines from different atoms, and even from the same atom, cannot be represented by a unique pair [Tkin; Vnth]. Values of Tkin deduced from observed line radiances using models indicate low temperatures down to Tkin ≈ 5000 K. Non-thermal velocities, related to different physical states of the respective emitting prominence region, seem to be the most important line broadening mechanism.

  19. UV Observations of Prominence Activation and Cool Loop Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of dynamic structures in and around a prominence channel observed on the limb on 17 April 2003. Observations were taken with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SOHO/SUMER) in lines formed at temperatures from 80,000 to 1.6 MK. The instrument was pointed to a single location and took a series of 90 s exposures. Two-dimensional context was provided by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) in the UV and EUV and the Kanzelhohe Solar Observatory in H-alpha. Two dynamic features were studied in depth: an activated prominence and repeated motions in a loop near the prominence. We calculated three-dimensional geometries and trajectories, differential emission measure, and limits on the mass, pressure, average density, and kinetic and thermal energies. These observations provide important tests for models of dynamics in prominences and cool (approx. 10(exp 5) K)loops, which will ultimately lead to a better understanding the mechanism(s) leading to energy and mass flow in these solar features.

  20. Further Validation of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, J. Paige; Hall, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine select psychometric properties of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale (CIPS), including the reliability, factorial validity, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and predictive validity. Coaches (N = 338) who averaged 37 (SD = 12.27) years of age, had a mean of 13 (SD = 9.90) years of coaching experience,…

  1. SPATIAL DAMPING OF PROPAGATING KINK WAVES IN PROMINENCE THREADS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2011-01-10

    Transverse oscillations and propagating waves are frequently observed in threads of solar prominences/filaments and have been interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. We investigate the spatial damping of propagating kink MHD waves in transversely nonuniform and partially ionized prominence threads. Resonant absorption and ion-neutral collisions (Cowling's diffusion) are the damping mechanisms taken into account. The dispersion relation of resonant kink waves in a partially ionized magnetic flux tube is numerically solved by considering prominence conditions. Analytical expressions of the wavelength and damping length as functions of the kink mode frequency are obtained in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. For typically reported periods of thread oscillations, resonant absorption is an efficient mechanism for the kink mode spatial damping, while ion-neutral collisions have a minor role. Cowling's diffusion dominates both the propagation and damping for periods much shorter than those observed. Resonant absorption may explain the observed spatial damping of kink waves in prominence threads. The transverse inhomogeneity length scale of the threads can be estimated by comparing the observed wavelengths and damping lengths with the theoretically predicted values. However, the ignorance of the form of the density profile in the transversely nonuniform layer introduces inaccuracies in the determination of the inhomogeneity length scale.

  2. The Prominence of Referring Expressions: Message and Lexical Level Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Tuan Q.

    2012-01-01

    In conversation, speakers produce some words with greater intensity, longer duration, and higher fundamental frequency (F0) than other words. By making different words in a sentence more prominent than other words, a speaker can change the meaning implied by a sentence. This thesis explores the relationship between processing in the language…

  3. Who's ''She''? Discourse Prominence Influences Preschoolers' Comprehension of Pronouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, H.j.; Fisher, C.

    2005-01-01

    Four experiments examined whether 3-year-olds' comprehension of pronouns was affected by the discourse prominence of the possible antecedents. In each experiment, children listened to short stories. The final (test) sentence of each story differed in whether it continued the grammatical subject (and first-mentioned character) established in prior…

  4. A-B Distinction in a Sample of Prominent Psychotherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Jesse D.; Berzins, Juris I.

    1976-01-01

    A sample of prominent psychotherapists were asked to fill out the A-B therapist "type" scale and comment on their possible differential effectiveness in treating schizoid/schizophrenic versus neurotic patients. The data suggest that B therapists desire and seek more complex and exciting sensory-cognitive inputs during therapy hours than A…

  5. The Prominence of Referring Expressions: Message and Lexical Level Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Tuan Q.

    2012-01-01

    In conversation, speakers produce some words with greater intensity, longer duration, and higher fundamental frequency (F0) than other words. By making different words in a sentence more prominent than other words, a speaker can change the meaning implied by a sentence. This thesis explores the relationship between processing in the language…

  6. Magnetohydrostatic Solar Prominences in Near-Potential Coronal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, G. J. D.; Blokland, J. W. S.; Keppens, R.

    2007-08-01

    We present numerical magnetohydrostatic solutions describing the gravitationally stratified, bulk equilibrium of cool, dense prominence plasma embedded in a near-potential coronal field. These solutions are calculated using the FINESSE magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium solver and describe the morphologies of magnetic field distributions in and around prominences and the cool prominence plasma that these fields support. The equilibrium condition for this class of problem is usually different in distinct subdomains separated by free boundaries, across which solutions are matched by suitable continuity or jump conditions describing force balance. We employ our precise finite element elliptic solver to calculate solutions not accessible by previous analytical techniques with temperature or entropy prescribed as free functions of the magnetic flux function, including a range of values of the polytropic index, temperature variations mainly across magnetic field lines and photospheric field profiles sheared close to the polarity inversion line. Out of the many examples computed here, perhaps the most noteworthy is one which reproduces precisely the three-part structure often encountered in observations: a cool dense prominence within a cavity/flux rope embedded in a hot corona. The stability properties of these new equilibria, which may be relevant to solar eruptions, can be determined in the form of a full resistive MHD spectrum using a companion hyperbolic stability solver.

  7. Further Validation of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, J. Paige; Hall, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine select psychometric properties of the Coach Identity Prominence Scale (CIPS), including the reliability, factorial validity, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and predictive validity. Coaches (N = 338) who averaged 37 (SD = 12.27) years of age, had a mean of 13 (SD = 9.90) years of coaching experience,…

  8. A-B Distinction in a Sample of Prominent Psychotherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Jesse D.; Berzins, Juris I.

    1976-01-01

    A sample of prominent psychotherapists were asked to fill out the A-B therapist "type" scale and comment on their possible differential effectiveness in treating schizoid/schizophrenic versus neurotic patients. The data suggest that B therapists desire and seek more complex and exciting sensory-cognitive inputs during therapy hours than A…

  9. 10. CANAL CUT THROUGH SHALE BEDROCK ON PROMINENT POINT, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CANAL CUT THROUGH SHALE BEDROCK ON PROMINENT POINT, LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST. NOTE CONCRETE ABUTMENTS PROBABLY INSTALLED IN 1935 TO PREVENT WATER FROM ESCAPING THROUGH A CANAL BANK BREACH. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  10. DEM Measurements of Moving UV Features in Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor); Kucera, T. A.; Landi, E.

    2003-01-01

    Multi-thermal features with speeds of 5-70 km/s perpendicular to the line of sight are common in the prominences which showed traceable motions. These speeds are noticeably higher than the typical speeds of 5-20 km/s observed in H-alpha data from "quiet" prominences and are more typical of "activated" prominences in which H-alpha blob speeds of up to 40 km/s have been reported. In order to make a more quantitative determination of the thermal properties of the moving features seen in the UV, we use the SOHO Cororial Diagnostic Spectrometer to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The resulting observations in lines of O III, O IV, O V, Ne IV, Ne V, Ne VI, and Ne VII allow us to calculate the differential emission measure of moving features and provide a test of models of flows in prominences.

  11. Thermal Properties of Moving UV Features in Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.

    2003-01-01

    Multi-thermal features with speeds of 5-70 kilometers per second perpendicular to the line of sight are common in the prominences which showed traceable motions. These speeds are noticeably higher than the typical speeds of 5-20 kilometers per second observed in H-alpha data from "quiet" prominences and are more typical of "activated" prominences in which H-alpha blob speeds of up to 40 kilometers per second have been reported. In order to make a more quantitative determination of the thermal properties of the moving features seen in the UV, we use the SOHO instruments SUMER and CDS to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The resulting observations in lines spectral lines in a range of "transition region" temperatures allow us to analyze the thermal properties of the moving prominence sources as a function of time.

  12. The Effects of Partial Ionization on Prominence Mass Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Olson, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Martinez Gomez, D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-12-01

    The origin of the prominence mass has been an open question since this cool plasma suspended in the hot corona was first discovered. We have known for a long time that the mass must come from the chromosphere, but it is unclear whether this mass is lifted bodily through magnetic levitation, injected by reconnection-driven upflows, or driven from the chromosphere by evaporation and then condensed. One evaporation-condensation scenario, the thermal nonequilibrium (TNE) model, is the most fully developed, quantitative model for the prominence plasma to date. In the TNE scenario, localized heating concentrated at the coronal loop footpoints produces chromospheric evaporation, filling the flux tube with hot, dense plasma that subsequently collapses radiatively to form cool condensations. Thus far this model has been successful in explaining the key properties of the long, persistent threads and small, highly dynamic, transient blobs in prominences, the damping of large-amplitude field-aligned prominence oscillations, the appearance of horn-shaped features above the cool prominence in EUV images of coronal cavities, and coronal rain in the ambient corona. To date, all studies of TNE have assumed that the plasma is fully ionized, which is appropriate for the hot coronal gas but unrealistic for the cool plasma below ~30,000 K. The energetics, dynamics, and evolutionary time scales of the TNE process are expected to be altered when the effects of ionization and recombination are considered. We have modified ARGOS, our 1D hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, to include an equation of state that accounts for the effects of partial ionization of the plasma over a wide range of temperatures and densities. We will discuss the results of these simulations and their comparison with our previous studies of TNE in typical filament-supporting flux tubes. This work was partially supported by NASA's LWS Strategic Capability program.

  13. Homologous prominence non-radial eruptions: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchlev, P.; Koleva, K.; Madjarska, M. S.; Dechev, M.

    2016-10-01

    The present study provides important details on homologous eruptions of a solar prominence that occurred in active region NOAA 10904 on 2006 August 22. We report on the pre-eruptive phase of the homologous feature as well as the kinematics and the morphology of a forth from a series of prominence eruptions that is critical in defining the nature of the previous consecutive eruptions. The evolution of the overlying coronal field during homologous eruptions is discussed and a new observational criterion for homologous eruptions is provided. We find a distinctive sequence of three activation periods each of them containing pre-eruptive precursors such as a brightening and enlarging of the prominence body followed by small surge-like ejections from its southern end observed in the radio 17 GHz. We analyse a fourth eruption that clearly indicates a full reformation of the prominence after the third eruption. The fourth eruption although occurring 11 h later has an identical morphology, the same angle of propagation with respect to the radial direction, as well as similar kinematic evolution as the previous three eruptions. We find an important feature of the homologous eruptive prominence sequence that is the maximum height increase of each consecutive eruption. The present analysis establishes that all four eruptions observed in Hα are of confined type with the third eruption undergoing a thermal disappearance during its eruptive phase. We suggest that the observation of the same direction of the magnetic flux rope (MFR) ejections can be consider as an additional observational criterion for MFR homology. This observational indication for homologous eruptions is important, especially in the case of events of typical or poorly distinguishable morphology of eruptive solar phenomena.

  14. Damping of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Solar Prominence Fine Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution observations of solar filaments and prominences reveal that these large-scale coronal structures are formed by a myriad of long and thin ribbons, here called threads, which are piled up to form the prominence body. Evidences suggest that these fine structures are magnetic flux tubes anchored in the solar photosphere, which are partially filled with the cool and dense prominence material. Individual and collective oscillations of prominence and filament fine structures are frequently reported by means of oscillatory variations in Doppler signals and spectral line intensity. Common features of these observations are that the reported oscillatory periods are usually in a narrow range between 2 and 10 minutes, that the velocity amplitudes are smaller than ˜3 km/s, and that the oscillations seem to be strongly damped after a few periods. Typically, the ratio of the damping time, tD, to the period, P, is tD/P < 10. While the oscillations have been interpreted in the context of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, i.e., in terms of the MHD normal modes supported by the filament thread body and/or propagating MHD waves, the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the damping are not well-known and a comparative study between different damping mechanisms is needed. In this Thesis, we study the efficiency of several physical mechanisms for the damping of MHD oscillations in prominence fine structures. Both individual and collective oscillations of threads are analyzed. We model a filament thread as a straight cylindrical magnetic flux tube with prominence conditions, embedded in a magnetized environment representing the solar coronal medium. The basic MHD equations are applied to the model and contain non-ideal terms accounting for effects as, e.g., non-adiabatic mechanisms, magnetic diffusion, ion-neutral collisions, etc., that may be of relevance in prominence plasmas and whose role on the damping of the oscillations is assessed. Our method combines

  15. Non-LTE hydrogen-line formation in moving prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinzel, P.; Rompolt, B.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen-line brightness variations, depending on the prominence-velocity changes were investigated. By solving the NON-Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) problem for hydrogen researchers determine quantitatively the effect of Doppler brightening and/or Doppler dimming (DBE, DDE) in the lines of Lyman and Balmer series. It is demonstrated that in low-density prominence plasmas, DBE in H alpha and H beta lines can reach a factor of three for velocities around 160 km/sec, while the L alpha line exhibits typical DDE. L beta brightness variations follow from a combined DBE in the H alpha and DDE in L alpha and L beta itself, providing that all relevant multilevel interlocking processes are taken into account.

  16. STRUCTURE OF PROMINENCE LEGS: PLASMA AND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Levens, P. J.; Labrosse, N.; Schmieder, B.; Ariste, A. López

    2016-02-10

    We investigate the properties of a “solar tornado” observed on 2014 July 15, and aim to link the behavior of the plasma to the internal magnetic field structure of the associated prominence. We made multi-wavelength observations with high spatial resolution and high cadence using SDO/AIA, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectrograph, and the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) instrument. Along with spectropolarimetry provided by the Télescope Héliographique pour l’Etude du Magnétisme et des Instabilités Solaires telescope we have coverage of both optically thick emission lines and magnetic field information. AIA reveals that the two legs of the prominence are strongly absorbing structures which look like they are rotating, or oscillating in the plane of the sky. The two prominence legs, which are both very bright in Ca ii (SOT), are not visible in the IRIS Mg ii slit-jaw images. This is explained by the large optical thickness of the structures in Mg ii, which leads to reversed profiles, and hence to lower integrated intensities at these locations than in the surroundings. Using lines formed at temperatures lower than 1 MK, we measure relatively low Doppler shifts on the order of ±10 km s{sup −1} in the tornado-like structure. Between the two legs we see loops in Mg ii, with material flowing from one leg to the other, as well as counterstreaming. It is difficult to interpret our data as showing two rotating, vertical structures that are unrelated to the loops. This kind of “tornado” scenario does not fit with our observations. The magnetic field in the two legs of the prominence is found to be preferentially horizontal.

  17. Structure of Prominence Legs: Plasma and Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levens, P. J.; Schmieder, B.; Labrosse, N.; López Ariste, A.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the properties of a “solar tornado” observed on 2014 July 15, and aim to link the behavior of the plasma to the internal magnetic field structure of the associated prominence. We made multi-wavelength observations with high spatial resolution and high cadence using SDO/AIA, the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spectrograph, and the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) instrument. Along with spectropolarimetry provided by the Télescope Héliographique pour l’Etude du Magnétisme et des Instabilités Solaires telescope we have coverage of both optically thick emission lines and magnetic field information. AIA reveals that the two legs of the prominence are strongly absorbing structures which look like they are rotating, or oscillating in the plane of the sky. The two prominence legs, which are both very bright in Ca ii (SOT), are not visible in the IRIS Mg ii slit-jaw images. This is explained by the large optical thickness of the structures in Mg ii, which leads to reversed profiles, and hence to lower integrated intensities at these locations than in the surroundings. Using lines formed at temperatures lower than 1 MK, we measure relatively low Doppler shifts on the order of ±10 km s-1 in the tornado-like structure. Between the two legs we see loops in Mg ii, with material flowing from one leg to the other, as well as counterstreaming. It is difficult to interpret our data as showing two rotating, vertical structures that are unrelated to the loops. This kind of “tornado” scenario does not fit with our observations. The magnetic field in the two legs of the prominence is found to be preferentially horizontal.

  18. 22. GENERAL VIEW OF MILL FROM SOUTHEAST. PROMINENT ARE THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. GENERAL VIEW OF MILL FROM SOUTHEAST. PROMINENT ARE THE 100-TON STEEL CRUSHED UNOXIDIZED ORE BIN, CENTER LEFT; STEPHENS-ADAMSON 15 TON/HR INCLINED BUCKET ELEVATOR IN FRONT OF THE STEEL ORE BIN; AND THE BAKER COOLER, LOWER RIGHT. THESE MACHINES AND OTHERS IN THE AREA WERE PART OF THE UNOXIDIZED ORE CIRCUIT. THE ROASTER IS OUT OF THE PICTURE TO THE RIGHT (EAST). - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  19. Quantitation of the prominent medullary pyramid: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Paling, M R; Black, W C

    1986-06-01

    We propose a revised objective measurement of the size of the renal medullary pyramid in the assessment of the prominent renal pyramid: the medullary-renal ratio (MRR). (Formula: see text). This is a more accurate assessment of the size of the renal pyramid relative to the size of the kidney than the previously proposed medullary pyramid index, which fails to take into account the varying morphology of otherwise normal kidneys.

  20. Observations of apparent superslow wave propagation in solar prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raes, J. O.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Baes, M.; Wright, A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Phase mixing of standing continuum Alfvén waves and/or continuum slow waves in atmospheric magnetic structures such as coronal arcades can create the apparent effect of a wave propagating across the magnetic field. Aims: We observe a prominence with SDO/AIA on 2015 March 15 and find the presence of oscillatory motion. We aim to demonstrate that interpreting this motion as a magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) wave is faulty. We also connect the decrease of the apparent velocity over time with the phase mixing process, which depends on the curvature of the magnetic field lines. Methods: By measuring the displacement of the prominence at different heights to calculate the apparent velocity, we show that the propagation slows down over time, in accordance with the theoretical work of Kaneko et al. We also show that this propagation speed drops below what is to be expected for even slow MHD waves for those circumstances. We use a modified Kippenhahn-Schlüter prominence model to calculate the curvature of the magnetic field and fit our observations accordingly. Results: Measuring three of the apparent waves, we get apparent velocities of 14, 8, and 4 km s-1. Fitting a simple model for the magnetic field configuration, we obtain that the filament is located 103 Mm below the magnetic centre. We also obtain that the scale of the magnetic field strength in the vertical direction plays no role in the concept of apparent superslow waves and that the moment of excitation of the waves happened roughly one oscillation period before the end of the eruption that excited the oscillation. Conclusions: Some of the observed phase velocities are lower than expected for slow modes for the circumstances, showing that they rather fit with the concept of apparent superslow propagation. A fit with our magnetic field model allows for inferring the magnetic geometry of the prominence. The movie attached to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  1. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF A MULTI-THREADED SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, M.

    2012-02-10

    We investigate the process of formation and subsequent evolution of prominence plasma in a filament channel and its overlying arcade. We construct a three-dimensional time-dependent model of an intermediate quiescent prominence suitable to be compared with observations. We combine the magnetic field structure of a three-dimensional sheared double arcade with one-dimensional independent simulations of many selected flux tubes, in which the thermal nonequilibrium process governs the plasma evolution. We have found that the condensations in the corona can be divided into two populations: threads and blobs. Threads are massive condensations that linger in the flux tube dips. Blobs are ubiquitous small condensations that are produced throughout the filament and overlying arcade magnetic structure, and rapidly fall to the chromosphere. The threads are the principal contributors to the total mass, whereas the blob contribution is small. The total prominence mass is in agreement with observations, assuming reasonable filling factors of order 0.001 and a fixed number of threads. The motion of the threads is basically horizontal, while blobs move in all directions along the field. We have generated synthetic images of the whole structure in an H{alpha} proxy and in two EUV channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board Solar Dynamics Observatory, thus showing the plasma at cool, warm, and hot temperatures. The predicted differential emission measure of our system agrees very well with observations in the temperature range log T = 4.6-5.7. We conclude that the sheared-arcade magnetic structure and plasma behavior driven by thermal nonequilibrium fit the abundant observational evidence well for typical intermediate prominences.

  2. 3D Reconstruction of a Rotating Erupting Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. T.; Kliem, B.; Torok, T.

    2011-01-01

    A bright prominence associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) was seen erupting from the Sun on 9 April 2008. This prominence was tracked by both the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUVI and COR1 telescopes, and was seen to rotate about the line of sight as it erupted; therefore, the event has been nicknamed the "Cartwheel CME." The threads of the prominence in the core of the CME quite clearly indicate the structure of a weakly to moderately twisted flux rope throughout the field of view, up to heliocentric heights of 4 solar radii. Although the STEREO separation was 48 deg, it was possible to match some sharp features in the later part of the eruption as seen in the 304 Angstrom line in EUVI and in the H alpha-sensitive bandpass of COR1 by both STEREO Ahead and Behind. These features could then be traced out in three dimensional space, and reprojected into a view in which the eruption is directed towards the observer. The reconstructed view shows that the alignment of the prominence to the vertical axis rotates as it rises up to a leading-edge height of approximately equals 2.5 solar radii, and then remains approximately constant. The alignment at 2.5 solar radii differs by about 115 deg. from the original filament orientation inferred from H alpha and EUV data, and the height profile of the rotation, obtained here for the first time, shows that two thirds of the total rotation is reached within approximately equals 0.5 solar radii above the photosphere. These features are well reproduced by numerical simulations of an unstable moderately twisted flux rope embedded in external flux with a relatively strong shear field component.

  3. Coronal transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves in a solar prominence.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T J; Tsuneta, S; Berger, T E; Ichimoto, K; Katsukawa, Y; Lites, B W; Nagata, S; Shibata, K; Shimizu, T; Shine, R A; Suematsu, Y; Tarbell, T D; Title, A M

    2007-12-07

    Solar prominences are cool 10(4) kelvin plasma clouds supported in the surrounding 10(6) kelvin coronal plasma by as-yet-undetermined mechanisms. Observations from Hinode show fine-scale threadlike structures oscillating in the plane of the sky with periods of several minutes. We suggest that these represent Alfvén waves propagating on coronal magnetic field lines and that these may play a role in heating the corona.

  4. 3D Reconstruction of a Rotating Erupting Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. T.; Kliem, B.; Toeroek, T.

    2011-01-01

    A bright prominence associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) was seen erupting from the Sun on 9 April 2008. This prominence was tracked by both the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) EUVI and COR1 telescopes, and was seen to rotate about the line of sight a it erupted; therefore, the event has been nicknamed the "Cartwheel CME." The threads of the prominence in the core of the CME quite clearly indicate the structure of a weakly to moderately twisted flux rope throughout the field of view, up to heliocentric heights of 4 solar radii. Although the STEREO separation was 48 deg, it was possible to match some sharp features in the later part of the eruption as seen in the 304 A line in EUVI and in the H-alpha-sensitive bandpass of COR I by both STEREO Ahead and Behind. These features could then be traced out in three-dimensional space, and reprojected into a view in which the eruption is directed toward the observer. The reconstructed view shows that the alignment of the prominence to the vertical axis rotates as it rises up to a leading-edge height of approximately equal to 2.5 solar radii, and then remains approximately constant. The alignment at 2.5 solar radii differs by about 115 deg from the original filament orientation inferred from H-alpha and EUV data, and the height profile of the rotation, obtained here for the first time, shows that two thirds of the total rotation are reached within approximately equal to 0.5 solar radii above the photosphere. These features are well reproduced by numerical simulations of an unstable moderately twisted flux rope embedded in external flux with a relatively strong shear field component.

  5. Predicting Node Degree Centrality with the Node Prominence Profile

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Dong, Yuxiao; Chawla, Nitesh V.

    2014-01-01

    Centrality of a node measures its relative importance within a network. There are a number of applications of centrality, including inferring the influence or success of an individual in a social network, and the resulting social network dynamics. While we can compute the centrality of any node in a given network snapshot, a number of applications are also interested in knowing the potential importance of an individual in the future. However, current centrality is not necessarily an effective predictor of future centrality. While there are different measures of centrality, we focus on degree centrality in this paper. We develop a method that reconciles preferential attachment and triadic closure to capture a node's prominence profile. We show that the proposed node prominence profile method is an effective predictor of degree centrality. Notably, our analysis reveals that individuals in the early stage of evolution display a distinctive and robust signature in degree centrality trend, adequately predicted by their prominence profile. We evaluate our work across four real-world social networks. Our findings have important implications for the applications that require prediction of a node's future degree centrality, as well as the study of social network dynamics. PMID:25429797

  6. Prominence and tornado dynamics observed with IRIS and THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Levens, Peter; Labrosse, Nicolas; Mein, Pierre; Lopez Ariste, Arturo; Zapior, Maciek

    2017-08-01

    Several prominences were observed during campaigns in September 2013 and July 2014 with the IRIS spectrometer and the vector magnetograph THEMIS (Tenerife). SDO/AIA and IRIS provided images and spectra of prominences and tornadoes corresponding to different physical conditions of the transition region between the cool plasma and the corona. The vector magnetic field was derived from THEMIS observations by using the He D3 depolarisation due to the magnetic field. The inversion code (PCA) takes into account the Hanle and Zeeman effects and allows us to compute the strength and the inclination of the magnetic field which is shown to be mostly horizontal in prominences as well as in tornadoes. Movies from SDO/AIA in 304 A and Hinode/SOT in Ca II show the highly dynamic nature of the fine structures. From spectra in Mg II and Si IV lines provided by IRIS and H-alpha observed by the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass (MSDP) spectrograph in the Meudon Solar Tower we derived the Doppler shifts of the fine structures and reconstructed the 3D structure of tornadoes. We conclude that the apparent rotation of AIA tornadoes is due to large-scale quasi-periodic oscillations of the plasma along more or less horizontal magnetic structures.

  7. Twisting, Rolling Motions, and Helicity in Prominence Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKillop, Sean; Miralles, Mari Paz; Murphy, Nicholas A.; McCauley, Patrick; Su, Yingna

    2015-04-01

    Panasenco et al. [1] report observations of several CMEs that display a rolling motion about the axis of the erupting prominence. Murphy et al. [2] present simulations of line-tied asymmetric magnetic reconnection that make a falsifiable prediction regarding the handedness of rolling motions of flux ropes during solar eruptions. Mass motions in prominence eruptions tend to be complicated and characterizing these motions is a challenge. We use the AIA filament eruption catalog [3] as a source for finding events. If rolling motions are detected then we will investigate the handedness prediction. We use magnetograms from HMI to determine the strength and asymmetric properties of the photospheric magnetic field in the regions of interest and will use AIA observations to determine the handedness of the rolling motions. We then compare the photospheric magnetic information with the handedness to determine if there is a relationship between the two. We also determine the chirality of the prominences to see if there is any interesting relationship to the twist, rolling motion and/or handedness of the roll.[1] O. Panasenco, S. Martin, A. D. Joshi, & N. Srivastava, J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys., 73, 1129 (2011)[2] N. A. Murphy, M. P. Miralles, C. L. Pope, J. C. Raymond, H. D. Winter, K. K. Reeves, D. B. Seaton, A. A. van Ballegooijen, & J. Lin, ApJ, 751, 56 (2012)[3] http://aia.cfa.harvard.edu/filament/

  8. Taking Care of Your Voice

    MedlinePlus

    ... that are positioned opposite each other in the larynx. The larynx is located between the base of the tongue ... vocal nodules or laryngeal papillomatosis Cancer of the larynx Neurological diseases (such as spasmodic dysphonia or vocal ...

  9. Are Giant Tornadoes the Legs of Solar Prominences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Bosnjak, Antonija; Antolin, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Observations in the 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the space-borne Solar Dynamics Observatory show tornado-like features in the atmosphere of the Sun. These giant tornadoes appear as dark, elongated, and apparently rotating structures in front of a brighter background. This phenomenon is thought to be produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend throughout the atmosphere. We characterize giant tornadoes through a statistical analysis of properties such as spatial distribution, lifetimes, and sizes. A total number of 201 giant tornadoes are detected in a period of 25 days, suggesting that, on average, about 30 events are present across the whole Sun at a time close to solar maximum. Most tornadoes appear in groups and seem to form the legs of prominences, thus serving as plasma sources/sinks. Additional Hα observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope imply that giant tornadoes rotate as a structure, although they clearly exhibit a thread-like structure. We observe tornado groups that grow prior to the eruption of the connected prominence. The rotation of the tornadoes may progressively twist the magnetic structure of the prominence until it becomes unstable and erupts. Finally, we investigate the potential relation of giant tornadoes to other phenomena, which may also be produced by rotating magnetic field structures. A comparison to cyclones, magnetic tornadoes, and spicules implies that such events are more abundant and short-lived the smaller they are. This comparison might help to construct a power law for the effective atmospheric heating contribution as a function of spatial scale.

  10. ARE GIANT TORNADOES THE LEGS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES?

    SciTech Connect

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Bosnjak, Antonija; Antolin, Patrick

    2013-09-10

    Observations in the 171 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the space-borne Solar Dynamics Observatory show tornado-like features in the atmosphere of the Sun. These giant tornadoes appear as dark, elongated, and apparently rotating structures in front of a brighter background. This phenomenon is thought to be produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend throughout the atmosphere. We characterize giant tornadoes through a statistical analysis of properties such as spatial distribution, lifetimes, and sizes. A total number of 201 giant tornadoes are detected in a period of 25 days, suggesting that, on average, about 30 events are present across the whole Sun at a time close to solar maximum. Most tornadoes appear in groups and seem to form the legs of prominences, thus serving as plasma sources/sinks. Additional H{alpha} observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope imply that giant tornadoes rotate as a structure, although they clearly exhibit a thread-like structure. We observe tornado groups that grow prior to the eruption of the connected prominence. The rotation of the tornadoes may progressively twist the magnetic structure of the prominence until it becomes unstable and erupts. Finally, we investigate the potential relation of giant tornadoes to other phenomena, which may also be produced by rotating magnetic field structures. A comparison to cyclones, magnetic tornadoes, and spicules implies that such events are more abundant and short-lived the smaller they are. This comparison might help to construct a power law for the effective atmospheric heating contribution as a function of spatial scale.

  11. Formation and Evolution of a Multi-Threaded Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, M.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the process of formation and subsequent evolution of prominence plasma in a filament channel and its overlying arcade. We construct a three-dimensional time-dependent model of a filament-channel prominence suitable to be compared with observations. We combine this magnetic field structure with one-dimensional independent simulations of many flux tubes. The magnetic structure is a three-dimensional sheared double arcade, and the thermal non-equilibrium process governs the plasma evolution. We have found that the condensations in the corona can be divided into two populations: threads and blobs. Threads are massive condensations that linger in the field line dips. Blobs are ubiquitous small condensations that are produced throughout the filament and overlying arcade magnetic structure, and rapidly fall to the chromosphere. The total prominence mass is in agreement with observations. The threads are the principal contributors to the total mass, whereas the blob contribution is small. The motion of the threads is basically horizontal, while blobs move in all directions along the field. The peak velocities for both populations are comparable, but there is a weak tendency for the velocity to increase with the inclination, and the blobs with motion near vertical have the largest values of the velocity. We have generated synthetic images of the whole structure in an H proxy and in two EUV channels of the AIA instrument aboard SDO. These images show the plasma at cool, warm and hot temperatures. The theoretical differential emission measure of our system agrees very well with observations in the temperature range log T = 4.6-5.7. We conclude that the sheared-arcade magnetic structure and plasma dynamics fit well the abundant observational evidence.

  12. Prominent Eustachian Valve in Newborns: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Ashraf; Mannan, Javed; Chhabra, Manoj; Zhang, Xi Xiao Yang; Narula, Pramod; Hoang, Danthanh

    2015-01-01

    The Eustachian valve (EV) is an embryological remnant of the inferior vena cava that during fetal life helps divert oxygenated blood from the IVC toward the foramen ovale to escape the pulmonary circulation. This remnant usually regresses after birth and is considered a benign finding in the majority of cases. However, EV can lead to complications in the neonatal period or later in life. In this short case series, we present four newborn infants with prominent EV who were symptomatic after birth and required admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:26929867

  13. Prominent β-relaxations in yttrium based metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z. G.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-19

    Most metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit weak slow β-relaxation. We report the prominent β-relaxation in YNiAl metallic glass with a wide composition range. Compared with other MGs, the MGs show a pronounced β-relaxation peak and high β-relaxation peak temperature, and the β-relaxation behavior varies significantly with the changes of the constituent elements, which is attributed to the fluctuations of chemical interactions between the components. We demonstrate the correlation between the β-relaxation and the activation of flow units for mechanical behaviors of the MG and show that the MG is model system for studying some controversial issues in glasses.

  14. Model comparison for the density structure along solar prominence threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arregui, I.; Soler, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Quiescent solar prominence fine structures are typically modelled as density enhancements, called threads, which occupy a fraction of a longer magnetic flux tube. This is justified from the spatial distribution of the imaged plasma emission or absorption of prominences at small spatial scales. The profile of the mass density along the magnetic field is unknown, however, and several arbitrary alternatives are employed in prominence wave studies. The identification and measurement of period ratios from multiple harmonics in standing transverse thread oscillations offer a remote diagnostics method to probe the density variation of these structures. Aims: We present a comparison of theoretical models for the field-aligned density along prominence fine structures. They aim to imitate density distributions in which the plasma is more or less concentrated around the centre of the magnetic flux tube. We consider Lorentzian, Gaussian, and parabolic profiles. We compare theoretical predictions based on these profiles for the period ratio between the fundamental transverse kink mode and the first overtone to obtain estimates for the density ratios between the central part of the tube and its foot-points and to assess which one would better explain observed period ratio data. Methods: Bayesian parameter inference and model comparison techniques were developed and applied. To infer the parameters, we computed the posterior distribution for the density gradient parameter that depends on the observable period ratio. The model comparison involved computing the marginal likelihood as a function of the period ratio to obtain the plausibility of each density model as a function of the observable. We also computed the Bayes factors to quantify the relative evidence for each model, given a period ratio observation. Results: A Lorentzian density profile, with plasma density concentrated around the centre of the tube, seems to offer the most plausible inversion result. A

  15. Model of quiescent prominence with the helical magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'ev, A. A.; Korolkova, O. A.; Kirichek, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    A new exact analytical solution of the magnetohydrostatic problem describes the equilibrium of a solitary, dense-cool solar filament maintained against the gravity by magnetic force in hot solar corona at heights up to 20-40 Mm. The filament is assumed to be uniform along the axis (the translation symmetry). The magnetic field of the filament has the helical structure (magnetic flux rope) with a typical strength of a few Gauss in the region of minimal temperature (about 4000 K). The model can be applied to the quiescent prominence of both normal and inverse magnetic polarity.

  16. Subclavian artery stenosis caused by a prominent first rib

    PubMed Central

    Van Bael, Kobe; Speybrouck, Sabrina; Van Der Tempel, Geerhardus

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a mechanical space problem in which the brachial plexus and/or subclavian vessels are compressed. Arterial compression is least common and almost always associated with a bony anomaly. We present a case of a 49-year-old woman with a prominent first rib which caused a subclavian artery stenosis. There are many options for subclavian artery repair through open surgery. In high-risk patients, minimal invasive techniques are favorable. To date, few case reports exist on an endovascular artery repair combined with open first rib resection. While long-term follow-up will be necessary, our preliminary results seem promising. PMID:27489685

  17. [Spasmodic torticollis, substantiating Manto syndrome, of possible toxic aethiology, with alterations of brainstem acoustic evoked potentials (BAEPs). Treatment with L-5-hydroxytryptophan. Follow up of 18 months, during which high degree resolution of symptoms and normalization of BAEPs took place].

    PubMed

    Disertori, B; Ducati, A; Piazza, M

    1982-01-01

    A case of very severe spasmodic torticollis observed for 18 months is presented and discussed. Head was so rotated that permitted only backward seeing and compressed brachial plexus between scaleni muscles with sensory, motor and trophic troubles in the hand. A toxic aethiology from parathion is likely. Brainstem Acoustic Evoked Potentials (BAEPs) showed in the beginning abnormal responses, especially as refers to waves originating in the mesencephalon. Therapy with L-5-hydroxytryptophan subdued neurological symptoms; a parallel normalization of BAEPs recording was observed. The Authors propose to call this syndrome (spasmodic torticollis with thoracic outlet syndrome) after the mythical diviner Manto, which Dante Alighieri refers to in his "Divina Commedia" (Inferno, XX, 55 e segg.).

  18. Perceptions of Social Responsibility of Prominent Animal Welfare Groups.

    PubMed

    Widmar, Nicole J Olynk; Morgan, Carissa J; Croney, Candace C

    2017-08-28

    Nonhuman animal welfare is an increasingly important component of consumer expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The extent to which prominent animal welfare or protection organizations may influence people's perceptions of food industry CSR may be related to an organization's perceived social responsibility. Data from an online survey of 300 U.S. residents were used to explore relationships between demographics/lifestyle choices and perceptions of prominent animal welfare organizations (using best-worst scaling methodology). Overall, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was perceived to be the most socially responsible organization analyzed, followed by the Humane Society of the United States and the American Humane Association (AHA). Results suggest that the perceived social responsibility of animal protection organizations in this study was not strongly linked to personally (financially) supporting them, with 2 exceptions: the perceptions of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and AHA. Improved understanding of the perception of animal welfare or protection organizations can inform decision making by organizations interested in furthering animal welfare causes.

  19. Rolling motion in erupting prominences observed by STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Martin, Sara; Joshi, Anand D.; Srivastava, Nandita

    2011-06-01

    We analyze the large-scale dynamical forms of three erupting prominences (filaments) observed by at least one of the two STEREO spacecraft and which reveal evidence of sideways rolling motion beginning at the crest of the erupting filament. We find that all three events were also highly non-radial and occurred adjacent to large coronal holes. For each event, the rolling motion and the average non-radial outward motion of the erupting filament and associated CME were away from a neighboring coronal hole. The location of each coronal hole was adjacent to the outer boundary of the arcade of loops overlying the filaments. The erupting filaments were all more non-radial than the CMEs but in the same general direction. From these associations, we make the hypothesis that the degree of the roll effect depends on the level of force imbalances inside the filament arcade related to the coronal hole and the relative amount of magnetic flux on each side of the filament, while the non-radial motion of the CME is related to global magnetic configuration force imbalances. Our analyses of the prominence eruption best observed from both STEREO-A and STEREO-B shows that its spine retained the thin ribbon-like topology that it had prior to the eruption. This topology allows bending, rolling, and twisting during the early phase of the eruption.

  20. TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OBSERVATIONS OF HOT PROMINENCE SHROUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Habbal, S. Rifai; Morgan, H.; Scholl, I.; Druckmueller, M.; Rusin, V.; Daw, A.; Johnson, J.; Arndt, M.

    2010-08-20

    Using observations of the corona taken during the total solar eclipses of 2006 March 29 and 2008 August 1 in broadband white light and in narrow bandpass filters centered at Fe X 637.4 nm, Fe XI 789.2 nm, Fe XIII 1074.7 nm, and Fe XIV 530.3 nm, we show that prominences observed off the solar limb are enshrouded in hot plasmas within twisted magnetic structures. These shrouds, which are commonly referred to as cavities in the literature, are clearly distinct from the overlying arch-like structures that form the base of streamers. The existence of these hot shrouds had been predicted by model studies dating back to the early 1970s, with more recent studies implying their association with twisted magnetic flux ropes. The eclipse observations presented here, which cover a temperature range of 0.9 to 2 x10{sup 6} K, are the first to resolve the long-standing ambiguity associated with the temperature and magnetic structure of prominence cavities.

  1. Pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans with prominent meningothelial-like whorls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yang, Wentao

    2008-10-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a locally aggressive skin tumor. In addition to the conventional type, several morphologic variants have been described. Recognition of these uncommon variants will facilitate the diagnosis. We report herein a peculiar case of pigmented DFSP (Bednar tumor) with prominent meningothelial-like whorls, a distinctive pattern that has not been described previously in DFSP. The tumor occurred in a 40-year-old man who presented with a slowly growing mass on his left shoulder. The overall histological features were consistent with Bednar tumor. However, unexpected numerous meningothelial-like whorls were found in some areas of the tumor. Like the tumor cells in typical areas of Bednar tumor these meningothelial-like whorls were also positive for CD34 but negative for epithelial membrane antigen and S100 protein. The meningothelial-like whorls in Bednar tumor represent an eccentric arrangement of the tumor cells. We propose the term 'pigmented DFSP with prominent meningothelial-like whorls' to highlight the distinctive pattern of this novel DFSP variant.

  2. Word-level prominence in Persian: An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Previous literature on the phonetics of stress in Persian has reported that fundamental frequency is the only reliable acoustic correlate of stress, and that stressed and unstressed syllables are not differentiated from each other in the absence of accentuation. In this study, the effects of lexical stress on duration, overall intensity and spectral tilt were examined in Persian both in the accented and unaccented conditions. Results showed that syllable duration is consistently affected by stress in Persian in both the accented and unaccented conditions across all vowel types. Unlike duration, the results for overall intensity and spectral tilt were significant only in the accented condition, suggesting that measures of intensity are not a correlate of stress in Persian but they are mainly caused by the presence of a pitch movement. The findings are phonologically interpreted as suggesting that word-level prominence in Persian is typologically similar to 'stress accent' languages, in which multiple phonetic cues are used to signal the prominence contrast in the accented condition, and stressed and unstressed syllables are different from each other even when the word is not pitch-accented.

  3. A confined prominence eruption on May 7, 1979

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchlev, P.; Koleva, K.; Dechev, M.; Petrov, N.; Rompolt, B.; Rudawy, P.

    A confined prominence eruption at the solar limb on 7 May 1979 associated with slow coronal mass ejection was observed and reported. The aim was to probe the kinking of the eruptive prominence (EP) loop and its relation to the processes coronal field confinement on erupting flux rope. The EP represents helically writhed (kinked) loop with fixed feet that presents a disturbed segment of a long-lived filament, located within a multipolar magnetic configuration. The rising of the EP apex and its velocity range suggest that the observation span late stage of the eruption. In terms of magnetic flux rope hypothesis, the kinking evolution of the EP flux rope was estimated by the normalized difference between heights of the flux rope apex and projected cross-point of its kinked legs, and the angle α between the kinked legs below the cross-point. The results suggest that the kink instability was in progress at the onset of observations and to the end of the eruption, the EP flux rope presented a large amount of kinking. Oscillations of the angle α with a period of 14 minutes, accompanying its increasing, suggest oscillations of the EP flux rope during the eruption. A possible scenario for confined eruption at the limb on 7 May 1979 was suggested, in which a breakout-type reconnection could occur above the EP but within a flux rope itself.

  4. Formation of Galactic Prominence in the Galactic Central Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chih-Han; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2017-02-01

    We carried out 2.5-dimensional resistive MHD simulations to study the formation mechanism of molecular loops observed by Fukui et al. in the Galactic central region. Since it is hard to form molecular loops by lifting up dense molecular gas, we study the formation mechanism of molecular gas in rising magnetic arcades. This model is based on the in situ formation model of solar prominences, in which prominences are formed by cooling instability in helical magnetic flux ropes formed by imposing converging and shearing motion at footpoints of the magnetic arch anchored to the solar surface. We extended this model to Galactic center scale (a few hundreds of parsecs). Numerical results indicate that magnetic reconnection taking place in the current sheet that formed inside the rising magnetic arcade creates dense blobs confined by the rising helical magnetic flux ropes. Thermal instability taking place in the flux ropes forms dense molecular filaments floating at high Galactic latitude. The mass of the filament increases with time and can exceed {10}5 {M}ȯ .

  5. Rolling Motions During Solar Prominence Eruptions in Asymmetric Magnetic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKillop, Sean; Miralles, Mari Paz; Murphy, Nicholas Arnold; McCauley, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    Panasenco et al. [1] report observations of several CMEs that display a rolling motion about the axis of the erupting prominence. Murphy et al. [2] present simulations of line-tied asymmetric magnetic reconnection that make a falsifiable prediction regarding the handedness of rolling motions of flux ropes during solar eruptions. We will present initial results of our work to investigate this prediction. To determine the strength and any asymmetric properties of the magnetic field in the regions of interest in the photosphere, we use magnetograms from HMI. We use AIA observations to determine if there is any rolling motion and, if so, what handedness the rolling motions have. We then compare the photospheric magnetic information with the handedness information to determine if there is any relationship between the two. Finally, we will discuss prospects for diagnosing rolling motions of erupting prominence using off-limb IRIS observations.[1] O. Panasenco, S. Martin, A. D. Joshi, & N. Srivastava, J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys., 73, 1129 (2011)[2] N. A. Murphy, M. P. Miralles, C. L. Pope, J. C. Raymond, H. D. Winter, K. K. Reeves, D. B. Seaton, A. A. van Ballegooijen, & J. Lin, ApJ, 751, 56 (2012)

  6. Hyperlinked suicide: assessing the prominence and accessibility of suicide websites.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Christopher G; Collings, Sunny C

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the Internet and suicide is a topic of growing concern among suicide researchers and the public, though to date few have actually attempted to investigate the accessibility and prominence of suicide-related information online, and there have been no comprehensive studies of site networking structure. To assess the visibility of various types of online information to suicide-risk individuals, and to assess the prominence and accessibility of "pro-suicide," suicide prevention, and support sites by measuring their networking structure. Employing empirically derived search terms, we used the web-based Virtual Observatory for the Study of Online Networks (VOSON) to conduct hyperlink network analysis (HNA) of suicide-related websites. Pro-suicide sites are rare and marginal, while sites dedicated to information about suicide as well as sites dedicated to prevention policy and advocacy are readily accessible. The networking structure of suicide-related Internet content has not been described previously. Our analysis shows that HNA is a useful method for gaining an indepth understanding of network traffic in relation to suicide-content websites. This information will be useful for strengthening the web presence of support and suicide prevention sites, and for monitoring changes over time.

  7. The applicability of the dysphonia severity index and the voice handicap index in evaluating effects of voice therapy and phonosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hakkesteegt, Marieke M; Brocaar, Michael P; Wieringa, Marjan H

    2010-03-01

    The objective was to investigate the applicability of the Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI) and the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) in evaluating effects of intervention between groups of patients and for intrasubject differences and whether DSI and VHI are complementing measurements. Analyses of measurement data before and after intervention of 171 patients with voice disorders. The voice quality was measured objectively with the DSI. The perceived voice handicap was measured with the VHI. Three groups of patients were used: patients who had voice therapy, phonosurgery, or no intervention. DSI and VHI improved significantly after intervention in the voice therapy and the surgery group (median difference DSI 1.19 and 3.03, VHI -8 and -26, respectively). The intrasubject results were analyzed based on the test-retest variability of DSI and VHI. Significant better DSI and VHI scores after intervention were found in, respectively, 22% and 38% of the patients with voice therapy, and 56% and 78% of the patients with surgery. In the no intervention group, this was 11% and 12%. In 37% of the patients, the differences before and after intervention in DSI and VHI were in discordance. The DSI and VHI are able to show significant differences after intervention for voice disorders between groups of patients. The DSI and VHI can be used to determine a significant intrasubject result of intervention. The DSI and VHI measure each different aspects of the voice and are complementing measurements. The DSI is therefore applicable in clinical practice for objective evaluation of voice quality and the VHI for subjective evaluation of the perceived handicap by the patient self.

  8. [Variability in the digital voice analysis depending on the analyzed vocal, in normal patients and in patients with dysphonia].

    PubMed

    Preciado López, J A; Calzada Uriondo, M G; Zabaleta López, M; García Cano, F J

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study is to decide which of Spanish's 5 vowels is the most suitable for the analysis of the voice by means of the program Dr. Speech 3.0. We assessed 98 patients: 51 normal subjects and 47 hoarse patients (34 polyps, 7 nodules, 2 hyperfunctional dysphonia, 4 other pathologies) before and after following a surgical and/or speech therapy. The methodology of the study included: protocolized questionnaire, ENT examination, perceptual evaluation of the hoarse voices and physical analysis of the 5 sustained vowels. Jitter, shimmer, NNE and HNR in the voice varied depending on the analyzed vowel and from normal subjects to hoarse patients. NNE and HNR for vowels [o] and [u] was higher than for [a], such differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001). Shimmer for vowels [o] and [u] was lower than shimmer for [a] in hoarse patients (p < 0.05). Jitter for [a] was higher than jitter for the other vowels in normal patients. All algorithms improveded with surgical and/or speech therapy. Especially levels of noise for vowels [a] [e] and [o] presented statiscally significant improvements (p < 0.001), shimmer for [a] and [e] (p < 0.001) and jitter for [e] (p < 0.01). The hoarse patients presented values more pathological than the normal subjects, especially jitter for vowels [a] [e] and [o] (p < 0.001), shimmer for [a] [e] [i] and [u] (p < 0.001) and level of noise for [a] [e] [o] and [u] (p < 0.001). The analysis of vowel [e] presented higher r than [a] when correlated with perceptual evaluation of voice or with voice quality that gave us Dr. Speech 3.0. Also, the [e] is the best vowel to express the improvements of jitter, shimmer and level of noise of hoarse patients after following surgical and/or speech therapy.

  9. Old World frog and bird vocalizations contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narins, Peter M.; Feng, Albert S.; Lin, Wenyu; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich; Denzinger, Annette; Suthers, Roderick A.; Xu, Chunhe

    2004-02-01

    Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication. In contrast, frogs and birds produce sounds during night- and day-time hours that are audible to humans; their sounds are so pervasive that together with those of insects, they are considered the primary sounds of nature. Here we show that an Old World frog (Amolops tormotus) and an oscine songbird (Abroscopus albogularis) living near noisy streams reliably produce acoustic signals that contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics. Our findings provide the first evidence that anurans and passerines are capable of generating tonal ultrasonic call components and should stimulate the quest for additional ultrasonic species.

  10. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  11. Old world frog and bird vocalizations contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics.

    PubMed

    Narins, Peter M; Feng, Albert S; Lin, Wenyu; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich; Denzinger, Annette; Suthers, Roderick A; Xu, Chunhe

    2004-02-01

    Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication. In contrast, frogs and birds produce sounds during night- and day-time hours that are audible to humans; their sounds are so pervasive that together with those of insects, they are considered the primary sounds of nature. Here we show that an Old World frog (Amolops tormotus) and an oscine songbird (Abroscopus albogularis) living near noisy streams reliably produce acoustic signals that contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics. Our findings provide the first evidence that anurans and passerines are capable of generating tonal ultrasonic call components and should stimulate the quest for additional ultrasonic species.

  12. Modelling of solar magnetic field and prominence structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Using plasma theory, the interaction is studied between high frequency and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves from which a set of coupling equations resulted. On the basis of this formalism, the modulation instabilities of an electromagnetic soliton in a current sheet are examined, and it is shown that there is a resistive instability at the onset of the magnetic field reconnection. This mechanism could be used to explain the onset of solar flares and prominences. To improve the resolution of vector magnetic fields at the sun's surface, state-of-the-art optics is examined to improve the design and fabrication of a new spaceborne solar vector magnetograph as part of the SAMEX (Solar Active Measurements Experiment) program.

  13. Measurement of prominent eta-decay branching fractions.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Mehrabyan, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V

    2007-09-21

    The decay psi(2S) --> etaJ/psi is used to measure, for the first time, all prominent eta-meson branching fractions with the same experiment in the same dataset, thereby providing a consistent treatment of systematics across branching fractions. We present results for eta decays to gamma gamma, pi(+)pi(-)pi(0), 3pi(0), pi(+)pi(-)gamma and e(+)e(-)gamma, accounting for 99.9% of all eta decays. The precision of several of the branching fractions and their ratios is improved. Two channels, pi(+)pi(-)gamma and e(+)e(-)gamma, show results that differ at the level of three standard deviations from those previously determined.

  14. Alcohol coverage in California newspapers: frequency, prominence, and framing.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Sonja L; Saphir, Melissa Nichols; Flora, June A; Howard, Kim Ammann; Gonzalez, Emily McChesney

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature and extent of alcohol coverage in California newspapers by examining the frequency, positioning, and framing of alcohol-related articles. A content analysis assessed the frequency and nature of alcohol references in news content drawn from a random sample of nine California newspaper issues from September 1997 to June 1998. The study findings indicate that alcohol is mentioned at least once a day in daily newspapers with more frequent mention in smaller newspapers. Alcohol is most often discussed in relation to trauma or in the context of promoting alcohol consumption. Articles on trauma and driving while intoxicated receive more prominence than other stories mentioning alcohol. Despite the relative frequency of alcohol content in trauma news, these stories are rarely framed with any sort of health context. Public health advocates should work toward increasing the frequency and improving the framing of alcohol in newspaper coverage.

  15. Thermal stability analysis of the fine structure of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, Pascal; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Raadu, Mickael A.

    1986-01-01

    The linear thermal stability of a 2D periodic structure (alternatively hot and cold) in a uniform magnetic field is analyzed. The energy equation includes wave heating (assumed proportional to density), radiative cooling and both conduction parallel and orthogonal to magnetic lines. The equilibrium is perturbed at constant gas pressure. With parallel conduction only, it is found to be unstable when the length scale 1// is greater than 45 Mn. In that case, orthogonal conduction becomes important and stabilizes the structure when the length scale is smaller than 5 km. On the other hand, when the length scale is greater than 5 km, the thermal equilibrium is unstable, and the corresponding time scale is about 10,000 s: this result may be compared to observations showing that the lifetime of the fine structure of solar prominences is about one hour; consequently, our computations suggest that the size of the unresolved threads could be of the order of 10 km only.

  16. Stellar Dynamo Models with Prominent Surface Toroidal Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work, it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular, it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low-mass fast-rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying αΩ mechanism.

  17. Solar corona/prominence seen through the White Light Coronograph

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-01-17

    S74-15697 (17 Jan. 1974) --- The solar corona and a solar prominence as seen through the White Light Coronograph, Skylab Experiment S052, on Jan. 17, 1974. This view was reproduced from a television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The bright spot is a burn in the vidicon. The solar corona is the halo around the sun which is normally visible only at the time of solar eclipse by the moon. The Skylab coronography uses an externally-mounted disk system which occults the brilliant solar surface while allowing the fainter radiation of the corona to enter an annulus and be photographed. A mirror system allows either TV viewing of the corona or photographic recording of the image. Photo credit: NASA

  18. New BVR photometry of six prominent RS Canum Venaticorum binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmakar; Pandey, S. K.

    1999-08-01

    A new BVR photometry of six prominent RS CVn stars: V711 Tau, UX Ari, IM Peg, II Peg, sigma Gem and lambda And, carried out during 1995-97, is presented. The new results reveal significant evolution in the shape as well as in the amplitude of light curves of these binaries. The traditional two-starspot model has been used to obtain the spot parameters from the observed light curves of the stars. Changes in spot area and their location on stellar surface can be noticed from extracted spot parameters. Some of these stars are found to have significant variation in (B-V) and (V-R) colour indices. The (V-R) colour index variation found in IM Peg, II Peg and lambda And have been used for determining starspot effective temperatures.

  19. Source of a Prominent Poleward Surge During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeates, A. R.; Baker, D.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    2015-11-01

    As an observational case study, we consider the origin of a prominent poleward surge of leading polarity, visible in the magnetic butterfly diagram during Solar Cycle 24. A new technique is developed for assimilating individual regions of strong magnetic flux into a surface-flux transport model. By isolating the contribution of each of these regions, the model shows the surge to originate primarily in a single high-latitude activity group consisting of a bipolar active region present in Carrington Rotations 2104 - 05 (November 2010 - January 2011) and a multipolar active region in Rotations 2107 - 08 (February - April 2011). This group had a strong axial dipole moment opposed to Joy's law. On the other hand, the modelling suggests that the transient influence of this group on the butterfly diagram will not be matched by a large long-term contribution to the polar field because it is located at high latitude. This is in accordance with previous flux-transport models.

  20. The production effect in memory: a prominent mnemonic in children.

    PubMed

    Icht, Michal; Mama, Yaniv

    2015-09-01

    The 'Production Effect' (PE) refers to a memory advantage for items studied aloud over items studied silently. Thus, vocalizing may serve as a mnemonic that can be used to assist learners in improving their memory for new concepts. Although many other types of mnemonic have been suggested in the literature, the PE seems especially appropriate for young children, as it does not involve literacy skills. The present study is a first investigation of the PE in children. In two experiments we tested five-year-olds in a PE paradigm using pictures of objects as stimuli. In Experiment 1, pictures of familiar objects were presented to be remembered, and in Experiment 2 we used pictures of unfamiliar objects (evaluating new vocabulary acquisition). In both experiments we showed a memory advantage for vocally produced words ('look and say') over other types of learning ('look', 'look and listen'), suggesting the PE as a prominent memory and learning tool.

  1. A Flux-Rope Scaling of CME and Prominence Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marque, C.; Chen, J.; Vourlidas, A.; Krall, J.; Schuck, P.

    2005-12-01

    It has been known that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive prominences (EPs) are closely associated with each other. A major question concerning CMEs and EPS is the magnetic geometry that underlies the eruptive plasma structures. It is now well established that many CMEs can be explained as erupting magnetic flux ropes. However, the coronal magnetic field cannot be directly measured at this time, and therefore the flux rope hypothesis has not been confirmed by magnetic field data. A second unresolved question is the structural relationship between the closely associated CMEs and EPs. Recently, it was theoretically found [1] that the height at which a CME or an EP attains maximum acceleration scales with the footpoint separation distance (S_f) of the underlying magnetic flux rope. This scaling law is characteristic of an erupting flux rope and is universal in that it depends only the flux rope geometry and the Lorentz force acting on the structure. It was shown to be well satisfied based on comparison with a small number of CMEs and EPs, indicating that the erupting structures in these events were initially flux ropes or evolved into flux ropes early enough. In the present paper, we present results of a study using a larger sample of events. In this study, we have analyzed CME events detected by LASCO, for which footpoints are determined by observational proxies such as magnetic neutral line length, and EPs seen in Hα and radio data, for which footpoint locations are observable. We find that CMEs and EPs in this large sample also satisfy the flux-rope scaling law. The results are consistent with the model structure with the bright CME rim at Z+2a and the prominence at Z-a, where Z is the height of the centroid and a is the minor radius of the flux rope, both defined at the apex of the flux rope. 1. Chen, J. and J. Krall, JGR, 108 (A11), 2003

  2. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MORPHOLOGY OF A CORONAL PROMINENCE CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S. E.; De Toma, G.; Rachmeler, L.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; Hao, J.; Zhang, M.; Hill, S.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmieder, B.; Schmit, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Williams, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step toward quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explain the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east versus west limbs.

  3. Three-Dimensional Morphology of a Coronal Prominence Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.; Rastawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hill, S.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Rachmeler, L.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmieder, B.; Schmit, D. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional density model of coronal prominence cavities, and a morphological fit that has been tightly constrained by a uniquely well-observed cavity. Observations were obtained as part of an International Heliophysical Year campaign by instruments from a variety of space- and ground-based observatories, spanning wavelengths from radio to soft-X-ray to integrated white light. From these data it is clear that the prominence cavity is the limb manifestation of a longitudinally-extended polar-crown filament channel, and that the cavity is a region of low density relative to the surrounding corona. As a first step towards quantifying density and temperature from campaign spectroscopic data, we establish the three-dimensional morphology of the cavity. This is critical for taking line-of-sight projection effects into account, since cavities are not localized in the plane of the sky and the corona is optically thin. We have augmented a global coronal streamer model to include a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. We have developed a semi-automated routine that fits ellipses to cross-sections of the cavity as it rotates past the solar limb, and have applied it to Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) observations from the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft. This defines the morphological parameters of our model, from which we reproduce forward-modeled cavity observables. We find that cavity morphology and orientation, in combination with the viewpoints of the observing spacecraft, explains the observed variation in cavity visibility for the east vs. west limbs

  4. The Effectiveness of the Comprehensive Voice Rehabilitation Program Compared With the Vocal Function Exercises Method in Behavioral Dysphonia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Vanessa; Pontes, Antônio; Pontes, Paulo; Behlau, Mara; Peccin, Stella Maria

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Comprehensive Voice Rehabilitation Program (CVRP) compared with Vocal Function Exercises (VFEs) to treat functional dysphonia. This is a randomized blinded clinical trial. Eighty voice professionals presented with voice complaints for more than 6 months with a functional dysphonia diagnosis. Subjects were randomized into two voice treatment groups: CVRP and VFE. The rehabilitation program consisted of six voice treatment sessions and three assessment sessions performed before, immediately after, and 1 month after treatment. The outcome measures were self-assessment protocols (Voice-Related Quality of Life [V-RQOL] and Voice Handicap Index [VHI]), perceptual evaluation of vocal quality, and a visual examination of the larynx, both blinded. The randomization process produced comparable groups in terms of age, gender, signs, and symptoms. Both groups had positive outcome measures. The CVRP effect size was 1.09 for the V-RQOL, 1.17 for the VHI, 0.79 for vocal perceptual evaluation, and 1.01 for larynx visual examination. The VFE effect size was 0.86 for the V-RQOL, 0.62 for the VHI, 0.48 for the vocal perceptual evaluation, and 0.51 for larynx visual examination. Only 10% of the patients were lost over the study. Both treatment programs were effective. The probability of a patient improving because of the CVRP treatment was similar to that of the VFE treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiologic comparison of erosive polyarthritis with prominent interphalangeal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, R.H.; Bassett, L.W.; Theros, E.G.

    1982-05-01

    Psoriatic arthritis, Reiter's disease, and multicentric reticulohistiocytosis may manifest prominent interphalangeal joint and cutaneous involvement. All three disorders may also affect the sacroiliac joints and spine. Despite these similarities, there are basic radiologic differences enabling distinction between the three disorders. Erosive osteoarthritis must also be considered in the differential diagnosis of interphalangeal erosive arthritis. Psoriatic erosions are characteristically ill defined, often bilaterally asymmetrical, usually unaccompanied by significant osteoporosis, and frequently associated with florid proliferation of subperiosteal new bone. An unilateral polyarticular pattern, which often occurs in a single ray, is the most prevalent of several patterns of involvement. Reiter's disease exhibits many clinical and radiologic similarities to psoriatic arthritis, but in the former there tends to be selective involvement of the joints of the lower limbs and particularly the feet, with relative sparing of the hands and wrists, while in the latter the joints of the upper and lower limbs tend to be involved to an equal extent. Multicentric reticulohistiocytosis (MR). Lesions predominate in skin and synovium and result in sharply circumscribed, rapidly progressive, strikingly bilaterally symmetrical erosions spreading from joint margins to articular surfaces. Most or all of the diarthrodial joints may be affected, but interphalangeal joint predominance and early and severe atlanto-axial involvement are characteristic. Erosive osteoarthritis is characterized by interphalangeal subchondral erosions, accompanying periosteal new bone that is more subtle than that of psoriatic arthritis, and interphalangeal bony ankylosis that occurs with the same frequency as that of psoriatic arthritis.

  6. Prominent papillary dermal edema in dermatophytosis (tinea corporis).

    PubMed

    Hoss, Diane; Berke, Adrienne; Kerr, Philip; Grant-Kels, Jane; Murphy, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Commonly described histologic 'clues' to the diagnosis of dermatophytosis include neutrophils in the stratum corneum and/or epidermis, compact orthokeratosis and identification of fungal hyphae between two zones of cornified cells. Prominent (striking) papillary dermal edema (PPDE) is not commonly reported with dermatophytosis (tinea corporis). We observed an index case in which PPDE was the salient histologic finding in lesions of tinea corporis. Fifteen additional cases of tinea corporis with PPDE were diagnosed in our dermatopathology laboratory over a 9-year period. The clinical and histologic findings were reviewed. All 16 cases occurred on the extremities of women, 11 of whom had skin of color. The submitted clinical differential diagnoses varied widely, but included some of the diseases 'classically' associated with PPDE, as well as other blistering eruptions. In several cases, only a few dermatophyte hyphae were identified in tissue sections. Our case series serves as a reminder that dermatophytosis should be strongly considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions with PPDE. Fungal culture may be helpful in patients whose biopsies show PPDE, negative periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stains and who fail to respond to conventional anti-inflammatory therapy. This study lends support for the routine use of PAS stains in biopsies of inflammatory dermatoses.

  7. A closer view of prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Shark, Half-Dome, Pumpkin, Flat Top and Frog are at center. Little Flat Top is at right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  8. Howard Russell Butler's Oil Paintings of Solar Eclipses and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, Roberta J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934) was invited to join the US Naval Observatory expedition to the total solar eclipse of 1918 because of his ability to paint astronomical phenomena based on quickly-made notes about spatial and color details. His giant triptych of the total eclipses of 1918, 1923, and 1925 was proposed for a never-built astronomical center at the American Museum of Natural History and wound up at their Hayden Planetarium when it was constructed in the mid-1930s. Half-size versions are installed at the Fels Planetarium at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and at the Firestone Library of Princeton University, whose newly conserved canvases were recently hung; the Buffalo Museum of Science has another half-size version in storage. We discuss not only the eclipse triptychs but also the series of large oil paintings he made of solar prominences (in storage at the American Museum of Natural History) and of his 1932-eclipse and other relevant works.JMP was supported for this work in part by Division III Discretionary Funds and the Brandi Fund of Williams College. His current eclipse research is supported by grants AGS-1047726 from the Solar Research Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of NSF and 9327-13 from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  9. Improved characterization of intranight optical variability of prominent AGN classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Arti; Gopal-Krishna, Wiita, Paul J.; Stalin, C. S.; Sagar, Ram

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of intranight optical variability (INOV) is known to differ significantly among different classes of powerful active galactic nuclei (AGN). A number of statistical methods have been employed in the literature for testing the presence of INOV in the light curves, sometimes leading to discordant results. In this paper, we compare the INOV characteristics of six prominent classes of AGN, as evaluated using three commonly used statistical tests, namely the χ2-test, the modified C-test and the F-test, which has recently begun to gain popularity. The AGN classes considered are: radio-quiet quasars, radio-intermediate quasars, lobe-dominated quasars, low optical polarization core-dominated quasars, high optical polarization core-dominated quasars and TeV blazars. Our analysis is based on a large body of AGN monitoring data, involving 262 sessions of intranight monitoring of a total 77 AGN, using 1-2 m class optical telescopes located in India. In order to compare the usefulness of the statistical tests, we have also subjected them to a `sanity check' by comparing the number of false positives yielded by each test with the corresponding statistical prediction. The present analysis is intended to serve as a benchmark for future INOV studies of AGN of different classes.

  10. Porcine CD38 exhibits prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Ting, Kai Yiu; Leung, Christina F P; Graeff, Richard M; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan; Kotaka, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates Ca(2+) influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. It is one of the products produced from the catalysis of NAD(+) by the multifunctional CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase superfamily. After elimination of the nicotinamide ring by the enzyme, the reaction intermediate of NAD(+) can either be hydrolyzed to form linear ADPR or cyclized to form cADPR. We have previously shown that human CD38 exhibits a higher preference towards the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to form linear ADPR while Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase prefers cyclizing NAD(+) to form cADPR. In this study, we characterized the enzymatic properties of porcine CD38 and revealed that it has a prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity producing cADPR. We also determined the X-ray crystallographic structures of porcine CD38 and were able to observe conformational flexibility at the base of the active site of the enzyme which allow the NAD(+) reaction intermediate to adopt conformations resulting in both hydrolysis and cyclization forming linear ADPR and cADPR respectively.

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of some anti-tussive and anti-spasmodic drugs through ion-pair complex formation with thiocyanate and cobalt(II) or molybdenum(V)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shiekh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; El-Fetouh Gouda, Ayman Abou

    2007-04-01

    Two rapid, simple and sensitive extractive specrophotometric methods has been developed for the determination of anti-tussive drugs, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DEX) and pipazethate hydrochloride (PiCl) and anti-spasmodic drugs, e.g., drotaverine hydrochloride (DvCl) and trimebutine maleate (TM) in bulk and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of cobalt(II)-thiocyanate (method A) and molybdenum(V)-thiocyanate ions (method B) with the cited drugs to form stable ion-pair complexes which extractable with an n-butnol-dichloromethane solvent mixture (3.5:6.5) and methylene chloride for methods A and B, respectively. The blue and orange red color complexes are determined either colorimetrically at λmax 625 nm (using method A) and 467 or 470 nm for (DEX and PiCl) or (DvCl and TM), respectively (using method B). The concentration range is 20-400 and 2.5-50 μg mL -1 for methods A and B, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in pure and in pharmaceutical formulations applying the standard additions technique and the results obtained in good agreement well with those obtained by the official method.

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of some anti-tussive and anti-spasmodic drugs through ion-pair complex formation with thiocyanate and cobalt(II) or molybdenum(V).

    PubMed

    El-Shiekh, Ragaa; Zahran, Faten; El-Fetouh Gouda, Ayman Abou

    2007-04-01

    Two rapid, simple and sensitive extractive specrophotometric methods has been developed for the determination of anti-tussive drugs, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DEX) and pipazethate hydrochloride (PiCl) and anti-spasmodic drugs, e.g., drotaverine hydrochloride (DvCl) and trimebutine maleate (TM) in bulk and in their pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of cobalt(II)-thiocyanate (method A) and molybdenum(V)-thiocyanate ions (method B) with the cited drugs to form stable ion-pair complexes which extractable with an n-butnol-dichloromethane solvent mixture (3.5:6.5) and methylene chloride for methods A and B, respectively. The blue and orange red color complexes are determined either colorimetrically at lambdamax 625 nm (using method A) and 467 or 470 nm for (DEX and PiCl) or (DvCl and TM), respectively (using method B). The concentration range is 20-400 and 2.5-50 microg mL-1 for methods A and B, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in pure and in pharmaceutical formulations applying the standard additions technique and the results obtained in good agreement well with those obtained by the official method.

  13. Catalogue of equivalent widths and line intensities for prominences observed during 1964-1965

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakhubovskiy, A. S.

    1973-01-01

    The method of observation and processing of the prominence spectra are described briefly. The equivalent widths, central intensities, half-widths and Doppler halfwidths are presented of the emission lines of the prominences.

  14. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, D. A.; Zsuppan, G.; Allen, N. S.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling.

  15. Graphene electrochemistry: fundamental concepts through to prominent applications.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Dale A C; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2012-11-07

    The use of graphene, a one atom thick individual planar carbon layer, has exploded in a plethora of scientific disciplines since it was reported to possess a range of unique and exclusive properties. Despite graphene being explored theoretically since the 1940s and known to exist since the 1960s, the recent burst of interest from a large proportion of scientists globally can be correlated with work by Geim and Novoselov in 2004/5, who reported the so-called "scotch tape method" for the production of graphene in addition to identifying its unique electronic properties which has escalated into graphene being reported to be superior in a superfluity of areas. Consequently, many are involved in the pursuit of producing new methodologies to fabricate pristine graphene on an industrial scale in order to meet the current world-wide appetite for graphene. One area which receives considerable interest is the field of electrochemistry, where graphene has been reported to be beneficial in various applications ranging from sensing through to energy storage and generation and carbon based molecular electronics. Electrochemistry is an interfacial technique which is dominated by processes that occur at the solid-liquid interface and thus with the correct understanding can be beneficially utilised to characterise the surface under investigation. In this tutorial review we overview fundamental concepts of Graphene Electrochemistry, making electrochemical characterisation accessible to those who are working on new methodologies to fabricate graphene, bridging the gap between materials scientists and electrochemists and also assisting those exploring graphene in electrochemical areas, or that wish to start to. An overview of the recent understanding of graphene modified electrodes is also provided, highlighting prominent applications reported in the current literature.

  16. Demonstration of prominent actin filaments in the root columella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, D. A.; Zsuppan, G.; Allen, N. S.; Blancaflor, E. B.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of actin filaments within the gravity-sensing columella cells of plant roots remains poorly understood, with studies over numerous years providing inconsistent descriptions of actin organization in these cells. This uncertainty in actin organization, and thus in actin's role in graviperception and gravisignaling, has led us to investigate actin arrangements in the columella cells of Zea mays L., Medicago truncatula Gaertn., Linum usitatissiilium L. and Nicotianla benthamiana Domin. Actin organization was examined using a combination of optimized immunofluorescence techniques, and an improved fluorochrome-conjugated phalloidin labeling method reliant on 3-maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide ester (MBS) cross-linking combined with glycerol permeabilization. Confocal microscopy of root sections labeled with anti-actin antibodies revealed patterns suggestive of actin throughout the columella region. These patterns included short and fragmented actin bundles, fluorescent rings around amyloplasts and intense fluorescence originating from the nucleus. Additionally, confocal microscopy of MBS-stabilized and Alexa Fluor-phalloidin-labeled root sections revealed a previously undetected state of actin organization in the columella. Discrete actin structures surrounded the amyloplasts and prominent actin cables radiated from the nuclear surface toward the cell periphery. Furthermore, the cortex of the columella cells contained fine actin bundles (or single filaments) that had a predominant transverse orientation. We also used confocal microscopy of plant roots expressing endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted green fluorescent protein to demonstrate rapid ER movements within the columella cells, suggesting that the imaged actin network is functional. The successful identification of discrete actin structures in the root columella cells forms the perception and signaling.

  17. Radio observations of the setting of a quiescent prominence behind the solar limb and the interpretation of results on the eclipse of a prominence on July 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Apushkinskii, G.P.; Topchilo, N.A.

    1985-07-01

    Radio observations of the setting of a quiescent prominence behind the solar limb at 0.8 cm permit a determination of its structure. The chromosphere below the prominence does not emit in the radio range: The radio radius equals the optical radius. The results of the eclipse of July 31, 1981, can be interpreted similarly.

  18. Temperatures of quiescent prominences measured from hydrogen Paschen and CaII IR lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engvold, Oddbjorn; Brynildsen, Nils

    1986-01-01

    During 12 to 17 September 1983 a number of prominences were observed with the McMatch solar telescope of National Solar Observatories, using the Fourier transform spectrometer with a InSb detector (Brault 1979). The present study refers to three prominences observed 13 and 14 September. Prominence A: Large quiescent prominence at S28 E90 Prominence B. Stable prominence in weakly enhanced magnetic region at about NO8 E90 Prominence C: Quiescent prominence at N30 E90. Spectra were obtained at a total of 15 different locations in the three prominences in the wavelength range lambda, lambda 7740 to 14,000 Angstroms. The observed differences between T sub exc and T sub kin are hardly significant. Researchers conclude that the two methods for temperature determination when applied to optically thin lines give reasonably consistent results, i.e., the population of the excited levels of hydrogen is collisionally controlled. The well known increase in T and V towards the edge of equiescent prominences (Hirayama 1964) is not corroborated by the present data. One explanation for this could be that prominence A is atypical. The optical thickness of prominence emission lines tends to increase from center to edges as demonstrated by the case of He I lambda 10830 angstroms. If line opacity plays a significant role in earlier center to edge determinations of T and V, a smaller variation would be expected from measurements in optically thin lines, such as in the present case.

  19. Association of prominent positive and prominent negative symptoms and functional health, well-being, healthcare-related quality of life and family burden: a CATIE analysis.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Jonathan; Berardo, Carmen Galani; Bugarski-Kirola, Dragana; Marder, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    There is an increased interest in evaluating the impact of core symptoms of schizophrenia, both positive and negative, on functioning and burden of disease. To examine the extent to which prominent positive and prominent negative symptoms impact functional health, well-being, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and family burden. Data on symptomatology, HRQoL, and resource use from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) were analyzed (n=1447). Patients were divided into four groups based on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) using published criteria as having (a) neither prominent positive nor prominent negative symptoms (n=575; 39.7%); (b) only prominent negative symptoms (n=274; 18.9%); (c) only prominent positive symptoms (n=295; 20.4%); or (d) both prominent positive and negative symptoms (n=303; 20.9%). Differences were examined for overall significance between the groups and for a linear trend. There was a significant linear decline in the outcome measures with each subsequent symptom group, with the combination of prominent positive and negative symptoms incrementing the decline further on quality-adjusted life-years derived from the PANSS, Short-Form-12, Index of Functioning, HRQoL measures, and number of workdays missed by caregiver during the month prior to CATIE (all p<0.001). Both prominent positive and prominent negative symptoms of schizophrenia are independently associated with significant decline in functionality, HRQoL, and caregiver lost workdays. An increased burden is observed in patients with highest symptomatology. Further research is needed to determine predictors of poor outcomes and burden of schizophrenia. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Weighted current sheets supported in normal and inverse configurations - A model for prominence observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, P.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    A technique which incorporates both photospheric and prominence magnetic field observations is used to analyze the magnetic support of solar prominences in two dimensions. The prominence is modeled by a mass-loaded current sheet which is supported against gravity by magnetic fields from a bipolar source in the photosphere and a massless line current in the corona. It is found that prominence support can be achieved in three different kinds of configurations: an arcade topology with a normal polarity; a helical topology with a normal polarity; and a helical topology with an inverse polarity. In all cases the important parameter is the variation of the horizontal component of the prominence field with height. Adding a line current external to the prominence eliminates the nonsupport problem which plagues virtually all previous prominence models with inverse polarity.

  1. Weighted current sheets supported in normal and inverse configurations - A model for prominence observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, P.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    A technique which incorporates both photospheric and prominence magnetic field observations is used to analyze the magnetic support of solar prominences in two dimensions. The prominence is modeled by a mass-loaded current sheet which is supported against gravity by magnetic fields from a bipolar source in the photosphere and a massless line current in the corona. It is found that prominence support can be achieved in three different kinds of configurations: an arcade topology with a normal polarity; a helical topology with a normal polarity; and a helical topology with an inverse polarity. In all cases the important parameter is the variation of the horizontal component of the prominence field with height. Adding a line current external to the prominence eliminates the nonsupport problem which plagues virtually all previous prominence models with inverse polarity.

  2. MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES FROM 3D MHD SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Terradas, J.; Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Luna, M.

    2015-01-20

    In this paper we present a numerical study of the time evolution of solar prominences embedded in sheared magnetic arcades. The prominence is represented by a density enhancement in a background-stratified atmosphere and is connected to the photosphere through the magnetic field. By solving the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in three dimensions, we study the dynamics for a range of parameters representative of real prominences. Depending on the parameters considered, we find prominences that are suspended above the photosphere, i.e., detached prominences, but also configurations resembling curtain or hedgerow prominences whose material continuously connects to the photosphere. The plasma-β is an important parameter that determines the shape of the structure. In many cases magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and oscillatory phenomena develop. Fingers and plumes are generated, affecting the whole prominence body and producing vertical structures in an essentially horizontal magnetic field. However, magnetic shear is able to reduce or even to suppress this instability.

  3. Measurement of Residual Flexibility for Substructures Having Prominent Flexible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.; Bookout, Paul S.

    1994-01-01

    structure in both test and analysis. Measured and predicted residual functions are compared, and regions of poor data in the measured curves are described. It is found that for accurate residual measurements, frequency response functions having prominent stiffness lines in the acceleration/force format are needed. The lack of such stiffness lines increases measurement errors. Interface drive point frequency respose functions for shuttle orbiter payloads exhibit dominant stiffness lines, making the residual test approach a good candidate for payload modal tests when constrained tests are inappropriate. Difficulties in extracting a residual flexibility value from noisy test data are discussed. It is shown that use of a weighted second order least-squares curve fit of the measured residual function allows identification of residual flexibility that compares very well with predictions for the simple structure. This approach also provides an estimate of second order residual mass effects.

  4. A comparison of solar prominence data between H alpha and EUV (He II-304 Angstrom)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiralli, Jonathan Luke

    Two spectral lines are often used to observe solar prominences: Halpha and He II 304 A. Both emission lines capture the same prominence structure but at vastly different temperatures: Halpha is visible at ˜10,000K while He II 304 A. at ˜80,000K. The He II 304 A images provide the ability to identify the relatively hotter outer region of a prominence, although they lack the details seen in the cooler lower regions. Halpha conversely shows great detail in the cooler lower regions of a prominence but lack any detail in the hotter outer region of a prominence. Two prominences will be the subject of this paper, a low lying prominence on the northeast limb of the Sun and a larger prominence near an active region on the northwest limb of the Sun. Analysis of simultaneous images of prominences using the SDO's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) at the He II 304 A wavelength and the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) Halpha wavelength reveal both similar and different morphology. The challenge when comparing observations from both systems is to obtain sufficient congruence to determine the prominence properties and structure. Halpha images tend to show the cooler core of a prominence and detail in the finer structure. 304 A images show much more detail in the terms of higher hotter material which gives a greater sense to the structure and life of a prominence. By studying both wavelengths a more complete picture of the properties, structure and the evolution of a prominence can be learned.

  5. Using Prominence Mass Inferences in Different Coronal Lines to Obtain the He/H Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Alexander, David; Kucera, Therese

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study we developed a new technique for deriving prominence mass by observing how much coronal radiation in the Fe XI1 (lambda 195) spectral line is absorbed by prominence material. In the present work we apply this method, which allows us to consider the effects of both foreground and background radiation in our calculations, to a sample of prominences absorbing in a coronal line that ionizes both H and He (h < 504 Angstroms), and a line that ionizes only H (504 Angstroms < lambda < 911 Angstroms). This approach, first suggested by Kucera et al. (1998), permits the determination of the abundance ratio [He I]/[H I] of neutral helium and hydrogen in the prominence. This ratio should depend on how the prominence is formed, on its current thermodynamic state, and on its dynamical evolution. Thus, it may provide useful insights into the formation and evolution of prominences.

  6. Using Prominence Mass Inferences in Different Coronal Lines to Obtain the He/H Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Alexander, David; Kucera, Therese

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study we developed a new technique for deriving prominence mass by observing how much coronal radiation in the Fe XII (lambda195) spectral Line is absorbed by prominence material. In the present work we apply this method. which allows us to consider the effects of both foreground and background radiation in our calculations, to a sample of prominences absorbing in a coronal line that ionizes both H and He (lambda < 504 Angstroms), and a line that ionizes only H (504 Angstroms < lambda < 911 Angstroms). This approach, first suggested by Mucera et al. (1998). permits the determination of the abundance ratio [He I]/[H I] of neutral helium and hydrogen in the prominence. This ratio should depend on how the prominence is formed, on its current thermodynamic state, and on its dynamical evolution. Thus, it may provide useful insights into the formation and evolution of prominences.

  7. Using Prominence Mass Inferences in Different Coronal Lines to Obtain the He/H Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Alexander, David; Kucera, Therese

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study we developed a new technique for deriving prominence mass by observing how much coronal radiation in the Fe XI1 (lambda 195) spectral line is absorbed by prominence material. In the present work we apply this method, which allows us to consider the effects of both foreground and background radiation in our calculations, to a sample of prominences absorbing in a coronal line that ionizes both H and He (h < 504 Angstroms), and a line that ionizes only H (504 Angstroms < lambda < 911 Angstroms). This approach, first suggested by Kucera et al. (1998), permits the determination of the abundance ratio [He I]/[H I] of neutral helium and hydrogen in the prominence. This ratio should depend on how the prominence is formed, on its current thermodynamic state, and on its dynamical evolution. Thus, it may provide useful insights into the formation and evolution of prominences.

  8. Prominence and its Coronal Cavity Observed by Hinode, TRACE and SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Schwartz, P.; Gunar, S.

    2008-09-01

    We will first give a definition of what is a prominence according to the glossary of Solar Physicists. A prominence is a filament observed at the limb. A filament lies over the inversion line of photospheric longitudinal magnetic field and is supported in dips of horizontal magnetic field lines. Recent models of flux tubes prove that fine structures of prominences could be represented by vertical structures embedded in dips of horizontal field lines. Observations of a prominence observed in H? by Hinode/SOT and the solar tower of Meudon show a very high dynamic nature. SUMER spectra in Lyman series show no reverse profiles indicating a large prominence corona transition region. This prominence is surrounded by a large coronal cavity as show spatial telescopes (TRACE, XRT). These results will be discussed in term of different formation models.

  9. Study of an Active Prominence and Its Emission Lines in the Coronal Enviornment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khetsuriani, Ts. S.; Tetruashvili, E. I.; Gigolashvili, M. Sh.

    2000-04-01

    The variations of active prominence and surrounding corona were observed with the chromospheric telescope and Lyot type coronagraph of Abastumani Astrophysical observatory at October 10 and 11, 1978. Some physical characteristics of eruptive prominences are investigated. The behaviour of the surrounding coronal formations are studied. The distribution of the green and red coronal lines intensities and half widths with position angles and heights above the solar disk are presented. The variations of some coronal formations with changes of active prominence are noticed.

  10. Study of Prominence Detection Based on Various Phone-Specific Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Han, Chang Woo; Kim, Nam Soo

    In this letter, we present useful features accounting for pronunciation prominence and propose a classification technique for prominence detection. A set of phone-specific features are extracted based on a forced alignment of the test pronunciation provided by a speech recognition system. These features are then applied to the traditional classifiers such as the support vector machine (SVM), artificial neural network (ANN) and adaptive boosting (Adaboost) for detecting the place of prominence.

  11. Prominence measurement of total solar eclipse: March 9th 2016, Ternate, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naufal, Luthfi; Abdan Malikul Mulki, Fargiza; Fatima, Siti; Widyanita; Zahirah, Saffanah; Dimas Satrya, Christoforus; Herdiwijaya, Dhani

    2016-11-01

    Prominence is a hot gas that consists of electrically charged particles, which is propelled outward Solar surface. It can happen when the activity of sunspot rising up. Ground- based observation of prominence is rather difficult due to the brightness of the Sun, which it needs appropriate method. During total solar eclipse (TSE), prominence is easier to observe. In Ternate, Maluku islands (0°4632.0"N 127°2305.7"E), we observed solar prominence in visual and infrared spectra performed by using regular-DSLR camera for visual wavelength and modified-DSLR (IR-cut filter removal) for infrared wavelength, respectively. Next, we calculated the length of prominence from TSE images, and found that the real minimum length of prominence in red is 1.05 times longer than green and blue ones. And, the real maximum length of prominence is 1.08 times longer than blue and 1.04 times longer than green. The intensity of red is brighter 1.37 times to green and 1.23 times to blue. The causes of the results due to the different temperatures of the prominences and the radiation from H-alpha emission. We succeeded to observe directly the prominence with simple cameras and measured its length and brightness.

  12. Validity of computed tomography in predicting scaphoid screw prominence: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Griffis, Clare E; Olsen, Cara; Nesti, Leon; Gould, C Frank; Frew, Michael; McKay, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    Studies of hardware protrusion into joint spaces following fracture fixation have been performed to address whether or not there is discrepancy between the actual and radiographic appearance of screw prominence. The purpose of our study was to prove that, with respect to the scaphoid, prominence as visualized on CT scan is real and not a result of metal artifact. Forty-two cadaveric wrists were separated into four allotted groups with 21 control specimens and 21 study specimens. All specimens were radiographically screened to exclude those with inherent carpal abnormalities. Acutrak® headless compression screws were placed into all specimens using an open dorsal approach. Cartilage was removed from screw insertion site at the convex surface of the scaphoid proximal pole. Control specimens had 0 mm screw head prominence. The studied specimens had 1, 2, and 3 mm head prominence measured with a digital caliper. Computed tomography, with direct sagittal acquisition and metal suppression technique, was then performed on all specimens following screw placement. Two staff radiologists blinded to the study groups interpreted the images. Results revealed that only one of 21 control specimens was interpreted as prominent. Comparatively, in the studied groups, 90% were accurately interpreted as prominent. CT provides an accurate assessment of scaphoid screw head prominence. When a screw appears prominent on CT scan, it is likely to be truly prominent without contribution from metallic artifact.

  13. Tic Tac TOE: Effects of Predictability and Importance on Acoustic Prominence in Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Duane G.; Arnold, Jennifer E.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Importance and predictability each have been argued to contribute to acoustic prominence. To investigate whether these factors are independent or two aspects of the same phenomenon, naive participants played a verbal variant of Tic Tac Toe. Both importance and predictability contributed independently to the acoustic prominence of a word, but in…

  14. Tic Tac TOE: Effects of Predictability and Importance on Acoustic Prominence in Language Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Duane G.; Arnold, Jennifer E.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    Importance and predictability each have been argued to contribute to acoustic prominence. To investigate whether these factors are independent or two aspects of the same phenomenon, naive participants played a verbal variant of Tic Tac Toe. Both importance and predictability contributed independently to the acoustic prominence of a word, but in…

  15. 21 CFR 801.15 - Medical devices; prominence of required label statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; prominence of required label statements. 801.15 Section 801.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...; prominence of required label statements. (a) A word, statement, or other information required by or...

  16. On the Structure and Evolution of a Polar Crown Prominence/Filament System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Schmit, D. J.; Tiwari, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Polar crown prominences, that partially circle the Sun's poles between 60° and 70° latitude, are made of chromospheric plasma. We aim to diagnose the 3D dynamics of a polar crown prominence using high-cadence EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/AIA at 304, 171, and 193 Å and the Ahead spacecraft of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO-A)/EUVI at 195 Å. Using time series across specific structures, we compare flows across the disk in 195 Å with the prominence dynamics seen on the limb. The densest prominence material forms vertical columns that are separated by many tens of Mm and connected by dynamic bridges of plasma that are clearly visible in 304/171 Å two-colour images. We also observe intermittent but repetitious flows with velocity 15 km s-1 in the prominence that appear to be associated with EUV bright points on the solar disk. The boundary between the prominence and the overlying cavity appears as a sharp edge. We discuss the structure of the coronal cavity seen both above and around the prominence. SDO/HMI and GONG magnetograms are used to infer the underlying magnetic topology. The evolution and structure of the prominence with respect to the magnetic field seems to agree with the filament-linkage model.

  17. CRITICAL HEIGHT FOR THE DESTABILIZATION OF SOLAR PROMINENCES: STATISTICAL RESULTS FROM STEREO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Kai; Wang Yuming; Wang Shui; Shen Chenglong

    2012-01-10

    At which height is a prominence inclined to be unstable, or where is the most probable critical height for the prominence destabilization? This question was statistically studied based on 362 solar limb prominences well recognized by Solar Limb Prominence Catcher and Tracker from 2007 April to the end of 2009. We found that there are about 71% disrupted prominences (DPs), among which about 42% of them did not erupt successfully and about 89% of them experienced a sudden destabilization process. After a comprehensive analysis of the DPs, we discovered the following: (1) Most DPs become unstable at a height of 0.06-0.14 R{sub Sun} from the solar surface, and there are two most probable critical heights at which a prominence is very likely to become unstable, the first one is 0.13 R{sub Sun} and the second one is 0.19 R{sub Sun }. (2) An upper limit for the erupting velocity of eruptive prominences (EPs) exists, which decreases following a power law with increasing height and mass; accordingly, the kinetic energy of EPs has an upper limit too, which decreases as the critical height increases. (3) Stable prominences are generally longer and heavier than DPs, and not higher than 0.4 R{sub Sun }. (4) About 62% of the EPs were associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs); but there is no difference in apparent properties between EPs associated with CMEs and those that are not.

  18. Heating of an Erupting Prominence Associated with a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection on 2012 January 27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the heating of an erupting prominence and loops associated with a coronal mass ejection and X-class flare. The prominence is seen as absorption in EUV at the beginning of its eruption. Later, the prominence changes to emission, which indicates heating of the erupting plasma. We find the densities of the erupting prominence using the absorption properties of hydrogen and helium in different passbands. We estimate the temperatures and densities of the erupting prominence and loops seen as emission features using the differential emission measure method, which uses both EUV and X-ray observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the X-ray Telescope on board Hinode. We consider synthetic spectra using both photospheric and coronal abundances in these calculations. We verify the methods for the estimation of temperatures and densities for the erupting plasmas. Then, we estimate the thermal, kinetic, radiative loss, thermal conduction, and heating energies of the erupting prominence and loops. We find that the heating of the erupting prominence and loop occurs strongly at early times in the eruption. This event shows a writhing motion of the erupting prominence, which may indicate a hot flux rope heated by thermal energy release during magnetic reconnection.

  19. Social Prominence and the Heterogeneity of Rejected Status in Late Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Thomas W.; Hall, Cristin M.; Leung, Man-Chi; Estell, David B.; Brooks, Debra

    2011-01-01

    The heterogeneity of peer rejection was examined as a function of social prominence in fifth grade classrooms. From an overall sample of 3,891 (1,931 girls) students, 721 youth (424 boys) were identified with rejected status. Social prominence was determined from the aggregation of peer nominations for "leader", "athletic", "cool", and "popular".…

  20. Anti-spasmodic assessment of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of aerial part of Pycnocycla caespitosa Boiss. & Hausskn on rat ileum contractions.

    PubMed

    Sadraei, Hassan; Asghari, Gholamreza; Alipour, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Pycnocycla caespitosa is an essential oil-containing plant naturally growing in southwest of Iran. The extract of this plant has been used as remedy in traditional medicine. Another species of Pycnocyla (P. spinosa) possessed antispasmodic activity. The pharmacological objective of this study was to look for relaxant effect of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of P. caespitosa on rat isolated ileum contractions for comparison with loperamide. The essential oil and the hydroalcoholic extract were prepared by hydrodistillation and percolation techniques, respectively. For antispasmodic studies a section of rat ileum was suspended in an organ bath containing Tyrode's solution. The tissue was stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS), KCl (80 mM) and acetylcholine (ACh 0.5 μM). The tissue was kept under 1 g tension at 37°C and continuously gassed with O2. The essential oil content in the aerial parts of P. caespitosa was found to be 0.16 % ml/g. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Seventy constituents, representing 97 % of the oil were identified. The major components of the oil were carvacrol (7.1%), β-eudesmol (6.4 %), ρ-cymene (5.7%), caryophyllene oxide (3.6%), α-pinine (1.4%) and α-phelandrene (1.1%). The hydroalcoholic extract of P. caespitosa inhibited the response to KCl (IC50 = 48 ± 3 μg/ml), ACh (IC50 = 61 ± 14.7 μg/ml) and EFS (IC50 = 77 ± 17 μg/ml) in a concentration-dependent manner. The essential oil of P. caespitosa also inhibited rat ileum contractions. The IC50 values for KCl, ACh and EFS were 9.2 ± 1.2 μg/ml, 7.6 ± 0.8 μg/ml and 6.4 ± 0.8 μg/ml, respectively. The inhibitory effect of both the essential oil and the extract were reversible. This research confirms the anti-spasmodic activity of both the essential oil and the extract of P. caespitosa on smooth muscle contraction of ileum.

  1. [Clinical observation of post-stroke upper limb spasmodic hemiplegia treated with relaxing needling technique combined with wheat-grain moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Sui, Yuejiao; Ma, Tieming; Bian, Di; Tian, Hui

    2015-05-01

    needling group and the conventional acupuncture group (both P<0.01). FMA score in the simple relaxing needleing group was higher than that the Enventional acupuncture group (P<0.05). The total effective rate in the combined therapy group was 93.3% (28/30), higher; than 86.7% (26/30) in the simple relaxing needling group (P<0.01), and 83.8% (25/30) in the conventionaP acupuncture group (P<0.01). The combined therapy of relaxing needling technique and wheat-grain moxibustion achieves more satisfactory efficacy on post-stroke upper limb spasmodic hemiplegia compared with the simple relaxing needling and conventional acupuncture.

  2. Anti-spasmodic assessment of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of aerial part of Pycnocycla caespitosa Boiss. & Hausskn on rat ileum contractions

    PubMed Central

    Sadraei, Hassan; Asghari, Gholamreza; Alipour, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Pycnocycla caespitosa is an essential oil-containing plant naturally growing in southwest of Iran. The extract of this plant has been used as remedy in traditional medicine. Another species of Pycnocyla (P. spinosa) possessed antispasmodic activity. The pharmacological objective of this study was to look for relaxant effect of hydroalcoholic extract and essential oil of P. caespitosa on rat isolated ileum contractions for comparison with loperamide. The essential oil and the hydroalcoholic extract were prepared by hydrodistillation and percolation techniques, respectively. For antispasmodic studies a section of rat ileum was suspended in an organ bath containing Tyrode's solution. The tissue was stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS), KCl (80 mM) and acetylcholine (ACh 0.5 μM). The tissue was kept under 1 g tension at 37°C and continuously gassed with O2. The essential oil content in the aerial parts of P. caespitosa was found to be 0.16 % ml/g. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Seventy constituents, representing 97 % of the oil were identified. The major components of the oil were carvacrol (7.1%), β-eudesmol (6.4 %), ρ-cymene (5.7%), caryophyllene oxide (3.6%), α-pinine (1.4%) and α-phelandrene (1.1%). The hydroalcoholic extract of P. caespitosa inhibited the response to KCl (IC50 = 48 ± 3 μg/ml), ACh (IC50 = 61 ± 14.7 μg/ml) and EFS (IC50 = 77 ± 17 μg/ml) in a concentration-dependent manner. The essential oil of P. caespitosa also inhibited rat ileum contractions. The IC50 values for KCl, ACh and EFS were 9.2 ± 1.2 μg/ml, 7.6 ± 0.8 μg/ml and 6.4 ± 0.8 μg/ml, respectively. The inhibitory effect of both the essential oil and the extract were reversible. This research confirms the anti-spasmodic activity of both the essential oil and the extract of P. caespitosa on smooth muscle contraction of ileum. PMID:27051430

  3. The coronal structure of Speedy Mic - II. Prominence masses and off-disc emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstone, N. J.; Collier Cameron, A.; Barnes, J. R.; Jardine, M.

    2006-12-01

    Observations of stellar prominences on young rapidly rotating stars provide unique probes of their magnetic fields out to many stellar radii. We compare two independently obtained data sets of the K3 dwarf Speedy Mic (BO Mic, HD 197890) using the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT). Taken more than a fortnight apart, they provide the first insight into the evolution of the prominence system on such a young rapidly rotating star. The largest prominences observed transiting the stellar disc are found at very similar rotational phases between the epochs. This suggests that the magnetic structures supporting the prominences retain their identity on a two to three week time-scale. By taking advantage of the high signal-to-noise ratio and large wavelength range of the VLT observations, we identify prominences as transient absorption features in all lines of the hydrogen Balmer series down to H10. We use the ratios of the prominence equivalent widths (EWs) in these lines to determine their column densities in the first excited state of hydrogen. We determine the optical depths, finding prominences to be rather optically thick (τ ~ 20) in the Hα line. The total hydrogen column density and thus the prominence masses are determined via observations of the CaII H&K lines. We find typical masses for four of the largest prominences to be in the range 0.5-2.3 × 1014 kg, slightly larger than giant solar prominence masses. Rotationally modulated emission is seen outside of the Hα line. These loops of emission are shown to be caused by prominences seen off the stellar disc. We find that all of the large emission loops can be associated with prominences we see transiting the stellar disc. This, combined with the fact that many prominences appear to eclipse the off-disc emission of others, strongly suggests that the prominence system is highly flattened and likely confined to low stellar latitudes. Based on

  4. The role of prominence in Spanish sentence comprehension: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Gattei, Carolina A; Tabullo, Ángel; París, Luis; Wainselboim, Alejandro J

    2015-11-01

    Prominence is the hierarchical relation among arguments that allows us to understand 'Who did what to whom' in a sentence. The present study aimed to provide evidence about the role of prominence information for the incremental interpretation of arguments in Spanish. We investigated the time course of neural correlates associated to the comprehension of sentences that require a reversal of argument prominence hierarchization. We also studied how the amount of available prominence information may affect the incremental build-up of verbal expectations. Results of the ERP data revealed that at the disambiguating verb region, object-initial sentences (only one argument available) elicited a centro-parietal negativity with a peak at 400 ms post-onset. Subject-initial sentences (two arguments available) yielded a broadly distributed positivity at around 650 ms. This dissociation suggests that argument interpretation may depend on their morphosyntactic features, and also on the amount of prominence information available before the verb is encountered.

  5. Transverse oscillations and stability of prominences in a magnetic field dip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolotkov, D. Y.; Nisticò, G.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We developed an analytical model of the global transverse oscillations and mechanical stability of a quiescent prominence in the magnetised environment with a magnetic field dip that accounts for the mirror current effect. Methods: The model is based on the interaction of line currents through the Lorentz force. Within this concept the prominence is treated as a straight current-carrying wire, and the magnetic dip is provided by two photospheric current sources. Results: Properties of both vertical and horizontal oscillations are determined by the value of the prominence current, its density and height above the photosphere, and the parameters of the magnetic dip. The prominence can be stable in both horizontal and vertical directions simultaneously when the prominence current dominates in the system and its height is less than the half-distance between the photospheric sources.

  6. Prominence and Cool Loop Energetics Measured in the UV, EUV, and H-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, E.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of moving features in a prominence jet, a approx. 10(exp 5)K loop near a prominence channel, and an erupting prominence. In order to make measurements of the quickly moving features seen in prominences in the UV we use the SOHO/SUMER spectrograph to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The lines observed cover a broad range of temperatures from 80,000 - 1.6 million K. These measurements are combined with TRACE movies in transition region and coronal temperature bands and with ground based H-alpha data to obtain more complete information concerning prominence structure and motions. The resulting observations allow us perform DEM analysis and to calculate limits on densities, pressures, and the thermal and kinetic energies of the moving sources.

  7. Physics of Solar Prominences: I-Spectral Diagnostics and Non-LTE Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.; Vial, J.-C,; Kucera, T.; Parenti, S.; Gunar, S.; Schmieder, B.; Kilper, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review paper outlines background information and covers recent advances made via the analysis of spectra and images of prominence plasma and the increased sophistication of non-LTE (i.e. when there is a departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) radiative transfer models. We first describe the spectral inversion techniques that have been used to infer the plasma parameters important for the general properties of the prominence plasma in both its cool core and the hotter prominence-corona transition region. We also review studies devoted to the observation of bulk motions of the prominence plasma and to the determination of prominence mass. However, a simple inversion of spectroscopic data usually fails when the lines become optically thick at certain wavelengths. Therefore, complex

  8. Prominence and Cool Loop Energetics Measured in the UV, EUV, and H-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Landi, E.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermal and dynamic properties of moving features in a prominence jet, a approx. 10(exp 5)K loop near a prominence channel, and an erupting prominence. In order to make measurements of the quickly moving features seen in prominences in the UV we use the SOHO/SUMER spectrograph to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The lines observed cover a broad range of temperatures from 80,000 - 1.6 million K. These measurements are combined with TRACE movies in transition region and coronal temperature bands and with ground based H-alpha data to obtain more complete information concerning prominence structure and motions. The resulting observations allow us perform DEM analysis and to calculate limits on densities, pressures, and the thermal and kinetic energies of the moving sources.

  9. Physics of Solar Prominences: I-Spectral Diagnostics and Non-LTE Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.; Vial, J.-C,; Kucera, T.; Parenti, S.; Gunar, S.; Schmieder, B.; Kilper, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review paper outlines background information and covers recent advances made via the analysis of spectra and images of prominence plasma and the increased sophistication of non-LTE (i.e. when there is a departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) radiative transfer models. We first describe the spectral inversion techniques that have been used to infer the plasma parameters important for the general properties of the prominence plasma in both its cool core and the hotter prominence-corona transition region. We also review studies devoted to the observation of bulk motions of the prominence plasma and to the determination of prominence mass. However, a simple inversion of spectroscopic data usually fails when the lines become optically thick at certain wavelengths. Therefore, complex

  10. SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC IMAGING REVEALS HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SOLAR PROMINENCE FEET

    SciTech Connect

    González, M. J. Martínez; Sainz, R. Manso; Ramos, A. Asensio; Beck, C.; Díaz, A. J.

    2015-03-20

    Solar prominences are clouds of cool plasma levitating above the solar surface and insulated from the million-degree corona by magnetic fields. They form in regions of complex magnetic topology, characterized by non-potential fields, which can evolve abruptly, disintegrating the prominence and ejecting magnetized material into the heliosphere. However, their physics is not yet fully understood because mapping such complex magnetic configurations and their evolution is extremely challenging, and must often be guessed by proxy from photometric observations. Using state-of-the-art spectro-polarimetric data, we reconstruct the structure of the magnetic field in a prominence. We find that prominence feet harbor helical magnetic fields connecting the prominence to the solar surface below.

  11. Correlation among the dysphonia severity index (DSI), the RBH voice perceptual evaluation, and minimum glottal area in female patients with vocal fold nodules.

    PubMed

    Hussein Gaber, Ammar Gaber; Liang, Fa-Ya; Yang, Jin-Shan; Wang, Ya-Jing; Zheng, Yi-Qing

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the clinical significance and correlation of the dysphonia severity index (DSI), the RBH (roughness [R]; breathiness [B]; hoarseness [H]) perceptual voice quality evaluation, and minimum glottal area (MGA) in patients with vocal fold nodules and validate the practicality of the DSI further. The DSI evaluation, the voice RBH perceptual evaluation, and the MGA were performed on 30 female patients with vocal fold nodules (the patient group) and 30 female volunteers with normal voices (the control group). The DSI determination was calculated using the following formula: DSI = 0.13 × MPT + 0.0053 × F(0)-High - 0.26 × I-Low - 1.18 × Jitter(%) + 12.4. The RBH evaluation was graded according to four scales. The MGA was measured by KayPENTAX Kips (7105) software. The differences among the DSI, the RBH grade, and MGA of the patients were compared. The median DSI values of the patient group and the control group were -0.81 and 3.79, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The median MGA of the patient group and the control group were 355.5 and 121, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). DSI exhibited moderate negative correlation with R (rP = -0.686, P < 0.01), B (rP = -0.609, P < 0.01), and H (rP = -0.487, P < 0.01). MGA demonstrated moderate positive correlation with R (rP = 0.667, P < 0.01), B (rP = 0.545, P < 0.01), and H (rP = 0.449, P < 0.01), whereas MGA showed strong negative correlation with DSI (rP = -0.888, P < 0.01). The application of the DSI as an objective parameter to evaluate dysphonia in female patients with vocal nodules has significant clinical application and good correlation with MGA measurement. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of Flows inside Quiescent Prominences as Captured by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, M. S.; McKenzie, D. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Wilburn, M.

    2016-02-01

    Developing an understanding of how magnetic fields can become entangled in a prominence is important for predicting a possible eruption. This work investigates the kinetic energy and vorticity associated with plasma motion residing inside quiescent prominences (QPs). These plasma flow characteristics can be utilized to improve our understanding of how the prominence maintains a stable magnetic field configuration. Three different contrast-enhanced solar prominence observations from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope were used to construct velocity maps—in the plane of the sky—via a Fourier local correlation tracking program. The resulting velocities were then used to perform the first-ever analysis of the two-dimensional kinetic energy and enstrophy spectra of a prominence. Enstrophy is introduced here as a means of quantifying the vorticity that has been observed in many QPs. The kinetic energy power spectral density (PSD) produced indices ranging from -1.00 to -1.60. There was a consistent anisotropy in the kinetic energy spectrum of all three prominences examined. Examination of the intensity PSD reveals that a different scaling relationship exists between the observed prominence structure and velocity maps. All of the prominences exhibited an inertial range of at least 0.8≤slant k≤slant 2.0 {rads} {{Mm}}-1. Quasi-periodic oscillations were also detected in the centroid of the velocity distributions for one prominence. Additionally, a lower limit was placed on the kinetic energy density (ɛ ˜ 0.22-7.04 {{km}}2 {{{s}}}-2) and enstrophy density (ω ˜ 1.43-13.69 × \\quad {10}-16 {{{s}}}-2) associated with each prominence.

  13. Prominence plasma and magnetic field structure - A coordinated observation with IRIS, Hinode and THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Labrosse, Nicolas; Levens, Peter; Lopez Ariste, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    During an international campaign in 2014, utilising both space-based (IRIS and Hinode) and ground-based (THEMIS) instruments, we focused on observing prominences. We compare IRIS observations with those of Hinode (EIS and SOT) in order to build a more complete picture of the prominence structure for a quiescent prominence observed on 15 July 2014, identified to have tornado-like structure. THEMIS provides valuable information on the orientation and strength of the internal magnetic field. Here we find there is almost ubiquitously horizontal field with respect to the local limb, with possibly a turbulent component. The Mg II lines form the majority of our IRIS analysis, with a mixture of reversed and non-reversed profiles present in the prominence spectra. Comparing the differences between the Mg II data from IRIS and the Ca II images from Hinode/SOT provides an intriguing insight into the prominence legs in these channels. We present plasma diagnostics from IRIS, with line of sight velocities of around 10 km/s in either direction along the magnetic loops of material in the front of the prominence, and line widths comparable to those found for prominences by previous authors (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2014). We also take a look into the lines formed at higher, coronal plasma temperatures, as seen by Hinode/EIS, to compare plasma structures at a full range of temperatures.

  14. Kinematics and evolution of twist in the eruptive prominence of August 18, 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrsnak, B.; Ruzdjak, V.; Rompolt, B.; Rosa, D.; Zlobec, P.

    1993-07-01

    The prominence which erupted at the SE limb on August 18, 1980 is one of the best observed disparition brusque events: high-resolution monochromatic ground-based observations in the H-alpha line were supplemented by the SMM and Solwind satellite coronographic observations, the radio wavelength range was well covered by single-frequency and spectral observations, and the prominence magnetic fields were measured two days before the eruption. The prominence showed a helical-like internal structure from the preeruptive phase up to the late phases of eruption. The pitch angles of the helical-like threads were measured at several positions along the prominence axis and the evolution of twist was followed during the eruption. These measurements provide an estimate of the parameters which are directly comparable with theoretical models. The pitch angles of the helical threads decreased during the eruption. A redistribution of twist along the prominence axis could not be detected within the accuracy of measurements, although there are indications that the twist was partly transformed into an external kink-type screw of the prominence axis. The value of the total twist did not change during the eruption within the accuracy of the measurements. The kinematics of the process was followed and accompanying events in the radio-range and soft X-rays are listed. Measurements of the magnetic field vector in the prominence are reviewed briefly.

  15. Tornado-like Evolution of a Kink-unstable Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wensi; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    We report on the tornado-like evolution of a quiescent prominence on 2014 November 1. The eastern section of the prominence first rose slowly, transforming into an arch-shaped structure as high as ∼150 Mm above the limb; the arch then writhed moderately in a left-handed sense, while the original dark prominence material emitted in the Fe ix 171 Å passband, and a braided structure appeared at the eastern edge of the warped arch. The unraveling of the braided structure was associated with a transient brightening in the EUV and apparently contributed to the formation of a curtain-like structure (CLS). The CLS consisted of myriad thread-like loops rotating counterclockwise about the vertical if viewed from above. Heated prominence material was observed to slide along these loops and land outside the filament channel. The tornado eventually disintegrated and the remaining material flew along a left-handed helical path constituting approximately a full turn, as corroborated through stereoscopic reconstruction, into the cavity of the stable, western section of the prominence. We suggest that the tornado-like evolution of the prominence was governed by the helical kink instability, and that the CLS formed through magnetic reconnections between the prominence field and the overlying coronal field.

  16. Tornado-Like Evolution of A Kink-Unstable Solar Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Liu, R.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the tornado-like evolution of a quiescent prominence on 2014 November 1. The evolution started with a slow rise of the eastern section of the prominence into an arch-shaped structure as high as 150 Mm above the limb, and then the arch experienced a moderate, left-handed writhing. Following the writhing, the originally dark prominence material became in emission in the Fe IX 171 °A passband, and a braiding structure appeared at the eastern edge of the writhing prominence body, whose unraveling process was associated with a transient brightening in EUV and apparently contributed to the formation of a curtain-like structure (CLS), which consisted of myriads of thread-like loops rotating counterclockwise about the vertical if viewed from above. Material sliding along these loops landed outside of the prominence channel. The tornado was eventually disintegrated and the remaining material flew along a lefthanded helical path of approximately a full turn, as confirmed through stereoscopic reconstruction, into the cavity of the stable, western section of the prominence. We suggest that the tornado-like evolution of the prominence was regulated by the helical kink instability, and that the CLS forms through magnetic reconnections between the flux-rope flux and the overlying flux.

  17. Monster Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    When a rather large-sized (M 3.6 class) flare occurred near the edge of the Sun, it blew out a gorgeous, waving mass of erupting plasma that swirled and twisted over a 90-minute period (Feb. 24, 20...

  18. Measuring attentional bias in children with prominent ears: A prospective eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Rebecca; Sobey, Stephanie; Chorney, Jill M; Bezuhly, Michael; Hong, Paul

    2015-12-01

    When observing new faces, most people focus their attention on the central triangle of the face containing the eyes, nose and mouth. When viewing faces with prominent ears, observers may divert their attention from the central triangle. The objective of this study was to determine whether there was an objective attentional bias to prominent ears in comparison to non-prominent ears. A total of 24 naïve participants (13 female; mean age 22.88 years) viewed 15 photographs of children with bilateral prominent ears, unilateral prominent ears and non-prominent ears. Both pre- and post-otoplasty photographs of two patients were included. The eye movements of participants were recorded using the EyeLink 1000, a table-mounted eye-tracking device. Overall, the participants spent more time looking at the ear regions for faces with prominent ears in comparison to faces without prominent ears (p = 0.007, Z = -2.688). The attentional bias to the ear region of the patient who underwent bilateral otoplasty was significantly reduced in the post-operative photograph (p = 0.011, Z = -2.534). The patient who underwent unilateral otoplasty had no significant change in fixation times towards the ear region (p = 0.594, Z = -0.533). This study presents objective data to support the notion that observers show attentional bias to the ear region when viewing faces of children with prominent ears. The scope of this finding requires further research in both extent and impact. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High resolution reconstruction of solar prominence images observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yong-yuan; Liu, Zhong; Jin, Zhen-yu

    2016-11-01

    A high resolution image showing fine structures is crucial for understanding the nature of solar prominence. In this paper, high resolution imaging of solar prominence on the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) is introduced, using speckle masking. Each step of the data reduction especially the image alignment is discussed. Accurate alignment of all frames and the non-isoplanatic calibration of each image are the keys for a successful reconstruction. Reconstructed high resolution images from NVST also indicate that under normal seeing condition, it is feasible to carry out high resolution observations of solar prominence by a ground-based solar telescope, even in the absence of adaptive optics.

  20. Spectral- and cepstral-based measures during continuous speech: capacity to distinguish dysphonia and consistency within a speaker.

    PubMed

    Lowell, Soren Y; Colton, Raymond H; Kelley, Richard T; Hahn, Youngmee C

    2011-09-01

    Spectral- and cepstral-based acoustic measures are preferable to time-based measures for accurately representing dysphonic voices during continuous speech. Although these measures show promising relationships to perceptual voice quality ratings, less is known regarding their ability to differentiate normal from dysphonic voice during continuous speech and the consistency of these measures across multiple utterances by the same speaker. The purpose of this study was to determine whether spectral moments of the long-term average spectrum (LTAS) (spectral mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis) and cepstral peak prominence measures were significantly different for speakers with and without voice disorders when assessed during continuous speech. The consistency of these measures within a speaker across utterances was also addressed. Continuous speech samples from 27 subjects without voice disorders and 27 subjects with mixed voice disorders were acoustically analyzed. In addition, voice samples were perceptually rated for overall severity. Acoustic analyses were performed on three continuous speech stimuli from a reading passage: two full sentences and one constituent phrase. Significant between-group differences were found for both cepstral measures and three LTAS measures (P<0.001): spectral mean, skewness, and kurtosis. These five measures also showed moderate to strong correlations to overall voice severity. Furthermore, high degrees of within-speaker consistency (correlation coefficients ≥0.89) across utterances with varying length and phonemic content were evidenced for both subject groups.

  1. The ecology of prominences. [classification, morphology and significance to solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses the roles of prominences in the solar scheme. Attention is given to classifications and the ways in which prominences exist: hydrostatic support, ballistic support, and magnetic support. In the case of ballistic support, surges are differentiated from sprays which involve the ejection of material that is already above the solar surface. Discussion also covers filimets and fibrils and the conditions for their appearance. It is proposed that most flares originate in prominence instabilities. In addition supergranulation is covered, noting the network is not seen on the boundary of unipolar regions. It is concluded that prominences play a critical role in flares and field reconnection, and the evolution of solar magnetic fields.

  2. Morphology Of A Hot Prominence Cavity Observed with Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Mark A.; Reeves, K. K.; Gibson, S. E.; Kucera, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    Prominence cavities appear as circularly shaped voids in coronal emission over polarity inversion lines where a prominence channel is straddling the solar limb. The presence of chromospheric material suspended at coronal altitudes is a common but not necessary feature within these cavities. These voids are observed to change shape as a prominence feature rotates around the limb. We use a morphological model projected in cross-sections to fit the cavity emission in Hinode/XRT passbands, and then apply temperature diagnostics to XRT and SDO/AIA data to investigate the thermal structure. We find significant evidence that the prominence cavity is hotter than the corona immediately outside the cavity boundary. This investigation follows upon "Thermal Properties of A Solar Coronal Cavity Observed with the X-ray Telescope on Hinode" by Reeves et al., 2012, ApJ, in press.

  3. Onset of solar flares as predicted by two-dimensional MHD-models of quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindotrejo, J.

    1985-01-01

    The close connection between the sudden disapperance (disparition brusque) of the quiescent prominences and the two-ribbon flares are well known. During this dynamic phase the prominence ascends rapidly (typically with a velocity about 100 Km/sec) and disappears. In another later stage is observed material falling back into the chromosphere. The impact of this downfalling matter on the chromosphere produces the H brightening, which shows the symmetric double pattern. The occurence of the disparition brusque is thought to be a consequence of a plasma instability of magnetohydrostatic (MHD) structures. By means of the MHD-energy principle, the stability properties of four prominence models are analyzed. It is shown that all considered models undergo instabilities for parameters outside of the observed range at quiescent prominences. The possibility that such instabilities in the flare parameter range may indicate just the onset of a flare is considered.

  4. QUIESCENT PROMINENCE DYNAMICS OBSERVED WITH THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE. I. TURBULENT UPFLOW PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Thomas E.; Slater, Gregory; Hurlburt, Neal; Shine, Richard; Tarbell, Theodore; Title, Alan; Okamoto, Takenori J.; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Katsukawa, Yukio; Magara, Tetsuya; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi

    2010-06-20

    Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) observations reveal two new dynamic modes in quiescent solar prominences: large-scale (20-50 Mm) 'arches' or 'bubbles' that 'inflate' from below into prominences, and smaller-scale (2-6 Mm) dark turbulent upflows. These novel dynamics are related in that they are always dark in visible-light spectral bands, they rise through the bright prominence emission with approximately constant speeds, and the small-scale upflows are sometimes observed to emanate from the top of the larger bubbles. Here we present detailed kinematic measurements of the small-scale turbulent upflows seen in several prominences in the SOT database. The dark upflows typically initiate vertically from 5 to 10 Mm wide dark cavities between the bottom of the prominence and the top of the chromospheric spicule layer. Small perturbations on the order of 1 Mm or less in size grow on the upper boundaries of cavities to generate plumes up to 4-6 Mm across at their largest widths. All plumes develop highly turbulent profiles, including occasional Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex 'roll-up' of the leading edge. The flows typically rise 10-15 Mm before decelerating to equilibrium. We measure the flowfield characteristics with a manual tracing method and with the Nonlinear Affine Velocity Estimator (NAVE) 'optical flow' code to derive velocity, acceleration, lifetime, and height data for several representative plumes. Maximum initial speeds are in the range of 20-30 km s{sup -1}, which is supersonic for a {approx}10,000 K plasma. The plumes decelerate in the final few Mm of their trajectories resulting in mean ascent speeds of 13-17 km s{sup -1}. Typical lifetimes range from 300 to 1000 s ({approx}5-15 minutes). The area growth rate of the plumes (observed as two-dimensional objects in the plane of the sky) is initially linear and ranges from 20,000 to 30,000 km{sup 2} s{sup -1} reaching maximum projected areas from 2 to 15 Mm{sup 2}. Maximum contrast of the dark flows relative to

  5. The Causal Ordering of Prominence and Salience in Identity Theory: An Empirical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Philip S.; Serpe, Richard T.; Stryker, Sheldon

    2016-01-01

    Identity theory invokes two distinct but related concepts, identity salience and prominence, to explain how the organization of identities that make up the self impacts the probability that a given identity is situationally enacted. However, much extant research has failed to clearly distinguish between salience and prominence, and their empirical relationship has not been adequately investigated, impeding a solid understanding of the significance and role of each in a general theory of the self. This study examines their causal ordering using three waves of panel data from 48 universities focusing on respondents’ identities as science students. Analyses strongly support a causal ordering from prominence to salience. We provide theoretical and empirical grounds to justify this ordering while acknowledging potential variation in its strength across identities. Finally, we offer recommendations about the use of prominence and salience when measures of one or both are available or when analyses use cross-sectional data. PMID:27284212

  6. The Causal Ordering of Prominence and Salience in Identity Theory: An Empirical Examination.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Philip S; Serpe, Richard T; Stryker, Sheldon

    2014-09-01

    Identity theory invokes two distinct but related concepts, identity salience and prominence, to explain how the organization of identities that make up the self impacts the probability that a given identity is situationally enacted. However, much extant research has failed to clearly distinguish between salience and prominence, and their empirical relationship has not been adequately investigated, impeding a solid understanding of the significance and role of each in a general theory of the self. This study examines their causal ordering using three waves of panel data from 48 universities focusing on respondents' identities as science students. Analyses strongly support a causal ordering from prominence to salience. We provide theoretical and empirical grounds to justify this ordering while acknowledging potential variation in its strength across identities. Finally, we offer recommendations about the use of prominence and salience when measures of one or both are available or when analyses use cross-sectional data.

  7. Prominence activity related to CME observed by SOHO, Yohkoh and ground-based observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmieder, B.; vanDriel-Gesztelyi, L.; Wiik, J. E.; Kucera, T.; Thompson, B.; DeForest, C.; SaintCyr, C.; Simnett, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    Examples of destabilization of prominences and their associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are presented. During the 1996 campaigns of multi-wavelength observations with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), the Yohkoh satellite's soft X-ray telescope (SXT) and the Meudon (France) H alpha spectroheliograph eruptive solar filaments and prominences associated with the CMEs were observed. Two of the observed events showed that CMEs and 'brusques disparitions' (BDs) seem to be consequences of global magnetic field instability.

  8. Solar Magnetized Tornadoes: Rotational Motion in a Tornado-like Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yang; Gömöry, Peter; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Wang, Tongjiang; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gan, Weiqun; Li, YouPing

    2014-04-01

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ~5 km s-1.

  9. Eruptive Prominences and Their Impact on the Earth and Our Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaz, Noé

    Following prominence eruptions (see Chap. 16 : Webb, Solar prominences. New York: Springer, 2014), the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) propagate into the solar wind and interplanetary medium. While the complex interactions with the magnetic field and plasma in the corona (see Chaps. 15 and 16 : Gopalswamy, Solar prominences. New York: Springer, 2014; Webb, Solar prominences. New York: Springer, 2014) have been observed for decades, it has only been in the last decade that the interaction of CMEs with the interplanetary medium can be directly imaged. As CMEs and prominences impact Earth, Earth's magnetosphere may be disrupted through reconnection and/or compression, resulting in geomagnetic storms. In the most extreme cases, CMEs and prominences may have a global effect on man-made technologies and human beings, especially if they are in space. The conditions in the near-Earth environment directly affected by the Sun and the solar activity are known as space weather and will be discussed here.

  10. SOLAR LIMB PROMINENCE CATCHER AND TRACKER (SLIPCAT): AN AUTOMATED SYSTEM AND ITS PRELIMINARY STATISTICAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuming; Cao Hao; Chen Junhong; Zhang Tengfei; Yu Sijie; Zheng Huinan; Shen Chenglong; Wang, S.; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-10

    In this paper, we present an automated system, which has the capability to catch and track solar limb prominences based on observations from the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) 304 A passband. The characteristic parameters and their evolution, including height, position angle, area, length, and brightness, are obtained without manual interventions. By applying the system to the STEREO-B/SECCHI/EUVI 304 A data during 2007 April-2009 October, we obtain a total of 9477 well-tracked prominences and a catalog of these events available online. A detailed analysis of these prominences suggests that the system has a rather good performance. We have obtained several interesting statistical results based on the catalog. Most prominences appear below the latitude of 60{sup 0} and at the height of about 26 Mm above the solar surface. Most of them are quite stable during the period they are tracked. Nevertheless, some prominences have an upward speed of more than 100 km s{sup -1}, and some others show significant downward and/or azimuthal speeds. There are strong correlations among the brightness, area, and height. The expansion of a prominence is probably one major cause of its fading during the rising or erupting process.

  11. MEASURING AN ERUPTIVE PROMINENCE AT LARGE DISTANCES FROM THE SUN. II. APPROACHING 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, T. A.

    2015-06-20

    The physical properties of eruptive prominences are unknown at large distances from the Sun. They are rarely, if ever, measured by in situ spacecraft and until recently our ability to measure them beyond the fields of view of solar imagers has been severely limited. The data quality of heliospheric imaging has reached a point where some quantitative measurements of prominences are now possible. I present the first such measurements of a bright prominence continually out to distances of around 1 AU from the Sun. This work follows on from the preparatory work presented in an accompanying paper, which showed that that the brightness of a prominence can be safely assumed to arise entirely from Thomson scattering in the STEREO/HI fields of view. Measurements of distance, speed, and mass are provided along with those from its accompanying coronal mass ejection (CME) to demonstrate their geometric, kinematic, and mass relationships. I find that the prominence travels with a slower speed than that of the CME, but its location relative to the CME structure does not conform to the expected location for basic geometric expansion. Further, the mass of the prominence was found to decrease by around an order of magnitude while that of the CME increased by an order of magnitude across the same distance.

  12. EVIDENCE FOR ROTATIONAL MOTIONS IN THE FEET OF A QUIESCENT SOLAR PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco Suarez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2012-12-20

    We present observational evidence of apparent plasma rotational motions in the feet of a solar prominence. Our study is based on spectroscopic observations taken in the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter attached to the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We recorded a time sequence of spectra with 34 s cadence placing the slit of the spectrograph almost parallel to the solar limb and crossing two feet of an intermediate size, quiescent hedgerow prominence. The data show opposite Doppler shifts, {+-}6 km s{sup -1}, at the edges of the prominence feet. We argue that these shifts may be interpreted as prominence plasma rotating counterclockwise around the vertical axis to the solar surface as viewed from above. The evolution of the prominence seen in EUV images taken with the Solar Dynamics Observatory provided us with clues to interpret the results as swirling motions. Moreover, time-distance images taken far from the central wavelength show plasma structures moving parallel to the solar limb with velocities of about 10-15 km s{sup -1}. Finally, the shapes of the observed intensity profiles suggest the presence of, at least, two components at some locations at the edges of the prominence feet. One of them is typically Doppler shifted (up to {approx}20 km s{sup -1}) with respect to the other, thus suggesting the existence of supersonic counter-streaming flows along the line of sight.

  13. Time Evolution of Plasma Parameters during the Rise of a Solar Prominence Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Díaz, A. J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.

    2014-04-01

    We present high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a quiescent hedgerow prominence taken in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet. The observation consisted of a time series in sit-and-stare mode of ~36 minutes duration. The spectrograph's slit crossed the prominence body and we recorded the time evolution of individual vertical threads. Eventually, we observed the development of a dark Rayleigh-Taylor plume that propagated upward with a velocity, projected onto the plane of the sky, of 17 km s-1. Interestingly, the plume apex collided with the prominence threads pushing them aside. We inferred Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, and magnetic field strength variations by interpreting the He I Stokes profiles with the HAZEL code. The Doppler shifts show that clusters of threads move coherently while individual threads have oscillatory patterns. Regarding the plume we found strong redshifts (~9-12 km s-1) and large Doppler widths (~10 km s-1) at the plume apex when it passed through the prominence body and before it disintegrated. We associate the redshifts with perspective effects while the Doppler widths are more likely due to an increase in the local temperature. No local variations of the magnetic field strength associated with the passage of the plume were found; this leads us to conclude that the plumes are no more magnetized than the surroundings. Finally, we found that some of the threads' oscillations are locally damped, what allowed us to apply prominence seismology techniques to infer additional prominence physical parameters.

  14. SOLAR MAGNETIZED TORNADOES: ROTATIONAL MOTION IN A TORNADO-LIKE PROMINENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Temmer, Manuela; Vanninathan, Kamalam; Gömöry, Peter; Wang, Tongjiang; Gan, Weiqun; Li, YouPing

    2014-04-10

    Su et al. proposed a new explanation for filament formation and eruption, where filament barbs are rotating magnetic structures driven by underlying vortices on the surface. Such structures have been noticed as tornado-like prominences when they appear above the limb. They may play a key role as the source of plasma and twist in filaments. However, no observations have successfully distinguished rotational motion of the magnetic structures in tornado-like prominences from other motions such as oscillation and counter-streaming plasma flows. Here we report evidence of rotational motions in a tornado-like prominence. The spectroscopic observations in two coronal lines were obtained from a specifically designed Hinode/EIS observing program. The data revealed the existence of both cold and million-degree-hot plasma in the prominence leg, supporting the so-called prominence-corona transition region. The opposite velocities at the two sides of the prominence and their persistent time evolution, together with the periodic motions evident in SDO/AIA dark structures, indicate a rotational motion of both cold and hot plasma with a speed of ∼5 km s{sup –1}.

  15. Coordinated Observations of Prominences with SUMER/CDS and Ground Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiik, J. E.; Schmieder, B.; Kucera, T.; Poland, A.

    An international campaign for the observation of prominences and filaments was successfully accomplished between June 3 and 9 1996. Several ground observatories took part in the campaign which included the space observatories SOHO and Yohkoh. The main objective of this campaign was to study the dynamics of prominences and the prominence-corona interface, the formation of filaments and the fine structures at different temperatures. We will reported on two Joint Observing Programmes of SUMER and CDS aboard SOHO (JOP 12 and JOP 17), which have been achieved. Finally we will present as an exemple a prominence observed on May 1, 1996 during the tests of the programme JOP 12. This prominence was associated with a CME (observed with LASCO). Very active parts with Dopplershifs up to +/- 36kms(-1) were measured in the SUMER spectra of the prominence, indicating the presence of twisted ropes during the eruption. Mean electron densities have spatial and temporal dispersion of one order of magnitude (10(9) - 10(10) cm(-3) ).

  16. The Fate of Cool Material in the Hot Corona: Solar Prominences and Coronal Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Antolin, Patrick; Sun, Xudong; Vial, Jean-Claude; Berger, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    As an important chain of the chromosphere-corona mass cycle, some of the million-degree hot coronal mass undergoes a radiative cooling instability and condenses into material at chromospheric or transition-region temperatures in two distinct forms - prominences and coronal rain (some of which eventually falls back to the chromosphere). A quiescent prominence usually consists of numerous long-lasting, filamentary downflow threads, while coronal rain consists of transient mass blobs falling at comparably higher speeds along well-defined paths. It remains puzzling why such material of similar temperatures exhibit contrasting morphologies and behaviors. We report recent SDO/AIA and IRIS observations that suggest different magnetic environments being responsible for such distinctions. Specifically, in a hybrid prominence-coronal rain complex structure, we found that the prominence material is formed and resides near magnetic null points that favor the radiative cooling process and provide possibly a high plasma-beta environment suitable for the existence of meandering prominence threads. As the cool material descends, it turns into coronal rain tied onto low-lying coronal loops in a likely low-beta environment. Such structures resemble to certain extent the so-called coronal spiders or cloud prominences, but the observations reported here provide critical new insights. We will discuss the broad physical implications of these observations for fundamental questions, such as coronal heating and beyond (e.g., in astrophysical and/or laboratory plasma environments).

  17. Reconstruction of a helical prominence in 3D from IRIS spectra and images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Zapiór, M.; López Ariste, A.; Levens, P.; Labrosse, N.; Gravet, R.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Movies of prominences obtained by space instruments e.g. the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) with high temporal and spatial resolution revealed the tremendous dynamical nature of prominences. Knots of plasma belonging to prominences appear to travel along both vertical and horizontal thread-like loops, with highly dynamical nature. Aims: The aim of the paper is to reconstruct the 3D shape of a helical prominence observed over two and a half hours by IRIS. Methods: From the IRIS Mg ii k spectra we compute Doppler shifts of the plasma inside the prominence and from the slit-jaw images (SJI) we derive the transverse field in the plane of the sky. Finally we obtain the velocity vector field of the knots in 3D. Results.We reconstruct the real trajectories of nine knots travelling along ellipses. Conclusions: The spiral-like structure of the prominence observed in the plane of the sky is mainly due to the projection effect of long arches of threads (up to 8 × 104 km). Knots run along more or less horizontal threads with velocities reaching 65 km s-1. The dominant driving force is the gas pressure. Movies associated to Figs. 1, 9, 10, and 13 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  18. SIMULATIONS OF PROMINENCE FORMATION IN THE MAGNETIZED SOLAR CORONA BY CHROMOSPHERIC HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, C.; Chen, P. F.; Keppens, R.

    2012-04-01

    Starting from a realistically sheared magnetic arcade connecting the chromospheric, transition region to coronal plasma, we simulate the in situ formation and sustained growth of a quiescent prominence in the solar corona. Contrary to previous works, our model captures all phases of the prominence formation, including the loss of thermal equilibrium, its successive growth in height and width to macroscopic dimensions, and the gradual bending of the arched loops into dipped loops, as a result of the mass accumulation. Our 2.5 dimensional, fully thermodynamically and magnetohydrodynamically consistent model mimics the magnetic topology of normal-polarity prominences above a photospheric neutral line, and results in a curtain-like prominence above the neutral line through which the ultimately dipped magnetic field lines protrude at a finite angle. The formation results from concentrated heating in the chromosphere, followed by plasma evaporation and later rapid condensation in the corona due to thermal instability, as verified by linear instability criteria. Concentrated heating in the lower atmosphere evaporates plasma from below to accumulate at the top of coronal loops and supply mass to the later prominence constantly. This is the first evaporation-condensation model study where we can demonstrate how the formed prominence stays in a force balanced state, which can be compared to the Kippenhahn-Schlueter type magnetohydrostatic model, all in a finite low-beta corona.

  19. Quiescent and Eruptive Prominences at Solar Minimum: A Statistical Study via an Automated Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loboda, I. P.; Bogachev, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    We employ an automated detection algorithm to perform a global study of solar prominence characteristics. We process four months of TESIS observations in the He II 304Å line taken close to the solar minimum of 2008-2009 and mainly focus on quiescent and quiescent-eruptive prominences. We detect a total of 389 individual features ranging from 25×25 to 150×500 Mm2 in size and obtain distributions of many of their spatial characteristics, such as latitudinal position, height, size, and shape. To study their dynamics, we classify prominences as either stable or eruptive and calculate their average centroid velocities, which are found to rarely exceed 3 km/s. In addition, we give rough estimates of mass and gravitational energy for every detected prominence and use these values to estimate the total mass and gravitational energy of all simultaneously existing prominences (1012 - 1014 kg and 1029 - 1031 erg). Finally, we investigate the form of the gravitational energy spectrum of prominences and derive it to be a power-law of index -1.1 ± 0.2.

  20. Otoplasty for prominent ears - demographics and surgical timing in different populations.

    PubMed

    Kajosaari, Lauri; Pennanen, Juhani; Klockars, Tuomas

    2017-09-01

    Prominent ears are seen in approximately 5% of the population. This benign condition can be treated surgically to reduce or prevent psychological and social problems, most commonly in children before the start of school. Our aim was to examine the demographic characteristics of patients undergoing prominent ear surgery in Finland, and compare findings with international data. A retrospective study of all the patients treated for prominent ears in our academic tertiary care referral center during 2007-2011 was performed to gather demographic details of operated patients. A systematic review of published series of prominent ear surgery after the year 2000 was performed to gather demographic details for international comparison. A total of 180 patients were operated in our institution for prominent ears, most of the cases (78.9%) were bilateral. Age at operation ranged between 3 and 36 years, with mean of 9.2 y and median of 7 y. The most common reason for seeking operative treatment was aesthetic complaint, followed by bullying. Review process gathered 20 publications, describing a total of 4433 patients who had been operated for prominent ears. There was wide variation the mean age at operation, ranging 7-38 y while the mean overall was 15.0y. Gender distribution of patient samples was also very variable, with percentage of females ranging from 38 to 71% (overall 52%). There was also considerable variation in the tendency to perform unilateral operations: from 0% up to 21% of the reported population. There were no statistically significant correlations linking these demographic variables, though there was a trend that females are more likely to have this operation performed at an older age. The treatment culture of prominent ear surgery varies substantially in international comparison. The age at which this operation is performed showed most variation. Omitting some of the basic demographic variables while reporting the results of surgery was common in the reviewed