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Sample records for promiscuous substrate recognition

  1. MTH1 Substrate Recognition--An Example of Specific Promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Nissink, J Willem M; Bista, Michal; Breed, Jason; Carter, Nikki; Embrey, Kevin; Read, Jonathan; Winter-Holt, Jon J

    2016-01-01

    MTH1 (NUDT1) is an oncologic target involved in the prevention of DNA damage. We investigate the way MTH1 recognises its substrates and present substrate-bound structures of MTH1 for 8-oxo-dGTP and 8-oxo-rATP as examples of novel strong and weak binding substrate motifs. Investigation of a small set of purine-like fragments using 2D NMR resulted in identification of a fragment with weak potency. The protein-ligand X-Ray structure of this fragment provides insight into the role of water molecules in substrate selectivity. Wider fragment screening by NMR resulted in three new protein structures exhibiting alternative binding configurations to the key Asp-Asp recognition element of the protein. These inhibitor binding modes demonstrate that MTH1 employs an intricate yet promiscuous mechanism of substrate anchoring through its Asp-Asp pharmacophore. The structures suggest that water-mediated interactions convey selectivity towards oxidized substrates over their non-oxidised counterparts, in particular by stabilization of a water molecule in a hydrophobic environment through hydrogen bonding. These findings may be useful in the design of inhibitors of MTH1. PMID:26999531

  2. Promiscuous Substrate Recognition in Folding and Assembly Activities of the Trigger Factor Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Trigger factor (TF) is a molecular chaperone that binds to bacterial ribosomes where it contacts emerging nascent chains, but TF is also abundant free in the cytosol where its activity is less well characterized. In vitro studies show that TF promotes protein refolding. We find here that ribosome-free TF stably associates with and rescues from misfolding a large repertoire of full-length proteins. We identify over 170 members of this cytosolic Escherichia coli TF substrate proteome, including ribosomal protein S7. We analyzed the biochemical properties of a TF:S7 complex from Thermotoga maritima and determined its crystal structure. Thereby, we obtained an atomic-level picture of a promiscuous chaperone in complex with a physiological substrate protein. The structure of the complex reveals the molecular basis of substrate recognition by TF, indicates how TF could accelerate protein folding, and suggests a role for TF in the biogenesis of protein complexes.

  3. NDM-1, the ultimate promiscuous enzyme: substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Cunningham, Mark A.; Mire, Joseph; Tesar, Christine; Sacchettini, James; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    The specter of a return to an era in which infectious disease looms as a significant threat to human health is not just hyperbole; there are serious concerns about the widespread overuse and misuse of antibiotics contributing to increased antibiotic resistance in pathogens. The recent discovery of a new enzyme, first identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae from a patient from New Delhi and denoted as NDM-1, represents an example of extreme promiscuity: It hydrolyzes and inactivates nearly all known β-lactam-based antibiotics with startling efficiency. NDM-1 can utilize different metal cofactors and seems to exploit an alternative mechanism based on the reaction conditions. Here we report the results of a combined experimental and theoretical study that examines the substrate, metal binding, and catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. We utilize structures obtained through X-ray crystallography, biochemical assays, and numerical simulation to construct a model of the enzyme catalytic pathway. The NDM-1 enzyme interacts with the substrate solely through zinc, or other metals, bound in the active site, explaining the observed lack of specificity against a broad range of β-lactam antibiotic agents. The zinc ions also serve to activate a water molecule that hydrolyzes the β-lactam ring through a proton shuttle.—Kim, Y., Cunningham, M. A.; Mire, J., Tesar, C., Sacchettini, J., Joachimiak, A. NDM-1, the ultimate promiscuous enzyme: substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism. PMID:23363572

  4. Enzymological and Structural Studies of the Mechanism of Promiscuous Substrate Recognition by the Oxidative DNA Repair Enzyme AlkB

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Hunt, J

    2009-01-01

    Promiscuous substrate recognition, the ability to catalyze transformations of chemically diverse compounds, is an evolutionarily advantageous, but poorly understood phenomenon. The promiscuity of DNA repair enzymes is particularly important, because it enables diverse kinds of damage to different nucleotide bases to be repaired in a metabolically parsimonious manner. We present enzymological and crystallographic studies of the mechanisms underlying promiscuous substrate recognition by Escherichia coli AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme that removes methyl adducts and some larger alkylation lesions from endocyclic positions on purine and pyrimidine bases. In vitro Michaelis-Menten analyses on a series of alkylated bases show high activity in repairing N1-methyladenine (m1A) and N3-methylcytosine (m3C), comparatively low activity in repairing 1,N6-ethenoadenine, and no detectable activity in repairing N1-methylguanine or N3-methylthymine. AlkB has a substantially higher kcat and Km for m3C compared with m1A. Therefore, the enzyme maintains similar net activity on the chemically distinct substrates by increasing the turnover rate of the substrate with nominally lower affinity. Cocrystal structures provide insight into the structural basis of this 'kcat/Km compensation,' which makes a significant contribution to promiscuous substrate recognition by AlkB. In analyzing a large ensemble of crystal structures solved in the course of these studies, we observed 2 discrete global conformations of AlkB differing in the accessibility of a tunnel hypothesized to control diffusion of the O2 substrate into the active site. Steric interactions between a series of protein loops control this conformational transition and present a plausible mechanism for preventing O2 binding before nucleotide substrate binding.

  5. Mutants of the EcoRI endonuclease with promiscuous substrate specificity implicate residues involved in substrate recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Heitman, J; Model, P

    1990-01-01

    The EcoRI restriction endonuclease cleaves DNA molecules at the sequence GAATTC. We devised a genetic screen to isolate EcoRI mutants with altered or broadened substrate specificity. In vitro, the purified mutant enzymes cleave both the wild-type substrate and sites which differ from this by one nucleotide (EcoRI star sites). These mutations identify four residues involved in substrate recognition and catalysis that are different from the amino acids proposed to recognize the substrate based on the EcoRI-DNA co-crystal structure. In fact, these mutations suppress EcoRI mutants altered at some of the proposed substrate binding residues (R145, R200). We argue that these mutations permit cleavage of additional DNA sequences either by perturbing or removing direct DNA-protein interactions or by facilitating conformational changes that allosterically couple substrate binding to DNA scission. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2209548

  6. Cys-Gly specific dipeptidase Dug1p from S. cerevisiae binds promiscuously to di-, tri-, and tetra-peptides: Peptide-protein interaction, homology modeling, and activity studies reveal a latent promiscuity in substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hardeep; Datt, Manish; Ekka, Mary Krishna; Mittal, Monica; Singh, Appu Kumar; Kumaran, Sangaralingam

    2011-02-01

    Dug1p is a recently identified novel dipeptidase and plays an important role in glutathione (GSH) degradation. To understand the mechanism of its substrate recognition and specificity towards Cys-Gly dipeptides, we characterized the solution properties of Dug1p and studied the thermodynamics of Dug1p-peptide interactions. In addition, we used homology modeling and ligand docking approaches to get structural insights into Dug1p-peptide interaction. Dug1p exists as dimer and the stoichiometry of peptide-Dug1p complex is 2:1 indicating each monomer in the dimer binds to one peptide. Thermodynamic studies indicate that the free energy change for Dug1p-peptide complex formation is similar (▵G(bind) ∼ -7.0 kcal/mol) for a variety of peptides of different composition and length (22 peptides). Three-dimensional model of Dug1p is constructed and docking of peptides to the modeled structure suggests that hydrogen bonding to active site residues (E172, E171, and D137) lock the N-terminal of the peptide into the binding site. Dug1p recognizes peptides in a metal independent manner and peptide binding is not sensitive to salts (dlogK/dlog[salt] ∼ 0) over a range of [NaCl] (0.02-0.5 M), [ZnCl(2)], and [MnCl(2)] (0-0.5 mM). Our results indicate that promiscuity in peptide binding results from the locking of peptide N-terminus into the active site. These observations were supported by our competitive inhibition activity assays. Dug1p activity towards Cys-Gly peptide is significantly reduced (∼ 70%) in the presence of Glu-Cys-Gly. Therefore, Dug1p can recognize a variety of oligopeptides, but has evolved with post-binding screening potential to hydrolyze Cys-Gly peptides selectively.

  7. MTH1 Substrate Recognition—An Example of Specific Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Nissink, J. Willem M.; Bista, Michal; Breed, Jason; Carter, Nikki; Embrey, Kevin; Read, Jonathan; Winter-Holt, Jon J.

    2016-01-01

    MTH1 (NUDT1) is an oncologic target involved in the prevention of DNA damage. We investigate the way MTH1 recognises its substrates and present substrate-bound structures of MTH1 for 8-oxo-dGTP and 8-oxo-rATP as examples of novel strong and weak binding substrate motifs. Investigation of a small set of purine-like fragments using 2D NMR resulted in identification of a fragment with weak potency. The protein-ligand X-Ray structure of this fragment provides insight into the role of water molecules in substrate selectivity. Wider fragment screening by NMR resulted in three new protein structures exhibiting alternative binding configurations to the key Asp-Asp recognition element of the protein. These inhibitor binding modes demonstrate that MTH1 employs an intricate yet promiscuous mechanism of substrate anchoring through its Asp-Asp pharmacophore. The structures suggest that water-mediated interactions convey selectivity towards oxidized substrates over their non-oxidised counterparts, in particular by stabilization of a water molecule in a hydrophobic environment through hydrogen bonding. These findings may be useful in the design of inhibitors of MTH1. PMID:26999531

  8. Molecular mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition by spermidine acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Sae; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Niiyama, Mayumi; Hirose, Mika; Miyazaki, Yuma; Higashi, Kyohei; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Spermidine acetyltransferase (SAT) from Escherichia coli, which catalyses the transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-CoA to spermidine, is a key enzyme in controlling polyamine levels in prokaryotic cells. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of SAT in complex with spermidine (SPD) and CoA at 2.5Å resolution. SAT is a dodecamer organized as a hexamer of dimers. The secondary structural element and folding topology of the SAT dimer resemble those of spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT), suggesting an evolutionary link between SAT and SSAT. However, the polyamine specificity of SAT is distinct from that of SSAT and is promiscuous. The SPD molecule is also located at the inter-dimer interface. The distance between SPD and CoA molecules is 13Å. A deep, highly acidic, water-filled cavity encompasses the SPD and CoA binding sites. Structure-based mutagenesis and in-vitro assays identified SPD-bound residues, and the acidic residues lining the walls of the cavity are mostly essential for enzymatic activities. Based on mutagenesis and structural data, we propose an acetylation mechanism underlying promiscuous polyamine recognition for SAT. PMID:27163532

  9. Multisite Promiscuity in the Processing of Endogenous Substrates By Human Carboxylesterase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bencharit, S.; Edwards, C.C.; Morton, C.L.; Howard-Williams, E.L.; Kuhn, P.; Potter, P.M.; Redinbo, M.R.; /North Carolina U. /St. Jude Children's Hosp., Memphis /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-16

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a drug and endobiotic-processing serine hydrolase that exhibits relatively broad substrate specificity. It has been implicated in a variety of endogenous cholesterol metabolism pathways including the following apparently disparate reactions: cholesterol ester hydrolysis (CEH), fatty acyl Coenzyme A hydrolysis (FACoAH), acyl-Coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransfer (ACAT), and fatty acyl ethyl ester synthesis (FAEES). The structural basis for the ability of hCE1 to perform these catalytic actions involving large substrates and products has remained unclear. Here we present four crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in complexes with the following endogenous substrates or substrate analogues: Coenzyme A, the fatty acid palmitate, and the bile acids cholate and taurocholate. While the active site of hCE1 was known to be promiscuous and capable of interacting with a variety of chemically distinct ligands, these structures reveal that the enzyme contains two additional ligand-binding sites and that each site also exhibits relatively non-specific ligand-binding properties. Using this multisite promiscuity, hCE1 appears structurally capable of assembling several catalytic events depending, apparently, on the physiological state of the cellular environment. These results expand our understanding of enzyme promiscuity and indicate that, in the case of hCE1, multiple non-specific sites are employed to perform distinct catalytic actions.

  10. Exquisite specificity and peptide epitope recognition promiscuity, properties shared by antibodies from sharks to humans.

    PubMed

    Marchalonis, J J; Adelman, M K; Robey, I F; Schluter, S F; Edmundson, A B

    2001-01-01

    This review considers definitions of the specificity of antibodies including the development of recent concepts of recognition polyspecificity and epitope promiscuity. Using sets of homologous and unrelated peptides derived from the sequences of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor chains we offer operational definitions of cross-reactivity by investigating correlations of either identities in amino acid sequence, or in hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity profiles with degree of binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Polyreactivity, or polyspecificity, are terms used to denote binding of a monoclonal antibody or purified antibody preparation to large complex molecules that are structurally unrelated, such as thyroglobulin and DNA. As a first approximation, there is a linear correlation between degree of sequence identity or hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and antigenic cross-binding. However, catastrophic interchanges of amino acids can occur where changing of one amino acid out of 16 in a synthetic peptide essentially eliminates binding to certain antibodies. An operational definition of epitope promiscuity for peptides is the case where two peptides show little or no identity in amino acid sequence but bind strongly to the same antibody as shown by either direct binding or competitive inhibition. Analysis of antibodies of humans and sharks, the two most divergent species in evolution to express antibodies and the combinatorial immune response, indicates that the capacity for both exquisite specificity and epitope recognition promiscuity are essential conserved features of individual vertebrate antibodies.

  11. Hyperstability and substrate promiscuity in laboratory resurrections of Precambrian β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Gavira, Jose A; Mejia-Carmona, Diego F; Gaucher, Eric A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2013-02-27

    We report a sequence reconstruction analysis targeting several Precambrian nodes in the evolution of class-A β-lactamases and the preparation and experimental characterization of their encoded proteins. Despite extensive sequence differences with the modern enzymes (~100 amino acid differences), the proteins resurrected in the laboratory properly fold into the canonical lactamase structure. The encoded proteins from 2-3 billion years (Gyr)-old β-lactamase sequences undergo cooperative two-state thermal denaturation and display very large denaturation temperature enhancements (~35 °C) relative to modern β-lactamases. They degrade different antibiotics in vitro with catalytic efficiencies comparable to that of an average modern enzyme. This enhanced substrate promiscuity is not accompanied by significant changes in the active-site region as seen in static X-ray structures, suggesting a plausible role for dynamics in the evolution of function in these proteins. Laboratory resurrections of 2-3 Gyr-old β-lactamases also endowed modern microorganisms with significant levels of resistance toward a variety of antibiotics, opening up the possibility of performing laboratory replays of the molecular tape of lactamase evolution. Overall, these results support the notions that Precambrian life was thermophilic and that proteins can evolve from substrate-promiscuous generalists into specialists during the course of natural evolution. They also highlight the biotechnological potential of laboratory resurrection of Precambrian proteins, as both high stability and enhanced promiscuity (likely contributors to high evolvability) are advantageous features in protein scaffolds for molecular design and laboratory evolution.

  12. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination. PMID:26244568

  13. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  14. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  15. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Although one of an enzyme's hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. It is known that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. Here we report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  16. Substrate promiscuity of the cyclic dipeptide prenyltransferases from Aspergillus fumigatus ( section sign).

    PubMed

    Zou, Huixi; Zheng, Xiaodong; Li, Shu-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study reports that a series of tryptophan derivatives with modifications on the side chain or at the indole ring were accepted by two cyclic dipeptide prenyltransferases, CdpNPT and FtmPT1, and converted to prenylated derivatives. The structures of the enzymatic products were elucidated by NMR and MS analyses. In comparison to cyclic dipeptides, which were reversely prenylated by CdpNPT at N-1 and in a regular manner by FtmPT1 at C-2, respectively, tryptophan and its simple derivatives were prenylated reversely by both enzymes at N-1. These results demonstrated the substrate promiscuity of both enzymes.

  17. Hyperstability and substrate promiscuity in laboratory resurrections of Precambrian β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Gavira, Jose A; Mejia-Carmona, Diego F; Gaucher, Eric A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2013-02-27

    We report a sequence reconstruction analysis targeting several Precambrian nodes in the evolution of class-A β-lactamases and the preparation and experimental characterization of their encoded proteins. Despite extensive sequence differences with the modern enzymes (~100 amino acid differences), the proteins resurrected in the laboratory properly fold into the canonical lactamase structure. The encoded proteins from 2-3 billion years (Gyr)-old β-lactamase sequences undergo cooperative two-state thermal denaturation and display very large denaturation temperature enhancements (~35 °C) relative to modern β-lactamases. They degrade different antibiotics in vitro with catalytic efficiencies comparable to that of an average modern enzyme. This enhanced substrate promiscuity is not accompanied by significant changes in the active-site region as seen in static X-ray structures, suggesting a plausible role for dynamics in the evolution of function in these proteins. Laboratory resurrections of 2-3 Gyr-old β-lactamases also endowed modern microorganisms with significant levels of resistance toward a variety of antibiotics, opening up the possibility of performing laboratory replays of the molecular tape of lactamase evolution. Overall, these results support the notions that Precambrian life was thermophilic and that proteins can evolve from substrate-promiscuous generalists into specialists during the course of natural evolution. They also highlight the biotechnological potential of laboratory resurrection of Precambrian proteins, as both high stability and enhanced promiscuity (likely contributors to high evolvability) are advantageous features in protein scaffolds for molecular design and laboratory evolution. PMID:23394108

  18. Production of Sactipeptides in Escherichia coli: Probing the Substrate Promiscuity of Subtilosin A Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Himes, Paul M; Allen, Scott E; Hwang, Sungwon; Bowers, Albert A

    2016-06-17

    Sactipeptides are peptide-derived natural products that are processed by remarkable, radical-mediated cysteine sulfur to α-carbon coupling reactions. The resulting sactionine thioether linkages give rise to the unique defined structures and concomitant biological activities of sactipeptides. An E. coli heterologous expression system, based on the biosynthesis of one such sactipeptide, subtilosin A, is described and this expression system is exploited to probe the promiscuity of the subtilosin A sactionine bond-forming enzyme, AlbA. These efforts allowed the facile expression and isolation of a small library of mutant sactipeptides based on the subtilosin A precursor peptide, demonstrating broad substrate promiscuity where none was previously known. Importantly, we show that the positions of the sactionine linkages can be moved, giving rise to new, unnatural sactipeptide structures. E. coli heterologous expression also allowed incorporation of unnatural amino acids into sactipeptides by means of amber-suppression technology, potentially opening up new chemistry and new applications for unnatural sactipeptides. PMID:27019323

  19. Exploiting the Substrate Promiscuity of Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:Shikimate Hydroxycinnamoyl Transferase to Reduce Lignin.

    PubMed

    Eudes, Aymerick; Pereira, Jose H; Yogiswara, Sasha; Wang, George; Teixeira Benites, Veronica; Baidoo, Edward E K; Lee, Taek Soon; Adams, Paul D; Keasling, Jay D; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    Lignin poses a major challenge in the processing of plant biomass for agro-industrial applications. For bioengineering purposes, there is a pressing interest in identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of lignin. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT; EC 2.3.1.133) is a key metabolic entry point for the synthesis of the most important lignin monomers: coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. In this study, we investigated the substrate promiscuity of HCT from a bryophyte (Physcomitrella) and from five representatives of vascular plants (Arabidopsis, poplar, switchgrass, pine and Selaginella) using a yeast expression system. We demonstrate for these HCTs a conserved capacity to acylate with p-coumaroyl-CoA several phenolic compounds in addition to the canonical acceptor shikimate normally used during lignin biosynthesis. Using either recombinant HCT from switchgrass (PvHCT2a) or an Arabidopsis stem protein extract, we show evidence of the inhibitory effect of these phenolics on the synthesis of p-coumaroyl shikimate in vitro, which presumably occurs via a mechanism of competitive inhibition. A structural study of PvHCT2a confirmed the binding of a non-canonical acceptor in a similar manner to shikimate in the active site of the enzyme. Finally, we exploited in Arabidopsis the substrate flexibility of HCT to reduce lignin content and improve biomass saccharification by engineering transgenic lines that overproduce one of the HCT non-canonical acceptors. Our results demonstrate conservation of HCT substrate promiscuity and provide support for a new strategy for lignin reduction in the effort to improve the quality of plant biomass for forage and cellulosic biofuels. PMID:26858288

  20. Exploiting the Substrate Promiscuity of Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:Shikimate Hydroxycinnamoyl Transferase to Reduce Lignin

    PubMed Central

    Eudes, Aymerick; Pereira, Jose H.; Yogiswara, Sasha; Wang, George; Teixeira Benites, Veronica; Baidoo, Edward E.K.; Lee, Taek Soon; Adams, Paul D.; Keasling, Jay D.; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Lignin poses a major challenge in the processing of plant biomass for agro-industrial applications. For bioengineering purposes, there is a pressing interest in identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of lignin. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT; EC 2.3.1.133) is a key metabolic entry point for the synthesis of the most important lignin monomers: coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. In this study, we investigated the substrate promiscuity of HCT from a bryophyte (Physcomitrella) and from five representatives of vascular plants (Arabidopsis, poplar, switchgrass, pine and Selaginella) using a yeast expression system. We demonstrate for these HCTs a conserved capacity to acylate with p-coumaroyl-CoA several phenolic compounds in addition to the canonical acceptor shikimate normally used during lignin biosynthesis. Using either recombinant HCT from switchgrass (PvHCT2a) or an Arabidopsis stem protein extract, we show evidence of the inhibitory effect of these phenolics on the synthesis of p-coumaroyl shikimate in vitro, which presumably occurs via a mechanism of competitive inhibition. A structural study of PvHCT2a confirmed the binding of a non-canonical acceptor in a similar manner to shikimate in the active site of the enzyme. Finally, we exploited in Arabidopsis the substrate flexibility of HCT to reduce lignin content and improve biomass saccharification by engineering transgenic lines that overproduce one of the HCT non-canonical acceptors. Our results demonstrate conservation of HCT substrate promiscuity and provide support for a new strategy for lignin reduction in the effort to improve the quality of plant biomass for forage and cellulosic biofuels. PMID:26858288

  1. Structural basis for promiscuous PAM recognition in type I-E Cascade from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert P; Xiao, Yibei; Ding, Fran; van Erp, Paul B G; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Bailey, Scott; Wiedenheft, Blake; Ke, Ailong

    2016-02-25

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the cas (CRISPR-associated) operon form an RNA-based adaptive immune system against foreign genetic elements in prokaryotes. Type I accounts for 95% of CRISPR systems, and has been used to control gene expression and cell fate. During CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-guided interference, Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defence) facilitates the crRNA-guided invasion of double-stranded DNA for complementary base-pairing with the target DNA strand while displacing the non-target strand, forming an R-loop. Cas3, which has nuclease and helicase activities, is subsequently recruited to degrade two DNA strands. A protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequence flanking target DNA is crucial for self versus foreign discrimination. Here we present the 2.45 Å crystal structure of Escherichia coli Cascade bound to a foreign double-stranded DNA target. The 5'-ATG PAM is recognized in duplex form, from the minor groove side, by three structural features in the Cascade Cse1 subunit. The promiscuity inherent to minor groove DNA recognition rationalizes the observation that a single Cascade complex can respond to several distinct PAM sequences. Optimal PAM recognition coincides with wedge insertion, initiating directional target DNA strand unwinding to allow segmented base-pairing with crRNA. The non-target strand is guided along a parallel path 25 Å apart, and the R-loop structure is further stabilized by locking this strand behind the Cse2 dimer. These observations provide the structural basis for understanding the PAM-dependent directional R-loop formation process. PMID:26863189

  2. Structural basis for promiscuous PAM recognition in type I-E Cascade from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert P; Xiao, Yibei; Ding, Fran; van Erp, Paul B G; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Bailey, Scott; Wiedenheft, Blake; Ke, Ailong

    2016-02-25

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and the cas (CRISPR-associated) operon form an RNA-based adaptive immune system against foreign genetic elements in prokaryotes. Type I accounts for 95% of CRISPR systems, and has been used to control gene expression and cell fate. During CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-guided interference, Cascade (CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defence) facilitates the crRNA-guided invasion of double-stranded DNA for complementary base-pairing with the target DNA strand while displacing the non-target strand, forming an R-loop. Cas3, which has nuclease and helicase activities, is subsequently recruited to degrade two DNA strands. A protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequence flanking target DNA is crucial for self versus foreign discrimination. Here we present the 2.45 Å crystal structure of Escherichia coli Cascade bound to a foreign double-stranded DNA target. The 5'-ATG PAM is recognized in duplex form, from the minor groove side, by three structural features in the Cascade Cse1 subunit. The promiscuity inherent to minor groove DNA recognition rationalizes the observation that a single Cascade complex can respond to several distinct PAM sequences. Optimal PAM recognition coincides with wedge insertion, initiating directional target DNA strand unwinding to allow segmented base-pairing with crRNA. The non-target strand is guided along a parallel path 25 Å apart, and the R-loop structure is further stabilized by locking this strand behind the Cse2 dimer. These observations provide the structural basis for understanding the PAM-dependent directional R-loop formation process.

  3. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete.

  4. Multi-substrate-activity space and quasi-species in enzyme evolution: Ohno's dilemma, promiscuity and functional orthogonality.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Runarsdottir, Arna; Kurtovic, Sanela

    2009-08-01

    A functional enzyme displays activity with at least one substrate and can be represented by a vector in substrate-activity space. Many enzymes, including GSTs (glutathione transferases), are promiscuous in the sense that they act on alternative substrates, and the corresponding vectors operate in multidimensional space. The direction of the vector is governed by the relative activities of the diverse substrates. Stochastic mutations of already existing enzymes generate populations of variants, and clusters of functionally similar mutants can serve as parents for subsequent generations of enzymes. The proper evolving unit is a functional quasi-species, which may not be identical with the 'best' variant in its generation. The manifestation of the quasi-species is dependent on the substrate matrix used to explore catalytic activities. Multivariate analysis is an approach to identifying quasi-species and to investigate evolutionary trajectories in the directed evolution of enzymes for novel functions.

  5. A Novel Semi-biosynthetic Route for Artemisinin Production Using Engineered Substrate-Promiscuous P450BM3

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Jeffrey; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Fisher, Karl; Woolard, Frank; Ockey, Denise; McPhee, Derek; Renninger, Neil; Chang, Michelle; Baker, David; Keasling, Jay

    2009-11-30

    Production of fine heterologus pathways in microbial hosts is frequently hindered by insufficient knowledge of the native metabolic pathway and its cognate enzymes; often the pathway is unresolved and enzymes lack detailed characterization. An alternative paradigm to using native pathways is de novo pathway design using well-characterized, substrate-promiscuous enzymes. We demonstrate this concept using P450BM3 from Bacillus megaterium. Using a computer model, we illustrate how key P450BM3 activ site mutations enable binding of non-native substrate amorphadiene, incorporating these mutations into P450BM3 enabled the selective oxidation of amorphadiene arteminsinic-11s,12-epoxide, at titers of 250 mg L"1 in E. coli. We also demonstrate high-yeilding, selective transformations to dihydroartemisinic acid, the immediate precursor to the high value anti-malarial drug artemisinin.

  6. Promiscuous presentation and recognition of nucleosomal autoepitopes in lupus: role of autoimmune T cell receptor alpha chain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Kaliyaperumal, A; Lu, L; Southwood, S; Sette, A; Michaels, M A; Datta, S K

    1998-02-01

    T cells specific for nucleosomal autoepitopes are selectively expanded in lupus mice and these Th cells drive autoimmune B cells to produce pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. We transfected the TCR-alpha and -beta chain genes of a representative, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing Th clone specific for the nucleosomal core histone peptide H471-94 into TCR-negative recipient cells. Although the autoimmune TCRs were originally derived from SNF1 (I-Ad/q) mice, the transfectants could recognize the nucleosomal autoepitope presented by APC-bearing I-A molecules of all haplotypes tested, as well as human DR molecules. Competition assays indicated that the autoepitopes bound to the MHC class II groove. Most remarkably, MHC-unrestricted recognition of the nucleosomal peptide epitope was conferred by the lupus TCR-alpha chain even when it paired with a TCR-beta chain of irrelevant specificity. Several other disease-relevant Th clones and splenic T cells of lupus mice had similar properties. The TCR-alpha chains of these murine lupus Th clones shared related motifs and charged residues in their CDRs, and similar motifs were apparent even in TCR-alpha chains of human lupus Th clones. The lupus TCR-alpha chains probably contact the nucleosomal peptide complexed with MHC with relatively high affinity/avidity to sustain TCR signaling, because CD4 coreceptor was not required for promiscuous recognition. Indeed, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing, CD4-negative, TCR-alphabeta+ Th cells are expanded in systemic lupus erythematosus. These results have implications regarding thymic selection and peripheral expansion of nucleosome-specific T cells in lupus. They also suggest that universally tolerogenic epitopes could be designed for therapy of lupus patients with diverse HLA alleles. We propose to designate nucleosomes and other antigens bearing universal epitopes "Pantigens" (for promiscuous antigens).

  7. The substrate promiscuity of a phosphopantetheinyl transferase SchPPT for coenzyme A derivatives and acyl carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Yue; Luo, Hong-Dou; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Lin, Tao; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2016-03-01

    Phosphopantetheinyl transferases (PPTases) catalyze the posttranslational modification of acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) in fatty acid synthases (FASs), ACPs in polyketide synthases, and peptidyl carrier proteins (PCPs) in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in all organisms. Some bacterial PPTases have broad substrate specificities for ACPs/PCPs and/or coenzyme A (CoA)/CoA analogs, facilitating their application in metabolite production in hosts and/or labeling of ACPs/PCPs, respectively. Here, a group II PPTase SchPPT from Streptomyces chattanoogensis L10 was characterized to accept a heterologous ACP and acetyl-CoA. Thus, SchPPT is a promiscuous PPTase and may be used on polyketide production in heterologous bacterial host and labeling of ACPs.

  8. Dynamics Govern Specificity of a Protein-Protein Interface: Substrate Recognition by Thrombin.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Huber, Roland G; Waldner, Birgit J; Kahler, Ursula; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition is crucial in cellular signal transduction. Signaling is mediated through molecular interactions at protein-protein interfaces. Still, specificity and promiscuity of protein-protein interfaces cannot be explained using simplistic static binding models. Our study rationalizes specificity of the prototypic protein-protein interface between thrombin and its peptide substrates relying solely on binding site dynamics derived from molecular dynamics simulations. We find conformational selection and thus dynamic contributions to be a key player in biomolecular recognition. Arising entropic contributions complement chemical intuition primarily reflecting enthalpic interaction patterns. The paradigm "dynamics govern specificity" might provide direct guidance for the identification of specific anchor points in biomolecular recognition processes and structure-based drug design. PMID:26496636

  9. Exosites determine macromolecular substrate recognition by prothrombinase.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, S; Betz, A

    1997-10-01

    The prothrombinase complex, composed of factor Xa and factor Va assembled on a membrane surface, catalyzes the proteolytic formation of thrombin during blood coagulation. The molecular basis for the macromolecular substrate specificity of prothrombinase is poorly understood. By kinetic studies of prethrombin 2 cleavage by prothrombinase in the presence or absence of fragment 1.2, we show that occupation of the active site of the catalyst by inhibitors or alternate peptidyl substrates does not alter the affinity for prethrombin 2. Productive recognition of the macromolecular substrate therefore results from an initial interaction at enzymic sites (exosites) distinct from the active site, which largely determines substrate affinity. This interaction at exosites is evident even in the absence of activation peptide domains responsible for mediating the binding of the substrate to membranes or factor Va. Interactions at the active site with structures surrounding the scissile bond then precede bond cleavage and product release. The second binding step, which appears unfavorable, does not affect substrate affinity but contributes to the maximum catalytic rate. Therefore, binding specificity of prothrombinase for the macromolecular substrate is determined by exosites on the enzyme. We show that competitive inhibition of prethrombin 2 cleavage can be accomplished by interfering with the exosite binding step without obscuring the active site of the enzyme. These findings suggest limitations to the common approach of inferring the basis of factor Xa specificity with active site mutants or the targeting the active site of factor Xa with reversible inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. The achievement of distinctive macromolecular substrate specificities through exosite interactions and modulation of maximum catalytic rate through binding steps may also underlie the reactions catalyzed by the other coagulation complexes containing trypsin-like enzymes. PMID:9315846

  10. Metal promiscuity and metal-dependent substrate preferences of Trypanosoma brucei methionine aminopeptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Marschner, Aline; Klein, Christian D

    2015-08-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases play a major role in posttranslational protein processing and are therefore promising targets for the discovery of novel therapeutical agents. We here describe the heterologous expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant Trypanosoma brucei methionine aminopeptidase, type 1 (TbMetAP1). We investigated the dependency of TbMetAP1 activity on pH and metal cofactor (type and concentration) using in particular the substrates Met-Gly-Met-Met and Met-AMC along with related compounds, and determined kinetic values (Km, vmax, kcat). The optimal pH for TbMetAP1 activity is between 7.0 and 8.0. Surprisingly, the two substrates have different cofactor requirements: Both substrates are processed by the cobalt-activated TbMetAP1, but only the Met-Gly-Met-Met substrate is processed with nearly identical catalytical properties by the zinc-activated enzyme. Depending on the substrate, various other metal ions (iron(II), manganese, nickel) were also accepted as cofactors. Two aspects of this work are relevant for the biochemistry of MetAPs and further drug discovery efforts: 1. Zinc, and not cobalt ions are probably the physiological cofactor of TbMetAP1 and possibly other MetAPs. 2. In MetAP assays for compound screening, the combination of the Met-AMC substrate with cobalt, manganese or iron ions may not represent the physiological reality, thereby leading to results that can not be extrapolated towards a phenotypic effect.

  11. Functional Characterization and Substrate Promiscuity of UGT71 Glycosyltransferases from Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Song, Chuankui; Gu, Le; Liu, Jingyi; Zhao, Shuai; Hong, Xiaotong; Schulenburg, Katja; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-12-01

    Glycosylation determines the complexity and diversity of plant natural products. To characterize fruit ripening-related UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs) functionally in strawberry, we mined the publicly available Fragaria vesca genome sequence and found 199 putative UGT genes. Candidate UGTs whose expression levels were strongly up-regulated during fruit ripening were cloned from F.×ananassa and six were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. UGT75T1 showed very strict substrate specificity and glucosylated only galangin out of 33 compounds. The other recombinant enzymes exhibited broad substrate tolerance, accepting numerous flavonoids, hydroxycoumarins, naphthols and the plant hormone, (+)-S-abscisic acid (ABA). UGT71W2 showed the highest activity towards 1-naphthol, while UGT71A33, UGT71A34a/b and UGT71A35 preferred 3-hydroxycoumarin and formed 3- and 7-O-glucosides as well as a diglucoside from flavonols. Screening of a strawberry physiological aglycone library identified kaempferol, quercetin, ABA and three unknown natural compounds as putative in planta substrates of UGT71A33, UGT71A34a and UGT71W2. Metabolite analyses of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silenced fruits demonstrated that UGT71W2 contributes to the glycosylation of flavonols, xenobiotics and, to a minor extent, of ABA, in planta. The study showed that both specialist and generalist UGTs were expressed during strawberry fruit ripening and the latter were probably not restricted to only one function in plants. PMID:26454881

  12. Functional Characterization and Substrate Promiscuity of UGT71 Glycosyltransferases from Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa).

    PubMed

    Song, Chuankui; Gu, Le; Liu, Jingyi; Zhao, Shuai; Hong, Xiaotong; Schulenburg, Katja; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-12-01

    Glycosylation determines the complexity and diversity of plant natural products. To characterize fruit ripening-related UDP-dependent glycosyltransferases (UGTs) functionally in strawberry, we mined the publicly available Fragaria vesca genome sequence and found 199 putative UGT genes. Candidate UGTs whose expression levels were strongly up-regulated during fruit ripening were cloned from F.×ananassa and six were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and biochemically characterized. UGT75T1 showed very strict substrate specificity and glucosylated only galangin out of 33 compounds. The other recombinant enzymes exhibited broad substrate tolerance, accepting numerous flavonoids, hydroxycoumarins, naphthols and the plant hormone, (+)-S-abscisic acid (ABA). UGT71W2 showed the highest activity towards 1-naphthol, while UGT71A33, UGT71A34a/b and UGT71A35 preferred 3-hydroxycoumarin and formed 3- and 7-O-glucosides as well as a diglucoside from flavonols. Screening of a strawberry physiological aglycone library identified kaempferol, quercetin, ABA and three unknown natural compounds as putative in planta substrates of UGT71A33, UGT71A34a and UGT71W2. Metabolite analyses of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silenced fruits demonstrated that UGT71W2 contributes to the glycosylation of flavonols, xenobiotics and, to a minor extent, of ABA, in planta. The study showed that both specialist and generalist UGTs were expressed during strawberry fruit ripening and the latter were probably not restricted to only one function in plants.

  13. Substrate promiscuity of secondary metabolite enzymes: prenylation of hydroxynaphthalenes by fungal indole prenyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia; Xie, Xiulan; Li, Shu-Ming

    2011-11-01

    Fungal prenyltransferases of the dimethylallyltryptophan synthase (DMATS) superfamily share no sequence, but structure similarity with the prenyltransferases of the CloQ/NphB group. The members of the DMATS superfamily have been reported to catalyze different prenylations of diverse indole or tyrosine derivatives, while some members of the CloQ/NphB group used hydroxynaphthalenes as prenylation substrates. In this study, we report for the first time the prenylation of hydroxynaphthalenes by the members of the DMATS superfamily. Three tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptide prenyltransferases (AnaPT, CdpNPT and CdpC3PT), one tryptophan C7-prenyltransferase and one tyrosine O-prenyltransferase (SirD) were incubated with naphthalene and 11 derivatives. The enzyme activity and preference of the tested prenyltransferases towards hydroxynaphthalenes differed clearly from each other. For an accepted substrate, however, different enzymes produced usually the same major prenylation product, i.e. with a regular C-prenyl moiety at para- or ortho-position to a hydroxyl group. Regularly, O-prenylated and diprenylated derivatives were also identified as enzyme products of substrates with low conversion rates and regioselectivity. This was unequivocally proven by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. The K (M) values and turnover numbers (k (cat)) of the enzymes towards selected hydroxynaphthalenes were determined to be in the range of 0.064-2.8 mM and 0.038-1.30 s(-1), respectively. These data are comparable to those obtained using indole derivatives. The results presented in this study expanded the potential usage of the members of the DMATS superfamily for production of prenylated derivatives including hydroxynaphthalenes.

  14. Extreme Substrate Promiscuity of the Neisseria Oligosaccharyl Transferase Involved in Protein O-Glycosylation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Faridmoayer, Amirreza; Fentabil, Messele A.; Haurat, M. Florencia; Yi, Wen; Woodward, Robert; Wang, Peng George; Feldman, Mario F.

    2008-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis PglL belongs to a novel family of bacterial oligosaccharyltransferases (OTases) responsible for O-glycosylation of type IV pilins. Although members of this family are widespread among pathogenic bacteria, there is little known about their mechanism. Understanding the O-glycosylation process may uncover potential targets for therapeutic intervention, and can open new avenues for the exploitation of these pathways for biotechnological purposes. In this work, we demonstrate that PglL is able to transfer virtually any glycan from the undecaprenyl pyrophosphate (UndPP) carrier to pilin in engineered Escherichia coli and Salmonella cells. Surprisingly, PglL was also able to interfere with the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery and transfer peptidoglycan subunits to pilin. This represents a previously unknown post-translational modification in bacteria. Given the wide range of glycans transferred by PglL, we reasoned that substrate specificity of PglL lies in the lipid carrier. To test this hypothesis we developed an in vitro glycosylation system that employed purified PglL, pilin, and the lipid farnesyl pyrophosphate (FarPP) carrying a pentasaccharide that had been synthesized by successive chemical and enzymatic steps. Although FarPP has different stereochemistry and a significantly shorter aliphatic chain than the natural lipid substrate, the pentasaccharide was still transferred to pilin in our system. We propose that the primary roles of the lipid carrier during O-glycosylation are the translocation of the glycan into the periplasm, and the positioning of the pyrophosphate linker and glycan adjacent to PglL. The unique characteristics of PglL make this enzyme a promising tool for glycoengineering novel glycan-based vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:18930921

  15. Promiscuous glycan site recognition by antibodies to the high-mannose patch of gp120 broadens neutralization of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sok, Devin; Doores, Katie J.; Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa M.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Ramos, Alejandra; Kulp, Daniel W.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Menis, Sergey; Wickramasinghe, Lalinda; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) that target the high-mannose patch centered around the glycan at position 332 on HIV Env are promising vaccine leads and therapeutic candidates as they effectively protect against mucosal SHIV challenge and strongly suppress SHIV viraemia in established infection in macaque models. However, these antibodies demonstrate varying degrees of dependency on the N332 glycan site and the origins of their neutralization breadth are not always obvious. By measuring neutralization on an extended range of glycan site viral variants, we found that some bnMAbs can utilize alternate N-linked glycans in the absence of the N332 glycan site and therefore neutralize a substantial number of viruses lacking the site. Furthermore, many of the antibodies can neutralize viruses in which the N332 glycan site is shifted to the 334 position. Finally, we found that a combination of three antibody families that target the high-mannose patch can lead to 99% neutralization coverage of a large panel of viruses containing the N332/334 glycan site and up to 66% coverage for viruses that lack the N332/334 glycan site. The results indicate that a diverse response against the high-mannose patch may provide near equivalent coverage as a combination of bnMAbs targeting multiple epitopes. Additionally, the ability of some bnMAbs to utilize other N-linked glycan sites can help counter neutralization escape mediated by shifting of glycosylation sites. Overall, this work highlights the importance of promiscuous glycan binding properties in bnMAbs to the high-mannose patch for optimal anti-viral activity either in protective or therapeutic modalities. PMID:24828077

  16. Promiscuous glycan site recognition by antibodies to the high-mannose patch of gp120 broadens neutralization of HIV.

    PubMed

    Sok, Devin; Doores, Katie J; Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa M; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Ramos, Alejandra; Kulp, Daniel W; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Menis, Sergey; Wickramasinghe, Lalinda; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R

    2014-05-14

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnmAbs) that target the high-mannose patch centered around the glycan at position 332 on HIV Env are promising vaccine leads and therapeutic candidates because they effectively protect against mucosal SHIV challenge and strongly suppress SHIV viremia in established infection in macaque models. However, these antibodies demonstrate varying degrees of dependency on the N332 glycan site, and the origins of their neutralization breadth are not always obvious. By measuring neutralization on an extended range of glycan site viral variants, we found that some bnmAbs can use alternate N-linked glycans in the absence of the N332 glycan site and therefore neutralize a substantial number of viruses lacking the site. Furthermore, many of the antibodies can neutralize viruses in which the N332 glycan site is shifted to the 334 position. Finally, we found that a combination of three antibody families that target the high-mannose patch can lead to 99% neutralization coverage of a large panel of viruses containing the N332/N334 glycan site and up to 66% coverage for viruses that lack the N332/N334 glycan site. The results indicate that a diverse response against the high-mannose patch may provide near-equivalent coverage as a combination of bnmAbs targeting multiple epitopes. Additionally, the ability of some bnmAbs to use other N-linked glycan sites can help counter neutralization escape mediated by shifting of glycosylation sites. Overall, this work highlights the importance of promiscuous glycan binding properties in bnmAbs to the high-mannose patch for optimal antiviral activity in either protective or therapeutic modalities.

  17. Catalytic vs. Inhibitory Promiscuity in Cytochrome P450s: Implications for Evolution of New Function

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Robert S.; Honaker, Mathew; Nath, Abhinav; Pearson, Josh T.; Buttrick, Brian; Isoherranen, Nina; Atkins, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Catalytically promiscuous enzymes are intermediates in the evolution of new function from an existing pool of protein scaffolds. However, promiscuity will only confer an evolutionary advantage if other useful properties are not compromised, or if there is no ‘negative trade-off’ induced by the mutations that yield promiscuity. Therefore, identification and characterization of negative trade-offs incurred during the emergence of promiscuity is required to further develop the evolutionary models and to optimize in vitro evolution. One potential negative trade-off of catalytic promiscuity is increased susceptibility to inhibition, or inhibitory promiscuity. Here we exploit Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) as a model protein scaffold that spans a vast range of catalytic promiscuity, and apply a quantitative index to determine the relationship between promiscuity of catalysis and promiscuity of inhibition for a series of homologs. The aim of these studies is to begin to identify properties that, in general, correlate with catalytic promiscuity, hypothetically such as inhibitory promiscuity. Interestingly, the data indicate that the potential negative trade-off of inhibitory promiscuity is nearly insignificant because even highly substrate specific CYPs have high inhibitory promiscuity, with little incremental increase in susceptibility to inhibitory interactions as the substrate promiscuity increases across the series of enzymes. In the context of evolution, inhibitory promiscuity is not an obligate negative trade-off of catalytic promiscuity. PMID:21370922

  18. An evolutionary biochemist's perspective on promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Copley, Shelley D

    2015-02-01

    Evolutionary biochemists define enzyme promiscuity as the ability to catalyze secondary reactions that are physiologically irrelevant, either because they are too inefficient to affect fitness or because the enzyme never encounters the substrate. Promiscuous activities are common because evolution of a perfectly specific active site is both difficult and unnecessary; natural selection ceases when the performance of a protein is 'good enough' that it no longer affects fitness. Although promiscuous functions are accidental and physiologically irrelevant, they are of great importance because they provide opportunities for the evolution of new functions in nature and in the laboratory, as well as targets for therapeutic drugs and tools for a wide range of technological applications.

  19. Characterization of a sugar-O-methyltransferase TiaS5 affords new Tiacumicin analogues with improved antibacterial properties and reveals substrate promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Niu, Siwen; Hu, Tao; Li, Sumei; Xiao, Yi; Ma, Liang; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhang, Haibo; Yang, Xiaohong; Ju, Jianhua; Zhang, Changsheng

    2011-07-25

    The 18-membered macrocyclic glycoside tiacumicin B, an RNA polymerase inhibitor, is of great therapeutic significance in treating Clostridium difficile infections. The recent characterization of the tiacumicin B biosynthetic gene cluster from Dactylosporangium aurantiacum subsp. hamdenensis NRRL 18085 revealed the functions of two glycosyltransferases, a C-methyltransferase, an acyltransferase, two cytochrome P450s, and a tailoring dihalogenase in tiacumicin biosynthesis. Here we report the genetic confirmation and biochemical characterization of TiaS5 as a sugar-O-methyltransferase, requisite for tiacumicin B biosynthesis. The tiaS5-inactivation mutant is capable of producing 14 tiacumicin analogues (11 of which are new), all lacking the 2'-O-methyl group on the internal rhamnose moiety. Notably, two tiacumicin analogues exhibit improved antibacterial properties. We have also biochemically verified TiaS5 as an S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferase, requiring divalent metal ions for activity. Substrate probing revealed TiaS5 to be a promiscuous enzyme, recognizing 12 tiacumicin analogues. These findings unequivocally establish that TiaS5 functions as a 2'-O-methyltransferase and provide direct biochemical evidence that TiaS5-catalyzed methylation is a tailoring step after glycosyl coupling in tiacumicin B biosynthesis.

  20. Characterization of cyclo-Acetoacetyl-L-Tryptophan Dimethylallyltransferase in Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis: Substrate Promiscuity and Site Directed Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2009-01-01

    The fungal neurotoxin α-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase with a unique pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold is assembled by a three enzyme pathway CpaS, CpaD and CpaO in Aspergillus sp. We recently characterized the first pathway-specific enzyme CpaS, a hybrid two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that generates cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp). Here we report the characterization of the second pathway-specific enzyme CpaD that regiospecifically dimethylallylates cAATrp to form β-cyclopiazonic acid. By exploring the tryptophan and tetramate moieties of cAATrp, we demonstrate that CpaD discriminates against free Trp but accepts tryptophan-containing thiohydantoins, diketopiperazines and linear peptides as substrates for C4-prenylation and also acts as regiospecific O-dimethylallyltransferase (DMAT) on a tyrosine-derived tetramic acid. Comparative evaluation of CpaDs from A. oryzae RIB40 and A. flavus NRRL3357 indicated the importance of the N-terminal region for its activity. Sequence alignment of CpaD with eleven homologous fungal Trp-DMATs revealed five regions of conservation suggesting the presense of critical motifs that could be diagonostic for discovering additional Trp-DMATs. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis studies identified five polar/charged residues and five tyrosine residues within these motifs that are critical for CpaD activity. This motif characerization will enable a gene probe-based approach to discover additional biosynthetic Trp-DMATs. PMID:19877600

  1. Substrate recognition by ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S K; Sato, S; Lazinski, D W

    2001-01-01

    RNA editing catalyzed by ADAR1 and ADAR2 involves the site-specific conversion of adenosine to inosine within imperfectly duplexed RNA. ADAR1- and ADAR2-mediated editing occurs within transcripts of glutamate receptors (GluR) in the brain and in hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA in the liver. Although the Q/R site within the GluR-B premessage is edited more efficiently by ADAR2 than it is by ADAR1, the converse is true for the +60 site within this same transcript. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are homologs having two common functional regions, an N-terminal double-stranded RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal deaminase domain. It is neither understood why only certain adenosines within a substrate molecule serve as targets for ADARs, nor is it known which domain of an ADAR confers its specificity for particular editing sites. To assess the importance of several aspects of RNA sequence and structure on editing, we evaluated 20 different mutated substrates, derived from four editing sites, for their ability to be edited by either ADAR1 or ADAR2. We found that when these derivatives contained an A:C mismatch at the editing site, editing by both ADARs was enhanced compared to when A:A or A:G mismatches or A:U base pairs occurred at the same site. Hence substrate recognition and/or catalysis by ADARs could involve the base that opposes the edited adenosine. In addition, by using protein chimeras in which the deaminase domains were exchanged between ADAR1 and ADAR2, we found that this domain played a dominant role in defining the substrate specificity of the resulting enzyme. PMID:11421361

  2. Structural characterization of human heparanase reveals insights into substrate recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Viola, Cristina M.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2016-01-01

    Heparan Sulfate (HS) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) which forms a key component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Breakdown of HS is carried out by heparanase (HPSE), an endo-β-glucuronidase of the glycoside hydrolase (GH)79 family. Overexpression of HPSE is strongly linked to cancer metastases - reflecting breakdown of extracellular HS and release of stored growth factors. Here we present crystal structures of human HPSE at 1.6-1.9 Å resolution reveal how an endo-acting binding cleft is exposed by proteolytic activation of latent proHPSE. Oligosaccharide complexes map the substrate-binding and sulfate recognition motifs. These data shed light on the structure and interactions for a key enzyme involved in ECM maintenance, and provide a starting point for design of HPSE inhibitors as biochemical tools and anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26575439

  3. Neural Substrates of Auditory Emotion Recognition Deficits in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hoptman, Matthew J.; Leitman, David I.; Moreno-Ortega, Marta; Lehrfeld, Jonathan M.; Dias, Elisa; Sehatpour, Pejman; Laukka, Petri; Silipo, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in auditory emotion recognition (AER) are a core feature of schizophrenia and a key component of social cognitive impairment. AER deficits are tied behaviorally to impaired ability to interpret tonal (“prosodic”) features of speech that normally convey emotion, such as modulations in base pitch (F0M) and pitch variability (F0SD). These modulations can be recreated using synthetic frequency modulated (FM) tones that mimic the prosodic contours of specific emotional stimuli. The present study investigates neural mechanisms underlying impaired AER using a combined event-related potential/resting-state functional connectivity (rsfMRI) approach in 84 schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder patients and 66 healthy comparison subjects. Mismatch negativity (MMN) to FM tones was assessed in 43 patients/36 controls. rsfMRI between auditory cortex and medial temporal (insula) regions was assessed in 55 patients/51 controls. The relationship between AER, MMN to FM tones, and rsfMRI was assessed in the subset who performed all assessments (14 patients, 21 controls). As predicted, patients showed robust reductions in MMN across FM stimulus type (p = 0.005), particularly to modulations in F0M, along with impairments in AER and FM tone discrimination. MMN source analysis indicated dipoles in both auditory cortex and anterior insula, whereas rsfMRI analyses showed reduced auditory-insula connectivity. MMN to FM tones and functional connectivity together accounted for ∼50% of the variance in AER performance across individuals. These findings demonstrate that impaired preattentive processing of tonal information and reduced auditory-insula connectivity are critical determinants of social cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, and thus represent key targets for future research and clinical intervention. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Schizophrenia patients show deficits in the ability to infer emotion based upon tone of voice [auditory emotion recognition (AER)] that drive

  4. Enzyme promiscuity: engine of evolutionary innovation.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Chetanya; Farelli, Jeremiah D; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Allen, Karen N

    2014-10-31

    Catalytic promiscuity and substrate ambiguity are keys to evolvability, which in turn is pivotal to the successful acquisition of novel biological functions. Action on multiple substrates (substrate ambiguity) can be harnessed for performance of functions in the cell that supersede catalysis of a single metabolite. These functions include proofreading, scavenging of nutrients, removal of antimetabolites, balancing of metabolite pools, and establishing system redundancy. In this review, we present examples of enzymes that perform these cellular roles by leveraging substrate ambiguity and then present the structural features that support both specificity and ambiguity. We focus on the phosphatases of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily and the thioesterases of the hotdog fold superfamily.

  5. Monitoring drug promiscuity over time

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Drug promiscuity and polypharmacology are much discussed topics in pharmaceutical research. Experimentally, promiscuity can be studied by profiling of compounds on arrays of targets. Computationally, promiscuity rates can be estimated by mining of compound activity data. In this study, we have assessed drug promiscuity over time by systematically collecting activity records for approved drugs. For 518 diverse drugs, promiscuity rates were determined over different time intervals. Significant differences between the number of reported drug targets and the promiscuity rates derived from activity records were frequently observed. On the basis of high-confidence activity data, an increase in average promiscuity rates from 1.5 to 3.2 targets per drug was detected between 2000 and 2014. These promiscuity rates are lower than often assumed. When the stringency of data selection criteria was reduced in subsequent steps, non-realistic increases in promiscuity rates from ~6 targets per drug in 2000 to more than 28 targets were obtained. Hence, estimates of drug promiscuity significantly differ depending on the stringency with which target annotations and activity data are considered. PMID:25352982

  6. Monitoring drug promiscuity over time.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Drug promiscuity and polypharmacology are much discussed topics in pharmaceutical research. Experimentally, promiscuity can be studied by profiling of compounds on arrays of targets. Computationally, promiscuity rates can be estimated by mining of compound activity data. In this study, we have assessed drug promiscuity over time by systematically collecting activity records for approved drugs. For 518 diverse drugs, promiscuity rates were determined over different time intervals. Significant differences between the number of reported drug targets and the promiscuity rates derived from activity records were frequently observed. On the basis of high-confidence activity data, an increase in average promiscuity rates from 1.5 to 3.2 targets per drug was detected between 2000 and 2014. These promiscuity rates are lower than often assumed. When the stringency of data selection criteria was reduced in subsequent steps, non-realistic increases in promiscuity rates from ~6 targets per drug in 2000 to more than 28 targets were obtained. Hence, estimates of drug promiscuity significantly differ depending on the stringency with which target annotations and activity data are considered.

  7. Inbreeding promotes female promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Michalczyk, Łukasz; Millard, Anna L; Martin, Oliver Y; Lumley, Alyson J; Emerson, Brent C; Chapman, Tracey; Gage, Matthew J G

    2011-09-23

    The widespread phenomenon of polyandry (mating by females with multiple males) is an evolutionary puzzle, because females can sustain costs from promiscuity, whereas full fertility can be provided by a single male. Using the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, we identify major fitness benefits of polyandry to females under inbreeding, when the risks of fertilization by incompatible male haplotypes are especially high. Fifteen generations after inbred populations had passed through genetic bottlenecks, we recorded increased levels of female promiscuity compared with noninbred controls, most likely due to selection from prospective fitness gains through polyandry. These data illustrate how this common mating pattern can evolve if population genetic bottlenecks increase the risks of fitness depression due to fertilization by sperm carrying genetically incompatible haplotypes.

  8. Substrate recognition by β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases.

    PubMed

    Borgaro, Janine G; Chang, Andrew; Machutta, Carl A; Zhang, Xujie; Tonge, Peter J

    2011-12-13

    β-Ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) enzymes catalyze Claisen condensation reactions in the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. These reactions follow a ping-pong mechanism in which a donor substrate acylates the active site cysteine residue after which the acyl group is condensed with the malonyl-ACP acceptor substrate to form a β-ketoacyl-ACP. In the priming KASIII enzymes the donor substrate is an acyl-CoA while in the elongating KASI and KASII enzymes the donor is an acyl-ACP. Although the KASIII enzyme in Escherichia coli (ecFabH) is essential, the corresponding enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtFabH) is not, suggesting that the KASI or II enzyme in M. tuberculosis (KasA or KasB, respectively) must be able to accept a CoA donor substrate. Since KasA is essential, the substrate specificity of this KASI enzyme has been explored using substrates based on phosphopantetheine, CoA, ACP, and AcpM peptide mimics. This analysis has been extended to the KASI and KASII enzymes from E. coli (ecFabB and ecFabF) where we show that a 14-residue malonyl-phosphopantetheine peptide can efficiently replace malonyl-ecACP as the acceptor substrate in the ecFabF reaction. While ecFabF is able to catalyze the condensation reaction when CoA is the carrier for both substrates, the KASI enzymes ecFabB and KasA have an absolute requirement for an ACP substrate as the acyl donor. Provided that this requirement is met, variation in the acceptor carrier substrate has little impact on the k(cat)/K(m) for the KASI reaction. For the KASI enzymes we propose that the binding of ecACP (AcpM) results in a conformational change that leads to an open form of the enzyme to which the malonyl acceptor substrate binds. Finally, the substrate inhibition observed when palmitoyl-CoA is the donor substrate for the KasA reaction has implications for the importance of mtFabH in the mycobacterial FASII pathway. PMID:22017312

  9. Fractionating the Neural Substrates of Incidental Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ciara M.; Vidaki, Kleio; Soto, David

    2015-01-01

    Familiar stimuli are typically accompanied by decreases in neural response relative to the presentation of novel items, but these studies often include explicit instructions to discriminate old and new items; this creates difficulties in partialling out the contribution of top-down intentional orientation to the items based on recognition goals.…

  10. Neural Substrates for Episodic Encoding and Recognition of Unfamiliar Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Alex; Siedentopf, Christian M.; Ischebeck, Anja; Rettenbacher, Maria A.; Verius, Michael; Golaszewski, Stefan M.; Felber, Stephan; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Functional MRI was used to investigate brain activation in healthy volunteers during encoding of unfamiliar faces as well as during correct recognition of newly learned faces (CR) compared to correct identification of distractor faces (CF), missed alarms (not recognizing previously presented faces, MA), and false alarms (incorrectly recognizing…

  11. Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by the Cofactor-Independent Dioxygenase DpgC+

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding,E.; Widboom, P.; Bruner, S.

    2007-01-01

    The enzyme DpgC belongs to a small class of oxygenases not dependent on accessory cofactors for activity. DpgC is in the biosynthetic pathway for the nonproteinogenic amino acid 3, 5-dihydroxyphenylglycine in actinomycetes bacteria responsible for the production of the vancomycin/teicoplanin family of antibiotic natural products. The X-ray structure of DpgC confirmed the absence of cofactors and defined a novel hydrophobic dioxygen binding pocket adjacent to a bound substrate analogue. In this paper, the role specific amino acids play in substrate recognition and catalysis is examined through biochemical and structural characterization of site-specific enzyme mutations and alternate substrates. The results establish the importance of three amino acids, Arg254, Glu299, and Glu189, in the chemistry of DpgC. Arg254 and Glu189 join to form a specific contact with one of the phenolic hydroxyls of the substrate, and this interaction plays a key role in both substrate recognition and catalysis. The X-ray crystal structure of Arg254Lys was determined to address the role this residue plays in the chemistry. In addition, characterization of alternate substrate analogues demonstrates the presence and position of phenol groups are necessary for both enzyme recognition and downstream oxidation chemistry. Overall, this work defines the mechanism of substrate recognition and specificity by the cofactor-independent dioxygenase DpgC.

  12. Substrate Recognition of Histone H2B by DUBm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Berndsen, Christopher; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2011-03-01

    The SAGA complex is a transcriptional coactivator that regulates gene expression in eukaryotes via histone acetylation and deubiquitination, which are crucial for transcription. Our lab is investigating the SAGA-dependent deubiquitination of histone H2B. The deubiquitinating module (DUBm) of SAGA is comprised of a ubiquitin-specific protease, Ubp8, and three other proteins. It is known that Ubp8 cleaves ubiquitin from histone H2B, however, the specific way in which the enzyme binds to the substrate remains elusive. In order to unravel this mechanism, we attempted to determine the crystal structure of the substrate binding complex. We obtained this substrate by exploiting the techniques of intein chemistry to artificially ubiquitinate a histone H2B peptide, which we then co-crystallized with DUBm. Additionally, we synthesized Ub-K63R-linked chains and Ub-K48-linked chains and co-crystallized them with DUBm.

  13. Cation–π Interactions Contribute to Substrate Recognition in γ‐Butyrobetaine Hydroxylase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kamps, Jos J. A. G.; Khan, Amjad; Choi, Hwanho; Lesniak, Robert K.; Brem, Jürgen; Rydzik, Anna M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract γ‐Butyrobetaine hydroxylase (BBOX) is a non‐heme FeII‐ and 2‐oxoglutarate‐dependent oxygenase that catalyzes the stereoselective hydroxylation of an unactivated C−H bond of γ‐butyrobetaine (γBB) in the final step of carnitine biosynthesis. BBOX contains an aromatic cage for the recognition of the positively charged trimethylammonium group of the γBB substrate. Enzyme binding and kinetic analyses on substrate analogues with P and As substituting for N in the trimethylammonium group show that the analogues are good BBOX substrates, which follow the efficiency trend N+>P+>As+. The results reveal that an uncharged carbon analogue of γBB is not a BBOX substrate, thus highlighting the importance of the energetically favorable cation–π interactions in productive substrate recognition. PMID:26660433

  14. The Molecular Basis for Different Recognition of Substrates by Phosphodiesterase Families 4 and 10

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,H.; Robinson, H.; Ke, H.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are key enzymes that control the cellular concentrations of the second messengers cAMP and cGMP. The mechanism for selective recognition of substrates cAMP and cGMP by individual PDE families remains a puzzle. To understand the mechanism for substrate recognition by PDE enzymes, the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of an inactive D201N mutant of PDE4D2 in complex with substrate cAMP has been determined at 1.56 Angstroms resolution. The structure shows that Gln369 forms only one hydrogen bond with the adenine of cAMP. This finding provides experimental evidence against the hypothesis of two hydrogen bonds between the invariant glutamine and the substrate cAMP in PDE4, and thus suggests that the widely circulated 'glutamine switch' model is unlikely the mechanism for substrate recognition by PDEs. A structure comparison between PDE4D2-cAMP and PDE10A2-cAMP reveals an anti configuration of cAMP in PDE4D2 but syn in PDE10A2, in addition to different contact patterns of cAMP in these two structures. These observations imply that individual PDE families have their characteristic mechanisms for substrate recognition.

  15. Substrate recognition mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin-cleaving clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4') do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond.

  16. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  17. Promiscuity in the Enzymatic Catalysis of Phosphate and Sulfate Transfer.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Duarte, Fernanda; Kamerlin, Shina C L

    2016-06-01

    The enzymes that facilitate phosphate and sulfate hydrolysis are among the most proficient natural catalysts known to date. Interestingly, a large number of these enzymes are promiscuous catalysts that exhibit both phosphatase and sulfatase activities in the same active site and, on top of that, have also been demonstrated to efficiently catalyze the hydrolysis of other additional substrates with varying degrees of efficiency. Understanding the factors that underlie such multifunctionality is crucial both for understanding functional evolution in enzyme superfamilies and for the development of artificial enzymes. In this Current Topic, we have primarily focused on the structural and mechanistic basis for catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that facilitate both phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer in the same active site, while comparing this to how catalytic promiscuity manifests in other promiscuous phosphatases. We have also drawn on the large number of experimental and computational studies of selected model systems in the literature to explore the different features driving the catalytic promiscuity of such enzymes. Finally, on the basis of this comparative analysis, we probe the plausible origins and determinants of catalytic promiscuity in enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl and sulfuryl transfer. PMID:27187273

  18. The structural basis of substrate recognition by the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT.

    PubMed

    Joachimiak, Lukasz A; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Liu, Corey W; Aebersold, Ruedi; Frydman, Judith

    2014-11-20

    The eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC (also called CCT) is the obligate chaperone for many essential proteins. TRiC is hetero-oligomeric, comprising two stacked rings of eight different subunits each. Subunit diversification from simpler archaeal chaperonins appears linked to proteome expansion. Here, we integrate structural, biophysical, and modeling approaches to identify the hitherto unknown substrate-binding site in TRiC and uncover the basis of substrate recognition. NMR and modeling provided a structural model of a chaperonin-substrate complex. Mutagenesis and crosslinking-mass spectrometry validated the identified substrate-binding interface and demonstrate that TRiC contacts full-length substrates combinatorially in a subunit-specific manner. The binding site of each subunit has a distinct, evolutionarily conserved pattern of polar and hydrophobic residues specifying recognition of discrete substrate motifs. The combinatorial recognition of polypeptides broadens the specificity of TRiC and may direct the topology of bound polypeptides along a productive folding trajectory, contributing to TRiC's unique ability to fold obligate substrates. PMID:25416944

  19. The structural basis of substrate recognition by the eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT

    PubMed Central

    Joachimiak, Lukasz A.; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Liu, Corey; Aebersold, Ruedi; Frydman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC (also called CCT) is the obligate chaperone for many essential proteins. TRiC is hetero-oligomeric, comprising two stacked rings of eight different subunits each. Subunit diversification from simpler archaeal chaperonins appears linked to proteome expansion. Here, we integrate structural, biophysical and modeling approaches to identify the hitherto unknown substrate-binding site in TRiC and uncover the basis of substrate recognition. NMR and modeling provided a structural model of a chaperonin-substrate complex. Mutagenesis and crosslinking-mass spectrometry validated the identified substrate binding interface and demonstrate that TRiC contacts full-length substrates combinatorially in a subunit-specific manner. The binding site of each subunit has a distinct, evolutionarily conserved, pattern of polar and hydrophobic residues specifying recognition of discrete substrate motifs. The combinatorial recognition of polypeptides broadens the specificity of TRiC and may direct the topology of bound polypeptides along a productive folding trajectory, contributing to its unique ability to fold obligate substrates. PMID:25416944

  20. Mechanism of substrate recognition by the novel Botulinum Neurotoxin subtype F5

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the causative agents of botulism, which act by potently inhibiting the neurotransmitter release in motor neurons. Seven serotypes of BoNTs designated as BoNT/A-G have been identified. Recently, two novel types of Botulinum neurotoxins, which cleave a novel scissile bond, L54-E55, of VAMP-2 have been reported including BoNT/F subtype F5 and serotype H. However, little has been known on how these BoNTs recognize their substrates. The present study addressed for the first time the unique substrate recognition mechanism of LC/F5. Our data indicated that the optimal peptide required for efficient LC/F5 substrate cleavage is VAMP-2 (20–65). Interestingly, the overall mode of substrate recognition adopted by LC/F5 was similar to LC/F1, except that its recognition sites were shifted one helix toward the N-terminus of VAMP-2 when compared to that of LC/F1. The composition of LC/F5 pockets were found to have changed accordingly to facilitate specific recognition of these new sites of VAMP-2, including the P2′, P1′, P2, P3, B3, B2 and B1 sites. The study provides direct evidence of the evolutionary adaption of BoNT to recognize its substrate which is useful for effective antitoxin and inhibitor development. PMID:26794648

  1. Mechanism of substrate recognition by the novel Botulinum Neurotoxin subtype F5.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiubiao; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the causative agents of botulism, which act by potently inhibiting the neurotransmitter release in motor neurons. Seven serotypes of BoNTs designated as BoNT/A-G have been identified. Recently, two novel types of Botulinum neurotoxins, which cleave a novel scissile bond, L(54)-E(55), of VAMP-2 have been reported including BoNT/F subtype F5 and serotype H. However, little has been known on how these BoNTs recognize their substrates. The present study addressed for the first time the unique substrate recognition mechanism of LC/F5. Our data indicated that the optimal peptide required for efficient LC/F5 substrate cleavage is VAMP-2 (20-65). Interestingly, the overall mode of substrate recognition adopted by LC/F5 was similar to LC/F1, except that its recognition sites were shifted one helix toward the N-terminus of VAMP-2 when compared to that of LC/F1. The composition of LC/F5 pockets were found to have changed accordingly to facilitate specific recognition of these new sites of VAMP-2, including the P2', P1', P2, P3, B3, B2 and B1 sites. The study provides direct evidence of the evolutionary adaption of BoNT to recognize its substrate which is useful for effective antitoxin and inhibitor development. PMID:26794648

  2. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J.; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M.; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J.; Ashford, Michael L. J.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J.; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J.; Fuller, William

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme–substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump. PMID:25422474

  3. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Ashford, Michael L J; Calaghan, Sarah C; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J; Fuller, William

    2014-12-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼ 120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme-substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump.

  4. Molecular Basis of Substrate Promiscuity for the SAM-Dependent O-Methyltransferase NcsB1, Involved in the Biosynthesis of the Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotic Neocarzinostatin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.; Guenther, E; Luo, Y; Shen, B; Bruner, S

    2009-01-01

    The small molecule component of chromoprotein enediyne antitumor antibiotics is biosynthesized through a convergent route, incorporating amino acid, polyketide, and carbohydrate building blocks around a central enediyne hydrocarbon core. The naphthoic acid moiety of the enediyne neocarzinostatin plays key roles in the biological activity of the natural product by interacting with both the carrier protein and duplex DNA at the site of action. We have previously described the in vitro characterization of an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent O-methyltransferase (NcsB1) in the neocarzinostatin biosynthetic pathway [Luo, Y., Lin, S., Zhang, J., Cooke, H. A., Bruner, S. D., and Shen, B. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 14694-14702]. Here we provide a structural basis for NcsB1 activity, illustrating that the enzyme shares an overall architecture with a large family of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent proteins. In addition, NcsB1 represents the first enzyme to be structurally characterized in the biosynthetic pathway of neocarzinostatin. By cocrystallizing the enzyme with various combinations of the cofactor and substrate analogues, details of the active site structure have been established. Changes in subdomain orientation were observed via comparison of structures in the presence and absence of substrate, suggesting that reorientation of the enzyme is involved in binding of the substrate. In addition, residues important for substrate discrimination were predicted and probed through site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro biochemical characterization.

  5. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  6. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  7. Conserved Sequence Preferences Contribute to Substrate Recognition by the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houqing; Singh Gautam, Amit K.; Wilmington, Shameika R.; Wylie, Dennis; Martinez-Fonts, Kirby; Kago, Grace; Warburton, Marie; Chavali, Sreenivas; Inobe, Tomonao; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of its substrates at the site where it initiates degradation. Here, we report that modulating these sequences can tune the steady-state abundance of proteins over 2 orders of magnitude in cells. This is the same dynamic range as seen for inducing ubiquitination through a classic N-end rule degron. The stability and abundance of His3 constructs dictated by the initiation site affect survival of yeast cells and show that variation in proteasomal initiation can affect fitness. The proteasome's sequence preferences are linked directly to the affinity of the initiation sites to their receptor on the proteasome and are conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. These findings establish that the sequence composition of unstructured initiation sites influences protein abundance in vivo in an evolutionarily conserved manner and can affect phenotype and fitness. PMID:27226608

  8. Mechanism and Substrate Recognition of 2-Hydroxyethylphosphonate Dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, Spencer C.; Cooke, Heather A.; Cicchillo, Robert M.; Malova, Petra; Hammerschmidt, Friedrich; Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2011-09-20

    HEPD belongs to the superfamily of 2-His-1-carboxylate non-heme iron-dependent dioxygenases. It converts 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate (2-HEP) to hydroxymethylphosphonate (HMP) and formate. Previously postulated mechanisms for the reaction catalyzed by HEPD cannot explain its conversion of 1-HEP to acetylphosphate. Alternative mechanisms that involve either phosphite or methylphosphonate as intermediates, which potentially explain all experimental studies including isotope labeling experiments and use of substrate analogues, were investigated. The results of these studies reveal that these alternative mechanisms are not correct. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of Lys16, Arg90, and Tyr98 support roles of these residues in binding of 2-HEP. Mutation of Lys16 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme, whereas mutation of Arg90 to Ala or Tyr98 to Phe greatly decreased k{sub cat}/K{sub m,2-HEP}. Furthermore, the latter mutants could not be saturated in O{sub 2}. These results suggest that proper binding of 2-HEP is important for O{sub 2} activation and that the enzyme uses a compulsory binding order with 2-HEP binding before O{sub 2}. The Y98F mutant produces methylphosphonate as a minor side product providing indirect support for the proposal that the last step during catalysis involves a ferric hydroxide reacting with a methylphosphonate radical.

  9. The CouPSTU and TarPQM Transporters in Rhodopseudomonas palustris: Redundant, Promiscuous Uptake Systems for Lignin-Derived Aromatic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Robert C.; Cliff, Matthew J.; Rafferty, John B.; Kelly, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The biodegradation of lignin, one of the most abundant carbon compounds on Earth, has important biotechnological applications in the derivation of useful products from lignocellulosic wastes. The purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris is able to grow photoheterotrophically under anaerobic conditions on a range of phenylpropeneoid lignin monomers, including coumarate, ferulate, caffeate, and cinnamate. RPA1789 (CouP) is the periplasmic binding-protein component of an ABC system (CouPSTU; RPA1789, RPA1791–1793), which has previously been implicated in the active transport of this class of aromatic substrate. Here, we show using both intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry that CouP binds a range of phenylpropeneoid ligands with Kd values in the nanomolar range. The crystal structure of CouP with ferulate as the bound ligand shows H-bond interactions between the 4-OH group of the aromatic ring with His309 and Gln305. H-bonds are also made between the carboxyl group on the ferulate side chain and Arg197, Ser222, and Thr102. An additional transport system (TarPQM; RPA1782–1784), a member of the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter family, is encoded at the same locus as rpa1789 and several other genes involved in coumarate metabolism. We show that the periplasmic binding-protein of this system (TarP; RPA1782) also binds coumarate, ferulate, caffeate, and cinnamate with nanomolar Kd values. Thus, we conclude that R. palustris uses two redundant but energetically distinct primary and secondary transporters that both employ high-affinity periplasmic binding-proteins to maximise the uptake of lignin-derived aromatic substrates from the environment. Our data provide a detailed thermodynamic and structural basis for understanding the interaction of lignin-derived aromatic substrates with proteins and will be of use in the further exploitation of the flexible metabolism of R. palustris for anaerobic

  10. Evolution of Acyl-Substrate Recognition by a Family of Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Quin H.; Brecht, Ryan M.; Dudekula, Dastagiri; Greenberg, E. Peter; Nagarajan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Members of the LuxI protein family catalyze synthesis of acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum sensing signals from S-adenosyl-L-methionine and an acyl thioester. Some LuxI family members prefer acyl-CoA, and others prefer acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) as the acyl-thioester substrate. We sought to understand the evolutionary history and mechanisms mediating this substrate preference. Our phylogenetic and motif analysis of the LuxI acyl-HSL synthase family indicates that the acyl-CoA-utilizing enzymes evolved from an acyl-ACP-utilizing ancestor. To further understand how acyl-ACPs and acyl-CoAs are recognized by acyl-HSL synthases we studied BmaI1, an octanoyl-ACP-dependent LuxI family member from Burkholderia mallei, and BjaI, an isovaleryl-CoA-dependent LuxI family member from Bradyrhizobium japonicum. We synthesized thioether analogs of their thioester acyl-substrates to probe recognition of the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety common to both acyl-ACP and acyl-CoA substrates. The kinetics of catalysis and inhibition of these enzymes indicate that they recognize the acyl-phosphopantetheine moiety and they recognize non-preferred substrates with this moiety. We find that CoA substrate utilization arose through exaptation of acyl-phosphopantetheine recognition in this enzyme family. PMID:25401334

  11. Mode of VAMP Substrate Recognition and Inhibition of Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin F

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, R.; Schmidt, J; Stafford, R; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cleave neuronal proteins responsible for neurotransmitter release, causing the neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNT serotypes B, D, F and G cleave and inactivate vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), each at a unique peptide bond. The specificity of BoNTs depends on the mode of substrate recognition. We have investigated the mechanism of substrate recognition of BoNT F by determining the crystal structures of its complex with two substrate-based inhibitors, VAMP 22-58/Gln58D-cysteine and 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. The inhibitors bind to BoNT F in the canonical direction (as seen for BoNTs A and E substrates) but are positioned specifically via three major exosites away from the active site. The cysteine sulfur of the inhibitors interacts with the zinc and exists as sulfinic acid in the inhibitor VAMP 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. Arg133 and Arg171, which form part of two separate exosites, are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis.

  12. Mode of VAMP substrate recognition and inhibition of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin F.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rakhi; Schmidt, James J; Stafford, Robert G; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2009-07-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cleave neuronal proteins responsible for neurotransmitter release, causing the neuroparalytic disease botulism. BoNT serotypes B, D, F and G cleave and inactivate vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), each at a unique peptide bond. The specificity of BoNTs depends on the mode of substrate recognition. We have investigated the mechanism of substrate recognition of BoNT F by determining the crystal structures of its complex with two substrate-based inhibitors, VAMP 22-58/Gln58D-cysteine and 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. The inhibitors bind to BoNT F in the canonical direction (as seen for BoNTs A and E substrates) but are positioned specifically via three major exosites away from the active site. The cysteine sulfur of the inhibitors interacts with the zinc and exists as sulfinic acid in the inhibitor VAMP 27-58/Gln58D-cysteine. Arg133 and Arg171, which form part of two separate exosites, are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis.

  13. A PP2A-B55 recognition signal controls substrate dephosphorylation kinetics during mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Cundell, Michael J; Hutter, Lukas H; Nunes Bastos, Ricardo; Poser, Elena; Holder, James; Mohammed, Shabaz; Novak, Bela; Barr, Francis A

    2016-08-29

    PP2A-B55 is one of the major phosphatases regulating cell division. Despite its importance for temporal control during mitotic exit, how B55 substrates are recognized and differentially dephosphorylated is unclear. Using phosphoproteomics combined with kinetic modeling to extract B55-dependent rate constants, we have systematically identified B55 substrates and assigned their temporal order in mitotic exit. These substrates share a bipartite polybasic recognition determinant (BPR) flanking a Cdk1 phosphorylation site. Experiments and modeling show that dephosphorylation rate is encoded into B55 substrates, including its inhibitor ENSA, by cooperative action of basic residues within the BPR. A complementary acidic surface on B55 decodes this signal, supporting a cooperative electrostatic mechanism for substrate selection. A further level of specificity is encoded into B55 substrates because B55 displays selectivity for phosphothreonine. These simple biochemical properties, combined with feedback control of B55 activity by the phosphoserine-containing substrate/inhibitor ENSA, can help explain the temporal sequence of events during exit from mitosis. PMID:27551054

  14. A PP2A-B55 recognition signal controls substrate dephosphorylation kinetics during mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Cundell, Michael J; Hutter, Lukas H; Nunes Bastos, Ricardo; Poser, Elena; Holder, James; Mohammed, Shabaz; Novak, Bela; Barr, Francis A

    2016-08-29

    PP2A-B55 is one of the major phosphatases regulating cell division. Despite its importance for temporal control during mitotic exit, how B55 substrates are recognized and differentially dephosphorylated is unclear. Using phosphoproteomics combined with kinetic modeling to extract B55-dependent rate constants, we have systematically identified B55 substrates and assigned their temporal order in mitotic exit. These substrates share a bipartite polybasic recognition determinant (BPR) flanking a Cdk1 phosphorylation site. Experiments and modeling show that dephosphorylation rate is encoded into B55 substrates, including its inhibitor ENSA, by cooperative action of basic residues within the BPR. A complementary acidic surface on B55 decodes this signal, supporting a cooperative electrostatic mechanism for substrate selection. A further level of specificity is encoded into B55 substrates because B55 displays selectivity for phosphothreonine. These simple biochemical properties, combined with feedback control of B55 activity by the phosphoserine-containing substrate/inhibitor ENSA, can help explain the temporal sequence of events during exit from mitosis.

  15. A remarkably stable kissing-loop interaction defines substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud Satellite ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Patricia; Legault, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Kissing loops are tertiary structure elements that often play key roles in functional RNAs. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, a kissing-loop interaction between the stem–loop I (SLI) substrate and stem–loop V (SLV) of the catalytic domain is known to play an important role in substrate recognition. In addition, this I/V kissing-loop interaction is associated with a helix shift in SLI that activates the substrate for catalysis. To better understand the role of this kissing-loop interaction in substrate recognition and activation by the VS ribozyme, we performed a thermodynamic characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry using isolated SLI and SLV stem–loops. We demonstrate that preshifted SLI variants have higher affinity for SLV than shiftable SLI variants, with an energetic cost of 1.8–3 kcal/mol for the helix shift in SLI. The affinity of the preshifted SLI for SLV is remarkably high, the interaction being more stable by 7–8 kcal/mol than predicted for a comparable duplex containing three Watson–Crick base pairs. The structural basis of this remarkable stability is discussed in light of previous NMR studies. Comparative thermodynamic studies reveal that kissing-loop complexes containing 6–7 Watson–Crick base pairs are as stable as predicted from comparable RNA duplexes; however, those with 2–3 Watson–Crick base pairs are more stable than predicted. Interestingly, the stability of SLI/ribozyme complexes is similar to that of SLI/SLV complexes. Thus, the I/V kissing loop interaction represents the predominant energetic contribution to substrate recognition by the trans-cleaving VS ribozyme. PMID:25051972

  16. Development of conformation independent computational models for the early recognition of breast cancer resistance protein substrates.

    PubMed

    Gantner, Melisa Edith; Di Ianni, Mauricio Emiliano; Ruiz, María Esperanza; Talevi, Alan; Bruno-Blanch, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    ABC efflux transporters are polyspecific members of the ABC superfamily that, acting as drug and metabolite carriers, provide a biochemical barrier against drug penetration and contribute to detoxification. Their overexpression is linked to multidrug resistance issues in a diversity of diseases. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is the most expressed ABC efflux transporter throughout the intestine and the blood-brain barrier, limiting oral absorption and brain bioavailability of its substrates. Early recognition of BCRP substrates is thus essential to optimize oral drug absorption, design of novel therapeutics for central nervous system conditions, and overcome BCRP-mediated cross-resistance issues. We present the development of an ensemble of ligand-based machine learning algorithms for the early recognition of BCRP substrates, from a database of 262 substrates and nonsubstrates compiled from the literature. Such dataset was rationally partitioned into training and test sets by application of a 2-step clustering procedure. The models were developed through application of linear discriminant analysis to random subsamples of Dragon molecular descriptors. Simple data fusion and statistical comparison of partial areas under the curve of ROC curves were applied to obtain the best 2-model combination, which presented 82% and 74.5% of overall accuracy in the training and test set, respectively. PMID:23984415

  17. An allosteric inhibitor of substrate recognition by the SCF[superscript Cdc4] ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Orlicky, Stephen; Tang, Xiaojing; Neduva, Victor; Elowe, Nadine; Brown, Eric D.; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2010-09-17

    The specificity of SCF ubiquitin ligase-mediated protein degradation is determined by F-box proteins. We identified a biplanar dicarboxylic acid compound, called SCF-I2, as an inhibitor of substrate recognition by the yeast F-box protein Cdc4 using a fluorescence polarization screen to monitor the displacement of a fluorescein-labeled phosphodegron peptide. SCF-I2 inhibits the binding and ubiquitination of full-length phosphorylated substrates by SCF{sup Cdc4}. A co-crystal structure reveals that SCF-I2 inserts itself between the {beta}-strands of blades 5 and 6 of the WD40 propeller domain of Cdc4 at a site that is 25 {angstrom} away from the substrate binding site. Long-range transmission of SCF-I2 interactions distorts the substrate binding pocket and impedes recognition of key determinants in the Cdc4 phosphodegron. Mutation of the SCF-I2 binding site abrogates its inhibitory effect and explains specificity in the allosteric inhibition mechanism. Mammalian WD40 domain proteins may exhibit similar allosteric responsiveness and hence represent an extensive class of druggable target.

  18. Controllable Drug Release System in Living Cells Triggered by Enzyme-Substrate Recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengchang; Wang, Xiaoliang; Hiltunen, Kalervo; Chen, Zhijun

    2015-12-01

    Vehicles can deliver the drug molecules into cells, yet immunoreaction of the commonly used capping agents and release triggers limit their biomedical use. This shortcoming might be circumvented through replacing these chemicals with certain biomolecules. Here, we show a new and facile way to encapsulate the drug delivery vehicles and release the cargos in a highly controllable manner via modulating supramolecular interactions between enzyme, substrate, and vehicle. The cargo release from the vehicles within cells can be achieved upon substrate treatment. Yeast cells were used, allowing for a fast and cost-effective way for imaging and morphological analysis. We believe this new platform can be readily extended to various carrier systems for different purposes based on shifting the recognition pattern of enzyme-substrate pairs. PMID:26562724

  19. Role of SLV in SLI substrate recognition by the Neurospora VS ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Patricia; Lacroix-Labonté, Julie; Desjardins, Geneviève; Lampron, Philipe; Lisi, Véronique; Lemieux, Sébastien; Major, François; Legault, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    Substrate recognition by the VS ribozyme involves a magnesium-dependent loop/loop interaction between the SLI substrate and the SLV hairpin from the catalytic domain. Recent NMR studies of SLV demonstrated that magnesium ions stabilize a U-turn loop structure and trigger a conformational change for the extruded loop residue U700, suggesting a role for U700 in SLI recognition. Here, we kinetically characterized VS ribozyme mutants to evaluate the contribution of U700 and other SLV loop residues to SLI recognition. To help interpret the kinetic data, we structurally characterized the SLV mutants by NMR spectroscopy and generated a three-dimensional model of the SLI/SLV complex by homology modeling with MC-Sym. We demonstrated that the mutation of U700 by A, C, or G does not significantly affect ribozyme activity, whereas deletion of U700 dramatically impairs this activity. The U700 backbone is likely important for SLI recognition, but does not appear to be required for either the structural integrity of the SLV loop or for direct interactions with SLI. Thus, deletion of U700 may affect other aspects of SLI recognition, such as magnesium ion binding and SLV loop dynamics. As part of our NMR studies, we developed a convenient assay based on detection of unusual 31P and 15N N7 chemical shifts to probe the formation of U-turn structures in RNAs. Our model of the SLI/SLV complex, which is compatible with biochemical data, leads us to propose novel interactions at the loop I/loop V interface. PMID:18314503

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Substrate Recognition and Specificity of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jiachi; Leung, Thomas Yun-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenems are one of the last lines of defense for Gram-negative pathogens, such as members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Despite the fact that most carbapenems are resistant to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), emerging metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), including New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1), that can hydrolyze carbapenems have become prevalent and are frequently associated with the so-called “superbugs,” for which treatments are extremely limited. Crystallographic study sheds light on the modes of antibiotic binding to NDM-1, yet the mechanisms governing substrate recognition and specificity are largely unclear. This study provides a connection between crystallographic study and the functional significance of NDM-1, with an emphasis on the substrate specificity and catalysis of various β-lactams. L1 loop residues L59, V67, and W87 were important for the activity of NDM-1, most likely through maintaining the partial folding of the L1 loop or active site conformation through hydrophobic interaction with the R groups of β-lactams or the β-lactam ring. Substitution of alanine for L59 showed greater reduction of MICs to ampicillin and selected cephalosporins, whereas substitutions of alanine for V67 had more impact on the MICs of carbapenems. K224 and N233 on the L3 loop played important roles in the recognition of substrate and contributed to substrate hydrolysis. These data together with the structure comparison of the B1 and B2 subclasses of MBLs revealed that the broad substrate specificity of NDM-1 could be due to the ability of its wide active site cavity to accommodate a wide range of β-lactams. This study provides insights into the development of efficient inhibitors for NDM-1 and offers an efficient tactic with which to study the substrate specificities of other β-lactamases. PMID:24982075

  1. Differential substrate recognition by isozymes of plant protein-only Ribonuclease P.

    PubMed

    Howard, Michael J; Karasik, Agnes; Klemm, Bradley P; Mei, Christine; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Fierke, Carol A; Koutmos, Markos

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the cleavage of leader sequences from precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA). Typically, these enzymes are ribonucleic protein complexes that are found in all domains of life. However, a new class of RNase P has been discovered that is composed entirely of protein, termed protein-only RNase P (PRORP). To investigate the molecular determinants of PRORP substrate recognition, we measured the binding affinities and cleavage kinetics of Arabidopsis PRORP1 for varied pre-tRNA substrates. This analysis revealed that PRORP1 does not make significant contacts within the trailer or beyond N-1of the leader, indicating that this enzyme recognizes primarily the tRNA body. To determine the extent to which sequence variation within the tRNA body modulates substrate selectivity and to provide insight into the evolution and function of PRORP enzymes, we measured the reactivity of the three Arabidopsis PRORP isozymes (PRORP1-3) with four pre-tRNA substrates. A 13-fold range in catalytic efficiencies (10(4)-10(5)M(-1)s(-1)) was observed, demonstrating moderate selectivity for pre-tRNA substrates. Although PRORPs bind the different pre-tRNA species with affinities varying by as much as 100-fold, the three isozymes have similar affinities for a given pre-tRNA, suggesting similar binding modes. However, PRORP isozymes have varying degrees of cleavage fidelity, which is dependent on the pre-tRNA species and the presence of a 3'-discriminator base. This work defines molecular determinants of PRORP substrate recognition that provides insight into this new class of RNA processing enzymes. PMID:26966150

  2. Substrate recognition and specificity of double-stranded RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Lela; Koh, Hye Ran; Myong, Sua; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    Recognition of double-stranded (ds) RNA is an important part of many cellular pathways, including RNA silencing, viral recognition, RNA editing, processing, and transport. dsRNA recognition is often achieved by dsRNA binding domains (dsRBDs). We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to examine the binding interface of the transactivation response RNA binding protein (TRBP) dsRBDs to dsRNA substrates. Our results explain the exclusive selectivity of dsRBDs toward dsRNA and against DNA-RNA hybrid and dsDNA duplexes. We also provide corresponding experimental evidence. The dsRNA duplex is recognized by dsRBDs through the A-form of three duplex grooves and by the chemical properties of RNA bases, which have 2'-hydroxyl groups on their sugar rings. Our simulations show that TRBP dsRBD discriminates dsRNA- from DNA-containing duplexes primarily through interactions at two duplex grooves. The simulations also reveal that the conformation of the DNA-RNA duplex can be altered by dsRBD proteins, resulting in a weak binding of dsRBDs to DNA-RNA hybrids. Our study reveals the structural and molecular basis of protein-RNA interaction that gives rise to the observed substrate specificity of dsRNA binding proteins. PMID:24801449

  3. Promiscuous Feminisms for Troubling Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voithofer, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Looking across the six articles in this issue, this paper argues that promiscuous uses of feminist methodologies offer a unique constellation of conceptual, pragmatic, material, and ethical strategies with which to understand and engage some of the social and cultural tensions that are occurring within and outside schools. It presents a…

  4. Molecular Basis of Symbiotic Promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Xavier; Staehelin, Christian; Broughton, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Eukaryotes often form symbioses with microorganisms. Among these, associations between plants and nitrogen-fixing bacteria are responsible for the nitrogen input into various ecological niches. Plants of many different families have evolved the capacity to develop root or stem nodules with diverse genera of soil bacteria. Of these, symbioses between legumes and rhizobia (Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Rhizobium) are the most important from an agricultural perspective. Nitrogen-fixing nodules arise when symbiotic rhizobia penetrate their hosts in a strictly controlled and coordinated manner. Molecular codes are exchanged between the symbionts in the rhizosphere to select compatible rhizobia from pathogens. Entry into the plant is restricted to bacteria that have the “keys” to a succession of legume “doors”. Some symbionts intimately associate with many different partners (and are thus promiscuous), while others are more selective and have a narrow host range. For historical reasons, narrow host range has been more intensively investigated than promiscuity. In our view, this has given a false impression of specificity in legume-Rhizobium associations. Rather, we suggest that restricted host ranges are limited to specific niches and represent specialization of widespread and more ancestral promiscuous symbioses. Here we analyze the molecular mechanisms governing symbiotic promiscuity in rhizobia and show that it is controlled by a number of molecular keys. PMID:10704479

  5. Human ornithine transcarbamylase: crystallographic insights into substrate recognition and conformational changes.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, D; Morizono, H; Yu, X; Tong, L; Allewell, N M; Tuchman, M

    2001-01-01

    Two crystal structures of human ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase) complexed with the substrate carbamoyl phosphate (CP) have been solved. One structure, whose crystals were prepared by substituting N-phosphonacetyl-L-ornithine (PALO) liganded crystals with CP, has been refined at 2.4 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution to a crystallographic R factor of 18.4%. The second structure, whose crystals were prepared by co-crystallization with CP, has been refined at 2.6 A resolution to a crystallographic R factor of 20.2%. These structures provide important new insights into substrate recognition and ligand-induced conformational changes. Comparison of these structures with the structures of OTCase complexed with the bisubstrate analogue PALO or CP and L-norvaline reveals that binding of the first substrate, CP, induces a global conformational change involving relative domain movement, whereas the binding of the second substrate brings the flexible SMG loop, which is equivalent to the 240s loop in aspartate transcarbamylase, into the active site. The model reveals structural features that define the substrate specificity of the enzyme and that regulate the order of binding and release of products. PMID:11237854

  6. Structure of an XPF endonuclease with and without DNA suggests a model for substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Newman, Matthew; Murray-Rust, Judith; Lally, John; Rudolf, Jana; Fadden, Andrew; Knowles, Philip P; White, Malcolm F; McDonald, Neil Q

    2005-03-01

    The XPF/Mus81 structure-specific endonucleases cleave double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) within asymmetric branched DNA substrates and play an essential role in nucleotide excision repair, recombination and genome integrity. We report the structure of an archaeal XPF homodimer alone and bound to dsDNA. Superposition of these structures reveals a large domain movement upon binding DNA, indicating how the (HhH)(2) domain and the nuclease domain are coupled to allow the recognition of double-stranded/single-stranded DNA junctions. We identify two nonequivalent DNA-binding sites and propose a model in which XPF distorts the 3' flap substrate in order to engage both binding sites and promote strand cleavage. The model rationalises published biochemical data and implies a novel role for the ERCC1 subunit of eukaryotic XPF complexes. PMID:15719018

  7. AIRE: From promiscuous molecular partnerships to promiscuous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Jakub; Goldfarb, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a unique transcriptional regulator that induces promiscuous expression of thousands of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), a step critical for the induction of immunological self-tolerance. The past 15 years have seen dramatic progress in our understanding of how AIRE induces immunological self-tolerance on a molecular level. This major advancement can be greatly attributed to the identification of a large variety of proteins that physically associate with AIRE, supporting and regulating its transcription-transactivation capacity. These diverse molecular partnerships have been shown to play roles in shuttling AIRE to the nucleus, securing AIRE's interaction with nuclear matrix and chromatin, releasing RNA polymerase-II from its stalled state and potentiating AIRE-mediated gene expression, among others. In this review we discuss the relationship of AIRE with its vast and rather diverse repertoire of partners and highlight how such "promiscuous partnerships" contribute to the phenomenon of "promiscuous gene expression" in the thymus.

  8. The structural basis for substrate recognition by mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3’ phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Pearl, Laurence H.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3’ phosphatase (PNK) plays a key role in the repair of DNA damage, functioning as part of both the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and base-excision repair (BER) pathways. Through its two catalytic activities, PNK ensures that DNA termini are compatible with extension and ligation by either removing 3’-phosphates from, or by phosphorylating 5’-hydroxyl groups on, the ribose sugar of the DNA backbone. We have now determined crystal structures of murine PNK with DNA molecules bound to both of its active sites. The structure of ssDNA engaged with the 3’-phosphatase domain suggests a mechanism of substrate interaction that assists DNA end-seeking. The structure of dsDNA bound to the 5’-kinase domain reveals a mechanism of DNA bending that facilitates recognition of DNA-ends in the context of single-strand and double-strand breaks, and suggests a close functional cooperation in substrate recognition between the kinase and phosphatase active sites. PMID:22055185

  9. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Wienk, Hans; Slootweg, Jack C; Speerstra, Sietske; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2013-07-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL is specifically recognized by the Fanconi anemia proteins FANCM and FAAP24, we determined the structure of the HhH domain of FAAP24. Although it resembles other HhH domains, the FAAP24 domain contains a canonical hairpin motif followed by distorted motif. The HhH domain can bind various DNA substrates; using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments, we demonstrate that the canonical HhH motif is required for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding, whereas the unstructured N-terminus can interact with single-stranded DNA. Both DNA binding surfaces are used for binding to ICL-like single/double-strand junction-containing DNA substrates. A structural model for FAAP24 bound to dsDNA has been made based on homology with the translesion polymerase iota. Site-directed mutagenesis, sequence conservation and charge distribution support the dsDNA-binding model. Analogous to other HhH domain-containing proteins, we suggest that multiple FAAP24 regions together contribute to binding to single/double-strand junction, which could contribute to specificity in ICL DNA recognition. PMID:23661679

  10. Crystal structures of the human RNA demethylase Alkbh5 reveal basis for substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chong; Liu, Yang; Wang, Guoqiang; Deng, Zengqin; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Wei; Tong, Yufeng; Cheng, Changmei; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2014-04-25

    N(6)-Methylation of adenosine is the most ubiquitous and abundant modification of nucleoside in eukaryotic mRNA and long non-coding RNA. This modification plays an essential role in the regulation of mRNA translation and RNA metabolism. Recently, human AlkB homolog 5 (Alkbh5) and fat mass- and obesity-associated protein (FTO) were shown to erase this methyl modification on mRNA. Here, we report five high resolution crystal structures of the catalytic core of Alkbh5 in complex with different ligands. Compared with other AlkB proteins, Alkbh5 displays several unique structural features on top of the conserved double-stranded β-helix fold typical of this protein family. Among the unique features, a distinct "lid" region of Alkbh5 plays a vital role in substrate recognition and catalysis. An unexpected disulfide bond between Cys-230 and Cys-267 is crucial for the selective binding of Alkbh5 to single-stranded RNA/DNA by bringing a "flipping" motif toward the central β-helix fold. We generated a substrate binding model of Alkbh5 based on a demethylation activity assay of several structure-guided site-directed mutants. Crystallographic and biochemical studies using various analogs of α-ketoglutarate revealed that the active site cavity of Alkbh5 is much smaller than that of FTO and preferentially binds small molecule inhibitors. Taken together, our findings provide a structural basis for understanding the substrate recognition specificity of Alkbh5 and offer a foundation for selective drug design against AlkB members. PMID:24616105

  11. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg2+ ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg2+ ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process. PMID:27440438

  12. Multibody cofactor and substrate molecular recognition in the myo-inositol monophosphatase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ferruz, Noelia; Tresadern, Gary; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; De Fabritiis, Gianni

    2016-07-21

    Molecular recognition is rarely a two-body protein-ligand problem, as it often involves the dynamic interplay of multiple molecules that together control the binding process. Myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), a drug target for bipolar disorder, depends on 3 Mg(2+) ions as cofactor for its catalytic activity. Although the crystallographic pose of the pre-catalytic complex is well characterized, the binding process by which substrate, cofactor and protein cooperate is essentially unknown. Here, we have characterized cofactor and substrate cooperative binding by means of large-scale molecular dynamics. Our study showed the first and second Mg(2+) ions identify the binding pocket with fast kinetics whereas the third ion presents a much higher energy barrier. Substrate binding can occur in cooperation with cofactor, or alone to a binary or ternary cofactor-IMPase complex, although the last scenario occurs several orders of magnitude faster. Our atomic description of the three-body mechanism offers a particularly challenging example of pathway reconstruction, and may prove particularly useful in realistic contexts where water, ions, cofactors or other entities cooperate and modulate the binding process.

  13. Substrate recognition and catalysis by LytB, a pneumococcal peptidoglycan hydrolase involved in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Lastres, Palma; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Bustamante, Noemí; Aldridge, Christine; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Gray, Joe; Vollmer, Waldemar; García, Pedro; Menéndez, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of life-threatening diseases worldwide. Here we provide an in-depth functional characterization of LytB, the peptidoglycan hydrolase responsible for physical separation of daughter cells. Identified herein as an N-acetylglucosaminidase, LytB is involved also in colonization and invasion of the nasopharynx, biofilm formation and evasion of host immunity as previously demonstrated. We have shown that LytB cleaves the GlcNAc-β-(1,4)-MurNAc glycosidic bond of peptidoglycan building units. The hydrolysis occurs at sites with fully acetylated GlcNAc moieties, with preference for uncross-linked muropeptides. The necessity of GlcN acetylation and the presence of a single acidic moiety (Glu585) essential for catalysis strongly suggest a substrate-assisted mechanism with anchimeric assistance of the acetamido group of GlcNAc moieties. Additionally, modelling of the catalytic region bound to a hexasaccharide tripentapeptide provided insights into substrate-binding subsites and peptidoglycan recognition. Besides, cell-wall digestion products and solubilisation rates might indicate a tight control of LytB activity to prevent unrestrained breakdown of the cell wall. Choline-independent localization at the poles of the cell, mediated by the choline-binding domain, peptidoglycan modification, and choline-mediated (lipo)teichoic-acid attachment contribute to the high selectivity of LytB. Moreover, so far unknown chitin hydrolase and glycosyltransferase activities were detected using GlcNAc oligomers as substrate. PMID:26537571

  14. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5–cobra venom factor complex

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S; Andersen, Kasper R; Braren, Ingke; Spillner, Edzard; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Andersen, Gregers R

    2011-01-01

    Complement acts as a danger-sensing system in the innate immune system, and its activation initiates a strong inflammatory response and cleavage of the proteins C3 and C5 by proteolytic enzymes, the convertases. These contain a non-catalytic substrate contacting subunit (C3b or C4b) in complex with a protease subunit (Bb or C2a). We determined the crystal structures of the C3b homologue cobra venom factor (CVF) in complex with C5, and in complex with C5 and the inhibitor SSL7 at 4.3 Å resolution. The structures reveal a parallel two-point attachment between C5 and CVF, where the presence of SSL7 only slightly affects the C5–CVF interface, explaining the IgA dependence for SSL7-mediated inhibition of C5 cleavage. CVF functions as a relatively rigid binding scaffold inducing a conformational change in C5, which positions its cleavage site in proximity to the serine protease Bb. A general model for substrate recognition by the convertases is presented based on the C5–CVF and C3b–Bb–SCIN structures. Prior knowledge concerning interactions between the endogenous convertases and their substrates is rationalized by this model. PMID:21217642

  15. Evolutionary bases of carbohydrate recognition and substrate discrimination in the ROK protein family.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Maria S; Thompson, Steven M; Miller, Brian G

    2010-06-01

    The ROK (repressor, open reading frame, kinase) protein family (Pfam 00480) is a large collection of bacterial polypeptides that includes sugar kinases, carbohydrate responsive transcriptional repressors, and many functionally uncharacterized gene products. ROK family sugar kinases phosphorylate a range of structurally distinct hexoses including the key carbon source D: -glucose, various glucose epimers, and several acetylated hexosamines. The primary sequence elements responsible for carbohydrate recognition within different functional categories of ROK polypeptides are largely unknown due to a limited structural characterization of this protein family. In order to identify the structural bases for substrate discrimination in individual ROK proteins, and to better understand the evolutionary processes that led to the divergent evolution of function in this family, we constructed an inclusive alignment of 227 representative ROK polypeptides. Phylogenetic analyses and ancestral sequence reconstructions of the resulting tree reveal a discrete collection of active site residues that dictate substrate specificity. The results also suggest a series of mutational events within the carbohydrate-binding sites of ROK proteins that facilitated the expansion of substrate specificity within this family. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of ROK glucokinases and non-ROK glucokinases (Pfam 02685), revealing the primary sequence elements shared between these two protein families, which diverged from a common ancestor in ancient times. PMID:20512568

  16. Crystal Structures of the Histidine Acid Phosphatase from Francisella tularensis Provide Insight into Substrate Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Felts, Richard L.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-12-01

    Histidine acid phosphatases catalyze the transfer of a phosphoryl group from phosphomonoesters to water at acidic pH using an active-site histidine. The histidine acid phosphatase from the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis (FtHAP) has been implicated in intramacrophage survival and virulence, motivating interest in understanding the structure and mechanism of this enzyme. Here, we report a structure-based study of ligand recognition by FtHAP. The 1.70-{angstrom}-resolution structure of FtHAP complexed with the competitive inhibitor L(+)-tartrate was solved using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Structures of the ligand-free enzyme and the complex with inorganic phosphate were determined at resolutions of 1.85 and 1.70 {angstrom}, respectively. The structure of the Asp261Ala mutant enzyme complexed with the substrate 3'-AMP was determined at 1.50 {angstrom} resolution to gain insight into substrate recognition. FtHAP exhibits a two-domain fold similar to that of human prostatic acid phosphatase, consisting of an {alpha}/{beta} core domain and a smaller domain that caps the core domain. The structures show that the core domain supplies the phosphoryl binding site, catalytic histidine (His17), and an aspartic acid residue (Asp261) that protonates the leaving group, while the cap domain contributes residues that enforce substrate preference. FtHAP and human prostatic acid phosphatase differ in the orientation of the crucial first helix of the cap domain, implying differences in the substrate preferences of the two enzymes. 3'-AMP binds in one end of a 15-{angstrom}-long tunnel, with the adenine clamped between Phe23 and Tyr135, and the ribose 2'-hydroxyl interacting with Gln132. The importance of the clamp is confirmed with site-directed mutagenesis; mutation of Phe23 and Tyr135 individually to Ala increases K{sub m} by factors of 7 and 10, respectively. The structural data are consistent with a role for FtHAP in scavenging phosphate from small

  17. Multiple sequence signals direct recognition and degradation of protein substrates by the AAA+ protease HslUV.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Shankar; McGinness, Kathleen E; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2010-10-29

    Proteolysis is important for protein quality control and for the proper regulation of many intracellular processes in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Discerning substrates from other cellular proteins is a key aspect of proteolytic function. The Escherichia coli HslUV protease is a member of a major family of ATP-dependent AAA+ degradation machines. HslU hexamers recognize and unfold native protein substrates and then translocate the polypeptide into the degradation chamber of the HslV peptidase. Although a wealth of structural information is available for this system, relatively little is known about mechanisms of substrate recognition. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of two model substrates alter HslUV recognition and degradation kinetics, including changes in V(max). By introducing N- or C-terminal sequences that serve as recognition sites for specific peptide-binding proteins, we show that blocking either terminus of the substrate interferes with HslUV degradation, with synergistic effects when both termini are obstructed. These results support a model in which one terminus of the substrate is tethered to the protease and the other terminus is engaged by the translocation/unfolding machinery in the HslU pore. Thus, degradation appears to consist of discrete steps, which involve the interaction of different terminal sequence signals in the substrate with different receptor sites in the HslUV protease. PMID:20837023

  18. Substrate Recognition by the Cdh1 Destruction Box Receptor Is a General Requirement for APC/CCdh1-mediated Proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liang; Guimarães, Dimitrius Santiago P S F; Melesse, Michael; Hall, Mark C

    2016-07-22

    The anaphase-promoting complex, or cyclosome (APC/C), is a ubiquitin ligase that selectively targets proteins for degradation in mitosis and the G1 phase and is an important component of the eukaryotic cell cycle control system. How the APC/C specifically recognizes its substrates is not fully understood. Although well characterized degron motifs such as the destruction box (D-box) and KEN-box are commonly found in APC/C substrates, many substrates apparently lack these motifs. A variety of alternative APC/C degrons have been reported, suggesting either that multiple modes of substrate recognition are possible or that our definitions of degron structure are incomplete. We used an in vivo yeast assay to compare the G1 degradation rate of 15 known substrates of the APC/C co-activator Cdh1 under normal conditions and conditions that impair binding of D-box, KEN-box, and the recently identified ABBA motif degrons to Cdh1. The D-box receptor was required for efficient proteolysis of all Cdh1 substrates, despite the absence of canonical D-boxes in many. In contrast, the KEN-box receptor was only required for normal proteolysis of a subset of substrates and the ABBA motif receptor for a single substrate in our system. Our results suggest that binding to the D-box receptor may be a shared requirement for recognition and processing of all Cdh1 substrates.

  19. Multiple docking sites on substrate proteins form a modular system that mediates recognition by ERK MAP kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Dave; Glossip, Danielle; Xing, Heming; Muslin, Anthony J.; Kornfeld, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    MAP kinases phosphorylate specific groups of substrate proteins. Here we show that the amino acid sequence FXFP is an evolutionarily conserved docking site that mediates ERK MAP kinase binding to substrates in multiple protein families. FXFP and the D box, a different docking site, form a modular recognition system, as they can function independently or in combination. FXFP is specific for ERK, whereas the D box mediates binding to ERK and JNK MAP kinase, suggesting that the partially overlapping substrate specificities of ERK and JNK result from recognition of shared and unique docking sites. These findings enabled us to predict new ERK substrates and design peptide inhibitors of ERK that functioned in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9925641

  20. Regulation of Structural Dynamics within a Signal Recognition Particle Promotes Binding of Protein Targeting Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Kight, Alicia D.; Henderson, Rory; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Patel, Parth; Murchison, Marissa; Sharma, Priyanka; Goforth, Robyn L.; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh; Henry, Ralph L.; Heyes, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein targeting is critical in all living organisms and involves a signal recognition particle (SRP), an SRP receptor, and a translocase. In co-translational targeting, interactions among these proteins are mediated by the ribosome. In chloroplasts, the light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein (LHCP) in the thylakoid membrane is targeted post-translationally without a ribosome. A multidomain chloroplast-specific subunit of the SRP, cpSRP43, is proposed to take on the role of coordinating the sequence of targeting events. Here, we demonstrate that cpSRP43 exhibits significant interdomain dynamics that are reduced upon binding its SRP binding partner, cpSRP54. We showed that the affinity of cpSRP43 for the binding motif of LHCP (L18) increases when cpSRP43 is complexed to the binding motif of cpSRP54 (cpSRP54pep). These results support the conclusion that substrate binding to the chloroplast SRP is modulated by protein structural dynamics in which a major role of cpSRP54 is to improve substrate binding efficiency to the cpSRP. PMID:25918165

  1. Kinetics of substrate recognition and cleavage by human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.; Douglas, Kenneth T.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2005-01-01

    Human 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase (hOgg1) excises 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) from damaged DNA. We report a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of hOgg1 mechanism using stopped-flow and enzyme fluorescence monitoring. The kinetic scheme for hOgg1 processing an 8-oxoG:C-containing substrate was found to include at least three fast equilibrium steps followed by two slow, irreversible steps and another equilibrium step. The second irreversible step was rate-limiting overall. By comparing data from Ogg1 intrinsic fluorescence traces and from accumulation of products of different types, the irreversible steps were attributed to two main chemical steps of the Ogg1-catalyzed reaction: cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of the damaged nucleotide and β-elimination of its 3′-phosphate. The fast equilibrium steps were attributed to enzyme conformational changes during the recognition of 8-oxoG, and the final equilibrium, to binding of the reaction product by the enzyme. hOgg1 interacted with a substrate containing an aldehydic AP site very slowly, but the addition of 8-bromoguanine (8-BrG) greatly accelerated the reaction, which was best described by two initial equilibrium steps followed by one irreversible chemical step and a final product release equilibrium step. The irreversible step may correspond to β-elimination since it is the very step facilitated by 8-BrG. PMID:16024742

  2. In vitro analysis of phosphorothioate modification of DNA reveals substrate recognition by a multiprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Qiuxiang; Yao, Fen; Zheng, Tao; Ramesh Babu, I.; Zhou, Huchen; Dedon, Peter; You, Delin

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of prokaryotes possess DNA modifications consisting of sequence-specific phosphorothioates (PT) inserted by members of a five-gene cluster. Recent genome mapping studies revealed two unusual features of PT modifications: short consensus sequences and partial modification of a specific genomic site in a population of bacteria. To better understand the mechanism of target selection of PT modifications that underlies these features, we characterized the substrate recognition of the PT-modifying enzymes termed DptC, D and E in a cell extract system from Salmonella. The results revealed that double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides underwent de novo PT modification in vitro, with the same modification pattern as in vivo, i. e., GpsAAC/GpsTTC motif. Unexpectedly, in these in vitro analyses we observed no significant effect on PT modification by sequences flanking GAAC/GTTC motif, while PT also occurred in the GAAC/GTTC motif that could not be modified in vivo. Hemi-PT DNA also served as substrate of the PT-modifying enzymes, but not single-stranded DNA. The PT-modifying enzymes were then found to function as a large protein complex, with all of three subunits in tetrameric conformations. This study provided the first demonstration of in vitro DNA PT modification by PT-modifying enzymes that function as a large protein complex. PMID:26213215

  3. Structures of Down syndrome kinases, DYRKs, reveal mechanisms of kinase activation and substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Meera; Roos, Annette K; Savitsky, Pavel; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Kettenbach, Arminja N; Olsen, Jesper V; Gerber, Scott A; Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M

    2013-06-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) play key roles in brain development, regulation of splicing, and apoptosis, and are potential drug targets for neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We present crystal structures of one representative member of each DYRK subfamily: DYRK1A with an ATP-mimetic inhibitor and consensus peptide, and DYRK2 including NAPA and DH (DYRK homology) box regions. The current activation model suggests that DYRKs are Ser/Thr kinases that only autophosphorylate the second tyrosine of the activation loop YxY motif during protein translation. The structures explain the roles of this tyrosine and of the DH box in DYRK activation and provide a structural model for DYRK substrate recognition. Phosphorylation of a library of naturally occurring peptides identified substrate motifs that lack proline in the P+1 position, suggesting that DYRK1A is not a strictly proline-directed kinase. Our data also show that DYRK1A wild-type and Y321F mutant retain tyrosine autophosphorylation activity. PMID:23665168

  4. Structures of Down Syndrome Kinases, DYRKs, Reveal Mechanisms of Kinase Activation and Substrate Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Meera; Roos, Annette K.; Savitsky, Pavel; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Kettenbach, Arminja N.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Gerber, Scott A.; Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinases (DYRKs) play key roles in brain development, regulation of splicing, and apoptosis, and are potential drug targets for neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. We present crystal structures of one representative member of each DYRK subfamily: DYRK1A with an ATP-mimetic inhibitor and consensus peptide, and DYRK2 including NAPA and DH (DYRK homology) box regions. The current activation model suggests that DYRKs are Ser/Thr kinases that only autophosphorylate the second tyrosine of the activation loop YxY motif during protein translation. The structures explain the roles of this tyrosine and of the DH box in DYRK activation and provide a structural model for DYRK substrate recognition. Phosphorylation of a library of naturally occurring peptides identified substrate motifs that lack proline in the P+1 position, suggesting that DYRK1A is not a strictly proline-directed kinase. Our data also show that DYRK1A wild-type and Y321F mutant retain tyrosine autophosphorylation activity. PMID:23665168

  5. RNA structure-dependent uncoupling of substrate recognition and cleavage by Escherichia coli ribonuclease III

    PubMed Central

    Calin-Jageman, Irina; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the ribonuclease III superfamily of double-strand-specific endoribonucleases participate in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Ribonuclease III of the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli processes rRNA and mRNA precursors, and its catalytic action can regulate gene expression by controlling mRNA translation and stability. It has been proposed that E.coli RNase III can function in a non-catalytic manner, by binding RNA without cleaving phosphodiesters. However, there has been no direct evidence for this mode of action. We describe here an RNA, derived from the T7 phage R1.1 RNase III substrate, that is resistant to cleavage in vitro by E.coli RNase III but retains comparable binding affinity. R1.1[CL3B] RNA is recognized by RNase III in the same manner as R1.1 RNA, as revealed by the similar inhibitory effects of a specific mutation in both substrates. Structure-probing assays and Mfold analysis indicate that R1.1[CL3B] RNA possesses a bulge– helix–bulge motif in place of the R1.1 asymmetric internal loop. The presence of both bulges is required for uncoupling. The bulge–helix–bulge motif acts as a ‘catalytic’ antideterminant, which is distinct from recognition antideterminants, which inhibit RNase III binding. PMID:12711683

  6. Nosology, ontology and promiscuous realism.

    PubMed

    Binney, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    Medics may consider worrying about their metaphysics and ontology to be a waste of time. I will argue here that this is not the case. Promiscuous realism is a metaphysical position which holds that multiple, equally valid, classification schemes should be applied to objects (such as patients) to capture different aspects of their complex and heterogeneous nature. As medics at the bedside may need to capture different aspects of their patients' problems, they may need to use multiple classification schemes (multiple nosologies), and thus consider adopting a different metaphysics to the one commonly in use.

  7. P-glycoprotein recognition of substrates and circumvention through rational drug design.

    PubMed

    Raub, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    It is now well recognized that membrane efflux transporters, especially P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1), play a role in determining the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicology behaviors of some drugs and molecules in development. An investment in screening structure-activity relationship (SAR) is warranted in early discovery when exposure and/or target activity in an in vivo efficacy model is not achieved and P-gp efflux is identified as a rate-limiting factor. However, the amount of investment in SAR must be placed into perspective by assessing the risks associated with the intended therapeutic target, the potency and margin of safety of the compound, the intended patient population(s), and the market competition. The task of rationally designing a chemistry strategy for circumventing a limiting P-gp interaction can be daunting. The necessity of retaining biological potency and metabolic stability places restrictions on what can be done, and the factors for P-gp recognition of substrates are complicated and poorly understood. The parameters within the assays that affect overall pump efficiency or net efflux, such as passive diffusion, membrane partitioning, and molecular interaction between pump and substrate, should be understood when interpreting data sets associated with chemistry around a scaffold. No single, functional group alone is often the cause, but one group can accentuate the recognition points existing within a scaffold. This can be likened to a rheostat, rather than an on/off switch, where addition or removal of a key group can increase or decrease the pumping efficiency. The most practical approach to de-emphasize the limiting effects of P-gp on a particular scaffold is to increase passive diffusion. Efflux pumping efficiency may be overcome when passive diffusion is fast enough. Eliminating, or substituting with fewer, groups that solvate in water, or decreasing their hydrogen bonding capacity, and adding halogen groups can

  8. Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition by Hematopoietic Tyrosine Phosphatase (HePTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Critton, D.; Tortajada, A; Stetson, G; Peti, W; Page, R

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP) is one of three members of the kinase interaction motif (KIM) phosphatase family which also includes STEP and PCPTP1. The KIM-PTPs are characterized by a 15 residue sequence, the KIM, which confers specific high-affinity binding to their only known substrates, the MAP kinases Erk and p38, an interaction which is critical for their ability to regulate processes such as T cell differentiation (HePTP) and neuronal signaling (STEP). The KIM-PTPs are also characterized by a unique set of residues in their PTP substrate binding loops, where 4 of the 13 residues are differentially conserved among the KIM-PTPs as compared to more than 30 other class I PTPs. One of these residues, T106 in HePTP, is either an aspartate or asparagine in nearly every other PTP. Using multiple techniques, we investigate the role of these KIM-PTP specific residues in order to elucidate the molecular basis of substrate recognition by HePTP. First, we used NMR spectroscopy to show that Erk2-derived peptides interact specifically with HePTP at the active site. Next, to reveal the molecular details of this interaction, we solved the high-resolution three-dimensional structures of two distinct HePTP-Erk2 peptide complexes. Strikingly, we were only able to obtain crystals of these transient complexes using a KIM-PTP specific substrate-trapping mutant, in which the KIM-PTP specific residue T106 was mutated to an aspartic acid (T106D). The introduced aspartate side chain facilitates the coordination of the bound peptides, thereby stabilizing the active dephosphorylation complex. These structures establish the essential role of HePTP T106 in restricting HePTP specificity to only those substrates which are able to interact with KIM-PTPs via the KIM (e.g., Erk2, p38). Finally, we describe how this interaction of the KIM is sufficient for overcoming the otherwise weak interaction at the active site of KIM-PTPs.

  9. Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 7A1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 7A1 (ALDH7A1) is part of lysine catabolism and catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of α-aminoadipate semialdehyde to α-aminoadipate. Herein, we describe a structural study of human ALDH7A1 focused on substrate recognition. Five crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering data are reported, including the first crystal structure of any ALDH7 family member complexed with α-aminoadipate. The product binds with the ε-carboxylate in the oxyanion hole, the aliphatic chain packed into an aromatic box, and the distal end of the product anchored by electrostatic interactions with five conserved residues. This binding mode resembles that of glutamate bound to the proline catabolic enzyme ALDH4A1. Analysis of ALDH7A1 and ALDH4A1 structures suggests key interactions that underlie substrate discrimination. Structures of apo ALDH7A1 reveal dramatic conformational differences from the product complex. Product binding is associated with a 16 Å movement of the C-terminus into the active site, which stabilizes the active conformation of the aldehyde substrate anchor loop. The fact that the C-terminus is part of the active site was hitherto unknown. Interestingly, the C-terminus and aldehyde anchor loop are disordered in a new tetragonal crystal form of the apoenzyme, implying that these parts of the enzyme are highly flexible. Our results suggest that the active site of ALDH7A1 is disassembled when the aldehyde site is vacant, and the C-terminus is a mobile element that forms quaternary structural interactions that aid aldehyde binding. These results are relevant to the c.1512delG genetic deletion associated with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, which alters the C-terminus of ALDH7A1. PMID:26260980

  10. Fidelity and Promiscuity of a Mycobacterial Glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Yamatsugu, Kenzo; Splain, Rebecca A; Kiessling, Laura L

    2016-07-27

    Members of the genus Mycobacterium cause devastating human diseases, including tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis can resist some antibiotics because of its durable and impermeable cell envelope. This barrier is assembled from saccharide building blocks not found in mammals, including galactofuranose (Galf). Within the cell envelope, Galf residues are linked together to afford an essential polysaccharide, termed the galactan. The formation of this polymer is catalyzed by the glycosyltransferase GlfT2, a processive carbohydrate polymerase, which generates a sequence-specific polysaccharide with alternating regioisomeric β(1-5) and β(1-6) Galf linkages. GlfT2 exhibits high fidelity in linkage formation, as it will terminate polymerization rather than deviate from its linkage pattern. These findings suggest that GlfT2 would prefer an acceptor with a canonical alternating β(1-5) and β(1-6) Galf sequence. To test this hypothesis, we devised a synthetic route to assemble oligosaccharides with natural and non-natural sequences. GlfT2 could elongate each of these acceptors, even those with non-natural linkage patterns. These data indicate that the glycosyltransferase is surprisingly promiscuous in its substrate preferences. However, GlfT2 did favor some substrates: it preferentially acted on those in which the lipid-bearing Galf residue was connected to the sequence by a β(1-6) glycosidic linkage. The finding that the relative positioning of the lipid and the non-reducing end of the acceptor influences substrate selectivity is consistent with a role for the lipid in acceptor binding. The data also suggest that the fidelity of GlfT2 for generating an alternating β(1-5) and β(1-6) pattern of Galf residues arises not from preferential substrate binding but during processive elongation. These observations suggest that inhibiting the action of GlfT2 will afford changes in cell wall structure. PMID:27302377

  11. Substrate recognition by the zinc metalloprotease effector NleC from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Giogha, Cristina; Lung, Tania Wong Fok; Mühlen, Sabrina; Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2015-12-01

    Upon infection of epithelial cells, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli suppresses host cell inflammatory signalling in a type III secretion system (T3SS) dependent manner. Two key T3SS effector proteins involved in this response are NleE and NleC. NleC is a zinc metalloprotease effector that degrades the p65 subunit of NF-κB. Although the site of p65 cleavage by NleC is now well described, other areas of interaction have not been precisely defined. Here we constructed overlapping truncations of p65 to identify regions required for NleC cleavage. We determined that NleC cleaved both p65 and p50 within the Rel homology domain (RHD) and that two motifs, E22IIE25 and P177VLS180 , within the RHD of p65 were important for recognition and binding by NleC. Alanine substitution of one or both of these motifs protected p65 from binding and degradation by NleC. The E22IIE25 and P177VLS180 motifs were located within the structurally distinct N-terminal subdomain of the RHD involved in DNA binding by p65 on adjacent, parallel strands. Although these motifs have not been recognized previously, both were needed for the correct localization and function of p65. In summary, this work has identified two regions of p65 within the RHD needed for binding and cleavage by NleC and provides further insight into the molecular basis of substrate recognition by a T3SS effector.

  12. Neural substrates of view-invariant object recognition developed without experiencing rotations of the objects.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Jun-Ya; Yamaguchi, Reona; Honda, Kazunari; Wang, Gang; Tanaka, Keiji

    2014-11-01

    One fails to recognize an unfamiliar object across changes in viewing angle when it must be discriminated from similar distractor objects. View-invariant recognition gradually develops as the viewer repeatedly sees the objects in rotation. It is assumed that different views of each object are associated with one another while their successive appearance is experienced in rotation. However, natural experience of objects also contains ample opportunities to discriminate among objects at each of the multiple viewing angles. Our previous behavioral experiments showed that after experiencing a new set of object stimuli during a task that required only discrimination at each of four viewing angles at 30° intervals, monkeys could recognize the objects across changes in viewing angle up to 60°. By recording activities of neurons from the inferotemporal cortex after various types of preparatory experience, we here found a possible neural substrate for the monkeys' performance. For object sets that the monkeys had experienced during the task that required only discrimination at each of four viewing angles, many inferotemporal neurons showed object selectivity covering multiple views. The degree of view generalization found for these object sets was similar to that found for stimulus sets with which the monkeys had been trained to conduct view-invariant recognition. These results suggest that the experience of discriminating new objects in each of several viewing angles develops the partially view-generalized object selectivity distributed over many neurons in the inferotemporal cortex, which in turn bases the monkeys' emergent capability to discriminate the objects across changes in viewing angle.

  13. Modeling catalytic promiscuity in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Fernanda; Amrein, Beat Anton

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that promiscuity plays a key role in the evolution of new enzyme function. This finding has helped to elucidate fundamental aspects of molecular evolution. While there has been extensive experimental work on enzyme promiscuity, computational modeling of the chemical details of such promiscuity has traditionally fallen behind the advances in experimental studies, not least due to the nearly prohibitive computational cost involved in examining multiple substrates with multiple potential mechanisms and binding modes in atomic detail with a reasonable degree of accuracy. However, recent advances in both computational methodologies and power have allowed us to reach a stage in the field where we can start to overcome this problem, and molecular simulations can now provide accurate and efficient descriptions of complex biological systems with substantially less computational cost. This has led to significant advances in our understanding of enzyme function and evolution in a broader sense. Here, we will discuss currently available computational approaches that can allow us to probe the underlying molecular basis for enzyme specificity and selectivity, discussing the inherent strengths and weaknesses of each approach. As a case study, we will discuss recent computational work on different members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily (AP) using a range of different approaches, showing the complementary insights they have provided. We have selected this particular superfamily, as it poses a number of significant challenges for theory, ranging from the complexity of the actual reaction mechanisms involved to the reliable modeling of the catalytic metal centers, as well as the very large system sizes. We will demonstrate that, through current advances in methodologies, computational tools can provide significant insight into the molecular basis for catalytic promiscuity, and, therefore, in turn, the mechanisms of protein

  14. Conformational Changes and Substrate Recognition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa d-Arginine Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Guoxing; Yuan, Hongling; Li, Congran; Lu, Chung-Dar; Gadda, Giovanni; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-11-15

    DADH catalyzes the flavin-dependent oxidative deamination of D-amino acids to the corresponding {alpha}-keto acids and ammonia. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structures of DADH at 1.06 {angstrom} resolution and its complexes with iminoarginine (DADH{sub red}/iminoarginine) and iminohistidine (DADH{sub red}/iminohistidine) at 1.30 {angstrom} resolution. The DADH crystal structure comprises an unliganded conformation and a product-bound conformation, which is almost identical to the DADH{sub red}/iminoarginine crystal structure. The active site of DADH was partially occupied with iminoarginine product (30% occupancy) that interacts with Tyr53 in the minor conformation of a surface loop. This flexible loop forms an 'active site lid', similar to those seen in other enzymes, and may play an essential role in substrate recognition. The guanidinium side chain of iminoarginine forms a hydrogen bond interaction with the hydroxyl of Thr50 and an ionic interaction with Glu87. In the structure of DADH in complex with iminohistidine, two alternate conformations were observed for iminohistidine where the imidazole groups formed hydrogen bond interactions with the side chains of His48 and Thr50 and either Glu87 or Gln336. The different interactions and very distinct binding modes observed for iminoarginine and iminohistidine are consistent with the 1000-fold difference in k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values for D-arginine and D-histidine. Comparison of the kinetic data for the activity of DADH on different D-amino acids and the crystal structures in complex with iminoarginine and iminohistidine establishes that this enzyme is characterized by relatively broad substrate specificity, being able to oxidize positively charged and large hydrophobic D-amino acids bound within a flask-like cavity.

  15. Probing the brain substrates of cognitive processes responsible for context effects on recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Eli; Raz, Tal; Levy, Daniel A

    2010-09-01

    Context effects on episodic recognition memory involve separable contributions of target-context binding, additive familiarity, and configural constancy. Here we examine whether these factors reflect contributions of processes attributed to different brain substrates. First, we challenged frontal and medial temporal lobe-based cognitive capacities in healthy young adults, employing divided attention tasks at encoding and retrieval, and extended retrieval delay, respectively. Target-context binding effects were specifically attenuated by delay, but not by divided attention. In a second experiment, older adults were identified by neuropsychological testing as having different levels of frontal and medial temporal lobe-dependent cognitive functions. Consistent with Experiment 1, older adults with low medial temporal lobe function exhibited reduced target-context binding effects, but levels of frontal function did not modulate binding effects. These findings indicate that unlike source memory, context effects on memory are associated with the integrity of medial temporal lobe-based processes but not with the integrity of frontal lobe-based processes. Our findings also emphasize the importance of discriminating between functional subgroups in the attempt to characterize memory processes in older adults.

  16. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  17. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'.

  18. Targeted reengineering of protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I selectivity functionally implicates active-site residues in protein-substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Soumyashree A; Losito, Erica L; Hougland, James L

    2014-01-21

    Posttranslational modifications are vital for the function of many proteins. Prenylation is one such modification, wherein protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I) or protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) modify proteins by attaching a 20- or 15-carbon isoprenoid group, respectively, to a cysteine residue near the C-terminus of a target protein. These enzymes require a C-terminal Ca1a2X sequence on their substrates, with the a1, a2, and X residues serving as substrate-recognition elements for FTase and/or GGTase-I. While crystallographic structures of rat GGTase-I show a tightly packed and hydrophobic a2 residue binding pocket, consistent with a preference for moderately sized a2 residues in GGTase-I substrates, the functional impact of enzyme-substrate contacts within this active site remains to be determined. Using site-directed mutagenesis and peptide substrate structure-activity studies, we have identified specific active-site residues within rat GGTase-I involved in substrate recognition and developed novel GGTase-I variants with expanded/altered substrate selectivity. The ability to drastically alter GGTase-I selectivity mirrors similar behavior observed in FTase but employs mutation of a distinct set of structurally homologous active-site residues. Our work demonstrates that tunable selectivity may be a general phenomenon among multispecific enzymes involved in posttranslational modification and raises the possibility of variable substrate selectivity among GGTase-I orthologues from different organisms. Furthermore, the GGTase-I variants developed herein can serve as tools for studying GGTase-I substrate selectivity and the effects of prenylation pathway modifications on specific proteins. PMID:24344934

  19. Neutral genetic drift can alter promiscuous protein functions, potentially aiding functional evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D; Romero, Philip A; Lu, Zhongyi; Arnold, Frances H

    2007-01-01

    Background Many of the mutations accumulated by naturally evolving proteins are neutral in the sense that they do not significantly alter a protein's ability to perform its primary biological function. However, new protein functions evolve when selection begins to favor other, "promiscuous" functions that are incidental to a protein's original biological role. If mutations that are neutral with respect to a protein's primary biological function cause substantial changes in promiscuous functions, these mutations could enable future functional evolution. Results Here we investigate this possibility experimentally by examining how cytochrome P450 enzymes that have evolved neutrally with respect to activity on a single substrate have changed in their abilities to catalyze reactions on five other substrates. We find that the enzymes have sometimes changed as much as four-fold in the promiscuous activities. The changes in promiscuous activities tend to increase with the number of mutations, and can be largely rationalized in terms of the chemical structures of the substrates. The activities on chemically similar substrates tend to change in a coordinated fashion, potentially providing a route for systematically predicting the change in one activity based on the measurement of several others. Conclusion Our work suggests that initially neutral genetic drift can lead to substantial changes in protein functions that are not currently under selection, in effect poising the proteins to more readily undergo functional evolution should selection favor new functions in the future. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Martijn Huynen, Fyodor Kondrashov, and Dan Tawfik (nominated by Christoph Adami). PMID:17598905

  20. An efficient, multiply promiscuous hydrolase in the alkaline phosphatase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Bert; Jonas, Stefanie; Babtie, Ann C.; Benjdia, Alhosna; Berteau, Olivier; Hyvönen, Marko; Hollfelder, Florian

    2010-01-01

    We report a catalytically promiscuous enzyme able to efficiently promote the hydrolysis of six different substrate classes. Originally assigned as a phosphonate monoester hydrolase (PMH) this enzyme exhibits substantial second-order rate accelerations ((kcat/KM)/kw), ranging from 107 to as high as 1019, for the hydrolyses of phosphate mono-, di-, and triesters, phosphonate monoesters, sulfate monoesters, and sulfonate monoesters. This substrate collection encompasses a range of substrate charges between 0 and -2, transition states of a different nature, and involves attack at two different reaction centers (P and S). Intrinsic reactivities (half-lives) range from 200 days to 105 years under near neutrality. The substantial rate accelerations for a set of relatively difficult reactions suggest that efficient catalysis is not necessarily limited to efficient stabilization of just one transition state. The crystal structure of PMH identifies it as a member of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily. PMH encompasses four of the native activities previously observed in this superfamily and extends its repertoire by two further activities, one of which, sulfonate monoesterase, has not been observed previously for a natural enzyme. PMH is thus one of the most promiscuous hydrolases described to date. The functional links between superfamily activities can be presumed to have played a role in functional evolution by gene duplication. PMID:20133613

  1. Promiscuity and the evolution of cooperative breeding.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Helen C; El Mouden, Claire; Wild, Geoff; West, Stuart

    2012-04-01

    Empirical data suggest that low levels of promiscuity have played a key role in the evolution of cooperative breeding and eusociality. However, from a theoretical perspective, low levels of promiscuity can favour dispersal away from the natal patch, and have been argued to select against cooperation in a way that cannot be explained by inclusive fitness theory. Here, we use an inclusive fitness approach to model selection to stay and help in a simple patch-structured population, with strict density dependence, where helping increases the survival of the breeder on the patch. Our model predicts that the level of promiscuity has either no influence or a slightly positive influence on selection for helping. This prediction is driven by the fact that, in our model, staying to help leads to increased competition between relatives for the breeding position-when promiscuity is low (and relatedness is high), the best way to aid relatives is by dispersing to avoid competing with them. Furthermore, we found the same results with an individual-based simulation, showing that this is not an area where inclusive fitness theory 'gets it wrong'. We suggest that our predicted influence of promiscuity is sensitive to biological assumptions, and that if a possibly more biologically relevant scenario were examined, where helping provided fecundity benefits and there was not strict density dependence, then low levels of promiscuity would favour helping, as has been observed empirically. PMID:21993501

  2. Mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition in the Lin28/let-7 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2014-01-01

    Summary paragraph The pluripotency factor Lin28 inhibits the biogenesis of the let-7 family of mammalian microRNAs1–4. Lin28 is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and has a fundamental role in regulation of development5, glucose metabolism6 and tissue regeneration7. Alternatively, Lin28 overexpression is correlated with the onset of numerous cancers8, while let-7, a tumor suppressor, silences several human oncogenes5. Lin28 binds to precursor let-7 (pre-let-7) hairpins9, triggering the 3' oligo-uridylation activity of TUT4/710–12. The oligoU tail added to pre-let-7 serves as a decay signal, as it is rapidly degraded by Dis3L213,14, a homolog of the catalytic subunit of the RNA exosome. The molecular basis of Lin28 mediated recruitment of TUT4/7 to pre-let-7 and its subsequent degradation by Dis3L2 is largely unknown. To examine the mechanism of Dis3L2 substrate recognition we determined the structure of mouse Dis3L2 in complex with an oligoU RNA to mimic the uridylated tail of pre-let-7. Three RNA binding domains form an open funnel on one face of the catalytic domain that allows RNA to navigate a path to the active site different from its exosome counterpart. The resulting path reveals an extensive network of uracil-specific interactions spanning the first twelve nucleotides of an oligoU-tailed RNA. We identify three U-specificity zones that explain how Dis3L2 recognizes, binds and processes uridylated pre-let-7 in the final step of the Lin28/let-7 pathway. PMID:25119025

  3. Substrate recognition of N,N'-diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Niiyama, Mayumi; Ida, Kurumi; Oshima, Maki; Morita, Junji; Uegaki, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Enzymes of carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 14 catalyze hydrolysis of N-acetyl groups at the non-reducing end of the N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue of chitooligosaccharides or related compounds. N,N'-diacetylchitobiose deacetylase (Dac) belongs to the CE-14 family and plays a role in the chitinolytic pathway in archaea by deacetylating N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2), which is the end product of chitinase. In this study, we revealed the structural basis of reaction specificity in CE-14 deacetylases by solving a crystal structure of Dac from Pyrococcus horikoshii (Ph-Dac) in complex with a novel reaction intermediate analog. We developed 2-deoxy-2-methylphosphoramido-d-glucose (MPG) as the analog of the tetrahedral oxyanion intermediate of the monosaccharide substrate GlcNAc. The crystal structure of Ph-Dac in complex with MPG demonstrated that Arg92, Asp115, and His152 side chains interact with hydroxyl groups of the glucose moiety of the non-reducing-end GlcNAc residue. The amino acid residues responsible for recognition of the MPG glucose moiety are spatially conserved in other CE-14 deacetylases. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure of the Ph-Dac-GlcNAc2 complex indicated that the reducing GlcNAc residue is placed in a large intermolecular cleft and is not involved with specific interactions with the enzyme. This observation was consistent with results indicating that Ph-Dac displayed similar kinetic parameters for both GlcNAc and GlcNAc2. This study provides the structural basis of reaction-site specificity of Dac and related CE-14 enzymes.

  4. Substrate recognition of N,N'-diacetylchitobiose deacetylase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tsutomu; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Niiyama, Mayumi; Ida, Kurumi; Oshima, Maki; Morita, Junji; Uegaki, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Enzymes of carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 14 catalyze hydrolysis of N-acetyl groups at the non-reducing end of the N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue of chitooligosaccharides or related compounds. N,N'-diacetylchitobiose deacetylase (Dac) belongs to the CE-14 family and plays a role in the chitinolytic pathway in archaea by deacetylating N,N'-diacetylchitobiose (GlcNAc2), which is the end product of chitinase. In this study, we revealed the structural basis of reaction specificity in CE-14 deacetylases by solving a crystal structure of Dac from Pyrococcus horikoshii (Ph-Dac) in complex with a novel reaction intermediate analog. We developed 2-deoxy-2-methylphosphoramido-d-glucose (MPG) as the analog of the tetrahedral oxyanion intermediate of the monosaccharide substrate GlcNAc. The crystal structure of Ph-Dac in complex with MPG demonstrated that Arg92, Asp115, and His152 side chains interact with hydroxyl groups of the glucose moiety of the non-reducing-end GlcNAc residue. The amino acid residues responsible for recognition of the MPG glucose moiety are spatially conserved in other CE-14 deacetylases. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure of the Ph-Dac-GlcNAc2 complex indicated that the reducing GlcNAc residue is placed in a large intermolecular cleft and is not involved with specific interactions with the enzyme. This observation was consistent with results indicating that Ph-Dac displayed similar kinetic parameters for both GlcNAc and GlcNAc2. This study provides the structural basis of reaction-site specificity of Dac and related CE-14 enzymes. PMID:27456364

  5. Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition in Human Nicotinamide N-Methyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yi; Sartini, Davide; Pozzi, Valentina; Wilk, Dennis; Emanuelli, Monica; Yee, Vivien C.

    2012-05-02

    Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) catalyzes the N-methylation of nicotinamide, pyridines, and other analogues using S-adenosyl-L-methionine as donor. NNMT plays a significant role in the regulation of metabolic pathways and is expressed at markedly high levels in several kinds of cancers, presenting it as a potential molecular target for cancer therapy. We have determined the crystal structure of human NNMT as a ternary complex bound to both the demethylated donor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine and the acceptor substrate nicotinamide, to 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. These studies reveal the structural basis for nicotinamide binding and highlight several residues in the active site which may play roles in nicotinamide recognition and NNMT catalysis. The functional importance of these residues was probed by mutagenesis. Of three residues near the nicotinamide's amide group, substitution of S201 and S213 had no effect on enzyme activity while replacement of D197 dramatically decreased activity. Substitutions of Y20, whose side chain hydroxyl interacts with both the nicotinamide aromatic ring and AdoHcy carboxylate, also compromised activity. Enzyme kinetics analysis revealed k{sub cat}/K{sub m} decreases of 2-3 orders of magnitude for the D197A and Y20A mutants, confirming the functional importance of these active site residues. The mutants exhibited substantially increased K{sub m} for both NCA and AdoMet and modestly decreased k{sub cat}. MD simulations revealed long-range conformational effects which provide an explanation for the large increase in K{sub m}(AdoMet) for the D197A mutant, which interacts directly only with nicotinamide in the ternary complex crystal structure.

  6. Beyond perceptual expertise: revisiting the neural substrates of expert object recognition

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Assaf; Kravitz, Dwight; Baker, Chris I.

    2013-01-01

    Real-world expertise provides a valuable opportunity to understand how experience shapes human behavior and neural function. In the visual domain, the study of expert object recognition, such as in car enthusiasts or bird watchers, has produced a large, growing, and often-controversial literature. Here, we synthesize this literature, focusing primarily on results from functional brain imaging, and propose an interactive framework that incorporates the impact of high-level factors, such as attention and conceptual knowledge, in supporting expertise. This framework contrasts with the perceptual view of object expertise that has concentrated largely on stimulus-driven processing in visual cortex. One prominent version of this perceptual account has almost exclusively focused on the relation of expertise to face processing and, in terms of the neural substrates, has centered on face-selective cortical regions such as the Fusiform Face Area (FFA). We discuss the limitations of this face-centric approach as well as the more general perceptual view, and highlight that expert related activity is: (i) found throughout visual cortex, not just FFA, with a strong relationship between neural response and behavioral expertise even in the earliest stages of visual processing, (ii) found outside visual cortex in areas such as parietal and prefrontal cortices, and (iii) modulated by the attentional engagement of the observer suggesting that it is neither automatic nor driven solely by stimulus properties. These findings strongly support a framework in which object expertise emerges from extensive interactions within and between the visual system and other cognitive systems, resulting in widespread, distributed patterns of expertise-related activity across the entire cortex. PMID:24409134

  7. Substrate recognition of VAMP-2 by botulinum neurotoxin B and tetanus neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Hall, Cherisse; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT; serotypes A-G) and tetanus neurotoxin elicit flaccid and spastic paralysis, respectively. These neurotoxins are zinc proteases that cleave SNARE proteins to inhibit synaptic vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane. Although BoNT/B and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) cleave VAMP-2 at the same scissile bond, their mechanism(s) of VAMP-2 recognition is not clear. Mapping experiments showed that residues 60-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient cleavage by BoNT/B and that residues 40-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient TeNT cleavage. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis and kinetic analysis identified three regions within VAMP-2 that were recognized by BoNT/B and TeNT: residues adjacent to the site of scissile bond cleavage (cleavage region) and residues located within N-terminal and C-terminal regions relative to the cleavage region. Analysis of residues within the cleavage region showed that mutations at the P7, P4, P2, and P1' residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/B cleavage (> or =32-fold), whereas mutations at P7, P4, P1', and P2' residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/TeNT cleavage (> or =64-fold). Residues within the cleavage region influenced catalysis, whereas residues N-terminal and C-terminal to the cleavage region influenced binding affinity. Thus, BoNT/B and TeNT possess similar organization but have unique residues to recognize and cleave VAMP-2. These studies provide new insights into how the clostridial neurotoxins recognize their substrates.

  8. Substrate Recognition of VAMP-2 by Botulinum Neurotoxin B and Tetanus Neurotoxin*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Hall, Cherisse; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT; serotypes A-G) and tetanus neurotoxin elicit flaccid and spastic paralysis, respectively. These neurotoxins are zinc proteases that cleave SNARE proteins to inhibit synaptic vesicle fusion to the plasma membrane. Although BoNT/B and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) cleave VAMP-2 at the same scissile bond, their mechanism(s) of VAMP-2 recognition is not clear. Mapping experiments showed that residues 60-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient cleavage by BoNT/B and that residues 40-87 of VAMP-2 were sufficient for efficient TeNT cleavage. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis and kinetic analysis identified three regions within VAMP-2 that were recognized by BoNT/B and TeNT: residues adjacent to the site of scissile bond cleavage (cleavage region) and residues located within N-terminal and C-terminal regions relative to the cleavage region. Analysis of residues within the cleavage region showed that mutations at the P7, P4, P2, and P1′ residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/B cleavage (≥32- fold), whereas mutations at P7, P4, P1′, and P2′ residues of VAMP-2 had the greatest inhibition of LC/TeNT cleavage (≥64-fold). Residues within the cleavage region influenced catalysis, whereas residues N-terminal and C-terminal to the cleavage region influenced binding affinity. Thus, BoNT/B and TeNT possess similar organization but have unique residues to recognize and cleave VAMP-2. These studies provide new insights into how the clostridial neurotoxins recognize their substrates. PMID:18511417

  9. A Single-Stranded Junction Modulates Nanosecond Motional Ordering of the Substrate Recognition Duplex of a Group I Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong; Shi, Xuesong; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Rigid spinning: Site-directed spin-labeling studies using a rigid nitroxide spin label (Ç) reveal that both length and sequence of a single-stranded junction (J1/2) modulate nanosecond motional ordering of the substrate-recognition duplex (P1) of the 120 kD group I ribozyme. The studies demonstrate an approach for experimental measurements of nanosecond dynamics in high-molecular-weight RNA complexes. PMID:23900919

  10. Acyl-ACP Substrate Recognition in Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer mediated quorum sensing regulates virulence in several pathogenic bacteria. The hallmark of an efficient quorum sensing system relies on the tight specificity in the signal generated by each bacterium. Since AHL signal specificity is derived from the acyl-chain of the acyl-ACP (ACP = acyl carrier protein) substrate, AHL synthase enzymes must recognize and react with the native acyl-ACP with high catalytic efficiency while keeping reaction rates with non-native acyl-ACPs low. The mechanism of acyl-ACP substrate recognition in these enzymes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we investigated differences in catalytic efficiencies for shorter and longer chain acyl-ACP substrates reacting with an octanoyl-homoserine lactone synthase Burkholderia mallei BmaI1. With the exception of two-carbon shorter hexanoyl-ACP, the catalytic efficiencies of butyryl-ACP, decanoyl-ACP, and octanoyl-CoA reacting with BmaI1 decreased by greater than 20-fold compared to the native octanoyl-ACP substrate. Furthermore, we also noticed kinetic cooperativity when BmaI1 reacted with non-native acyl-donor substrates. Our kinetic data suggest that non-native acyl-ACP substrates are unable to form a stable and productive BmaI1·acyl-ACP·SAM ternary complex and are thus effectively discriminated by the enzyme. These results offer insights into the molecular basis of substrate recognition for the BmaI1 enzyme. PMID:25215658

  11. Exosite-mediated substrate recognition of factor IX by factor XIa. The factor XIa heavy chain is required for initial recognition of factor IX.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taketoshi; Verhamme, Ingrid M; Sun, Mao-Fu; Bock, Paul E; Gailani, David

    2005-06-24

    Studies of the mechanisms of blood coagulation zymogen activation demonstrate that exosites (sites on the activating complex distinct from the protease active site) play key roles in macromolecular substrate recognition. We investigated the importance of exosite interactions in recognition of factor IX by the protease factor XIa. Factor XIa cleavage of the tripeptide substrate S2366 was inhibited by the active site inhibitors p-aminobenzamidine (Ki 28 +/- 2 microM) and aprotinin (Ki 1.13 +/- 0.07 microM) in a classical competitive manner, indicating that substrate and inhibitor binding to the active site was mutually exclusive. In contrast, inhibition of factor XIa cleavage of S2366 by factor IX (Ki 224 +/- 32 nM) was characterized by hyperbolic mixed-type inhibition, indicating that factor IX binds to free and S2366-bound factor XIa at exosites. Consistent with this premise, inhibition of factor XIa activation of factor IX by aprotinin (Ki 0.89 +/- 0.52 microM) was non-competitive, whereas inhibition by active site-inhibited factor IXa beta was competitive (Ki 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM). S2366 cleavage by isolated factor XIa catalytic domain was competitively inhibited by p-aminobenzamidine (Ki 38 +/- 14 microM) but was not inhibited by factor IX, consistent with loss of factor IX-binding exosites on the non-catalytic factor XI heavy chain. The results support a model in which factor IX binds initially to exosites on the factor XIa heavy chain, followed by interaction at the active site with subsequent bond cleavage, and support a growing body of evidence that exosite interactions are critical determinants of substrate affinity and specificity in blood coagulation reactions. PMID:15829482

  12. Promiscuous Recognition of a Trypanosoma cruzi CD8+ T Cell Epitope among HLA-A2, HLA-A24 and HLA-A1 Supertypes in Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Fanny; Rosas, Fernando; Thomas, M. Carmen; López, Manuel Carlos; González, John Mario; Cuéllar, Adriana; Puerta, Concepción J.

    2016-01-01

    Background TcTLE is a nonamer peptide from Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein that is conserved among different parasite strains and that is presented by different HLA-A molecules from the A2 supertype. Because peptides presented by several major histocompatibility complex (MHC) supertypes are potential targets for immunotherapy, the aim of this study was to determine whether MHC molecules other than the A2 supertype present the TcTLE peptide. Methodology/Principal Findings From 36 HLA-A2-negative chagasic patients, the HLA-A genotypes of twenty-eight patients with CD8+ T cells that recognized the TcTLE peptide using tetramer (twenty) or functional (eight) assays, were determined. SSP-PCR was used to identify the A locus and the allelic variants. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the frequency of TcTLE-specific CD8+ T cells, and their functional activity (IFN-γ, TNFα, IL-2, perforin, granzyme and CD107a/b production) was induced by exposure to the TcTLE peptide. All patients tested had TcTLE-specific CD8+ T cells with frequencies ranging from 0.07–0.37%. Interestingly, seven of the twenty-eight patients had HLA-A homozygous alleles: A*24 (5 patients), A*23 (1 patient) and A*01 (1 patient), which belong to the A24 and A1 supertypes. In the remaining 21 patients with HLA-A heterozygous alleles, the most prominent alleles were A24 and A68. The most common allele sub-type was A*2402 (sixteen patients), which belongs to the A24 supertype, followed by A*6802 (six patients) from the A2 supertype. Additionally, the A*3002/A*3201 alleles from the A1 supertype were detected in one patient. All patients presented CD8+ T cells producing at least one cytokine after TcTLE peptide stimulation. Conclusion/Significance These results show that TcTLE is a promiscuous peptide that is presented by the A24 and A1 supertypes, in addition to the A2 supertype, suggesting its potential as a target for immunotherapy. PMID:26974162

  13. Molecular Recognition of Fluorine Impacts Substrate Selectivity in the Fluoroacetyl-CoA Thioesterase FlK

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The fluoroacetate-producing bacterium Streptomyces cattleya has evolved a fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase (FlK) that exhibits a remarkably high level of discrimination for its cognate substrate compared to the cellularly abundant analogue acetyl-CoA, which differs only by the absence of the fluorine substitution. A major determinant of FlK specificity derives from its ability to take advantage of the unique properties of fluorine to enhance the reaction rate, allowing fluorine discrimination under physiological conditions where both substrates are likely to be present at saturating concentrations. Using a combination of pH–rate profiles, pre-steady-state kinetic experiments, and Taft analysis of wild-type and mutant FlKs with a set of substrate analogues, we explore the role of fluorine in controlling the enzyme acylation and deacylation steps. Further analysis of chiral (R)- and (S)-[2H1]fluoroacetyl-CoA substrates demonstrates that a kinetic isotope effect (1.7 ± 0.2) is observed for only the (R)-2H1 isomer, indicating that deacylation requires recognition of the prochiral fluoromethyl group to position the α-carbon for proton abstraction. Taken together, the selectivity for the fluoroacetyl-CoA substrate appears to rely not only on the enhanced polarization provided by the electronegative fluorine substitution but also on molecular recognition of fluorine in both formation and breakdown of the acyl-enzyme intermediate to control active site reactivity. These studies provide insights into the basis of fluorine selectivity in a naturally occurring enzyme–substrate pair, with implications for drug design and the development of fluorine-selective biocatalysts. PMID:24635371

  14. Molecular recognition of fluorine impacts substrate selectivity in the fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase FlK.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Amy M; Keddie, Neil S; Wadoux, Rudy D P; O'Hagan, David; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    The fluoroacetate-producing bacterium Streptomyces cattleya has evolved a fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase (FlK) that exhibits a remarkably high level of discrimination for its cognate substrate compared to the cellularly abundant analogue acetyl-CoA, which differs only by the absence of the fluorine substitution. A major determinant of FlK specificity derives from its ability to take advantage of the unique properties of fluorine to enhance the reaction rate, allowing fluorine discrimination under physiological conditions where both substrates are likely to be present at saturating concentrations. Using a combination of pH-rate profiles, pre-steady-state kinetic experiments, and Taft analysis of wild-type and mutant FlKs with a set of substrate analogues, we explore the role of fluorine in controlling the enzyme acylation and deacylation steps. Further analysis of chiral (R)- and (S)-[(2)H1]fluoroacetyl-CoA substrates demonstrates that a kinetic isotope effect (1.7 ± 0.2) is observed for only the (R)-(2)H1 isomer, indicating that deacylation requires recognition of the prochiral fluoromethyl group to position the α-carbon for proton abstraction. Taken together, the selectivity for the fluoroacetyl-CoA substrate appears to rely not only on the enhanced polarization provided by the electronegative fluorine substitution but also on molecular recognition of fluorine in both formation and breakdown of the acyl-enzyme intermediate to control active site reactivity. These studies provide insights into the basis of fluorine selectivity in a naturally occurring enzyme-substrate pair, with implications for drug design and the development of fluorine-selective biocatalysts.

  15. Substrate Recognition by the Multifunctional Cytochrome P450 MycG in Mycinamicin Hydroxylation and Epoxidation Reactions*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengying; Tietz, Drew R.; Rutaganira, Florentine U.; Kells, Petrea M.; Anzai, Yojiro; Kato, Fumio; Pochapsky, Thomas C.; Sherman, David H.; Podust, Larissa M.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of characterized cytochrome P450 enzymes in actinomycete secondary metabolic pathways are strictly substrate-, regio-, and stereo-specific. Examples of multifunctional biosynthetic cytochromes P450 with broader substrate and regio-specificity are growing in number and are of particular interest for biosynthetic and chemoenzymatic applications. MycG is among the first P450 monooxygenases characterized that catalyzes both hydroxylation and epoxidation reactions in the final biosynthetic steps, leading to oxidative tailoring of the 16-membered ring macrolide antibiotic mycinamicin II in the actinomycete Micromonospora griseorubida. The ordering of steps to complete the biosynthetic process involves a complex substrate recognition pattern by the enzyme and interplay between three tailoring modifications as follows: glycosylation, methylation, and oxidation. To understand the catalytic properties of MycG, we structurally characterized the ligand-free enzyme and its complexes with three native metabolites. These include substrates mycinamicin IV and V and their biosynthetic precursor mycinamicin III, which carries the monomethoxy sugar javose instead of the dimethoxylated sugar mycinose. The two methoxy groups of mycinose serve as sensors that mediate initial recognition to discriminate between closely related substrates in the post-polyketide oxidative tailoring of mycinamicin metabolites. Because x-ray structures alone did not explain the mechanisms of macrolide hydroxylation and epoxidation, paramagnetic NMR relaxation measurements were conducted. Molecular modeling based on these data indicates that in solution substrate may penetrate the active site sufficiently to place the abstracted hydrogen atom of mycinamicin IV within 6 Å of the heme iron and ∼4 Å of the oxygen of iron-ligated water. PMID:22952225

  16. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  17. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  18. Identification of determinants for tRNA substrate recognition by Escherichia coli C/U34 2'-O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Long, Tao; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Liu, Ru-Juan; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications bring chemical diversity to tRNAs, especially at positions 34 and 37 of the anticodon stem-loop (ASL). TrmL is the prokaryotic methyltransferase that catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the wobble base of tRNA(Leu)CAA and tRNA(Leu)UAA isoacceptors. This Cm34/Um34 modification affects codon-anticodon interactions and is essential for translational fidelity. TrmL-catalyzed 2'-O-methylation requires its homodimerization; however, understanding of the tRNA recognition mechanism by TrmL remains elusive. In the current study, by measuring tRNA methylation by TrmL and performing kinetic analysis of tRNA mutants, we found that TrmL exhibits a fine-tuned tRNA substrate recognition mechanism. Anticodon stem-loop minihelices with an extension of 2 base pairs are the minimal substrate for EcTrmL methylation. A35 is a key residue for TrmL recognition, while A36-A37-A38 are important either via direct interaction with TrmL or due to the necessity for prior isopentenylation (i(6)) at A37. In addition, TrmL only methylates pyrimidines but not purine residues at the wobble position, and the 2'-O-methylation relies on prior N(6)-isopentenyladenosine modification at position 37. PMID:26106808

  19. Motions of the Substrate Recognition Duplex in a Group I Intron Assessed by Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Gian Paola G; Boyd, Nathan; Herschlag, Daniel; Qin, Peter Z

    2009-03-11

    The Tetrahymena group I intron recognizes its oligonucleotide substrate in a two-step process. First, a substrate recognition duplex, called the P1 duplex, is formed. The P1 duplex then docks into the prefolded ribozyme core by forming tertiary contacts. P1 docking controls both the rate and the fidelity of substrate cleavage and has been extensively studied as a model for the formation of RNA tertiary structure. However, previous work has been limited to studying millisecond or slower motions. Here we investigated nanosecond P1 motions in the context of the ribozyme using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. A nitroxide spin label (R5a) was covalently attached to a specific site of the substrate oligonucleotide, the labeled substrate was bound to a prefolded ribozyme to form the P1 duplex, and X-band EPR spectroscopy was used to monitor nitroxide motions in the 0.1-50 ns regime. Using substrates that favor the docked or the undocked states, it was established that R5a was capable of reporting P1 duplex motions. Using R5a-labeled substrates it was found that the J1/2 junction connecting P1 to the ribozyme core controls nanosecond P1 mobility in the undocked state. This may account for previous observations that J1/2 mutations weaken substrate binding and give rise to cryptic cleavage. This study establishes the use of SDSL to probe nanosecond dynamic behaviors of individual helices within large RNA and RNA/protein complexes. This approach may help in understanding the relationship between RNA structure, dynamics, and function.

  20. Flavivirus enzyme-substrate interactions studied with chimeric proteinases: identification of an intragenic locus important for substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Preugschat, F; Lenches, E M; Strauss, J H

    1991-09-01

    The proteins of flaviviruses are translated as a single long polyprotein which is co- and posttranslationally processed by both cellular and viral proteinases. We have studied the processing of flavivirus polyproteins in vitro by a viral proteinase located within protein NS3 that cleaves at least three sites within the nonstructural region of the polyprotein, acting primarily autocatalytically. Recombinant polyproteins in which part of the polyprotein is derived from yellow fever virus and part from dengue virus were used. We found that polyproteins containing the yellow fever virus cleavage sites were processed efficiently by the yellow fever virus enzyme, by the dengue virus enzyme, and by various chimeric enzymes. In contrast, dengue virus cleavage sites were cleaved inefficiently by the dengue virus enzyme and not at all by the yellow fever virus enzyme. Studies with chimeric proteinases and with site-directed mutants provided evidence for a direct interaction between the cleavage sites and the proposed substrate-binding pocket of the enzyme. We also found that the efficiency and order of processing could be altered by site-directed mutagenesis of the proposed substrate-binding pocket.

  1. An Ordered Water Channel in Staphylococcus aureus FabI: Unraveling the Mechanism of Substrate Recognition and Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Schiebel, Johannes; Chang, Andrew; Merget, Benjamin; Bommineni, Gopal R.; Yu, Weixuan; Spagnuolo, Lauren A.; Baxter, Michael V.; Tareilus, Mona; Tonge, Peter J.; Kisker, Caroline; Sotriffer, Christoph A.

    2015-01-01

    One third of all drugs in clinical use owe their pharmacological activity to the functional inhibition of enzymes, highlighting the importance of enzymatic targets for drug development. Because of the close relationship between inhibition and catalysis, understanding the recognition and turnover of enzymatic substrates is essential for rational drug design. Although the Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (saFabI) involved in bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis constitutes a very promising target for the development of novel, urgently needed anti-staphylococcal agents, the substrate binding mode and catalytic mechanism remained unclear for this enzyme. Using a combined crystallographic, kinetic and computational approach, we have explored the chemical properties of the saFabI binding cavity, obtaining a consistent mechanistic model for substrate binding and turnover. We identified a water-molecule network linking the active site with a water basin inside the homo-tetrameric protein, which seems to be crucial for the closure of the flexible substrate binding loop as well as for an effective hydride and proton transfer during catalysis. Based on our results, we also derive a new model for the FabI-ACP complex that reveals how the ACP-bound acyl-substrate is injected into the FabI binding crevice. These findings support the future development of novel FabI inhibitors that target the FabI-ACP interface leading to the disruption of the interaction between these two proteins. PMID:25706582

  2. Determining the Degree of Promiscuity of Extensively Assayed Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jasial, Swarit; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In the context of polypharmacology, an emerging concept in drug discovery, promiscuity is rationalized as the ability of compounds to specifically interact with multiple targets. Promiscuity of drugs and bioactive compounds has thus far been analyzed computationally on the basis of activity annotations, without taking assay frequencies or inactivity records into account. Most recent estimates have indicated that bioactive compounds interact on average with only one to two targets, whereas drugs interact with six or more. In this study, we have further extended promiscuity analysis by identifying the most extensively assayed public domain compounds and systematically determining their promiscuity. These compounds were tested in hundreds of assays against hundreds of targets. In our analysis, assay promiscuity was distinguished from target promiscuity and separately analyzed for primary and confirmatory assays. Differences between the degree of assay and target promiscuity were surprisingly small and average and median degrees of target promiscuity of 2.6 to 3.4 and 2.0 were determined, respectively. Thus, target promiscuity remained at a low level even for most extensively tested active compounds. These findings provide further evidence that bioactive compounds are less promiscuous than drugs and have implications for pharmaceutical research. In addition to a possible explanation that drugs are more extensively tested for additional targets, the results would also support a “promiscuity enrichment model” according to which promiscuous compounds might be preferentially selected for therapeutic efficacy during clinical evaluation to ultimately become drugs. PMID:27082988

  3. Structural basis for acceptor-substrate recognition of UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Clitoria ternatea.

    PubMed

    Hiromoto, Takeshi; Honjo, Eijiro; Noda, Naonobu; Tamada, Taro; Kazuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Masahiko; Blaber, Michael; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-03-01

    UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UGT78K6) from Clitoria ternatea catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to anthocyanidins such as delphinidin. After the acylation of the 3-O-glucosyl residue, the 3'- and 5'-hydroxyl groups of the product are further glucosylated by a glucosyltransferase in the biosynthesis of ternatins, which are anthocyanin pigments. To understand the acceptor-recognition scheme of UGT78K6, the crystal structure of UGT78K6 and its complex forms with anthocyanidin delphinidin and petunidin, and flavonol kaempferol were determined to resolutions of 1.85 Å, 2.55 Å, 2.70 Å, and 1.75 Å, respectively. The enzyme recognition of unstable anthocyanidin aglycones was initially observed in this structural determination. The anthocyanidin- and flavonol-acceptor binding details are almost identical in each complex structure, although the glucosylation activities against each acceptor were significantly different. The 3-hydroxyl groups of the acceptor substrates were located at hydrogen-bonding distances to the Nε2 atom of the His17 catalytic residue, supporting a role for glucosyl transfer to the 3-hydroxyl groups of anthocyanidins and flavonols. However, the molecular orientations of these three acceptors are different from those of the known flavonoid glycosyltransferases, VvGT1 and UGT78G1. The acceptor substrates in UGT78K6 are reversely bound to its binding site by a 180° rotation about the O1-O3 axis of the flavonoid backbones observed in VvGT1 and UGT78G1; consequently, the 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups are protected from glucosylation. These substrate recognition schemes are useful to understand the unique reaction mechanism of UGT78K6 for the ternatin biosynthesis, and suggest the potential for controlled synthesis of natural pigments. PMID:25556637

  4. Structural basis for acceptor-substrate recognition of UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Clitoria ternatea

    PubMed Central

    Hiromoto, Takeshi; Honjo, Eijiro; Noda, Naonobu; Tamada, Taro; Kazuma, Kohei; Suzuki, Masahiko; Blaber, Michael; Kuroki, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UGT78K6) from Clitoria ternatea catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to anthocyanidins such as delphinidin. After the acylation of the 3-O-glucosyl residue, the 3′- and 5′-hydroxyl groups of the product are further glucosylated by a glucosyltransferase in the biosynthesis of ternatins, which are anthocyanin pigments. To understand the acceptor-recognition scheme of UGT78K6, the crystal structure of UGT78K6 and its complex forms with anthocyanidin delphinidin and petunidin, and flavonol kaempferol were determined to resolutions of 1.85 Å, 2.55 Å, 2.70 Å, and 1.75 Å, respectively. The enzyme recognition of unstable anthocyanidin aglycones was initially observed in this structural determination. The anthocyanidin- and flavonol-acceptor binding details are almost identical in each complex structure, although the glucosylation activities against each acceptor were significantly different. The 3-hydroxyl groups of the acceptor substrates were located at hydrogen-bonding distances to the Nε2 atom of the His17 catalytic residue, supporting a role for glucosyl transfer to the 3-hydroxyl groups of anthocyanidins and flavonols. However, the molecular orientations of these three acceptors are different from those of the known flavonoid glycosyltransferases, VvGT1 and UGT78G1. The acceptor substrates in UGT78K6 are reversely bound to its binding site by a 180° rotation about the O1–O3 axis of the flavonoid backbones observed in VvGT1 and UGT78G1; consequently, the 5- and 7-hydroxyl groups are protected from glucosylation. These substrate recognition schemes are useful to understand the unique reaction mechanism of UGT78K6 for the ternatin biosynthesis, and suggest the potential for controlled synthesis of natural pigments. PMID:25556637

  5. Substrate Recognition of Anthrax Lethal Factor Examined by Combinatorial and Pre-steady-state Kinetic Approaches*

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Maria Yu.; Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Dubiley, Svetlana A.; Kozyr, Arina V.; Fedorova, Olga S.; Chudakov, Dmitry M.; Knorre, Dmitry G.; Shemyakin, Igor G.; Gabibov, Alexander G.; Kolesnikov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Lethal factor (LF), a zinc-dependent protease of high specificity produced by Bacillus anthracis, is the effector component of the binary toxin that causes death in anthrax. New therapeutics targeting the toxin are required to reduce systemic anthrax-related fatalities. In particular, new insights into the LF catalytic mechanism will be useful for the development of LF inhibitors. We evaluated the minimal length required for formation of bona fide LF substrates using substrate phage display. Phage-based selection yielded a substrate that is cleaved seven times more efficiently by LF than the peptide targeted in the protein kinase MKK6. Site-directed mutagenesis within the metal-binding site in the LF active center and within phage-selected substrates revealed a complex pattern of LF-substrate interactions. The elementary steps of LF-mediated proteolysis were resolved by the stopped-flow technique. Pre-steady-state kinetics of LF proteolysis followed a four-step mechanism as follows: initial substrate binding, rearrangement of the enzyme-substrate complex, a rate-limiting cleavage step, and product release. Examination of LF interactions with metal ions revealed an unexpected activation of the protease by Ca2+ and Mn2+. Based on the available structural and kinetic data, we propose a model for LF-substrate interaction. Resolution of the kinetic and structural parameters governing LF activity may be exploited to design new LF inhibitors. PMID:19359249

  6. Molecular bases for the recognition of short peptide substrates and cysteine-directed modifications of human insulin-degrading enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid β (Aβ). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located ~30Å away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9Å crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite, and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high Km values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all thirteen cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitroso-glutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing towards an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:18986166

  7. Molecular bases for the recognition of short peptide substrates and cysteine-directed modifications of human insulin-degrading enzyme.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L; Wadlington, Natasha L; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2008-12-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid beta (Abeta). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located approximately 30 A away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9 A crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high K(m) values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all 13 cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitrosoglutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing toward an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis.

  8. Molecular Bases for the Recognition of Short Peptide Substrates and Cysteine-Directed Modifications of Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid {beta} (A{beta}). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located 30 {angstrom} away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high K{sub m} values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all 13 cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitrosoglutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing toward an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis.

  9. Reprogramming Caspase-7 Specificity by Regio-Specific Mutations and Selection Provides Alternate Solutions for Substrate Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hill, Maureen E; MacPherson, Derek J; Wu, Peng; Julien, Olivier; Wells, James A; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2016-06-17

    The ability to routinely engineer protease specificity can allow us to better understand and modulate their biology for expanded therapeutic and industrial applications. Here, we report a new approach based on a caged green fluorescent protein (CA-GFP) reporter that allows for flow-cytometry-based selection in bacteria or other cell types enabling selection of intracellular protease specificity, regardless of the compositional complexity of the protease. Here, we apply this approach to introduce the specificity of caspase-6 into caspase-7, an intracellular cysteine protease important in cellular remodeling and cell death. We found that substitution of substrate-contacting residues from caspase-6 into caspase-7 was ineffective, yielding an inactive enzyme, whereas saturation mutagenesis at these positions and selection by directed evolution produced active caspases. The process produced a number of nonobvious mutations that enabled conversion of the caspase-7 specificity to match caspase-6. The structures of the evolved-specificity caspase-7 (esCasp-7) revealed alternate binding modes for the substrate, including reorganization of an active site loop. Profiling the entire human proteome of esCasp-7 by N-terminomics demonstrated that the global specificity toward natural protein substrates is remarkably similar to that of caspase-6. Because the esCasp-7 maintained the core of caspase-7, we were able to identify a caspase-6 substrate, lamin C, that we predict relies on an exosite for substrate recognition. These reprogrammed proteases may be the first tool built with the express intent of distinguishing exosite dependent or independent substrates. This approach to specificity reprogramming should also be generalizable across a wide range of proteases.

  10. Alteration of Substrate Specificity: The Variable N-Terminal Domain of Tobacco Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase Is Important for Substrate Recognition[W

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takeshi; Nakata, Masaru; Fukazawa, Jutarou; Ishida, Sarahmi; Takahashi, Yohsuke

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are major signaling molecules that are involved in a variety of cellular processes. However, the molecular mechanisms whereby protein kinases discriminate specific substrates are still largely unknown. Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play central roles in Ca2+ signaling in plants. Previously, we found that a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) CDPK1 negatively regulated the transcription factor REPRESSION OF SHOOT GROWTH (RSG), which is involved in gibberellin feedback regulation. Here, we found that the variable N-terminal domain of CDPK1 is necessary for the recognition of RSG. A mutation (R10A) in the variable N-terminal domain of CDPK1 reduced both RSG binding and RSG phosphorylation while leaving kinase activity intact. Furthermore, the R10A mutation suppressed the in vivo function of CDPK1. The substitution of the variable N-terminal domain of an Arabidopsis thaliana CDPK, At CPK9, with that of Nt CDPK1 conferred RSG kinase activities. This chimeric CDPK behaved according to the identity of the variable N-terminal domain in transgenic plants. Our results open the possibility of engineering the substrate specificity of CDPK by manipulation of the variable N-terminal domain, enabling a rational rewiring of cellular signaling pathways. PMID:20442373

  11. β-Amyrin Biosynthesis: Promiscuity for Steric Bulk at Position 23 in the Oxidosqualene Substrate and the Significance of Hydrophobic Interaction between the Methyl Group at Position 30 and the Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ikki; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    To examine how the sterics at the 23 position of (3S)-2,3-oxidosqualene 1 influence the polycyclization cascade in β-amyrin biosynthesis, substrate analogues substituted with an ethyl group (10, 11), a hydrogen atom (12, 13), or a propyl residue (14) at the 23 position were incubated with β-amyrin synthase. The bulkier ethyl group was accepted as a substrate, leading to formation of the β-amyrin skeleton (42, 43) without truncation of the multiple cyclization reactions. Analogue 13, possessing a hydrogen atom and an ethyl group at the 23E and 23Z positions, respectively, was also converted into the β-amyrin skeleton 45. However, the analogue lacking an ethyl group at the 23Z position (12) underwent almost no conversion, strongly indicating that an alkyl group must exist at the Z position. The cyclization of the analogue with a propyl substituent at the Z position (14) was poor. Analogue 15 possessing CH2OH at the 23E position afforded a new compound 47 in a high yield as a result of trapping of the final oleanyl cation. Conversely, 16 with 23Z-CH2OH afforded novel compounds 48-50 in low yields, which resulted from the intermediary dammarenyl and baccharenyl cations. Therefore, the hydrophobic interaction between the 23Z-alkyl group and its binding site (possibly via CH/π interaction) is critical for adopting the correct chair-chair-chair-boat-boat conformation and for the full cyclization cascade. PMID:27419810

  12. Evolution of a new chlorophyll metabolic pathway driven by the dynamic changes in enzyme promiscuous activity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2014-03-01

    Organisms generate an enormous number of metabolites; however, the mechanisms by which a new metabolic pathway is acquired are unknown. To elucidate the importance of promiscuous enzyme activity for pathway evolution, the catalytic and substrate specificities of Chl biosynthetic enzymes were examined. In green plants, Chl a and Chl b are interconverted by the Chl cycle: Chl a is hydroxylated to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a followed by the conversion to Chl b, and both reactions are catalyzed by chlorophyllide a oxygenase. Chl b is reduced to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a by Chl b reductase and then converted to Chl a by 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase (HCAR). A phylogenetic analysis indicated that HCAR evolved from cyanobacterial 3,8-divinyl chlorophyllide reductase (DVR), which is responsible for the reduction of an 8-vinyl group in the Chl biosynthetic pathway. In addition to vinyl reductase activity, cyanobacterial DVR also has Chl b reductase and HCAR activities; consequently, three of the four reactions of the Chl cycle already existed in cyanobacteria, the progenitor of the chloroplast. During the evolution of cyanobacterial DVR to HCAR, the HCAR activity, a promiscuous reaction of cyanobacterial DVR, became the primary reaction. Moreover, the primary reaction (vinyl reductase activity) and some disadvantageous reactions were lost, but the neutral promiscuous reaction (NADH dehydrogenase) was retained in both DVR and HCAR. We also show that a portion of the Chl c biosynthetic pathway already existed in cyanobacteria. We discuss the importance of dynamic changes in promiscuous activity and of the latent pathways for metabolic evolution.

  13. Structural basis of substrate recognition by a bacterial deubiquitinase important for dynamics of phagosome ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Sheedlo, Michael J; Qiu, Jiazhang; Tan, Yunhao; Paul, Lake N; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Das, Chittaranjan

    2015-12-01

    Manipulation of the host's ubiquitin network is emerging as an important strategy for counteracting and repurposing the posttranslational modification machineries of the host by pathogens. Ubiquitin E3 ligases encoded by infectious agents are well known, as are a variety of viral deubiquitinases (DUBs). Bacterial DUBs have been discovered, but little is known about the structure and mechanism underlying their ubiquitin recognition. In this report, we found that members of the Legionella pneumophila SidE effector family harbor a DUB module important for ubiquitin dynamics on the bacterial phagosome. Structural analysis of this domain alone and in complex with ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester (Ub-VME) reveals unique molecular contacts used in ubiquitin recognition. Instead of relying on the Ile44 patch of ubiquitin, as commonly used in eukaryotic counterparts, the SdeADub module engages Gln40 of ubiquitin. The architecture of the active-site cleft presents an open arrangement with conformational plasticity, permitting deubiquitination of three of the most abundant polyubiquitin chains, with a distinct preference for Lys63 linkages. We have shown that this preference enables efficient removal of Lys63 linkages from the phagosomal surface. Remarkably, the structure reveals by far the most parsimonious use of molecular contacts to achieve deubiquitination, with less than 1,000 Å(2) of accessible surface area buried upon complex formation with ubiquitin. This type of molecular recognition appears to enable dual specificity toward ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier NEDD8. PMID:26598703

  14. Structural basis of substrate recognition by a bacterial deubiquitinase important for dynamics of phagosome ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Sheedlo, Michael J.; Qiu, Jiazhang; Tan, Yunhao; Paul, Lake N.; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Das, Chittaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of the host’s ubiquitin network is emerging as an important strategy for counteracting and repurposing the posttranslational modification machineries of the host by pathogens. Ubiquitin E3 ligases encoded by infectious agents are well known, as are a variety of viral deubiquitinases (DUBs). Bacterial DUBs have been discovered, but little is known about the structure and mechanism underlying their ubiquitin recognition. In this report, we found that members of the Legionella pneumophila SidE effector family harbor a DUB module important for ubiquitin dynamics on the bacterial phagosome. Structural analysis of this domain alone and in complex with ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester (Ub-VME) reveals unique molecular contacts used in ubiquitin recognition. Instead of relying on the Ile44 patch of ubiquitin, as commonly used in eukaryotic counterparts, the SdeADub module engages Gln40 of ubiquitin. The architecture of the active-site cleft presents an open arrangement with conformational plasticity, permitting deubiquitination of three of the most abundant polyubiquitin chains, with a distinct preference for Lys63 linkages. We have shown that this preference enables efficient removal of Lys63 linkages from the phagosomal surface. Remarkably, the structure reveals by far the most parsimonious use of molecular contacts to achieve deubiquitination, with less than 1,000 Å2 of accessible surface area buried upon complex formation with ubiquitin. This type of molecular recognition appears to enable dual specificity toward ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like modifier NEDD8. PMID:26598703

  15. Dissecting the substrate recognition of 3-O-sulfotransferase for the biosynthesis of anticoagulant heparin

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Andrea F.; Xu, Yongmei; Woody, Susan M.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Linhardt, Robert J.; Liu, Jian; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2012-05-29

    Heparin is a polysaccharide-based natural product that is used clinically as an anticoagulant drug. Heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST) is an enzyme that transfers a sulfo group to the 3-OH position of a glucosamine unit. 3-OST is present in multiple isoforms, and the polysaccharides modified by these different isoforms perform distinct biological functions. 3-OST isoform 1 (3-OST-1) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of anticoagulant heparin. Here, we report the crystal structure of the ternary complex of 3-OST-1, 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate, and a heptasaccharide substrate. Comparisons to previously determined structures of 3-OST-3 reveal unique binding modes used by the different isoforms of 3-OST for distinguishing the fine structures of saccharide substrates. Our data demonstrate that the saccharide substrates display distinct conformations when interacting with the different 3-OST isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis data suggest that several key amino residues, including Lys259, Thr256, and Trp283 in 3-OST-3 and Arg268 in 3-OST-1, play important roles in substrate binding and specificity between isoforms. These results deepen our understanding of the biosynthetic mechanism of heparan sulfate and provide structural information for engineering enzymes for an enhanced biosynthetic approach to heparin production.

  16. Structural Insights into Separase Architecture and Substrate Recognition through Computational Modelling of Caspase-Like and Death Domains

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Anja; Schmid, Ralf; Bayliss, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Separases are large proteins that mediate sister chromatid disjunction in all eukaryotes. They belong to clan CD of cysteine peptidases and contain a well-conserved C-terminal catalytic protease domain similar to caspases and gingipains. However, unlike other well-characterized groups of clan CD peptidases, there are no high-resolution structures of separases and the details of their regulation and substrate recognition are poorly understood. Here we undertook an in-depth bioinformatical analysis of separases from different species with respect to their similarity in amino acid sequence and protein fold in comparison to caspases, MALT-1 proteins (mucosa-associated lymphoidtissue lymphoma translocation protein 1) and gingipain-R. A comparative model of the single C-terminal caspase-like domain in separase from C. elegans suggests similar binding modes of substrate peptides between these protein subfamilies, and enables differences in substrate specificity of separase proteins to be rationalised. We also modelled a newly identified putative death domain, located N-terminal to the caspase-like domain. The surface features of this domain identify potential sites of protein-protein interactions. Notably, we identified a novel conserved region with the consensus sequence WWxxRxxLD predicted to be exposed on the surface of the death domain, which we termed the WR motif. We envisage that findings from our study will guide structural and functional studies of this important protein family. PMID:26513470

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-08-16

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance.

  18. Substrate Recognition Mechanism of VAMP/Synaptobrevin-cleaving Clostridial Neurotoxins*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4′) do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond. PMID:18511418

  19. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  20. cAMP-dependent protein kinase: crystallographic insights into substrate recognition and phosphotransfer.

    PubMed Central

    Madhusudan; Trafny, E. A.; Xuong, N. H.; Adams, J. A.; Ten Eyck, L. F.; Taylor, S. S.; Sowadski, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of ternary and binary substrate complexes of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been refined at 2.2 and 2.25 A resolution, respectively. The ternary complex contains ADP and a 20-residue substrate peptide, whereas the binary complex contains the phosphorylated substrate peptide. These 2 structures were refined to crystallographic R-factors of 17.5 and 18.1%, respectively. In the ternary complex, the hydroxyl oxygen OG of the serine at the P-site is 2.7 A from the OD1 atom of Asp 166. This is the first crystallographic evidence showing the direct interaction of this invariant carboxylate with a peptide substrate, and supports the predicted role of Asp 166 as a catalytic base and as an agent to position the serine -OH for nucleophilic attack. A comparison of the substrate and inhibitor ternary complexes places the hydroxyl oxygen of the serine 2.7 A from the gamma-phosphate of ATP and supports a direct in-line mechanism for phosphotransfer. In the binary complex, the phosphate on the Ser interacts directly with the epsilon N of Lys 168, another conserved residue. In the ternary complex containing ATP and the inhibitor peptide, Lys 168 interacts electrostatically with the gamma-phosphate of ATP (Zheng J, Knighton DR, Ten Eyck LF, Karlsson R, Xuong NH, Taylor SS, Sowadski JM, 1993, Biochemistry 32:2154-2161). Thus, Lys 168 remains closely associated with the phosphate in both complexes. A comparison of this binary complex structure with the recently solved structure of the ternary complex containing ATP and inhibitor peptide also reveals that the phosphate atom traverses a distance of about 1.5 A following nucleophilic attack by serine and transfer to the peptide. No major conformational changes of active site residues are seen when the substrate and product complexes are compared, although the binary complex with the phosphopeptide reveals localized changes in conformation in the region corresponding to the glycine

  1. Structures of Human Pumilio with Noncognate RNAs Reveal Molecular Mechanisms for Binding Promiscuity

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,Y.; Nair, D.; Wharton, R.; Aggarwal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Pumilio is a founder member of the evolutionarily conserved Puf family of RNA-binding proteins that control a number of physiological processes in eukaryotes. A structure of human Pumilio (hPum) Puf domain bound to a Drosophila regulatory sequence showed that each Puf repeat recognizes a single nucleotide. Puf domains in general bind promiscuously to a large set of degenerate sequences, but the structural basis for this promiscuity has been unclear. Here, we describe the structures of hPum Puf domain complexed to two noncognate RNAs, CycBreverse and Puf5. In each complex, one of the nucleotides is ejected from the binding surface, in effect, acting as a 'spacer.' The complexes also reveal the plasticity of several Puf repeats, which recognize noncanonical nucleotides. Together, these complexes provide a molecular basis for recognition of degenerate binding sites, which significantly increases the number of mRNAs targeted for regulation by Puf proteins in vivo.

  2. Supramolecular adhesives to hard surfaces: adhesion between host hydrogels and guest glass substrates through molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshinori; Sahara, Taiga; Sekine, Tomoko; Kakuta, Takahiro; Nakahata, Masaki; Otsubo, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Harada, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Supramolecular materials based on host-guest interactions should exhibit high selectivity and external stimuli-responsiveness. Among various stimuli, redox and photo stimuli are useful for its wide application. An external stimuli-responsive adhesive system between CD host-gels (CD gels) and guest molecules modified glass substrates (guest Sub) is focused. Here, the selective adhesion between host gels and guest substrates where adhesion depends on molecular complementarity is reported. Initially, it is thought that adhesion of a gel material onto a hard material might be difficult unless many guest molecules modified linear polymers immobilize on the surface of hard materials. However, reversible adhesion of the CD gels is observed by dissociating and re-forming inclusion complex in response to redox and photo stimuli.

  3. Massively parallel enzyme kinetics reveals the substrate recognition landscape of the metalloprotease ADAMTS13

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Colin A.; Dai, Manhong; Soylemez, Onuralp; Yee, Andrew; Desch, Karl C.; Siemieniak, David; Tomberg, Kärt; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.; Meng, Fan; Ginsburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in many biologic processes and are key mediators of cancer, inflammation, and thrombosis. However, comprehensive and quantitative techniques to define the substrate specificity profile of proteases are lacking. The metalloprotease ADAMTS13 regulates blood coagulation by cleaving von Willebrand factor (VWF), reducing its procoagulant activity. A mutagenized substrate phage display library based on a 73-amino acid fragment of VWF was constructed, and the ADAMTS13-dependent change in library complexity was evaluated over reaction time points, using high-throughput sequencing. Reaction rate constants (kcat/KM) were calculated for nearly every possible single amino acid substitution within this fragment. This massively parallel enzyme kinetics analysis detailed the specificity of ADAMTS13 and demonstrated the critical importance of the P1-P1′ substrate residues while defining exosite binding domains. These data provided empirical evidence for the propensity for epistasis within VWF and showed strong correlation to conservation across orthologs, highlighting evolutionary selective pressures for VWF. PMID:26170332

  4. The structural basis of pregnane X receptor binding promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Chi-Ho; Beglov, Dmitri; Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra N.; Kozakov, Dima; Waxman, David J.; Vajda, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    The steroid and xenobiotic-responsive human pregnane X receptor (PXR) binds a broad range of structurally diverse compounds. The structures of the apo and ligand-bound forms of PXR are very similar, in contrast to most promiscuous proteins that generally adapt their shape to different ligands. We investigated the structural origins of PXR's recognition promiscuity using computational solvent mapping, a technique developed for the identification and characterization of hot spots, i.e., regions of the protein surface that are major contributors to the binding free energy. Results reveal that the smooth and nearly spherical binding site of PXR has a well-defined hot spot structure, with four hot spots located on four different sides of the pocket and a fifth close to its center. Three of these hot spots are already present in the ligand-free protein. The most important hot spot is defined by three structurally and sequentially conserved residues, W299, F288, and Y306. This largely hydrophobic site is not very specific, and interacts with all known PXR ligands. Depending on their sizes and shapes, individual PXR ligands extend into 2, 3, or 4 more hot spot regions. The large number of potential arrangements within the binding site explains why PXR is able to accommodate a large variety of compounds. All five hot spots include at least one important residue, which is conserved in all mammalian PXRs, suggesting that the hot spot locations have remained largely invariant during mammalian evolution. The same side chains also show a high level of structural conservation across hPXR structures. However, each of the hPXR hot spots also includes residues with moveable side chains, further increasing the size variation in ligands that PXR can bind. Results also suggest a unique signal transduction mechanism between the PXR homodimerization interface and its co-activator binding site. PMID:19856963

  5. No genome barriers to promiscuous DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewin, R.

    1984-06-01

    Farrelly and Butow (1983) used the term 'promiscuous DNA' in their report of the apparent natural transfer of yeast mitochondrial DNA sequences into the nuclear genome. Ellis (1982) applied the same term in an editorial comment. It is pointed out since that time the subject of DNA's promiscuity has exploded with a series of reports. According to a report by Stern (1984), movement of DNA sequences between chloroplasts and mitochondria is not just a rare event but is a rampant process. It was recently concluded that 'the widespread presence of ctDNA sequences in plant mtDNA is best regarded as a dramatic demonstration of the dynamo nature of interactions between the chloroplast and the mitochondrion, similar to the ongoing process of interorganellar DNA transfer already documented between mitochondrion and nucleus and between chloroplast and nucleus'.

  6. [Proximity, intimacy and promiscuity in care].

    PubMed

    Flicourt, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    Lying at the heart of the intimacy of the other person, the nature of care supposes that the caregiver identifies the components resulting from the proximity and the invasion of the patient's personal space, where perceptions and representations give rise to reactive emotions and behaviour. Between modesty and nudity, proximity and promiscuity, caregivers have to adjust their approach of proper care, limiting the risks of intrusion. PMID:26043630

  7. The role of emotional promiscuity in unprotected sex.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel N; Paulhus, Delroy L

    2012-01-01

    Sexual promiscuity is a known risk factor for unprotected sex. A related variable, emotional promiscuity, has conceptual relevance but has yet to be studied with respect to unprotected sex. Data from four studies (total N = 908) indicated that both sexual promiscuity and emotional promiscuity were associated with womens' reports of unprotected sex. Independent of those contributions, the interaction between sexual promiscuity and emotional promiscuity was also significant for women: Scoring high on both variables was associated with the highest number of unprotected partners. This synergistic interaction emerged whether the question about number of unprotected partners referred to the past year or lifetime total. The interaction held up even after controlling for other relevant factors (lifetime partners, romantic beliefs, and attachment styles). In sum, among sexually active women, the susceptibility to falling in love puts them at risk for unprotected sex. Our discussion addresses possible mechanisms and why the key interaction only emerged in women. PMID:22260274

  8. Female economic dependence and the morality of promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael E; Pound, Nicholas; Scott, Isabel M

    2014-10-01

    In environments in which female economic dependence on a male mate is higher, male parental investment is more essential. In such environments, therefore, both sexes should value paternity certainty more and thus object more to promiscuity (because promiscuity undermines paternity certainty). We tested this theory of anti-promiscuity morality in two studies (N = 656 and N = 4,626) using U.S. samples. In both, we examined whether opposition to promiscuity was higher among people who perceived greater female economic dependence in their social network. In Study 2, we also tested whether economic indicators of female economic dependence (e.g., female income, welfare availability) predicted anti-promiscuity morality at the state level. Results from both studies supported the proposed theory. At the individual level, perceived female economic dependence explained significant variance in anti-promiscuity morality, even after controlling for variance explained by age, sex, religiosity, political conservatism, and the anti-promiscuity views of geographical neighbors. At the state level, median female income was strongly negatively related to anti-promiscuity morality and this relationship was fully mediated by perceived female economic dependence. These results were consistent with the view that anti-promiscuity beliefs may function to promote paternity certainty in circumstances where male parental investment is particularly important.

  9. Structural basis of cofactor-mediated stabilization and substrate recognition of the α-tubulin acetyltransferase αTAT1.

    PubMed

    Yuzawa, Satoru; Kamakura, Sachiko; Hayase, Junya; Sumimoto, Hideki

    2015-04-01

    The functions of microtubules are controlled in part by tubulin post-translational modification including acetylation of Lys⁴⁰ in α-tubulin. αTAT1 (α-tubulin acetyltransferase 1), an enzyme evolutionarily conserved among eukaryotes, has recently been identified as the major α-tubulin Lys⁴⁰ acetyltransferase, in which AcCoA (acetyl-CoA) serves as an acetyl group donor. The regulation and substrate recognition of this enzyme, however, have not been fully understood. In the present study, we show that AcCoA and CoA each form a stable complex with human αTAT1 to maintain the protein integrity both in vivo and in vitro. The invariant residues Arg¹³² and Ser¹⁶⁰ in αTAT1 participate in the stable interaction not only with AcCoA but also with CoA, which is supported by analysis of the present crystal structures of the αTAT1 catalytic domain in complex with CoA. Alanine substitution for Arg¹³² or Ser¹⁶⁰ leads to a drastic misfolding of the isolated αTAT1 catalytic domain in the absence of CoA and AcCoA but not in the presence of excess amounts of either cofactor. A mutant αTAT1 carrying the R132A or S160A substitution is degraded much faster than the wild-type protein when expressed in mammalian Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, alanine-scanning experiments using Lys⁴⁰-containing peptides reveal that α-tubulin Ser³⁸ is crucial for substrate recognition of αTAT1, whereas Asp³⁹, Ile⁴², the glycine stretch (amino acid residues 43-45) and Asp⁴⁶ are also involved. The requirement for substrate selection is totally different from that in various histone acetyltransferases, which appears to be consistent with the inability of αTAT1 to acetylate histones.

  10. Structures of trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from pathogenic fungi reveal the mechanisms of substrate recognition and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yi; Tenor, Jennifer L; Toffaletti, Dena L; Washington, Erica J; Liu, Jiuyu; Shadrick, William R; Schumacher, Maria A; Lee, Richard E; Perfect, John R; Brennan, Richard G

    2016-06-28

    Trehalose is a disaccharide essential for the survival and virulence of pathogenic fungi. The biosynthesis of trehalose requires trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, Tps1, and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, Tps2. Here, we report the structures of the N-terminal domain of Tps2 (Tps2NTD) from Candida albicans, a transition-state complex of the Tps2 C-terminal trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase domain (Tps2PD) bound to BeF3 and trehalose, and catalytically dead Tps2PD(D24N) from Cryptococcus neoformans bound to trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P). The Tps2NTD closely resembles the structure of Tps1 but lacks any catalytic activity. The Tps2PD-BeF3-trehalose and Tps2PD(D24N)-T6P complex structures reveal a "closed" conformation that is effected by extensive interactions between each trehalose hydroxyl group and residues of the cap and core domains of the protein, thereby providing exquisite substrate specificity. Disruption of any of the direct substrate-protein residue interactions leads to significant or complete loss of phosphatase activity. Notably, the Tps2PD-BeF3-trehalose complex structure captures an aspartyl-BeF3 covalent adduct, which closely mimics the proposed aspartyl-phosphate intermediate of the phosphatase catalytic cycle. Structures of substrate-free Tps2PD reveal an "open" conformation whereby the cap and core domains separate and visualize the striking conformational changes effected by substrate binding and product release and the role of two hinge regions centered at approximately residues 102-103 and 184-188. Significantly, tps2Δ, tps2NTDΔ, and tps2D705N strains are unable to grow at elevated temperatures. Combined, these studies provide a deeper understanding of the substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism of Tps2 and provide a structural basis for the future design of novel antifungal compounds against a target found in three major fungal pathogens. PMID:27307435

  11. Ultrahigh-throughput discovery of promiscuous enzymes by picodroplet functional metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte M.; Fischer, Gerhard; Mohamed, Mark F.; Hyvönen, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P.; Janssen, Dick B; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in microfluidic picolitre droplet compartments. Using bait substrates, new hydrolases for sulfate monoesters and phosphotriesters were identified, mostly based on promiscuous activities presumed not to be under selection pressure. Spanning three protein superfamilies, these break new ground in sequence space: promiscuity now connects enzymes with only distantly related sequences. Most hits could not have been predicted by sequence analysis, because the desired activities have never been ascribed to similar sequences, showing how this approach complements bioinformatic harvesting of metagenomic sequencing data. Functional screening of a library of unprecedented size with excellent assay sensitivity has been instrumental in identifying rare genes constituting catalytically versatile hubs in sequence space as potential starting points for the acquisition of new functions. PMID:26639611

  12. Ultrahigh-throughput discovery of promiscuous enzymes by picodroplet functional metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte M; Fischer, Gerhard; Mohamed, Mark F; Hyvönen, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P; Janssen, Dick B; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-12-07

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in microfluidic picolitre droplet compartments. Using bait substrates, new hydrolases for sulfate monoesters and phosphotriesters were identified, mostly based on promiscuous activities presumed not to be under selection pressure. Spanning three protein superfamilies, these break new ground in sequence space: promiscuity now connects enzymes with only distantly related sequences. Most hits could not have been predicted by sequence analysis, because the desired activities have never been ascribed to similar sequences, showing how this approach complements bioinformatic harvesting of metagenomic sequencing data. Functional screening of a library of unprecedented size with excellent assay sensitivity has been instrumental in identifying rare genes constituting catalytically versatile hubs in sequence space as potential starting points for the acquisition of new functions.

  13. High-throughput functional screening of steroid substrates with wild-type and chimeric P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Urban, Philippe; Truan, Gilles; Pompon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation. PMID:25243177

  14. High-Throughput Functional Screening of Steroid Substrates with Wild-Type and Chimeric P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Truan, Gilles; Pompon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation. PMID:25243177

  15. Substrate recognition and function of the R2TP complex in response to cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    von Morgen, Patrick; Hořejší, Zuzana; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    The R2TP complex is a HSP90 co-chaperone, which consists of four subunits: PIH1D1, RPAP3, RUVBL1, and RUVBL2. It is involved in the assembly of large protein or protein–RNA complexes such as RNA polymerase, small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs), phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-related kinases (PIKKs), and their complexes. While RPAP3 has a HSP90 binding domain and the RUVBLs comprise ATPase activities important for R2TP functions, PIH1D1 contains a PIH-N domain that specifically recognizes phosphorylated substrates of the R2TP complex. In this review we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the R2TP complex with the focus on the recently identified structural and mechanistic features of the R2TP complex functions. We also discuss the way R2TP regulates cellular response to stress caused by low levels of nutrients or by DNA damage and its possible exploitation as a target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25767478

  16. Substrate recognition by glycoside hydrolase family 74 xyloglucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takuya; Yaoi, Katsuro; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro

    2007-11-01

    The basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium produces xyloglucanase Xgh74B, which has the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 74 catalytic domain and family 1 carbohydrate-binding module, in cellulose-grown culture. The recombinant enzyme, which was heterologously expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris, had high hydrolytic activity toward xyloglucan from tamarind seed (TXG), whereas other beta-1,4-glucans examined were poor substrates for the enzyme. The existence of the carbohydrate-binding module significantly affects adsorption of the enzyme on crystalline cellulose, but has no effect on the hydrolysis of xyloglucan, indicating that the domain may contribute to the localization of the enzyme. HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS analyses of the hydrolytic products of TXG clearly indicated that Xgh74B hydrolyzes the glycosidic bonds of unbranched glucose residues, like other GH family 74 xyloglucanases. However, viscometric analysis suggested that Xgh74B hydrolyzes TXG in a different manner from other known GH family 74 xyloglucanases. Gel permeation chromatography showed that Xgh74B initially produced oligosaccharides of degree of polymerization (DP) 16-18, and these oligosaccharides were then slowly hydrolyzed to final products of DP 7-9. In addition, the ratio of oligosaccharides of DP 7-9 versus those of DP 16-18 was dependent upon the pH of the reaction mixture, indicating that the affinity of Xgh74B for the oligosaccharides of DP 16-18 is affected by the ionic environment at the active site. PMID:17922847

  17. Structures of trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from pathogenic fungi reveal the mechanisms of substrate recognition and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi; Tenor, Jennifer L.; Toffaletti, Dena L.; Washington, Erica J.; Liu, Jiuyu; Shadrick, William R.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Lee, Richard E.; Perfect, John R.; Brennan, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose is a disaccharide essential for the survival and virulence of pathogenic fungi. The biosynthesis of trehalose requires trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, Tps1, and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase, Tps2. Here, we report the structures of the N-terminal domain of Tps2 (Tps2NTD) from Candida albicans, a transition-state complex of the Tps2 C-terminal trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase domain (Tps2PD) bound to BeF3 and trehalose, and catalytically dead Tps2PD(D24N) from Cryptococcus neoformans bound to trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P). The Tps2NTD closely resembles the structure of Tps1 but lacks any catalytic activity. The Tps2PD–BeF3–trehalose and Tps2PD(D24N)–T6P complex structures reveal a “closed” conformation that is effected by extensive interactions between each trehalose hydroxyl group and residues of the cap and core domains of the protein, thereby providing exquisite substrate specificity. Disruption of any of the direct substrate–protein residue interactions leads to significant or complete loss of phosphatase activity. Notably, the Tps2PD–BeF3–trehalose complex structure captures an aspartyl-BeF3 covalent adduct, which closely mimics the proposed aspartyl-phosphate intermediate of the phosphatase catalytic cycle. Structures of substrate-free Tps2PD reveal an “open” conformation whereby the cap and core domains separate and visualize the striking conformational changes effected by substrate binding and product release and the role of two hinge regions centered at approximately residues 102–103 and 184–188. Significantly, tps2Δ, tps2NTDΔ, and tps2D705N strains are unable to grow at elevated temperatures. Combined, these studies provide a deeper understanding of the substrate recognition and catalytic mechanism of Tps2 and provide a structural basis for the future design of novel antifungal compounds against a target found in three major fungal pathogens. PMID:27307435

  18. Mechanism of Substrate Recognition And PLP-Induced Conformational Changes in II-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase From Arabidopsis Thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, N.; Clay, M.D.; Belkum, M.J.van; Cherney, M.M.; Vederas, J.C.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-26

    LL-Diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT), a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathways of plants and Chlamydia, is a potential target for the development of herbicides or antibiotics. This homodimeric enzyme converts L-tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (THDP) directly to LL-DAP using L-glutamate as the source of the amino group. Earlier, we described the 3D structures of native and malate-bound LL-DAP-AT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDAP-AT). Seven additional crystal structures of AtDAP-AT and its variants are reported here as part of an investigation into the mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis. Two structures are of AtDAP-AT with reduced external aldimine analogues: N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-glutamate (PLP-Glu) and N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)- LL-Diaminopimelate (PLP-DAP) bound in the active site. Surprisingly, they reveal that both L-glutamate and LL-DAP are recognized in a very similar fashion by the same sets of amino acid residues; both molecules adopt twisted V-shaped conformations. With both substrates, the {alpha}-carboxylates are bound in a salt bridge with Arg404, whereas the distal carboxylates are recognized via hydrogen bonds to the well-conserved side chains of Tyr37, Tyr125 and Lys129. The distal C{sup {var_epsilon}} amino group of LL-DAP is specifically recognized by several non-covalent interactions with residues from the other subunit (Asn309*, Tyr94*, Gly95*, and Glu97* (Amino acid designators followed by an asterisk (*) indicate that the residues originate in the other subunit of the dimer)) and by three bound water molecules. Two catalytically inactive variants of AtDAP-AT were created via site-directed mutagenesis of the active site lysine (K270N and K270Q). The structures of these variants permitted the observation of the unreduced external aldimines of PLP with L-glutamate and with LL-DAP in the active site, and revealed differences in the torsion angle about the PLP-substrate bond. Lastly, an apo

  19. Molecular recognition of the substrate diphosphate group governs product diversity in trichodiene synthase mutants.

    PubMed

    Vedula, L Sangeetha; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Pyun, Hyung-Jung; Coates, Robert M; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2005-04-26

    The X-ray crystal structures of Y305F trichodiene synthase and its complex with coproduct inorganic pyrophosphate (PP(i)) and of Y305F and D100E trichodiene synthases in ternary complexes with PP(i) and aza analogues of the bisabolyl carbocation intermediate are reported. The Y305F substitution in the basic D(302)RRYR motif does not cause large changes in the overall structure in comparison with the wild-type enzyme in either the uncomplexed enzyme or its complex with PP(i). However, the loss of the Y305F-PP(i) hydrogen bond appears to be compensated by a very slight shift in the position of the side chain of R304. The putative bisabolyl carbocation mimic, R-azabisabolene, binds in a conformation and orientation that does not appear to mimic that of the actual carbocation intermediate, suggesting that the avid inhibition by R- and S-azabisabolenes arises more from favorable electrostatic interactions with PP(i) rather than any special resemblance to a reaction intermediate. Greater enclosed active-site volumes result from the Y305F and D100E mutations that appear to confer greater variability in ligand-binding conformations and orientations, which results in the formation of aberrant cyclization products. Because the binding conformations and orientations of R-azabisabolene to Y305F and D100E trichodiene synthases do not correspond to binding conformations required for product formation and because the binding conformations and orientations of diverse substrate and carbocation analogues to other cyclases such as 5-epi-aristolochene synthase and bornyl diphosphate synthase generally do not correspond to catalytically productive complexes, we conclude that the formation of transient carbocation intermediates in terpene cyclization reactions is generally under kinetic rather than thermodynamic control. PMID:15835903

  20. Mutations, kataegis, and translocations in B lymphocytes: towards a mechanistic understanding of AID promiscuous activity

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Rafael; Basu, Uttiya; Yewdell, William T.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Robbiani, Davide F.; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    As B cells engage in the immune response they express the deaminase AID to initiate the hypermutation and recombination of immunoglobulin genes, which are crucial processes for the efficient recognition and disposal of pathogens, However, AID must be tightly controlled in B cells to minimize off-targeting mutations, which can drive chromosomal translocations and the development of B cell malignancies, such as lymphomas. Recent genomic and biochemical analyses have begun to unravel the crucial question of how AID-mediated deamination is targeted outside immunoglobulin genes. Here, we discuss the transcriptional and topological features that are emerging as key drivers of AID promiscuous activity. PMID:26898111

  1. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K.

    2016-01-01

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5′ extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms—either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins—the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5′ or 3′ extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  2. Roles of the N domain of the AAA+ Lon protease in substrate recognition, allosteric regulation and chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Degron binding regulates the activities of the AAA+ Lon protease in addition to targeting proteins for degradation. The sul20 degron from the cell-division inhibitor SulA is shown here to bind to the N domain of Escherichia coli Lon, and the recognition site is identified by cross-linking and scanning for mutations that prevent sul20-peptide binding. These N-domain mutations limit the rates of proteolysis of model sul20-tagged substrates and ATP hydrolysis by an allosteric mechanism. Lon inactivation of SulA in vivo requires binding to the N domain and robust ATP hydrolysis but does not require degradation or translocation into the proteolytic chamber. Lon-mediated relief of proteotoxic stress and protein aggregation in vivo can also occur without degradation but is not dependent on robust ATP hydrolysis. In combination, these results demonstrate that Lon can function as a protease or a chaperone and reveal that some of its ATP-dependent biological activities do not require translocation.

  3. X-ray structure of active site-inhibited clotting factor Xa. Implications for drug design and substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, H; Kühne, A; Bode, W; Huber, R; von der Saal, W; Wirthensohn, K; Engh, R A

    1996-11-22

    The 3.0-A resolution x-ray structure of human des-Gla-coagulation factor Xa (fXa) has been determined in complex with the synthetic inhibitor DX-9065a. The binding geometry is characterized primarily by two interaction sites: the naphthamidine group is fixed in the S1 pocket by a typical salt bridge to Asp-189, while the pyrrolidine ring binds in the unique aryl-binding site (S4) of fXa. Unlike the large majority of inhibitor complexes with serine proteinases, Gly-216 (S3) does not contribute to hydrogen bond formation. In contrast to typical thrombin binding modes, the S2 site of fXa cannot be used by DX-9065a since it is blocked by Tyr-99, and the aryl-binding site (S4) of fXa is lined by carbonyl oxygen atoms that can accommodate positive charges. This has implications for natural substrate recognition as well as for drug design. PMID:8939944

  4. Role of the C-terminal region of mouse inducible Hsp72 in the recognition of peptide substrate for chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Michiko; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Tani, Fumito

    2004-10-22

    Here, we produced the C-terminal truncation variants of mouse inducible heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) to elucidate the regulatory role of the C-terminal helical lid of Hsp70 for substrate recognition. All of the truncation variants containing the substrate binding domain bound a short-length peptide substrate CLLLSAPRR. When a large mass reduced carboxymethyl alpha-lactalbumin (RCMLA) as a substrate was used in gel filtration experiment, we observed the complex formation only for the truncation variants containing the long alpha-helix C in the helical lid. However, RCMLA binding occurred even for the variants lacking alpha-helix C when their C-terminal region was anchored onto a solid phase. Together with the finding that helix C is involved in the self-association of Hsp70, our present data suggest that the C-terminal region of Hsp70 modulates the substrate recognition and its kinetics may be substrate-mass dependent. PMID:15498567

  5. Molecular Insight into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Frame-Modifying Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Agent Mithramycin

    SciTech Connect

    Bosserman, Mary A.; Downey, Theresa; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2014-02-14

    Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) have been shown to play key roles for the biosynthesis of important natural products. MtmOIV, a homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent BVMO, catalyzes the key frame-modifying steps of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway, including an oxidative C–C bond cleavage, by converting its natural substrate premithramycin B into mithramycin DK, the immediate precursor of mithramycin. The drastically improved protein structure of MtmOIV along with the high-resolution structure of MtmOIV in complex with its natural substrate premithramycin B are reported here, revealing previously undetected key residues that are important for substrate recognition and catalysis. Kinetic analyses of selected mutants allowed us to probe the substrate binding pocket of MtmOIV and also to discover the putative NADPH binding site. This is the first substrate-bound structure of MtmOIV providing new insights into substrate recognition and catalysis, which paves the way for the future design of a tailored enzyme for the chemo-enzymatic preparation of novel mithramycin analogues.

  6. Structural Determinants of Substrate Recognition in the HAD Superfamily Member D-glycero-D-manno-Heptose-1,7-bisphosphate Phosphatase (GmhB)

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.; Wang, L; Huang, H; Peisach, E; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K

    2010-01-01

    The haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase (HAD) enzyme superfamily is the largest family of phosphohydrolases. In HAD members, the structural elements that provide the binding interactions that support substrate specificity are separated from those that orchestrate catalysis. For most HAD phosphatases, a cap domain functions in substrate recognition. However, for the HAD phosphatases that lack a cap domain, an alternate strategy for substrate selection must be operative. One such HAD phosphatase, GmhB of the HisB subfamily, was selected for structure-function analysis. Herein, the X-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli GmhB in the apo form (1.6 {angstrom} resolution), in a complex with Mg{sup 2+} and orthophosphate (1.8 {angstrom} resolution), and in a complex with Mg{sup 2+} and D-glycero-D-manno-heptose 1{beta},7-bisphosphate (2.2 {angstrom} resolution) were determined, in addition to the structure of Bordetella bronchiseptica GmhB bound to Mg{sup 2+} and orthophosphate (1.7 {angstrom} resolution). The structures show that in place of a cap domain, the GmhB catalytic site is elaborated by three peptide inserts or loops that pack to form a concave, semicircular surface around the substrate leaving group. Structure-guided kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants was conducted in parallel with a bioinformatics study of sequence diversification within the HisB subfamily to identify loop residues that serve as substrate recognition elements and that distinguish GmhB from its subfamily counterpart, the histidinol-phosphate phosphatase domain of HisB. We show that GmhB and the histidinol-phosphate phosphatase domain use the same design of three substrate recognition loops inserted into the cap domain yet, through selective residue usage on the loops, have achieved unique substrate specificity and thus novel biochemical function.

  7. Molecular insight into the role of the N-terminal extension in the maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of a bacterial alginate lyase from polysaccharide lyase family 18.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sheng; Wei, Tian-Di; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Li, Chun-Yang; Wang, Peng; Xie, Bin-Bin; Qin, Qi-Long; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Pang, Xiu-Hua; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-10-24

    Bacterial alginate lyases, which are members of several polysaccharide lyase (PL) families, have important biological roles and biotechnological applications. The mechanisms for maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of PL18 alginate lyases are still largely unknown. A PL18 alginate lyase, aly-SJ02, from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 0524 displays a β-jelly roll scaffold. Structural and biochemical analyses indicated that the N-terminal extension in the aly-SJ02 precursor may act as an intramolecular chaperone to mediate the correct folding of the catalytic domain. Molecular dynamics simulations and mutational assays suggested that the lid loops over the aly-SJ02 active center serve as a gate for substrate entry. Molecular docking and site-directed mutations revealed that certain conserved residues at the active center, especially those at subsites +1 and +2, are crucial for substrate recognition. Tyr(353) may function as both a catalytic base and acid. Based on our results, a model for the catalysis of aly-SJ02 in alginate depolymerization is proposed. Moreover, although bacterial alginate lyases from families PL5, 7, 15, and 18 adopt distinct scaffolds, they share the same conformation of catalytic residues, reflecting their convergent evolution. Our results provide the foremost insight into the mechanisms of maturation, substrate recognition, and catalysis of a PL18 alginate lyase.

  8. Structural evidence for the involvement of the residues Ser187 and Tyr422 in substrate recognition in the 3-methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Pérez, César; Díaz-Pérez, Alma Laura; Rodríguez-Zavala, José Salud; Campos-García, Jesús

    2013-09-01

    The enzyme 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa-MCCase) is essential for the assimilation of leucine and acyclic monoterpenes. The structure of the Pa-MCCase was analysed by computational modelling to establish the molecular basis of substrate recognition. The active site is composed of two zones, which may play important roles in substrate recognition and catalysis. To further understand the interactions of the active site with the substrate, site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved residues S187 and R51 located in zone I, and F417, Y422 and G423 from zone II of the Pa-MCCase was carried out. The residue substitutions S187A and Y422D completely abolished the Pa-MCCase activity, whereas substitutions R51A, F417Y and G423A indicated that these residues are not essential. Interestingly, the residues R47, R51 and S187 form a well-defined pocket that may play important roles in substrate coupling to the Co-A motif. At zone one, mutation S187A was essential, but mutant R51A retained activity, suggesting that the R51 function could be relegated to neighbouring positive residues. Residue Y422 instead of contributing to substrate discrimination, it may participate in deprotonation of methyl group on MC-CoA, because it is located at adequate distances from the 3-methylcrotonyl-chain and carboxybiotin groups in the Pa-MCCase carboxylation site.

  9. Crystal structure of the human cytosolic sialidase Neu2. Evidence for the dynamic nature of substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Chavas, Leonard M G; Tringali, Cristina; Fusi, Paola; Venerando, Bruno; Tettamanti, Guido; Kato, Ryuichi; Monti, Eugenio; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2005-01-01

    Gangliosides play key roles in cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions, and transmembrane signaling. Sialidases hydrolyze sialic acids to produce asialo compounds, which is the first step of degradation processes of glycoproteins and gangliosides. Sialidase involvement has been implicated in some lysosomal storage disorders such as sialidosis and galactosialidosis. Neu2 is a recently identified human cytosolic sialidase. Here we report the first high resolution x-ray structures of mammalian sialidase, human Neu2, in its apo form and in complex with an inhibitor, 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetylneuraminic acid (DANA). The structure shows the canonical six-blade beta-propeller observed in viral and bacterial sialidases with its active site in a shallow crevice. In the complex structure, the inhibitor lies in the catalytic crevice surrounded by ten amino acids. In particular, the arginine triad, conserved among sialidases, aids in the proper positioning of the carboxylate group of DANA within the active site region. The tyrosine residue, Tyr(334), conserved among mammalian and bacterial sialidases as well as in viral neuraminidases, facilitates the enzymatic reaction by stabilizing a putative carbonium ion in the transition state. The loops containing Glu(111) and the catalytic aspartate Asp(46) are disordered in the apo form but upon binding of DANA become ordered to adopt two short alpha-helices to cover the inhibitor, illustrating the dynamic nature of substrate recognition. The N-acetyl and glycerol moieties of DANA are recognized by Neu2 residues not shared by bacterial sialidases and viral neuraminidases, which can be regarded as a key structural difference for potential drug design against bacteria, influenza, and other viruses.

  10. Plasminogen Substrate Recognition by the Streptokinase-Plasminogen Catalytic Complex Is Facilitated by Arg253, Lys256, and Lys257 in the Streptokinase β-Domain and Kringle 5 of the Substrate*

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Anthony C.; Laha, Malabika; Panizzi, Peter; Thompson, Michael W.; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Bock, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Streptokinase (SK) conformationally activates the central zymogen of the fibrinolytic system, plasminogen (Pg). The SK·Pg* catalytic complex binds Pg as a specific substrate and cleaves it into plasmin (Pm), which binds SK to form the SK·Pm complex that propagates Pm generation. Catalytic complex formation is dependent on lysine-binding site (LBS) interactions between a Pg/Pm kringle and the SK COOH-terminal Lys414. Pg substrate recognition is also LBS-dependent, but the kringle and SK structural element(s) responsible have not been identified. SK mutants lacking Lys414 with Ala substitutions of charged residues in the SK β-domain 250-loop were evaluated in kinetic studies that resolved conformational and proteolytic Pg activation. Activation of [Lys]Pg and mini-Pg (containing only kringle 5 of Pg) by SK with Ala substitutions of Arg253, Lys256, and Lys257 showed decreases in the bimolecular rate constant for Pm generation, with nearly total inhibition for the SK Lys256/Lys257 double mutant. Binding of bovine Pg (BPg) to the SK·Pm complex containing fluorescently labeled Pm demonstrated LBS-dependent assembly of a SK·labeled Pm·BPg ternary complex, whereas BPg did not bind to the complex containing the SK Lys256/Lys257 mutant. BPg was activated by SK·Pm with a Km indistinguishable from the KD for BPg binding to form the ternary complex, whereas the SK Lys256/Lys257 mutant did not support BPg activation. We conclude that SK residues Arg253, Lys256, and Lys257 mediate Pg substrate recognition through kringle 5 of the [Lys]Pg and mini-Pg substrates. A molecular model of the SK·kringle 5 complex identifies the putative interactions involved in LBS-dependent Pg substrate recognition. PMID:19473980

  11. Insight into determinants of substrate binding and transport in a multidrug efflux protein

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Kamela O.; Paul, Stephanie; Labarbuta, Paola; Law, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance arising from the activity of integral membrane transporter proteins presents a global public health threat. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, transporter proteins belonging to the major facilitator superfamily make a considerable contribution to multidrug resistance by catalysing efflux of myriad structurally and chemically different antimicrobial compounds. Despite their clinical relevance, questions pertaining to mechanistic details of how these promiscuous proteins function remain outstanding, and the role(s) played by individual amino acid residues in recognition, binding and subsequent transport of different antimicrobial substrates by multidrug efflux members of the major facilitator superfamily requires illumination. Using in silico homology modelling, molecular docking and mutagenesis studies in combination with substrate binding and transport assays, we identified several amino acid residues that play important roles in antimicrobial substrate recognition, binding and transport by Escherichia coli MdtM, a representative multidrug efflux protein of the major facilitator superfamily. Furthermore, our studies suggested that ‘aromatic clamps’ formed by tyrosine and phenylalanine residues located within the substrate binding pocket of MdtM may be important for antimicrobial substrate recognition and transport by the protein. Such ‘clamps’ may be a structurally and functionally important feature of all major facilitator multidrug efflux proteins. PMID:26961153

  12. A requirement of hydrophobic and basic amino acid residues for substrate recognition by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J C; Kwon, Y G; Lawrence, D S; Edelman, A M

    1994-01-01

    The substrate recognition determinants of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia were investigated by using peptide analogues based on the amino acid sequence around Ser-9 of synapsin I. The Km and Vmax for the synthetic peptide Leu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Leu-Ser-Asp-Ala-Asn-Phe are 3.9 microM and 18.5 mumol/(min.mg), respectively. Deletion of Leu at the -5 position lowers the Vmax/Km by 470-fold. The requirement for a hydrophobic residue at -5 was confirmed by the 90- to 2400-fold reduction in Vmax/Km produced by Arg, Ala, or Asp substitutions, but only 2.6-fold decrease after Phe substitution at this position. A hydrophobic residue is similarly required at the +4 position. Deletion of Phe at this position produces a 67-fold reduction, and substitution of Ala for Phe a 43-fold reduction in Vmax/Km. In contrast, substitution with Leu increases Vmax/Km by 1.8-fold. Arg at -3 is also required for recognition as shown by an approximately 240-fold decrease in Vmax/Km after Ala substitution at this position. Positions -2, -4, and +1 appear to play secondary roles in substrate recognition. Arg at -2 and -4 are positive determinants, since Ala substitution at these positions decreases Vmax/Km by 4.7- and 11-fold, respectively. Asp at +1 is a negative influence, since Ala and Leu substitutions at this position increase Vmax/Km by 2.3- and 6.3-fold, respectively. Substitution of Ala for Leu at -1 or Thr for Ser at the 0 position has little effect on phosphorylation kinetics. Thus, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ia has the minimal substrate recognition motif of Hyd-Xaa-Arg-Xaa-Xaa-(Ser*/Thr*)-Xaa-Xaa-Xaa-Hyd, where Hyd represents a hydrophobic amino acid residue. PMID:8022798

  13. Promiscuity, paternity and personality in the great tit

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Samantha C.; Chapman, Joanne R.; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Quinn, John L.; Sheldon, Ben C.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding causes of variation in promiscuity within populations remain a major challenge. While most studies have focused on quantifying fitness costs and benefits of promiscuous behaviour, an alternative possibility—that variation in promiscuity within populations is maintained because of linkage with other traits—has received little attention. Here, we examine whether promiscuity in male and female great tits (Parus major)—quantified as extra-pair paternity (EPP) within and between nests—is associated with variation in a well-documented personality trait: exploration behaviour in a novel environment. Exploration behaviour has been shown to correlate with activity levels, risk-taking and boldness, and these are behaviours that may plausibly influence EPP. Exploration behaviour correlated positively with paternity gained outside the social pair among males in our population, but there was also a negative correlation with paternity in the social nest. Hence, while variation in male personality predicted the relative importance of paternity gain within and outside the pair bond, total paternity gained was unrelated to exploration behaviour. We found evidence that males paired with bold females were more likely to sire extra-pair young. Our data thus demonstrate a link between personality and promiscuity, with no net effects on reproductive success, suggesting personality-dependent mating tactics, in contrast with traditional adaptive explanations for promiscuity. PMID:22130602

  14. Sexual promiscuity: knowledge of dangers in institutions of higher learning.

    PubMed

    Ebong, R D

    1994-06-01

    Knowledge of dangers of sexual promiscuity was assessed in 2 institutions of higher learning. The objectives were to find out the knowledge of medical and social consequences as well as the factors responsible for sexual promiscuity among Nigerian youths. The study also assessed the discrepancies in societal concept of sex norms for males and females. The result was used as an index to determine the need for sex education for Nigerian youths. A total of 200 students (100 from each school) was assessed by random selection and use of a questionnaire. The result showed that students had a fair knowledge of sexual promiscuity, although in terms of medical consequences the knowledge was low for both groups. On social consequences, the knowledge was fair for both groups. Students agreed that lack of financial support and of supervision from parents and teachers were among the causes of sexual promiscuity. Recommendations were made for Health Education in these areas in institutions of higher learning. Also, recommendations were made for parental education on how to bring up, and care for, their adolescents to reduce the problems of sexual promiscuity. It was also recommended that a compulsory course on sexual promiscuity should be included in the syllabus in institutions of higher learning.

  15. AIDS and promiscuity: muddles in the models of HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Bolton, R

    1992-05-01

    AIDS has been blamed on promiscuity and the promiscuous, and a major goal of many HIV-prevention programs has been to induce people to reduce the number of their sexual partners. Despite the salience of this concept in the AIDS discourse of scientists, policymakers, the media, religious leaders, and the gay community, critical analysis of the role of promiscuity in this epidemic has been lacking. Following a review of promiscuity in various genres of AIDS discourse, this article discusses promiscuity in American society and in HIV-prevention campaigns. The relative risks associated with monogamy, abstinence and promiscuity are examined, and the author concludes that the partner-reduction strategy, instead of contributing to a reduction in HIV transmission has been an impediment to AIDS prevention efforts, exacerbating the problem by undermining the sex-positive approaches to risk reduction that have proven effective. Responsibility for this misguided strategy is attributed to a moralistic approach to AIDS and to the misapplication of epidemiological concepts and inappropriate social science models to the task of promoting healthy forms of sexuality.

  16. Molecular Evolution of the CYP2D Subfamily in Primates: Purifying Selection on Substrate Recognition Sites without the Frequent or Long-Tract Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Satta, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 gene is a member of the CYP2D gene subfamily, along with the CYP2D7P and CYP2D8P pseudogenes. Although the CYP2D6 enzyme has been studied extensively because of its clinical importance, the evolution of the CYP2D subfamily has not yet been fully understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to reveal the evolutionary process of the human drug metabolic system. Here, we investigate molecular evolution of the CYP2D subfamily in primates by comparing 14 CYP2D sequences from humans to New World monkey genomes. Window analysis and statistical tests revealed that entire genomic sequences of paralogous genes were extensively homogenized by gene conversion during molecular evolution of CYP2D genes in primates. A neighbor-joining tree based on genomic sequences at the nonsubstrate recognition sites showed that CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes were clustered together due to gene conversion. In contrast, a phylogenetic tree using amino acid sequences at substrate recognition sites did not cluster the CYP2D6 and CYP2D8 genes, suggesting that the functional constraint on substrate specificity is one of the causes for purifying selection at the substrate recognition sites. Our results suggest that the CYP2D gene subfamily in primates has evolved to maintain the regioselectivity for a substrate hydroxylation activity between individual enzymes, even though extensive gene conversion has occurred across CYP2D coding sequences. PMID:25808902

  17. Dual roles of a conserved pair, Arg23 and Ser20, in recognition of multiple substrates in {alpha}-aminoadipate aminotransferase from Thermus thermophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, Takuya; Tomita, Takeo; Miyagawa, Tomoharu; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2009-10-09

    To clarify the mechanism for substrate recognition of {alpha}-aminoadipate aminotransferase (AAA-AT) from Thermus thermophilus, the crystal structure of AAA-AT complexed with N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-glutamate (PPE) was determined at 1.67 A resolution. The crystal structure revealed that PPE is recognized by amino acid residues the same as those seen in N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-{alpha}-aminoadipate (PPA) recognition; however, to bind the {gamma}-carboxyl group of Glu at a fixed position, the C{alpha} atom of the Glu moiety moves 0.80 A toward the {gamma}-carboxyl group in the PPE complex. Markedly decreased activity for Asp can be explained by the shortness of the aspartyl side chain to be recognized by Arg23 and further dislocation of the C{alpha} atom of bound Asp. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Arg23 has dual functions for reaction, (i) recognition of {gamma} ({delta})-carboxyl group of Glu (AAA) and (ii) rearrangement of {alpha}2 helix by changing the interacting partners to place the hydrophobic substrate at the suitable position.

  18. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  19. Structural and Thermodymamic Basis for Enhanced DNA Binding by a Promiscuous Mutant EcoRI Endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza,P.; Rosenberg, J.; Jen-Jacobson, L.

    2007-01-01

    Promiscuous mutant EcoRI endonucleases bind to the canonical site GAATTC more tightly than does the wild-type endonuclease, yet cleave variant (EcoRI*) sites more rapidly than does wild-type. The crystal structure of the A138T promiscuous mutant homodimer in complex with a GAATTC site is nearly identical to that of the wild-type complex, except that the Thr138 side chains make packing interactions with bases in the 5'-flanking regions outside the recognition hexanucleotide while excluding two bound water molecules seen in the wild-type complex. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm exclusion of these waters. The structure and simulations suggest possible reasons why binding of the A138T protein to the GAATTC site has S more favorable and H less favorable than for wild-type endonuclease binding. The interactions of Thr138 with flanking bases may permit A138T, unlike wild-type enzyme, to form complexes with EcoRI* sites that structurally resemble the specific wild-type complex with GAATTC.

  20. Structural Insights Into Substrate Recognition by the Neurospora Varkud Satellite Ribozyme: Importance of U-Turns at the Kissing-Loop Junction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Substrate recognition by the Neurospora Varkud satellite ribozyme depends on the formation of a magnesium-dependent kissing-loop interaction between the stem-loop I (SLI) substrate and stem-loop V (SLV) of the catalytic domain. From mutagenesis studies, it has been established that this I/V kissing-loop interaction involves three Watson–Crick base pairs and is associated with a structural rearrangement of the SLI substrate that facilitates catalysis. Here, we report the NMR structural characterization of this I/V kissing-loop using isolated stem-loops. NMR studies were performed on different SLI/SLV complexes containing a common SLV and shiftable, preshifted, or double-stranded SLI variants. These studies confirm the presence of three Watson–Crick base pairs at the kissing-loop junction and provide evidence for the structural rearrangement of shiftable SLI variants upon SLV binding. NMR structure determination of an SLI/SLV complex demonstrates that both the SLI and SLV loops adopt U-turn structures, which facilitates intermolecular Watson–Crick base pairing. Several other interactions at the I/V interface, including base triples and base stacking, help create a continuously stacked structure. These NMR studies provide a structural basis to understand the stability of the I/V kissing-loop interaction and lead us to propose a kinetic model for substrate activation in the VS ribozyme. PMID:24325625

  1. Peptide-cleaving agents for human islet amyloid polypeptide containing substrate recognition site based on quinoxaline: cleavage efficiency enhanced by lowering substrate concentration.

    PubMed

    Chei, Woosuk; Ju, Heeyeon; Suh, Junghun

    2012-02-15

    Oligomers of human islet amyloid polypeptide (h-IAPP) are believed to be the pathogenic species for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Peptide-cleaving agents selective for oligomers of h-IAPP were synthesized by using quinoxaline derivatives as recognition sites attached to the Co(III) complex of cyclen in this study. When the initial concentration of h-IAPP was lowered from 4.0 to 0.20 μM, cleavage yield of the new agents was enhanced by 3 times reaching 16-22 mol%. This shows that the agents would have significant activities at subnano molar concentrations if the concentration of h-IAPP is lowered to the in vivo values. This further indicates that the peptide-cleaving agents prepared previously in this laboratory possess sufficiently high activity for application as a new therapeutic option for Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and Parkinson's disease.

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis maps interactions that enhance cognate and limit promiscuous catalysis by an alkaline phosphatase superfamily phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-12-23

    Catalytic promiscuity, an evolutionary concept, also provides a powerful tool for gaining mechanistic insights into enzymatic reactions. Members of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily are highly amenable to such investigation, with several members having been shown to exhibit promiscuous activity for the cognate reactions of other superfamily members. Previous work has shown that nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) exhibits a >10⁶-fold preference for the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters over phosphate monoesters, and that the reaction specificity is reduced 10³-fold when the size of the substituent on the transferred phosphoryl group of phosphate diester substrates is reduced to a methyl group. Here we show additional specificity contributions from the binding pocket for this substituent (herein termed the R' substituent) that account for an additional ~250-fold differential specificity with the minimal methyl substituent. Removal of four hydrophobic side chains suggested on the basis of structural inspection to interact favorably with R' substituents decreases phosphate diester reactivity 10⁴-fold with an optimal diester substrate (R' = 5'-deoxythymidine) and 50-fold with a minimal diester substrate (R' = CH₃). These mutations also enhance the enzyme's promiscuous phosphate monoesterase activity by nearly an order of magnitude, an effect that is traced by mutation to the reduction of unfavorable interactions with the two residues closest to the nonbridging phosphoryl oxygen atoms. The quadruple R' pocket mutant exhibits the same activity toward phosphate diester and phosphate monoester substrates that have identical leaving groups, with substantial rate enhancements of ~10¹¹-fold. This observation suggests that the Zn²⁺ bimetallo core of AP superfamily enzymes, which is equipotent in phosphate monoester and diester catalysis, has the potential to become specialized for the hydrolysis of each class of phosphate esters via addition

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis maps interactions that enhance cognate and limit promiscuous catalysis by an alkaline phosphatase superfamily phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-12-23

    Catalytic promiscuity, an evolutionary concept, also provides a powerful tool for gaining mechanistic insights into enzymatic reactions. Members of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily are highly amenable to such investigation, with several members having been shown to exhibit promiscuous activity for the cognate reactions of other superfamily members. Previous work has shown that nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) exhibits a >10⁶-fold preference for the hydrolysis of phosphate diesters over phosphate monoesters, and that the reaction specificity is reduced 10³-fold when the size of the substituent on the transferred phosphoryl group of phosphate diester substrates is reduced to a methyl group. Here we show additional specificity contributions from the binding pocket for this substituent (herein termed the R' substituent) that account for an additional ~250-fold differential specificity with the minimal methyl substituent. Removal of four hydrophobic side chains suggested on the basis of structural inspection to interact favorably with R' substituents decreases phosphate diester reactivity 10⁴-fold with an optimal diester substrate (R' = 5'-deoxythymidine) and 50-fold with a minimal diester substrate (R' = CH₃). These mutations also enhance the enzyme's promiscuous phosphate monoesterase activity by nearly an order of magnitude, an effect that is traced by mutation to the reduction of unfavorable interactions with the two residues closest to the nonbridging phosphoryl oxygen atoms. The quadruple R' pocket mutant exhibits the same activity toward phosphate diester and phosphate monoester substrates that have identical leaving groups, with substantial rate enhancements of ~10¹¹-fold. This observation suggests that the Zn²⁺ bimetallo core of AP superfamily enzymes, which is equipotent in phosphate monoester and diester catalysis, has the potential to become specialized for the hydrolysis of each class of phosphate esters via addition

  4. Promiscuity and the evolution of sexual transmitted diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Sebastián; Kuperman, Marcelo; Ferreira da Costa Gomes, Marcelo

    2003-09-01

    We study the relation between different social behaviors and the onset of epidemics in a model for the dynamics of sexual transmitted diseases. The model considers the society as a system of individual sexuated agents that can be organized in couples and interact with each other. The different social behaviors are incorporated assigning what we call a promiscuity value to each individual agent. The individual promiscuity is taken from a distribution and represents the daily probability of going out to look for a sexual partner, abandoning its eventual mate. In terms of this parameter we find a threshold for the epidemic which is much lower than the classical SIR model prediction, i.e., R0 (basic reproductive number)=1. Different forms for the distribution of the population promiscuity are considered showing that the threshold is weakly sensitive to them. We study the homosexual and the heterosexual case as well.

  5. Rational engineering of the Neurospora VS ribozyme to allow substrate recognition via different kissing-loop interactions.

    PubMed

    Lacroix-Labonté, Julie; Girard, Nicolas; Dagenais, Pierre; Legault, Pascale

    2016-08-19

    The Neurospora VS ribozyme is a catalytic RNA that has the unique ability to specifically recognize and cleave a stem-loop substrate through formation of a highly stable kissing-loop interaction (KLI). In order to explore the engineering potential of the VS ribozyme to cleave alternate substrates, we substituted the wild-type KLI by other known KLIs using an innovative engineering method that combines rational and combinatorial approaches. A bioinformatic search of the protein data bank was initially performed to identify KLIs that are structurally similar to the one found in the VS ribozyme. Next, substrate/ribozyme (S/R) pairs that incorporate these alternative KLIs were kinetically and structurally characterized. Interestingly, several of the resulting S/R pairs allowed substrate cleavage with substantial catalytic efficiency, although with reduced activity compared to the reference S/R pair. Overall, this study describes an innovative approach for RNA engineering and establishes that the KLI of the trans VS ribozyme can be adapted to cleave other folded RNA substrates. PMID:27166370

  6. Fidelity and Promiscuity in an Ant-Plant Mutualism: A Case Study of Triplaris and Pseudomyrmex

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The association between the myrmecophyte Triplaris and ants of the genus Pseudomyrmex is an often-reported example of mutualism but no molecular studies have examined this association to date. In this study, the interspecific relationships of Triplaris were reconstructed using five molecular markers (two chloroplast and three nuclear), and the relationships of the associated Pseudomyrmex using two molecular regions (one mitochondrial and one nuclear). A data set including all known collections of plant hosts and resident ants was also compiled. The pattern of distribution of both organisms reveals that there are varying degrees of host specificity; most ants show broader host usage (promiscuous) but one species (P. dendroicus) is faithful to a single species of Triplaris. In most ant-plant interactions, host usage is not specific at the species level and preferences may result from geographical or ecological sorting. The specificity of P. dendroicus could be based on chemical recognition of the host they were raised on. PMID:26630384

  7. The Structure and Specificity of the Type III Secretion System Effector NleC Suggest a DNA Mimicry Mechanism of Substrate Recognition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria utilize the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins directly into host cells, facilitating colonization. In enterohemmorhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), a subset of T3SS effectors is essential for suppression of the inflammatory response in hosts, including humans. Identified as a zinc protease that cleaves NF-κB transcription factors, NleC is one such effector. Here, we investigate NleC substrate specificity, showing that four residues around the cleavage site in the DNA-binding loop of the NF-κB subunit RelA strongly influence the cleavage rate. Class I NF-κB subunit p50 is cleaved at a reduced rate consistent with conservation of only three of these four residues. However, peptides containing 10 residues on each side of the scissile bond were not efficiently cleaved by NleC, indicating that elements distal from the cleavage site are also important for substrate recognition. We present the crystal structure of NleC and show that it mimics DNA structurally and electrostatically. Consistent with this model, mutation of phosphate-mimicking residues in NleC reduces the level of RelA cleavage. We propose that global recognition of NF-κB subunits by DNA mimicry combined with a high sequence selectivity for the cleavage site results in exquisite NleC substrate specificity. The structure also shows that despite undetectable similarity of its sequence to those of other Zn2+ proteases beyond its conserved HExxH Zn2+-binding motif, NleC is a member of the Zincin protease superfamily, albeit divergent from its structural homologues. In particular, NleC displays a modified Ψ-loop motif that may be important for folding and refolding requirements implicit in T3SS translocation. PMID:25040221

  8. Studies of the Maltose Transport System Reveal a Mechanism for Coupling ATP Hydrolysis to Substrate Translocation without Direct Recognition of Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Alister D.; Shilton, Brian H.

    2010-10-11

    The ATPase activity of the maltose transporter (MalFGK{sub 2}) is dependent on interactions with the maltose-binding protein (MBP). To determine whether direct interactions between the translocated sugar and MalFGK{sub 2} are important for the regulation of ATP hydrolysis, we used an MBP mutant (sMBP) that is able to bind either maltose or sucrose. We observed that maltose- and sucrose-bound sMBP stimulate equal levels of MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase activity. Therefore, the ATPase activity of MalFGK{sub 2} is coupled to translocation of maltose solely by interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and MBP. For both maltose and sucrose, the ability of sMBP to stimulate the MalFGK{sub 2} ATPase was greatly reduced compared with wild-type MBP, indicating that the mutations in sMBP have interfered with important interactions between MBP and MalFGK{sub 2}. High resolution crystal structure analysis of sMBP shows that in the closed conformation with bound sucrose, three of four mutations are buried, and the fourth causes only a minor change in the accessible surface. In contrast, in the open form of sMBP, all of the mutations are accessible, and the main chain of Tyr{sup 62}-Gly{sup 69} is destabilized and occupies an alternative conformation due to the W62Y mutation. On this basis, the compromised ability of sMBP to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by MalFGK{sub 2} is most likely due to a disruption of interactions between MalFGK{sub 2} and the open, rather than the closed, conformation of sMBP. Modeling the open sMBP structure bound to MalFGK{sub 2} in the transition state for ATP hydrolysis points to an important site of interaction and suggests a mechanism for coupling ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation that is independent of the exact structure of the substrate.

  9. Much More than Power: The Pedagogy of Promiscuous Black Feminism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckaby, M. Francyne

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores promiscuous black feminism by juxtaposing black feminism, Foucualt's poststructuralism, and my grandmother. The tensions created by these juxtapositions illuminate the ways black feminism and poststructuralism are resources and challenges to each other, and how both offer understandings of the relations at play that shape…

  10. Promiscuity in mice is associated with increased vaginal bacterial diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmanes, Matthew David

    2011-11-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures, as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used two sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents— Peromyscus californicus and Peromyscus maniculatus that differ with regard to the number of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity.

  11. Promiscuity in Mice is Associated with Increased Vaginal Bacterial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    MacManes, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in the number of sexual partners (i.e., mating system) have the potential to exert a strong influence on the bacterial communities present in reproductive structures like the vagina. Because this structure serves as a conduit for gametes, bacteria present there may have a pronounced, direct effect on host reproductive success. As a first step towards the identification of the relationship between sexual behavior and potentially pathogenic bacterial communities inhabiting vital reproductive structures—as well as their potential effects on fitness, I sought to quantify differences in bacterial diversity in a promiscuous and monogamous mammal species. To accomplish this, I used 2 sympatric species of Peromyscus rodents—P. californicus and P. maniculatus that differ with regard to numbers of sexual partners per individual to test the hypothesis that bacterial diversity should be greater in the promiscuous P. maniculatus relative to the monogamous P. californicus. As predicted, phylogenetically controlled and operational taxonomic unit-based indices of bacterial diversity indicated that diversity is greater in the promiscuous species. These results provide important new insights into the effects of mating system on bacterial diversity in free-living vertebrates, and may suggest a potential cost of promiscuity. PMID:21964973

  12. Understanding the structural basis of substrate recognition by Plasmodium falciparum plasmepsin V to aid in the design of potent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Rajiv K; Patel, Chandan; Mishra, Vandana; Xiao, Huogen; Yada, Rickey Y; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum plasmepsin V (PfPMV) is an essential aspartic protease required for parasite survival, thus, considered as a potential drug target. This study reports the first detailed structural analysis and molecular dynamics simulation of PfPMV as an apoenzyme and its complexes with the substrate PEXEL as well as with the inhibitor saquinavir. The presence of pro-peptide in PfPMV may not structurally hinder the formation of a functionally competent catalytic active site. The structure of PfPMV-PEXEL complex shows that the unique positions of Glu179 and Gln222 are responsible for providing the specificity of PEXEL substrate with arginine at P3 position. The structural analysis also reveals that the S4 binding pocket in PfPMV is occupied by Ile94, Ala98, Phe370 and Tyr472, and therefore, does not allow binding of pepstatin, a potent inhibitor of most pepsin-like aspartic proteases. Among the screened inhibitors, the HIV-1 protease inhibitors and KNI compounds have higher binding affinities for PfPMV with saquinavir having the highest value. The presence of a flexible group at P2 and a bulky hydrophobic group at P3 position of the inhibitor is preferred in the PfPMV substrate binding pocket. Results from the present study will aid in the design of potent inhibitors of PMV. PMID:27531685

  13. Understanding the structural basis of substrate recognition by Plasmodium falciparum plasmepsin V to aid in the design of potent inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Rajiv K.; Patel, Chandan; Mishra, Vandana; Xiao, Huogen; Yada, Rickey Y.; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum plasmepsin V (PfPMV) is an essential aspartic protease required for parasite survival, thus, considered as a potential drug target. This study reports the first detailed structural analysis and molecular dynamics simulation of PfPMV as an apoenzyme and its complexes with the substrate PEXEL as well as with the inhibitor saquinavir. The presence of pro-peptide in PfPMV may not structurally hinder the formation of a functionally competent catalytic active site. The structure of PfPMV-PEXEL complex shows that the unique positions of Glu179 and Gln222 are responsible for providing the specificity of PEXEL substrate with arginine at P3 position. The structural analysis also reveals that the S4 binding pocket in PfPMV is occupied by Ile94, Ala98, Phe370 and Tyr472, and therefore, does not allow binding of pepstatin, a potent inhibitor of most pepsin-like aspartic proteases. Among the screened inhibitors, the HIV-1 protease inhibitors and KNI compounds have higher binding affinities for PfPMV with saquinavir having the highest value. The presence of a flexible group at P2 and a bulky hydrophobic group at P3 position of the inhibitor is preferred in the PfPMV substrate binding pocket. Results from the present study will aid in the design of potent inhibitors of PMV. PMID:27531685

  14. The Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition in an exo-b-d-glucosaminidase Involved in Chitosan Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bueren, A.; Ghinet, M; Gregg, K; Fleury, A; Brzezinski, R; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Family 2 of the glycoside hydrolase classification is one of the largest families. Structurally characterized members of this family include enzymes with ?-galactosidase activity (Escherichia coli LacZ), ?-glucuronidase activity (Homo sapiens GusB), and ?-mannosidase activity (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BtMan2A). Here, we describe the structure of a family 2 glycoside hydrolase, CsxA, from Amycolatopsis orientalis that has exo-?-d-glucosaminidase (exo-chitosanase) activity. Analysis of a product complex (1.85 A resolution) reveals a unique negatively charged pocket that specifically accommodates the nitrogen of nonreducing end glucosamine residues, allowing this enzyme to discriminate between glucose and glucosamine. This also provides structural evidence for the role of E541 as the catalytic nucleophile and D469 as the catalytic acid/base. The structures of an E541A mutant in complex with a natural ?-1,4-d-glucosamine tetrasaccharide substrate and both E541A and D469A mutants in complex with a pNP-?-d-glucosaminide synthetic substrate provide insight into interactions in the + 1 subsite of this enzyme. Overall, a comparison with the active sites of other GH2 enzymes highlights the unique architecture of the CsxA active site, which imparts specificity for its cationic substrate.

  15. The Structural Basis of Substrate Recognition in an exo-beta-d-Glucosaminidase Involved in Chitosan Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lammerts van Bueren, A.; Ghinet, M; Gregg, K; Fleury, A; Brzezinski, R; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    Family 2 of the glycoside hydrolase classification is one of the largest families. Structurally characterized members of this family include enzymes with beta-galactosidase activity (Escherichia coli LacZ), beta-glucuronidase activity (Homo sapiens GusB), and beta-mannosidase activity (Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron BtMan2A). Here, we describe the structure of a family 2 glycoside hydrolase, CsxA, from Amycolatopsis orientalis that has exo-beta-D-glucosaminidase (exo-chitosanase) activity. Analysis of a product complex (1.85 A resolution) reveals a unique negatively charged pocket that specifically accommodates the nitrogen of nonreducing end glucosamine residues, allowing this enzyme to discriminate between glucose and glucosamine. This also provides structural evidence for the role of E541 as the catalytic nucleophile and D469 as the catalytic acid/base. The structures of an E541A mutant in complex with a natural beta-1,4-D-glucosamine tetrasaccharide substrate and both E541A and D469A mutants in complex with a pNP-beta-D-glucosaminide synthetic substrate provide insight into interactions in the +1 subsite of this enzyme. Overall, a comparison with the active sites of other GH2 enzymes highlights the unique architecture of the CsxA active site, which imparts specificity for its cationic substrate.

  16. Elucidation of the sugar recognition ability of the lectin domain of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 by using unnatural glycopeptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yayoi; Nudelman, Aaron S; Levery, Steven B; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P; Hindsgaul, Ole; Clausen, Henrik; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-03-01

    Mucin-type glycosylation [α-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (α-GalNAc)-O-Ser/Thr] on proteins is initiated biosynthetically by 16 homologous isoforms of GalNAc-Ts (uridine diphosphate-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases). All the GalNAc-Ts consist of a catalytic domain and a lectin domain. Previous reports of GalNAc-T assays toward peptides and α-GalNAc glycopeptides showed that the lectin domain recognized the sugar on the substrates and affected the reaction; however, the details are not clear. Here, we report a new strategy to give insight on the sugar recognition ability and the function of the GalNAc-T3 lectin domain using chemically synthesized natural-type (α-GalNAc-O-Thr) and unnatural-type [β-GalNAc-O-Thr, α-Fuc-O-Thr and β-GlcNAc-O-Thr] MUC5AC glycopeptides. GalNAc-T3 is one of isoforms expressed in various organs, its substrate specificity extensively characterized and its anomalous expression has been identified in several types of cancer (e.g. pancreas and stomach). The glycopeptides used in this study were designed based on a preliminary peptide assay with a sequence derived from the MUC5AC tandem repeat. Through GalNAc-T3 and lectin-inactivated GalNAc-T3, competition assays between the glycopeptide substrates and product analyses (MALDI-TOF MS, RP-HPLC and ETD-MS/MS), we show that the lectin domain strictly recognized GalNAc on the substrate and this specificity controlled the glycosylation pathway.

  17. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  18. Complete abolition of reading and writing ability with a third ventricle colloid cyst: implications for surgical intervention and proposed neural substrates of visual recognition and visual imaging ability.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lynne Ann; Morton, Nicholas; Romanowski, Charles A J; Gosden, Kevin

    2013-10-24

    We report a rare case of a patient unable to read (alexic) and write (agraphic) after a mild head injury. He had preserved speech and comprehension, could spell aloud, identify words spelt aloud and copy letter features. He was unable to visualise letters but showed no problems with digits. Neuropsychological testing revealed general visual memory, processing speed and imaging deficits. Imaging data revealed an 8 mm colloid cyst of the third ventricle that splayed the fornix. Little is known about functions mediated by fornical connectivity, but this region is thought to contribute to memory recall. Other regions thought to mediate letter recognition and letter imagery, visual word form area and visual pathways were intact. We remediated reading and writing by multimodal letter retraining. The study raises issues about the neural substrates of reading, role of fornical tracts to selective memory in the absence of other pathology, and effective remediation strategies for selective functional deficits.

  19. Aquifex aeolicus Trm1[tRNA (m2(2)G26) methyltransferase] has a novel recognition mechanism of the substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Awai, Takako; Takehara, Toru; Takeda, Hiroshi; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    Aquifex aeolicus is a hyper-thermophilic eubacterium, which probably diverged at the earliest period from the other bacteria on the evolution of life. Therefore, analyses of RNA modification enzymes of this bacterium may supply important information in relation to the establishment of the early protein synthesis. In the previous meeting, we have reported that Aquifex aeolicus trm1 gene product possesses a tRNA (m2(2)G26) methyltransferase activity. This enzyme catalyzes the methyl-transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the semi-conserved residue, G26, via the intermediate modified base, m2G26. In this meeting, we report the A. aeolicus Trm1 large scale expression system in E. coli and the substrate RNA recognition mechanism of the enzyme.

  20. Critical determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis in the M. tuberculosis class II AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Shukla, Ankita; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exodeoxyribonuclease (MtbXthA) is an important player in DNA base excision repair (BER). We demonstrate that the enzyme has robust apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity, 3'-5' exonuclease, phosphatase, and phosphodiesterase activities. The enzyme functions as an AP-endonuclease at high ionic environments, while the 3'-5'-exonuclease activity is predominant at low ionic environments. Our molecular modelling and mutational experiments show that E57 and D251 are critical for catalysis. Although nicked DNA and gapped DNA are fair substrates of MtbXthA, the gap-size did not affect the excision activity and furthermore, a substrate with a recessed 3'-end is preferred. To understand the determinants of abasic-site recognition, we examined the possible roles of (i) the base opposite the abasic site, (ii) the abasic ribose ring itself, (iii) local distortions in the AP-site, and (iv) conserved residues located near the active site. Our experiments demonstrate that the first three determinants do not play a role in MtbXthA, and in fact the enzyme exhibits robust endonucleolytic activity against single-stranded AP DNA also. Regarding the fourth determinant, it is known that the catalytic-site of AP endonucleases is surrounded by conserved aromatic residues and intriguingly, the exact residues that are directly involved in abasic site recognition vary with the individual proteins. We therefore, used a combination of mutational analysis, kinetic assays, and structure-based modelling, to identify that Y237, supported by Y137, mediates the formation of the MtbXthA-AP-DNA complex and AP-site incision. PMID:25748880

  1. Unexpected expansion of tRNA substrate recognition by the yeast m1G9 methyltransferase Trm10

    PubMed Central

    Swinehart, William E.; Henderson, Jeremy C.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    N-1 Methylation of the nearly invariant purine residue found at position 9 of tRNA is a nucleotide modification found in multiple tRNA species throughout Eukarya and Archaea. First discovered in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the tRNA methyltransferase Trm10 is a highly conserved protein both necessary and sufficient to catalyze all known instances of m1G9 modification in yeast. Although there are 19 unique tRNA species that contain a G at position 9 in yeast, and whose fully modified sequence is known, only 9 of these tRNA species are modified with m1G9 in wild-type cells. The elements that allow Trm10 to distinguish between structurally similar tRNA species are not known, and sequences that are shared between all substrate or all nonsubstrate tRNAs have not been identified. Here, we demonstrate that the in vitro methylation activity of yeast Trm10 is not sufficient to explain the observed pattern of modification in vivo, as additional tRNA species are substrates for Trm10 m1G9 methyltransferase activity. Similarly, overexpression of Trm10 in yeast yields m1G9 containing tRNA species that are ordinarily unmodified in vivo. Thus, yeast Trm10 has a significantly broader tRNA substrate specificity than is suggested by the observed pattern of modification in wild-type yeast. These results may shed light onto the suggested involvement of Trm10 in other pathways in other organisms, particularly in higher eukaryotes that contain up to three different genes with sequence similarity to the single TRM10 gene in yeast, and where these other enzymes have been implicated in pathways beyond tRNA processing. PMID:23793893

  2. The Crystal Structure of Burkholderia cenocepacia DfsA Provides Insights into Substrate Recognition and Quorum Sensing Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Francesca; Scoffone, Viola C; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Fumagalli, Marco; Buroni, Silvia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Forneris, Federico

    2016-06-14

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a major concern among respiratory tract infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This pathogen is particularly difficult to treat because of its high level of resistance to the clinically relevant antimicrobial agents. In B. cenocepacia, the quorum sensing cell-cell communication system is involved in different processes that are important for bacterial virulence, such as biofilm formation and protease and siderophore production. Targeting the enzymes involved in this process represents a promising therapeutic approach. With the aim of finding effective quorum sensing inhibitors, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of B. cenocepacia diffusible factor synthase A, DfsA. This bifunctional crotonase (dehydratase/thioesterase) produces the characteristic quorum sensing molecule of B. cenocepacia, cis-2-dodecenoic acid or BDSF, starting from 3-hydroxydodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure revealed the presence of a lipid molecule in the catalytic site of the enzyme, which was identified as dodecanoic acid. Our biochemical characterization shows that DfsA is able to use dodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein as a substrate, demonstrating that dodecanoic acid, the product of this reaction, is released very slowly from the DfsA active site, therefore acting as a DfsA inhibitor. This molecule shows an unprecedented conformational arrangement inside the DfsA active site. In contrast with previous hypotheses, our data illustrate how DfsA and closely related homologous enzymes can recognize long hydrophobic substrates without large conformational changes or assistance by additional regulator molecules. The elucidation of the substrate binding mode in DfsA provides the starting point for structure-based drug discovery studies targeting B. cenocepacia quorum sensing-assisted virulence.

  3. The Crystal Structure of Burkholderia cenocepacia DfsA Provides Insights into Substrate Recognition and Quorum Sensing Fatty Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Francesca; Scoffone, Viola C; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Fumagalli, Marco; Buroni, Silvia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Forneris, Federico

    2016-06-14

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is a major concern among respiratory tract infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This pathogen is particularly difficult to treat because of its high level of resistance to the clinically relevant antimicrobial agents. In B. cenocepacia, the quorum sensing cell-cell communication system is involved in different processes that are important for bacterial virulence, such as biofilm formation and protease and siderophore production. Targeting the enzymes involved in this process represents a promising therapeutic approach. With the aim of finding effective quorum sensing inhibitors, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of B. cenocepacia diffusible factor synthase A, DfsA. This bifunctional crotonase (dehydratase/thioesterase) produces the characteristic quorum sensing molecule of B. cenocepacia, cis-2-dodecenoic acid or BDSF, starting from 3-hydroxydodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure revealed the presence of a lipid molecule in the catalytic site of the enzyme, which was identified as dodecanoic acid. Our biochemical characterization shows that DfsA is able to use dodecanoyl-acyl carrier protein as a substrate, demonstrating that dodecanoic acid, the product of this reaction, is released very slowly from the DfsA active site, therefore acting as a DfsA inhibitor. This molecule shows an unprecedented conformational arrangement inside the DfsA active site. In contrast with previous hypotheses, our data illustrate how DfsA and closely related homologous enzymes can recognize long hydrophobic substrates without large conformational changes or assistance by additional regulator molecules. The elucidation of the substrate binding mode in DfsA provides the starting point for structure-based drug discovery studies targeting B. cenocepacia quorum sensing-assisted virulence. PMID:27198181

  4. Evolution of conformational dynamics determines the conversion of a promiscuous generalist into a specialist enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zou, Taisong; Risso, Valeria A; Gavira, Jose A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M; Ozkan, S Banu

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactamases are produced by many modern bacteria as a mechanism of resistance toward β-lactam antibiotics, the most common antibiotics in use. β-Lactamases, however, are ancient enzymes that originated billions of years ago. Recently, proteins corresponding to 2- to 3-Gy-old Precambrian nodes in the evolution of Class A β-lactamases have been prepared and shown to be moderately efficient promiscuous catalysts, able to degrade a variety of antibiotics with catalytic efficiency levels similar to those of an average modern enzyme. Remarkably, there are few structural differences (in particular at the active-site regions) between the resurrected enzymes and a penicillin-specialist modern β-lactamase. Here, we propose that the ancestral promiscuity originates from conformational dynamics. We investigate the differences in conformational dynamics of the ancient and extant β-lactamases through MD simulations and quantify the contribution of each position to functionally related dynamics through Dynamic Flexibility Index. The modern TEM-1 lactamase shows a comparatively rigid active-site region, likely reflecting adaptation for efficient degradation of a specific substrate (penicillin), whereas enhanced deformability at the active-site neighborhood in the ancestral resurrected proteins likely accounts for the binding and subsequent degradation of antibiotic molecules of different size and shape. Clustering of the conformational dynamics on the basis of Principal Component Analysis is in agreement with the functional divergence, as the ancient β-lactamases cluster together, separated from their modern descendant. Finally, our analysis leads to testable predictions, as sites of potential relevance for the evolution of dynamics are identified and mutations at those sites are expected to alter substrate-specificity. PMID:25312912

  5. Characterization and mechanism insight of accelerated catalytic promiscuity of Sulfolobus tokodaii (ST0779) peptidase for aldol addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Perez, Bianca; Jian, Hui; Jensen, Mads Mørk; Gao, Renjun; Dong, Mingdong; Glasius, Marianne; Guo, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    A novel peptidase from thermophilic archaea Sulfolobus tokodaii (ST0779) is examined for its catalytic promiscuity of aldol addition, which shows comparable activity as porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL, one of the best enzymes identified for biocatalytic aldol addition) at 30 °C but much accelerated activity at elevated temperature. The molecular catalytic efficiency kcat/Km (M(-1) s(-1)) of this thermostable enzyme at 55 °C adds up to 140 times higher than that of PPL at its optimum temperature 37 °C. The fluorescence quenching analysis depicts that the binding constants of PPL are significantly higher than those of ST0779, and their numbers of binding sites show opposite temperature dependency. Thermodynamic parameters estimated by fluorescence quenching analysis unveil distinctly different substrate-binding modes between PPL and ST0779: the governing binding interaction between PPL and substrates is hydrophobic force, while the dominating substrate-binding forces for ST0779 are van der Waals and H-bonds interactions. A reasonable mechanism for ST0779-catalyzed aldol reaction is proposed based on kinetic study, spectroscopic analysis, and molecular stereostructure simulation. This work represents a successful example to identify a new enzyme for catalytic promiscuity, which demonstrates a huge potential to discover and exploit novel biocatalyst from thermophile microorganism sources. PMID:26169629

  6. Structural basis for substrate recognition and processive cleavage mechanisms of the trimeric exonuclease PhoExo I

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Ishino, Sonoko; Tsutsumi, Kanae; Ito, Tomoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Nucleases play important roles in nucleic acid processes, such as replication, repair and recombination. Recently, we identified a novel single-strand specific 3′-5′ exonuclease, PfuExo I, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which may be involved in the Thermococcales-specific DNA repair system. PfuExo I forms a trimer and cleaves single-stranded DNA at every two nucleotides. Here, we report the structural basis for the cleavage mechanism of this novel exonuclease family. A structural analysis of PhoExo I, the homologous enzyme from P. horikoshii OT3, showed that PhoExo I utilizes an RNase H-like active site and possesses a 3′-OH recognition site ∼9 Å away from the active site, which enables cleavage at every two nucleotides. Analyses of the heterotrimeric and monomeric PhoExo I activities showed that trimerization is indispensable for its processive cleavage mechanism, but only one active site of the trimer is required. PMID:26138487

  7. Crystal Structure of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase with Bound Substrate Analogue Provides Insight on Antigenic Epitope Precursor Recognition and Processing.

    PubMed

    Mpakali, Anastasia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Harlos, Karl; Zhao, Yuguang; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-09-15

    Aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides influence immunodominance and adaptive cytotoxic immune responses. The mechanisms that allow these enzymes to efficiently process a vast number of different long peptide substrates are poorly understood. In this work, we report the structure of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, an enzyme that prepares antigenic epitopes for cross-presentation in dendritic cells, in complex with an antigenic peptide precursor analog. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase is found in a semiclosed conformation with an extended internal cavity with limited access to the solvent. The N-terminal moiety of the peptide is located at the active site, positioned optimally for catalysis, whereas the C-terminal moiety of the peptide is stabilized along the extended internal cavity lodged between domains II and IV. Hydrophobic interactions and shape complementarity enhance peptide affinity beyond the catalytic site and support a limited selectivity model for antigenic peptide selection that may underlie the generation of complex immunopeptidomes.

  8. Bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s possessing coordinated metal center(s) and their inclusion complexation behavior with model substrates: enhanced molecular binding ability by multiple recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Chen, Y; Li, L; Zhang, H Y; Liu, S X; Guan, X D

    2001-12-14

    To investigate quantitatively the cooperative binding ability of several beta-cyclodextrin oligomers bearing single or multiligated metal center(s), the inclusion complexation behavior of four bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s (2-5) linked by 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxy tethers and their copper(II) complexes (6-9) with representative dye guests, i.e., methyl orange (MO), acridine red (AR), rhodamine B (RhB), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toludino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been examined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C by means of UV-vis, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results obtained indicate that bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-5 can associate with one or three copper(II) ion(s) producing 2:1 or 2:3 bis(beta-cyclodextrin)-copper(II) complexes. These metal-ligated oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s can bind two model substrates to form intramolecular 2:2 host-guest inclusion complexes and thus significantly enhance the original binding abilities of parent beta-cyclodextrin and bis(beta-cyclodextrin) toward model substrates through the cooperative binding of two guest molecules by four tethered cyclodextrin moieties, as well as the additional binding effect supplied by ligated metal center(s). Host 6 showed the highest enhancement of the stability constant, up to 38.3 times for ANS as compared with parent beta-cyclodextrin. The molecular binding mode and stability constant of substrates by bridged bis- and oligo(beta-cyclodextrin)s 2-9 are discussed from the viewpoint of the size/shape-fit interaction and molecular multiple recognition between host and guest.

  9. Crystal complexes of a predicted S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase reveal a typical AdoMet binding domain and a substrate recognition domain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Ouellette, N.; Evodokimova, E.; Savchenko, A.; Edwards, A.; Anderson, W.F.

    2010-03-08

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MTs) are abundant, and highly conserved across phylogeny. These enzymes use the cofactor AdoMet to methylate a wide variety of molecular targets, thereby modulating important cellular and metabolic activities. Thermotoga maritima protein 0872 (TM0872) belongs to a large sequence family of predicted MTs, ranging phylogenetically from relatively simple bacteria to humans. The genes for many of the bacterial homologs are located within operons involved in cell wall synthesis and cell division. Despite preliminary biochemical studies in E. coli and B. subtilis, the substrate specificity of this group of more than 150 proteins is unknown. As part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics initiative (www.mcsg.anl.gov), we have determined the structure of TM0872 in complexes with AdoMet and with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy). As predicted, TM0872 has a typical MT domain, and binds endogenous AdoMet, or co-crystallized AdoHcy, in a manner consistent with other known MT structures. In addition, TM0872 has a second domain that is novel among MTs in both its location in the sequence and its structure. The second domain likely acts in substrate recognition and binding, and there is a potential substrate-binding cleft spanning the two domains. This long and narrow cleft is lined with positively charged residues which are located opposite the S{sup +}-CH{sub 3} bond, suggesting that a negatively charged molecule might be targeted for catalysis. However, AdoMet and AdoHcy are both buried, and access to the methyl group would presumably require structural rearrangement. These TM0872 crystal structures offer the first structural glimpses at this phylogenetically conserved sequence family.

  10. Dissecting the roles of a strictly conserved tyrosine in substrate recognition and catalysis by pseudouridine 55 synthase.

    PubMed

    Phannachet, Kulwadee; Elias, Youssef; Huang, Raven H

    2005-11-29

    Sequence alignment of the TruA, TruB, RsuA, and RluA families of pseudouridine synthases (PsiS) identifies a strictly conserved aspartic acid, which has been shown to be the critical nucleophile for the PsiS-catalyzed formation of pseudouridine (Psi). However, superposition of the representative structures from these four families of enzymes identifies two additional amino acids, a lysine or an arginine (K/R) and a tyrosine (Y), from a K/RxY motif that are structurally conserved in the active site. We have created a series of Thermotoga maritima and Escherichia coli pseudouridine 55 synthase (Psi55S) mutants in which the conserved Y is mutated to other amino acids. A new crystal structure of the T. maritima Psi55S Y67F mutant in complex with a 5FU-RNA at 2.4 A resolution revealed formation of 5-fluoro-6-hydroxypseudouridine (5FhPsi), the same product previously seen in wild-type Psi55S-5FU-RNA complex structures. HPLC analysis confirmed efficient formation of 5FhPsi by both Psi55S Y67F and Y67L mutants but to a much lesser extent by the Y67A mutant when 5FU-RNA substrate was used. However, both HPLC analysis and a tritium release assay indicated that these mutants had no detectable enzymatic activity when the natural RNA substrate was used. The combined structural and mutational studies lead us to propose that the side chain of the conserved tyrosine in these four families of PsiS plays a dual role within the active site, maintaining the structural integrity of the active site through its hydrophobic phenyl ring and acting as a general base through its OH group for the proton abstraction required in the last step of PsiS-catalyzed formation of Psi.

  11. Crystal Structure and Product Analysis of an Archaeal myo-Inositol Kinase Reveal Substrate Recognition Mode and 3-OH Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Ryuhei; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Sato, Takaaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Miki, Kunio

    2015-06-01

    The TK2285 protein from Thermococcus kodakarensis was recently characterized as an enzyme catalyzing the phosphorylation of myo-inositol. Only two myo-inositol kinases have been identified so far, the TK2285 protein and Lpa3 from Zea mays, both of which belong to the ribokinase family. In either case, which of the six hydroxyl groups of myo-inositol is phosphorylated is still unknown. In addition, little is known about the myo-inositol binding mechanism of these enzymes. In this work, we determined two crystal structures: those of the TK2285 protein complexed with the substrates (ATP analogue and myo-inositol) or the reaction products formed by the enzyme. Analysis of the ternary substrates-complex structure and site-directed mutagenesis showed that five residues were involved in the interaction with myo-inositol. Structural comparison with other ribokinase family enzymes indicated that two of the five residues, Q136 and R140, are characteristic of myo-inositol kinase. The crystal structure of the ternary products-complex, which was prepared by incubating the TK2285 protein with myo-inositol and ATP, holds 1d-myo-inositol 3-phosphate (Ins(3)P) in the active site. NMR and HPLC analyses with a chiral column also indicated that the TK2285 reaction product was Ins(3)P. The results obtained here showed that the TK2285 protein specifically catalyzes the phosphorylation of the 3-OH of myo-inositol. We thus designated TK2285 as myo-inositol 3-kinase (MI3K). The precise identification of the reaction product should provide a sound basis to further explore inositol metabolism in Archaea.

  12. Crystal Structure and Substrate Recognition of Cellobionic Acid Phosphorylase, Which Plays a Key Role in Oxidative Cellulose Degradation by Microbes*

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young-Woo; Nihira, Takanori; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Saito, Yuka; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The microbial oxidative cellulose degradation system is attracting significant research attention after the recent discovery of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases. A primary product of the oxidative and hydrolytic cellulose degradation system is cellobionic acid (CbA), the aldonic acid form of cellobiose. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular enzyme belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 94 from cellulolytic fungus and bacterium is cellobionic acid phosphorylase (CBAP), which catalyzes reversible phosphorolysis of CbA into glucose 1-phosphate and gluconic acid (GlcA). In this report, we describe the biochemical characterization and the three-dimensional structure of CBAP from the marine cellulolytic bacterium Saccharophagus degradans. Structures of ligand-free and complex forms with CbA, GlcA, and a synthetic disaccharide product from glucuronic acid were determined at resolutions of up to 1.6 Å. The active site is located near the dimer interface. At subsite +1, the carboxylate group of GlcA and CbA is recognized by Arg-609 and Lys-613. Additionally, one residue from the neighboring protomer (Gln-190) is involved in the carboxylate recognition of GlcA. A mutational analysis indicated that these residues are critical for the binding and catalysis of the aldonic and uronic acid acceptors GlcA and glucuronic acid. Structural and sequence comparisons with other glycoside hydrolase family 94 phosphorylases revealed that CBAPs have a unique subsite +1 with a distinct amino acid residue conservation pattern at this site. This study provides molecular insight into the energetically efficient metabolic pathway of oxidized sugars that links the oxidative cellulolytic pathway to the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways in cellulolytic microbes. PMID:26041776

  13. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  14. Unattractive, promiscuous and heavy drinkers: perceptions of women with tattoos.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-12-01

    This study examined social and physical perceptions of blonde and brunette women with different degrees of tattooing. Eighty-four female and 76 male undergraduates rated a series of 16 female line drawings that varied in 2 levels of hair colour and 8 levels of tattooing. Ratings were made for physical attractiveness and sexual promiscuity, as well as estimates of the number of alcohol units consumed on a typical night out. Results showed that tattooed women were rated as less physically attractive, more sexually promiscuous and heavier drinkers than untattooed women, with more negative ratings with increasing number of tattoos. There were also weak interactions between body art and hair colour, with blonde women in general rated more negatively than brunettes. Results are discussed in terms of stereotypes about women who have tattoos and the effects of such stereotypes on well-being.

  15. Promiscuous primates engage in same-sex genital interactions.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Geoff R; Vasey, Paul L

    2016-05-01

    Same-sex genital interactions (SSGIs) occur across the order primates, yet explaining their maintenance in evolutionary terms appears problematic; as such interactions seem to counteract reproductive goals. We hypothesised that in more promiscuous species, where sexual motivation, mating effort, and non-conceptive heterosexual behaviour are greater, SSGIs may also occur at greater frequencies without necessarily impeding reproduction. We found that the expression of both male and female SSGIs were greater in multimale systems than in unimale ones. Both male and female SSGIs were positively correlated with the degree of promiscuity (relative testes mass). As mating system confers biases in the sex ratio that may influence the expression of SSGIs, we controlled for availability of members of the same-sex. When employing this control, results were largely congruent. For males, SSGIs were expressed more frequently in multimale systems. For both sexes, SSGIs were expressed more frequently with greater relative testes mass. We suggest SSGIs in primates may be a neutral by-product of selection for increases in promiscuous sexual activity, and that in certain instances these interactions may be co-opted to facilitate adaptive social functions.

  16. PROMISCUOUS: a database for network-based drug-repositioning

    PubMed Central

    von Eichborn, Joachim; Murgueitio, Manuela S.; Dunkel, Mathias; Koerner, Soeren; Bourne, Philip E.; Preissner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The procedure of drug approval is time-consuming, costly and risky. Accidental findings regarding multi-specificity of approved drugs led to block-busters in new indication areas. Therefore, the interest in systematically elucidating new areas of application for known drugs is rising. Furthermore, the knowledge, understanding and prediction of so-called off-target effects allow a rational approach to the understanding of side-effects. With PROMISCUOUS we provide an exhaustive set of drugs (25 000), including withdrawn or experimental drugs, annotated with drug–protein and protein–protein relationships (21 500/104 000) compiled from public resources via text and data mining including manual curation. Measures of structural similarity for drugs as well as known side-effects can be easily connected to protein–protein interactions to establish and analyse networks responsible for multi-pharmacology. This network-based approach can provide a starting point for drug-repositioning. PROMISCUOUS is publicly available at http://bioinformatics.charite.de/promiscuous. PMID:21071407

  17. The chemoenzymatic synthesis of clofarabine and related 2'-deoxyfluoroarabinosyl nucleosides: the electronic and stereochemical factors determining substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Fateev, Ilja V; Antonov, Konstantin V; Konstantinova, Irina D; Muravyova, Tatyana I; Seela, Frank; Esipov, Roman S; Miroshnikov, Anatoly I; Mikhailopulo, Igor A

    2014-01-01

    Two approaches to the synthesis of 2-chloro-9-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)adenine (1, clofarabine) were studied. The first approach consists in the chemical synthesis of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (12a, (2F)Ara-1P) via three step conversion of 1,3,5-tri-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose (9) into the phosphate 12a without isolation of intermediary products. Condensation of 12a with 2-chloroadenine catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) resulted in the formation of clofarabine in 67% yield. The reaction was also studied with a number of purine bases (2-aminoadenine and hypoxanthine), their analogues (5-aza-7-deazaguanine and 8-aza-7-deazahypoxanthine) and thymine. The results were compared with those of a similar reaction with α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (13a, Ara-1P). Differences of the reactivity of various substrates were analyzed by ab initio calculations in terms of the electronic structure (natural purines vs analogues) and stereochemical features ((2F)Ara-1P vs Ara-1P) of the studied compounds to determine the substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases. The second approach starts with the cascade one-pot enzymatic transformation of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a, followed by its condensation with 2-chloroadenine thereby affording clofarabine in ca. 48% yield in 24 h. The following recombinant E. coli enzymes catalyze the sequential conversion of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a: ribokinase (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinofuranose-5-phosphate), phosphopentomutase (PPN; no 1,6-diphosphates of D-hexoses as co-factors required) (12a), and finally PNP. The substrate activities of D-arabinose, D-ribose and D-xylose in the similar cascade syntheses of the relevant 2-chloroadenine nucleosides were studied and compared with the activities of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose. As expected, D-ribose exhibited the best substrate activity

  18. Contributions of a unique β-clamp to substrate recognition illuminates the molecular basis of exolysis in ferulic acid esterases.

    PubMed

    Gruninger, Robert J; Cote, Chris; McAllister, Tim A; Abbott, D Wade

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a promising renewable resource; however, deconstruction of this material is still the rate-limiting step. Major obstacles in the biocatalytic turnover of lignocellulose are ester-linked decorations that prevent access to primary structural polysaccharides. Enzymes targeting these esters represent promising biotools for increasing bioconversion efficiency. Ruminant livestock are unique in their ability to degrade lignocellulose through the action of their gut microbiome. The anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) are key members of this ecosystem that express a large repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) with little sequence identity with characterized CAZymes [Lombard, Golaconda, Drula, Coutinho and Henrissat (2014) Nucleic Acids Res. 42: , D490-D495]. We have identified a carbohydrate esterase family 1 (CE1) ferulic acid esterase (FAE) belonging to Anaeromyces mucronatus(AmCE1/Fae1a), and determined its X-ray structure in both the presence [1.55 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm)] and absence (1.60 Å) of ferulic acid. AmCE1 adopts an α/β-hydrolase fold that is structurally conserved with bacterial FAEs, and possesses a unique loop, termed the β-clamp, that encloses the ligand. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that substrate binding is driven by enthalpic contributions, which overcomes a large entropic penalty. A comparative analysis of AmCE1 with related enzymes has uncovered the apparent structural basis for differential FAE activities targeting cross-linking ferulic acid conjugates compared with terminal decorations. Based on comparisons to structurally characterized FAEs, we propose that the β-clamp may define the structural basis of exolytic activities in FAEs. This provides a structure-based tool for predicting exolysis and endolysis in CE1. These insights hold promise for rationally identifying enzymes tailored for bioconversion of biomass with variations in cell wall composition.

  19. Molecular mechanisms and design principles for promiscuous inhibitors to avoid drug resistance: lessons learned from HIV-1 protease inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Radhakrishnan, Mala L; Tidor, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Molecular recognition is central to biology and ranges from highly selective to broadly promiscuous. The ability to modulate specificity at will is particularly important for drug development, and discovery of mechanisms contributing to binding specificity is crucial for our basic understanding of biology and for applications in health care. In this study, we used computational molecular design to create a large dataset of diverse small molecules with a range of binding specificities. We then performed structural, energetic, and statistical analysis on the dataset to study molecular mechanisms of achieving specificity goals. The work was done in the context of HIV-1 protease inhibition and the molecular designs targeted a panel of wild-type and drug-resistant mutant HIV-1 protease structures. The analysis focused on mechanisms for promiscuous binding to bind robustly even to resistance mutants. Broadly binding inhibitors tended to be smaller in size, more flexible in chemical structure, and more hydrophobic in nature compared to highly selective ones. Furthermore, structural and energetic analyses illustrated mechanisms by which flexible inhibitors achieved binding; we found ligand conformational adaptation near mutation sites and structural plasticity in targets through torsional flips of asymmetric functional groups to form alternative, compensatory packing interactions or hydrogen bonds. As no inhibitor bound to all variants, we designed small cocktails of inhibitors to do so and discovered that they often jointly covered the target set through mechanistic complementarity. Furthermore, using structural plasticity observed in experiments, and potentially in simulations, is suggested to be a viable means of designing adaptive inhibitors that are promiscuous binders.

  20. Crystal structures and kinetics of monofunctional proline dehydrogenase provide insight into substrate recognition and conformational changes associated with flavin reduction and product release.

    PubMed

    Luo, Min; Arentson, Benjamin W; Srivastava, Dhiraj; Becker, Donald F; Tanner, John J

    2012-12-18

    Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) catalyzes the FAD-dependent oxidation of proline to Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, which is the first step of proline catabolism. Here, we report the structures of proline dehydrogenase from Deinococcus radiodurans in the oxidized state complexed with the proline analogue L-tetrahydrofuroic acid and in the reduced state with the proline site vacant. The analogue binds against the si face of the FAD isoalloxazine and is protected from bulk solvent by helix α8 and the β1-α1 loop. The FAD ribityl chain adopts two conformations in the E-S complex, which is unprecedented for flavoenzymes. One of the conformations is novel for the PRODH superfamily and may contribute to the low substrate affinity of Deinococcus PRODH. Reduction of the crystalline enzyme-inhibitor complex causes profound structural changes, including 20° butterfly bending of the isoalloxazine, crankshaft rotation of the ribityl, shifting of α8 by 1.7 Å, reconfiguration of the β1-α1 loop, and rupture of the Arg291-Glu64 ion pair. These changes dramatically open the active site to facilitate product release and allow electron acceptors access to the reduced flavin. The structures suggest that the ion pair, which is conserved in the PRODH superfamily, functions as the active site gate. Mutagenesis of Glu64 to Ala decreases the catalytic efficiency 27-fold, which demonstrates the importance of the gate. Mutation of Gly63 decreases the efficiency 140-fold, which suggests that flexibility of the β1-α1 loop is essential for optimal catalysis. The large conformational changes that are required to form the E-S complex suggest that conformational selection plays a role in substrate recognition. PMID:23151026

  1. Crystal Structures and Kinetics of Monofunctional Proline Dehydrogenase Provide Insight into Substrate Recognition and Conformational Changes Associated With Flavin Reduction and Product Release

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Arentson, Benjamin W.; Srivastava, Dhiraj; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Proline dehydrogenase catalyzes the FAD-dependent oxidation of proline to Δ1- pyrroline-5-carboxylate, which is the first step of proline catabolism. Here, we report the structures of proline dehydrogenase from Deinococcus radiodurans in the oxidized state complexed with the proline analog L-tetrahydrofuroic acid and in the reduced state with the proline site vacant. The analog binds against the si face of the FAD isoalloxazine and is protected from bulk solvent by the α8 helix and the β1-α1 loop. The FAD ribityl chain adopts two conformations in the E-S complex, which is unprecedented for flavoenzymes. One of the conformations is novel for the PRODH superfamily and may contribute to the low substrate affinity of Deinococcus PRODH. Reduction of the crystalline enzyme-inhibitor complex causes profound structural changes, including 20° butterfly bending of the isoalloxazine, crankshaft rotation of the ribityl, shifting of α8 by 1.7 Å, reconfiguration of the β1-α1 loop, and rupture of the Arg291-Glu64 ion pair. These changes dramatically open the active site to facilitate product release and allow electron acceptors access to the reduced flavin. The structures suggest that the ion pair, which is conserved in the PRODH superfamily, functions as the active site gate. Mutagenesis of Glu64 to Ala decreases catalytic efficiency 27-fold, which demonstrates the importance of the gate. Mutation of Gly63 decreases efficiency 140-fold, which suggests that flexibility of the β1-α1 loop is essential for optimal catalysis. The large conformational changes that are required to form the E-S complex suggest that conformational selection plays a role in substrate recognition. PMID:23151026

  2. Structure-Based Mutagenesis of the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Nrdp1/FLRF Identifies the Binding Site for the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase ErbB3

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyain,S.; Leahy, D.

    2007-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degrading protein 1 (Nrdp1) mediates the ligand-independent degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member ErbB3/HER3. By regulating cellular levels of ErbB3, Nrdp1 influences ErbB3-mediated signaling, which is essential for normal vertebrate development. Nrdp1 belongs to the tripartite or RBCC (RING, B-box, coiled-coil) family of ubiquitin ligases in which the RING domain is responsible for ubiquitin ligation and a variable C-terminal region mediates substrate recognition. We report here the 1.95 A crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of Nrdp1 and show that this domain is sufficient to mediate ErbB3 binding. Furthermore, we have used site-directed mutagenesis to map regions of the Nrdp1 surface that are important for interacting with ErbB3 and mediating its degradation in transfected cells. The ErbB3-binding site localizes to a region of Nrdp1 that is conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates, in contrast to ErbB3, which is only found in vertebrates. This observation suggests that Nrdp1 uses a common binding site to recognize its targets in different species.

  3. Leucine-684: A conserved residue of an AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AceCS) from Leishmania donovani is involved in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation.

    PubMed

    Soumya, Neelagiri; Tandan, Hitendra; Damre, Mangesh V; Gangwal, Rahul P; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Singh, Sushma

    2016-04-15

    AMP-acetyl CoA synthetase (AMP-AceCS) is a key enzyme which catalyzes the activation of acetate to acetyl CoA, an important intermediate at the cross roads of various anabolic and catabolic pathways. Multiple sequence alignment of Leishmania donovani AceCS with other organisms revealed the presence of a highly conserved leucine residue at 684 position which is known to be crucial for acetylation by protein acetyl transferases in other organisms. In an attempt to understand the role of leucine residue at 684 position in L. donovani acetyl CoA synthetase (LdAceCS), it was mutated to proline (P) by site directed mutagenesis. Kinetic analysis of the L684P-LdAceCS mutant revealed approximately two fold increased binding affinity with acetate, whereas fivefold decreased affinity was observed with ATP. There was insignificant change in secondary structure as revealed by CD however, two fold decreased fluorescence intensity was observed at an emission maxima of 340 nm. Interestingly, L684P mutation abolished the acetylation of the mutant enzyme indicating the importance of L684 in acetylation of the enzyme. Changes in biochemical parameters of the mutant protein were validated by homology modeling of the wild type and mutant LdAceCS enzyme using Salmonella enterica AceCS crystal structure as template. Our data provides evidence for the role of leucine 684 residue in substrate recognition, catalysis and acetylation of the AceCS enzyme.

  4. Crystal structure of tRNA m1G9 methyltransferase Trm10: insight into the catalytic mechanism and recognition of tRNA substrate

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhenhua; Yan, Wei; Peng, Junhui; Zuo, Xiaobing; Zou, Yang; Li, Fudong; Gong, Deshun; Ma, Rongsheng; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu; Zhang, Zhiyong; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu; Gong, Qingguo

    2014-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) methylation is necessary for the proper biological function of tRNA. The N1 methylation of guanine at Position 9 (m1G9) of tRNA, which is widely identified in eukaryotes and archaea, was found to be catalyzed by the Trm10 family of methyltransferases (MTases). Here, we report the first crystal structures of the tRNA MTase spTrm10 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe in the presence and absence of its methyl donor product S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH) and its ortholog scTrm10 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in complex with SAH. Our crystal structures indicated that the MTase domain (the catalytic domain) of the Trm10 family displays a typical SpoU-TrmD (SPOUT) fold. Furthermore, small angle X-ray scattering analysis reveals that Trm10 behaves as a monomer in solution, whereas other members of the SPOUT superfamily all function as homodimers. We also performed tRNA MTase assays and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the catalytic mechanism of Trm10 in vitro. In combination with mutational analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, our results provide insights into the substrate tRNA recognition mechanism of Trm10 family MTases. PMID:24081582

  5. The crystal structure of L-lactate oxidase from Aerococcus viridans at 2.1 A resolution reveals the mechanism of strict substrate recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Umena, Yasufumi; Yorita, Kazuko; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Kita, Akiko; Fukui, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Yukio . E-mail: morimoto@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-17

    L-Lactate oxidase (LOX) from Aerococcus viridans is a member of the {alpha}-hydroxyacid-oxidase flavoenzyme family. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of LOX and revealed the mechanism of substrate recognition. The LOX monomer structure has a typical {alpha}{sub 8}/{beta}{sub 8} motif commonly found in other flavin family proteins. A related enzyme, glycolate oxidase, catalyzes the oxidation of glycolate rather than lactate. Comparison of the two enzyme structures highlights the importance of five residues around the FMN prosthetic group of LOX, which act synergistically to discriminate between the L/D configurations of lactate. X-ray crystallography of LOX gave a space group I422 of unit-cell parameters a = b = 191.096 A, c 194.497 A and {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90 deg. with four monomers per asymmetric unit. The four independent monomers display slight structural differences around the active site. Diffraction data were collected, under cryogenic conditions to 2.1 A resolution at the synchrotron facilities in Japan.

  6. Study shows condom use does not promote promiscuity.

    PubMed

    1997-06-27

    Researchers from Switzerland's Lausanne University Institute of Social and Preventative Medicine report the results of a media and school-based prevention education program that promoted condom use, sexual abstinence, and marital fidelity. Findings indicated that condom usage has increased dramatically and people are engaging in no more sex now than when the campaign began. The findings should reassure those who fear that widespread condom education will increase sexual activity and promiscuity. These findings are consistent with studies on condom use and sexual behavior in Germany and other European nations.

  7. Force Dependent Biotinylation of Myosin IIA by α-Catenin Tagged with a Promiscuous Biotin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Shuji; Blee, Alexandra M.; Macway, Katherine G.; Renner, Derrick J.; Yamada, Soichiro

    2015-01-01

    Tissues and organs undergo constant physical perturbations and individual cells must respond to mechanical forces to maintain tissue integrity. However, molecular interactions underlying mechano-transduction are not fully defined at cell-cell junctions. This is in part due to weak and transient interactions that are likely prevalent in force-induced protein complexes. Using in situ proximal biotinylation by the promiscuous biotin ligase BirA tagged to α-catenin and a substrate stretch cell chamber, we sought to identify force-dependent molecular interactions surrounding α-catenin, an actin regulator at the sites of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion. While E-cadherin, β-catenin, vinculin and actin localize with α-catenin at cell-cell contacts in immuno-fluorescent staining, only β-catenin and plakoglobin were biotinylated, suggesting that this proximal biotinylation is limited to the molecules that are in the immediate vicinity of α-catenin. In mechanically stretched samples, increased biotinylation of non-muscle myosin IIA, but not myosin IIB, suggests close spatial proximity between α-catenin and myosin IIA during substrate stretching. This force-induced biotinylation diminished as myosin II activity was inhibited by blebbistatin. Taken together, this promising technique enables us to identify force sensitive complexes that may be essential for mechano-responses in force bearing cell adhesion. PMID:25806963

  8. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling.

  9. Maintenance of Sperm Variation in a Highly Promiscuous Wild Bird

    PubMed Central

    Calhim, Sara; Double, Michael C.; Margraf, Nicolas; Birkhead, Tim R.; Cockburn, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Postcopulatory sexual selection is an important force in the evolution of reproductive traits, including sperm morphology. In birds, sperm morphology is known to be highly heritable and largely condition-independent. Theory predicts, and recent comparative work corroborates, that strong selection in such traits reduces intraspecific phenotypic variation. Here we show that some variation can be maintained despite extreme promiscuity, as a result of opposing, copulation-role-specific selection forces. After controlling for known correlates of siring success in the superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus), we found that (a) lifetime extra-pair paternity success was associated with sperm with a shorter flagellum and relatively large head, and (b) males whose sperm had a longer flagellum and a relatively smaller head achieved higher within-pair paternity. In this species extrapair copulations occur in the same morning, but preceding, pair copulations during a female's fertile period, suggesting that shorter and relatively larger-headed sperm are most successful in securing storage (defense), whereas the opposite phenotype might be better at outcompeting stored sperm (offense). Furthermore, since cuckolding ability is a major contributor to differential male reproductive output, stronger selection on defense sperm competition traits might explain the short sperm of malurids relative to other promiscuous passerines. PMID:22194918

  10. Extreme Female Promiscuity in a Non-Social Invertebrate Species

    PubMed Central

    Panova, Marina; Boström, Johan; Hofving, Tobias; Areskoug, Therese; Eriksson, Anders; Mehlig, Bernhard; Mäkinen, Tuuli; André, Carl; Johannesson, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Background While males usually benefit from as many matings as possible, females often evolve various methods of resistance to matings. The prevalent explanation for this is that the cost of additional matings exceeds the benefits of receiving sperm from a large number of males. Here we demonstrate, however, a strongly deviating pattern of polyandry. Methodology/Principal Findings We analysed paternity in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis by genotyping large clutches (53–79) of offspring from four females sampled in their natural habitats. We found evidence of extreme promiscuity with 15–23 males having sired the offspring of each female within the same mating period. Conclusions/Significance Such a high level of promiscuity has previously only been observed in a few species of social insects. We argue that genetic bet-hedging (as has been suggested earlier) is unlikely to explain such extreme polyandry. Instead we propose that these high levels are examples of convenience polyandry: females accept high numbers of matings if costs of refusing males are higher than costs of accepting superfluous matings. PMID:20300171

  11. Tailoring Agility: Promiscuous Pair Story Authoring and Value Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendon, Steve

    This chapter describes how a multi-national software organization created a business plan involving business units from eight countries that followed an agile way, after two previously failed attempts with traditional approaches. The case is told by the consultant who initiated implementation of agility into requirements gathering, estimation and planning processes in an international setting. The agile approach was inspired by XP, but then tailored to meet the peculiar requirements. Two innovations were critical. The first innovation was promiscuous pair story authoring, where user stories were written by two people (similarly to pair programming), and the pairing changed very often (as frequently as every 15-20 minutes) to achieve promiscuity and cater for diverse point of views. The second innovation was an economic value evaluation (and not the cost) which was attributed to stories. Continuous recalculation of the financial value of the stories allowed to assess the projects financial return. In this case implementation of agility in the international context allowed the involved team members to reach consensus and unanimity of decisions, vision and purpose.

  12. Promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles (PrATs): a frequent hitting scaffold.

    PubMed

    Devine, Shane M; Mulcair, Mark D; Debono, Cael O; Leung, Eleanor W W; Nissink, J Willem M; Lim, San Sui; Chandrashekaran, Indu R; Vazirani, Mansha; Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Simpson, Jamie S; Baell, Jonathan B; Scammells, Peter J; Norton, Raymond S; Scanlon, Martin J

    2015-02-12

    We have identified a class of molecules, known as 2-aminothiazoles (2-ATs), as frequent-hitting fragments in biophysical binding assays. This was exemplified by 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine being identified as a hit in 14/14 screens against a diverse range of protein targets, suggesting that this scaffold is a poor starting point for fragment-based drug discovery. This prompted us to analyze this scaffold in the context of an academic fragment library used for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) and two larger compound libraries used for high-throughput screening (HTS). This analysis revealed that such "promiscuous 2-aminothiazoles" (PrATs) behaved as frequent hitters under both FBDD and HTS settings, although the problem was more pronounced in the fragment-based studies. As 2-ATs are present in known drugs, they cannot necessarily be deemed undesirable, but the combination of their promiscuity and difficulties associated with optimizing them into a lead compound makes them, in our opinion, poor scaffolds for fragment libraries. PMID:25559643

  13. Discovery of a Unique Clp Component, ClpF, in Chloroplasts: A Proposed Binary ClpF-ClpS1 Adaptor Complex Functions in Substrate Recognition and Delivery[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Kenji; Apitz, Janina; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Ponnala, Lalit; Grimm, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Clp proteases are found in prokaryotes, mitochondria, and plastids where they play crucial roles in maintaining protein homeostasis (proteostasis). The plant plastid Clp machinery comprises a hetero-oligomeric ClpPRT proteolytic core, ATP-dependent chaperones ClpC and ClpD, and an adaptor protein, ClpS1. ClpS1 selects substrates to the ClpPR protease-ClpC chaperone complex for degradation, but the underlying substrate recognition and delivery mechanisms are currently unclear. Here, we characterize a ClpS1-interacting protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, ClpF, which can interact with the Clp substrate glutamyl-tRNA reductase. ClpF and ClpS1 mutually stimulate their association with ClpC. ClpF, which is only found in photosynthetic eukaryotes, contains bacterial uvrB/C and YccV protein domains and a unique N-terminal domain. We propose a testable model in which ClpS1 and ClpF form a binary adaptor for selective substrate recognition and delivery to ClpC, reflecting an evolutionary adaptation of the Clp system to the plastid proteome. PMID:26419670

  14. Catalytic Promiscuity of the Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine Enzyme NosL

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Ji, Xinjian; Li, Yongzhen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic promiscuity plays a key role in enzyme evolution and the acquisition of novel biological functions. Because of the high reactivity of radical species, in our view enzymes involving radical-mediated mechanisms could intrinsically be more prone to catalytic promiscuity. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in the study of NosL, a radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent L-tryptophan (L-Trp) lyase. We demonstrate here the interesting chemistry and remarkable catalytic promiscuity of NosL, and attempt to highlight the high evolvability of radical SAM enzymes and the potential to engineer these enzymes for novel and improved activities. PMID:27446906

  15. A Novel Glycoside Hydrolase Family 113 Endo-β-1,4-Mannanase from Alicyclobacillus sp. Strain A4 and Insight into the Substrate Recognition and Catalytic Mechanism of This Family

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Lu, Haiqiang; Xia, Mengjuan; Cui, Ying; Bai, Yingguo; Qian, Lichun; Luo, Huiying

    2016-01-01

    Few members of glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 113 have been characterized, and information on substrate recognition by and the catalytic mechanism of this family is extremely limited. In the present study, a novel endo-β-1,4-mannanase of GH 113, Man113A, was identified in thermoacidophilic Alicyclobacillus sp. strain A4 and found to exhibit both hydrolytic and transglycosylation activities. The enzyme had a broad substrate spectrum, showed higher activities on glucomannan than on galactomannan, and released mannobiose and mannotriose as the main hydrolysis products after an extended incubation. Compared to the only functionally characterized and structure-resolved counterpart Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius ManA (AaManA) of GH 113, Man113A showed much higher catalytic efficiency on mannooligosaccharides, in the order mannohexaose ≈ mannopentaose > mannotetraose > mannotriose, and required at least four sugar units for efficient catalysis. Homology modeling, molecular docking analysis, and site-directed mutagenesis revealed the vital roles of eight residues (Trp13, Asn90, Trp96, Arg97, Tyr196, Trp274, Tyr292, and Cys143) related to substrate recognition by and catalytic mechanism of GH 113. Comparison of the binding pockets and key residues of β-mannanases of different families indicated that members of GH 113 and GH 5 have more residues serving as stacking platforms to support −4 to −1 subsites than those of GH 26 and that the residues preceding the acid/base catalyst are quite different. Taken as a whole, this study elucidates substrate recognition by and the catalytic mechanism of GH 113 β-mannanases and distinguishes them from counterparts of other families. PMID:26921423

  16. Understanding the different activities of highly promiscuous MbtI by computational methods.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Silvia; Martí, Sergio; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki; Bertrán, Juan

    2012-03-14

    Salicylate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, MbtI, is a highly promiscuous Mg(2+) dependent enzyme with up to four distinct activities detected in vitro: isochorismate synthase (IS), isochorismate pyruvate lyase (IPL), salicylate synthase (SS) and chorismate mutase (CM). In this paper, Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulations employing hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) potentials have been carried out to get a detailed knowledge of the IS and the IPL activities at the molecular level. According to our simulations, the architecture of the MbtI active site allows catalyzing the two reactions: the isochorismate formation, by means of a stepwise mechanism, and the salicylate production from isochorismate, that appears to be pericyclic in nature. Findings also explain the role of the magnesium cation and the pH dependence activity experimentally observed in MbtI. Mg(2+) would be polarizing and pre-organizing the substrate and active site, as well as shifting the pK(a) values of key active site residues. PMID:22307014

  17. Alcohol and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: promiscuous drug, wanton effects.

    PubMed

    Geil, Chelsea R; Hayes, Dayna M; McClain, Justin A; Liput, Daniel J; Marshall, S Alex; Chen, Kevin Y; Nixon, Kimberly

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis is now widely accepted as an important contributor to hippocampal integrity and function but also dysfunction when adult neurogenesis is affected in neuropsychiatric diseases such as alcohol use disorders. Excessive alcohol consumption, the defining characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in a variety of cognitive and behavioral impairments related wholly or in part to hippocampal structure and function. Recent preclinical work has shown that adult neurogenesis may be one route by which alcohol produces hippocampal neuropathology. Alcohol is a pharmacologically promiscuous drug capable of interfering with adult neurogenesis through multiple mechanisms. This review will discuss the primary mechanisms underlying alcohol-induced changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis including alcohol's effects on neurotransmitters, CREB and its downstream effectors, and the neurogenic niche.

  18. Butterfly genome reveals promiscuous exchange of mimicry adaptations among species

    PubMed Central

    Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K; Walters, James R.; Briscoe, Adriana D.; Davey, John W.; Whibley, Annabel; Nadeau, Nicola J.; Zimin, Aleksey V.; Hughes, Daniel S. T.; Ferguson, Laura C.; Martin, Simon H.; Salazar, Camilo; Lewis, James J.; Adler, Sebastian; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Baker, Dean A.; Baxter, Simon W.; Chamberlain, Nicola L.; Chauhan, Ritika; Counterman, Brian A.; Dalmay, Tamas; Gilbert, Lawrence E.; Gordon, Karl; Heckel, David G.; Hines, Heather M.; Hoff, Katharina J.; Holland, Peter W.H.; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Jiggins, Francis M.; Jones, Robert T.; Kapan, Durrell D.; Kersey, Paul; Lamas, Gerardo; Lawson, Daniel; Mapleson, Daniel; Maroja, Luana S.; Martin, Arnaud; Moxon, Simon; Palmer, William J.; Papa, Riccardo; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Pauchet, Yannick; Ray, David A.; Rosser, Neil; Salzberg, Steven L.; Supple, Megan A.; Surridge, Alison; Tenger-Trolander, Ayse; Vogel, Heiko; Wilkinson, Paul A.; Wilson, Derek; Yorke, James A.; Yuan, Furong; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Eland, Cathlene; Gharbi, Karim; Thomson, Marian; Gibbs, Richard A.; Han, Yi; Jayaseelan, Joy C.; Kovar, Christie; Mathew, Tittu; Muzny, Donna M.; Ongeri, Fiona; Pu, Ling-Ling; Qu, Jiaxin; Thornton, Rebecca L.; Worley, Kim C.; Wu, Yuan-Qing; Linares, Mauricio; Blaxter, Mark L.; Constant, Richard H. ffrench; Joron, Mathieu; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Mullen, Sean P.; Reed, Robert D.; Scherer, Steven E.; Richards, Stephen; Mallet, James; McMillan, W. Owen; Jiggins, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    The evolutionary importance of hybridization and introgression has long been debated1. We used genomic tools to investigate introgression in Heliconius, a rapidly radiating genus of neotropical butterflies widely used in studies of ecology, behaviour, mimicry and speciation2-5 . We sequenced the genome of Heliconius melpomene and compared it with other taxa to investigate chromosomal evolution in Lepidoptera and gene flow among multiple Heliconius species and races. Among 12,657 predicted genes for Heliconius, biologically important expansions of families of chemosensory and Hox genes are particularly noteworthy. Chromosomal organisation has remained broadly conserved since the Cretaceous, when butterflies split from the silkmoth lineage. Using genomic resequencing, we show hybrid exchange of genes between three co-mimics, H. melpomene, H. timareta, and H. elevatus, especially at two genomic regions that control mimicry pattern. Closely related Heliconius species clearly exchange protective colour pattern genes promiscuously, implying a major role for hybridization in adaptive radiation. PMID:22722851

  19. Preliminary crystallographic studies of glucose dehydrogenase from the promiscuous Entner–Doudoroff pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    PubMed Central

    Theodossis, Alex; Milburn, Christine C.; Heyer, Narinder I.; Lamble, Henry J.; Hough, David W.; Danson, Michael J.; Taylor, Garry L.

    2005-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus grows optimally above 353 K and can metabolize glucose and its C4 epimer galactose via a non-phosphorylative variant of the Entner–Doudoroff pathway involving catalytically promiscuous enzymes that can operate with both sugars. The initial oxidation step is catalysed by glucose dehydrogenase (SsGDH), which can utilize both NAD and NADP as cofactors. The enzyme operates with glucose and galactose at similar catalytic efficiency, while its substrate profile also includes a range of other five- and six-carbon sugars. Crystals of the 164 kDa SsGDH homotetramer have been grown under a variety of conditions. The best crystals to date diffract to 1.8 Å on a synchrotron source, have orthorhombic symmetry and belong to space group P21212. Attempts are being made to solve the structure by MAD and MR. PMID:16508107

  20. Efficient lipase-catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation: utilization of biocatalytic promiscuity for synthesis of benzylidene-indolin-2-ones.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Xiang, Xinran; Gu, Mengjie; Xu, Haoran; Huang, He; Hu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Based on the screening of biocatalysts and reaction conditions including solvent, water content, temperature, enzyme loading, and reaction time, lipase from porcine pancreas (PPL) showed the prominent promiscuity for the Knoevenagel condensation between 1,3-dihydroindol-2-one heterocycle and aromatic aldehydes. Under the optimized procedure, both electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituent of aldehydes substrates could react efficiently, and benzylidene-indolin-2-ones were obtained in excellent yields (75.0-96.6%). Benzylidene-indolin-2-ones derivatives were efficiently synthesized by the Knoevenagel condensation between various aromatic aldehydes and 1,3-dihydroindol-2-one catalyzed by lipase from porcine pancreas with excellent yields obtained. PMID:26546230

  1. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling. PMID:26839412

  2. Analyzing compound activity records and promiscuity degrees in light of publication statistics

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    For the generation of contemporary databases of bioactive compounds, activity information is usually extracted from the scientific literature. However, when activity data are analyzed, source publications are typically no longer taken into consideration. Therefore, compound activity data selected from ChEMBL were traced back to thousands of original publications, activity records including compound, assay, and target information were systematically generated, and their distributions across the literature were determined. In addition, publications were categorized on the basis of activity records. Furthermore, compound promiscuity, defined as the ability of small molecules to specifically interact with multiple target proteins, was analyzed in light of publication statistics, thus adding another layer of information to promiscuity assessment. It was shown that the degree of compound promiscuity was not influenced by increasing numbers of source publications. Rather, most non-promiscuous as well as promiscuous compounds, regardless of their degree of promiscuity, originated from single publications, which emerged as a characteristic feature of the medicinal chemistry literature. PMID:27347396

  3. Characterizing the Promiscuity of LigAB, a Lignin Catabolite Degrading Extradiol Dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Kevin P.; Taylor, Erika A.

    2014-01-01

    LigAB from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 is the only structurally characterized dioxygenase of the largely uncharacterized superfamily of Type II extradiol dioxygenases (EDO). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidative ring-opening of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid or PCA) in a pathway allowing the degradation of lignin derived aromatic compounds (LDACs). LigAB has also been shown to utilize two other LDACs from the same metabolic pathway as substrates, gallate, and 3-O-methyl gallate; however, kcat/KM had not been reported for any of these compounds. In order to assess the catalytic efficiency and get insights into the observed promiscuity of this enzyme, steady-state kinetic analyses were performed for LigAB with these and a library of related compounds. The dioxygenation of PCA by LigAB was highly efficient, with a kcat of 51 s−1 and a kcat/KM of 4.26 × 106 M−1s−1. LigAB demonstrated the ability to use a variety of catecholic molecules as substrates beyond the previously identified gallate and 3-O-methyl gallate, including 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide, homoprotocatechuate, catechol, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile. Interestingly, 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide (DHBAm) behaves in a manner similar to that of the preferred benzoic acid substrates, with a kcat/Km value only ~4-fold lower than that for gallate and ~10-fold higher than that for 3-O-methyl gallate. All of these most active substrates demonstrate mechanistic inactivation of LigAB. Additionally, DHBAm exhibits potent product inhibition that leads to an inactive enzyme, being more highly deactivating at lower substrate concentration, a phenomena that, to our knowledge, has not been reported for another dioxygenase substrate/product pair. These results provide valuable catalytic insight into the reactions catalyzed by LigAB and make it the first Type II EDO that is fully characterized both structurally and kinetically. PMID:23977959

  4. Characterizing the promiscuity of LigAB, a lignin catabolite degrading extradiol dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Barry, Kevin P; Taylor, Erika A

    2013-09-24

    LigAB from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 is the only structurally characterized dioxygenase of the largely uncharacterized superfamily of Type II extradiol dioxygenases (EDO). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidative ring-opening of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid or PCA) in a pathway allowing the degradation of lignin derived aromatic compounds (LDACs). LigAB has also been shown to utilize two other LDACs from the same metabolic pathway as substrates, gallate, and 3-O-methyl gallate; however, kcat/KM had not been reported for any of these compounds. In order to assess the catalytic efficiency and get insights into the observed promiscuity of this enzyme, steady-state kinetic analyses were performed for LigAB with these and a library of related compounds. The dioxygenation of PCA by LigAB was highly efficient, with a kcat of 51 s(-1) and a kcat/KM of 4.26 × 10(6) M(-1)s(-1). LigAB demonstrated the ability to use a variety of catecholic molecules as substrates beyond the previously identified gallate and 3-O-methyl gallate, including 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide, homoprotocatechuate, catechol, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile. Interestingly, 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide (DHBAm) behaves in a manner similar to that of the preferred benzoic acid substrates, with a kcat/Km value only ∼4-fold lower than that for gallate and ∼10-fold higher than that for 3-O-methyl gallate. All of these most active substrates demonstrate mechanistic inactivation of LigAB. Additionally, DHBAm exhibits potent product inhibition that leads to an inactive enzyme, being more highly deactivating at lower substrate concentration, a phenomena that, to our knowledge, has not been reported for another dioxygenase substrate/product pair. These results provide valuable catalytic insight into the reactions catalyzed by LigAB and make it the first Type II EDO that is fully characterized both structurally and kinetically.

  5. Legume-rhizobia signal exchange: promiscuity and environmental effects

    PubMed Central

    Lira, Mario A.; Nascimento, Luciana R. S.; Fracetto, Giselle G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Although signal exchange between legumes and their rhizobia is among the best-known examples of this biological process, most of the more characterized data comes from just a few legume species and environmental stresses. Although a relative wealth of information is available for some model legumes and some of the major pulses such as soybean, little is known about tropical legumes. This relative disparity in current knowledge is also apparent in the research on the effects of environmental stress on signal exchange; cool-climate stresses, such as low-soil temperature, comprise a relatively large body of research, whereas high-temperature stresses and drought are not nearly as well understood. Both tropical legumes and their environmental stress-induced effects are increasingly important due to global population growth (the demand for protein), climate change (increasing temperatures and more extreme climate behavior), and urbanization (and thus heavy metals). This knowledge gap for both legumes and their environmental stresses is compounded because whereas most temperate legume-rhizobia symbioses are relatively specific and cultivated under relatively stable environments, the converse is true for tropical legumes, which tend to be promiscuous, and grow in highly variable conditions. This review will clarify some of this missing information and highlight fields in which further research would benefit our current knowledge. PMID:26441880

  6. Beyond promiscuity: mate-choice commitments in social breeding

    PubMed Central

    Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2013-01-01

    Obligate eusociality with distinct caste phenotypes has evolved from strictly monogamous sub-social ancestors in ants, some bees, some wasps and some termites. This implies that no lineage reached the most advanced form of social breeding, unless helpers at the nest gained indirect fitness values via siblings that were identical to direct fitness via offspring. The complete lack of re-mating promiscuity equalizes sex-specific variances in reproductive success. Later, evolutionary developments towards multiple queen-mating retained lifetime commitment between sexual partners, but reduced male variance in reproductive success relative to female's, similar to the most advanced vertebrate cooperative breeders. Here, I (i) discuss some of the unique and highly peculiar mating system adaptations of eusocial insects; (ii) address ambiguities that remained after earlier reviews and extend the monogamy logic to the evolution of soldier castes; (iii) evaluate the evidence for indirect fitness benefits driving the dynamics of (in)vertebrate cooperative breeding, while emphasizing the fundamental differences between obligate eusociality and cooperative breeding; (iv) infer that lifetime commitment is a major driver towards higher levels of organization in bodies, colonies and mutualisms. I argue that evolutionary informative definitions of social systems that separate direct and indirect fitness benefits facilitate transparency when testing inclusive fitness theory. PMID:23339241

  7. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    PubMed

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  8. Is Promiscuous CALB a Good Scaffold for Designing New Epoxidases?

    PubMed

    Bordes, Isabel; Recatalá, José; Świderek, Katarzyna; Moliner, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Candida Antarctica lipase B (CALB) is a well-known enzyme, especially because of its promiscuous activity. Due to its properties, CALB was widely used as a benchmark for designing new catalysts for important organic reactions. The active site of CALB is very similar to that of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) formed by a nucleophile-histidine-acid catalytic triad and an oxyanion hole typical for molecular structures derived from processes of α/β hydrolases. In this work we are exploring these similarities and proposing a Ser105Asp variant of CALB as a new catalyst for epoxide hydrolysis. In particular, the hydrolysis of the trans-diphenylpropene oxide (t-DPPO) is studied by means of quantum cluster models mimicking the active site of both enzymes. Our results, based on semi-empirical and DFT calculations, suggest that mutant Ser105Asp CALB is a good protein scaffold to be used for the bio-synthesis of chiral compounds. PMID:26404218

  9. The energetic cost of mating in a promiscuous cephalopod.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Amanda Michelle; Squires, Zoe Elizabeth; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2012-10-23

    Costs that individuals incur through mating can play an important role in understanding the evolution of life histories and senescence, particularly in promiscuous species. Copulation costs, ranging from energy expenditure to reduced longevity, are widely studied in insects but have received substantially less attention in other taxa. One cost of mating, the energetic cost, is poorly studied across all taxa despite its potential importance for the many species where copulation is physically demanding and/or frequent. Here, we investigated the energetic cost of mating in both male and female dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica). In this species, copulation can last up to 3 h and requires that the male physically restrains the female. We report that the act of copulation halves the swimming endurance of both sexes, and that they take up to 30 min to recover. Such a reduction in post-copulatory performance may have important implications for predator avoidance, foraging ability and energy allocation. Therefore, quantifying this cost is essential to understand the evolution of reproductive strategies and behaviours such as female receptivity and male and female mating frequency. PMID:22809722

  10. A promiscuous DNA packaging machine from bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Kottadiel, Vishal I; Vafabakhsh, Reza; Dai, Li; Chemla, Yann R; Ha, Taekjip; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-01-01

    Complex viruses are assembled from simple protein subunits by sequential and irreversible assembly. During genome packaging in bacteriophages, a powerful molecular motor assembles at the special portal vertex of an empty prohead to initiate packaging. The capsid expands after about 10%-25% of the genome is packaged. When the head is full, the motor cuts the concatemeric DNA and dissociates from the head. Conformational changes, particularly in the portal, are thought to drive these sequential transitions. We found that the phage T4 packaging machine is highly promiscuous, translocating DNA into finished phage heads as well as into proheads. Optical tweezers experiments show that single motors can force exogenous DNA into phage heads at the same rate as into proheads. Single molecule fluorescence measurements demonstrate that phage heads undergo repeated initiations, packaging multiple DNA molecules into the same head. These results suggest that the phage DNA packaging machine has unusual conformational plasticity, powering DNA into an apparently passive capsid receptacle, including the highly stable virus shell, until it is full. These features probably led to the evolution of viral genomes that fit capsid volume, a strikingly common phenomenon in double-stranded DNA viruses, and will potentially allow design of a novel class of nanocapsid delivery vehicles. PMID:21358801

  11. Phytochemicals Perturb Membranes and Promiscuously Alter Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding. PMID:24901212

  12. Butterfly genome reveals promiscuous exchange of mimicry adaptations among species.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    The evolutionary importance of hybridization and introgression has long been debated. Hybrids are usually rare and unfit, but even infrequent hybridization can aid adaptation by transferring beneficial traits between species. Here we use genomic tools to investigate introgression in Heliconius, a rapidly radiating genus of neotropical butterflies widely used in studies of ecology, behaviour, mimicry and speciation. We sequenced the genome of Heliconius melpomene and compared it with other taxa to investigate chromosomal evolution in Lepidoptera and gene flow among multiple Heliconius species and races. Among 12,669 predicted genes, biologically important expansions of families of chemosensory and Hox genes are particularly noteworthy. Chromosomal organization has remained broadly conserved since the Cretaceous period, when butterflies split from the Bombyx (silkmoth) lineage. Using genomic resequencing, we show hybrid exchange of genes between three co-mimics, Heliconius melpomene, Heliconius timareta and Heliconius elevatus, especially at two genomic regions that control mimicry pattern. We infer that closely related Heliconius species exchange protective colour-pattern genes promiscuously, implying that hybridization has an important role in adaptive radiation. PMID:22722851

  13. Substrate Specificity of the Citrate Transporter CitP of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Pudlik, Agata M.

    2012-01-01

    The citrate transporter CitP of lactic acid bacteria catalyzes electrogenic precursor-product exchange of citrate versus l-lactate during citrate-glucose cometabolism. In the absence of sugar, l-lactate is replaced by the metabolic intermediates/end products pyruvate, α-acetolactate, and acetate. In this study, the binding and translocation properties of CitP were analyzed systematically for a wide variety of mono- and dicarboxylates of the form X-CR2-COO−, where X represents OH (2-hydroxy acid), O (2-keto acid), or H (acid) and R groups differ in size, hydrophobicity, and composition. It follows that CitP is a very promiscuous carboxylate transporter. A carboxylate group is both essential and sufficient for recognition by the transporter. A C-2 atom is not essential, formate is a substrate, and C-2 may be part of a ring structure, as in benzoate. The R group may be as bulky as an indole ring structure. For all monocarboxylates of the form X-CHR-COO−, the hydroxy (X = OH) analogs were the preferred substrates. The preference for keto (X = O) or acid (X = H) analogs was dependent on the bulkiness of the R group, such that the acid was preferred for small R groups and the 2-ketoacid was preferred for more bulky R groups. The C4 to C6 dicarboxylates succinate, glutarate, and adipate were also substrates of CitP. The broad substrate specificity is discussed in the context of a model of the binding site of CitP. Many of the substrates of CitP are intermediates or products of amino acid metabolism, suggesting that CitP may have a broader physiological function than its role in citrate fermentation alone. PMID:22563050

  14. Syntheses of 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-xylonate and 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-arabinonate as stereochemical probes for demonstrating the metabolic promiscuity of Sulfolobus solfataricus towards D-xylose and L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Archer, Robert M; Royer, Sylvain F; Mahy, William; Winn, Caroline L; Danson, Michael J; Bull, Steven D

    2013-02-18

    Practical syntheses of 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-xylonate (D-KDX) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-arabinonate (L-KDA) that rely on reaction of the anion of ethyl 2-[(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)oxy]-2-(dimethoxy phosphoryl) acetate with enantiopure glyceraldehyde acetonide, followed by global deprotection of the resultant O-silyl-enol esters, have been developed. This has enabled us to confirm that a 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate aldolase from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus demonstrates good activity for catalysis of the retro-aldol cleavage of both these enantiomers to afford pyruvate and glycolaldehyde. The stereochemical promiscuity of this aldolase towards these enantiomeric aldol substrates confirms that this organism employs a metabolically promiscuous pathway to catabolise the C5-sugars D-xylose and L-arabinose.

  15. Promiscuous and Adaptable Enzymes Fill “Holes” in the Tetrahydrofolate Pathway in Chlamydia Species

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nancy E.; Thiaville, Jennifer J.; Proestos, James; Juárez-Vázquez, Ana L.; McCoy, Andrea J.; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Folates are tripartite molecules comprising pterin, para-aminobenzoate (PABA), and glutamate moieties, which are essential cofactors involved in DNA and amino acid synthesis. The obligately intracellular Chlamydia species have lost several biosynthetic pathways for essential nutrients which they can obtain from their host but have retained the capacity to synthesize folate. In most bacteria, synthesis of the pterin moiety of folate requires the FolEQBK enzymes, while synthesis of the PABA moiety is carried out by the PabABC enzymes. Bioinformatic analyses reveal that while members of Chlamydia are missing the genes for FolE (GTP cyclohydrolase) and FolQ, which catalyze the initial steps in de novo synthesis of the pterin moiety, they have genes for the rest of the pterin pathway. We screened a chlamydial genomic library in deletion mutants of Escherichia coli to identify the “missing genes” and identified a novel enzyme, TrpFCtL2, which has broad substrate specificity. TrpFCtL2, in combination with GTP cyclohydrolase II (RibA), the first enzyme of riboflavin synthesis, provides a bypass of the first two canonical steps in folate synthesis catalyzed by FolE and FolQ. Notably, TrpFCtL2 retains the phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase activity of the original annotation. Additionally, we independently confirmed the recent discovery of a novel enzyme, CT610, which uses an unknown precursor to synthesize PABA and complements E. coli mutants with deletions of pabA, pabB, or pabC. Thus, Chlamydia species have evolved a variant folate synthesis pathway that employs a patchwork of promiscuous and adaptable enzymes recruited from other biosynthetic pathways. PMID:25006229

  16. X-ray structure and molecular dynamics simulations of endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum: structural organization and substrate recognition by endoglucanases that lack cellulose binding module.

    PubMed

    Prates, Érica T; Stankovic, Ivana; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Liberato, Marcelo V; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Pereira, Nei; Polikarpov, Igor; Skaf, Munir S

    2013-01-01

    Plant biomass holds a promise for the production of second-generation ethanol via enzymatic hydrolysis, but its utilization as a biofuel resource is currently limited to a large extent by the cost and low efficiency of the cellulolytic enzymes. Considerable efforts have been dedicated to elucidate the mechanisms of the enzymatic process. It is well known that most cellulases possess a catalytic core domain and a carbohydrate binding module (CBM), without which the enzymatic activity can be drastically reduced. However, Cel12A members of the glycosyl hydrolases family 12 (GHF12) do not bear a CBM and yet are able to hydrolyze amorphous cellulose quite efficiently. Here, we use X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the molecular basis underlying the catalytic capability of endoglucanase 3 from Trichoderma harzianum (ThEG3), a member of the GHF12 enzymes that lacks a CBM. A comparative analysis with the Cellulomonas fimi CBM identifies important residues mediating interactions of EG3s with amorphous regions of the cellulose. For instance, three aromatic residues constitute a harboring wall of hydrophobic contacts with the substrate in both ThEG3 and CfCBM structures. Moreover, residues at the entrance of the active site cleft of ThEG3 are identified, which might hydrogen bond to the substrate. We advocate that the ThEG3 residues Asn152 and Glu201 interact with the substrate similarly to the corresponding CfCBM residues Asn81 and Arg75. Altogether, these results show that CBM motifs are incorporated within the ThEG3 catalytic domain and suggest that the enzymatic efficiency is associated with the length and position of the substrate chain, being higher when the substrate interact with the aromatic residues at the entrance of the cleft and the catalytic triad. Our results provide guidelines for rational protein engineering aiming to improve interactions of GHF12 enzymes with cellulosic substrates.

  17. The lifestyle of prokaryotic organisms influences the repertoire of promiscuous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2015-09-01

    The metabolism of microbial organisms and its diversity are partly the result of an adaptation process to the characteristics of the environments that they inhabit. In this work, we analyze the influence of lifestyle on the content of promiscuous enzymes in 761 nonredundant bacterial and archaeal genomes. Promiscuous enzymes were defined as those proteins whose catalytic activities are defined by two or more different Enzyme Commission (E.C.) numbers. The genomes analyzed were categorized into four lifestyles for their exhaustive comparisons: free-living, extremophiles, pathogens, and intracellular. From these analyses we found that free-living organisms have larger genomes and an enrichment of promiscuous enzymes. In contrast, intracellular organisms showed smaller genomes and the lesser proportion of promiscuous enzymes. On the basis of our data, we show that the proportion of promiscuous enzymes in an organism is mainly influenced by the lifestyle, where fluctuating environments promote its emergence. Finally, we evidenced that duplication processes occur preferentially in metabolism of free-living and extremophiles species.

  18. The lifestyle of prokaryotic organisms influences the repertoire of promiscuous enzymes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2015-09-01

    The metabolism of microbial organisms and its diversity are partly the result of an adaptation process to the characteristics of the environments that they inhabit. In this work, we analyze the influence of lifestyle on the content of promiscuous enzymes in 761 nonredundant bacterial and archaeal genomes. Promiscuous enzymes were defined as those proteins whose catalytic activities are defined by two or more different Enzyme Commission (E.C.) numbers. The genomes analyzed were categorized into four lifestyles for their exhaustive comparisons: free-living, extremophiles, pathogens, and intracellular. From these analyses we found that free-living organisms have larger genomes and an enrichment of promiscuous enzymes. In contrast, intracellular organisms showed smaller genomes and the lesser proportion of promiscuous enzymes. On the basis of our data, we show that the proportion of promiscuous enzymes in an organism is mainly influenced by the lifestyle, where fluctuating environments promote its emergence. Finally, we evidenced that duplication processes occur preferentially in metabolism of free-living and extremophiles species. PMID:26109005

  19. Key aromatic residues at subsites +2 and +3 of glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidase contribute to recognition of long-chain substrates.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Takayoshi; Okuyama, Masayuki; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kim, Young-Min; Mori, Haruhide; Taguchi, Kazunori; Svensson, Birte; Kimura, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 31 α-glucosidases (31AGs) show various specificities for maltooligosaccharides according to chain length. Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase (ANG) is specific for short-chain substrates with the highest k(cat)/K(m) for maltotriose, while sugar beet α-glucosidase (SBG) prefers long-chain substrates and soluble starch. Multiple sequence alignment of 31AGs indicated a high degree of diversity at the long loop (N-loop), which forms one wall of the active pocket. Mutations of Phe236 in the N-loop of SBG (F236A/S) decreased k(cat)/K(m) values for substrates longer than maltose. Providing a phenylalanine residue at a similar position in ANG (T228F) altered the k(cat)/K(m) values for maltooligosaccharides compared with wild-type ANG, i.e., the mutant enzyme showed the highest k(cat)/K(m) value of maltotetraose. Subsite affinity analysis indicated that modification of subsite affinities at +2 and +3 caused alterations of substrate specificity in the mutant enzymes. These results indicated that the aromatic residue in the N-loop contributes to determining the chain-length specificity of 31AGs. PMID:23457711

  20. Mutational and Structural Analysis of Conserved Residues in Ribose-5-Phosphate Isomerase B from Leishmania donovani: Role in Substrate Recognition and Conformational Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Preet Kamal; Tripathi, Neha; Desale, Jayesh; Neelagiri, Soumya; Yadav, Shailendra; Bharatam, Prasad V.; Singh, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B from Leishmania donovani (LdRpiB) is one of the potential drug targets against visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study, we have targeted several conserved amino acids for mutational analysis (i.e. Cys69, His11, His102, His138, Asp45, Tyr46, Pro47 and Glu149) to gain crucial insights into their role in substrate binding, catalysis and conformational stability of the enzyme. All the eight LdRpiB variants were cloned, sequenced, expressed and purified. C69S, H102N, D45N and E149A mutants exhibited complete loss of enzyme activity indicating that they are indispensable for the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters were altered in case of H138N, H11N and P47A variants; however Y46F exhibited similar kinetic behaviour as wild type. All the mutants except H138N exhibited altered protein structure as determined by CD and fluorescence spectral analysis. This data was supported by the atomic level details of the conformational changes and substrate binding using molecular dynamic simulations. LdRpiB also exhibited activity with D-form of various aldose substrates in the order of D-ribose > D-talose > D-allose > D-arabinose. Our study provides insights for better understanding of substrate enzyme interactions which can rationalize the process of drug design against parasite RpiB. PMID:26953696

  1. QM/MM analysis suggests that Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and Nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase slightly tighten the transition state for phosphate diester hydrolysis relative to solution: implication for catalytic promiscuity in the AP superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guanhua

    2011-01-01

    Several members of the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) superfamily exhibit a high level of catalytic proficiency and promiscuity in structurally similar active sites. A thorough characterization of the nature of transition state for different substrates in these enzymes is crucial for understanding the molecular mechanisms that govern those remarkable catalytic properties. In this work, we study the hydrolysis of a phosphate diester, MpNPP−, in solution, two experimentally well-characterized variants of AP (R166S AP, R166S/E322Y AP) and wild type Nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) by QM/MM calculations in which the QM method is an approximate density functional theory previously parameterized for phosphate hydrolysis (SCC-DFTBPR). The general agreements found between these calculations and available experimental data for both solution and enzymes support the use of SCC-DFTBPR/MM for a semi-quantitative analysis of the catalytic mechanism and nature of transition state in AP and NPP. Although phosphate diesters are cognate substrates for NPP but promiscuous substrates for AP, the calculations suggest that their hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by AP and NPP feature similar synchronous transition states that are slightly tighter in nature compared to that in solution, due in part to the geometry of the bimetallic zinc motif. Therefore, this study provides the first direct computational support to the hypothesis that enzymes in the AP superfamily catalyze cognate and promiscuous substrates via similar transition states to those in solution. Our calculations do not support the finding of recent QM/MM studies by López-Canut and coworkers, who suggested that the same diester substrate goes through a much looser transition state in NPP/AP than in solution, a result likely biased by the large structural distortion of the bimetallic zinc site in their simulations. Finally, our calculations for different phosphate diester orientations and phosphorothioate diesters

  2. Filtering promiscuous compounds in early drug discovery: is it a good idea?

    PubMed

    Senger, Mario R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Dantas, Rafael F; Silva, Floriano P

    2016-06-01

    The use of computational filters for excluding supposedly nonspecific and promiscuous compounds from chemical libraries is a controversial issue, because many drugs used in clinics today would never reach the market if these filters were applied. In part, this conflict could be caused by the paradigm: one-drug-one-target, even though it is widely agreed that drug action is a result of a complex network of biomolecular interactions. Therefore, the so-called pan assay interference compounds (PAINS) or promiscuous compounds could be in fact assay artifacts, false positives or, simply, bright chemical matter (BCM) composed of privileged scaffolds, as we propose here. Despite apparent promiscuity, BCM can be tailored into new and safe drugs after overcoming selectivity criteria.

  3. Extreme promiscuity of a bacterial and a plant diterpene synthase enables combinatorial biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Meirong; Potter, Kevin C; Peters, Reuben J

    2016-09-01

    Diterpenes are widely distributed across many biological kingdoms, where they serve a diverse range of physiological functions, and some have significant industrial utility. Their biosynthesis involves class I diterpene synthases (DTSs), whose activity can be preceded by that of class II diterpene cyclases (DTCs). Here, a modular metabolic engineering system was used to examine the promiscuity of DTSs. Strikingly, both a bacterial and plant DTS were found to exhibit extreme promiscuity, reacting with all available precursors with orthogonal activity, producing an olefin or hydroxyl group, respectively. Such DTS promiscuity enables combinatorial biosynthesis, with remarkably high yields for these unoptimized non-native enzymatic combinations (up to 15mg/L). Indeed, it was possible to readily characterize the 13 unknown products. Notably, 16 of the observed diterpenes were previously inaccessible, and these results provide biosynthetic routes that are further expected to enable assembly of more extended pathways to produce additionally elaborated 'non-natural' diterpenoids.

  4. The crystal structure of D-mandelate dehydrogenase reveals its distinct substrate and coenzyme recognition mechanisms from those of 2-ketopantoate reductase.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Fujisawa, Shinsuke; Furukawa, Nayuta; Arai, Kazuhito; Nakajima, Masahiro; Taguchi, Hayao

    2013-09-13

    D-Mandelate dehydrogenases (D-ManDHs), belonging to a new d-2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenase family, catalyze the conversion between benzoylformate and d-mandelate using NAD as a coenzyme. We determined the first D-ManDH structure, that of ManDH2 from Enterococcus faecalis IAM10071. The overall structure showed ManDH2 has a similar fold to 2-ketopantoate reductase (KPR), which catalyzes the conversion of 2-ketopantoate to d-pantoate using NADP as a coenzyme. They share conserved catalytic residues, indicating ManDH2 has the same reaction mechanism as KPR. However, ManDH2 exhibits significant structural variations in the coenzyme and substrate binding sites compared to KPR. These structural observations could explain their different coenzyme and substrate specificities.

  5. Crystal Structures of the Quinone Oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 and Its Complex with NADPH: Implication for NADPH and Substrate Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Yoshimitsu; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Fukuyama, Keiichi

    2003-01-01

    The crystal structures of the ζ-crystalline-like soluble quinone oxidoreductase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (QORTt) and of its complex with NADPH have been determined at 2.3- and 2.8-Å resolutions, respectively. QORTt is composed of two domains, and its overall fold is similar to the folds of Escherichia coli quinone oxidoreductase (QOREc) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase. QORTt forms a homodimer in the crystal by interaction of the βF-strands in domain II, forming a large β-sheet that crosses the dimer interface. High thermostability of QORTt was evidenced by circular dichroic measurement. NADPH is located between the two domains in the QORTt-NADPH complex. The disordered segment involved in the coenzyme binding of apo-QORTt becomes ordered upon NADPH binding. The segment covers an NADPH-binding cleft and may serve as a lid. The 2′-phosphate group of the adenine of NADPH is surrounded by polar and positively charged residues in QORTt, suggesting that QORTt binds NADPH more readily than NADH. The putative substrate-binding site of QORTt, unlike that of QOREc, is largely blocked by nearby residues, permitting access only to small substrates. This may explain why QORTt has weak p-benzoquinone reduction activity and is inactive with such large substrates of QOREc as 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and phenanthraquinone. PMID:12837796

  6. Ligand-binding specificity and promiscuity of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families as revealed by active-site architecture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Liu, Shijia; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    Biomass can be converted into sugars by a series of lignocellulolytic enzymes, which belong to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families summarized in CAZy databases. Here, using a structural bioinformatics method, we analyzed the active site architecture of the main lignocellulolytic enzyme families. The aromatic amino acids Trp/Tyr and polar amino acids Glu/Asp/Asn/Gln/Arg occurred at higher frequencies in the active site architecture than in the whole enzyme structure. And the number of potential subsites was significantly different among different families. In the cellulase and xylanase families, the conserved amino acids in the active site architecture were mostly found at the −2 to +1 subsites, while in β-glucosidase they were mainly concentrated at the −1 subsite. Families with more conserved binding amino acid residues displayed strong selectivity for their ligands, while those with fewer conserved binding amino acid residues often exhibited promiscuity when recognizing ligands. Enzymes with different activities also tended to bind different hydroxyl oxygen atoms on the ligand. These results may help us to better understand the common and unique structural bases of enzyme-ligand recognition from different families and provide a theoretical basis for the functional evolution and rational design of major lignocellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27009476

  7. Structural basis for the energetics of jacalin-sugar interactions: promiscuity versus specificity.

    PubMed

    Arockia Jeyaprakash, A; Jayashree, G; Mahanta, S K; Swaminathan, C P; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2005-03-18

    Jacalin, a tetrameric lectin, is one of the two lectins present in jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds. Its crystal structure revealed, for the first time, the occurrence of the beta-prism I fold in lectins. The structure led to the elucidation of the crucial role of a new N terminus generated by post-translational proteolysis for the lectin's specificity for galactose. Subsequent X-ray studies on other carbohydrate complexes showed that the extended binding site of jacalin consisted of, in addition to the primary binding site, a hydrophobic secondary site A composed of aromatic residues and a secondary site B involved mainly in water-bridges. A recent investigation involving surface plasmon resonance and the X-ray analysis of a methyl-alpha-mannose complex, had led to a suggestion of promiscuity in the lectin's sugar specificity. To explore this suggestion further, detailed isothermal titration calorimetric studies on the interaction of galactose (Gal), mannose (Man), glucose (Glc), Me-alpha-Gal, Me-alpha-Man, Me-alpha-Glc and other mono- and oligosaccharides of biological relevance and crystallographic studies on the jacalin-Me-alpha-Glc complex and a new form of the jacalin-Me-alpha-Man complex, have been carried out. The binding affinity of Me-alpha-Man is 20 times weaker than that of Me-alpha-Gal. The corresponding number is 27, when the binding affinities of Gal and Me-alpha-Gal, and those of Man and Me-alpha-Man are compared. Glucose (Glc) shows no measurable binding, while the binding affinity of Me-alpha-Glc is slightly less than that of Me-alpha-Man. The available crystal structures of jacalin-sugar complexes provide a convincing explanation for the energetics of binding in terms of interactions at the primary binding site and secondary site A. The other sugars used in calorimetric studies show no detectable binding to jacalin. These results and other available evidence suggest that jacalin is specific to O-glycans and its affinity to N-glycans is

  8. Probing the Crucial Role of Leu31 and Thr33 of the Bacillus pumilus CBS Alkaline Protease in Substrate Recognition and Enzymatic Depilation of Animal Hide

    PubMed Central

    Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Jaouadi, Bassem; Ben Hlima, Hajer; Rekik, Hatem; Belhoul, Mouna; Hmidi, Maher; Aicha, Houda Slimene Ben; Hila, Chiraz Gorgi; Toumi, Abdessatar; Aghajari, Nushin; Bejar, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The sapB gene, encoding Bacillus pumilus CBS protease, and seven mutated genes (sapB-L31I, sapB-T33S, sapB-N99Y, sapB-L31I/T33S, sapB-L31I/N99Y, sapB-T33S/N99Y, and sapB-L31I/T33S/N99Y) were overexpressed in protease-deficient Bacillus subtilis DB430 and purified to homogeneity. SAPB-N99Y and rSAPB displayed the highest levels of keratinolytic activity, hydrolysis efficiency, and enzymatic depilation. Interestingly, and at the semi-industrial scale, rSAPB efficiently removed the hair of goat hides within a short time interval of 8 h, thus offering a promising opportunity for the attainment of a lime and sulphide-free depilation process. The efficacy of the process was supported by submitting depilated pelts and dyed crusts to scanning electron microscopic analysis, and the results showed well opened fibre bundles and no apparent damage to the collagen layer. The findings also revealed better physico-chemical properties and less effluent loads, which further confirmed the potential candidacy of the rSAPB enzyme for application in the leather industry to attain an ecofriendly process of animal hide depilation. More interestingly, the findings on the substrate specificity and kinetic properties of the enzyme using the synthetic peptide para-nitroanilide revealed strong preferences for an aliphatic amino-acid (valine) at position P1 for keratinases and an aromatic amino-acid (phenylalanine) at positions P1/P4 for subtilisins. Molecular modeling suggested the potential involvement of a Leu31 residue in a network of hydrophobic interactions, which could have shaped the S4 substrate binding site. The latter could be enlarged by mutating L31I, fitting more easily in position P4 than a phenylalanine residue. The molecular modeling of SAPB-T33S showed a potential S2 subside widening by a T33S mutation, thus suggesting its importance in substrate specificity. PMID:25264614

  9. Probing the crucial role of Leu31 and Thr33 of the Bacillus pumilus CBS alkaline protease in substrate recognition and enzymatic depilation of animal hide.

    PubMed

    Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Jaouadi, Bassem; Ben Hlima, Hajer; Rekik, Hatem; Belhoul, Mouna; Hmidi, Maher; Ben Aicha, Houda Slimene; Hila, Chiraz Gorgi; Toumi, Abdessatar; Aghajari, Nushin; Bejar, Samir

    2014-01-01

    The sapB gene, encoding Bacillus pumilus CBS protease, and seven mutated genes (sapB-L31I, sapB-T33S, sapB-N99Y, sapB-L31I/T33S, sapB-L31I/N99Y, sapB-T33S/N99Y, and sapB-L31I/T33S/N99Y) were overexpressed in protease-deficient Bacillus subtilis DB430 and purified to homogeneity. SAPB-N99Y and rSAPB displayed the highest levels of keratinolytic activity, hydrolysis efficiency, and enzymatic depilation. Interestingly, and at the semi-industrial scale, rSAPB efficiently removed the hair of goat hides within a short time interval of 8 h, thus offering a promising opportunity for the attainment of a lime and sulphide-free depilation process. The efficacy of the process was supported by submitting depilated pelts and dyed crusts to scanning electron microscopic analysis, and the results showed well opened fibre bundles and no apparent damage to the collagen layer. The findings also revealed better physico-chemical properties and less effluent loads, which further confirmed the potential candidacy of the rSAPB enzyme for application in the leather industry to attain an ecofriendly process of animal hide depilation. More interestingly, the findings on the substrate specificity and kinetic properties of the enzyme using the synthetic peptide para-nitroanilide revealed strong preferences for an aliphatic amino-acid (valine) at position P1 for keratinases and an aromatic amino-acid (phenylalanine) at positions P1/P4 for subtilisins. Molecular modeling suggested the potential involvement of a Leu31 residue in a network of hydrophobic interactions, which could have shaped the S4 substrate binding site. The latter could be enlarged by mutating L31I, fitting more easily in position P4 than a phenylalanine residue. The molecular modeling of SAPB-T33S showed a potential S2 subside widening by a T33S mutation, thus suggesting its importance in substrate specificity. PMID:25264614

  10. Monogamous and promiscuous rodent species exhibit discrete variation in the size of the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Marcy A; Gleason, Erin D; Ophir, Alexander G; Phelps, Steven M; Young, Larry J; Marler, Catherine A

    2012-01-01

    Limbic-associated cortical areas, such as the medial prefrontal and retrosplenial cortex (mPFC and RS, respectively), are involved in the processing of emotion, motivation, and various aspects of working memory and have been implicated in mating behavior. To determine whether the independent evolution of mating systems is associated with a convergence in cortical mechanisms, we compared the size of mPFC and RS between the monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) and the promiscuous meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus), and between the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) and the promiscuous white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus). For both promiscuous mice and voles, the mPFC occupied a significantly larger percentage of total cortex than in the monogamous species. No significant differences were observed for the RS or overall cortex size with respect to mating system, supporting the convergent evolution of mPFC size, specifically. Individual differences in the mating behavior of male prairie voles (wandering versus pair-bonding), presumably facultative tactics, were not reflected in the relative size of the mPFC, which is likely a heritable trait. Given the importance of the mPFC for complex working memory, particularly object-place and temporal order memory, we hypothesize that the relatively greater size of the mPFC in promiscuous species reflects a greater need to remember multiple individuals and the times and locations in which they have been encountered in the home range. PMID:22759599

  11. The "Promiscuous Audience" Controversy and the Emergence of the Early Woman's Rights Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaeske, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Examines the "Promiscuous Audience" charge against activist women in the 1830s--its emergence, persuasive force, motivations, and responses to it. Shows how, in establishing their right to speak from public platforms, activist women did not rely on natural law or Constitutional appeals, but rather emphasized the special nature of female…

  12. Predictors of Drug/Alcohol Abuse and Sexual Promiscuity of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Jeong Sook; And Others

    This study examined the relationship between the individual's purpose in life, existential anxiety, powerlessness and use of alcohol/drugs and the tendency to be sexually promiscuous. The study is rooted in the work of Viktor E. Frankl, which suggested that a lack of meaning and purpose can cause socially deviant behavior and psychological…

  13. Substrate Recognition and Hydrolysis by a Family 50 exo-β-Agarase, Aga50D, from the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans*

    PubMed Central

    Pluvinage, Benjamin; Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2013-01-01

    The bacteria that metabolize agarose use multiple enzymes of complementary specificities to hydrolyze the glycosidic linkages in agarose, a linear polymer comprising the repeating disaccharide subunit of neoagarobiose (3,6-anhydro-l-galactose-α-(1,3)-d-galactose) that are β-(1,4)-linked. Here we present the crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 50 exo-β-agarase, Aga50D, from the marine microbe Saccharophagus degradans. This enzyme catalyzes a critical step in the metabolism of agarose by S. degradans through cleaving agarose oligomers into neoagarobiose products that can be further processed into monomers. The crystal structure of Aga50D to 1.9 Å resolution reveals a (β/α)8-barrel fold that is elaborated with a β-sandwich domain and extensive loops. The structures of catalytically inactivated Aga50D in complex with non-hydrolyzed neoagarotetraose (2.05 Å resolution) and neoagarooctaose (2.30 Å resolution) provide views of Michaelis complexes for a β-agarase. In these structures, the d-galactose residue in the −1 subsite is distorted into a 1S3 skew boat conformation. The relative positioning of the putative catalytic residues are most consistent with a retaining catalytic mechanism. Additionally, the neoagarooctaose complex showed that this extended substrate made substantial interactions with the β-sandwich domain, which resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, thus creating additional plus (+) subsites and funneling the polymeric substrate through the tunnel-shaped active site. A synthesis of these results in combination with an additional neoagarobiose product complex suggests a potential exo-processive mode of action of Aga50D on the agarose double helix. PMID:23921382

  14. Structure of a trypanosomatid mitochondrial cytochrome c with heme attached via only one thioether bond and implications for the substrate recognition requirements of heme lyase.

    PubMed

    Fülöp, Vilmos; Sam, Katharine A; Ferguson, Stuart J; Ginger, Michael L; Allen, James W A

    2009-05-01

    The principal physiological role of mitochondrial cytochrome c is electron transfer during oxidative phosphorylation. c-Type cytochromes are almost always characterized by covalent attachment of heme to protein through two thioether bonds between the heme vinyl groups and the thiols of cysteine residues in a Cys-Xxx-Xxx-Cys-His motif. Uniquely, however, members of the evolutionarily divergent protist phylum Euglenozoa, which includes Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, have mitochondrial cytochromes c with heme attached through only one thioether bond [to an (A/F)XXCH motif]; the implications of this for the cytochrome structures are unclear. Here we present the 1.55 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of cytochrome c from the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata. Despite the fundamental difference in heme attachment and in the cytochrome c biogenesis machinery of the Euglenozoa, the structure is remarkably similar to that of typical (CXXCH) mitochondrial cytochromes c, both in overall fold and, other than the missing thioether bond, in the details of the heme attachment. Notably, this similarity includes the stereochemistry of the covalent heme attachment to the protein. The structure has implications for the maturation of c-type cytochromes in the Euglenozoa; it also hints at a distinctive redox environment in the mitochondrial intermembrane space of trypanosomes. Surprisingly, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c heme lyase (the yeast cytochrome c biogenesis system) cannot efficiently mature Trypanosoma brucei cytochrome c or a CXXCH variant when expressed in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli, despite their great structural similarity to yeast cytochrome c, suggesting that heme lyase requires specific recognition features in the apocytochrome. PMID:19459937

  15. A peptidoglycan recognition protein from Sciaenops ocellatus is a zinc amidase and a bactericide with a substrate range limited to Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo-Fei; Zhang, Min; Wang, Chun-Lin; Sun, Li

    2012-02-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are a family of innate immune molecules that recognize bacterial peptidoglycan. PGRPs are highly conserved in invertebrates and vertebrates including fish. However, the biological function of teleost PGRP remains largely uninvestigated. In this study, we identified a PGRP homologue, SoPGLYRP-2, from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and analyzed its activity and potential function. The deduced amino acid sequence of SoPGLYRP-2 is composed of 482 residues and shares 46-94% overall identities with known fish PGRPs. SoPGLYRP-2 contains at the C-terminus a single zinc amidase domain with conserved residues that form the catalytic site. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis detected SoPGLYRP-2 expression in multiple tissues, with the highest expression occurring in liver and the lowest expression occurring in brain. Experimental bacterial infection upregulated SoPGLYRP-2 expression in kidney, spleen, and liver in time-dependent manners. To examine the biological activity of SoPGLYRP-2, purified recombinant proteins representing the intact SoPGLYRP-2 (rSoPGLYRP-2) and the amidase domain (rSoPGLYRP-AD) were prepared from Escherichia coli. Subsequent analysis showed that rSoPGLYRP-2 and rSoPGLYRP-AD (i) exhibited comparable Zn(2+)-dependent peptidoglycan-lytic activity and were able to recognize and bind to live bacterial cells, (ii) possessed bactericidal effect against Gram-positive bacteria and slight bacteriostatic effect against Gram-negative bacteria, (iii) were able to block bacterial infection into host cells. These results indicate that SoPGLYRP-2 is a zinc-dependent amidase and a bactericide that targets preferentially at Gram-positive bacteria, and that SoPGLYRP-2 is likely to play a role in host innate immune defense during bacterial infection. PMID:22146700

  16. Promiscuous and adaptable enzymes fill "holes" in the tetrahydrofolate pathway in Chlamydia species.

    PubMed

    Adams, Nancy E; Thiaville, Jennifer J; Proestos, James; Juárez-Vázquez, Ana L; McCoy, Andrea J; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; Iwata-Reuyl, Dirk; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2014-07-08

    Folates are tripartite molecules comprising pterin, para-aminobenzoate (PABA), and glutamate moieties, which are essential cofactors involved in DNA and amino acid synthesis. The obligately intracellular Chlamydia species have lost several biosynthetic pathways for essential nutrients which they can obtain from their host but have retained the capacity to synthesize folate. In most bacteria, synthesis of the pterin moiety of folate requires the FolEQBK enzymes, while synthesis of the PABA moiety is carried out by the PabABC enzymes. Bioinformatic analyses reveal that while members of Chlamydia are missing the genes for FolE (GTP cyclohydrolase) and FolQ, which catalyze the initial steps in de novo synthesis of the pterin moiety, they have genes for the rest of the pterin pathway. We screened a chlamydial genomic library in deletion mutants of Escherichia coli to identify the "missing genes" and identified a novel enzyme, TrpFCtL2, which has broad substrate specificity. TrpFCtL2, in combination with GTP cyclohydrolase II (RibA), the first enzyme of riboflavin synthesis, provides a bypass of the first two canonical steps in folate synthesis catalyzed by FolE and FolQ. Notably, TrpFCtL2 retains the phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase activity of the original annotation. Additionally, we independently confirmed the recent discovery of a novel enzyme, CT610, which uses an unknown precursor to synthesize PABA and complements E. coli mutants with deletions of pabA, pabB, or pabC. Thus, Chlamydia species have evolved a variant folate synthesis pathway that employs a patchwork of promiscuous and adaptable enzymes recruited from other biosynthetic pathways. Importance: Collectively, the involvement of TrpFCtL2 and CT610 in the tetrahydrofolate pathway completes our understanding of folate biosynthesis in Chlamydia. Moreover, the novel roles for TrpFCtL2 and CT610 in the tetrahydrofolate pathway are sophisticated examples of how enzyme evolution plays a vital role in the

  17. Diverse pore loops of the AAA+ ClpX machine mediate unassisted and adaptor-dependent recognition of ssrA-tagged substrates.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andreas; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2008-02-29

    ClpX, an archetypal proteolytic AAA+ unfoldase, must engage the ssrA tags of appropriate substrates prior to ATP-dependent unfolding and translocation of the denatured polypeptide into ClpP for degradation. Here, specificity-transplant and disulfide-crosslinking experiments reveal that the ssrA tag interacts with different loops that form the top, middle, and lower portions of the central channel of the ClpX hexamer. Our results support a two-step binding mechanism, in which the top loop serves as a specificity filter and the remaining loops form a binding site for the peptide tag relatively deep within the pore. Crosslinking experiments suggest a staggered arrangement of pore loops in the hexamer and nucleotide-dependent changes in pore-loop conformations. This mechanism of initial tag binding would allow ATP-dependent conformational changes in one or more pore loops to drive peptide translocation, force unfolding, and mediate threading of the denatured protein through the ClpX pore.

  18. Carotenoid β-ring hydroxylase and ketolase from marine bacteria-promiscuous enzymes for synthesizing functional xanthophylls.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Norihiko

    2011-01-01

    Marine bacteria belonging to genera Paracoccus and Brevundimonas of the α-Proteobacteria class can produce C₄₀-type dicyclic carotenoids containing two β-end groups (β rings) that are modified with keto and hydroxyl groups. These bacteria produce astaxanthin, adonixanthin, and their derivatives, which are ketolated by carotenoid β-ring 4(4')-ketolase (4(4')-oxygenase; CrtW) and hydroxylated by carotenoid β-ring 3(3')-hydroxylase (CrtZ). In addition, the genus Brevundimonas possesses a gene for carotenoid β-ring 2(2')-hydroxylase (CrtG). This review focuses on these carotenoid β-ring-modifying enzymes that are promiscuous for carotenoid substrates, and pathway engineering for the production of xanthophylls (oxygen-containing carotenoids) in Escherichia coli, using these enzyme genes. Such pathway engineering researches are performed towards efficient production not only of commercially important xanthophylls such as astaxanthin, but also of xanthophylls minor in nature (e.g., β-ring(s)-2(2')-hydroxylated carotenoids). PMID:21673887

  19. Catalytic promiscuity of a bacterial α-N-methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2012-01-01

    The posttranslational methylation of N-terminal α-amino groups (α-N-methylation) is a ubiquitous reaction found in all domains of life. Although this modification usually occurs on protein substrates, recent studies have shown that it also takes place on ribosomally synthesized natural products. Here we report an investigation of the bacterial α-N-methyltransferase CypM involved in the biosynthesis of the peptide antibiotic cypemycin. We demonstrate that CypM has low substrate selectivity and methylates a variety of oligopeptides, cyclic peptides such as nisin and haloduracin, and the ε-amino group of lysine. Hence it may have potential for enzyme engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis. Bayesian phylogenetic inference of bacterial α-N-methyltransferases suggests that they have not evolved as a specific group based on the chemical transformations they catalyze, but that they have been acquired from various other methyltransferase classes during evolution. PMID:22841713

  20. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3′, 3′-cGAMP)

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Zachary F.; Wang, Xin C.; Wright, Todd A.; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3′, 3′-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling. PMID:26839412

  1. Predicting promiscuous antigenic T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mymA operon proteins binding to MHC Class I and Class II molecules.

    PubMed

    Saraav, Iti; Pandey, Kirti; Sharma, Monika; Singh, Swati; Dutta, Prasun; Bhardwaj, Anshu; Sharma, Sadhna

    2016-10-01

    Limited efficacy of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine has raised the need to explore other immunogenic candidates to develop an effective vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells play a critical role in host immunity to Mtb. Infection of macrophages with Mtb results in upregulation of mymA operon genes thereby suggesting their importance as immune targets. In the present study, after exclusion of self-peptides mymA operon proteins of Mtb were analyzed in silico for the presence of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I and Class II binding peptides using Bioinformatics and molecular analysis section, NetMHC 3.4, ProPred and Immune epitope database software. Out of 56 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 41 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic for MHC Class I. In MHC Class II, out of 336 promiscuous epitopes obtained, 142 epitopes were predicted to be antigenic. The comparative bioinformatics analysis of mymA operon proteins found Rv3083 to be the best vaccine candidate. Molecular docking was performed with the most antigenic peptides of Rv3083 (LASGAASVV with alleles HLA-B51:01, HAATSGTLI with HLA-A02, IVTATGLNI and EKIHYGLKVNTA with HLA-DRB1_01:01) to study the structural basis for recognition of peptides by various HLA molecules. The software binding prediction was validated by the obtained molecular docking score of peptide-HLA complex. These peptides can be further investigated for their immunological relevance in patients of tuberculosis using major histocompatibility complex tetramer approach. PMID:27389362

  2. Z linkage of female promiscuity genes in the moth Utetheisa ornatrix: support for the sexy-sperm hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Vikram K; Reeve, Hudson K

    2010-05-01

    Female preference genes for large males in the highly promiscuous moth Utetheisa ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) have previously been shown to be mostly Z-linked, in accordance with the hypothesis that ZZ-ZW sex chromosome systems should facilitate Fisherian sexual selection. We determined the heritability of both female and male promiscuity in the highly promiscuous moth U. ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) through parent-offspring and grandparent-offspring regression analyses. Our data show that male promiscuity is not sex-limited and either autosomal or sex-linked whereas female promiscuity is primarily determined by sex-limited, Z-linked genes. These data are consistent with the "sexy-sperm hypothesis," which posits that multiple-mating and sperm competitiveness coevolve through a Fisherian-like process in which female promiscuity is a kind of mate choice in which sperm-competitiveness is the trait favored in males. Such a Fisherian process should also be more potent when female preferences are Z-linked and sex-limited than when autosomal or not limited.

  3. Z linkage of female promiscuity genes in the moth Utetheisa ornatrix: support for the sexy-sperm hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Vikram K; Reeve, Hudson K

    2010-05-01

    Female preference genes for large males in the highly promiscuous moth Utetheisa ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) have previously been shown to be mostly Z-linked, in accordance with the hypothesis that ZZ-ZW sex chromosome systems should facilitate Fisherian sexual selection. We determined the heritability of both female and male promiscuity in the highly promiscuous moth U. ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) through parent-offspring and grandparent-offspring regression analyses. Our data show that male promiscuity is not sex-limited and either autosomal or sex-linked whereas female promiscuity is primarily determined by sex-limited, Z-linked genes. These data are consistent with the "sexy-sperm hypothesis," which posits that multiple-mating and sperm competitiveness coevolve through a Fisherian-like process in which female promiscuity is a kind of mate choice in which sperm-competitiveness is the trait favored in males. Such a Fisherian process should also be more potent when female preferences are Z-linked and sex-limited than when autosomal or not limited. PMID:20002164

  4. Duplication of a promiscuous transcription factor drives the emergence of a new regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Pougach, Ksenia; Voet, Arnout; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Voordeckers, Karin; Christiaens, Joaquin F; Baying, Bianka; Benes, Vladimir; Sakai, Ryo; Aerts, Jan; Zhu, Bo; Van Dijck, Patrick; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of new genes throughout evolution requires rewiring and extension of regulatory networks. However, the molecular details of how the transcriptional regulation of new gene copies evolves remain largely unexplored. Here we show how duplication of a transcription factor gene allowed the emergence of two independent regulatory circuits. Interestingly, the ancestral transcription factor was promiscuous and could bind different motifs in its target promoters. After duplication, one paralogue evolved increased binding specificity so that it only binds one type of motif, whereas the other copy evolved a decreased activity so that it only activates promoters that contain multiple binding sites. Interestingly, only a few mutations in both the DNA-binding domains and in the promoter binding sites were required to gradually disentangle the two networks. These results reveal how duplication of a promiscuous transcription factor followed by concerted cis and trans mutations allows expansion of a regulatory network.

  5. Promiscuity and selectivity in covalent enzyme inhibition: a systematic study of electrophilic fragments.

    PubMed

    Jöst, Christian; Nitsche, Christoph; Scholz, Therese; Roux, Lionel; Klein, Christian D

    2014-09-25

    Covalent ligand-target interactions offer significant pharmacological advantages. However, off-target reactivity of the reactive groups, which usually have electrophilic properties, must be minimized, and the selectivity of irreversible inhibitors is a crucial requirement. We therefore performed a systematic study to determine the selectivity of several electrophilic groups that can be used as building blocks for covalently binding ligands. Six reactive groups with modulated electrophilicity were combined with 11 nonreactive moieties, resulting in a small combinatorial library of 72 fragment-like compounds. These compounds were screened against a group of 11 enzyme targets to assess their selectivity and their potential for promiscuous binding to proteins. The assay results showed a considerably lower degree of promiscuity than initially expected, even for those members of the screening collection that contain supposedly highly reactive electrophiles.

  6. Duplication of a promiscuous transcription factor drives the emergence of a new regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Pougach, Ksenia; Voet, Arnout; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.; Voordeckers, Karin; Christiaens, Joaquin F.; Baying, Bianka; Benes, Vladimir; Sakai, Ryo; Aerts, Jan; Zhu, Bo; Van Dijck, Patrick; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of new genes throughout evolution requires rewiring and extension of regulatory networks. However, the molecular details of how the transcriptional regulation of new gene copies evolves remain largely unexplored. Here we show how duplication of a transcription factor gene allowed the emergence of two independent regulatory circuits. Interestingly, the ancestral transcription factor was promiscuous and could bind different motifs in its target promoters. After duplication, one paralogue evolved increased binding specificity so that it only binds one type of motif, whereas the other copy evolved a decreased activity so that it only activates promoters that contain multiple binding sites. Interestingly, only a few mutations in both the DNA-binding domains and in the promoter binding sites were required to gradually disentangle the two networks. These results reveal how duplication of a promiscuous transcription factor followed by concerted cis and trans mutations allows expansion of a regulatory network. PMID:25204769

  7. Differential plant invasiveness is not always driven by host promiscuity with bacterial symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Klock, Metha M.; Barrett, Luke G.; Thrall, Peter H.; Harms, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of mechanisms that allow some species to outcompete others is a fundamental goal in ecology and invasive species management. One useful approach is to examine congeners varying in invasiveness in a comparative framework across native and invaded ranges. Acacia species have been widely introduced outside their native range of Australia, and a subset of these species have become invasive in multiple parts of the world. Within specific regions, the invasive status of these species varies. Our study examined whether a key mechanism in the life history of Acacia species, the legume-rhizobia symbiosis, influences acacia invasiveness on a regional scale. To assess the extent to which species varying in invasiveness correspondingly differ with regard to the diversity of rhizobia they associate with, we grew seven Acacia species ranging in invasiveness in California in multiple soils from both their native (Australia) and introduced (California) ranges. In particular, the aim was to determine whether more invasive species formed symbioses with a wider diversity of rhizobial strains (i.e. are more promiscuous hosts). We measured and compared plant performance, including aboveground biomass, survival, and nodulation response, as well as rhizobial community composition and richness. Host promiscuity did not differ among invasiveness categories. Acacia species that varied in invasiveness differed in aboveground biomass for only one soil and did not differ in survival or nodulation within individual soils. In addition, acacias did not differ in rhizobial richness among invasiveness categories. However, nodulation differed between regions and was generally higher in the native than introduced range. Our results suggest that all Acacia species introduced to California are promiscuous hosts and that host promiscuity per se does not explain the observed differences in invasiveness within this region. Our study also highlights the utility of assessing potential

  8. Plasmodium vivax Promiscuous T-Helper Epitopes Defined and Evaluated as Linear Peptide Chimera Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Caro-Aguilar, Ivette; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Guzmán, Fanny; De la Vega, Patricia; Elkin Patarroyo, Manuel; Galinski, Mary R.; Moreno, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trials of malaria vaccines have confirmed that parasite-derived T-cell epitopes are required to elicit consistent and long-lasting immune responses. We report here the identification and functional characterization of six T-cell epitopes that are present in the merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium vivax (PvMSP-1) and bind promiscuously to four different HLA-DRB1∗ alleles. Each of these peptides induced lymphoproliferative responses in cells from individuals with previous P. vivax infections. Furthermore, linear-peptide chimeras containing the promiscuous PvMSP-1 T-cell epitopes, synthesized in tandem with the Plasmodium falciparum immunodominant circumsporozoite protein (CSP) B-cell epitope, induced high specific antibody titers, cytokine production, long-lasting immune responses, and immunoglobulin G isotype class switching in BALB/c mice. A linear-peptide chimera containing an allele-restricted P. falciparum T-cell epitope with the CSP B-cell epitope was not effective. Two out of the six promiscuous T-cell epitopes exhibiting the highest anti-peptide response also contain B-cell epitopes. Antisera generated against these B-cell epitopes recognize P. vivax merozoites in immunofluorescence assays. Importantly, the anti-peptide antibodies generated to the CSP B-cell epitope inhibited the invasion of P. falciparum sporozoites into human hepatocytes. These data and the simplicity of design of the chimeric constructs highlight the potential of multimeric, multistage, and multispecies linear-peptide chimeras containing parasite promiscuous T-cell epitopes for malaria vaccine development. PMID:12065487

  9. UNAIDS says sex education does not promote promiscuity. Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    1997-11-28

    A review of 68 studies from around the world commissioned by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS determined that providing children with sex education does not promote promiscuity. The most effective prevention education programs are those that foster open communication regarding sex, negotiation skills, social and media influences, and safer sex methods. Zimbabwe was cited as a country with an effective prevention educational program.

  10. Differential plant invasiveness is not always driven by host promiscuity with bacterial symbionts.

    PubMed

    Klock, Metha M; Barrett, Luke G; Thrall, Peter H; Harms, Kyle E

    2016-01-01

    Identification of mechanisms that allow some species to outcompete others is a fundamental goal in ecology and invasive species management. One useful approach is to examine congeners varying in invasiveness in a comparative framework across native and invaded ranges. Acacia species have been widely introduced outside their native range of Australia, and a subset of these species have become invasive in multiple parts of the world. Within specific regions, the invasive status of these species varies. Our study examined whether a key mechanism in the life history of Acacia species, the legume-rhizobia symbiosis, influences acacia invasiveness on a regional scale. To assess the extent to which species varying in invasiveness correspondingly differ with regard to the diversity of rhizobia they associate with, we grew seven Acacia species ranging in invasiveness in California in multiple soils from both their native (Australia) and introduced (California) ranges. In particular, the aim was to determine whether more invasive species formed symbioses with a wider diversity of rhizobial strains (i.e. are more promiscuous hosts). We measured and compared plant performance, including aboveground biomass, survival, and nodulation response, as well as rhizobial community composition and richness. Host promiscuity did not differ among invasiveness categories. Acacia species that varied in invasiveness differed in aboveground biomass for only one soil and did not differ in survival or nodulation within individual soils. In addition, acacias did not differ in rhizobial richness among invasiveness categories. However, nodulation differed between regions and was generally higher in the native than introduced range. Our results suggest that all Acacia species introduced to California are promiscuous hosts and that host promiscuity per se does not explain the observed differences in invasiveness within this region. Our study also highlights the utility of assessing potential

  11. Variation in promiscuity and sexual selection drives avian rate of Faster-Z evolution.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alison E; Harrison, Peter W; Zimmer, Fabian; Montgomery, Stephen H; Pointer, Marie A; Mank, Judith E

    2015-03-01

    Higher rates of coding sequence evolution have been observed on the Z chromosome relative to the autosomes across a wide range of species. However, despite a considerable body of theory, we lack empirical evidence explaining variation in the strength of the Faster-Z Effect. To assess the magnitude and drivers of Faster-Z Evolution, we assembled six de novo transcriptomes, spanning 90 million years of avian evolution. Our analysis combines expression, sequence and polymorphism data with measures of sperm competition and promiscuity. In doing so, we present the first empirical evidence demonstrating the positive relationship between Faster-Z Effect and measures of promiscuity, and therefore variance in male mating success. Our results from multiple lines of evidence indicate that selection is less effective on the Z chromosome, particularly in promiscuous species, and that Faster-Z Evolution in birds is due primarily to genetic drift. Our results reveal the power of mating system and sexual selection in shaping broad patterns in genome evolution.

  12. VS-APPLE: A Virtual Screening Algorithm Using Promiscuous Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Tatsuya; Kato, Koya; Terada, Tomoki P; Sasai, Masaki; Chikenji, George

    2015-06-22

    As the number of structurally resolved protein-ligand complexes increases, the ligand-binding pockets of many proteins have been found to accommodate multiple different compounds. Effective use of these structural data is important for developing virtual screening (VS) methods that identify bioactive compounds. Here, we introduce a VS method, VS-APPLE (Virtual Screening Algorithm using Promiscuous Protein-Ligand complExes), based on promiscuous protein-ligand binding structures. In VS-APPLE, multiple ligands bound to a pocket are combined into a query template for screening. Both the structural match between a test compound and the multiple-ligand template and the possible collisions between the test compound and the target protein are evaluated by an efficient geometric hashing method. The performance of VS-APPLE was examined on a filtered, clustered version of the Directory of Useful Decoys data set. In Area Under the Curve analyses of this data set, VS-APPLE outperformed several popular screening programs. Judging from the performance of VS-APPLE, the structural data of promiscuous protein-ligand bindings could be further analyzed and exploited for developing VS methods.

  13. Mesaconase/Fumarase FumD in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Promiscuity of Escherichia coli Class I Fumarases FumA and FumB

    PubMed Central

    Kronen, Miriam; Berg, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesaconase catalyzes the hydration of mesaconate (methylfumarate) to (S)-citramalate. The enzyme participates in the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate fermentation as well as in the metabolism of various C5-dicarboxylic acids such as mesaconate or L-threo-β-methylmalate. We have recently shown that Burkholderia xenovorans uses a promiscuous class I fumarase to catalyze this reaction in the course of mesaconate utilization. Here we show that classical Escherichia coli class I fumarases A and B (FumA and FumB) are capable of hydrating mesaconate with 4% (FumA) and 19% (FumB) of the catalytic efficiency kcat/Km, compared to the physiological substrate fumarate. Furthermore, the genomes of 14.8% of sequenced Enterobacteriaceae (26.5% of E. coli, 90.6% of E. coli O157:H7 strains) possess an additional class I fumarase homologue which we designated as fumarase D (FumD). All these organisms are (opportunistic) pathogens. fumD is clustered with the key genes for two enzymes of the methylaspartate pathway of glutamate fermentation, glutamate mutase and methylaspartate ammonia lyase, converting glutamate to mesaconate. Heterologously produced FumD was a promiscuous mesaconase/fumarase with a 2- to 3-fold preference for mesaconate over fumarate. Therefore, these bacteria have the genetic potential to convert glutamate to (S)-citramalate, but the further fate of citramalate is still unclear. Our bioinformatic analysis identified several other putative mesaconase genes and revealed that mesaconases probably evolved several times from various class I fumarases independently. Most, if not all iron-dependent fumarases, are capable to catalyze mesaconate hydration. PMID:26658641

  14. A RSK(y) relationship with promiscuous PKA.

    PubMed

    Houslay, Miles D

    2006-08-22

    Where, when, and with "whom" do molecules interact? Such relations in space and time are key concepts that currently engage investigators of cellular signaling processes. The notion of compartmentalized signaling grew out of studies of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) signaling processes, and this area continues to generate exciting new paradigms. Distinct clouds of cAMP are formed and shaped within cells by tethered cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs). AKAPosomes, formed from distinct subpopulations of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) tethered to anchoring proteins (AKAPs) together with specific substrate molecules, interpret these gradients to generate individualized responses. PKA activity is also regulated by the interaction of other proteins with the regulatory (R) or catalytic (C) subunits of PKA, and a mechanism has been uncovered in which ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK1) interacts with either PKA subunit, depending on whether RSK1 has been phosphorylated and activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Thus, inactive RSK1 binds the RI subunit of PKA to sensitize it to activation, whereas activated RSK1 binds the C subunit to desensitize PKA to cAMP activation. Cross-talk between the key cAMP and ERK signaling pathways provides a mechanism that, along with distinct mechanisms of both positive and negative attenuation provided by Raf and PDE4 isoforms, can be tailored on a cell type-specific basis.

  15. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from the Reciprocal Promiscuity of Two Pyridoxal Phosphate-dependent Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Valerie W. C.; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes that utilize the cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate play essential roles in amino acid metabolism in all organisms. The cofactor is used by proteins that adopt at least five different folds, which raises questions about the evolutionary processes that might explain the observed distribution of functions among folds. In this study, we show that a representative of fold type III, the Escherichia coli alanine racemase (ALR), is a promiscuous cystathionine β-lyase (CBL). Furthermore, E. coli CBL (fold type I) is a promiscuous alanine racemase. A single round of error-prone PCR and selection yielded variant ALR(Y274F), which catalyzes cystathionine β-elimination with a near-native Michaelis constant (Km = 3.3 mm) but a poor turnover number (kcat ≈10 h−1). In contrast, directed evolution also yielded CBL(P113S), which catalyzes l-alanine racemization with a poor Km (58 mm) but a high kcat (22 s−1). The structures of both variants were solved in the presence and absence of the l-alanine analogue, (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid. As expected, the ALR active site was enlarged by the Y274F substitution, allowing better access for cystathionine. More surprisingly, the favorable kinetic parameters of CBL(P113S) appear to result from optimizing the pKa of Tyr-111, which acts as the catalytic acid during l-alanine racemization. Our data emphasize the short mutational routes between the functions of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzymes, regardless of whether or not they share the same fold. Thus, they confound the prevailing model of enzyme evolution, which predicts that overlapping patterns of promiscuity result from sharing a common multifunctional ancestor. PMID:27474741

  16. Symbiotic N nutrition, bradyrhizobial biodiversity and photosynthetic functioning of six inoculated promiscuous-nodulating soybean genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pule-Meulenberg, Flora; Gyogluu, Cynthia; Naab, Jesse; Dakora, Felix D

    2011-04-15

    Six promiscuous soybean genotypes were assessed for their ability to nodulate with indigenous root-nodule bacteria in Ghana, with Bradyrhizobium japonicum WB74 serving as positive control. Although the results revealed free nodulation of all six genotypes in both inoculated and uninoculated plots, there was a marked effect of inoculation on photosynthetic rates and whole-plant C. Inoculation also increased stomatal conductance in TGx1485-1D, TGx1448-2E, TGx1740-2F and TGx1445-3E, leading to significantly elevated transpiration rates in the last two genotypes, and a decrease in TGx1485-1D, TGx1440-1E and Salintuya-1, resulting in reduced leaf transpiration and decreased C accumulation. Nodulation, total plant biomass, plant N concentration and content also increased and ∂(15)N of the six genotypes, except for TGx1448-2E decreased. Significantly higher %Ndfa resulted in all the soybean genotypes tested (except for TGx1485-1D), and the symbiotic N yield in TGx1740-2F and TGx1448-2E doubled. PCR-RFLP revealed 18 distinct IGS types present in root nodules of the six promiscuous soybean genotypes, with IGS type II being isolated from all six genotypes, followed by IGS types X and XI from five out of the six genotypes. Marked differences in strain IGS type symbiotic efficiency were revealed. For example, as sole nodule occupant, IGS type XI produced high symbiotic N in TGx1445-3E, but low amounts in TGx1448-2E. Inoculated Salintuya-1, which trapped nine strain IGS types in its root nodules, was the most promiscuous genotype, but produced less symbiotic N compared to genotypes with fewer strains in their root nodules. PMID:21044808

  17. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from the Reciprocal Promiscuity of Two Pyridoxal Phosphate-dependent Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Soo, Valerie W C; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher J; Patrick, Wayne M

    2016-09-16

    Enzymes that utilize the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate play essential roles in amino acid metabolism in all organisms. The cofactor is used by proteins that adopt at least five different folds, which raises questions about the evolutionary processes that might explain the observed distribution of functions among folds. In this study, we show that a representative of fold type III, the Escherichia coli alanine racemase (ALR), is a promiscuous cystathionine β-lyase (CBL). Furthermore, E. coli CBL (fold type I) is a promiscuous alanine racemase. A single round of error-prone PCR and selection yielded variant ALR(Y274F), which catalyzes cystathionine β-elimination with a near-native Michaelis constant (Km = 3.3 mm) but a poor turnover number (kcat ≈10 h(-1)). In contrast, directed evolution also yielded CBL(P113S), which catalyzes l-alanine racemization with a poor Km (58 mm) but a high kcat (22 s(-1)). The structures of both variants were solved in the presence and absence of the l-alanine analogue, (R)-1-aminoethylphosphonic acid. As expected, the ALR active site was enlarged by the Y274F substitution, allowing better access for cystathionine. More surprisingly, the favorable kinetic parameters of CBL(P113S) appear to result from optimizing the pKa of Tyr-111, which acts as the catalytic acid during l-alanine racemization. Our data emphasize the short mutational routes between the functions of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes, regardless of whether or not they share the same fold. Thus, they confound the prevailing model of enzyme evolution, which predicts that overlapping patterns of promiscuity result from sharing a common multifunctional ancestor. PMID:27474741

  18. Symbiotic N nutrition, bradyrhizobial biodiversity and photosynthetic functioning of six inoculated promiscuous-nodulating soybean genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pule-Meulenberg, Flora; Gyogluu, Cynthia; Naab, Jesse; Dakora, Felix D

    2011-04-15

    Six promiscuous soybean genotypes were assessed for their ability to nodulate with indigenous root-nodule bacteria in Ghana, with Bradyrhizobium japonicum WB74 serving as positive control. Although the results revealed free nodulation of all six genotypes in both inoculated and uninoculated plots, there was a marked effect of inoculation on photosynthetic rates and whole-plant C. Inoculation also increased stomatal conductance in TGx1485-1D, TGx1448-2E, TGx1740-2F and TGx1445-3E, leading to significantly elevated transpiration rates in the last two genotypes, and a decrease in TGx1485-1D, TGx1440-1E and Salintuya-1, resulting in reduced leaf transpiration and decreased C accumulation. Nodulation, total plant biomass, plant N concentration and content also increased and ∂(15)N of the six genotypes, except for TGx1448-2E decreased. Significantly higher %Ndfa resulted in all the soybean genotypes tested (except for TGx1485-1D), and the symbiotic N yield in TGx1740-2F and TGx1448-2E doubled. PCR-RFLP revealed 18 distinct IGS types present in root nodules of the six promiscuous soybean genotypes, with IGS type II being isolated from all six genotypes, followed by IGS types X and XI from five out of the six genotypes. Marked differences in strain IGS type symbiotic efficiency were revealed. For example, as sole nodule occupant, IGS type XI produced high symbiotic N in TGx1445-3E, but low amounts in TGx1448-2E. Inoculated Salintuya-1, which trapped nine strain IGS types in its root nodules, was the most promiscuous genotype, but produced less symbiotic N compared to genotypes with fewer strains in their root nodules.

  19. A Promiscuous De Novo Retro-Aldolase Catalyzes Asymmetric Michael Additions via Schiff Base Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Garrabou, Xavier; Beck, Tobias; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in computational design have enabled the development of primitive enzymes for a range of mechanistically distinct reactions. Here we show that the rudimentary active sites of these catalysts can give rise to useful chemical promiscuity. Specifically, RA95.5-8, designed and evolved as a retro-aldolase, also promotes asymmetric Michael additions of carbanions to unsaturated ketones with high rates and selectivities. The reactions proceed by amine catalysis, as indicated by mutagenesis and X-ray data. The inherent flexibility and tunability of this catalyst should make it a versatile platform for further optimization and/or mechanistic diversification by directed evolution. PMID:25777153

  20. Exploring the catalytic promiscuity of a new glycosyltransferase from Carthamus tinctorius.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kebo; Chen, Ridao; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Ruishan; Chen, Dawei; Dou, Xiaoxiang; Dai, Jungui

    2014-09-19

    The catalytic promiscuity of a new glycosyltransferase (UGT73AE1) from Carthamus tinctorius was explored. UGT73AE1 showed the capability to glucosylate a total of 19 structurally diverse types of acceptors and to generate O-, S-, and N-glycosides, making it the first reported trifunctional plant glycosyltransferase. The catalytic reversibility and regioselectivity were observed and modeled in a one-pot reaction transferring a glucose moiety from icariin to emodin. These findings demonstrate the potential versatility of UGT73AE1 in the glycosylation of bioactive natural products.

  1. Watching one's P's and Q's: promiscuity, plasticity, and quasiequivalence in a T = 1 virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, M S

    1998-01-01

    Although quasiequivalence is not needed to explain the assembly of the T = 1 canine parvovirus capsid, the interactions of the 60-fold symmetrical capsid protein with less symmetrical viral components illustrate the elements of plasticity and promiscuity of interactions that are embodied in quasiequivalence. The current analysis is based on interactions of fivefold related proteins with a single peptide running along the fivefold axis, and on interactions of the capsid protein with various fragments of the genomic DNA, each having a different sequence and exposing the protein to interactions with different types of nucleotide base. PMID:9449365

  2. Supramolecular Assembly of Artificial Metalloenzymes Based on the Dimeric Protein LmrR as Promiscuous Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bos, Jeffrey; Browne, Wesley R; Driessen, Arnold J M; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-08-12

    Supramolecular anchoring of transition metal complexes to a protein scaffold is an attractive approach to the construction of artificial metalloenzymes since this is conveniently achieved by self-assembly. Here, we report a novel design for supramolecular artificial metalloenzymes that exploits the promiscuity of the central hydrophobic cavity of the transcription factor Lactococcal multidrug resistance Regulator (LmrR) as a generic binding site for planar coordination complexes that do not provide specific protein binding interactions. The success of this approach is manifested in the excellent enantioselectivities that are achieved in the Cu(II) catalyzed enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles. PMID:26214343

  3. Is Promiscuity Associated with Enhanced Selection on MHC-DQα in Mice (genus Peromyscus)?

    PubMed Central

    MacManes, Matthew D.; Lacey, Eileen A.

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive behavior may play an important role in shaping selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes. For example, the number of sexual partners that an individual has may affect exposure to sexually transmitted pathogens, with more partners leading to greater exposure and, hence, potentially greater selection for variation at MHC loci. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the strength of selection on exon 2 of the MHC-DQα locus in two species of Peromyscus. While the California mouse (P. californicus) is characterized by lifetime social and genetic monogamy, the deer mouse (P. maniculatus) is socially and genetically promiscuous; consistent with these differences in mating behavior, the diversity of bacteria present within the reproductive tracts of females is significantly greater for P. maniculatus. To test the prediction that more reproductive partners and exposure to a greater range of sexually transmitted pathogens are associated with enhanced diversifying selection on genes responsible for immune function, we compared patterns and levels of diversity at the Class II MHC-DQα locus in sympatric populations of P. maniculatus and P. californicus. Using likelihood based analyses, we show that selection is enhanced in the promiscuous P. maniculatus. This study is the first to compare the strength of selection in wild sympatric rodents with known differences in pathogen milieu. PMID:22649541

  4. The Promiscuous Protein Binding Ability of Erythrosine B Studied by Metachromasy (Metachromasia)

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Lakshmi; Buchwald, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to elucidate aspects of the protein binding ability of erythrosine B (ErB), a poly-iodinated xanthene dye and an FDA-approved food colorant (FD&C Red No. 3), which we have identified recently as a promiscuous inhibitor of protein–protein interactions (PPI) with a remarkably consistent median inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the 5–30 µM range. Because ErB exhibits metachromasy, i.e., color change upon binding to several proteins, we exploited this property to quantify its binding to proteins such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) and CD40L (CD154) and to determine the corresponding binding constants (Kd) and stoichiometry (nb) using spectrophotometric methods. Binding was reversible and the estimated affinities for both protein targets obtained here (Kd values of 14 and 20 µM for BSA and CD40L, respectively) were in good agreement with that expected from the protein–protein interaction (PPI) inhibitory activity of ErB. A stoichiometry greater than one was observed both for CD40L and BSA binding (nb of 5–6 and 8–9 for BSA and CD40L, respectively) indicating the possibility of nonspecific binding of the flat an rigid ErB molecule at multiple sites, which could explain the promiscuous PPI inhibitory activity if some of these overlap with the binding site of the protein partner and interfere with the binding. PMID:23456742

  5. The promiscuous protein binding ability of erythrosine B studied by metachromasy (metachromasia).

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Lakshmi; Buchwald, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The present study aims to elucidate aspects of the protein binding ability of erythrosine B (ErB), a poly-iodinated xanthene dye and an FDA-approved food colorant (FD&C Red No. 3), which we have identified recently as a promiscuous inhibitor of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with a remarkably consistent median inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) in the 5- to 30-μM range. Because ErB exhibits metachromasy, that is, color change upon binding to several proteins, we exploited this property to quantify its binding to proteins such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) and CD40L (CD154) and to determine the corresponding binding constants (Kd ) and stoichiometry (nb ) using spectrophotometric methods. Binding was reversible, and the estimated affinities for both protein targets obtained here (Kd values of 14 and 20 μM for BSA and CD40L, respectively) were in good agreement with that expected from the PPI inhibitory activity of ErB. A stoichiometry greater than one was observed both for CD40L and BSA binding (nb of 5-6 and 8-9 for BSA and CD40L, respectively), indicating the possibility of nonspecific binding of the flat and rigid ErB molecule at multiple sites, which could explain the promiscuous PPI inhibitory activity if some of these overlap with the binding site of the protein partner and interfere with the binding.

  6. Promiscuous activity of ER glucosidase II discovered through donor specificity analysis of UGGT

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Atsushi; Totani, Kiichiro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} UGGT has a narrow donor specificity. {yields} UGGT gave several non-natural high-mannose-type glycans. {yields} G-II has a promiscuous activity as broad specificity hexosidase. -- Abstract: In glycoprotein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), UGGT (UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase) and glucosidase II (G-II) play key roles. UGGT serves as a glycoprotein folding sensor by virtue of its unique specificity to glucosylate glycoproteins at incompletely folded stage. By using various UDP-Glc analogues, we first analyzed donor specificity of UGGT, which was proven to be rather narrow. However, marginal activity was observed with UDP-galactose and UDP-glucuronic acid as well as with 3-, 4- and 6-deoxy glucose analogues to give corresponding transfer products. Intriguingly, G-II smoothly converted all of them back to Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2}, providing an indication that G-II has a promiscuous activity as a broad specificity hexosidase.

  7. The promiscuous larvae: flexibility in the establishment of symbiosis in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbo, V. R.; Baird, A. H.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2013-03-01

    Coral reefs thrive in part because of the symbiotic partnership between corals and Symbiodinium. While this partnership is one of the keys to the success of coral reef ecosystems, surprisingly little is known about many aspects of coral symbiosis, in particular the establishment and development of symbiosis in host species that acquire symbionts anew in each generation. More specifically, the point at which symbiosis is established (i.e., larva vs. juvenile) remains uncertain, as does the source of free-living Symbiodinium in the environment. In addition, the capacity of host and symbiont to form novel combinations is unknown. To explore patterns of initial association between host and symbiont, larvae of two species of Acropora were exposed to sediment collected from three locations on the Great Barrier Reef. A high proportion of larvae established symbiosis shortly after contact with sediments, and Acropora larvae were promiscuous, taking up multiple types of Symbiodinium. The Symbiodinium types acquired from the sediments reflected the symbiont assemblage within a wide range of cnidarian hosts at each of the three sites, suggesting potential regional differences in the free-living Symbiodinium assemblage. Coral larvae clearly have the capacity to take up Symbiodinium prior to settlement, and sediment is a likely source. Promiscuous larvae allow species to associate with Symbiodinium appropriate for potentially novel environments that may be experienced following dispersal.

  8. Privileged scaffolds or promiscuous binders: a comparative study on rhodanines and related heterocycles in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mendgen, Thomas; Steuer, Christian; Klein, Christian D

    2012-01-26

    Rhodanines and related five-membered heterocycles with multiple heteroatoms have recently gained a reputation of being unselective compounds that appear as "frequent hitters" in screening campaigns and therefore have little value in drug discovery. However, this judgment appears to be based mostly on anecdotal evidence. Having identified various rhodanines and related compounds in screening campaigns, we decided to perform a systematic study on their promiscuity. An amount of 163 rhodanines, hydantoins, thiohydantoins, and thiazolidinediones were synthesized and tested against several targets. The compounds were also characterized with respect to aggregation and electrophilic reactivity, and the binding modes of rhodanines and related compounds in published X-ray cocrystal structures were analyzed. The results indicate that the exocyclic, double bonded sulfur atom in rhodanines and thiohydantoins, in addition to other structural features, offers a particularly high density of interaction sites for polar interactions and hydrogen bonds. This causes a promiscuous behavior at concentrations in the "screening range" but should not be regarded as a general knockout criterion that excludes such screening hits from further development. It is suggested that special criteria for target affinity and selectivity are applied to these classes of compounds and that their exceptional and potentially valuable biomolecular binding properties are consequently exploited in a useful way. PMID:22077389

  9. Childhood victimization and subsequent risk for promiscuity, prostitution, and teenage pregnancy: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Widom, C S; Kuhns, J B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the extent to which being abused and/or neglected in childhood increases a person's risk for promiscuity, prostitution, and teenage pregnancy. METHODS: A prospective cohorts design was used to match, on the basis of age, race, sex, and social class, cases of abused and/or neglected children from 1967 to 1971 with nonabused and nonneglected children; subjects were followed into young adulthood. From 1989 to 1995 1196 subjects (676 abused and/or neglected and 520 control subjects were located and interviewed. RESULTS: Early childhood abuse and/or neglect was a significant predictor of prostitution for females (odds ratio [OR] = 2.96). For females, sexual abuse (OR = 2.54) and neglect (OR = 2.58) were associated with prostitution, whereas physical abuse was only marginally associated. Childhood abuse and neglect were not associated with increased risk for promiscuity or teenage pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings strongly support a relationship between childhood victimization and subsequent prostitution. The presumed causal sequence between childhood victimization and teenage pregnancy may need to be reevaluated. PMID:8916528

  10. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.

  11. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; et al

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is uniquemore » among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-8 activity.« less

  12. The structural basis for receptor recognition of human interleukin-18

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Naotaka; Kimura, Takeshi; Arita, Kyohei; Ariyoshi, Mariko; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Zuo, Xiaobing; Maenaka, Katsumi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kondo, Naomi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito; Kato, Zenichiro

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that belongs to the IL-1 family and plays an important role in inflammation. The uncontrolled release of this cytokine is associated with severe chronic inflammatory disease. IL-18 forms a signalling complex with the IL-18 receptor α (Rα) and β (Rβ) chains at the plasma membrane, which induces multiple inflammatory cytokines. Here, we present a crystal structure of human IL-18 bound to the two receptor extracellular domains. Generally, the receptors’ recognition mode for IL-18 is similar to IL-1β; however, certain notable differences were observed. The architecture of the IL-18 receptor second domain (D2) is unique among the other IL-1R family members, which presumably distinguishes them from the IL-1 receptors that exhibit a more promiscuous ligand recognition mode. The structures and associated biochemical and cellular data should aid in developing novel drugs to neutralize IL-18 activity. PMID:25500532

  13. Polypharmacology directed compound data mining: identification of promiscuous chemotypes with different activity profiles and comparison to approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-12-27

    Increasing evidence that many pharmaceutically relevant compounds elicit their effects through binding to multiple targets, so-called polypharmacology, is beginning to change conventional drug discovery and design strategies. In light of this paradigm shift, we have mined publicly available compound and bioactivity data for promiscuous chemotypes. For this purpose, a hierarchy of active compounds, atomic property based scaffolds, and unique molecular topologies were generated, and activity annotations were analyzed using this framework. Starting from ∼35 000 compounds active against human targets with at least 1 μM potency, 33 chemotypes with distinct topology were identified that represented molecules active against at least 3 different target families. Network representations were utilized to study scaffold-target family relationships and activity profiles of scaffolds corresponding to promiscuous chemotypes. A subset of promiscuous chemotypes displayed a significant enrichment in drugs over bioactive compounds. A total of 190 drugs were identified that had on average only 2 known target annotations but belonged to the 7 most promiscuous chemotypes that were active against 8-15 target families. These drugs should be attractive candidates for polypharmacological profiling.

  14. Functional Trade-Offs in Promiscuous Enzymes Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Mutational Robustness of the Native Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Miriam; Emond, Stephane; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which an emerging new function trades off with the original function is a key characteristic of the dynamics of enzyme evolution. Various cases of laboratory evolution have unveiled a characteristic trend; a large increase in a new, promiscuous activity is often accompanied by only a mild reduction of the native, original activity. A model that associates weak trade-offs with “evolvability” was put forward, which proposed that enzymes possess mutational robustness in the native activity and plasticity in promiscuous activities. This would enable the acquisition of a new function without compromising the original one, reducing the benefit of early gene duplication and therefore the selection pressure thereon. Yet, to date, no experimental study has examined this hypothesis directly. Here, we investigate the causes of weak trade-offs by systematically characterizing adaptive mutations that occurred in two cases of evolutionary transitions in enzyme function: (1) from phosphotriesterase to arylesterase, and (2) from atrazine chlorohydrolase to melamine deaminase. Mutational analyses in various genetic backgrounds revealed that, in contrast to the prevailing model, the native activity is less robust to mutations than the promiscuous activity. For example, in phosphotriesterase, the deleterious effect of individual mutations on the native phosphotriesterase activity is much larger than their positive effect on the promiscuous arylesterase activity. Our observations suggest a revision of the established model: weak trade-offs are not caused by an intrinsic robustness of the native activity and plasticity of the promiscuous activity. We propose that upon strong adaptive pressure for the new activity without selection against the original one, selected mutations will lead to the largest possible increases in the new function, but whether and to what extent they decrease the old function is irrelevant, creating a bias towards initially weak trade-offs and

  15. Switch-Loop Flexibility Affects Transport of Large Drugs by the Promiscuous AcrB Multidrug Efflux Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hi-jea; Müller, Reinke T.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug efflux transporters recognize a variety of structurally unrelated compounds for which the molecular basis is poorly understood. For the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) inner membrane component AcrB of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux system from Escherichia coli, drug binding occurs at the access and deep binding pockets. These two binding areas are separated by an 11-amino-acid-residue-containing switch loop whose conformational flexibility is speculated to be essential for drug binding and transport. A G616N substitution in the switch loop has a distinct and local effect on the orientation of the loop and on the ability to transport larger drugs. Here, we report a distinct phenotypical pattern of drug recognition and transport for the G616N variant, indicating that drug substrates with minimal projection areas of >70 Å2 are less well transported than other substrates. PMID:24914123

  16. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-06-24

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail.

  17. Mr. right versus Mr. right now: A discounting-based approach to promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Jarmolowicz, David P; Lemley, Shea M; Asmussen, Laura; Reed, Derek D

    2015-06-01

    Research has begun to examine how individuals discount delayed sex. However, these tasks have not evaluated the dimension of sexual behavior associated with promiscuity (i.e., choices between partners). The current study assessed choices between hypothetical sexual partners within a delay discounting paradigm. Participants first completed a preference assessment featuring pictures of hypothetical sexual partners. These rankings were then used to present hypothetical choices between immediate sex with a less preferred partner or sex with the most-preferred partner after a series of delays. These choices titrated through the partner rankings from the preference assessment. Data were well fit by the hyperboloid model of discounting. Area under the curve (AUC) measures were calculated for all participants' discounting of sex. AUC was higher for those with more sexual partners and was correlated with measures of sexual risk behavior.

  18. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail. PMID:26105662

  19. Male coercion and the costs of promiscuous mating for female chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Martin N; Kahlenberg, Sonya M; Emery Thompson, Melissa; Wrangham, Richard W

    2007-01-01

    For reasons that are not yet clear, male aggression against females occurs frequently among primates with promiscuous mating systems. Here, we test the sexual coercion hypothesis that male aggression functions to constrain female mate choice. We use 10 years of behavioural and endocrine data from a community of wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) to show that sexual coercion is the probable primary function of male aggression against females. Specifically, we show that male aggression is targeted towards the most fecund females, is associated with high male mating success and is costly for the victims. Such aggression can be viewed as a counter-strategy to female attempts at paternity confusion, and a cost of multi-male mating. PMID:17264062

  20. HUMAN PARAOXONASE-1 (PON1): GENE STRUCTURE AND EXPRESSION, PROMISCUOUS ACTIVITIES AND MULTIPLE PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES

    PubMed Central

    Mackness, Mike; Mackness, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Human PON1 is a HDL-associated lipolactonase capable of preventing LDL and cell membrane oxidation and is therefore considered to be atheroprotective. PON1 contributes to the antioxidative function of HDL and reductions in HDL-PON1 activity, prevalent in a wide variety of diseases with an inflammatory component, is believed to lead to dysfunctional HDL which can promote inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, PON1 is multifunctional and may contribute to other HDL functions such as in innate immunity, preventing infection by quorum sensing gram negative bacteria by destroying acyl lactone mediators of quorum sensing, and putative new roles in cancer development and the promotion of healthy ageing. In this review we explore the physiological roles of PON1 in disease development, as well as PON1 gene and protein structure, promiscuous activities and the roles of SNPs and ethnicity in determining PON1 activity. PMID:25965560

  1. Evidence of promiscuous endothelial binding by Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Esser, Claudia; Bachmann, Anna; Kuhn, Daniela; Schuldt, Kathrin; Förster, Birgit; Thiel, Meike; May, Jürgen; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Yáñez-Mó, María; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Schinkel, Alfred H; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Craig, Alister G; Bruchhaus, Iris; Horstmann, Rolf D

    2014-05-01

    The adhesion of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) to human endothelium is considered a key event in the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria and other life-threatening complications caused by the most prevalent malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. In the past 30 years, 14 endothelial receptors for iRBCs have been identified. Exposing 10 additional surface proteins of endothelial cells to a mixture of P.  falciparum isolates from three Ghanaian malaria patients, we identified seven new iRBC receptors, all expressed in brain vessels. This finding strongly suggests that endothelial binding of P.  falciparum iRBCs is promiscuous and may use a combination of endothelial surface moieties.

  2. Structural Plasticity Underpins Promiscuous Binding of the Prosurvival Protein A1

    SciTech Connect

    Smits,C.; Czabotar, P.; Hinds, M.; Day, C.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptotic pathways are regulated by protein-protein interactions. Interaction of the BH3 domains of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins with the hydrophobic groove of prosurvival proteins is critical. Whereas some BH3 domains bind in a promiscuous manner, others exhibit considerable selectivity and the sequence characteristics that distinguish these activities are unclear. In this study, crystal structures of complexes between the prosurvival protein A1 and the BH3 domains from Puma, Bmf, Bak, and Bid have been solved. The structure of A1 is similar to that of other prosurvival proteins, although features, such as an acidic patch in the binding groove, may allow specific therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. Significant conformational plasticity was observed in the intermolecular interactions and these differences explain some of the variation in affinity. This study, in combination with published data, suggests that interactions between conserved residues demarcate optimal binding.

  3. In situ imaging and proteome profiling indicate andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Wijaya, Hadhi; Samanta, Sanjay; Lam, Yulin; Yao, Shao Q.

    2015-06-01

    Natural products represent an enormous source of pharmacologically useful compounds, and are often used as the starting point in modern drug discovery. Many biologically interesting natural products are however not being pursued as potential drug candidates, partly due to a lack of well-defined mechanism-of-action. Traditional in vitro methods for target identification of natural products based on affinity protein enrichment from crude cellular lysates cannot faithfully recapitulate protein-drug interactions in living cells. Reported herein are dual-purpose probes inspired by the natural product andrographolide, capable of both reaction-based, real-time bioimaging and in situ proteome profiling/target identification in live mammalian cells. Our results confirm that andrographolide is a highly promiscuous compound and engaged in covalent interactions with numerous previously unknown cellular targets in cell type-specific manner. We caution its potential therapeutic effects should be further investigated in detail.

  4. Males and females gain differentially from sociality in a promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kritika M; Chattopadhyay, Balaji; Swami Doss, D P; Kumar, A K Vinoth; Kandula, Sripathi; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Sociality emerges when the benefits of group living outweigh its costs. While both males and females are capable of strong social ties, the evolutionary drivers for sociality and the benefits accrued maybe different for each sex. In this study, we investigate the differential reproductive success benefits of group membership that males and females might obtain in the promiscuous fruit bat Cynopterus sphinx. Individuals of this species live in flexible social groups called colonies. These colonies are labile and there is high turnover of individuals. However, colony males sire more offspring within the colony suggesting that being part of a colony may result in reproductive benefits for males. This also raises the possibility that long-term loyalty towards the colony may confer additional advantage in terms of higher reproductive success. We used ten seasons of genetic parentage data to estimate reproductive success and relatedness of individuals in the colony. We used recapture data to identify long and short-term residents in the colony as well as to obtain rates of recapture for males and females. Our results reveal that males have a significantly higher chance of becoming long-term residents (than females), and these long-term resident males gain twice the reproductive success compared to short-term resident males. We also observed that long-term resident females are related to each other and also achieve higher reproductive success than short-term resident females. In contrast, long-term resident males do not differ from short-term resident males in their levels of relatedness. Our results re-iterate the benefits of sociality even in species that are promiscuous and socially labile and possible benefits of maintaining a colony. PMID:25794185

  5. Target Promiscuity and Heterogeneous Effects of Tarantula Venom Peptides Affecting Na+ and K+ Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Elisa; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Silva, Deyanira Fuentes; Clement, Herlinda; Schiavon, Emanuele; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Odell, George; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Alagón, Alejandro; de la Vega, Ricardo C. Rodríguez; Possani, Lourival D.; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Venom-derived peptide modulators of ion channel gating are regarded as essential tools for understanding the molecular motions that occur during the opening and closing of ion channels. In this study, we present the characterization of five spider toxins on 12 human voltage-gated ion channels, following observations about the target promiscuity of some spider toxins and the ongoing revision of their “canonical” gating-modifying mode of action. The peptides were purified de novo from the venom of Grammostola rosea tarantulas, and their sequences were confirmed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. Their effects on seven tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, the three human ether-à-go-go (hERG)-related K+ channels, and two human Shaker-related K+ channels were extensively characterized by electrophysiological techniques. All the peptides inhibited ion conduction through all the Na+ channels tested, although with distinctive patterns. The peptides also affected the three pharmaceutically relevant hERG isoforms differently. At higher concentrations, all peptides also modified the gating of the Na+ channels by shifting the activation to more positive potentials, whereas more complex effects were recorded on hERG channels. No effects were evident on the two Shaker-related K+ channels at concentrations well above the IC50 value for the affected channels. Given the sequence diversity of the tested peptides, we propose that tarantula toxins should be considered both as multimode and target-promiscuous ion channel modulators; both features should not be ignored when extracting mechanistic interpretations about ion channel gating. Our observations could also aid in future structure-function studies and might help the development of novel ion channel-specific drugs. PMID:19955179

  6. Rhizobial Diversity and Nodulation Characteristics of the Extremely Promiscuous Legume Sophora flavescens.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yin Shan; Liu, Yuan Hui; Yan, Hui; Wang, En Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin; Guo, Bao Lin; Chen, Wen Feng

    2015-12-01

    In present study, we report our extensive survey on the diversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with Sophora flavescens, a sophocarpidine (matrine)-containing medicinal legume. We additionally investigated the cross nodulation, infection pattern, light and electron microscopies of root nodule sections of S. flavescens infected by various rhizobia. Seventeen genospecies of rhizobia belonging to five genera with seven types of symbiotic nodC genes were found to nodulate S. flavescens in natural soils. In the cross-nodulation tests, most representative rhizobia in class α-Proteobacteria, whose host plants belong to different cross-nodulation groups, form effective indeterminate nodules, while representative rhizobia in class β-Proteobacteria form ineffective nodules on S. flavescens. Highly host-specific biovars of Rhizobium leguminosarum (bv. trifolii and bv. viciae) and Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli could establish symbioses with S. flavescens, providing further evidence that S. flavescens is an extremely promiscuous legume and it does not have strict selectivity on either the symbiotic genes or the species-determining housekeeping genes of rhizobia. Root-hair infection is found as the pattern that rhizobia have gained entry into the curled root hairs. Electron microscopies of ultra-thin sections of S. flavescens root nodules formed by different rhizobia show that the bacteroids are regular or irregular rod shape and nonswollen types. Some bacteroids contain poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), while others do not, indicating the synthesis of PHB in bacteroids is rhizobia-dependent. The extremely promiscuous symbiosis between S. flavescens and different rhizobia provide us a basis for future studies aimed at understanding the molecular interactions of rhizobia and legumes. PMID:26389798

  7. A β-Alanine Catabolism Pathway Containing a Highly Promiscuous ω-Transaminase in the 12-Aminododecanate-Degrading Pseudomonas sp. Strain AAC

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Matthew; Peat, Thomas S.; Newman, Janet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously isolated the transaminase KES23458 from Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC as a promising biocatalyst for the production of 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of nylon-12. Here, we report the subsequent characterization of this transaminase. It exhibits activity with a broad substrate range which includes α-, β-, and ω-amino acids, as well as α,ω-diamines and a number of other industrially relevant compounds. It is therefore a prospective candidate for the biosynthesis of a range of polyamide monomers. The crystal structure of KES23458 revealed that the protein forms a dimer containing a large active site pocket and unusual phosphorylated histidine residues. To infer the physiological role of the transaminase, we expressed, purified, and characterized a dehydrogenase from the same operon, KES23460. Unlike the transaminase, the dehydrogenase was shown to be quite selective, catalyzing the oxidation of malonic acid semialdehyde, formed from β-alanine transamination via KES23458. In keeping with previous reports, the dehydrogenase was shown to catalyze both a coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent reaction to form acetyl-CoA and a significantly slower CoA-independent reaction to form acetate. These findings support the original functional assignment of KES23458 as a β-alanine transaminase. However, a seemingly well-adapted active site and promiscuity toward unnatural compounds, such as 12-aminododecanoic acid, suggest that this enzyme could perform multiple functions for Pseudomonas sp. strain AAC. IMPORTANCE We describe the characterization of an industrially relevant transaminase able to metabolize 12-aminododecanoic acid, a constituent building block of the widely used polymer nylon-12, and we report the biochemical and structural characterization of the transaminase protein. A physiological role for this highly promiscuous enzyme is proposed based on the characterization of a related gene from the host organism. Molecular dynamics

  8. Discovery of a Promiscuous Non-Heme Iron Halogenase in Ambiguine Alkaloid Biogenesis: Implication for an Evolvable Enzyme Family for Late-Stage Halogenation of Aliphatic Carbons in Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Zhu, Qin; Ittiamornkul, Kuljira; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-05-01

    The elucidation of enigmatic enzymatic chlorination timing in ambiguine indole alkaloid biogenesis led to the discovery and characterization of AmbO5 protein as a promiscuous non-heme iron aliphatic halogenase. AmbO5 was shown capable of selectively modifying seven structurally distinct ambiguine, fischerindole and hapalindole alkaloids with chlorine via late-stage aliphatic C-H group functionalization. Cross-comparison of AmbO5 with a previously characterized aliphatic halogenase homolog WelO5 that has a restricted substrate scope led to the identification of a C-terminal sequence motif important for substrate tolerance and specificity. Mutagenesis of 18 residues of WelO5 within the identified sequence motif led to a functional mutant with an expanded substrate scope identical to AmbO5, but an altered substrate specificity from the wild-type enzymes. These observations collectively provide evidence on the evolvable nature of AmbO5/WelO5 enzyme duo in the context of hapalindole-type alkaloid biogenesis and implicate their promise for the future development of designer biocatalysis for the selective late-stage modification of unactivated aliphatic carbon centers in small molecules with halogens. PMID:27027281

  9. Growth of ligand-target interaction data in ChEMBL is associated with increasing and activity measurement-dependent compound promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-10-22

    Compounds with high-confidence target annotations and activity measurements in the original and current release of the ChEMBL database have been compared to better understand how the growth of compound activity data might influence the spectrum of ligand-target interactions and the degree of target promiscuity among active compounds. Compared to the original ChEMBL release, a significant increase in the proportion of target promiscuous compounds was observed in the current version. The presence of these compounds led to large-magnitude changes in compound activity-based target and target family relationships and to a reorganization of major target communities. Surprisingly, however, this strong trend toward increasing target promiscuity was largely caused by growth of compounds with exclusive IC(50) measurements. By contrast, compounds with available equilibrium constants, which were also added in large amounts, did not substantially alter compound-based target relationships and notably contribute to increasing target promiscuity. These findings suggest that apparent compound promiscuity is much dependent on experimental conditions under which activities are determined and that care should be taken when evaluating promiscuity and polypharmacology on the basis of assay-dependent activity measurements.

  10. Influence of Combinatorial Histone Modifications on Antibody and Effector Protein Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Stephen M.; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Baker, Richard W.; Miller, Victoria L.; Strahl, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We report a general method to examine the recognition of post-translational modifications (PTMs) by antibodies and proteins. We use this method to evaluate the binding of modification-specific antibodies and chromatin-associating factors to an array of high-purified, biotinylated peptides (derived from human histone sequences) harboring multiple PTMs printed onto streptavidin-coated glass slides. We find that modification-specific antibodies are both more promiscuous in their PTM recognition than expected and highly influenced by neighboring PTMs. Binding of chromatin-associating factors is also influenced by combinatorial PTMs, giving further support for the “Histone Code” hypothesis. Thus we report the first thorough characterization of PTM influence on antibody recognition and describe a tool for the rapid and inexpensive assessment of chromatin-associating factor binding specificity. PMID:21167713

  11. PAINS in the Assay: Chemical Mechanisms of Assay Interference and Promiscuous Enzymatic Inhibition Observed during a Sulfhydryl-Scavenging HTS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Significant resources in early drug discovery are spent unknowingly pursuing artifacts and promiscuous bioactive compounds, while understanding the chemical basis for these adverse behaviors often goes unexplored in pursuit of lead compounds. Nearly all the hits from our recent sulfhydryl-scavenging high-throughput screen (HTS) targeting the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 were such compounds. Herein, we characterize the chemical basis for assay interference and promiscuous enzymatic inhibition for several prominent chemotypes identified by this HTS, including some pan-assay interference compounds (PAINS). Protein mass spectrometry and ALARM NMR confirmed these compounds react covalently with cysteines on multiple proteins. Unfortunately, compounds containing these chemotypes have been published as screening actives in reputable journals and even touted as chemical probes or preclinical candidates. Our detailed characterization and identification of such thiol-reactive chemotypes should accelerate triage of nuisance compounds, guide screening library design, and prevent follow-up on undesirable chemical matter. PMID:25634295

  12. Data mining of protein-binding profiling data identifies structural modifications that distinguish selective and promiscuous compounds.

    PubMed

    Yongye, Austin B; Medina-Franco, José L

    2012-09-24

    Activity profiling of compound collections across multiple targets is increasingly being used in probe and drug discovery. Herein, we discuss an approach to systematically analyzing the structure-activity relationships of a large screening profile data with emphasis on identifying structural changes that have a significant impact on the number of proteins to which a compound binds. As a case study, we analyzed a recently released public data set of more than 15 000 compounds screened across 100 sequence-unrelated proteins. The screened compounds have different origins and include natural products, synthetic molecules from academic groups, and commercial compounds. Similar synthetic structures from academic groups showed, overall, greater promiscuity differences than do natural products and commercial compounds. The method implemented in this work readily identified structural changes that differentiated highly specific from promiscuous compounds. This approach is general and can be applied to analyze any other large-scale protein-binding profile data.

  13. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  14. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  15. Prediction of promiscuous epitopes in the e6 protein of three high risk human papilloma viruses: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nirmala; Chinnappan, Sudandiradoss

    2013-01-01

    A najor current challenge and constraint in cervical cancer research is the development of vaccines against human papilloma virus (HPV) epitopes. Although many studies are done on epitope identification on HPVs, no computational work has been carried out for high risk forms which are considered to cause cervical cancer. Of all the high risk HPVs, HPV 16, HPV 18 and HPV 45 are responsible for 94% of cervical cancers in women worldwide. In this work, we computationally predicted the promiscuous epitopes among the E6 proteins of high risk HPVs. We identified the conserved residues, HLA class I, HLA class II and B-cell epitopes along with their corresponding secondary structure conformations. We used extremely precise bioinformatics tools like ClustalW2, MAPPP, NetMHC, EpiJen, EpiTop 1.0, ABCpred, BCpred and PSIPred for achieving this task. Our study identified specific regions 'FAFR(K)DL' followed by 'KLPD(Q)LCTEL' fragments which proved to be promiscuous epitopes present in both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, class II molecules and B cells as well. These fragments also follow every suitable character to be considered as promiscuous epitopes with supporting evidences of previously reported experimental results. Thus, we conclude that these regions should be considered as the important for design of specific therapeutic vaccines for cervical cancer.

  16. Coexistence of unlimited bipartite and genuine multipartite entanglement: Promiscuous quantum correlations arising from discrete to continuous-variable systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Ericsson, Marie; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2007-08-15

    Quantum mechanics imposes 'monogamy' constraints on the sharing of entanglement. We show that, despite these limitations, entanglement can be fully 'promiscuous', i.e., simultaneously present in unlimited two-body and many-body forms in states living in an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space. Monogamy just bounds the divergence rate of the various entanglement contributions. This is demonstrated in simple families of N-mode (N{>=}4) Gaussian states of light fields or atomic ensembles, which therefore enable infinitely more freedom in the distribution of information, as opposed to systems of individual qubits. Such a finding is of importance for the quantification, understanding, and potential exploitation of shared quantum correlations in continuous variable systems. We discuss how promiscuity gradually arises when considering simple families of discrete variable states, with increasing Hilbert space dimension towards the continuous variable limit. Such models are somehow analogous to Gaussian states with asymptotically diverging, but finite, squeezing. In this respect, we find that non-Gaussian states (which in general are more entangled than Gaussian states) exhibit also the interesting feature that their entanglement is more shareable: in the non-Gaussian multipartite arena, unlimited promiscuity can be already achieved among three entangled parties, while this is impossible for Gaussian, even infinitely squeezed states.

  17. The chemical versatility of the beta-alpha-beta fold: catalytic promiscuity and divergent evolution in the tautomerase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Poelarends, G J; Veetil, V Puthan; Whitman, C P

    2008-11-01

    Tautomerase superfamily members have an amino-terminal proline and a beta-alpha-beta fold, and include 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), 5-(carboxymethyl)-2-hydroxymuconate isomerase (CHMI), trans- and cis-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD and cis-CaaD, respectively), malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD), and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which exhibits a phenylpyruvate tautomerase (PPT) activity. Pro-1 is a base (4-OT, CHMI, the PPT activity of MIF) or an acid (CaaD, cis-CaaD, MSAD). Components of the catalytic machinery have been identified and mechanistic hypotheses formulated. Characterization of new homologues shows that these mechanisms are incomplete. 4-OT, CaaD, cis-CaaD, and MSAD also have promiscuous activities with a hydratase activity in CaaD, cis-CaaD, and MSAD, PPT activity in CaaD and cis-CaaD, and CaaD and cis-CaaD activities in 4-OT. The shared promiscuous activities provide evidence for divergent evolution from a common ancestor, give hints about mechanistic relationships, and implicate catalytic promiscuity in the emergence of new enzymes.

  18. Characterization of Promiscuous Binding of Phosphor Ligands to Breast-Cancer-Gene 1 (BRCA1) C-Terminal (BRCT): Molecular Dynamics, Free Energy, Entropy and Inhibitor Design.

    PubMed

    You, Wanli; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Kizhake, Smitha; Natarajan, Amarnath; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediated by breast-cancer-gene 1 C-terminal (BRCT) is an attractive strategy to sensitize breast and ovarian cancers to chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage. Such inhibitors could also be used for studies to understand the role of this PPI in DNA damage response. However, design of BRCT inhibitors is challenging because of the inherent flexibility associated with this domain. Several studies identified short phosphopeptides as tight BRCT binders. Here we investigated the thermodynamic properties of 18 phosphopeptides or peptide with phosphate mimic and three compounds with phosphate groups binding to BRCT to understand promiscuous molecular recognition and guide inhibitor design. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interactions between inhibitors and BRCT and their dynamic behavior in the free and bound states. MD simulations revealed the key role of loops in altering the shape and size of the binding site to fit various ligands. The mining minima (M2) method was used for calculating binding free energy to explore the driving forces and the fine balance between configuration entropy loss and enthalpy gain. We designed a rigidified ligand, which showed unfavorable experimental binding affinity due to weakened enthalpy. This was because it lacked the ability to rearrange itself upon binding. Investigation of another phosphate group containing compound, C1, suggested that the entropy loss can be reduced by preventing significant narrowing of the energy well and introducing multiple new compound conformations in the bound states. From our computations, we designed an analog of C1 that introduced new intermolecular interactions to strengthen attractions while maintaining small entropic penalty. This study shows that flexible compounds do not always encounter larger entropy penalty, compared with other more rigid binders, and highlights a new strategy for inhibitor design. PMID

  19. Characterization of Promiscuous Binding of Phosphor Ligands to Breast-Cancer-Gene 1 (BRCA1) C-Terminal (BRCT): Molecular Dynamics, Free Energy, Entropy and Inhibitor Design

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-ming M.; Kizhake, Smitha; Natarajan, Amarnath; Chang, Chia-en A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediated by breast-cancer-gene 1 C-terminal (BRCT) is an attractive strategy to sensitize breast and ovarian cancers to chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage. Such inhibitors could also be used for studies to understand the role of this PPI in DNA damage response. However, design of BRCT inhibitors is challenging because of the inherent flexibility associated with this domain. Several studies identified short phosphopeptides as tight BRCT binders. Here we investigated the thermodynamic properties of 18 phosphopeptides or peptide with phosphate mimic and three compounds with phosphate groups binding to BRCT to understand promiscuous molecular recognition and guide inhibitor design. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interactions between inhibitors and BRCT and their dynamic behavior in the free and bound states. MD simulations revealed the key role of loops in altering the shape and size of the binding site to fit various ligands. The mining minima (M2) method was used for calculating binding free energy to explore the driving forces and the fine balance between configuration entropy loss and enthalpy gain. We designed a rigidified ligand, which showed unfavorable experimental binding affinity due to weakened enthalpy. This was because it lacked the ability to rearrange itself upon binding. Investigation of another phosphate group containing compound, C1, suggested that the entropy loss can be reduced by preventing significant narrowing of the energy well and introducing multiple new compound conformations in the bound states. From our computations, we designed an analog of C1 that introduced new intermolecular interactions to strengthen attractions while maintaining small entropic penalty. This study shows that flexible compounds do not always encounter larger entropy penalty, compared with other more rigid binders, and highlights a new strategy for inhibitor design. PMID

  20. Characterization of Promiscuous Binding of Phosphor Ligands to Breast-Cancer-Gene 1 (BRCA1) C-Terminal (BRCT): Molecular Dynamics, Free Energy, Entropy and Inhibitor Design.

    PubMed

    You, Wanli; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Kizhake, Smitha; Natarajan, Amarnath; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediated by breast-cancer-gene 1 C-terminal (BRCT) is an attractive strategy to sensitize breast and ovarian cancers to chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage. Such inhibitors could also be used for studies to understand the role of this PPI in DNA damage response. However, design of BRCT inhibitors is challenging because of the inherent flexibility associated with this domain. Several studies identified short phosphopeptides as tight BRCT binders. Here we investigated the thermodynamic properties of 18 phosphopeptides or peptide with phosphate mimic and three compounds with phosphate groups binding to BRCT to understand promiscuous molecular recognition and guide inhibitor design. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interactions between inhibitors and BRCT and their dynamic behavior in the free and bound states. MD simulations revealed the key role of loops in altering the shape and size of the binding site to fit various ligands. The mining minima (M2) method was used for calculating binding free energy to explore the driving forces and the fine balance between configuration entropy loss and enthalpy gain. We designed a rigidified ligand, which showed unfavorable experimental binding affinity due to weakened enthalpy. This was because it lacked the ability to rearrange itself upon binding. Investigation of another phosphate group containing compound, C1, suggested that the entropy loss can be reduced by preventing significant narrowing of the energy well and introducing multiple new compound conformations in the bound states. From our computations, we designed an analog of C1 that introduced new intermolecular interactions to strengthen attractions while maintaining small entropic penalty. This study shows that flexible compounds do not always encounter larger entropy penalty, compared with other more rigid binders, and highlights a new strategy for inhibitor design.

  1. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean P.; Hastings, Jordan F.; Han, Jeremy Z. R.; Croucher, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies.

  2. Promiscuous nickel import in human pathogens: structure, thermodynamics, and evolution of extracytoplasmic nickel-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Lebrette, Hugo; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Zambelli, Barbara; de Reuse, Hilde; Borezée-Durant, Elise; Ciurli, Stefano; Cavazza, Christine

    2014-10-01

    In human pathogenic bacteria, nickel is required for the activation of two enzymes, urease and [NiFe]-hydrogenase, necessary for host infection. Acquisition of Ni(II) is mediated by either permeases or ABC-importers, the latter including a subclass that involves an extracytoplasmic nickel-binding protein, Ni-BP. This study reports on the structure of three Ni-BPs from a diversity of human pathogens and on the existence of three new nickel-binding motifs. These are different from that previously described for Escherichia coli Ni-BP NikA, known to bind nickel via a nickelophore, and indicate a variegated ligand selectivity for Ni-BPs. The structures are consistent with ligand affinities measured in solution by calorimetry and challenge the hypothesis of a general requirement of nickelophores for nickel uptake by canonical ABC importers. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Ni-BPs have different evolutionary origins and emerged independently from peptide-binding proteins, possibly explaining the promiscuous behavior of this class of Ni(II) carriers.

  3. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean P; Hastings, Jordan F; Han, Jeremy Z R; Croucher, David R

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  4. The protein kinase promiscuities in the cancer-preventive mechanisms of NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    Norvaisas, Povilas; Chan, Diana; Yokoi, Kenji; Dave, Bhuvanesh

    2016-01-01

    NSAIDs have been observed to have cancer-preventive properties, but the actual mechanism is elusive. We hypothesize that NSAIDs might have an effect through common pathways and targets of anticancer drugs by exploiting promiscuities of anticancer drug targets. Here, we have explored NSAIDs by their structural and pharmacophoric similarities with small anticancer molecules. In-silico analyses have shown a strong similarity between NSAIDs and protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. The calculated affinities of NSAIDs were found to be lower than the affinities of anticancer drugs, but higher than the affinities of compounds that are not specific to PKs. The competitive inhibition model suggests that PK might be inhibited by around 10%, which was confirmed by biochemical screening of some NSAIDs against PKs. NSAIDs did not affect all PKs universally, but had specificities for certain sets of PKs, which differed according to the NSAID. The study revealed potentially new features and mechanisms of NSAIDs that are useful in explaining their role in cancer prevention, which might lead to clinically significant breakthroughs in the future. PMID:25714784

  5. Using mutability landscapes of a promiscuous tautomerase to guide the engineering of enantioselective Michaelases

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Miao, Yufeng; Rahimi, Mehran; Kunzendorf, Andreas; van Merkerk, Ronald; Tepper, Pieter G.; Geertsema, Edzard M.; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Quax, Wim J.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.

    2016-01-01

    The Michael-type addition reaction is widely used in organic synthesis for carbon–carbon bond formation. However, biocatalytic methodologies for this type of reaction are scarce, which is related to the fact that enzymes naturally catalysing carbon–carbon bond-forming Michael-type additions are rare. A promising template to develop new biocatalysts for carbon–carbon bond formation is the enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase, which exhibits promiscuous Michael-type addition activity. Here we present mutability landscapes for the expression, tautomerase and Michael-type addition activities, and enantioselectivity of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase. These maps of neutral, beneficial and detrimental amino acids for each residue position and enzyme property provide detailed insight into sequence–function relationships. This offers exciting opportunities for enzyme engineering, which is illustrated by the redesign of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase into two enantiocomplementary ‘Michaelases'. These ‘Michaelases' catalyse the asymmetric addition of acetaldehyde to various nitroolefins, providing access to both enantiomers of γ-nitroaldehydes, which are important precursors for pharmaceutically active γ-aminobutyric acid derivatives. PMID:26952338

  6. Promiscuous Gene Expression in the Thymus: A Matter of Epigenetics, miRNA, and More?

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Olga; Rattay, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The induction of central tolerance in the course of T cell development crucially depends on promiscuous gene expression (pGE) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). mTECs express a genome-wide variety of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), preventing the escape of autoreactive T cells to the periphery, and the development of severe autoimmunity. Most of our knowledge of how pGE is controlled comes from studies on the autoimmune regulator (Aire). Aire activates the expression of a large subset of TRAs by interacting with the general transcriptional machinery and promoting transcript elongation. However, further factors regulating Aire-independent TRAs must be at play. Recent studies demonstrated that pGE in general and the function of Aire in particular are controlled by epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of the regulation of pGE by miRNA and epigenetic regulatory mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromosomal topology. PMID:25784915

  7. A promiscuous biotin ligase fusion protein identifies proximal and interacting proteins in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae In; Raida, Manfred; Burke, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new technique for proximity-dependent labeling of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Named BioID for proximity-dependent biotin identification, this approach is based on fusion of a promiscuous Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase to a targeting protein. BioID features proximity-dependent biotinylation of proteins that are near-neighbors of the fusion protein. Biotinylated proteins may be isolated by affinity capture and identified by mass spectrometry. We apply BioID to lamin-A (LaA), a well-characterized intermediate filament protein that is a constituent of the nuclear lamina, an important structural element of the nuclear envelope (NE). We identify multiple proteins that associate with and/or are proximate to LaA in vivo. The most abundant of these include known interactors of LaA that are localized to the NE, as well as a new NE-associated protein named SLAP75. Our results suggest BioID is a useful and generally applicable method to screen for both interacting and neighboring proteins in their native cellular environment. PMID:22412018

  8. Promiscuous activity of the LXR antagonist GSK2033 in a mouse model of fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffett, Kristine; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    The liver X receptor (LXR) functions as a receptor for oxysterols and plays a critical role in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism. We recently described a synthetic LXR inverse agonist that displayed efficacy in treatment of hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This compound, SR9238, was designed to display liver specificity so as to avoid potential detrimental effects on reverse cholesterol transport in peripheral tissues. Here, we examined the effects of a LXR antagonist/inverse agonist, GSK2033, which displays systemic exposure. Although GSK2033 performed as expected in cell-based models as a LXR inverse agonist, it displayed unexpected activity in the mouse NAFLD model. The expression of lipogenic enzyme genes such as fatty acid synthase and sterol regulatory binding protein 1c were induced rather than suppressed and no effect on hepatic steatosis was found. Further characterization of the specificity of GSK2033 revealed that it displayed a significant degree of promiscuity, targeting a number of other nuclear receptors that could clearly alter hepatic gene expression. PMID:27680310

  9. The Under-Appreciated Promiscuity of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Family

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Sean P.; Hastings, Jordan F.; Han, Jeremy Z. R.; Croucher, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Each member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family plays a key role in normal development, homeostasis, and a variety of pathophysiological conditions, most notably in cancer. According to the prevailing dogma, these four receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs; EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, and ERBB4) function exclusively through the formation of homodimers and heterodimers within the EGFR family. These combinatorial receptor interactions are known to generate increased interactome diversity and therefore influence signaling output, subcellular localization and function of the heterodimer. This molecular plasticity is also thought to play a role in the development of resistance toward targeted cancer therapies aimed at these known oncogenes. Interestingly, many studies now challenge this dogma and suggest that the potential for EGFR family receptors to interact with more distantly related RTKs is much greater than currently appreciated. Here we discuss how the promiscuity of these oncogenic receptors may lead to the formation of many unexpected receptor pairings and the significant implications for the efficiency of many targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27597943

  10. A Disease-Causing Variant in PCNA Disrupts a Promiscuous Protein Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Caroline M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Kelch, Brian A

    2016-03-27

    The eukaryotic DNA polymerase sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen or PCNA, is a ring-shaped protein complex that surrounds DNA to act as a sliding platform for increasing processivity of cellular replicases and for coordinating various cellular pathways with DNA replication. A single point mutation, Ser228Ile, in the human PCNA gene was recently identified to cause a disease whose symptoms resemble those of DNA damage and repair disorders. The mutation lies near the binding site for most PCNA-interacting proteins. However, the structural consequences of the S228I mutation are unknown. Here, we describe the structure of the disease-causing variant, which reveals a large conformational change that dramatically transforms the binding pocket for PCNA client proteins. We show that the mutation markedly alters the binding energetics for some client proteins, while another, p21(CIP1), is only mildly affected. Structures of the disease variant bound to peptides derived from two PCNA partner proteins reveal that the binding pocket can adjust conformation to accommodate some ligands, indicating that the binding site is dynamic and pliable. Our work has implications for the plasticity of the binding site in PCNA and reveals how a disease mutation selectively alters interactions to a promiscuous binding site that is critical for DNA metabolism.

  11. Rethinking Bateman's Principles: Challenging Persistent Myths of Sexually Reluctant Females and Promiscuous Males.

    PubMed

    Tang-Martínez, Zuleyma

    2016-01-01

    In 1948, Angus Bateman published a paper on fruit flies that tested Charles Darwin's ideas of sexual selection. Based on this one fruit fly study, Bateman concluded that because males are able to produce millions of small sperm, males are likely to behave promiscuously, mating with as many females as possible. On the other hand, because females produce relatively fewer, larger, and presumably more expensive eggs, females are likely to be very discriminating in selecting only one high-quality sexual partner. He also posited that a male's reproductive success increases linearly with the number of females he is able to mate with, but that a female's reproductive success peaks after she mates with only one male. Consequently, in almost all organisms, sexual selection acts most strongly on males. These ideas became a recurring theme in attempts to explain wide-ranging differences in male and female behavior not only in nonhuman animals but also in humans. As such, Bateman's conclusions and predictions have become axiomatic and, at times, have gone unquestioned even when modern empirical data do not conform to this model. This article reviews the origins and history of these ideas and uses modern data to highlight the current and growing controversy surrounding the validity and general applicability of this paradigm. PMID:27074147

  12. An evolutionarily conserved mutual interdependence between Aire and microRNAs in promiscuous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Olga; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Dooley, James; Liston, Adrian; Kyewski, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The establishment and maintenance of central tolerance depends to a large extent on the ability of medullary thymic epithelial cells to express a variety of tissue-restricted antigens, the so-called promiscuous gene expression (pGE). Autoimmune regulator (Aire) is to date the best characterised transcriptional regulator known to at least partially coordinate pGE. There is accruing evidence that the expression of Aire-dependent and -independent genes is modulated by higher order chromatin configuration, epigenetic modifications and post-transcriptional control. Given the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) as potent post-transcriptional modulators of gene expression, we investigated their role in the regulation of pGE in purified mouse and human thymic epithelial cells (TECs). Microarray profiling of TEC subpopulations revealed evolutionarily conserved cell type and differentiation-specific miRNA signatures with a subset of miRNAs being significantly upregulated during terminal medullary thymic epithelial cell differentiation. The differential regulation of this subset of miRNAs was correlated with Aire expression and some of these miRNAs were misexpressed in the Aire knockout thymus. In turn, the specific absence of miRNAs in TECs resulted in a progressive reduction of Aire expression and pGE, affecting both Aire-dependent and -independent genes. In contrast, the absence of miR-29a only affected the Aire-dependent gene pool. These findings reveal a mutual interdependence of miRNA and Aire.

  13. Promiscuous contacts and heightened dynamics increase thermostability in an engineered variant of the engrailed homeodomain

    PubMed Central

    McCully, Michelle E.; Beck, David A.C.; Daggett, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    A thermostabilized variant (UVF) of the engrailed homeodomain (EnHD) was previously engineered by Mayo and co-workers. The melting temperature of the non-natural, designed protein is 50°C higher than the natural wild-type protein (>99 vs. 52°C), and the two proteins share 22% sequence identity. We have performed extensive (1 μs) all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type and engineered proteins to investigate their structural and dynamic properties at room temperature and at 100°C. Our simulations are in good agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance data available for the two proteins [nuclear Overhauser effect crosspeaks (NOEs), J-coupling constants and order parameters for EnHD; and NOEs for UVF], showing that we reproduce the backbone dynamics and side chain packing in the native state of both proteins. UVF was more dynamic at room temperature than EnHD, with respect to both its backbone and side chain motion. When the temperature was raised, the thermostable protein maintained this mobility while retaining its native conformation. EnHD, on the other hand, was unable to maintain its more rigid native structure at higher temperature and began to unfold. Heightened protein dynamics leading to promiscuous and dynamically interchangeable amino acid contacts makes UVF more tolerant to increasing temperature, providing a molecular explanation for heightened thermostability of this protein. PMID:23012442

  14. Systems-Wide Prediction of Enzyme Promiscuity Reveals a New Underground Alternative Route for Pyridoxal 5’-Phosphate Production in E. coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oberhardt, Matthew A.; Zarecki, Raphy; Reshef, Leah; Xia, Fangfang; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Schreiber, Rachel; Henry, Christopher S.; Ben-Tal, Nir; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Gophna, Uri; et al

    2016-01-28

    Recent insights suggest that non-specific and/or promiscuous enzymes are common and active across life. Understanding the role of such enzymes is an important open question in biology. Here we develop a genome-wide method, PROPER, that uses a permissive PSI-BLAST approach to predict promiscuous activities of metabolic genes. Enzyme promiscuity is typically studied experimentally using multicopy suppression, in which over-expression of a promiscuous ‘replacer’ gene rescues lethality caused by inactivation of a ‘target’ gene. We use PROPER to predict multicopy suppression in Escherichia coli, achieving highly significant overlap with published cases (hypergeometric p = 4.4e-13). We then validate three novel predictedmore » target-replacer gene pairs in new multicopy suppression experiments. We next go beyond PROPER and develop a network-based approach, GEM-PROPER, that integrates PROPER with genome-scale metabolic modeling to predict promiscuous replacements via alternative metabolic pathways. GEM-PROPER predicts a new indirect replacer (thiG) for an essential enzyme (pdxB) in production of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (the active form of Vitamin B6), which we validate experimentally via multicopy suppression. Here, we perform a structural analysis of thiG to determine its potential promiscuous active site, which we validate experimentally by inactivating the pertaining residues and showing a loss of replacer activity. Thus, this study is a successful example where a computational investigation leads to a network-based identification of an indirect promiscuous replacement of a key metabolic enzyme, which would have been extremely difficult to identify directly.« less

  15. Systems-Wide Prediction of Enzyme Promiscuity Reveals a New Underground Alternative Route for Pyridoxal 5'-Phosphate Production in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Oberhardt, Matthew A; Zarecki, Raphy; Reshef, Leah; Xia, Fangfang; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Schreiber, Rachel; Henry, Christopher S; Ben-Tal, Nir; Dwyer, Daniel J; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights suggest that non-specific and/or promiscuous enzymes are common and active across life. Understanding the role of such enzymes is an important open question in biology. Here we develop a genome-wide method, PROPER, that uses a permissive PSI-BLAST approach to predict promiscuous activities of metabolic genes. Enzyme promiscuity is typically studied experimentally using multicopy suppression, in which over-expression of a promiscuous 'replacer' gene rescues lethality caused by inactivation of a 'target' gene. We use PROPER to predict multicopy suppression in Escherichia coli, achieving highly significant overlap with published cases (hypergeometric p = 4.4e-13). We then validate three novel predicted target-replacer gene pairs in new multicopy suppression experiments. We next go beyond PROPER and develop a network-based approach, GEM-PROPER, that integrates PROPER with genome-scale metabolic modeling to predict promiscuous replacements via alternative metabolic pathways. GEM-PROPER predicts a new indirect replacer (thiG) for an essential enzyme (pdxB) in production of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (the active form of Vitamin B6), which we validate experimentally via multicopy suppression. We perform a structural analysis of thiG to determine its potential promiscuous active site, which we validate experimentally by inactivating the pertaining residues and showing a loss of replacer activity. Thus, this study is a successful example where a computational investigation leads to a network-based identification of an indirect promiscuous replacement of a key metabolic enzyme, which would have been extremely difficult to identify directly. PMID:26821166

  16. Systems-Wide Prediction of Enzyme Promiscuity Reveals a New Underground Alternative Route for Pyridoxal 5’-Phosphate Production in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Reshef, Leah; Xia, Fangfang; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; Schreiber, Rachel; Henry, Christopher S.; Ben-Tal, Nir; Dwyer, Daniel J.; Gophna, Uri; Ruppin, Eytan

    2016-01-01

    Recent insights suggest that non-specific and/or promiscuous enzymes are common and active across life. Understanding the role of such enzymes is an important open question in biology. Here we develop a genome-wide method, PROPER, that uses a permissive PSI-BLAST approach to predict promiscuous activities of metabolic genes. Enzyme promiscuity is typically studied experimentally using multicopy suppression, in which over-expression of a promiscuous ‘replacer’ gene rescues lethality caused by inactivation of a ‘target’ gene. We use PROPER to predict multicopy suppression in Escherichia coli, achieving highly significant overlap with published cases (hypergeometric p = 4.4e-13). We then validate three novel predicted target-replacer gene pairs in new multicopy suppression experiments. We next go beyond PROPER and develop a network-based approach, GEM-PROPER, that integrates PROPER with genome-scale metabolic modeling to predict promiscuous replacements via alternative metabolic pathways. GEM-PROPER predicts a new indirect replacer (thiG) for an essential enzyme (pdxB) in production of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (the active form of Vitamin B6), which we validate experimentally via multicopy suppression. We perform a structural analysis of thiG to determine its potential promiscuous active site, which we validate experimentally by inactivating the pertaining residues and showing a loss of replacer activity. Thus, this study is a successful example where a computational investigation leads to a network-based identification of an indirect promiscuous replacement of a key metabolic enzyme, which would have been extremely difficult to identify directly. PMID:26821166

  17. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  18. Cortical Networks for Visual Self-Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments regarding the brain mechanisms of visual self-recognition. A special cognitive mechanism for visual self-recognition has been postulated based on behavioral and neuropsychological evidence, but its neural substrate remains controversial. Recent functional imaging studies suggest that multiple cortical mechanisms play self-specific roles during visual self-recognition, reconciling the existing controversy. Respective roles for the left occipitotemporal, right parietal, and frontal cortices in symbolic, visuospatial, and conceptual aspects of self-representation have been proposed.

  19. Structure-based investigation into the functional roles of the extended loop and substrate-recognition sites in an endo-β-1,4-D-mannanase from the Antarctic springtail, Cryptopygus antarcticus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Kyu; An, Young Jun; Song, Jung Min; Jeong, Chang-Sook; Kang, Mee Hye; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Lee, Youn-Ho; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2014-11-01

    Endo-β-1,4-D-mannanase from the Antarctic springtail, Cryptopygus antarcticus (CaMan), is a cold-adapted β-mannanase that has the lowest optimum temperature (30°C) of all known β-mannanases. Here, we report the apo- and mannopentaose (M5) complex structures of CaMan. Structural comparison of CaMan with other β-mannanases from the multicellular animals reveals that CaMan has an extended loop that alters topography of the active site. Structural and mutational analyses suggest that this extended loop is linked to the cold-adapted enzymatic activity. From the CaMan-M5 complex structure, we defined the mannose-recognition subsites and observed unreported M5 binding site on the surface of CaMan. PMID:25082572

  20. Cleavage of lamin A by Mch2 alpha but not CPP32: multiple interleukin 1 beta-converting enzyme-related proteases with distinct substrate recognition properties are active in apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, A; Alnemri, E S; Lazebnik, Y A; Fernandes-Alnemri, T; Litwack, G; Moir, R D; Goldman, R D; Poirier, G G; Kaufmann, S H; Earnshaw, W C

    1996-01-01

    Although proteases related to the interleukin 1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE) are known to be essential for apoptotic execution, the number of enzymes involved, their substrate specificities, and their specific roles in the characteristic biochemical and morphological changes of apoptosis are currently unknown. These questions were addressed using cloned recombinant ICE-related proteases (IRPs) and a cell-free model system for apoptosis (S/M extracts). First, we compared the substrate specificities of two recombinant human IRPs, CPP32 and Mch2 alpha. Both enzymes cleaved poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase, albeit with different efficiencies. Mch2 alpha also cleaved recombinant and nuclear lamin A at a conserved VEID decreases NG sequence located in the middle of the coiled-coil rod domain, producing a fragment that was indistinguishable from the lamin A fragment observed in S/M extracts and in apoptotic cells. In contrast, CPP32 did not cleave lamin A. The cleavage of lamin A by Mch2 alpha and by S/M extracts was inhibited by millimolar concentrations of Zn2+, which had a minimal effect on cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase by CPP32 and by S/M extracts. We also found that N-(acetyltyrosinylvalinyl-N epsilon-biotinyllysyl)aspartic acid [(2,6-dimethylbenzoyl)oxy]methyl ketone, which derivatizes the larger subunit of active ICE, can affinity label up to five active IRPs in S/M extracts. Together, these observations indicate that the processing of nuclear proteins in apoptosis involves multiple IRPs having distinct preferences for their apoptosis-associated substrates. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8710882

  1. Mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by short- and long-range glycopeptide substrate recognition that varies among members of the polypeptide GalNAc transferase family.

    PubMed

    Revoredo, Leslie; Wang, Shengjun; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik; Moremen, Kelley W; Jarvis, Donald L; Ten Hagen, Kelly G; Tabak, Lawrence A; Gerken, Thomas A

    2016-04-01

    A large family of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc-Ts) initiates and defines sites of mucin-type Ser/Thr-O-GalNAc glycosylation. Family members have been classified into peptide- and glycopeptide-preferring subfamilies, although both families possess variable activities against glycopeptide substrates. All but one isoform contains a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding lectin domain whose roles in modulating glycopeptide specificity is just being understood. We have previously shown for several peptide-preferring isoforms that the presence of a remote Thr-O-GalNAc, 6-17 residues from a Ser/Thr acceptor site, may enhance overall catalytic activity in an N- or C-terminal direction. This enhancement varies with isoform and is attributed to Thr-O-GalNAc interactions at the lectin domain. We now report on the glycopeptide substrate utilization of a series of glycopeptide (human-ppGalNAc-T4, T7, T10, T12 and fly PGANT7) and peptide-preferring transferases (T2, T3 and T5) by exploiting a series of random glycopeptide substrates designed to probe the functions of their catalytic and lectin domains. Glycosylation was observed at the -3, -1 and +1 residues relative to a neighboring Thr-O-GalNAc, depending on isoform, which we attribute to specific Thr-O-GalNAc binding at the catalytic domain. Additionally, these glycopeptide-preferring isoforms show remote lectin domain-assisted Thr-O-GalNAc enhancements that vary from modest to none. We conclude that the glycopeptide specificity of the glycopeptide-preferring isoforms predominantly resides in their catalytic domain but may be further modulated by remote lectin domain interactions. These studies further demonstrate that both domains of the ppGalNAc-Ts have specialized and unique functions that work in concert to control and order mucin-type O-glycosylation.

  2. Mutations of an NAD(P)H-dependent flavoprotein monooxygenase that influence cofactor promiscuity and enantioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Chantel N; Ali, Sohail T; Allen, Michael J; Grogan, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    The flavoprotein monooxygenase (FPMO) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (SMFMO, Uniprot: B2FLR2) catalyses the asymmetric oxidation of thioethers and is unusual amongst FPMOs in its ability to use the non-phosphorylated cofactor NADH, as well as NADPH, for the reduction of the FAD coenzyme. In order to explore the basis for cofactor promiscuity, structure-guided mutation of two residues in the cofactor binding site, Gln193 and His194, in SMFMO were performed in an attempt to imitate the cofactor binding site of the NADPH-dependent FMO from Methylophaga aminisulfidivorans sp. SK1 (mFMO), in which structurally homologous residues Arg234 and Thr235 bind the NADPH 2'-ribose phosphate. Mutation of His194 to threonine proved most significant, with a switch in specificity from NADH to NADPH [(k cat/K m NADH)/k cat/K m NADPH) from 1.5:1 to 1:3.5, mostly as a result of a reduced K m for NADPH of approximately sevenfold in the His194Thr mutant. The structure of the Gln193Arg/His194Thr mutant revealed no substantial changes in the backbone of the enzyme or orientation of side chains resulting from mutation. Mutation of Phe52, in the vicinity of FAD, and which in mFMO is an asparagine thought to be responsible for flavin hydroperoxide stabilisation, is, in SMFMO, a determinant of enantioselectivity in sulfoxidation. Mutation of Phe52 to valine resulted in a mutant that transformed para-tolyl methyl sulfide into the (S)-sulfoxide with 32% e.e., compared to 25% (R)- for the wild type. These results shed further light both on the cofactor specificity of FPMOs, and their determinants of enantioselectivity, with a view to informing engineering studies of FPMOs in the future.

  3. Structural basis of the promiscuous inhibitor susceptibility of Escherichia coli LpxC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Najeeb, Javaria; Ark, Eugene D; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei

    2014-01-17

    The LpxC enzyme in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway is one of the most promising and clinically unexploited antibiotic targets for treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. Progress in medicinal chemistry has led to the discovery of potent LpxC inhibitors with a variety of chemical scaffolds and distinct antibiotic profiles. The vast majority of these compounds, including the nanomolar inhibitors L-161,240 and BB-78485, are highly effective in suppressing the activity of Escherichia coli LpxC (EcLpxC) but not divergent orthologs such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa LpxC (PaLpxC) in vitro. The molecular basis for such promiscuous inhibition of EcLpxC has remained poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcLpxC bound to L-161,240, providing the first molecular insight into L-161,240 inhibition. Additionally, structural analysis of the EcLpxC/L-161,240 complex together with the EcLpxC/BB-78485 complex reveals an unexpected backbone flipping of the Insert I βa-βb loop in EcLpxC in comparison with previously reported crystal structures of EcLpxC complexes with l-threonyl-hydroxamate-based broad-spectrum inhibitors. Such a conformational switch, which has only been observed in EcLpxC but not in divergent orthologs such as PaLpxC, results in expansion of the active site of EcLpxC, enabling it to accommodate LpxC inhibitors with a variety of head groups, including compounds containing single (R- or S-enantiomers) or double substitutions at the neighboring Cα atom of the hydroxamate warhead group. These results highlight the importance of understanding inherent conformational plasticity of target proteins in lead optimization. PMID:24117400

  4. Human origins and the transition from promiscuity to pair-bonding

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilets, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    A crucial step in recent theories of human origins is the emergence of strong pair-bonding between males and females accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the male-to-male conflict over mating and an increased investment in offspring. How such a transition from promiscuity to pair-bonding could be achieved is puzzling. Many species would, indeed, be much better off evolutionarily if the effort spent on male competition over mating was redirected to increasing female fertility or survivorship of offspring. Males, however, are locked in a “social dilemma,” where shifting one’s effort from “appropriation” to “production” would give an advantage to free-riding competitors and therefore, should not happen. Here, I first consider simple models for four prominent scenarios of the human transition to pair-bonding: communal care, mate guarding, food for mating, and mate provisioning. I show that the transition is not feasible under biologically relevant conditions in any of these models. Then, I show that the transition can happen if one accounts for male heterogeneity, assortative pair formation, and evolution of female choice and faithfulness. This process is started when low-ranked males begin using an alternative strategy of female provisioning. At the end, except for the top-ranked individuals, males invest exclusively in provisioning females who have evolved very high fidelity to their mates. My results point to the crucial importance of female choice and emphasize the need for incorporating between-individual variation in theoretical and empirical studies of social dilemmas and behaviors. PMID:22645330

  5. Shifting to structures in physics and biology: a prophylactic for promiscuous realism.

    PubMed

    French, Steven

    2011-06-01

    Within the philosophy of science, the realism debate has been revitalised by the development of forms of structural realism. These urge a shift in focus from the object oriented ontologies that come and go through the history of science to the structures that remain through theory change. Such views have typically been elaborated in the context of theories of physics and are motivated by, first of all, the presence within such theories of mathematical equations that allow straightforward representation of the relevant structures; and secondly, the implications of such theories for the individuality and identity of putative objects. My aim in this paper is to explore the possibility of extending such views to biological theories. An obvious concern is that within the context of the latter it is typically insisted that we cannot find the kinds of highly mathematised structures that structural realism can point to in physics. I shall indicate how the model-theoretic approach to theories might help allay such concerns. Furthermore, issues of identity and individuality also arise within biology. Thus Dupré has recently noted that there exists a 'General Problem of Biological Individuality' which relates to the issue of how one divides 'massively integrated and interconnected' systems into discrete components. In response Dupré advocates a form of 'Promiscuous Realism' that holds, for example, that there is no unique way of dividing the phylogenetic tree into kinds. Instead I shall urge serious consideration of those aspects of the work of Dupré and others that lean towards a structuralist interpretation. By doing so I hope to suggest possible ways in which a structuralist stance might be extended to biology.

  6. Identification of promiscuous HPV16-derived T helper cell epitopes for therapeutic HPV vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Riemer, Angelika B

    2015-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma and several other human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced malignancies are a global public health problem, thus novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an attractive option for treatment of HPV infection and HPV-mediated premalignant and malignant lesions. However, previous approaches--focusing on the induction of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs)--have as yet not yielded clinical successes. Since CD4+ T cells have been shown to be crucial for the induction and maintenance of CTL responses, and more recently to be also important for direct anti-tumor immunity, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted epitopes are intensively investigated to improve the efficacy of peptide-based HPV immunotherapy. We here present an approach to identify promiscuous HPV16-derived CD4+ T helper epitopes, which are capable of inducing T cell immunity in a large proportion of the population. To this end, we combined HLA class II epitope prediction servers with in vitro immunological evaluation to identify HPV16 E2-, E5-, E6-, and E7-derived CD4+ T cell epitopes. Candidate selected HPV16-derived epitopes were found to be restricted by up to nine HLA-DR molecules. Furthermore, they were found to induce frequent and robust HPV16 peptide-specific Th1 responses in healthy donors, as monitored by interferon (IFN)-γ ELISPOT and cytokine secretion assays. Moreover, these selected peptides also induced specific IFN-γ T cell responses in blood from HPV16+ CIN2/3 and cervical carcinoma patients. We thus conclude that the identified T helper epitopes are valuable candidates for the development of a comprehensive therapeutic HPV vaccine.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin Y Is a Promiscuous Cyclase That Increases Endothelial Tau Phosphorylation and Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Pastukh, Viktoriya; Balczon, Ron; Stevens, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Exotoxin Y (ExoY) is a type III secretion system effector found in ∼ 90% of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Although it is known that ExoY causes inter-endothelial gaps and vascular leak, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Using both a bacteria-delivered and a codon-optimized conditionally expressed ExoY, we report that this toxin is a dual soluble adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase that results in intracellular cAMP and cGMP accumulation. The enzymatic activity of ExoY caused phosphorylation of endothelial Tau serine 214, accumulation of insoluble Tau, inter-endothelial cell gap formation, and increased macromolecular permeability. To discern whether the cAMP or cGMP signal was responsible for Tau phosphorylation and barrier disruption, pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were engineered for the conditional expression of either wild-type guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP, or a mutated guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cAMP. Sodium nitroprusside stimulation of the cGMP-generating cyclase resulted in transient Tau serine 214 phosphorylation and gap formation, whereas stimulation of the cAMP-generating cyclase induced a robust increase in Tau serine 214 phosphorylation, gap formation, and macromolecular permeability. These results indicate that the cAMP signal is the dominant stimulus for Tau phosphorylation. Hence, ExoY is a promiscuous cyclase and edema factor that uses cAMP and, to some extent, cGMP to induce the hyperphosphorylation and insolubility of endothelial Tau. Because hyperphosphorylated and insoluble Tau are hallmarks in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease, acute Pseudomonas infections cause a pathophysiological sequela in endothelium previously recognized only in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22637478

  8. Identification of Conserved and HLA Promiscuous DENV3 T-Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Khan, Asif M.; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Guzman, Nicole; Paulaitis, Michael; de Melo, Andréa Barbosa; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Gil, Laura V. G.; Lemonnier, Françoir; Rinaldo, Charles; August, J. Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T. A.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-dengue T-cell responses have been implicated in both protection and immunopathology. However, most of the T-cell studies for dengue include few epitopes, with limited knowledge of their inter-serotype variation and the breadth of their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) affinity. In order to expand our knowledge of HLA-restricted dengue epitopes, we screened T-cell responses against 477 overlapping peptides derived from structural and non-structural proteins of the dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3) by use of HLA class I and II transgenic mice (TgM): A2, A24, B7, DR2, DR3 and DR4. TgM were inoculated with peptides pools and the T-cell immunogenic peptides were identified by ELISPOT. Nine HLA class I and 97 HLA class II novel DENV3 epitopes were identified based on immunogenicity in TgM and their HLA affinity was further confirmed by binding assays analysis. A subset of these epitopes activated memory T-cells from DENV3 immune volunteers and was also capable of priming naïve T-cells, ex vivo, from dengue IgG negative individuals. Analysis of inter- and intra-serotype variation of such an epitope (A02-restricted) allowed us to identify altered peptide ligands not only in DENV3 but also in other DENV serotypes. These studies also characterized the HLA promiscuity of 23 HLA class II epitopes bearing highly conserved sequences, six of which could bind to more than 10 different HLA molecules representing a large percentage of the global population. These epitope data are invaluable to investigate the role of T-cells in dengue immunity/pathogenesis and vaccine design. PMID:24130917

  9. The promiscuous phosphomonoestearase activity of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA, a thermophilic Cu+ transport ATPase.

    PubMed

    Bredeston, Luis M; González Flecha, F Luis

    2016-07-01

    Membrane transport P-type ATPases display two characteristic enzymatic activities: a principal ATPase activity provides the driving force for ion transport across biological membranes, whereas a promiscuous secondary activity catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters. This last activity is usually denoted as the phosphatase activity of P-ATPases. In the present study, we characterize the phosphatase activity of the Cu(+)-transport ATPase from Archaeglobus fulgidus (Af-CopA) and compare it with the principal ATPase activity. Our results show that the phosphatase turnover number was 20 times higher than that corresponding to the ATPase activity, but it is compensated by a high value of Km, producing a less efficient catalysis for pNPP. This secondary activity is enhanced by Mg(2+) (essential activator) and phospholipids (non-essential activator), and inhibited by salts and Cu(+). Transition state analysis of the catalyzed and noncatalyzed hydrolysis of pNPP indicates that Af-CopA enhances the reaction rates by a factor of 10(5) (ΔΔG(‡)=38 kJ/mol) mainly by reducing the enthalpy of activation (ΔΔH(‡)=30 kJ/mol), whereas the entropy of activation is less negative on the enzyme than in solution. For the ATPase activity, the decrease in the enthalpic component of the barrier is higher (ΔΔH(‡)=39 kJ/mol) and the entropic component is small on both the enzyme and in solution. These results suggest that different mechanisms are involved in the transference of the phosphoryl group of p-nitrophenyl phosphate and ATP. PMID:27086711

  10. Quantitative detection of single DNA molecules on DNA tetrahedron decorated substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguang; Xue, Qingwang; Tian, Wenzhi; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    A single DNA molecule detection method on DNA tetrahedron decorated substrates has been developed. DNA tetrahedra were introduced onto substrates for both preventing nonspecific adsorption and sensitive recognition of single DNA molecules.

  11. Biophysical basis of the promiscuous binding of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 apoptotic repressor to BH3 ligands.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B; Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-10-01

    B-cell lymphoma protein 2 (Bcl2) apoptotic repressor carries out its function by virtue of its ability to bind to BH3 domains of various pro-apoptotic regulators in a highly promiscuous manner. Herein, we investigate the biophysical basis of such promiscuity of Bcl2 toward its cognate BH3 ligands. Our data show that although the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif bind to Bcl2 with submicromolar affinity, those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif afford weak interactions. This implies that the replacement of alanine at the fourth position (A + 4)-relative to the N-terminal leucine (L0) within the LXXXAD motif-to glycine/serine results in the loss of free energy of binding. Consistent with this notion, the A + 4 residue within the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif engages in key intermolecular van der Waals contacts with A149 lining the ligand binding groove within Bcl2, whereas A + 4G/S substitution results in the disruption of such favorable binding interactions. Of particular interest is the observation that although increasing ionic strength has little or negligible effect on the binding of high-affinity BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif, the binding of those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif in general experiences a varying degree of enhancement. This salient observation is indicative of the fact that hydrophobic forces not only play a dominant but also a universal role in driving the Bcl2-BH3 interactions. Taken together, our study sheds light on the molecular basis of the factors governing the promiscuous binding of Bcl2 to pro-apoptotic regulators and thus bears important consequences on the development of rational therapeutic approaches. PMID:23996493

  12. Strategic promiscuity helps avoid inbreeding at multiple levels in a cooperative breeder where both sexes are philopatric.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Lyanne; Van De Pol, Martijn; Atema, Els; Cockburn, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    In cooperative breeders, the tension between the opposing forces of kin selection and kin competition is at its most severe. Although philopatry facilitates kin selection, it also increases the risk of inbreeding. When dispersal is limited, extra-pair paternity might be an important mechanism to avoid inbreeding, but evidence for this is equivocal. The red-winged fairy-wren is part of a genus of cooperative breeders with extreme levels of promiscuity and male philopatry, but is unique in that females are also strongly philopatric. Here, we test the hypothesis that promiscuity is an important inbreeding avoidance mechanism when both sexes are philopatric. Levels of extra-pair paternity were substantial (70% of broods), but did not arise through females mating with their helpers, but via extra-group mating. Offspring were more likely to be sired by extra-pair males when the social pair was closely related, and these extra-pair males were genetically less similar to the female than the social male and thus, inbreeding is avoided through extra-pair mating. Females were consistent in their choice of the extra-pair sire over time and preferred early moulting males. Despite neighbouring males often being close kin, they sired 37% of extra-pair offspring. However, females that gained paternity from neighbours were typically less related to them than females that gained paternity further away. Our study is the first to suggest that mating with both closely related social partners and neighbours is avoided. Such sophistication in inbreeding avoidance strategies is remarkable, as the extreme levels of promiscuity imply that social context may provide little cue to relatedness. PMID:22008256

  13. Towards a general model for protein–substrate stereoselectivity

    PubMed Central

    Sundaresan, Vidyasankar; Abrol, Ravinder

    2002-01-01

    Protein–substrate interactions in enzymatic, neurological, and immunological systems are typically characterized by a high degree of stereoselectivity towards complex substrates. We propose a novel stereocenter-recognition (SR) model for stereoselectivity of proteins (or receptors in general) towards substrates that have multiple stereocenters, based on the topology of substrate stereocenters. The model provides the minimum number of substrate locations that need to enter into binding, nonbinding, or repulsive interactions with receptor sites, for stereoselectivity to occur. According to this model, a substrate location may interact with multiple receptor sites, or multiple substrate locations may interact with a single receptor site, but a stereoselective receptor has to offer, in the correct geometry, at least as many interactions as the required minimum number of substrate locations. The SR model predicts that stereoselectivity towards an acyclic substrate with N stereocenters distributed along a single chain requires interactions involving a minimum of N + 2 substrate locations, distributed over all stereocenters in the substrate, such that effectively three locations exist per stereocenter. Thus, enantioselective recognition of molecules with one chiral center requires a protein to interact with a minimum of three substrate locations, while stereoselectivity towards substrates with two or three stereocenters requires interactions with a minimum of four or five substrate locations, respectively, and so on. We demonstrate the general applicability of this model to protein–substrate interactions by interpreting several previous experimental observations. PMID:12021432

  14. Promiscuous Girls, Good Wives, and Cheating Husbands: Gender Inequality, Transitions to Marriage, and Infidelity in Southeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel Jordan

    2013-01-01

    The transition from premarital sexual relationships and courtship to marriage and parenthood in southeastern Nigeria involves particularly dramatic adjustments for young women who have absorbed changing ideas about sexuality, marriage, and gender equality, and who have had active premarital sexual lives. In the eyes of society, these women must transform from being promiscuous girls to good wives. This paper examines these adjustments and, specifically, how young married women’s lives are affected by the reality of male infidelity and a persistent gendered double standard regarding the acceptability of extramarital sex. PMID:24259752

  15. Promiscuous Girls, Good Wives, and Cheating Husbands: Gender Inequality, Transitions to Marriage, and Infidelity in Southeastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel Jordan

    2010-01-01

    The transition from premarital sexual relationships and courtship to marriage and parenthood in southeastern Nigeria involves particularly dramatic adjustments for young women who have absorbed changing ideas about sexuality, marriage, and gender equality, and who have had active premarital sexual lives. In the eyes of society, these women must transform from being promiscuous girls to good wives. This paper examines these adjustments and, specifically, how young married women's lives are affected by the reality of male infidelity and a persistent gendered double standard regarding the acceptability of extramarital sex.

  16. Use of chemical auxiliaries to control p450 enzymes for predictable oxidations at unactivated C-h bonds of substrates.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Karine; Polic, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) have the ability to oxidize unactivated C-H bonds of substrates with remarkable regio- and stereoselectivity. Comparable selectivity for chemical oxidizing agents is typically difficult to achieve. Hence, there is an interest in exploiting P450s as potential biocatalysts. Despite their impressive attributes, the current use of P450s as biocatalysts is limited. While bacterial P450 enzymes typically show higher activity, they tend to be highly selective for one or a few substrates. On the other hand, mammalian P450s, especially the drug-metabolizing enzymes, display astonishing substrate promiscuity. However, product prediction continues to be challenging. This review discusses the use of small molecules for controlling P450 substrate specificity and product selectivity. The focus will be on two approaches in the area: (1) the use of decoy molecules, and (2) the application of substrate engineering to control oxidation by the enzyme.

  17. Novel substrates.

    PubMed

    Wahed, Mahmood; Geoghegan, Michael; Powell-Tuck, Jeremy

    2007-05-01

    Enteral and parenteral feeds need at least to contain adequate amounts of water, energy, protein, electrolytes, vitamins and trace elements. Ready-manufactured parenteral feeds for example are incomplete because of shelf-life constraints and require the addition of vitamins (especially) and trace elements. Acute vitamin deficiencies, notably thiamine deficiency, can be precipitated if this is not adhered to. An increasing interest, however, exists in the use of feeds containing substrates, which are intended to improve patient outcome in particular clinical circumstances. The purpose of this article is to examine as to what is available and make recommendations on their use. It deals with artificial feeds only - disease-specific diets are outside our remit.

  18. Differential Features of AIRE-Induced and AIRE-Independent Promiscuous Gene Expression in Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Charles; Trofimov, Assya; Brochu, Sylvie; Lemieux, Sébastien; Perreault, Claude

    2015-07-15

    Establishment of self-tolerance in the thymus depends on promiscuous expression of tissue-restricted Ags (TRA) by thymic epithelial cells (TEC). This promiscuous gene expression (pGE) is regulated in part by the autoimmune regulator (AIRE). To evaluate the commonalities and discrepancies between AIRE-dependent and -independent pGE, we analyzed the transcriptome of the three main TEC subsets in wild-type and Aire knockout mice. We found that the impact of AIRE-dependent pGE is not limited to generation of TRA. AIRE decreases, via non-cell autonomous mechanisms, the expression of genes coding for positive regulators of cell proliferation, and it thereby reduces the number of cortical TEC. In mature medullary TEC, AIRE-driven pGE upregulates non-TRA coding genes that enhance cell-cell interactions (e.g., claudins, integrins, and selectins) and are probably of prime relevance to tolerance induction. We also found that AIRE-dependent and -independent TRA present several distinctive features. In particular, relative to AIRE-induced TRA, AIRE-independent TRA are more numerous and show greater splicing complexity. Furthermore, we report that AIRE-dependent versus -independent TRA project nonredundant representations of peripheral tissues in the thymus.

  19. Processed VirB2 is the major subunit of the promiscuous pilus of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Lai, E M; Kado, C I

    1998-05-01

    Previous studies have implicated the obligatory requirement for the vir regulon (or "virulon") of the Ti plasmid for the transfer of oncogenes from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to plant cells. The machinery used in this horizontal gene transfer has been long thought to be a transformation or conjugative delivery system. Based on recent protein sequence comparisons, the proteins encoded by the virB operon are strikingly similar to proteins involved in the synthesis and assembly of conjugative pili such as the conjugative pilus of F plasmid in Escherichia coli. The F pilus is composed of TraA pilin subunits derived from TraA propilin. In the present study, evidence is provided showing that the counterpart of TraA is VirB2, which like TraA propilin is processed into a 7.2-kDa product that comprises the pilus subunit as demonstrated by biochemical and electron microscopic analyses. The processed VirB2 protein is present exocellularly on medium on which induced A. tumefaciens had grown and appears as thin filaments of 10 nm that react specifically to VirB2 antibody. Exocellular VirB2 is produced abundantly at 19 degreesC as compared with 28 degreesC, an observation that parallels the effect of low temperature on the production of vir gene-specific pili observed previously (K. J. Fullner, L. C. Lara, and E. W. Nester, Science 273:1107-1109, 1996). Export of the processed VirB2 requires other virB genes since mutations in these genes cause the loss of VirB2 pilus formation and result in processed VirB2 accumulation in the cell. The presence of exocellular processed VirB2 is directly correlated with the formation of pili, and it appears as the major protein in the purified pilus preparation. The evidence provides a compelling argument for VirB2 as the propilin whose 7.2-kDa processed product is the pilin subunit of the promiscuous conjugative pilus, hereafter called the "T pilus" of A. tumefaciens. PMID:9573157

  20. In Silico Prediction of Inhibition of Promiscuous Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi-Lung; Shih, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Fu-Yuan; Leong, Max K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer resistant protein has an essential role in active transport of endogenous substances and xenobiotics across extracellular and intracellular membranes along with P-glycoprotein. It also plays a major role in multiple drug resistance and permeation of blood-brain barrier. Therefore, it is of great importance to derive theoretical models to predict the inhibition of both transporters in the process of drug discovery and development. Hitherto, very limited BCRP inhibition predictive models have been proposed as compared with its P-gp counterpart. Methodology/Principal Findings An in silico BCRP inhibition model was developed in this study using the pharmacophore ensemble/support vector machine scheme to take into account the promiscuous nature of BCRP. The predictions by the PhE/SVM model were found to be in good agreement with the observed values for those molecules in the training set (n = 22, r2 = 0.82,  = 0.73, RMSE  =  0.40, s = 0.24), test set (n = 97, q2 = 0.75–0.89, RMSE  = 0.31, s = 0.21), and outlier set (n = 16, q2 = 0.72–0.91, RMSE  =  0.29, s = 0.17). When subjected to a variety of statistical validations, the developed PhE/SVM model consistently met the most stringent criteria. A mock test by HIV protease inhibitors also asserted its predictivity. Conclusions/Significance It was found that this accurate, fast, and robust PhE/SVM model can be employed to predict the BCRP inhibition of structurally diverse molecules that otherwise cannot be carried out by any other methods in a high-throughput fashion to design therapeutic agents with insignificant drug toxicity and unfavorable drug–drug interactions mediated by BCRP to enhance clinical efficacy and/or circumvent drug resistance. PMID:24614353

  1. Metabolic Noise, Vestigial Metabolites or the Raw Material of Ecological Adaptation? Opportunitistic Enzymes, Catalytic Promiscuity and the Evolution of chemodiversity in Nature (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Noel, Joseph

    2016-07-12

    Joseph Noel from the Salk Institute on "Metabolic Noise, Vestigial Metabolites or the Raw Material of Ecological Adaptation? Enzymes, Catalytic Promiscuity and the Evolution of Chemodiversity in Nature" on March 26, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  2. Metabolic Noise, Vestigial Metabolites or the Raw Material of Ecological Adaptation? Opportunitistic Enzymes, Catalytic Promiscuity and the Evolution of chemodiversity in Nature (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Joseph

    2010-03-26

    Joseph Noel from the Salk Institute on "Metabolic Noise, Vestigial Metabolites or the Raw Material of Ecological Adaptation? Enzymes, Catalytic Promiscuity and the Evolution of Chemodiversity in Nature" on March 26, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  3. Fine-scale kin recognition in the absence of social familiarity in the Siberian jay, a monogamous bird species.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Michael; Halvarsson, Peter; Drobniak, Szymon M; Vilà, Carles

    2015-11-01

    Kin recognition is a critical element to kin cooperation, and in vertebrates, it is primarily based on associative learning. Recognition of socially unfamiliar kin occurs rarely, and it is reported only in vertebrate species where promiscuity prevents recognition of first-order relatives. However, it is unknown whether the recognition of socially unfamiliar kin can evolve in monogamous species. Here, we investigate whether genetic relatedness modulates aggression among group members in Siberian jays (Perisoreus infaustus). This bird species is genetically and socially monogamous and lives in groups that are formed through the retention of offspring beyond independence, and the immigration of socially unfamiliar nonbreeders. Observations on feeders showed that genetic relatedness modulated aggression of breeders towards immigrants in a graded manner, in that they chased most intensely the immigrant group members that were genetically the least related. However, cross-fostering experiments showed that breeders were equally tolerant towards their own and cross-fostered young swapped as nestlings. Thus, breeders seem to use different mechanisms to recognize socially unfamiliar individuals and own offspring. As Siberian jays show a high degree of nepotism during foraging and predator encounters, inclusive fitness benefits may play a role for the evolution of fine-scale kin recognition. More generally, our results suggest that fine-graded kin recognition can evolve independently of social familiarity, highlighting the evolutionary importance of kin recognition for social species. PMID:26460512

  4. Building Group Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, George

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the value of name recognition for theater companies. Describes steps toward identity and recognition, analyzing the group, the mission statement, symbolic logic, designing and identity, developing a communications plan, and meaningful activities. (SR)

  5. Speech recognition and understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Vintsyuk, T.K.

    1983-05-01

    This article discusses the automatic processing of speech signals with the aim of finding a sequence of works (speech recognition) or a concept (speech understanding) being transmitted by the speech signal. The goal of the research is to develop an automatic typewriter that will automatically edit and type text under voice control. A dynamic programming method is proposed in which all possible class signals are stored, after which the presented signal is compared to all the stored signals during the recognition phase. Topics considered include element-by-element recognition of words of speech, learning speech recognition, phoneme-by-phoneme speech recognition, the recognition of connected speech, understanding connected speech, and prospects for designing speech recognition and understanding systems. An application of the composition dynamic programming method for the solution of basic problems in the recognition and understanding of speech is presented.

  6. Dynamic multidrug recognition by multidrug transcriptional repressor LmrR.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koh; Tokunaga, Yuji; Imai, Misaki; Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-11-18

    LmrR is a multidrug transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of a major multidrug transporter, LmrCD, in Lactococcus lactis. However, the molecular mechanism by which LmrR binds to structurally unrelated compounds and is released from the promoter region remains largely unknown. Here, we structurally and dynamically characterized LmrR in the apo, compound-bound and promoter-bound states. The compound-binding site of LmrR exhibits ps-μs dynamics in the apo state, and compound ligation shifts the preexisting conformational equilibrium to varying extents to achieve multidrug recognition. Meanwhile, the compound binding induces redistribution of ps-ns dynamics to the allosteric sites, which entropically favors the high-affinity recognition. Furthermore, the reciprocal compound/promoter binding by LmrR is achieved by the incompatible conformational ensembles between the compound- and promoter-bound states. Collectively, the data show how LmrR can dynamically exert its functions through promiscuous multi-target interactions, in a manner that cannot be understood by a static structural view.

  7. Profiles of Discourse Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Murray

    2013-01-01

    A discourse recognition theory derived from more general memory formulations would be broad in its psychological implications. This study compared discourse recognition with some established profiles of item recognition. Participants read 10 stories either once or twice each. They then rated their confidence in recognizing explicit, paraphrased,…

  8. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Goñi, Félix M

    2013-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  9. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  10. Directed divergent evolution of a thermostable D-tagatose epimerase towards improved activity for two hexose substrates.

    PubMed

    Bosshart, Andreas; Hee, Chee Seng; Bechtold, Matthias; Schirmer, Tilman; Panke, Sven

    2015-03-01

    Functional promiscuity of enzymes can often be harnessed as the starting point for the directed evolution of novel biocatalysts. Here we describe the divergent morphing of an engineered thermostable variant (Var8) of a promiscuous D-tagatose epimerase (DTE) into two efficient catalysts for the C3 epimerization of D-fructose to D-psicose and of L-sorbose to L-tagatose. Iterative single-site randomization and screening of 48 residues in the first and second shells around the substrate-binding site of Var8 yielded the eight-site mutant IDF8 (ninefold improved kcat for the epimerization of D-fructose) and the six-site mutant ILS6 (14-fold improved epimerization of L-sorbose), compared to Var8. Structure analysis of IDF8 revealed a charged patch at the entrance of its active site; this presumably facilitates entry of the polar substrate. The improvement in catalytic activity of variant ILS6 is thought to relate to subtle changes in the hydration of the bound substrate. The structures can now be used to select additional sites for further directed evolution of the ketohexose epimerase.

  11. [Face recognition in patients with autism spectrum disorders].

    PubMed

    Kita, Yosuke; Inagaki, Masumi

    2012-07-01

    The present study aimed to review previous research conducted on face recognition in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Face recognition is a key question in the ASD research field because it can provide clues for elucidating the neural substrates responsible for the social impairment of these patients. Historically, behavioral studies have reported low performance and/or unique strategies of face recognition among ASD patients. However, the performance and strategy of ASD patients is comparable to those of the control group, depending on the experimental situation or developmental stage, suggesting that face recognition of ASD patients is not entirely impaired. Recent brain function studies, including event-related potential and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, have investigated the cognitive process of face recognition in ASD patients, and revealed impaired function in the brain's neural network comprising the fusiform gyrus and amygdala. This impaired function is potentially involved in the diminished preference for faces, and in the atypical development of face recognition, eliciting symptoms of unstable behavioral characteristics in these patients. Additionally, face recognition in ASD patients is examined from a different perspective, namely self-face recognition, and facial emotion recognition. While the former topic is intimately linked to basic social abilities such as self-other discrimination, the latter is closely associated with mentalizing. Further research on face recognition in ASD patients should investigate the connection between behavioral and neurological specifics in these patients, by considering developmental changes and the spectrum clinical condition of ASD.

  12. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of small subunit residues

    SciTech Connect

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Drevland, Randy; Gayathri, Dasara; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Shinkai, Akeo; Graham, David E

    2010-01-01

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of -hydroxyacids to -hydroxyacids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of , -dicarboxylates with hydrophobic -chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length -carboxylate groups. These enzymes stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins leads to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between 2 and 3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence, but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These structural and kinetic results will

  13. Multimodal eye recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  14. Kin Recognition in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wall, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The ability of bacteria to recognize kin provides a means to form social groups. In turn these groups can lead to cooperative behaviors that surpass the ability of the individual. Kin recognition involves specific biochemical interactions between a receptor(s) and an identification molecule(s). Recognition specificity, ensuring that nonkin are excluded and kin are included, is critical and depends on the number of loci and polymorphisms involved. After recognition and biochemical perception, the common ensuing cooperative behaviors include biofilm formation, quorum responses, development, and swarming motility. Although kin recognition is a fundamental mechanism through which cells might interact, microbiologists are only beginning to explore the topic. This review considers both molecular and theoretical aspects of bacterial kin recognition. Consideration is also given to bacterial diversity, genetic relatedness, kin selection theory, and mechanisms of recognition. PMID:27359217

  15. Diagnostic odor recognition

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt; Phan; Desandre; Lobon; Hsu

    2000-10-01

    Many diseases, toxic ingestions, and intoxications have characteristic odors. These odors may provide diagnostic clues that affect rapid treatment long before laboratory confirmation or clinical deterioration. Odor recognition skills, similar to auscultation and palpation skills, require teaching and practical exposure. Dr. Goldfrank and colleagues recognized the importance of teaching odor recognition to emergency service providers. They proposed the "sniffing bar" method for odor recognition training. OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify the recognition rates of medically important odors among emergency care providers. (2) To investigate the effectiveness of teaching odor recognition. Hypothesis: The recognition rates of medically important odors will increase after teaching exposure. METHODS: The study exposed emergency care providers to 11 tubes of odors. Identifications of each substance were recorded. After corrective feedback, subjects were re-tested on their ability to identify the odors. Analysis of odor recognition improvement after teaching was done via chi-square test. RESULTS: Improvement in identification after teaching was seen in all odors. However, the improvement was significant only in the lesscommon substances because their initial recognition was especially low. Significant changes may improve with a larger sample size. Subjects often confuse the odors of alcohol with acetone, and wintergreen with camphor. CONCLUSIONS: The recognition rates are higher for the more-common odors, and lower for the less-common odors. Teaching exposures to the less well-known odors are effective and can significantly improve the recognition rate of these substances. Because odor recognition may affect rapid diagnosis and treatment of certain medical emergencies such as toxic ingestion, future studies should investigate the correlation between odor recognition and the ability to identify corresponding medical emergencies.

  16. PTB or not to be: promiscuous, tolerant and Bizarro domains come of age.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Amjad; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2004-09-01

    PTB domains are protein modules that usually interact with the cytoplasmic tail of a wide variety of growth factor receptors. In so doing, they mediate the transduction of extracellular information to specific downstream targets within the cell that ultimately determine the fate of a number of important biological processes such as cell growth and differentiation, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. Recent structural and functional studies of PTB domains from a variety of cellular proteins have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms of action of these important protein modules. In the present review, we provide an account of such studies and suggest that PTB domains can be subdivided into three distinct categories on the basis of their topological differences. We also discuss the various mechanisms employed by the PTB domains in recognition of a diverse set of ligands without a consensus sequence. Finally, we discuss the role of molecular plasticity as a possible determinant of functional versatility of PTB domains. PMID:15590561

  17. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sara R; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-06-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn(181) and Asn(231) Whereas mutation of Asn(231) seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn(181) disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys(86) and Cys(107) compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys(158) and Cys(172) has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  18. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sara R.; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B.; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G.; López-Marqués, Rosa L.

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn181 and Asn231. Whereas mutation of Asn231 seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn181 disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys86 and Cys107 compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys158 and Cys172 has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  19. Structural basis for the promiscuous biosynthetic prenylation of aromatic natural products

    PubMed Central

    Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Noel, Joseph P.; Richard, Stéphane B.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-oxidant naphterpin is a natural product containing a polyketide-based aromatic core with an attached 10-carbon geranyl group derived from isoprenoid (terpene) metabolism1–3. Hybrid natural products such as naphterpin that contain 5-carbon (dimethylallyl), 10-carbon (geranyl) or 15-carbon (farnesyl) isoprenoid chains possess biological activities distinct from their non-prenylated aromatic precursors4. These hybrid natural products represent new anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral and anti-cancer compounds. A small number of aromatic prenyltransferases (PTases) responsible for prenyl group attachment have only recently been isolated and characterized5,6. Here we report the gene identification, biochemical characterization and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an architecturally novel aromatic PTase, Orf2 from Streptomyces sp. strain CL190, with substrates and substrate analogues bound. In vivo, Orf2 attaches a geranyl group to a 1,3,6,8-tetra-hydroxynaphthalene-derived polyketide during naphterpin biosynthesis. In vitro, Orf2 catalyses carbon–carbon-based and carbon–oxygen-based prenylation of a diverse collection of hydroxyl-containing aromatic acceptors of synthetic, microbial and plant origin. These crystal structures, coupled with in vitro assays, provide a basis for understanding and potentially manipulating the regio-specific prenylation of aromatic small molecules using this structurally unique family of aromatic PTases. PMID:15959519

  20. Structural basis for the promiscuous biosynthetic prenylation of aromatic natural products.

    PubMed

    Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Noel, Joseph P; Richard, Stéphane B

    2005-06-16

    The anti-oxidant naphterpin is a natural product containing a polyketide-based aromatic core with an attached 10-carbon geranyl group derived from isoprenoid (terpene) metabolism. Hybrid natural products such as naphterpin that contain 5-carbon (dimethylallyl), 10-carbon (geranyl) or 15-carbon (farnesyl) isoprenoid chains possess biological activities distinct from their non-prenylated aromatic precursors. These hybrid natural products represent new anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral and anti-cancer compounds. A small number of aromatic prenyltransferases (PTases) responsible for prenyl group attachment have only recently been isolated and characterized. Here we report the gene identification, biochemical characterization and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an architecturally novel aromatic PTase, Orf2 from Streptomyces sp. strain CL190, with substrates and substrate analogues bound. In vivo, Orf2 attaches a geranyl group to a 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene-derived polyketide during naphterpin biosynthesis. In vitro, Orf2 catalyses carbon-carbon-based and carbon-oxygen-based prenylation of a diverse collection of hydroxyl-containing aromatic acceptors of synthetic, microbial and plant origin. These crystal structures, coupled with in vitro assays, provide a basis for understanding and potentially manipulating the regio-specific prenylation of aromatic small molecules using this structurally unique family of aromatic PTases.

  1. Palmitylation of Src family tyrosine kinases regulates functional interaction with a B cell substrate.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Wolven, A; Resh, M D; Bolen, J B

    1997-05-19

    Palmitylation of Src family tyrosine kinases has been shown to play a role in directing their membrane localization. Here we demonstrate that palmitylation can also regulate recognition and tyrosine phosphorylation of the B cell Src kinase substrate Ig alpha. Blk and Src, which are not palmitylated, phosphorylate co-expressed Ig alpha in Cos cells, whereas palmitylated Src kinases do not. Addition of a palmitylation site to Blk abrogates its phosphorylation of the substrate, while mutation of Fyn's palmitylation sites results in recognition and phosphorylation of Ig alpha. These results indicate that palmitylation, a reversible protein modification, aids in regulating recognition of physiologic substrates by Src family tyrosine kinases. PMID:9177269

  2. Moreland Recognition Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland Elementary School District, San Jose, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Recognition for special effort and achievement has been noted as a component of effective schools. Schools in the Moreland School District have effectively improved standards of discipline and achievement by providing forty-six different ways for children to receive positive recognition. Good…

  3. Infant Visual Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.

    2004-01-01

    Visual recognition memory is a robust form of memory that is evident from early infancy, shows pronounced developmental change, and is influenced by many of the same factors that affect adult memory; it is surprisingly resistant to decay and interference. Infant visual recognition memory shows (a) modest reliability, (b) good discriminant…

  4. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  5. Utilization of synthetic peptides to evaluate the importance of substrate interaction at the proteolytic site of Escherichia coli Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Ward, Jessica; Tedesco, Johnathan; Hudak, Jason; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Becker, James; Frase, Hilary; McNamara, Kirsten; Lee, Irene

    2009-09-01

    Lon, also known as protease La, is an ATP-dependent protease functioning to degrade many unstructured proteins. Currently, very little is known about the substrate determinants of Lon at the proteolytic site. Using synthetic peptides constituting different regions of the endogenous protein substrate lambdaN, we demonstrated that the proteolytic site of Escherichia coli Lon exhibits a certain level of localized sequence specificity. Using an alanine positional scanning approach, we discovered a set of discontinuous substrate determinants surrounding the scissile Lon cleavage site in a model peptide substrate, which function to influence the k(cat) of the peptidase activity of Lon. We further investigated the mode of peptide interaction with the proteolytically inactive Lon mutant S679A in the absence and presence of ADP or AMPPNP by 2-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and discovered that the binding interaction between protein and peptide varies with the nucleotide bound to the enzyme. This observation is suggestive of a substrate translocation step, which likely limits the turnover of the proteolytic reaction. The contribution of the identified substrate determinants towards the kinetics of ATP-dependent degradation of lambdaN and truncated lambdaN mutants by Lon was also examined. Our results indicated that Lon likely recognizes numerous discontinuous substrate determinants throughout lambdaN to achieve substrate promiscuity.

  6. Conformational plasticity of RepB, the replication initiator protein of promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D. Roeland; Ruiz-Masó, José Angel; Rueda, Manuel; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Machón, Cristina; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Orozco, Modesto; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication initiation is a vital and tightly regulated step in all replicons and requires an initiator factor that specifically recognizes the DNA replication origin and starts replication. RepB from the promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is a hexameric ring protein evolutionary related to viral initiators. Here we explore the conformational plasticity of the RepB hexamer by i) SAXS, ii) sedimentation experiments, iii) molecular simulations and iv) X-ray crystallography. Combining these techniques, we derive an estimate of the conformational ensemble in solution showing that the C-terminal oligomerisation domains of the protein form a rigid cylindrical scaffold to which the N-terminal DNA-binding/catalytic domains are attached as highly flexible appendages, featuring multiple orientations. In addition, we show that the hinge region connecting both domains plays a pivotal role in the observed plasticity. Sequence comparisons and a literature survey show that this hinge region could exists in other initiators, suggesting that it is a common, crucial structural element for DNA binding and manipulation. PMID:26875695

  7. Promiscuous targeting of bromodomains by bromosporine identifies BET proteins as master regulators of primary transcription response in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Leonards, Katharina; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; Dovey, Oliver; Wells, Christopher; Fedorov, Oleg; Monteiro, Octovia; Fujisawa, Takao; Wang, Chen-Yi; Lingard, Hannah; Tallant, Cynthia; Nikbin, Nikzad; Guetzoyan, Lucie; Ingham, Richard; Ley, Steven V.; Brennan, Paul; Muller, Susanne; Samsonova, Anastasia; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Schwaller, Juerg; Vassiliou, George; Knapp, Stefan; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomains (BRDs) have emerged as compelling targets for cancer therapy. The development of selective and potent BET (bromo and extra-terminal) inhibitors and their significant activity in diverse tumor models have rapidly translated into clinical studies and have motivated drug development efforts targeting non-BET BRDs. However, the complex multidomain/subunit architecture of BRD protein complexes complicates predictions of the consequences of their pharmacological targeting. To address this issue, we developed a promiscuous BRD inhibitor [bromosporine (BSP)] that broadly targets BRDs (including BETs) with nanomolar affinity, creating a tool for the identification of cellular processes and diseases where BRDs have a regulatory function. As a proof of principle, we studied the effects of BSP on leukemic cell lines known to be sensitive to BET inhibition and found, as expected, strong antiproliferative activity. Comparison of the modulation of transcriptional profiles by BSP after a short exposure to the inhibitor resulted in a BET inhibitor signature but no significant additional changes in transcription that could account for inhibition of other BRDs. Thus, nonselective targeting of BRDs identified BETs, but not other BRDs, as master regulators of context-dependent primary transcription response. PMID:27757418

  8. Promiscuous speciation with gene flow in silverside fish genus Odontesthes (Atheriniformes, Atherinopsidae) from south western Atlantic Ocean basins.

    PubMed

    García, Graciela; Ríos, Néstor; Gutiérrez, Verónica; Varela, Jorge Guerra; Bouza Fernández, Carmen; Pardo, Belén Gómez; Portela, Paulino Martínez

    2014-01-01

    The present paper integrates phylogenetic and population genetics analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers in silversides, genus Odontesthes, from a non-sampled area in the SW Atlantic Ocean to address species discrimination and to define Managements Units for sustainable conservation. All phylogenetic analyses based on the COI mitochondrial gene were consistent to support the monophyly of the genus Odontesthes and to include O. argentinensis, O. perugiae-humensis and some O. bonariensis haplotypes in a basal polytomy conforming a major derivative clade. Microsatellites data revealed somewhat higher genetic variability values in the O. argentinensis-perugia populations than in O. bonariensis and O. perugia-humensis taxa. Contrasting population genetics structuring emerged from mitochondrial and microsatellites analyses in these taxa. Whereas mitochondrial data supported two major groups (O. argentinensis-perugia-humensis vs. O. bonariensis-perugiae-humensis populations), microsatellite data detected three major genetic entities represented by O. bonariensis, O. perugiae-humensis and an admixture of populations belonging to O. argentinensis-perugiae respectively. Therefore, the star COI polytomy in the tree topology involving these taxa could be interpreted by several hypothetic scenarios such as the existence of shared ancestral polymorphisms, incomplete lineage sorting in a radiating speciation process and/or reticulation events. Present findings support that promiscuous and recent contact between incipient species sharing asymmetric gene flow exchanges, blurs taxa boundaries yielding complicated taxonomy and Management Units delimitation in silverside genus Odontesthes from SW Atlantic Ocean basins.

  9. Promiscuous Speciation with Gene Flow in Silverside Fish Genus Odontesthes (Atheriniformes, Atherinopsidae) from South Western Atlantic Ocean Basins

    PubMed Central

    García, Graciela; Ríos, Néstor; Gutiérrez, Verónica; Varela, Jorge Guerra; Bouza Fernández, Carmen; Pardo, Belén Gómez; Portela, Paulino Martínez

    2014-01-01

    The present paper integrates phylogenetic and population genetics analyses based on mitochondrial and nuclear molecular markers in silversides, genus Odontesthes, from a non-sampled area in the SW Atlantic Ocean to address species discrimination and to define Managements Units for sustainable conservation. All phylogenetic analyses based on the COI mitochondrial gene were consistent to support the monophyly of the genus Odontesthes and to include O. argentinensis, O. perugiae-humensis and some O. bonariensis haplotypes in a basal polytomy conforming a major derivative clade. Microsatellites data revealed somewhat higher genetic variability values in the O. argentinensis-perugia populations than in O. bonariensis and O. perugia-humensis taxa. Contrasting population genetics structuring emerged from mitochondrial and microsatellites analyses in these taxa. Whereas mitochondrial data supported two major groups (O. argentinensis-perugia-humensis vs. O. bonariensis-perugiae-humensis populations), microsatellite data detected three major genetic entities represented by O. bonariensis, O. perugiae-humensis and an admixture of populations belonging to O. argentinensis-perugiae respectively. Therefore, the star COI polytomy in the tree topology involving these taxa could be interpreted by several hypothetic scenarios such as the existence of shared ancestral polymorphisms, incomplete lineage sorting in a radiating speciation process and/or reticulation events. Present findings support that promiscuous and recent contact between incipient species sharing asymmetric gene flow exchanges, blurs taxa boundaries yielding complicated taxonomy and Management Units delimitation in silverside genus Odontesthes from SW Atlantic Ocean basins. PMID:25126842

  10. The Promiscuity of [beta]-Strand Pairing Allows for Rational Design of [beta]-Sheet Face Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2009-06-17

    Recent studies suggest the dominant role of main-chain H-bond formation in specifying {beta}-sheet topology. Its essentially sequence-independent nature implies a large degree of freedom in designing {beta}-sheet-based nanomaterials. Here we show rational design of {beta}-sheet face inversions by incremental deletions of {beta}-strands from the single-layer {beta}-sheet of Borrelia outer surface protein A. We show that a {beta}-sheet structure can be maintained when a large number of native contacts are removed and that one can design large-scale conformational transitions of a {beta}-sheet such as face inversion by exploiting the promiscuity of strand-strand interactions. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures confirmed the success of the design and supported the importance of main-chain H-bonds in determining {beta}-sheet topology. This work suggests a simple but effective strategy for designing and controlling nanomaterials based on {beta}-rich peptide self-assemblies.

  11. Persistent infection and promiscuous recombination of multiple genotypes of an RNA virus within a single host generate extensive diversity.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ziming; Barthelson, Roger; Gowda, Siddarame; Hilf, Mark E; Dawson, William O; Galbraith, David W; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2007-01-01

    Recombination and reassortment of viral genomes are major processes contributing to the creation of new, emerging viruses. These processes are especially significant in long-term persistent infections where multiple viral genotypes co-replicate in a single host, generating abundant genotypic variants, some of which may possess novel host-colonizing and pathogenicity traits. In some plants, successive vegetative propagation of infected tissues and introduction of new genotypes of a virus by vector transmission allows for viral populations to increase in complexity for hundreds of years allowing co-replication and subsequent recombination of the multiple viral genotypes. Using a resequencing microarray, we examined a persistent infection by a Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) complex in citrus, a vegetatively propagated, globally important fruit crop, and found that the complex comprised three major and a number of minor genotypes. Subsequent deep sequencing analysis of the viral population confirmed the presence of the three major CTV genotypes and, in addition, revealed that the minor genotypes consisted of an extraordinarily large number of genetic variants generated by promiscuous recombination between the major genotypes. Further analysis provided evidence that some of the recombinants underwent subsequent divergence, further increasing the genotypic complexity. These data demonstrate that persistent infection of multiple viral genotypes within a host organism is sufficient to drive the large-scale production of viral genetic variants that may evolve into new and emerging viruses. PMID:17878952

  12. Exploring the transferase activity of Ffase from Schwanniomyces occidentalis, a β-fructofuranosidase showing high fructosyl-acceptor promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Piedrabuena, David; Míguez, Noa; Poveda, Ana; Plou, Francisco J; Fernández-Lobato, María

    2016-10-01

    The β-fructofuranosidase from the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis (Ffase) produces the prebiotic sugars 6-kestose and 1-kestose by transfructosylation of sucrose, which makes it of biotechnological interest. In this study, the hydrolase and transferase activity of this enzyme was kinetically characterized and its potential to synthesize new fructosylated products explored. A total of 40 hydroxylated compounds were used as potential fructosyl-acceptor alternatives to sucrose. Only 17 of them, including some monosaccharides, disaccharides, and oligosaccharides as well as alditols and glycosides were fructosylated. The best alternative acceptors were the alditols. The major transfer product of the reaction including mannitol was purified and characterized as 1-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-D-mannitol, whose maximum concentration reached 44 g/L, representing about 7.3 % of total compounds in the mixture and 89 % of all products generated by transfructosylation. The reactions including erythritol produced 35 g/L of an isomer mixture comprising 1- and 4-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-D-erythritol. In addition, Ffase produced 24 g/L of the disaccharide blastose by direct fructosylation of glucose, which makes it the first enzyme characterized from yeast showing this ability. Thus, novel fructosylated compounds with potential applications in food and pharmaceutical industries can be obtained due to the Ffase fructosyl-acceptor promiscuity.

  13. Promiscuous trans activation of gene expression by an Epstein-Barr virus-encoded early nuclear protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, P M; O'Hare, P; Hayward, G S; Hayward, S D

    1986-01-01

    We identified an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gene product which functions in transient-expression assays as a nonspecific trans activator. In Vero cells, cotransfection of the BglII J DNA fragment of EBV together with recombinant constructs containing the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene gave up to a 100-fold increased expression of CAT activity over that in cells transfected with the recombinant CAT constructs alone. The BglII J fragment acted promiscuously, in that increased CAT synthesis was observed regardless of whether the promoter sequences driving the CAT gene were of EBV, simian virus 40, adenovirus, or herpes simplex virus origin. Cleavage of cloned BglII-J plasmid DNA before transfection revealed that activation was dependent upon the presence of an intact BMLF1 open reading frame. This was confirmed with subclones of BglII-J and with hybrid promoter-open reading frame constructs. This region of the genome is also present in the rearranged P3HR-1-defective DNA species, and defective DNA clones containing these sequences produced a similar activation of CAT expression in cotransfection experiments. The heterogeneous 45-60-kilodalton polypeptide product of BMLF1 may play an important regulatory role in expression of lytic-cycle proteins in EBV-infected lymphocytes. Images PMID:3018281

  14. Exploring the transferase activity of Ffase from Schwanniomyces occidentalis, a β-fructofuranosidase showing high fructosyl-acceptor promiscuity.

    PubMed

    Piedrabuena, David; Míguez, Noa; Poveda, Ana; Plou, Francisco J; Fernández-Lobato, María

    2016-10-01

    The β-fructofuranosidase from the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis (Ffase) produces the prebiotic sugars 6-kestose and 1-kestose by transfructosylation of sucrose, which makes it of biotechnological interest. In this study, the hydrolase and transferase activity of this enzyme was kinetically characterized and its potential to synthesize new fructosylated products explored. A total of 40 hydroxylated compounds were used as potential fructosyl-acceptor alternatives to sucrose. Only 17 of them, including some monosaccharides, disaccharides, and oligosaccharides as well as alditols and glycosides were fructosylated. The best alternative acceptors were the alditols. The major transfer product of the reaction including mannitol was purified and characterized as 1-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-D-mannitol, whose maximum concentration reached 44 g/L, representing about 7.3 % of total compounds in the mixture and 89 % of all products generated by transfructosylation. The reactions including erythritol produced 35 g/L of an isomer mixture comprising 1- and 4-O-β-D-fructofuranosyl-D-erythritol. In addition, Ffase produced 24 g/L of the disaccharide blastose by direct fructosylation of glucose, which makes it the first enzyme characterized from yeast showing this ability. Thus, novel fructosylated compounds with potential applications in food and pharmaceutical industries can be obtained due to the Ffase fructosyl-acceptor promiscuity. PMID:27229725

  15. PCA facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hori, Inas H.; El-Momen, Zahraa K.; Ganoun, Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. The comparative study of Facial Expression Recognition (FER) techniques namely Principal Component's analysis (PCA) and PCA with Gabor filters (GF) is done. The objective of this research is to show that PCA with Gabor filters is superior to the first technique in terms of recognition rate. To test and evaluates their performance, experiments are performed using real database by both techniques. The universally accepted five principal emotions to be recognized are: Happy, Sad, Disgust and Angry along with Neutral. The recognition rates are obtained on all the facial expressions.

  16. Ribbed electrode substrates

    DOEpatents

    Breault, Richard D.; Goller, Glen J.

    1983-01-01

    A ribbed substrate for an electrochemical cell electrode is made from a mixture of carbon fibers and carbonizable resin and has a mean pore size in the ribs which is 60-75% of the mean pore size of the web portions of the substrate which interconnect the ribs. Preferably the mean pore size of the web portion is 25-45 microns; and, if the substrate includes edge seals parallel to the ribs, the edge seals preferably have a mean pore size no greater than about ten microns. Most preferably the substrate has the same ratio of carbon fibers to polymeric carbon in all areas, including the ribs, webs, and edge seals. A substrate according to the present invention will have better overall performance than prior art substrates and minimizes the substrate thickness required for the substrate to perform all its functions well.

  17. Coated substrates and process

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Wei-kan; Childs, Charles B.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a coated substrate and a process for forming films on substrates and for providing a particularly smooth film on a substrate. The method of this invention involves subjecting a surface of a substrate to contact with a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient force and energy to substantially change the surface characteristics of said substrate, and then exposing a film-forming material to a stream of ions of an inert gas having sufficient energy to vaporize the atoms of said film-forming material and to transmit the vaporized atoms to the substrate surface with sufficient force to form a film bonded to the substrate. This process is particularly useful commercially because it forms strong bonds at room temperature. This invention is particularly useful for adhering a gold film to diamond and forming ohmic electrodes on diamond, but also can be used to bond other films to substrates.

  18. Polished polymide substrate

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John; Sudarshanam, Venkatapuram S.

    2003-05-13

    Polymer substrates, in particular polyimide substrates, and polymer laminates for optical applications are described. Polyimide substrates are polished on one or both sides depending on their thickness, and single-layer or multi-layer waveguide structures are deposited on the polished polyimide substrates. Optical waveguide devices are machined by laser ablation using a combination of IR and UV lasers. A waveguide-fiber coupler with a laser-machined groove for retaining the fiber is also disclosed.

  19. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution.

  20. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution. PMID:27444875

  1. Recovery of EUVL substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Baker, S.L.

    1995-01-19

    Mo/Si multilayers, were removed from superpolished zerodur and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  2. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  3. Context based gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazazian, Shermin; Gavrilova, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Gait recognition has recently become a popular topic in the field of biometrics. However, the main hurdle is the insufficient recognition rate in the presence of low quality samples. The main focus of this paper is to investigate how the performance of a gait recognition system can be improved using additional information about behavioral patterns of users and the context in which samples have been taken. The obtained results show combining the context information with biometric data improves the performance of the system at a very low cost. The amount of improvement depends on the distinctiveness of the behavioral patterns and the quality of the gait samples. Using the appropriate distinctive behavioral models it is possible to achieve a 100% recognition rate.

  4. CASE Recognition Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A total of 294 schools, colleges, and universities received prizes in this year's CASE Recognition program. Awards were given in: public relations programs, student recruitment, marketing, program pulications, news writing, fund raising, radio programming, school periodicals, etc. (MLW)

  5. Progress in fold recognition.

    PubMed

    Flöckner, H; Braxenthaler, M; Lackner, P; Jaritz, M; Ortner, M; Sippl, M J

    1995-11-01

    The prediction experiment reveals that fold recognition has become a powerful tool in structural biology. We applied our fold recognition technique to 13 target sequences. In two cases, replication terminating protein and prosequence of subtilisin, the predicted structures are very similar to the experimentally determined folds. For the first time, in a public blind test, the unknown structures of proteins have been predicted ahead of experiment to an accuracy approaching molecular detail. In two other cases the approximate folds have been predicted correctly. According to the assessors there were 12 recognizable folds among the target proteins. In our postprediction analysis we find that in 7 cases our fold recognition technique is successful. In several of the remaining cases the predicted folds have interesting features in common with the experimental results. We present our procedure, discuss the results, and comment on several fundamental and technical problems encountered in fold recognition.

  6. Structural insights into Parkin substrate lysine targeting from minimal Miro substrates.

    PubMed

    Klosowiak, Julian L; Park, Sungjin; Smith, Kyle P; French, Michael E; Focia, Pamela J; Freymann, Douglas M; Rice, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson's disease is commonly caused by mutations in the protein kinase PINK1 or the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, which function together to eliminate damaged mitochondria. PINK1 phosphorylates both Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate ubiquitination of dozens of proteins on the surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. However, the mechanisms by which Parkin recognizes specific proteins for modification remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that the C-terminal GTPase (cGTPase) of the Parkin primary substrate human Miro is necessary and sufficient for efficient ubiquitination. We present several new X-ray crystal structures of both human Miro1 and Miro2 that reveal substrate recognition and ubiquitin transfer to be specific to particular protein domains and lysine residues. We also provide evidence that Parkin substrate recognition is functionally separate from substrate modification. Finally, we show that prioritization for modification of a specific lysine sidechain of the cGTPase (K572) within human Miro1 is dependent on both its location and chemical microenvironment. Activation of Parkin by phosphorylation or by binding of pUb is required for prioritization of K572 for modification, suggesting that Parkin activation and acquisition of substrate specificity are coupled. PMID:27605430

  7. Structural insights into Parkin substrate lysine targeting from minimal Miro substrates

    PubMed Central

    Klosowiak, Julian L.; Park, Sungjin; Smith, Kyle P.; French, Michael E.; Focia, Pamela J.; Freymann, Douglas M.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary Parkinson’s disease is commonly caused by mutations in the protein kinase PINK1 or the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, which function together to eliminate damaged mitochondria. PINK1 phosphorylates both Parkin and ubiquitin to stimulate ubiquitination of dozens of proteins on the surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. However, the mechanisms by which Parkin recognizes specific proteins for modification remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that the C-terminal GTPase (cGTPase) of the Parkin primary substrate human Miro is necessary and sufficient for efficient ubiquitination. We present several new X-ray crystal structures of both human Miro1 and Miro2 that reveal substrate recognition and ubiquitin transfer to be specific to particular protein domains and lysine residues. We also provide evidence that Parkin substrate recognition is functionally separate from substrate modification. Finally, we show that prioritization for modification of a specific lysine sidechain of the cGTPase (K572) within human Miro1 is dependent on both its location and chemical microenvironment. Activation of Parkin by phosphorylation or by binding of pUb is required for prioritization of K572 for modification, suggesting that Parkin activation and acquisition of substrate specificity are coupled. PMID:27605430

  8. [Electrocardiograph beat pattern recognition].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qunyi; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huiling

    2005-02-01

    It is very important to recognize arrhythmia in clinical electrocardiography (ECG) analysis. The fundamental of beat pattern recognition is presented in this paper. Various prevalent methods for arrhythmia recognitiion are categorized and summarized, based on which the advantages and disadvantages among the methods are compared, and the main problems are discussed in depth. At last, the development trend of arrhythmia recognition technology is pointed out.

  9. Promiscuous Dimerization of the Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor (GHS-R1a) Attenuates Ghrelin-mediated Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Harriët; van Oeffelen, Wesley E. P. A.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a), the melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3), and the serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2C), are well known for their key role in the homeostatic control of food intake and energy balance. Ghrelin is the only known gut peptide exerting an orexigenic effect and has thus received much attention as an anti-obesity drug target. In addition, recent data have revealed a critical role for ghrelin in dopaminergic mesolimbic circuits involved in food reward signaling. This study investigates the downstream signaling consequences and ligand-mediated co-internalization following heterodimerization of the GHS-R1a receptor with the dopamine 1 receptor, as well as that of the GHS-R1a-MC3 heterodimer. In addition, a novel heterodimer between the GHS-R1a receptor and the 5-HT2C receptor was identified. Interestingly, dimerization of the GHS-R1a receptor with the unedited 5-HT2C-INI receptor, but not with the partially edited 5-HT2C-VSV isoform, significantly reduced GHS-R1a agonist-mediated calcium influx, which was completely restored following pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT2C receptor. These results combined suggest a potential novel mechanism for fine-tuning GHS-R1a receptor-mediated activity via promiscuous dimerization of the GHS-R1a receptor with other G protein-coupled receptors involved in appetite regulation and food reward. These findings may uncover novel mechanisms of significant relevance for the future pharmacological targeting of the GHS-R1a receptor in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance and in hedonic appetite signaling, both of which play a significant role in the development of obesity. PMID:23161547

  10. Amygdala's involvement in facilitating associative learning-induced plasticity: a promiscuous role for the amygdala in memory acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Lily S.; Galvez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the amygdala plays a critical role in acquisition and consolidation of fear-related memories. Some of the more widely employed behavioral paradigms that have assisted in solidifying the amygdala's role in fear-related memories are associative learning paradigms. With most associative learning tasks, a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) is paired with a salient unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits an unconditioned response (UR). After multiple CS-US pairings, the subject learns that the CS predicts the onset or delivery of the US, and thus elicits a learned conditioned response (CR). Most fear-related associative paradigms have suggested that an aspect of the fear association is stored in the amygdala; however, some fear-motivated associative paradigms suggest that the amygdala is not a site of storage, but rather facilitates consolidation in other brain regions. Based upon various learning theories, one of the most likely sites for storage of long-term memories is the neocortex. In support of these theories, findings from our laboratory, and others, have demonstrated that trace-conditioning, an associative paradigm where there is a separation in time between the CS and US, induces learning-specific neocortical plasticity. The following review will discuss the amygdala's involvement, either as a site of storage or facilitating storage in other brain regions such as the neocortex, in fear- and non-fear-motivated associative paradigms. In this review, we will discuss recent findings suggesting a broader role for the amygdala in increasing the saliency of behaviorally relevant information, thus facilitating acquisition for all forms of memory, both fear- and non-fear-related. This proposed promiscuous role of the amygdala in facilitating acquisition for all memories further suggests a potential role of the amygdala in general learning disabilities. PMID:23087626

  11. Amygdala's involvement in facilitating associative learning-induced plasticity: a promiscuous role for the amygdala in memory acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chau, Lily S; Galvez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the amygdala plays a critical role in acquisition and consolidation of fear-related memories. Some of the more widely employed behavioral paradigms that have assisted in solidifying the amygdala's role in fear-related memories are associative learning paradigms. With most associative learning tasks, a neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) is paired with a salient unconditioned stimulus (US) that elicits an unconditioned response (UR). After multiple CS-US pairings, the subject learns that the CS predicts the onset or delivery of the US, and thus elicits a learned conditioned response (CR). Most fear-related associative paradigms have suggested that an aspect of the fear association is stored in the amygdala; however, some fear-motivated associative paradigms suggest that the amygdala is not a site of storage, but rather facilitates consolidation in other brain regions. Based upon various learning theories, one of the most likely sites for storage of long-term memories is the neocortex. In support of these theories, findings from our laboratory, and others, have demonstrated that trace-conditioning, an associative paradigm where there is a separation in time between the CS and US, induces learning-specific neocortical plasticity. The following review will discuss the amygdala's involvement, either as a site of storage or facilitating storage in other brain regions such as the neocortex, in fear- and non-fear-motivated associative paradigms. In this review, we will discuss recent findings suggesting a broader role for the amygdala in increasing the saliency of behaviorally relevant information, thus facilitating acquisition for all forms of memory, both fear- and non-fear-related. This proposed promiscuous role of the amygdala in facilitating acquisition for all memories further suggests a potential role of the amygdala in general learning disabilities.

  12. Molecular promiscuity of plant polyphenols in the management of age-related diseases: far beyond their antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Herranz-López, María; Joven, Jorge; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Menéndez, Javier A; Micol, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    The use of plant-derived polyphenols for the management of diseases has been under debate in the last decades. Most studies have focused on the specific effects of polyphenols on particular targets, while ignoring their pleiotropic character. The multitargeted character of polyphenols, a plausible consequence of their molecular promiscuity, may suppose an opportunity to fight multifactorial diseases. Therefore, a wider perspective is urgently needed to elucidate whether their rational use as bioactive food components may be valid for the management of diseases. In this chapter, we discuss the most likely targets of polyphenols that may account for their salutary effects from a global perspective. Among these targets, the modulation of signalling and energy-sensitive pathways, oxidative stress and inflammation-related processes, mitochondrial functionality, epigenetic machinery, histone acetylation and membrane-dependent processes play central roles in polyphenols' mechanisms of action.Sufficient evidence on polyphenols has accumulated for them to be considered a serious option for the management of non-communicable diseases, such as cancer and obesity, as well as infectious diseases. The remaining unresolved issues that must be seriously addressed are their bioavailability, metabolite detection, specific molecular targets, interactions and toxicity. The Xenohormesis hypothesis, which postulates that polyphenols are the product of plant evolutive adaptation to stress and conferee their resistance to mammals, offers a reasonable explanation to justify the beneficial and non-toxic effects of plant mixtures, but do not fully meet expectations. Hence, future research must be supported by the use of complex polypharmacology approaches and synergic studies focused on the understanding of the pleiotropic effects of polyphenols. Revisiting polyphenol mechanisms of action with the help of these techniques may allow for the improvement of human health and wellness by using

  13. Plasticity in Interactions of Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 (FGF1) N Terminus with FGF Receptors Underlies Promiscuity of FGF1*

    PubMed Central

    Beenken, Andrew; Eliseenkova, Anna V.; Ibrahimi, Omar A.; Olsen, Shaun K.; Mohammadi, Moosa

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing in the second half of Ig-like domain 3 (D3) of fibroblast growth factor receptors 1–3 (FGFR1 to -3) generates epithelial FGFR1b-FGFR3b and mesenchymal FGFR1c-FGFR3c splice isoforms. This splicing event establishes a selectivity filter to restrict the ligand binding specificity of FGFRb and FGFRc isoforms to mesenchymally and epithelially derived fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), respectively. FGF1 is termed the “universal FGFR ligand” because it overrides this specificity barrier. To elucidate the molecular basis for FGF1 cross-reactivity with the “b” and “c” splice isoforms of FGFRs, we determined the first crystal structure of FGF1 in complex with an FGFRb isoform, FGFR2b, at 2.1 Å resolution. Comparison of the FGF1-FGFR2b structure with the three previously published FGF1-FGFRc structures reveals that plasticity in the interactions of the N-terminal region of FGF1 with FGFR D3 is the main determinant of FGF1 cross-reactivity with both isoforms of FGFRs. In support of our structural data, we demonstrate that substitution of three N-terminal residues (Gly-19, His-25, and Phe-26) of FGF2 (a ligand that does not bind FGFR2b) for the corresponding residues of FGF1 (Phe-16, Asn-22, and Tyr-23) enables the FGF2 triple mutant to bind and activate FGFR2b. These findings taken together with our previous structural data on receptor binding specificity of FGF2, FGF8, and FGF10 conclusively show that sequence divergence at the N termini of FGFs is the primary regulator of the receptor binding specificity and promiscuity of FGFs. PMID:22057274

  14. Page Recognition: Quantum Leap In Recognition Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Larry

    1989-07-01

    No milestone has proven as elusive as the always-approaching "year of the LAN," but the "year of the scanner" might claim the silver medal. Desktop scanners have been around almost as long as personal computers. And everyone thinks they are used for obvious desktop-publishing and business tasks like scanning business documents, magazine articles and other pages, and translating those words into files your computer understands. But, until now, the reality fell far short of the promise. Because it's true that scanners deliver an accurate image of the page to your computer, but the software to recognize this text has been woefully disappointing. Old optical-character recognition (OCR) software recognized such a limited range of pages as to be virtually useless to real users. (For example, one OCR vendor specified 12-point Courier font from an IBM Selectric typewriter: the same font in 10-point, or from a Diablo printer, was unrecognizable!) Computer dealers have told me the chasm between OCR expectations and reality is so broad and deep that nine out of ten prospects leave their stores in disgust when they learn the limitations. And this is a very important, very unfortunate gap. Because the promise of recognition -- what people want it to do -- carries with it tremendous improvements in our productivity and ability to get tons of written documents into our computers where we can do real work with it. The good news is that a revolutionary new development effort has led to the new technology of "page recognition," which actually does deliver the promise we've always wanted from OCR. I'm sure every reader appreciates the breakthrough represented by the laser printer and page-makeup software, a combination so powerful it created new reasons for buying a computer. A similar breakthrough is happening right now in page recognition: the Macintosh (and, I must admit, other personal computers) equipped with a moderately priced scanner and OmniPage software (from Caere

  15. Crystallographic analysis of CaaX prenyltransferases complexed with substrates defines rules of protein substrate selectivity.

    PubMed

    Reid, T Scott; Terry, Kimberly L; Casey, Patrick J; Beese, Lorena S

    2004-10-15

    Post-translational modifications are essential for the proper function of many proteins in the cell. The attachment of an isoprenoid lipid (a process termed prenylation) by protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) or geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I) is essential for the function of many signal transduction proteins involved in growth, differentiation, and oncogenesis. FTase and GGTase-I (also called the CaaX prenyltransferases) recognize protein substrates with a C-terminal tetrapeptide recognition motif called the Ca1a2X box. These enzymes possess distinct but overlapping protein substrate specificity that is determined primarily by the sequence identity of the Ca1a2X motif. To determine how the identity of the Ca1a2X motif residues and sequence upstream of this motif affect substrate binding, we have solved crystal structures of FTase and GGTase-I complexed with a total of eight cognate and cross-reactive substrate peptides, including those derived from the C termini of the oncoproteins K-Ras4B, H-Ras and TC21. These structures suggest that all peptide substrates adopt a common binding mode in the FTase and GGTase-I active site. Unexpectedly, while the X residue of the Ca1a2X motif binds in the same location for all GGTase-I substrates, the X residue of FTase substrates can bind in one of two different sites. Together, these structures outline a series of rules that govern substrate peptide selectivity; these rules were utilized to classify known protein substrates of CaaX prenyltransferases and to generate a list of hypothetical substrates within the human genome.

  16. The outs and ins of bacterial type IV secretion substrates

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhiyong; Atmakuri, Krishnamohan; Christie, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use type IV secretion systems (T4SS) to translocate macromolecular substrates destined for bacterial, plant or human target cells. The T4SS are medically important, contributing to virulence-gene spread, genome plasticity and the alteration of host cellular processes during infection. The T4SS are ancestrally related to bacterial conjugation machines, but present-day functions include (i) conjugal transfer of DNA by cell-to-cell contact, (ii) translocation of effector molecules to eukaryotic target cells, and (iii) DNA uptake from or release to the extracellular milieu. Rapid progress has been made toward identification of type IV secretion substrates and the requirements for substrate recognition. PMID:14607070

  17. Bishydrazide glycoconjugates for lectin recognition and capture of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S; Wei, Alexander

    2010-11-17

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexa(ethylene glycol) (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive cross-linking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS(2) under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 10³ cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  18. Bishydrazide Glycoconjugates for Lectin Recognition and Capture of Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Adak, Avijit Kumar; Leonov, Alexei P.; Ding, Ning; Thundimadathil, Jyothi; Kularatne, Sumith; Low, Philip S.; Wei, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Bishydrazides are versatile linkers for attaching glycans to substrates for lectin binding and pathogen detection schemes. The α,ω-bishydrazides of carboxymethylated hexaethylene glycol (4) can be conjugated at one end to unprotected oligosaccharides, then attached onto carrier proteins, tethered onto activated carboxyl-terminated surfaces, or functionalized with a photoactive crosslinking agent for lithographic patterning. Glycoconjugates of bishydrazide 4 can also be converted into dithiocarbamates (DTCs) by treatment with CS2 under mild conditions, for attachment onto gold substrates. The immobilized glycans serve as recognition elements for cell-surface lectins and enable the detection and capture of bacterial pathogens such as Psuedomonas aeruginosa by their adsorption onto micropatterned substrates. A detection limit of 103 cfu/mL is demonstrated, using a recently introduced method based on optical pattern recognition. PMID:20925370

  19. Probabilistic Open Set Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Lalit Prithviraj

    Real-world tasks in computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning often touch upon the open set recognition problem: multi-class recognition with incomplete knowledge of the world and many unknown inputs. An obvious way to approach such problems is to develop a recognition system that thresholds probabilities to reject unknown classes. Traditional rejection techniques are not about the unknown; they are about the uncertain boundary and rejection around that boundary. Thus traditional techniques only represent the "known unknowns". However, a proper open set recognition algorithm is needed to reduce the risk from the "unknown unknowns". This dissertation examines this concept and finds existing probabilistic multi-class recognition approaches are ineffective for true open set recognition. We hypothesize the cause is due to weak adhoc assumptions combined with closed-world assumptions made by existing calibration techniques. Intuitively, if we could accurately model just the positive data for any known class without overfitting, we could reject the large set of unknown classes even under this assumption of incomplete class knowledge. For this, we formulate the problem as one of modeling positive training data by invoking statistical extreme value theory (EVT) near the decision boundary of positive data with respect to negative data. We provide a new algorithm called the PI-SVM for estimating the unnormalized posterior probability of class inclusion. This dissertation also introduces a new open set recognition model called Compact Abating Probability (CAP), where the probability of class membership decreases in value (abates) as points move from known data toward open space. We show that CAP models improve open set recognition for multiple algorithms. Leveraging the CAP formulation, we go on to describe the novel Weibull-calibrated SVM (W-SVM) algorithm, which combines the useful properties of statistical EVT for score calibration with one-class and binary

  20. Toward hyperspectral face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robila, Stefan A.

    2008-02-01

    Face recognition continues to meet significant challenges in reaching accurate results and still remains one of the activities where humans outperform technology. An attractive approach in improving face identification is provided by the fusion of multiple imaging sources such as visible and infrared images. Hyperspectral data, i.e. images collected over hundreds of narrow contiguous light spectrum intervals constitute a natural choice for expanding face recognition image fusion, especially since it may provide information beyond the normal visible range, thus exceeding the normal human sensing. In this paper we investigate the efficiency of hyperspectral face recognition through an in house experiment that collected data in over 120 bands within the visible and near infrared range. The imagery was produced using an off the shelf sensor in both indoors and outdoors with the subjects being photographed from various angles. Further processing included spectra collection and feature extraction. Human matching performance based on spectral properties is discussed.

  1. Sex-specific estimates of dispersal show female philopatry and male dispersal in a promiscuous amphibian, the alpine salamander (Salamandra atra).

    PubMed

    Helfer, V; Broquet, T; Fumagalli, L

    2012-10-01

    Amphibians display wide variations in life-history traits and life cycles that should prove useful to explore the evolution of sex-biased dispersal, but quantitative data on sex-specific dispersal patterns are scarce. Here, we focused on Salamandra atra, an endemic alpine species showing peculiar life-history traits. Strictly terrestrial and viviparous, the species has a promiscuous mating system, and females reproduce only every 3 to 4 years. In the present study, we provide quantitative estimates of asymmetries in male vs. female dispersal using both field-based (mark-recapture) and genetic approaches (detection of sex-biased dispersal and estimates of migration rates based on the contrast in genetic structure across sexes and age classes). Our results revealed a high level of gene flow among populations, which stems exclusively from male dispersal. We hypothesize that philopatric females benefit from being familiar with their natal area for the acquisition and defence of an appropriate shelter, while male dispersal has been secondarily favoured by inbreeding avoidance. Together with other studies on amphibians, our results indicate that a species' mating system alone is a poor predictor of sex-linked differences in dispersal, in particular for promiscuous species. Further studies should focus more directly on the proximate forces that favour or limit dispersal to refine our understanding of the evolution of sex-biased dispersal in animals.

  2. The Molecular Mechanism of Substrate Engagement and Immunosuppressant Inhibition of Calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriu, Simina; Bond, Rachel; Cossio, Pilar; Chen, Jennifer A.; Ly, Nina; Hummer, Gerhard; Page, Rebecca; Cyert, Martha S.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Ser/thr phosphatases dephosphorylate their targets with high specificity, yet the structural and sequence determinants of phosphosite recognition are poorly understood. Calcineurin (CN) is a conserved Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent ser/thr phosphatase and the target of immunosuppressants, FK506 and cyclosporin A (CSA). To investigate CN substrate recognition we used X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, modeling, and in vivo experiments to study A238L, a viral protein inhibitor of CN. We show that A238L competitively inhibits CN by occupying a critical substrate recognition site, while leaving the catalytic center fully accessible. Critically, the 1.7 Å structure of the A238L-CN complex reveals how CN recognizes residues in A238L that are analogous to a substrate motif, “LxVP.” The structure enabled modeling of a peptide substrate bound to CN, which predicts substrate interactions beyond the catalytic center. Finally, this study establishes that “LxVP” sequences and immunosuppressants bind to the identical site on CN. Thus, FK506, CSA, and A238L all prevent “LxVP”-mediated substrate recognition by CN, highlighting the importance of this interaction for substrate dephosphorylation. Collectively, this work presents the first integrated structural model for substrate selection and dephosphorylation by CN and lays the groundwork for structure-based development of new CN inhibitors. PMID:23468591

  3. Recognition for Employed Inventors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Howard J.

    1980-01-01

    Presents arguments for monetary rewards and other forms of recognition by employers for inventions of employed inventors, particularly as the concept applies to stimulating innovativeness in America. Discusses the controversy of federally mandated compensation for employed inventors. The efforts of the American Chemical Society along these lines…

  4. Units of Word Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa, Carol M.; And Others

    Both psychologists and reading specialists have been interested in whether words are processed letter by letter or in larger units. A reaction time paradigm was used to evaluate these options with interest focused on potential units of word recognition which might be functional within single syllable words. The basic paradigm involved presenting…

  5. Optical Character Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  6. [Facial recognition and autism].

    PubMed

    Assumpçäo Júnior, F B; Sprovieri, M H; Kuczynski, E; Farinha, V

    1999-12-01

    Through the presentation of four facial expressions' illustrations, we evaluate the capacity of autistic children recognition, comparing with normal intelligence children and adults. The comparison of results was accomplished through the qui-square test. The differences observed were significant, showing that a disturbance of the facial expressions' perception is present in autistic children, and that it interferes directly in the social relationships.

  7. Recognition Memory for Pseudowords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Participants are more likely to give positive responses on a recognition test to pseudowords (pronounceable nonwords) than words. A series of experiments suggests that this difference reflects the greater overall familiarity of pseudowords than of words. Pseudowords receive higher ratings of similarity to a studied list than do words. Pseudowords…

  8. Microprocessor for speech recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, H.; Watari, M.; Sakoe, H.; Chiba, S.; Iwata, T.; Matsuki, T.; Kawakami, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new single-chip microprocessor for speech recognition has been developed utilizing multi-processor architecture and pipelined structure. By DP-matching algorithm, the processor recognizes up to 340 isolated words or 40 connected words in realtime. 6 references.

  9. 1987 CASE Recognition Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 CASE Recognition Awards are presented for: general excellence in programs; student recruitment marketing improvement; video public service announcements, news, and commercial spots; total publications; magazines of the decade; improvement in periodicals; photocommunications via print; designer of the year and series; and imagination in…

  10. Pattern recognition in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Dick; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2013-09-01

    Pattern recognition is concerned with the development of systems that learn to solve a given problem using a set of example instances, each represented by a number of features. These problems include clustering, the grouping of similar instances; classification, the task of assigning a discrete label to a given instance; and dimensionality reduction, combining or selecting features to arrive at a more useful representation. The use of statistical pattern recognition algorithms in bioinformatics is pervasive. Classification and clustering are often applied to high-throughput measurement data arising from microarray, mass spectrometry and next-generation sequencing experiments for selecting markers, predicting phenotype and grouping objects or genes. Less explicitly, classification is at the core of a wide range of tools such as predictors of genes, protein function, functional or genetic interactions, etc., and used extensively in systems biology. A course on pattern recognition (or machine learning) should therefore be at the core of any bioinformatics education program. In this review, we discuss the main elements of a pattern recognition course, based on material developed for courses taught at the BSc, MSc and PhD levels to an audience of bioinformaticians, computer scientists and life scientists. We pay attention to common problems and pitfalls encountered in applications and in interpretation of the results obtained.

  11. Incompatibility Protein IncC and Global Regulator KorB Interact in Active Partition of Promiscuous Plasmid RK2

    PubMed Central

    Rosche, Thomas M.; Siddique, Azeem; Larsen, Michelle H.; Figurski, David H.

    2000-01-01

    Replication of the broad-host-range, IncPα plasmid RK2 requires two plasmid loci: trfA, the replication initiator gene, and oriV, the origin of replication. While these determinants are sufficient for replication in a wide variety of bacteria, they do not confer the stable maintenance of parental RK2 observed in its hosts. The product of the incC gene has been proposed to function in the stable maintenance of RK2 because of its relatedness to the ParA family of ATPases, some of which are known to be involved in the active partition of plasmid and chromosomal DNA. Here we show that IncC has the properties expected of a component of an active partition system. The smaller polypeptide product of incC (IncC2) exhibits a strong, replicon-independent incompatibility phenotype with RK2. This incompatibility phenotype requires the global transcriptional repressor, KorB, and the target for incC-mediated incompatibility is a KorB-binding site (OB). We found that KorB and IncC interact in vivo by using the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro by using partially purified proteins. Elevated expression of the incC and korB genes individually has no obvious effect on Escherichia coli cell growth, but their simultaneous overexpression is toxic, indicating a possible interaction of IncC-KorB complexes with a vital host target. A region of RK2 bearing incC, korB, and multiple KorB-binding sites is able to stabilize an unstable, heterologous plasmid in an incC-dependent manner. Finally, elevated levels of IncC2 cause RK2 to aggregate, indicating a possible role for IncC in plasmid pairing. These findings demonstrate that IncC, KorB, and at least one KorB-binding site are components of an active partition system for the promiscuous plasmid RK2. PMID:11029420

  12. Theoretical Proposal for the Whole Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis Mechanism Promoted by a Catalytic Promiscuous Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Lucas F; Rey, Nicolás A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; Costa, Luiz Antônio S

    2016-03-21

    The catalytic mechanism that involves the cleavage of the phosphate diester model BDNPP (bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed through a dinuclear copper complex is investigated in the current study. The metal complex was originally designed to catalyze catechol oxidation, and it showed an interesting catalytic promiscuity case in biomimetic systems. The current study investigates two different reaction mechanisms through quantum mechanics calculations in the gas phase, and it also includes the solvent effect through PCM (polarizable continuum model) single-point calculations using water as solvent. Two mechanisms are presented in order to fully describe the phosphate diester hydrolysis. Mechanism 1 is of the S(N)2 type, which involves the direct attack of the μ-OH bridge between the two copper(II) ions toward the phosphorus center, whereas mechanism 2 is the process in which hydrolysis takes place through proton transfer between the oxygen atom in the bridging hydroxo ligand and the other oxygen atom in the phosphate model. Actually, the present theoretical study shows two possible reaction paths in mechanism 1. Its first reaction path (p1) involves a proton transfer that occurs immediately after the hydrolytic cleavage, so that the proton transfer is the rate-determining step, which is followed by the entry of two water molecules. Its second reaction path (p2) consists of the entry of two water molecules right after the hydrolytic cleavage, but with no proton transfer; thus, hydrolytic cleavage is the rate-limiting step. The most likely catalytic path occurs in mechanism 1, following the second reaction path (p2), since it involves the lowest free energy activation barrier (ΔG(⧧) = 23.7 kcal mol(-1), in aqueous solution). A kinetic analysis showed that the experimental k(obs) value of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) agrees with the calculated value k1 = 2.6 × 10(-5) s(-1); the concerted mechanism is kinetically favorable. The KIE (kinetic isotope effect) analysis

  13. Theoretical Proposal for the Whole Phosphate Diester Hydrolysis Mechanism Promoted by a Catalytic Promiscuous Dinuclear Copper(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Lucas F; Rey, Nicolás A; Dos Santos, Hélio F; Costa, Luiz Antônio S

    2016-03-21

    The catalytic mechanism that involves the cleavage of the phosphate diester model BDNPP (bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) phosphate) catalyzed through a dinuclear copper complex is investigated in the current study. The metal complex was originally designed to catalyze catechol oxidation, and it showed an interesting catalytic promiscuity case in biomimetic systems. The current study investigates two different reaction mechanisms through quantum mechanics calculations in the gas phase, and it also includes the solvent effect through PCM (polarizable continuum model) single-point calculations using water as solvent. Two mechanisms are presented in order to fully describe the phosphate diester hydrolysis. Mechanism 1 is of the S(N)2 type, which involves the direct attack of the μ-OH bridge between the two copper(II) ions toward the phosphorus center, whereas mechanism 2 is the process in which hydrolysis takes place through proton transfer between the oxygen atom in the bridging hydroxo ligand and the other oxygen atom in the phosphate model. Actually, the present theoretical study shows two possible reaction paths in mechanism 1. Its first reaction path (p1) involves a proton transfer that occurs immediately after the hydrolytic cleavage, so that the proton transfer is the rate-determining step, which is followed by the entry of two water molecules. Its second reaction path (p2) consists of the entry of two water molecules right after the hydrolytic cleavage, but with no proton transfer; thus, hydrolytic cleavage is the rate-limiting step. The most likely catalytic path occurs in mechanism 1, following the second reaction path (p2), since it involves the lowest free energy activation barrier (ΔG(⧧) = 23.7 kcal mol(-1), in aqueous solution). A kinetic analysis showed that the experimental k(obs) value of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) agrees with the calculated value k1 = 2.6 × 10(-5) s(-1); the concerted mechanism is kinetically favorable. The KIE (kinetic isotope effect) analysis

  14. Individual MHCI-Restricted T-Cell Receptors are Characterized by a Unique Peptide Recognition Signature.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Effective immunity requires that a limited TCR repertoire is able to recognize a vast number of foreign peptide-MHCI (peptide-major histocompatibility complex class I) molecules. This challenge is overcome by the ability of individual TCRs to recognize large numbers of peptides. Recently, it was demonstrated that MHCI-restricted TCRs can recognize up to 10(6) peptides of a defined length. Astonishingly, this remarkable level of promiscuity does not extend to peptides of different lengths, a fundamental observation that has broad implications for CD8(+) T-cell immunity. In particular, the findings suggest that effective immunity can only be achieved by mobilization of "length-matched" CD8(+) T-cell clonotypes. Overall, recent findings suggest that every TCR is specific for a unique set of peptides, which can be described as a unique "peptide recognition signature" (PRS) and consists of three components: (1) peptide length preference, (2) number of peptides recognized; and, (3) sequence identity (e.g., self versus pathogen derived). In future, the ability to de-convolute peptide recognition signatures across the normal and pathogenic repertoire will be essential for understanding the system requirements for effective CD8(+) T-cell immunity and elucidating mechanisms which underlie CD8(+) T-cell mediated disease.

  15. A degradation signal recognition in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Young; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of ssrA-tagged substrates in prokaryotes is conducted by a subset of ATP-dependent proteases, including ClpXP complex. More than 630 sequences of ssrA have been identified from 514 species, and are conserved in a wide range of prokaryotes. SspB protein markedly stimulates the degradation of these ssrA-tagged substrates by the ClpXP proteolytic machine. The dimeric SspB protein is composed of a compact ssrA-binding domain, which has a dimerization surface and a flexible C-terminal tail with a ClpX-binding motif at its very end. Since SspB is an adaptor protein for the ClpXP complex, designed mutagenesis, fluorescence spectroscopy, biochemistry and X-ray crystallography have been used to investigate the mechanism of delivery of ssrA-tagged proteins. In this paper the structural basis of ssrA-tag recognition by ClpX and SspB, as well as SspB-tail recognition by ZBD, is described. PMID:18421150

  16. Supporting Quality Teachers with Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    Value has been found in providing recognition and awards programs for excellent teachers. Research has also found a major lack of these programs in both the USA and in Australia. Teachers receiving recognition and awards for their teaching have praised recognition programs as providing motivation for them to continue high-level instruction.…

  17. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  18. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  19. Molecular recognition in protein modification with rhodium metallopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical manipulation of natural, unengineered proteins is a daunting challenge which tests the limits of reaction design. By combining transition-metal or other catalysts with molecular recognition ideas, it is possible to achieve site-selective protein reactivity without the need for engineered recognition sequences or reactive sites. Some recent examples in this area have used ruthenium photocatalysis, pyridine organocatalysis, and rhodium(II) metallocarbene catalysis, indicating that the fundamental ideas provide opportunities for using diverse reactivity on complex protein substrates and in complex cell-like environments. PMID:25588960

  20. An Ecological Analysis of the Effects of Deviant Peer Clustering on Sexual Promiscuity, Problem Behavior, and Childbearing from Early Adolescence to Adulthood: An Enhancement of the Life History Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishion, Thomas J.; Ha, Thao; Veronneau, Marie-Helene

    2012-01-01

    The authors propose that peer relationships should be included in a life history perspective on adolescent problem behavior. Longitudinal analyses were used to examine deviant peer clustering as the mediating link between attenuated family ties, peer marginalization, and social disadvantage in early adolescence and sexual promiscuity in middle…

  1. Polymer side-chains as arms for molecular recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Clinton Ray

    This thesis describes research based on synthetic protocols, methodologies, and applications of polymers containing side-chain molecular recognition elements. The motivation for the thesis lies in the belief among many in the field that a strict covalent paradigm for polymer chemistry is reaching its limit. The use of molecular recognition, in lieu of covalent chemistry, potentially presents a path through the current limits of polymer science. The work described in the following chapters of this thesis is, at least in part, a testament to this proposal. The first two chapters present a basic introduction and survey of the fundamental noncovalent interactions that are ubiquitous in the research of supramolecular polymers and molecular recognition. A hierarchy of noncovalent interactions, molecular recognition, and self-assembly is outlined and discussed. Chapter 2 lays the foundation for the remaining chapters of this thesis by presenting several examples of prior work related specifically to the use of molecular recognition on the side-chains of polymers. The next two chapters present research focused on advancing the functionalization of polymers through molecular recognition. The goal of this research is primarily to develop a general polymer backbone that both site-specifically and strongly associates noncovalently with small molecular substrates. These chapters demonstrate that both architecturally controlled block copolymers and random terpolymers can accept a full load of different substrates without interference among distinct molecular recognition elements along the polymer backbone. Chapters 5 and 6 present a unique application of polymers containing molecular recognition elements, templated synthesis. Chapter 5 first discusses lessons learned from small molecule based templated synthesis in which a template and a substrate are held together by metal coordination and a subsequent bond forming reaction occurs. Ultimately, the results of this chapter

  2. DAXX envelops a histone H3.3-H4 dimer for H3.3-specific recogniti