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Sample records for promote genomic instability

  1. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  2. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O.; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTKs) such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC -mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL –dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability. PMID:21123451

  3. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2011-02-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here, we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTK), such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC-mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL-dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability.

  4. Genome-Wide Demethylation Promotes Triplet Repeat Instability Independently of Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Vincent; Lin, Yunfu; Price, Brandee A.; Fyffe, Sharyl L.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Wilson, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat instability is intrinsic to a family of human neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism leading to repeat length variation is unclear. We previously showed that treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) dramatically increases triplet repeat instability in mammalian cells. Based on previous reports that demethylation increases homologous recombination (HR), and our own observations that HR destabilizes triplet repeats, we hypothesized that demethylation alters repeat stability by stimulating HR. Here, we test that hypothesis at the Aprt (adenosine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus in CHO cells, where CpG demethylation and HR have both been shown to increase CAG repeat instability. We find that the rate of HR at the Aprt locus is not altered by demethylation. The spectrum of recombinants, however, was shifted from the usual 6:1 ratio of conversions to crossovers to more equal proportions in 5-aza-CdR-treated cells. The subtle influences of demethylation on HR at the Aprt locus are not sufficient to account for its dramatic effects on repeat instability. We conclude that 5-aza-CdR promotes triplet repeat instability independently of HR. PMID:18083071

  5. Genomic Instability and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yixin; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a characteristic of most cancer cells. It is an increased tendency of genome alteration during cell division. Cancer frequently results from damage to multiple genes controlling cell division and tumor suppressors. It is known that genomic integrity is closely monitored by several surveillance mechanisms, DNA damage checkpoint, DNA repair machinery and mitotic checkpoint. A defect in the regulation of any of these mechanisms often results in genomic instability, which predisposes the cell to malignant transformation. Posttranslational modifications of the histone tails are closely associated with regulation of the cell cycle as well as chromatin structure. Nevertheless, DNA methylation status is also related to genomic integrity. We attempt to summarize recent developments in this field and discuss the debate of driving force of tumor initiation and progression. PMID:25541596

  6. Loss of p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis promotes genomic instability and premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Jiang, Le; Manfredi, James; Zha, Shan; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Although p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis are well accepted as major tumor suppression mechanisms, the loss of these functions does not directly lead to tumorigenesis, suggesting that the precise roles of these canonical activities of p53 need to be redefined. Here, we report that the cells derived from the mutant mice expressing p533KR, an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, exhibit high levels of aneuploidy upon DNA damage. Moreover, the embryonic lethality caused by the deficiency of XRCC4, a key DNA double strand break repair factor, can be fully rescued in the p533KR/3KR background. Notably, despite high levels of genomic instability, p533KR/3KRXRCC4−/− mice, unlike p53−/− XRCC4−/− mice, are not succumbed to pro-B-cell lymphomas. Nevertheless, p533KR/3KR XRCC4−/− mice display aging-like phenotypes including testicular atrophy, kyphosis, and premature death. Further analyses demonstrate that SLC7A11 is downregulated and that p53-mediated ferroptosis is significantly induced in spleens and testis of p533KR/3KRXRCC4−/− mice. These results demonstrate that the direct role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis is to control genomic stability in vivo. Our study not only validates the importance of ferroptosis in p53-mediated tumor suppression in vivo but also reveals that the combination of genomic instability and activation of ferroptosis may promote aging-associated phenotypes. PMID:26943586

  7. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  8. Genomic instability in pre-neoplastic colonic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J A; Graham, T A; Stebbing, J

    2013-01-01

    Genomic instability is a characteristic of most cancers and it is argued that genomic instability is a driving force for tumorigenesis. Data herein demonstrate that genomic instability, as evidenced by microsatellite instability (MSI) and promoter methylation of DNA mismatch repair genes, is common in individual glands of pre-malignant colorectal lesions and raises interesting questions about the role of MSI in the development of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:23396367

  9. Dysfunctional telomeres promote genomic instability and metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in oncogene induced mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2013-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres). In normal cells lacking telomerase activity, telomeres shorten with each cell division because of the inability to completely synthesize the lagging strand. Critically shortened telomeres elicit DNA damage responses and limit cellular division and lifespan, providing an important tumor suppressor function. Most human cancer cells express telomerase which contributes significantly to the tumor phenotype. In human breast cancer, telomerase expression is predictive of clinical outcomes such as lymph node metastasis and survival. In mouse models of mammary cancer, telomerase expression is also upregulated. Telomerase overexpression resulted in spontaneous mammary tumor development in aged female mice. Increased mammary cancer also was observed when telomerase deficient mice were crossed with p53 null mutant animals. However, the effects of telomerase and telomere length on oncogene driven mammary cancer have not been completely characterized. To address these issues we characterized neu proto-oncogene driven mammary tumor formation in G1 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with long telomeres), G3 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with short telomeres), and Terc+/+ mice. Telomerase deficiency reduced the number of mammary tumors and increased tumor latency regardless of telomere length. Decreased tumor formation correlated with increased apoptosis in Terc deficient tumors. Short telomeres dramatically increased lung metastasis which correlated with increased genomic instability, and specific alterations in DNA copy number and gene expression. We concluded that short telomeres promote metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in neu oncogene driven mammary tumors.

  10. The roles of DNA polymerase ζ and the Y family DNA polymerases in promoting or preventing genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpy; Helchowski, Corey M.; Canman, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display numerous abnormal characteristics which are initiated and maintained by elevated mutation rates and genome instability. Chromosomal DNA is continuously surveyed for the presence of damage or blocked replication forks by the DNA Damage Response (DDR) network. The DDR is complex and includes activation of cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, gene transcription, and induction of apoptosis. Duplicating a damaged genome is associated with elevated risks to fork collapse and genome instability. Therefore, the DNA Damage Tolerance (DDT) pathway is also employed to enhance survival and involves the recruitment of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases to sites of replication fork blockade or single stranded DNA gaps left after the completion of replication in order to restore DNA to its double stranded form before mitosis. TLS polymerases are specialized for inserting nucleotides opposite DNA adducts, abasic sites, or DNA crosslinks. By definition, the DDT pathway is not involved in the actual repair of damaged DNA, but provides a mechanism to tolerate DNA lesions during replication thereby increasing survival and lessening the chance for genome instability. However this may be associated with increased mutagenesis. In this review, we will describe the specialized functions of Y family polymerases (Rev1, Polη, Polι and Polκ) and DNA polymerase ζ in lesion bypass, mutagenesis, and prevention of genome instability, the latter due to newly appreciated roles in DNA repair. The recently described role of the Fanconi anemia pathway in regulating Rev1 and Polζ-dependent TLS is also discussed in terms of their involvement in TLS, interstrand crosslink repair, and homologous recombination. PMID:23195997

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis EsxO (Rv2346c) promotes bacillary survival by inducing oxidative stress mediated genomic instability in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Dal Molin, Michael; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Jena, Prajna; Selchow, Petra; Sengupta, Srabasti; Meuli, Michael; Sander, Peter; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives inside the macrophages by modulating the host immune responses in its favor. The 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6; esxA) of Mtb is known as a potent virulence and T-cell antigenic determinant. At least 23 such ESAT-6 family proteins are encoded in the genome of Mtb; however, the function of many of them is still unknown. We herein report that ectopic expression of Mtb Rv2346c (esxO), a member of ESAT-6 family proteins, in non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis strain (MsmRv2346c) aids host cell invasion and intracellular bacillary persistence. Further mechanistic studies revealed that MsmRv2346c infection abated macrophage immunity by inducing host cell death and genomic instability as evident from the appearance of several DNA damage markers. We further report that the induction of genomic instability in infected cells was due to increase in the hosts oxidative stress responses. MsmRv2346c infection was also found to induce autophagy and modulate the immune function of macrophages. In contrast, blockade of Rv2346c induced oxidative stress by treatment with ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevented the host cell death, autophagy induction and genomic instability in infected macrophages. Conversely, MtbΔRv2346c mutant did not show any difference in intracellular survival and oxidative stress responses. We envision that Mtb ESAT-6 family protein Rv2346c dampens antibacterial effector functions namely by inducing oxidative stress mediated genomic instability in infected macrophages, while loss of Rv2346c gene function may be compensated by other redundant ESAT-6 family proteins. Thus EsxO plays an important role in mycobacterial pathogenesis in the context of innate immunity. PMID:26786654

  12. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  13. Genome instability, cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Alexander Y.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage-driven genome instability underlies the diversity of life forms generated by the evolutionary process but is detrimental to the somatic cells of individual organisms. The cellular response to DNA damage can be roughly divided in two parts. First, when damage is severe, programmed cell death may occur or, alternatively, temporary or permanent cell cycle arrest. This protects against cancer but can have negative effects on the long term, e.g., by depleting stem cell reservoirs. Second, damage can be repaired through one or more of the many sophisticated genome maintenance pathways. However, erroneous DNA repair and incomplete restoration of chromatin after damage is resolved, produce mutations and epimutations, respectively, both of which have been shown to accumulate with age. An increased burden of mutations and/or epimutations in aged tissues increases cancer risk and adversely affects gene transcriptional regulation, leading to progressive decline in organ function. Cellular degeneration and uncontrolled cell proliferation are both major hallmarks of aging. Despite the fact that one seems to exclude the other, they both may be driven by a common mechanism. Here, we review age related changes in the mammalian genome and their possible functional consequences, with special emphasis on genome instability in stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19344750

  14. MicroRNA-34a promotes genomic instability by a broad suppression of genome maintenance mechanisms downstream of the oncogene KSHV-vGPCR

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Claudia J.; Popp, Oliver; Thirunarayanan, Nanthakumar; Dittmar, Gunnar; Lipp, Martin; Müller, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded chemokine receptor vGPCR acts as an oncogene in Kaposi's sarcomagenesis. Until now, the molecular mechanisms by which the vGPCR contributes to tumor development remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the KSHV-vGPCR contributes to tumor progression through microRNA (miR)-34a-mediated induction of genomic instability. Large-scale analyses on the DNA, gene and protein level of cell lines derived from a mouse model of vGPCR-driven tumorigenesis revealed that a vGPCR–induced upregulation of miR-34a resulted in a broad suppression of genome maintenance genes. A knockdown of either the vGPCR or miR-34a largely restored the expression of these genes and confirmed miR-34a as a downstream effector of the KSHV-vGPCR that compromises genome maintenance mechanisms. This novel, protumorigenic role of miR-34a questions the use of miR-34a mimetics in cancer therapy as they could impair genome stability. PMID:26871287

  15. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  16. Helicase-like transcription factor is a RUNX1 target whose downregulation promotes genomic instability and correlates with complex cytogenetic features in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi Keung; Chan, Natalie P. H.; Wan, Thomas S. K.; Lam, Lai Ying; Cheung, Coty H. Y.; Wong, Terry H. Y.; Ip, Rosalina K. L.; Wong, Raymond S. M.; Ng, Margaret H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Helicase-like transcription factor is a SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor involved in various biological processes. However, little is known about its role in hematopoiesis. In this study, we measured helicase-like transcription factor mRNA expression in the bone marrow of 204 adult patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia. Patients were dichotomized into low and high expression groups at the median level for clinicopathological correlations. Helicase-like transcription factor levels were dramatically reduced in the low expression patient group compared to those in the normal controls (n=40) (P<0.0001). Low helicase-like transcription factor expression correlated positively with French-American-British M4/M5 subtypes (P<0.0001) and complex cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.02 for ≥3 abnormalities; P=0.004 for ≥5 abnormalities) but negatively with CEBPA double mutations (P=0.012). Also, low expression correlated with poorer overall (P=0.005) and event-free (P=0.006) survival in the intermediate-risk cytogenetic subgroup. Consistent with the more aggressive disease associated with low expression, helicase-like transcription factor knockdown in leukemic cells promoted proliferation and chromosomal instability that was accompanied by downregulation of mitotic regulators and impaired DNA damage response. The significance of helicase-like transcription factor in genome maintenance was further indicated by its markedly elevated expression in normal human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. We further demonstrated that helicase-like transcription factor was a RUNX1 target and transcriptionally repressed by RUNX1-ETO and site-specific DNA methylation through a duplicated RUNX1 binding site in its promoter. Taken together, our findings provide new mechanistic insights on genomic instability linked to helicase-like transcription factor deregulation, and strongly suggest a tumor suppressor function of the SWI/SNF protein in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26802049

  17. The presence of extra chromosomes leads to genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Verena; Ozeri-Galai, Efrat; de Pagter, Mirjam S; Donnelly, Neysan; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Kerem, Batsheva; Storchová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a hallmark of cancer and underlies genetic disorders characterized by severe developmental defects, yet the molecular mechanisms explaining its effects on cellular physiology remain elusive. Here we show, using a series of human cells with defined aneuploid karyotypes, that gain of a single chromosome increases genomic instability. Next-generation sequencing and SNP-array analysis reveal accumulation of chromosomal rearrangements in aneuploids, with break point junction patterns suggestive of replication defects. Trisomic and tetrasomic cells also show increased DNA damage and sensitivity to replication stress. Strikingly, we find that aneuploidy-induced genomic instability can be explained by the reduced expression of the replicative helicase MCM2-7. Accordingly, restoring near-wild-type levels of chromatin-bound MCM helicase partly rescues the genomic instability phenotypes. Thus, gain of chromosomes triggers replication stress, thereby promoting genomic instability and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:26876972

  18. The presence of extra chromosomes leads to genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Verena; Ozeri-Galai, Efrat; de Pagter, Mirjam S.; Donnelly, Neysan; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Kerem, Batsheva; Storchová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy is a hallmark of cancer and underlies genetic disorders characterized by severe developmental defects, yet the molecular mechanisms explaining its effects on cellular physiology remain elusive. Here we show, using a series of human cells with defined aneuploid karyotypes, that gain of a single chromosome increases genomic instability. Next-generation sequencing and SNP-array analysis reveal accumulation of chromosomal rearrangements in aneuploids, with break point junction patterns suggestive of replication defects. Trisomic and tetrasomic cells also show increased DNA damage and sensitivity to replication stress. Strikingly, we find that aneuploidy-induced genomic instability can be explained by the reduced expression of the replicative helicase MCM2-7. Accordingly, restoring near-wild-type levels of chromatin-bound MCM helicase partly rescues the genomic instability phenotypes. Thus, gain of chromosomes triggers replication stress, thereby promoting genomic instability and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:26876972

  19. miR-155 Over-expression Promotes Genomic Instability by Reducing High-fidelity Polymerase Delta Expression and Activating Error-prone DSB Repair

    PubMed Central

    Czochor, Jennifer R.; Sulkowski, Parker; Glazer, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    miR-155 is an oncogenic microRNA (miR) that is often over-expressed in cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. miR-155 can target several DNA repair factors including RAD51, MLH1, and MSH6, and its over-expression results in an increased mutation frequency in vitro, although the mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that over-expression of miR-155 drives an increased mutation frequency both in vitro and in vivo, promoting genomic instability by affecting multiple DNA repair pathways. miR-155 over-expression causes a decrease in homologous recombination, but yields a concurrent increase in the error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. Despite repressing established targets MLH1 and MSH6, the identified mutation pattern upon miR-155 over-expression does not resemble that of a mismatch repair-deficient background. Further investigation revealed that all four subunits of polymerase delta, a high-fidelity DNA replication and repair polymerase, are down-regulated at the mRNA level in the context of miR-155 over-expression. FOXO3a, a transcription factor and known target of miR-155, has one or more putative binding site(s) in the promoter of all four polymerase delta subunits. Finally, suppression of FOXO3a by miR-155 or by siRNA knockdown is sufficient to repress the expression of the catalytic subunit of polymerase delta, POLD1, at the protein level, indicating that FOXO3a contributes to the regulation of polymerase delta levels. PMID:26850462

  20. MicroRNAs, Genomic Instability and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kimberly; Pichler, Martin; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Ling, Hui

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA transcripts approximately 20 nucleotides in length that regulate expression of protein-coding genes via complementary binding mechanisms. The last decade has seen an exponential increase of publications on miRNAs, ranging from every aspect of basic cancer biology to diagnostic and therapeutic explorations. In this review, we summarize findings of miRNA involvement in genomic instability, an interesting but largely neglected topic to date. We discuss the potential mechanisms by which miRNAs induce genomic instability, considered to be one of the most important driving forces of cancer initiation and progression, though its precise mechanisms remain elusive. We classify genomic instability mechanisms into defects in cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, and mitotic separation, and review the findings demonstrating the participation of specific miRNAs in such mechanisms. PMID:25141103

  1. Radiation induced genomic instability in bystander cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Gu, S.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Hei, T.

    There is considerable evidence that exposure to ionizing radiation may induce a heritable genomic instability that leads to a persisting increased frequency of genetic and functional changes in the non-irradiated progeny of a wide variety of irradiated cells Genomic instability is measured as delayed expressions in chromosomal alterations micronucleus formation gene mutations and decreased plating efficiency During the last decade numerous studies have shown that radiation could induce bystander effect in non-irradiated neighboring cells similar endpoints have also been used in genomic instability studies Both genomic instability and the bystander effect are phenomena that result in a paradigm shift in our understanding of radiation biology In the past it seemed reasonable to assume that the production of single- and double-strand DNA breaks are due to direct energy deposition of energy by a charged particle to the nucleus It turns out that biology is not quite that simple Using the Columbia University charged particle microbeam and the highly sensitive human hamster hybrid AL cell mutagenic assay we irradiated 10 of the cells with a lethal dose of 30 alpha particles through the nucleus After overnight incubation the remaining viable bystander cells were replated in dishes for colony formation Clonal isolates were expanded and cultured for 6 consecutive weeks to assess plating efficiency and mutation frequency Preliminary results indicated that there was no significant decrease in plating efficiency among the bystander colonies when compared with

  2. Impediments to replication fork movement: stabilisation, reactivation and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sarah; Carr, Antony M

    2013-03-01

    Maintaining genome stability is essential for the accurate transmission of genetic material. Genetic instability is associated with human genome disorders and is a near-universal hallmark of cancer cells. Genetic variation is also the driving force of evolution, and a genome must therefore display adequate plasticity to evolve while remaining sufficiently stable to prevent mutations and chromosome rearrangements leading to a fitness disadvantage. A primary source of genome instability are errors that occur during chromosome replication. More specifically, obstacles to the movement of replication forks are known to underlie many of the gross chromosomal rearrangements seen both in human cells and in model organisms. Obstacles to replication fork progression destabilize the replisome (replication protein complex) and impact on the integrity of forked DNA structures. Therefore, to ensure the successful progression of a replication fork along with its associated replisome, several distinct strategies have evolved. First, there are well-orchestrated mechanisms that promote continued movement of forks through potential obstacles. Second, dedicated replisome and fork DNA stabilization pathways prevent the dysfunction of the replisome if its progress is halted. Third, should stabilisation fail, there are mechanisms to ensure damaged forks are accurately fused with a converging fork or, when necessary, re-associated with the replication proteins to continue replication. Here, we review what is known about potential barriers to replication fork progression, how these are tolerated and their impact on genome instability.

  3. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Aaraby Yoheswaran; Gjerstorff, Morten Frier

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the similarities between meiosis and genomic instability, it has been proposed that activation of meiotic programs may drive genomic instability in cancer cells. Some germ cell proteins with ectopic expression in cancer cells indeed seem to promote genomic instability, while others reduce polyploidy and maintain mitotic fidelity. Furthermore, oncogenic germ cell proteins may indirectly contribute to genomic instability through induction of replication stress, similar to classic oncogenes. Thus, current evidence suggests that testis germ cell proteins are implicated in cancer development by regulating genomic instability during tumorigenesis, and these proteins therefore represent promising targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  4. Telomeres: protecting chromosomes against genome instability

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Roderick J.; Karlseder, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Preface The natural ends of linear chromosomes require unique genetic and structural adaptations to facilitate the protection of genetic material. This is achieved by the sequestration of the telomeric sequence into a protective nucleoprotein cap that masks the ends from constitutive exposure to the DNA damage response (DDR). When telomeres are unmasked, genome instability arises. Balancing capping requirements with telomere replication and the enzymatic processing steps obligatory for telomere function is a complex problem. Telomeric proteins and their interacting factors create an environment at chromosome ends that inhibits DNA repair there, however, the repair machinery is essential for proper telomere function. PMID:20125188

  5. Radiation-induced genomic instability: radiation quality and dose response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie E.; Nagar, Shruti; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is a term used to describe a phenomenon that results in the accumulation of multiple changes required to convert a stable genome of a normal cell to an unstable genome characteristic of a tumor. There has been considerable recent debate concerning the importance of genomic instability in human cancer and its temporal occurrence in the carcinogenic process. Radiation is capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells and instability is thought to be the driving force responsible for radiation carcinogenesis. Genomic instability is characterized by a large collection of diverse endpoints that include large-scale chromosomal rearrangements and aberrations, amplification of genetic material, aneuploidy, micronucleus formation, microsatellite instability, and gene mutation. The capacity of radiation to induce genomic instability depends to a large extent on radiation quality or linear energy transfer (LET) and dose. There appears to be a low dose threshold effect with low LET, beyond which no additional genomic instability is induced. Low doses of both high and low LET radiation are capable of inducing this phenomenon. This report reviews data concerning dose rate effects of high and low LET radiation and their capacity to induce genomic instability assayed by chromosomal aberrations, delayed lethal mutations, micronuclei and apoptosis.

  6. Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Helen H. Sedwick, David W. Veigl, Martina L.

    2006-07-15

    The goal of this project was to determine if genomic instability could be initiated by poorly repaired DNA damage induced by low doses of ionizing radiation leading to a mutator phenotype. Human cells were irradiated, then transfected with an unirradiated reporter gene at various times AFTER exposure. The vector carried an inactive GFP gene that fluoresced when the gene was activated by a delayed mutation. Fluorescent cells were measured in the interval of 50 hours to four days after transfection. The results showed that delayed mutations occurred in these cells after exposure to relatively low doses (0.3-1.0 Gy) of low or high ionizing radiation, as well as after treatment with hyrodgen peroxide (30-100 micromolar). The occurrence was both dose and time dependent, often decreasing at higher doses and later times. No marked difference was observed between the response of mis-match repair-proficient and -deficient cell lines. Although the results were quite reproducible within single experiments, difficulties were observed from experiment to experiment. Different reagents and assays were tested, but no improvement resulted. We concluded that this method is not sufficiently robust or consisent to be useful in the assay of the induction of genomic instability by low doses of radiation, at least in these cell lines under our conditions.

  7. Translational compensation of genomic instability in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Dassi, Erik; Greco, Valentina; Sidarovich, Viktoryia; Zuccotti, Paola; Arseni, Natalia; Scaruffi, Paola; Paolo Tonini, Gian; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated gene expression imbalances are conventionally studied at the genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic levels. Given the relevance of translational control in determining cell phenotypes, we evaluated the translatome, i.e., the transcriptome engaged in translation, as a descriptor of the effects of genetic instability in cancer. We performed this evaluation in high-risk neuroblastomas, which are characterized by a low frequency of point mutations or known cancer-driving genes and by the presence of several segmental chromosomal aberrations that produce gene-copy imbalances that guide aggressiveness. We thus integrated genome, transcriptome, translatome and miRome profiles in a representative panel of high-risk neuroblastoma cell lines. We identified a number of genes whose genomic imbalance was corrected by compensatory adaptations in translational efficiency. The transcriptomic level of these genes was predictive of poor prognosis in more than half of cases, and the genomic imbalances found in their loci were shared by 27 other tumor types. This homeostatic process is also not limited to copy number-altered genes, as we showed the translational stoichiometric rebalance of histone genes. We suggest that the translational buffering of fluctuations in these dose-sensitive transcripts is a potential driving process of neuroblastoma evolution. PMID:26399178

  8. Genomic instability caused by hepatitis B virus: into the hepatoma inferno.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Hsu, Jye-Lin; Su, Ih-Jen; Huang, Wenya

    2011-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide, especially in Asia. HBV induces HCC through multiple oncogenic pathways. Hepatitis-induced hepatocyte inflammation and regeneration stimulates cell proliferation. The interplay between the viral and host factors activates oncogenic signaling pathways and triggers cell transformation. In this review, we summarize previous studies, which reported that HBV induces host genomic instability and that HBV-induced genomic instability is a significant factor that accelerates carcinogenesis. The various types of genomic changes in HBV-induced HCC--chromosomal instability, telomere attrition, and gene-level mutations--are reviewed. In addition, the two viral factors, HBx and the pre-S2 mutant large surface antigen, are discussed for their roles in promoting genomic instability as their main features as viral oncoproteins.

  9. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society.

    PubMed

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H; Brown, Dustin G; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  10. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  11. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society

    PubMed Central

    Langie, Sabine A.S.; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H.; Brown, Dustin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K.; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A.; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome’s integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  12. Affected chromosome homeostasis and genomic instability of clonal yeast cultures.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Yeast cells originating from one single colony are considered genotypically and phenotypically identical. However, taking into account the cellular heterogeneity, it seems also important to monitor cell-to-cell variations within a clone population. In the present study, a comprehensive yeast karyotype screening was conducted using single chromosome comet assay. Chromosome-dependent and mutation-dependent changes in DNA (DNA with breaks or with abnormal replication intermediates) were studied using both single-gene deletion haploid mutants (bub1, bub2, mad1, tel1, rad1 and tor1) and diploid cells lacking one active gene of interest, namely BUB1/bub1, BUB2/bub2, MAD1/mad1, TEL1/tel1, RAD1/rad1 and TOR1/tor1 involved in the control of cell cycle progression, DNA repair and the regulation of longevity. Increased chromosome fragility and replication stress-mediated chromosome abnormalities were correlated with elevated incidence of genomic instability, namely aneuploid events-disomies, monosomies and to a lesser extent trisomies as judged by in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The tor1 longevity mutant with relatively balanced chromosome homeostasis was found the most genomically stable among analyzed mutants. During clonal yeast culture, spontaneously formed abnormal chromosome structures may stimulate changes in the ploidy state and, in turn, promote genomic heterogeneity. These alterations may be more accented in selected mutated genetic backgrounds, namely in yeast cells deficient in proper cell cycle regulation and DNA repair.

  13. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  14. The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L Ullrich; Susan Bailey

    2008-01-17

    The mechanistic role of radiation-induced genomic instability in radiation carcinogenesis is an attractive hypothesis that remains to be rigorously tested. There are few in vivo studies on which to base judgments, but work in our laboratory with mouse models of radiogenic mammary neoplasia provided the first indications that certain forms of genetically predisposed radiation-induced genomic instability may contribute to tumor development. The central goal of this research project is to more firmly establish the mechanistic basis of this radiation-associated genomic instability and, from this, to assess whether such induced instability might play a major role in tumorigenesis at low doses of low LET radiation. In the case of mouse mammary tumors, susceptibility to induced instability is expressed as an autosomal recessive trait in mammary epithelial cells and is manifest largely as excess chromatid damage. Recently published studies associate this form of instability with DNA repair deficiency, polymorphic variation in the gene encoding DNA-PKcs (Prkdc), and mammary associated susceptibility. The underlying hypothesis being tested in this project is that tumor-associated genomic instability is preferentially expressed in certain recombinogenic genomic domains and that these may be cell lineage/individual-specific.

  15. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09207.001 PMID:26374986

  16. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Houvras, Yariv; Rubin, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics. PMID:26374986

  17. SPOP mutation leads to genomic instability in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Gunther; Barbieri, Christopher E; Prandi, Davide; Blattner, Mirjam; Chae, Sung-Suk; Dahija, Arun; Nataraj, Srilakshmi; Huang, Dennis; Marotz, Clarisse; Xu, Limei; Huang, Julie; Lecca, Paola; Chhangawala, Sagar; Liu, Deli; Zhou, Pengbo; Sboner, Andrea; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Houvras, Yariv; Rubin, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer often resulting from impaired genome maintenance. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements are a common mechanism driving tumorigenesis. However, somatic alterations predisposing to chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer remain largely undefined. Here, we show that SPOP, the most commonly mutated gene in primary prostate cancer modulates DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, and that SPOP mutation is associated with genomic instability. In vivo, SPOP mutation results in a transcriptional response consistent with BRCA1 inactivation resulting in impaired homology-directed repair (HDR) of DSB. Furthermore, we found that SPOP mutation sensitizes to DNA damaging therapeutic agents such as PARP inhibitors. These results implicate SPOP as a novel participant in DSB repair, suggest that SPOP mutation drives prostate tumorigenesis in part through genomic instability, and indicate that mutant SPOP may increase response to DNA-damaging therapeutics.

  18. FANCD2 limits replication stress and genome instability in cells lacking BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Michl, Johanna; Zimmer, Jutta; Buffa, Francesca M; McDermott, Ultan; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2016-08-01

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 plays a key role in genome integrity by promoting replication-fork stability and homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair. Here we report that human cancer cells lacking BRCA2 rely on the Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2 to limit replication-fork progression and genomic instability. Our results identify a new role of FANCD2 in limiting constitutive replication stress in BRCA2-deficient cells, thereby affecting cell survival and treatment responses. PMID:27322732

  19. Chromosomal instability, tolerance of mitotic errors and multidrug resistance are promoted by tetraploidization in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Anastasia Y; Seget, Katarzyna; Moeller, Giuliana K; de Pagter, Mirjam S.; de Roos, Jeroen A D M; Dürrbaum, Milena; Kuffer, Christian; Müller, Stefan; Zaman, Guido J R; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Storchová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Up to 80% of human cancers, in particular solid tumors, contain cells with abnormal chromosomal numbers, or aneuploidy, which is often linked with marked chromosomal instability. Whereas in some tumors the aneuploidy occurs by missegregation of one or a few chromosomes, aneuploidy can also arise during proliferation of inherently unstable tetraploid cells generated by whole genome doubling from diploid cells. Recent findings from cancer genome sequencing projects suggest that nearly 40% of tumors underwent whole genome doubling at some point of tumorigenesis, yet its contribution to cancer phenotypes and benefits for malignant growth remain unclear. Here, we investigated the consequences of a whole genome doubling in both cancerous and non-transformed p53 positive human cells. SNP array analysis and multicolor karyotyping revealed that induced whole-genome doubling led to variable aneuploidy. We found that chromosomal instability (CIN) is a frequent, but not a default outcome of whole genome doubling. The CIN phenotypes were accompanied by increased tolerance to mitotic errors that was mediated by suppression of the p53 signaling. Additionally, the expression of pro-apoptotic factors, such as iASPP and cIAP2, was downregulated. Furthermore, we found that whole genome doubling promotes resistance to a broad spectrum of chemotherapeutic drugs and stimulates anchorage-independent growth even in non-transformed p53-positive human cells. Taken together, whole genome doubling provides multifaceted benefits for malignant growth. Our findings provide new insight why genome-doubling promotes tumorigenesis and correlates with poor survival in cancer. PMID:26151317

  20. Mechanisms of genome instability induced by RNA-processing defects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2014-06-01

    The role of normal transcription and RNA processing in maintaining genome integrity is becoming increasingly appreciated in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Several mutations in RNA biogenesis factors have been implicated in human cancers, but the mechanisms and potential connections to tumor genome instability are not clear. Here, we discuss how RNA-processing defects could destabilize genomes through mutagenic R-loop structures and by altering expression of genes required for genome stability. A compelling body of evidence now suggests that researchers should be directly testing these mechanisms in models of human cancer.

  1. Mechanisms of genome instability induced by RNA processing defects

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yujia A.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The role of normal transcription and RNA processing in maintaining genome integrity is becoming increasingly appreciated in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Several mutations in RNA biogenesis factors have been implicated in human cancers, but the mechanisms and potential connections to tumor genome instability are not clear. Here we discuss how RNA processing defects could destabilize genomes through mutagenic R-loop structures and by altering expression of genes required for genome stability. A compelling body of evidence now suggests that researchers should be directly testing these mechanisms in models of human cancer. PMID:24794811

  2. Mechanisms of genome instability induced by RNA-processing defects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yujia A; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2014-06-01

    The role of normal transcription and RNA processing in maintaining genome integrity is becoming increasingly appreciated in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. Several mutations in RNA biogenesis factors have been implicated in human cancers, but the mechanisms and potential connections to tumor genome instability are not clear. Here, we discuss how RNA-processing defects could destabilize genomes through mutagenic R-loop structures and by altering expression of genes required for genome stability. A compelling body of evidence now suggests that researchers should be directly testing these mechanisms in models of human cancer. PMID:24794811

  3. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  4. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  5. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  6. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  7. Genomic and Epigenomic Instability, Fragile Sites, Schizophrenia and Autism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Cassandra L.; Bolton, Andrew; Nguyen, Giang

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence links genomic and epigenomic instability, including multiple fragile sites regions to neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia and autism. Cancer is the only other disease associated with multiple fragile site regions, and genome and epigenomic instability is a characteristic of cancer. Research on cancer is far more advanced than research on neuropsychiatric disease; hence, insight into neuropsychiatric disease may be derived from cancer research results. Towards this end, this article will review the evidence linking schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric diseases (especially autism) to genomic and epigenomic instability, and fragile sites. The results of studies on genetic, epigenetic and environmental components of schizophrenia and autism point to the importance of the folate-methionine-transulfuration metabolic hub that is diseases also perturbed in cancer. The idea that the folate-methionine-transulfuration hub is important in neuropsychiatric is exciting because this hub present novel targets for drug development, suggests some drugs used in cancer may be useful in neuropsychiatric disease, and raises the possibility that nutrition interventions may influence the severity, presentation, or dynamics of disease. PMID:21358990

  8. Genomes on the Edge: Programmed Genome Instability in Ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Bracht, John R.; Fang, Wenwen; Goldman, Aaron David; Dolzhenko, Egor; Stein, Elizabeth M.; Landweber, Laura F.

    2013-01-01

    Ciliates are an ancient and diverse group of microbial eukaryotes that have emerged as powerful models for RNA-mediated epigenetic inheritance. They possess extensive sets of both tiny and long noncoding RNAs that, together with a suite of proteins that includes transposases, orchestrate a broad cascade of genome rearrangements during somatic nuclear development. This Review emphasizes three important themes: the remarkable role of RNA in shaping genome structure, recent discoveries that unify many deeply diverged ciliate genetic systems, and a surprising evolutionary “sign change” in the role of small RNAs between major species groups. PMID:23374338

  9. Histone demethylase JARID1C inactivation triggers genomic instability in sporadic renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rondinelli, Beatrice; Rosano, Dalia; Antonini, Elena; Frenquelli, Michela; Montanini, Laura; Huang, DaChuan; Segalla, Simona; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Amin, Samir B; Lazarevic, Dejan; The, Bin Tean; Verhaak, Roel G W; Futreal, P Andrew; Di Croce, Luciano; Chin, Lynda; Cittaro, Davide; Tonon, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in genes encoding chromatin-remodeling proteins are often identified in a variety of cancers. For example, the histone demethylase JARID1C is frequently inactivated in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC); however, it is largely unknown how JARID1C dysfunction promotes cancer. Here, we determined that JARID1C binds broadly to chromatin domains characterized by the trimethylation of lysine 9 (H3K9me3), which is a histone mark enriched in heterochromatin. Moreover, we found that JARID1C localizes on heterochromatin, is required for heterochromatin replication, and forms a complex with established players of heterochromatin assembly, including SUV39H1 and HP1α, as well as with proteins not previously associated with heterochromatin assembly, such as the cullin 4 (CUL4) complex adaptor protein DDB1. Transcription on heterochromatin is tightly suppressed to safeguard the genome, and in ccRCC cells, JARID1C inactivation led to the unrestrained expression of heterochromatic noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that in turn triggered genomic instability. Moreover, ccRCC patients harboring JARID1C mutations exhibited aberrant ncRNA expression and increased genomic rearrangements compared with ccRCC patients with tumors endowed with other genetic lesions. Together, these data suggest that inactivation of JARID1C in renal cancer leads to heterochromatin disruption, genomic rearrangement, and aggressive ccRCCs. Moreover, our results shed light on a mechanism that underlies genomic instability in sporadic cancers.

  10. Histone demethylase JARID1C inactivation triggers genomic instability in sporadic renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rondinelli, Beatrice; Rosano, Dalia; Antonini, Elena; Frenquelli, Michela; Montanini, Laura; Huang, DaChuan; Segalla, Simona; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Amin, Samir B.; Lazarevic, Dejan; The, Bin Tean; Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Di Croce, Luciano; Chin, Lynda; Cittaro, Davide; Tonon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding chromatin-remodeling proteins are often identified in a variety of cancers. For example, the histone demethylase JARID1C is frequently inactivated in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC); however, it is largely unknown how JARID1C dysfunction promotes cancer. Here, we determined that JARID1C binds broadly to chromatin domains characterized by the trimethylation of lysine 9 (H3K9me3), which is a histone mark enriched in heterochromatin. Moreover, we found that JARID1C localizes on heterochromatin, is required for heterochromatin replication, and forms a complex with established players of heterochromatin assembly, including SUV39H1 and HP1α, as well as with proteins not previously associated with heterochromatin assembly, such as the cullin 4 (CUL4) complex adaptor protein DDB1. Transcription on heterochromatin is tightly suppressed to safeguard the genome, and in ccRCC cells, JARID1C inactivation led to the unrestrained expression of heterochromatic noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that in turn triggered genomic instability. Moreover, ccRCC patients harboring JARID1C mutations exhibited aberrant ncRNA expression and increased genomic rearrangements compared with ccRCC patients with tumors endowed with other genetic lesions. Together, these data suggest that inactivation of JARID1C in renal cancer leads to heterochromatin disruption, genomic rearrangement, and aggressive ccRCCs. Moreover, our results shed light on a mechanism that underlies genomic instability in sporadic cancers. PMID:26551685

  11. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  12. RNA Polymerase Backtracking in Gene Regulation and Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Nudler, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase is a ratchet machine that oscillates between productive and backtracked states at numerous DNA positions. The amount of backtracking (reversible sliding of the enzyme along DNA and RNA) varies from one to many nucleotides. Since its first description 15 years ago, backtracking has been implicated in a plethora of critical processes in bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Here we review the most fundamental roles of this phenomenon in controlling transcription elongation, pausing, termination, fidelity, and genome instability. We also discuss recent progress in understanding the structural and mechanistic properties of the backtracking process. PMID:22726433

  13. Dysregulation of DNA methylation induced by past arsenic treatment causes persistent genomic instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  14. Dysregulation of DNA Methylation Induced by Past Arsenic Treatment Causes Persistent Genomic Instability in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  15. Dysregulation of DNA methylation induced by past arsenic treatment causes persistent genomic instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects.

  16. [Novel bidirectional promoter from human genome].

    PubMed

    Orekhova, A S; Sverdlova, P S; Spirin, P V; Leonova, O G; Popenko, V I; Prasolov, V S; Rubtsov, P M

    2011-01-01

    In human and other mammalian genomes a number of closely linked gene pairs transcribed in opposite directions are found. According to bioinformatic analysis up to 10% of human genes are arranged in this way. In present work the fragment of human genome was cloned that separates genes localized at 2p13.1 and oriented "head-to-head", coding for hypothetical proteins with unknown functions--CCDC (Coiled Coil Domain Containing) 142 and TTC (TetraTricopeptide repeat Containing) 31. Intergenic CCDC142-TTC31 region overlaps with CpG-island and contains a number of potential binding sites for transcription factors. This fragment functions as bidirectional promoter in the system ofluciferase reporter gene expression upon transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. The vectors containing genes of two fluorescent proteins--green (EGFP) and red (DsRed2) in opposite orientations separated by the fragment of CCDC142-TTC31 intergenic region were constructed. In HEK293 cells transfected with these vectors simultaneous expression of two fluorescent proteins is observed. Truncated versions of intergenic region were obtained and their promoter activity measured. Minimal promoter fragment contains elements Inr, BRE, DPE characteristic for TATA-less promoters. Thus, from the human genome the novel bidirectional promoter was cloned that can be used for simultaneous constitutive expression of two genes in human cells.

  17. [Novel bidirectional promoter from human genome].

    PubMed

    Orekhova, A S; Sverdlova, P S; Spirin, P V; Leonova, O G; Popenko, V I; Prasolov, V S; Rubtsov, P M

    2011-01-01

    In human and other mammalian genomes a number of closely linked gene pairs transcribed in opposite directions are found. According to bioinformatic analysis up to 10% of human genes are arranged in this way. In present work the fragment of human genome was cloned that separates genes localized at 2p13.1 and oriented "head-to-head", coding for hypothetical proteins with unknown functions--CCDC (Coiled Coil Domain Containing) 142 and TTC (TetraTricopeptide repeat Containing) 31. Intergenic CCDC142-TTC31 region overlaps with CpG-island and contains a number of potential binding sites for transcription factors. This fragment functions as bidirectional promoter in the system ofluciferase reporter gene expression upon transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. The vectors containing genes of two fluorescent proteins--green (EGFP) and red (DsRed2) in opposite orientations separated by the fragment of CCDC142-TTC31 intergenic region were constructed. In HEK293 cells transfected with these vectors simultaneous expression of two fluorescent proteins is observed. Truncated versions of intergenic region were obtained and their promoter activity measured. Minimal promoter fragment contains elements Inr, BRE, DPE characteristic for TATA-less promoters. Thus, from the human genome the novel bidirectional promoter was cloned that can be used for simultaneous constitutive expression of two genes in human cells. PMID:21790010

  18. Analysis of genomic instability in bronchial cells from uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Neft, R.E.; Belinsky, S.A.; Gilliland, F.D.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Epidemiological studies show that underground uranium miners have a radon progeny exposure-dependent increased risk for developing lung cancer. The odds ratio for lung cancer in uranium miners increase for all cumulative exposures above 99 Working Level Months. In addition, there is a strong multiplicative effect of cigarette smoking on the development of lung cancer in uranium miners. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether or not early genetic changes, as indicated by genomic instability, can be detected in bronchial cells from uranium miners. Investigations of this nature may serve as a means of discovering sub-clinical disease and could lead to earlier detection of lung cancer and a better prognosis for the patient.

  19. p53 protects against genome instability following centriole duplication failure.

    PubMed

    Lambrus, Bramwell G; Uetake, Yumi; Clutario, Kevin M; Daggubati, Vikas; Snyder, Michael; Sluder, Greenfield; Holland, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    Centriole function has been difficult to study because of a lack of specific tools that allow persistent and reversible centriole depletion. Here we combined gene targeting with an auxin-inducible degradation system to achieve rapid, titratable, and reversible control of Polo-like kinase 4 (Plk4), a master regulator of centriole biogenesis. Depletion of Plk4 led to a failure of centriole duplication that produced an irreversible cell cycle arrest within a few divisions. This arrest was not a result of a prolonged mitosis, chromosome segregation errors, or cytokinesis failure. Depleting p53 allowed cells that fail centriole duplication to proliferate indefinitely. Washout of auxin and restoration of endogenous Plk4 levels in cells that lack centrioles led to the penetrant formation of de novo centrioles that gained the ability to organize microtubules and duplicate. In summary, we uncover a p53-dependent surveillance mechanism that protects against genome instability by preventing cell growth after centriole duplication failure.

  20. Tying up loose ends: telomeres, genomic instability and lamins.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Susana; Eissenberg, Joel C

    2016-04-01

    On casual inspection, the eukaryotic nucleus is a deceptively simple organelle. Far from being a bag of chromatin, the nucleus is, in some ways, a structural and functional extension of the chromosomes it contains. Recently, interest has intensified in how chromosome compartmentalization and dynamics affect nuclear function. Different studies uncovered functional interactions between chromosomes and the filamentous nuclear meshwork comprised of lamin proteins. Here, we summarize recent research suggesting that telomeres, the capping structures that protect chromosome ends, are stabilized by lamin-binding and that alterations in nuclear lamins lead to defects in telomere compartmentalization, homeostasis and function. Telomere dysfunction contributes to the genomic instability that characterizes aging-related diseases, and might be an important factor in the pathophysiology of lamin-related diseases. PMID:27010504

  1. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Engelward, Bevin P

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  2. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability.

  3. A Genome-Wide Survey of Genetic Instability by Transposition in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Doris; Fontdevila, Antonio; Vieira, Cristina; García Guerreiro, María Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization between species is a genomic instability factor involved in increasing mutation rate and new chromosomal rearrangements. Evidence of a relationship between interspecific hybridization and transposable element mobilization has been reported in different organisms, but most studies are usually performed with particular TEs and do not discuss the real effect of hybridization on the whole genome. We have therefore studied whole genome instability of Drosophila interspecific hybrids, looking for the presence of new AFLP markers in hybrids. A high percentage (27–90%) of the instability markers detected corresponds to TEs belonging to classes I and II. Moreover, three transposable elements (Osvaldo, Helena and Galileo) representative of different families, showed an overall increase of transposition rate in hybrids compared to parental species. This research confirms the hypothesis that hybridization induces genomic instability by transposition bursts and suggests that genomic stress by transposition could contribute to a relaxation of mechanisms controlling TEs in the Drosophila genome. PMID:24586475

  4. Metabolic and Environmental Conditions Determine Nuclear Genomic Instability in Budding Yeast Lacking Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dirick, Léon; Bendris, Walid; Loubiere, Vincent; Gostan, Thierry; Gueydon, Elisabeth; Schwob, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are an internal cause of nuclear genome instability. Because mitochondria are key regulators of cellular metabolism, we have investigated a potential link between external growth conditions and nuclear chromosome instability in cells with mitochondrial defects. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (rho0 cells) have a unique feature, with nuclear chromosome instability that occurs in nondividing cells and strongly fluctuates depending on the cellular environment. Calorie restriction, lower growth temperatures, growth at alkaline pH, antioxidants (NAC, Tiron), or presence of nearby wild-type cells all efficiently stabilize nuclear genomes of rho0 cells, whereas high glucose and ethanol boost instability. In contrast, other respiratory mutants that still possess mitochondrial DNA (RHO+) keep fairly constant instability rates under the same growth conditions, like wild-type or other RHO+ controls. Our data identify mitochondrial defects as an important driver of nuclear genome instability influenced by environmental factors. PMID:24374640

  5. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  6. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  7. BLM protein mitigates formaldehyde-induced genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anuradha; Owen, Nichole; Juarez, Eleonora; McCullough, Amanda K.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a reactive aldehyde that has been classified as a class I human carcinogen by the International Agency for Cancer Research. There are growing concerns over the possible adverse health effects related to the occupational and environmental human exposures to formaldehyde. Although formaldehyde-induced DNA and protein adducts have been identified, the genomic instability mechanisms and the cellular tolerance pathways associated with formaldehyde exposure are not fully characterized. This study specifically examines the role of a genome stability protein, Bloom (BLM) in limiting formaldehyde-induced cellular and genetic abnormalities. Here, we show that in the absence of BLM protein, formaldehyde-treated cells exhibited increased cellular sensitivity, an immediate cell cycle arrest, and an accumulation of chromosome radial structures. In addition, live-cell imaging experiments demonstrated that formaldehyde-treated cells are dependent on BLM for timely segregation of daughter cells. Both wild-type and BLM-deficient formaldehyde-treated cells showed an accumulation of 53BP1 and γH2AX foci indicative of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, relative to wild-type cells, the BLM-deficient cells exhibited delayed repair. In response to formaldehyde exposure, we observed co-localization of 53BP1 and BLM foci at the DSB repair site, where ATM-dependent accumulation of formaldehyde-induced BLM foci occurred after the recruitment of 53BP1. Together, these findings highlight the significance of functional interactions among ATM, 53BP1, and BLM proteins as responders associated with the repair and tolerance mechanisms induced by formaldehyde. PMID:25770783

  8. Dioxin induces genomic instability in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Korkalainen, Merja; Huumonen, Katriina; Naarala, Jonne; Viluksela, Matti; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation and certain other exposures have been shown to induce genomic instability (GI), i.e., delayed genetic damage observed many cell generations later in the progeny of the exposed cells. The aim of this study was to investigate induction of GI by a nongenotoxic carcinogen, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (C3H10T1/2) were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 nM TCDD for 2 days. Micronuclei (MN) and expression of selected cancer-related genes were assayed both immediately and at a delayed point in time (8 days). For comparison, similar experiments were done with cadmium, a known genotoxic agent. TCDD treatment induced an elevated frequency of MN at 8 days, but not directly after the exposure. TCDD-induced alterations in gene expression were also mostly delayed, with more changes observed at 8 days than at 2 days. Exposure to cadmium produced an opposite pattern of responses, with pronounced effects immediately after exposure but no increase in MN and few gene expression changes at 8 days. Although all responses to TCDD alone were delayed, menadione-induced DNA damage (measured by the Comet assay), was found to be increased directly after a 2-day TCDD exposure, indicating that the stability of the genome was compromised already at this time point. The results suggested a flat dose-response relationship consistent with dose-response data reported for radiation-induced GI. These findings indicate that TCDD, although not directly genotoxic, induces GI, which is associated with impaired DNA damage response.

  9. BLM protein mitigates formaldehyde-induced genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anuradha; Owen, Nichole; Juarez, Eleonora; McCullough, Amanda K

    2015-04-01

    Formaldehyde is a reactive aldehyde that has been classified as a class I human carcinogen by the International Agency for Cancer Research. There are growing concerns over the possible adverse health effects related to the occupational and environmental human exposures to formaldehyde. Although formaldehyde-induced DNA and protein adducts have been identified, the genomic instability mechanisms and the cellular tolerance pathways associated with formaldehyde exposure are not fully characterized. This study specifically examines the role of a genome stability protein, Bloom (BLM) in limiting formaldehyde-induced cellular and genetic abnormalities. Here, we show that in the absence of BLM protein, formaldehyde-treated cells exhibited increased cellular sensitivity, an immediate cell cycle arrest, and an accumulation of chromosome radial structures. In addition, live-cell imaging experiments demonstrated that formaldehyde-treated cells are dependent on BLM for timely segregation of daughter cells. Both wild-type and BLM-deficient formaldehyde-treated cells showed an accumulation of 53BP1 and γH2AX foci indicative of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, relative to wild-type cells, the BLM-deficient cells exhibited delayed repair of formaldehyde-induced DSBs. In response to formaldehyde exposure, we observed co-localization of 53BP1 and BLM foci at the DSB repair site, where ATM-dependent accumulation of formaldehyde-induced BLM foci occurred after the recruitment of 53BP1. Together, these findings highlight the significance of functional interactions among ATM, 53BP1, and BLM proteins as responders associated with the repair and tolerance mechanisms induced by formaldehyde.

  10. Genomic instability of gold nanoparticle treated human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jasmine J; Lo, Soo-Ling; Ng, Cheng-Teng; Gurung, Resham Lal; Hartono, Deny; Hande, Manoor Prakash; Ong, Choon-Nam; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2011-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are one of the most versatile and widely researched materials for novel biomedical applications. However, the current knowledge in their toxicological profile is still incomplete and many on-going investigations aim to understand the potential adverse effects in human body. Here, we employed two dimensional gel electrophoresis to perform a comparative proteomic analysis of AuNP treated MRC-5 lung fibroblast cells. In our findings, we identified 16 proteins that were differentially expressed in MRC-5 lung fibroblasts following exposure to AuNPs. Their expression levels were also verified by western blotting and real time RT-PCR analysis. Of interest was the difference in the oxidative stress related proteins (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDUFS1), protein disulfide isomerase associate 3 (PDIA3), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleus protein C1/C2 (hnRNP C1/C2) and thioredoxin-like protein 1 (TXNL1)) as well as proteins associated with cell cycle regulation, cytoskeleton and DNA repair (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleus protein C1/C2 (hnRNP C1/C2) and Secernin-1 (SCN1)). This finding is consistent with the genotoxicity observed in the AuNP treated lung fibroblasts. These results suggest that AuNP treatment can induce oxidative stress-mediated genomic instability.

  11. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability.

    PubMed

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2012-03-15

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA-protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA-protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability.

  12. Ubiquitinated Fancd2 recruits Fan1 to stalled replication forks to prevent genome instability.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christophe; Moreno, Alberto; Marchesi, Francesco; Toth, Rachel; Blow, J Julian; Rouse, John

    2016-02-19

    Mono-ubiquitination of Fancd2 is essential for repairing DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The Fan1 nuclease, also required for ICL repair, is recruited to ICLs by ubiquitinated (Ub) Fancd2. This could in principle explain how Ub-Fancd2 promotes ICL repair, but we show that recruitment of Fan1 by Ub-Fancd2 is dispensable for ICL repair. Instead, Fan1 recruitment--and activity--restrains DNA replication fork progression and prevents chromosome abnormalities from occurring when DNA replication forks stall, even in the absence of ICLs. Accordingly, Fan1 nuclease-defective knockin mice are cancer-prone. Moreover, we show that a Fan1 variant in high-risk pancreatic cancers abolishes recruitment by Ub-Fancd2 and causes genetic instability without affecting ICL repair. Therefore, Fan1 recruitment enables processing of stalled forks that is essential for genome stability and health.

  13. Ubiquitinated Fancd2 recruits Fan1 to stalled replication forks to prevent genome instability.

    PubMed

    Lachaud, Christophe; Moreno, Alberto; Marchesi, Francesco; Toth, Rachel; Blow, J Julian; Rouse, John

    2016-02-19

    Mono-ubiquitination of Fancd2 is essential for repairing DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The Fan1 nuclease, also required for ICL repair, is recruited to ICLs by ubiquitinated (Ub) Fancd2. This could in principle explain how Ub-Fancd2 promotes ICL repair, but we show that recruitment of Fan1 by Ub-Fancd2 is dispensable for ICL repair. Instead, Fan1 recruitment--and activity--restrains DNA replication fork progression and prevents chromosome abnormalities from occurring when DNA replication forks stall, even in the absence of ICLs. Accordingly, Fan1 nuclease-defective knockin mice are cancer-prone. Moreover, we show that a Fan1 variant in high-risk pancreatic cancers abolishes recruitment by Ub-Fancd2 and causes genetic instability without affecting ICL repair. Therefore, Fan1 recruitment enables processing of stalled forks that is essential for genome stability and health. PMID:26797144

  14. DNA repair defects and genome instability in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2015-06-01

    The integrity of the nuclear lamina has emerged as an important factor in the maintenance of genome stability. In particular, mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins (lamin A/C), alter nuclear morphology and function, and cause genomic instability. LMNA gene mutations are associated with a variety of degenerative diseases and devastating premature aging syndromes such as Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) and Restrictive Dermopathy (RD). HGPS is a severe laminopathy, with patients dying in their teens from myocardial infarction or stroke. HGPS patient-derived cells exhibit nuclear shape abnormalities, changes in epigenetic regulation and gene expression, telomere shortening, genome instability, and premature senescence. This review highlights recent advances in identifying molecular mechanisms that contribute to the pathophysiology of HGPS, with a special emphasis on DNA repair defects and genome instability.

  15. Limiting replication stress during somatic cell reprogramming reduces genomic instability in induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J.; Gabut, Mathieu; Marion, Rosa M.; Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Bua, Sabela; Ramirez, Oscar; Olalde, Iñigo; Rodrigo-Perez, Sara; Li, Han; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Serrano, Manuel; Blasco, Maria A.; Batada, Nizar N.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from adult somatic cells is one of the most remarkable discoveries in recent decades. However, several works have reported evidence of genomic instability in iPSC, raising concerns on their biomedical use. The reasons behind the genomic instability observed in iPSC remain mostly unknown. Here we show that, similar to the phenomenon of oncogene-induced replication stress, the expression of reprogramming factors induces replication stress. Increasing the levels of the checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) reduces reprogramming-induced replication stress and increases the efficiency of iPSC generation. Similarly, nucleoside supplementation during reprogramming reduces the load of DNA damage and genomic rearrangements on iPSC. Our data reveal that lowering replication stress during reprogramming, genetically or chemically, provides a simple strategy to reduce genomic instability on mouse and human iPSC. PMID:26292731

  16. Chronic p53-independent p21 expression causes genomic instability by deregulating replication licensing.

    PubMed

    Galanos, Panagiotis; Vougas, Konstantinos; Walter, David; Polyzos, Alexander; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Haagensen, Emma J; Kokkalis, Antonis; Roumelioti, Fani-Marlen; Gagos, Sarantis; Tzetis, Maria; Canovas, Begoña; Igea, Ana; Ahuja, Akshay K; Zellweger, Ralph; Havaki, Sofia; Kanavakis, Emanuel; Kletsas, Dimitris; Roninson, Igor B; Garbis, Spiros D; Lopes, Massimo; Nebreda, Angel; Thanos, Dimitris; Blow, J Julian; Townsend, Paul; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Bartek, Jiri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G

    2016-07-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1) (p21) is a cell-cycle checkpoint effector and inducer of senescence, regulated by p53. Yet, evidence suggests that p21 could also be oncogenic, through a mechanism that has so far remained obscure. We report that a subset of atypical cancerous cells strongly expressing p21 showed proliferation features. This occurred predominantly in p53-mutant human cancers, suggesting p53-independent upregulation of p21 selectively in more aggressive tumour cells. Multifaceted phenotypic and genomic analyses of p21-inducible, p53-null, cancerous and near-normal cellular models showed that after an initial senescence-like phase, a subpopulation of p21-expressing proliferating cells emerged, featuring increased genomic instability, aggressiveness and chemoresistance. Mechanistically, sustained p21 accumulation inhibited mainly the CRL4-CDT2 ubiquitin ligase, leading to deregulated origin licensing and replication stress. Collectively, our data reveal the tumour-promoting ability of p21 through deregulation of DNA replication licensing machinery-an unorthodox role to be considered in cancer treatment, since p21 responds to various stimuli including some chemotherapy drugs. PMID:27323328

  17. Genomic instability in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a new step towards precision medicine and novel therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Lowery, Maeve A; Stadler, Zsofia K; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kelsen, David P; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most challenging cancers. Whole genome sequencing studies have been conducted to elucidate the underlying fundamentals underscoring disease behavior. Studies have identified a subgroup of pancreatic cancer patients with distinct molecular and clinical features. Genetic fingerprinting of these tumors is consistent with an unstable genome and defective DNA repair pathways, which creates unique susceptibility to agents inducing DNA damage. BRCA1/2 mutations, both germline and somatic, which lead to impaired DNA repair, are found to be important biomarkers of genomic instability as well as of response to DNA damaging agents. Recent studies have elucidated that PARP inhibitors and platinum agents may be effective to induce tumor regression in solid tumors bearing an unstable genome including pancreatic cancer. In this review we discuss the characteristics of genomic instability in pancreatic cancer along with its clinical implications and the utility of DNA targeting agents particularly PARP inhibitors as a novel treatment approach. PMID:26881472

  18. Association of genomic instability, and the methylation status of imprinted genes and mismatch-repair genes, with neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Yuanyuan; Ouyang, Shengrong; Chang, Huibo; Zhang, Ting; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Jianxin

    2012-05-01

    We studied the genomic instability and methylation status of the mismatch-repair (MMR) genes hMLH1 and hMSH2, and the imprinted genes H19/IGF2, in fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) to explore the pathogenesis of the disease. Microsatellite instability (MSI) was observed in 23 of 50 NTD patients. Five NTD patients showed high-degree MSI (MSI-H) and 18 showed low-degree MSI (MSI-L). The frequencies of mutated microsatellite loci were 3/50 (6%) for BatT-25, 10/50 (20%) for Bat-26, 3/50 (6%) for Bat34C4, 6/50 (12%) for D2S123, 4/50 (8%) for D2S119, and 3/50 (6%) for D3S1611. The promoter regions of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes were unmethylated in NTD patients, as determined by methylation-specific PCR. The hMLH1 and hMSH2 promoter methylation patterns, the methylation levels of H19 DMR1, and IGF2 DMR0 were detected by bisulfite sequencing PCR, sub-cloning, and sequencing. The hMSH2 promoter sequence was unmethylated, and the hMLH1 promoter showed a specific methylation pattern at two CpG sites. The methylation levels of H19 DMR1 in the NTD and control groups are 73.3% ± 15.9 and 58.3% ± 11.2, respectively. The methylation level of the NTD group was higher than that of the control group (Student's t-test, P<0.05). There is no significant difference in IGF2 DMR0 methylation level between the two groups. All of the results presented here suggest that genomic instability, the MMR system, and hyper-methylation of the H19 DMR1 may be correlated with the occurrence of NTDs.

  19. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  20. G-rich proto-oncogenes are targeted for genomic instability in B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Michelle L; Huber, Michael D; Maizels, Nancy

    2007-03-15

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common lymphoid malignancy in adults. It is a heterogeneous disease with variability in outcome. Genomic instability of a subset of proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC, BCL6, RhoH, PIM1, and PAX5, can contribute to initial tumor development and has been correlated with poor prognosis and aggressive tumor growth. Lymphomas in which these proto-oncogenes are unstable derive from germinal center B cells that express activation-induced deaminase (AID), the B-cell-specific factor that deaminates DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification. Proto-oncogene instability is evident as both aberrant hypermutation and translocation, paralleling programmed instability which diversifies the immunoglobulin loci. We have asked if genomic sequence correlates with instability in AID-positive B-cell lymphomas. We show that instability does not correlate with enrichment of the WRC sequence motif that is the consensus for deamination by AID. Instability does correlate with G-richness, evident as multiple runs of the base guanine on the nontemplate DNA strand. Extending previous analysis of c-MYC, we show experimentally that transcription of BCL6 and RhoH induces formation of structures, G-loops, which contain single-stranded regions targeted by AID. We further show that G-richness does not characterize translocation breakpoints in AID-negative B- and T-cell malignancies. These results identify G-richness as one feature of genomic structure that can contribute to genomic instability in AID-positive B-cell malignancies.

  1. A novel mechanism inducing genome instability in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brian R; Noerenberg, Marko; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with multiple AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV has a biphasic life cycle and both the lytic and latent phases are required for tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that KSHV lytic replication can cause genome instability in KSHV-infected cells, although no mechanism has thus far been described. A surprising link has recently been suggested between mRNA export, genome instability and cancer development. Notably, aberrations in the cellular transcription and export complex (hTREX) proteins have been identified in high-grade tumours and these defects contribute to genome instability. We have previously shown that the lytically expressed KSHV ORF57 protein interacts with the complete hTREX complex; therefore, we investigated the possible intriguing link between ORF57, hTREX and KSHV-induced genome instability. Herein, we show that lytically active KSHV infected cells induce a DNA damage response and, importantly, we demonstrate directly that this is due to DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, we show that sequestration of the hTREX complex by the KSHV ORF57 protein leads to this double strand break response and significant DNA damage. Moreover, we describe a novel mechanism showing that the genetic instability observed is a consequence of R-loop formation. Importantly, the link between hTREX sequestration and DNA damage may be a common feature in herpesvirus infection, as a similar phenotype was observed with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP27 protein. Our data provide a model of R-loop induced DNA damage in KSHV infected cells and describes a novel system for studying genome instability caused by aberrant hTREX. PMID:24788796

  2. A Novel Mechanism Inducing Genome Instability in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Brian R.; Noerenberg, Marko; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with multiple AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV has a biphasic life cycle and both the lytic and latent phases are required for tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that KSHV lytic replication can cause genome instability in KSHV-infected cells, although no mechanism has thus far been described. A surprising link has recently been suggested between mRNA export, genome instability and cancer development. Notably, aberrations in the cellular transcription and export complex (hTREX) proteins have been identified in high-grade tumours and these defects contribute to genome instability. We have previously shown that the lytically expressed KSHV ORF57 protein interacts with the complete hTREX complex; therefore, we investigated the possible intriguing link between ORF57, hTREX and KSHV-induced genome instability. Herein, we show that lytically active KSHV infected cells induce a DNA damage response and, importantly, we demonstrate directly that this is due to DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, we show that sequestration of the hTREX complex by the KSHV ORF57 protein leads to this double strand break response and significant DNA damage. Moreover, we describe a novel mechanism showing that the genetic instability observed is a consequence of R-loop formation. Importantly, the link between hTREX sequestration and DNA damage may be a common feature in herpesvirus infection, as a similar phenotype was observed with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP27 protein. Our data provide a model of R-loop induced DNA damage in KSHV infected cells and describes a novel system for studying genome instability caused by aberrant hTREX. PMID:24788796

  3. New type of genome instability in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Georgiev, P.G.; Simonova, O.B.; Gerasimova, T.I.

    1988-11-01

    During crossing of two stable laboratory lines, y/sup 2/sc/sup 1w/sup aG// and Df(1)Pgd-kz/FM4, y/sup 31d/sc/sup 8/dm B, consistent instability originated reproducibly in progeny containing a y/sup 2/sc/sup 1/w/sup aG/ chromosome and autosomes of both lines. It is expressed in active mutagenesis observed over the course of several tens of generations. Destabilization occurs independently of direction of crossing. Mutagenesis occurs both in somatic and in sex cells of males and females. It displays high locus specificity. A transpositional nature was shown for at least some of the mutations. Results of the experiments concerning hybridization in situ with different mobile elements indicates an absence or low frequency of tranpositional bursts in the system. Possible mechanisms of induction of genetic instability in the system described are discussed.

  4. Heavy ions, radioprotectors and genomic instability: implications for human space exploration.

    PubMed

    Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E

    2010-08-01

    The risk associated with space radiation exposure is unique from terrestrial radiation exposures due to differences in radiation quality, including linear energy transfer (LET). Both high- and low-LET radiations are capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells, and this instability is thought to be a driving force underlying radiation carcinogenesis. Unfortunately, during space exploration, flight crews cannot entirely avoid radiation exposure. As a result, chemical and biological countermeasures will be an important component of successful extended missions such as the exploration of Mars. There are currently several radioprotective agents (radioprotectors) in use; however, scientists continue to search for ideal radioprotective compounds-safe to use and effective in preventing and/or reducing acute and delayed effects of irradiation. This review discusses the agents that are currently available or being evaluated for their potential as radioprotectors. Further, this review discusses some implications of radioprotection for the induction and/or propagation of genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells.

  5. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Wu, L. J.; Willey, J. C.; Hall, E. J.

    1998-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/μm alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions.

  6. Conditional Coalescent Trees With Two Mutation Rates and Their Application to Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Emily, Mathieu; François, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    Humans have invested several genes in DNA repair and fidelity replication. To account for the disparity between the rarity of mutations in normal cells and the large number of mutations present in cancer, an hypothesis is that cancer cells must exhibit a mutator phenotype (genomic instability) during tumor progression, with the initiation of abnormal mutation rates caused by the loss of mismatch repair. In this study we introduce a stochastic model of mutation in tumor cells with the aim of estimating the amount of genomic instability due to the alteration of DNA repair genes. Our approach took into account the difficulties generated by sampling within tumoral clones and the fact that these clones must be difficult to isolate. We provide corrections to two classical statistics to obtain unbiased estimators of the raised mutation rate, and we show that large statistical errors may be associated with such estimators. The power of these new statistics to reject genomic instability is assessed and proved to increase with the intensity of mutation rates. In addition, we show that genomic instability cannot be detected unless the raised mutation rates exceed the normal rates by a factor of at least 1000. PMID:16387889

  7. BYSTANDER EFFECTS GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIAION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    BYSTANDER EFFECTS, GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIATION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    R. Julian Preston
    Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27711, USA

    There ...

  8. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-Dose
    Cancer Responses
    .
    There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellular
    responses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  9. Suppression of genome instability in pRB-deficient cells by enhancement of chromosome cohesion.

    PubMed

    Manning, Amity L; Yazinski, Stephanie A; Nicolay, Brandon; Bryll, Alysia; Zou, Lee; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2014-03-20

    Chromosome instability (CIN), a common feature of solid tumors, promotes tumor evolution and increases drug resistance during therapy. We previously demonstrated that loss of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) tumor suppressor causes changes in centromere structure and generates CIN. However, the mechanism and significance of this change was unclear. Here, we show that defects in cohesion are key to the pRB loss phenotype. pRB loss alters H4K20 methylation, a prerequisite for efficient establishment of cohesion at centromeres. Changes in cohesin regulation are evident during S phase, where they compromise replication and increase DNA damage. Ultimately, such changes compromise mitotic fidelity following pRB loss. Remarkably, increasing cohesion suppressed all of these phenotypes and dramatically reduced CIN in cancer cells lacking functional pRB. These data explain how loss of pRB undermines genomic integrity. Given the frequent functional inactivation of pRB in cancer, conditions that increase cohesion may provide a general strategy to suppress CIN.

  10. Characterization of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and engaging teaching strategies described in two curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alexandra P.

    Cancer arises through an accumulation of mutations in the genome. In cancer cells, mutations are frequently caused by DNA rearrangements, which include chromosomal breakages, deletions, insertions, and translocations. Such events contribute to genomic instability, a known hallmark of cancer. To study cycles of chromosomal instability, we are using baker's yeast as a model organism. In yeast, a ChrVII system was previously developed (Admire et al., 2006), in which a disomic yeast strain was used to identify regions of instability on ChrVII. Using this system, a fragile site on the left arm of ChrVII (Admire et al., 2006) was identified and characterized. This study led to insight into mechanisms involved in chromosomal rearrangements and mutations that arise from them as well as to an understanding of mechanisms involved in genomic instability. To further our understanding of genomic instability, I devised a strategy to study instability on a different chromosome (ChrV) (Figure 3), so that we could determine whether lessons learned from the ChrVII system are applicable to other chromosomes, and/or whether other mechanisms of instability could be identified. A suitable strain was generated and analyzed, and our findings suggest that frequencies of instability on the right arm of ChrV are similar to those found in ChrVII. The results from the work in ChrV described in this paper support the idea that the instability found on ChrVII is not an isolated occurrence. My research was supported by an NSF GK-12 grant. The aim of this grant is to improve science education in middle schools, and as part of my participation in this program, I studied and practiced effective science communication methodologies. In attempts to explain my research to middle school students, I collaborated with others to develop methods for explaining genetics and the most important techniques I used in my research. While developing these methods, I learned more about what motivates people to learn

  11. Whole Chromosome Instability induces senescence and promotes SASP

    PubMed Central

    Andriani, Grasiella Angelina; Almeida, Vinnycius Pereira; Faggioli, Francesca; Mauro, Maurizio; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Santambrogio, Laura; Maslov, Alexander; Gadina, Massimo; Campisi, Judith; Vijg, Jan; Montagna, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Age-related accumulation of ploidy changes is associated with decreased expression of genes controlling chromosome segregation and cohesin functions. To determine the consequences of whole chromosome instability (W-CIN) we down-regulated the spindle assembly checkpoint component BUB1 and the mitotic cohesin SMC1A, and used four-color-interphase-FISH coupled with BrdU incorporation and analyses of senescence features to reveal the fate of W-CIN cells. We observed significant correlations between levels of not-diploid cells and senescence-associated features (SAFs). W-CIN induced DNA double strand breaks and elevated oxidative stress, but caused low apoptosis. SAFs of W-CIN cells were remarkably similar to those induced by replicative senescence but occurred in only 13 days versus 4 months. Cultures enriched with not-diploid cells acquired a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) characterized by IL1B, CXCL8, CCL2, TNF, CCL27 and other pro-inflammatory factors including a novel SASP component CLEC11A. These findings suggest that W-CIN triggers premature senescence, presumably to prevent the propagation of cells with an abnormal DNA content. Cells deviating from diploidy have the ability to communicate with their microenvironment by secretion of an array of signaling factors. Our results suggest that aneuploid cells that accumulate during aging in some mammalian tissues potentially contribute to age-related pathologies and inflammation through SASP secretion. PMID:27731420

  12. Opposite Roles for p38MAPK-Driven Responses and Reactive Oxygen Species in the Persistence and Resolution of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Erica; Wang, Huichen; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    We report the functional and temporal relationship between cellular phenotypes such as oxidative stress, p38MAPK-dependent responses and genomic instability persisting in the progeny of cells exposed to sparsely ionizing low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation such as X-rays or high-charge and high-energy (HZE) particle high-LET radiation such as 56Fe ions. We found that exposure to low and high-LET radiation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels as a threshold-like response induced independently of radiation quality and dose. This response was sustained for two weeks, which is the period of time when genomic instability is evidenced by increased micronucleus formation frequency and DNA damage associated foci. Indicators for another persisting response sharing phenotypes with stress-induced senescence, including beta galactosidase induction, increased nuclear size, p38MAPK activation and IL-8 production, were induced in the absence of cell proliferation arrest during the first, but not the second week following exposure to high-LET radiation. This response was driven by a p38MAPK-dependent mechanism and was affected by radiation quality and dose. This stress response and elevation of ROS affected genomic instability by distinct pathways. Through interference with p38MAPK activity, we show that radiation-induced stress phenotypes promote genomic instability. In contrast, exposure to physiologically relevant doses of hydrogen peroxide or increasing endogenous ROS levels with a catalase inhibitor reduced the level of genomic instability. Our results implicate persistently elevated ROS following exposure to radiation as a factor contributing to genome stabilization. PMID:25271419

  13. How dormant origins promote complete genome replication.

    PubMed

    Blow, J Julian; Ge, Xin Quan; Jackson, Dean A

    2011-08-01

    Many replication origins that are licensed by loading MCM2-7 complexes in G1 are not normally used. Activation of these dormant origins during S phase provides a first line of defence for the genome if replication is inhibited. When replication forks fail, dormant origins are activated within regions of the genome currently engaged in replication. At the same time, DNA damage-response kinases activated by the stalled forks preferentially suppress the assembly of new replication factories, thereby ensuring that chromosomal regions experiencing replicative stress complete synthesis before new regions of the genome are replicated. Mice expressing reduced levels of MCM2-7 have fewer dormant origins, are cancer-prone and are genetically unstable, demonstrating the importance of dormant origins for preserving genome integrity. We review the function of dormant origins, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and their physiological implications.

  14. Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene accelerates DNA replication fork elongation and promotes genetic instability in the absence of DNA breakage.

    PubMed

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Komatsu, Jun; Hupé, Philippe; Roulin, Christophe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Dutreix, Marie; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Bensimon, Aaron; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Guillouf, Christel

    2010-09-01

    The multistage process of cancer formation is driven by the progressive acquisition of somatic mutations. Replication stress creates genomic instability in mammals. Using a well-defined multistep leukemia model driven by Spi-1/PU.1 overexpression in the mouse and Spi-1/PU.1-overexpressing human leukemic cells, we investigated the relationship between DNA replication and cancer progression. Here, using DNA molecular combing and flow cytometry methods, we show that Spi-1 increases the speed of replication by acting specifically on elongation rather than enhancing origin firing. This shortens the S-phase duration. Combining data from Spi-1 knockdown in murine cells with Spi-1 overexpression in human cells, we provide evidence that inappropriate Spi-1 expression is directly responsible for the replication alteration observed. Importantly, the acceleration of replication progression coincides with an increase in the frequency of genomic mutations without inducing DNA breakage. Thus, we propose that the hitherto unsuspected role for spi-1 oncogene in promoting replication elongation and genomic mutation promotes blastic progression during leukemic development.

  15. Genomic instability in human lymphoid cells exposed to 1 GeV/amu Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosovsky, A.; Bethel, H.; Parks, K.; Ritter, L.; Giver, C.; Gauny, S.; Wiese, C.; Kronenberg, A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess whether charged particle radiations of importance to spaceflight elicit genomic instability in human TK6 lymphoblasts. The incidence of genomic instability in TK6 cells was assessed 21 days after exposure to 2, 4, or 6 Fe ions (1 GeV/amu, LET= 146 keV/micrometers). Three indices of instability were used: intraclonal karyotypic heterogeneity, mutation rate analysis at the thymidine kinase (TK1) locus, and re-cloning efficiency. Fifteen of sixty clones demonstrated karyotypic heterogeneity. Five clones had multiple indicators of karyotypic change. One clone was markedly hypomutable and polyploid. Six clones were hypomutable, while 21 clones were mutators. Of these, seven were karyotypically unstable. Six clones had low re-cloning efficiencies, one of which was a mutator. All had normal karyotypes. In summary, many clones that survived exposure to a low fluence of Fe ions manifested one or more forms of genomic instability that may hasten the development of neoplasia through deletion or by recombination.

  16. High variability of genomic instability and gene expression profiling in different HeLa clones

    PubMed Central

    Frattini, Annalisa; Fabbri, Marco; Valli, Roberto; De Paoli, Elena; Montalbano, Giuseppe; Gribaldo, Laura; Pasquali, Francesco; Maserati, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    The HeLa cell line is one of the most popular cell lines in biomedical research, despite its well-known chromosomal instability. We compared the genomic and transcriptomic profiles of 4 different HeLa batches and showed that the gain and loss of genomic material varies widely between batches, drastically affecting basal gene expression. Moreover, different pathways were activated in response to a hypoxic stimulus. Our study emphasizes the large genomic and transcriptomic variability among different batches, to the point that the same experiment performed with different batches can lead to distinct conclusions and irreproducible results. The HeLa cell line is thought to be a unique cell line but it is clear that substantial differences between the primary tumour and the human genome exist and that an indeterminate number of HeLa cell lines may exist, each with a unique genomic profile. PMID:26483214

  17. Genomic instability in human cancer: Molecular insights and opportunities for therapeutic attack and prevention through diet and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Chen, Helen; Collins, Andrew R; Connell, Marisa; Damia, Giovanna; Dasgupta, Santanu; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Meeker, Alan K; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S Salman; Aquilano, Katia; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan; Boosani, Chandra S; Chen, Sophie; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Fujii, Hiromasa; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G; Keith, W Nicol; Mohammed, Sulma I; Niccolai, Elena; Yang, Xujuan; Honoki, Kanya; Parslow, Virginia R; Prakash, Satya; Rezazadeh, Sarallah; Shackelford, Rodney E; Sidransky, David; Tran, Phuoc T; Yang, Eddy S; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Genomic instability can initiate cancer, augment progression, and influence the overall prognosis of the affected patient. Genomic instability arises from many different pathways, such as telomere damage, centrosome amplification, epigenetic modifications, and DNA damage from endogenous and exogenous sources, and can be perpetuating, or limiting, through the induction of mutations or aneuploidy, both enabling and catastrophic. Many cancer treatments induce DNA damage to impair cell division on a global scale but it is accepted that personalized treatments, those that are tailored to the particular patient and type of cancer, must also be developed. In this review, we detail the mechanisms from which genomic instability arises and can lead to cancer, as well as treatments and measures that prevent genomic instability or take advantage of the cellular defects caused by genomic instability. In particular, we identify and discuss five priority targets against genomic instability: (1) prevention of DNA damage; (2) enhancement of DNA repair; (3) targeting deficient DNA repair; (4) impairing centrosome clustering; and, (5) inhibition of telomerase activity. Moreover, we highlight vitamin D and B, selenium, carotenoids, PARP inhibitors, resveratrol, and isothiocyanates as priority approaches against genomic instability. The prioritized target sites and approaches were cross validated to identify potential synergistic effects on a number of important areas of cancer biology.

  18. Genomic instability in human cancer: Molecular insights and opportunities for therapeutic attack and prevention through diet and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Chen, Helen; Collins, Andrew R.; Connell, Marisa; Damia, Giovanna; Dasgupta, Santanu; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Meeker, Alan K.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Ashraf, S. Salman; Aquilano, Katia; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan; Boosani, Chandra S.; Chen, Sophie; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Fujii, Hiromasa; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G.; Keith, W. Nicol; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Niccolai, Elena; Yang, Xujuan; Honoki, Kanya; Parslow, Virginia R.; Prakash, Satya; Rezazadeh, Sarallah; Shackelford, Rodney E.; Sidransky, David; Tran, Phuoc T.; Yang, Eddy S.; Maxwell, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability can initiate cancer, augment progression, and influence the overall prognosis of the affected patient. Genomic instability arises from many different pathways, such as telomere damage, centrosome amplification, epigenetic modifications, and DNA damage from endogenous and exogenous sources, and can be perpetuating, or limiting, through the induction of mutations or aneuploidy, both enabling and catastrophic. Many cancer treatments induce DNA damage to impair cell division on a global scale but it is accepted that personalized treatments, those that are tailored to the particular patient and type of cancer, must also be developed. In this review, we detail the mechanisms from which genomic instability arises and can lead to cancer, as well as treatments and measures that prevent genomic instability or take advantage of the cellular defects caused by genomic instability. In particular, we identify and discuss five priority targets against genomic instability: (1) prevention of DNA damage; (2) enhancement of DNA repair; (3) targeting deficient DNA repair; (4) impairing centrosome clustering; and, (5) inhibition of telomerase activity. Moreover, we highlight vitamin D and B, selenium, carotenoids, PARP inhibitors, resveratrol, and isothiocyanates as priority approaches against genomic instability. The prioritized target sites and approaches were cross validated to identify potential synergistic effects on a number of important areas of cancer biology. PMID:25869442

  19. Higher-Density Culture in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Results in DNA Damage and Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kurt; Zambelli, Filippo; Mertzanidou, Afroditi; Smolders, Ilse; Geens, Mieke; Nguyen, Ha Thi; Barbé, Lise; Sermon, Karen; Spits, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) show great promise for clinical and research applications, but their well-known proneness to genomic instability hampers the development to their full potential. Here, we demonstrate that medium acidification linked to culture density is the main cause of DNA damage and genomic alterations in hESC grown on feeder layers, and this even in the short time span of a single passage. In line with this, we show that increasing the frequency of the medium refreshments minimizes the levels of DNA damage and genetic instability. Also, we show that cells cultured on laminin-521 do not present this increase in DNA damage when grown at high density, although the (long-term) impact on their genomic stability remains to be elucidated. Our results explain the high levels of genome instability observed over the years by many laboratories worldwide, and show that the development of optimal culture conditions is key to solving this problem. PMID:26923824

  20. Lack of Major Genome Instability in Tumors of p53 Null Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Kuijk, Ewart; Youssef, Sameh A.; Kuiper, Raoul; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; de Bruin, Alain; Cuppen, Edwin; Simonis, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is often associated with loss of tumor suppressor genes (such as TP53), genomic instability and telomere lengthening. Previously, we generated and characterized a rat p53 knockout model in which the homozygous rats predominantly develop hemangiosarcomas whereas the heterozygous rats mainly develop osteosarcomas. Using genome-wide analyses, we find that the tumors that arise in the heterozygous and homozygous Tp53C273X mutant animals are also different in their genomic instability profiles. While p53 was fully inactivated in both heterozygous and homozygous knockout rats, tumors from homozygous animals show very limited aneuploidy and low degrees of somatic copy number variation as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. In addition, complex structural rearrangements such as chromothripsis and breakage-fusion-bridge cycles were never found in tumors from homozygous animals, while these were readily detectable in tumors from heterozygous animals. Finally, we measured telomere length and telomere lengthening pathway activity and found that tumors of homozygous animals have longer telomeres but do not show clear telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) activity differences as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. Taken together, our results demonstrate that host p53 status in this rat p53 knockout model has a large effect on both tumor type and genomic instability characteristics, where full loss of functional p53 is not the main driver of large-scale structural variations. Our results also suggest that chromothripsis primarily occurs under p53 heterozygous rather than p53 null conditions. PMID:25811670

  1. Autophagy-independent senescence and genome instability driven by targeted telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mar, Florie A; Debnath, Jayanta; Stohr, Bradley A

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction plays a complex role in tumorigenesis. While dysfunctional telomeres can block the proliferation of incipient cancer clones by inducing replicative senescence, fusion of dysfunctional telomeres can drive genome instability and oncogenic genomic rearrangements. Therefore, it is important to define the regulatory pathways that guide these opposing effects. Recent work has shown that the autophagy pathway regulates both senescence and genome instability in various contexts. Here, we apply models of acute telomere dysfunction to determine whether autophagy modulates the resulting genome instability and senescence responses. While telomere dysfunction rapidly induces autophagic flux in human fibroblast cell lines, inhibition of the autophagy pathway does not have a significant impact upon the transition to senescence, in contrast to what has previously been reported for oncogene-induced senescence. Our results suggest that this difference may be explained by disparities in the development of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. We also show that chromosome fusions induced by telomere dysfunction are comparable in autophagy-proficient and autophagy-deficient cells. Altogether, our results highlight the complexity of the senescence-autophagy interface and indicate that autophagy induction is unlikely to play a significant role in telomere dysfunction-driven senescence and chromosome fusions.

  2. Transgenerational genomic instability in children of irradiated parents as a result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Aghajanyan, Anna; Suskov, Igor

    2009-12-01

    The study of families irradiated as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed significantly increased aberrant genomes frequencies (AGFs) not only in irradiated parents (n=106, p<0.01), but also in their children born after the accident (n=159, p<0.05). This is an indicative of the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. To elucidate this phenomenon, experiments were undertaken to model genomic instability by using single and fractional in vitro gamma-irradiation ((137)Cs) of peripheral blood samples from the children and their parents at doses of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 Gy. The spectrum and frequency of chromosome aberrations were studied in the 1st and 2nd cell generations. The average AGF was significantly increased at all doses (except 0.1 Gy) in children of irradiated parents, as compared to children born from non-irradiated parents. Amplification of cells with single-break chromosome aberrations in mitosis 2, as compared to mitosis 1, suggests the replication mechanism of realization of potential damage in DNA and the occurrence of genomic instability in succeeding cell generations.

  3. Mutation of cancer driver MLL2 results in transcription stress and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Kantidakis, Theodoros; Saponaro, Marco; Mitter, Richard; Horswell, Stuart; Kranz, Andrea; Boeing, Stefan; Aygün, Ozan; Kelly, Gavin P.; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Stewart, A. Francis; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2016-01-01

    Genome instability is a recurring feature of tumorigenesis. Mutation in MLL2, encoding a histone methyltransferase, is a driver in numerous different cancer types, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we present evidence that MLL2 mutation results in genome instability. Mouse cells in which MLL2 gene deletion can be induced display elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange, gross chromosomal aberrations, 53BP1 foci, and micronuclei. Human MLL2 knockout cells are characterized by genome instability as well. Interestingly, MLL2 interacts with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and RECQL5, and, although MLL2 mutated cells have normal overall H3K4me levels in genes, nucleosomes in the immediate vicinity of RNAPII are hypomethylated. Importantly, MLL2 mutated cells display signs of substantial transcription stress, and the most affected genes overlap with early replicating fragile sites, show elevated levels of γH2AX, and suffer frequent mutation. The requirement for MLL2 in the maintenance of genome stability in genes helps explain its widespread role in cancer and points to transcription stress as a strong driver in tumorigenesis. PMID:26883360

  4. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  5. A high-throughput in vivo micronucleus assay for genome instability screening in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Karp, Natasha A; Ng, Bee Ling; Jackson, Stephen P; Adams, David J; McIntyre, Rebecca E

    2016-01-01

    We describe a sensitive, robust, high-throughput method for quantifying the formation of micronuclei, markers of genome instability, in mouse erythrocytes. Micronuclei are whole chromosomes or chromosome segments that have been separated from the nucleus. Other methods of detection rely on labour-intensive, microscopy-based techniques. Here, we describe a 2-d, 96-well plate-based flow cytometric method of micronucleus scoring that is simple enough for a research technician experienced in flow cytometry to perform. The assay detects low levels of genome instability that cannot be readily identified by classic phenotyping, using 25 μl of blood. By using this assay, we have screened >10,000 blood samples and discovered novel genes that contribute to vertebrate genome maintenance, as well as novel disease models and mechanisms of genome instability disorders. We discuss experimental design considerations, including statistical power calculation, we provide troubleshooting tips, and we discuss factors that contribute to a false-positive increase in the number of micronucleated red blood cells and to experimental variability. PMID:25551665

  6. Epigenetic dysregulation underlies radiation-induced transgenerational genome instability in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koturbash, Igor; Baker, Mike; Loree, Jonathan; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hudson, Darryl; Pogribny, Igor; Sedelnikova, Olga; Bonner, William; Kovalchuk, Olga . E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Although modern cancer radiation therapy has led to increased patient survival rates, the risk of radiation treatment-related complications is becoming a growing problem. Among various complications, radiation also poses a threat to the progeny of exposed parents. It causes transgenerational genome instability that is linked to transgenerational carcinogenesis. Although the occurrence of transgenerational genome instability, which manifests as elevated delayed and nontargeted mutation, has been well documented, the mechanisms by which it arises remain obscure. We hypothesized that epigenetic alterations may play a pivotal role in the molecular etiology of transgenerational genome instability. Methods and Materials: We studied the levels of cytosine DNA methylation in somatic tissues of unexposed offspring upon maternal, paternal, or combined parental exposure. Results: We observed a significant loss of global cytosine DNA methylation in the thymus tissue of the offspring upon combined parental exposure. The loss of DNA methylation was paralleled by a significant decrease in the levels of maintenance (DNMT1) and de novo methyltransferases DNMT3a and 3b and methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. Along with profound changes in DNA methylation, we noted a significant accumulation of DNA strand breaks in thymus, which is a radiation carcinogenesis target organ. Conclusions: The observed changes were indicative of a profound epigenetic dysregulation in the offspring, which in turn could lead to genome destabilization and possibly could serve as precursor for transgenerational carcinogenesis. Future studies are clearly needed to address the cellular and carcinogenic repercussions of those changes.

  7. Mutation of cancer driver MLL2 results in transcription stress and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Kantidakis, Theodoros; Saponaro, Marco; Mitter, Richard; Horswell, Stuart; Kranz, Andrea; Boeing, Stefan; Aygün, Ozan; Kelly, Gavin P; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Stewart, A Francis; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-02-15

    Genome instability is a recurring feature of tumorigenesis. Mutation in MLL2, encoding a histone methyltransferase, is a driver in numerous different cancer types, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we present evidence that MLL2 mutation results in genome instability. Mouse cells in which MLL2 gene deletion can be induced display elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange, gross chromosomal aberrations, 53BP1 foci, and micronuclei. Human MLL2 knockout cells are characterized by genome instability as well. Interestingly, MLL2 interacts with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and RECQL5, and, although MLL2 mutated cells have normal overall H3K4me levels in genes, nucleosomes in the immediate vicinity of RNAPII are hypomethylated. Importantly, MLL2 mutated cells display signs of substantial transcription stress, and the most affected genes overlap with early replicating fragile sites, show elevated levels of γH2AX, and suffer frequent mutation. The requirement for MLL2 in the maintenance of genome stability in genes helps explain its widespread role in cancer and points to transcription stress as a strong driver in tumorigenesis. PMID:26883360

  8. Nuclear compartments, genome folding, and enhancer-promoter communication.

    PubMed

    Ulianov, Sergey V; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome has an extremely complex spatial organization. The physical distances between regulatory elements of the genome, such as enhancers, promoters, insulators, and CpG-islands, do not necessarily reflect genomic distances. Some remote regulatory elements appear to interact physically with target promoters in the 3D nuclear space. These spatial contacts are thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of transcription. Recent studies performed using 3C (chromosome conformation capture)-based methods, FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) coupled with confocal microscopy, and other experimental approaches have revealed that the spatial interactions of distant genomic elements within a folded chromosome are specific and functionally relevant. Additionally, the spatial organization of the eukaryotic genome is linked to the functional compartmentalization of the cell nucleus. In this review, we discuss the current state of research on the functional architecture of the eukaryotic genome. Special emphasis is given to the role of the spatial organization of the genome in establishing communication between enhancers and promoters. The driving forces of the juxtaposition of remote genomic elements are also considered.

  9. Genomic Instability in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Arises from Replicative Stress and Chromosome Condensation Defects.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Noa; Ben-David, Uri; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Storchová, Zuzana; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kerem, Batsheva

    2016-02-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) frequently acquire chromosomal aberrations such as aneuploidy in culture. These aberrations progressively increase over time and may compromise the properties and clinical utility of the cells. The underlying mechanisms that drive initial genomic instability and its continued progression are largely unknown. Here, we show that aneuploid hPSCs undergo DNA replication stress, resulting in defective chromosome condensation and segregation. Aneuploid hPSCs show altered levels of actin cytoskeletal genes controlled by the transcription factor SRF, and overexpression of SRF rescues impaired chromosome condensation and segregation defects in aneuploid hPSCs. Furthermore, SRF downregulation in diploid hPSCs induces replication stress and perturbed condensation similar to that seen in aneuploid cells. Together, these results suggest that decreased SRF expression induces replicative stress and chromosomal condensation defects that underlie the ongoing chromosomal instability seen in aneuploid hPSCs. A similar mechanism may also operate during initiation of instability in diploid cells.

  10. RECQL5 controls transcript elongation and suppresses genome instability associated with transcription stress.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Marco; Kantidakis, Theodoros; Mitter, Richard; Kelly, Gavin P; Heron, Mark; Williams, Hannah; Söding, Johannes; Stewart, Aengus; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2014-05-22

    RECQL5 is the sole member of the RECQ family of helicases associated with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We now show that RECQL5 is a general elongation factor that is important for preserving genome stability during transcription. Depletion or overexpression of RECQL5 results in corresponding shifts in the genome-wide RNAPII density profile. Elongation is particularly affected, with RECQL5 depletion causing a striking increase in the average rate, concurrent with increased stalling, pausing, arrest, and/or backtracking (transcription stress). RECQL5 therefore controls the movement of RNAPII across genes. Loss of RECQL5 also results in the loss or gain of genomic regions, with the breakpoints of lost regions located in genes and common fragile sites. The chromosomal breakpoints overlap with areas of elevated transcription stress, suggesting that RECQL5 suppresses such stress and its detrimental effects, and thereby prevents genome instability in the transcribed region of genes. PMID:24836610

  11. Is delayed genomic instability specifically induced by high-LET particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testard, Isabelle; Sabatier, Laure

    1998-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can induce a large variety of damages in the DNA. The processing or repair of this damage occurs in the first minutes up to several hours after irradiation. Afterwhile the remaining lesions are fixed in an irreparable state. However, in recent years, data have accumulated to suggest that genomic instability can manifest in the progeny of irradiated cells leading to accumulation of damage through cell generations. Different biological endpoints were described: delayed cell death, delayed mutations, de novo chromosomal instability. The question regarding the ability of sparsely ionizing X-or γ-rays to induce such phenomenon is still unclear for normal cells. In most of the reports, high linear energy transfer (LET) particles are able to induce genomic instability but not low-LET particles. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unknown. In human fibroblasts irradiated by heavy ions in a large range of LETs, we showed that the chromosomal instability is characterized by telomeric associations (TAS) involving specific chromosomes. The same instability is observed during the senescence process and during the first passages after viral transfection. The specific chromosomal instability that we observed after irradiation would not be a direct consequence of irradiation but would be a natural phenomenon occurring after many cell divisions. The effect of the irradiation would lie on the bypass of the senescence process that would permit cells with end to end fusions to survive and be transmitted through cell generations, accumulating chromosome rearrangements and chromosome imbalances. Research on molecular mechanisms of chromosomal instability is focused on the role of telomeres in end to end fusions. Such observations could contribute to understand why chromosomal instability is not a dose dependant phenomenon. Why high-LET particles would be so potent in inducing delayed instability? The answer might lie in the study of primary effects of

  12. Genomic instability: Crossing pathways at the origin of structural and numerical chromosome changes.

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonella; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Cimini, Daniela; Ganem, Neil J; Genescà, Anna; Natarajan, Adayapalam T; Pavanello, Sofia; Valle, Giorgio; Degrassi, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Genomic instability leads to a wide spectrum of genetic changes, including single nucleotide mutations, structural chromosome alterations, and numerical chromosome changes. The accepted view on how these events are generated predicts that separate cellular mechanisms and genetic events explain the occurrence of these types of genetic variation. Recently, new findings have shed light on the complexity of the mechanisms leading to structural and numerical chromosome aberrations, their intertwining pathways, and their dynamic evolution, in somatic as well as in germ cells. In this review, we present a critical analysis of these recent discoveries in this area, with the aim to contribute to a deeper knowledge of the molecular networks leading to adverse outcomes in humans following exposure to environmental factors. The review illustrates how several technological advances, including DNA sequencing methods, bioinformatics, and live-cell imaging approaches, have contributed to produce a renewed concept of the mechanisms causing genomic instability. Special attention is also given to the specific pathways causing genomic instability in mammalian germ cells. Remarkably, the same scenario emerged from some pioneering studies published in the 1980s to 1990s, when the evolution of polyploidy, the chromosomal effects of spindle poisons, the fate of micronuclei, were intuitively proposed to share mechanisms and pathways. Thus, an old working hypothesis has eventually found proper validation.

  13. Inflammatory response to isocyanates and onset of genomic instability in cultured human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mishra, P K; Bhargava, A; Raghuram, G V; Gupta, S; Tiwari, S; Upadhyaya, R; Jain, S K; Maudar, K K

    2009-02-10

    Lungs comprise the primary organ exposed to environmental toxic chemicals, resulting in diverse respiratory ailments and other disorders, including carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage phenomenon, which involves a series of genetic alterations that begin with genomic instability provoked by certain factors such as inflammation and DNA damage and end with the development of cancer. Isocyanates such as methyl isocyanate are the chief metabolic intermediates in many industrial settings with diverse applications; exposure to them can lead to severe hypersensitive, mutagenic and genotoxic alterations. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying isocyanate-mediated inflammatory responses and their probable role in the onset of genomic instability in cultured IMR-90 human lung fibroblasts. The isocyanates induced inflammation, resulting in extensive DNA damage, evidenced by increases in ATM, ATR, gammaH2AX, and p53 expression levels. The apoptotic index also increased. Chromosomal anomalies in treated cells included over-expression of centrosome protein and variable amplification of inter-simple sequence repeats, further demonstrating isocyanate-induced genomic instability. This information could be useful in the design of new approaches for risk assessment of potential industrial disasters.

  14. Induction of genomic instability and activation of autophagy in artificial human aneuploid cells.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Kentaro; Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Fujishima, Yohei; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A

    2016-08-01

    Chromosome missegregation can lead to a change in chromosome number known as aneuploidy. Although aneuploidy is a known hallmark of cancer cells, the various mechanisms by which altered gene and/or DNA copy number facilitate tumorigenesis remain unclear. To understand the effect of aneuploidy occurring in non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells, we generated clones harboring artificial aneuploidy using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our results demonstrate that clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. Also, the increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploidy clones, and inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. In addition, the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones, and inhibition of autophagy further increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, these results suggest that even a single extraneous chromosome can induce genomic instability, and that autophagy triggered by aneuploidy-induced stress is a mechanism to protect cells bearing abnormal chromosome number. PMID:27343755

  15. Genome-wide proximal promoter analysis and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Segura, Victor; Corrales, Fernando J; Rubio, Angel

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput gene expression technologies based on DNA microarrays allow the examination of biological systems. However, the interpretation of the complex molecular descriptions generated by these approaches is still challenging. The development of new methodologies to identify common regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of the expression of a set of co-expressed genes might enhance our capacity to extract functional information from genomic data sets. In this chapter, we describe a method that integrates different sources of information: gene expression data, genome sequence information, described transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), functional information, and bibliographic data. The starting point of the analysis is the extraction of promoter sequences from a whole genome and the detection of TFBSs in each gene promoter. This information allows the identification of enriched TFBSs in the proximal promoter of differentially expressed genes. The functional and bibliographic interpretation of the results improves our biological insight into the regulatory mechanisms involved in a microarray experiment. PMID:19957149

  16. The Landscape of Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Laird, Peter W.; Park, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microsatellites - simple tandem repeats present at millions of sites in the human genome - can shorten or lengthen due to a defect in DNA mismatch repair. We present here the first comprehensive genome-wide analysis of the prevalence, mutational spectrum and functional consequences of microsatellite instability (MSI) in cancer genomes. We analyzed MSI in 277 colorectal and endometrial cancer genomes (including 57 microsatellite-unstable ones) using exome and whole-genome sequencing data. Recurrent MSI events in coding sequences showed tumor type-specificity, elevated frameshift-to-inframe ratios, and lower transcript levels than wildtype alleles. Moreover, genome-wide analysis revealed differences in the distribution of MSI versus point mutations, including overrepresentation of MSI in euchromatic and intronic regions compared to heterochromatic and intergenic regions, respectively, and depletion of MSI at nucleosome-occupied sequences. Our results provide a panoramic view of MSI in cancer genomes, highlighting their tumor type-specificity, impact on gene expression, and the role of chromatin organization. PMID:24209623

  17. Characterization of a novel mechanism of genomic instability involving the SEI1/SET/NM23H1 pathway in esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Nie, Chang-Jun; Hu, Liang; Qin, Yanru; Liu, Hai-Bo; Zeng, Ting-Ting; Chen, Leilei; Fu, Li; Deng, Wen; Chen, Shu-Peng; Jia, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Chunyu; Xie, Dan; Guan, Xin-Yuan

    2010-07-15

    Amplification of 19q is a frequent genetic alteration in many solid tumors, and SEI1 is a candidate oncogene within the amplified region. Our previous study found that the oncogenic function of SEI1 was associated with chromosome instability. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of genomic instability involving the SEI1-SET-NM23H1 pathway. Overexpression of SEI1 was observed in 57 of 100 of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cases. Functional study showed that SEI1 had strong tumorigenic ability, and overexpression of SEI1 could induce the genomic instability by increasing micronuclei formation and reducing the number of chromosomes. Further study found that SEI1 was able to upregulate SET expression and subsequently promote the translocation of a small amount of NM23H1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Nuclear NM23H1 can induce DNA damage through its DNA nick activity. Unlike CTL attack, only a small amount of NM23H1 translocated into the nucleus (<10%) induced by the overexpression of SEI1. Further study found that the small amount of NM23H1 only induced minor DNA damage and subsequently increased genomic instability, rather than inducing irreparable DNA damage and initiating apoptosis by CTL attack. Sister chromatid exchange experiment found that the translocation of small amount of NM23H1 into the nucleus induced by the overexpressions of SEI1/SET could increase the frequency of sister chromatid exchange. In addition, overexpression of SEI1 was associated with poor prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Taken together, these findings define a novel mechanism of genomic instability and malignant progression in esophageal cancers, a deadly disease of increasing incidence in developed countries. PMID:20570897

  18. Promoter Prediction on a Genomic Scale—The Adh Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ohler, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    We describe our statistical system for promoter recognition in genomic DNA with which we took part in the Genome Annotation Assessment Project (GASP1). We applied two versions of the system: the first uses a region-based approach toward transcription start site identification, namely, interpolated Markov chains; the second was a hybrid approach combining regions and signals within a stochastic segment model. We compare the results of both versions with each other and examine how well the application on a genomic scale compares with the results we previously obtained on smaller data sets. PMID:10779494

  19. Genomic instability, driver genes and cell selection: Projections from cancer to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells and stem cells share many traits, including a tendency towards genomic instability. Human cancers exhibit tumor-specific genomic aberrations, which often affect their malignancy and drug response. During their culture propagation, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) also acquire characteristic genomic aberrations, which may have significant impact on their molecular and cellular phenotypes. These aberrations vary in size from single nucleotide alterations to copy number alterations to whole chromosome gains. A prominent challenge in both cancer and stem cell research is to identify "driver aberrations" that confer a selection advantage, and "driver genes" that underlie the recurrence of these aberrations. Following principles that are already well-established in cancer research, candidate driver genes have also been suggested in hPSCs. Experimental validation of the functional role of such candidates can uncover whether these are bona fide driver genes. The identification of driver genes may bring us closer to a mechanistic understanding of the genomic instability of stem cells. Guided by terminologies and methodologies commonly applied in cancer research, such understanding may have important ramifications for both stem cell and cancer biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity.

  20. Induction of Genomic Instability In Vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Simon, Sanford, R.; Whorton, Elbert, B.

    2006-01-06

    The overall goal of this project is to determine if low doses (below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection, i.e. less than or equal to 10 cGy) of low LET radiation can induce genomic instability. The magnitude of genomic instability was measured as delayed chromosome instability in bone marrow cells of exposed mice with different levels of endogenous DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) activity, i.e. high (C57BL/6J mice), intermediate (BALB/cJ mice), and extremely low (Scid mice). In addition, at early time points (1 and 4 hrs) following irradiation, levels of activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcription factor known to be involved in regulating the expression of genes responsible for cell protection following stimuli, were measured in these cells. Bone marrow cells were collected at different times following irradiation, i.e. 1 hr, 4 hrs, 1 month, and 6 months. A total of five mice per dose per strain were sacrificed at each time point for sample collection. As a result, a total of 80 mice from each strain were used. The frequency and the type of metaphase chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells collected from exposed mice at different times following irradiation were used as markers for radiation-induced genomic instability. A three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol for mouse chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was used for the analysis of delayed stable chromosomal aberrations in metaphase cells. All other visible chromatid-type aberrations and gross structural abnormalities involving non-painted chromosomes were also evaluated on the same metaphase cells used for scoring the stable chromosomal aberrations of painted chromosomes. Levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation were also determined in cells at 1 and 4 hrs following irradiation (indicative of early responses).

  1. Spatial and temporal diversity in genomic instability processes defines lung cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Elza C; McGranahan, Nicholas; Mitter, Richard; Salm, Max; Wedge, David C; Yates, Lucy; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Rowan, Andrew J; Grönroos, Eva; Muhammad, Madiha A; Horswell, Stuart; Gerlinger, Marco; Varela, Ignacio; Jones, David; Marshall, John; Voet, Thierry; Van Loo, Peter; Rassl, Doris M; Rintoul, Robert C; Janes, Sam M; Lee, Siow-Ming; Forster, Martin; Ahmad, Tanya; Lawrence, David; Falzon, Mary; Capitanio, Arrigo; Harkins, Timothy T; Lee, Clarence C; Tom, Warren; Teefe, Enock; Chen, Shann-Ching; Begum, Sharmin; Rabinowitz, Adam; Phillimore, Benjamin; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Stamp, Gordon; Szallasi, Zoltan; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Campbell, Peter; Swanton, Charles

    2014-10-10

    Spatial and temporal dissection of the genomic changes occurring during the evolution of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may help elucidate the basis for its dismal prognosis. We sequenced 25 spatially distinct regions from seven operable NSCLCs and found evidence of branched evolution, with driver mutations arising before and after subclonal diversification. There was pronounced intratumor heterogeneity in copy number alterations, translocations, and mutations associated with APOBEC cytidine deaminase activity. Despite maintained carcinogen exposure, tumors from smokers showed a relative decrease in smoking-related mutations over time, accompanied by an increase in APOBEC-associated mutations. In tumors from former smokers, genome-doubling occurred within a smoking-signature context before subclonal diversification, which suggested that a long period of tumor latency had preceded clinical detection. The regionally separated driver mutations, coupled with the relentless and heterogeneous nature of the genome instability processes, are likely to confound treatment success in NSCLC. PMID:25301630

  2. Aberrant methylation and associated transcriptional mobilization of Alu elements contributes to genomic instability in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pal, Arnab; Srivastava, Tapasya; Sharma, Manish K; Mehndiratta, Mohit; Das, Prerna; Sinha, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxia is an integral part of tumorigenesis and contributes extensively to the neoplastic phenotype including drug resistance and genomic instability. It has also been reported that hypoxia results in global demethylation. Because a majority of the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands are found within the repeat elements of DNA, and are usually methylated under normoxic conditions, we suggested that retrotransposable Alu or short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) which show altered methylation and associated changes of gene expression during hypoxia, could be associated with genomic instability. U87MG glioblastoma cells were cultured in 0.1% O₂ for 6 weeks and compared with cells cultured in 21% O₂ for the same duration. Real-time PCR analysis showed a significant increase in SINE and reverse transcriptase coding long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) transcripts during hypoxia. Sequencing of bisulphite treated DNA as well as the Combined Bisulfite Restriction Analysis (COBRA) assay showed that the SINE loci studied underwent significant hypomethylation though there was patchy hypermethylation at a few sites. The inter-alu PCR profile of DNA from cells cultured under 6-week hypoxia, its 4-week revert back to normoxia and 6-week normoxia showed several changes in the band pattern indicating increased alu mediated genomic alteration. Our results show that aberrant methylation leading to increased transcription of SINE and reverse transcriptase associated LINE elements could lead to increased genomic instability in hypoxia. This might be a cause of genetic heterogeneity in tumours especially in variegated hypoxic environment and lead to a development of foci of more aggressive tumour cells.

  3. Effect of Cu supplementation on genomic instability in chemically-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Backround The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation (copper or copper and resveratrol) on the intensity of carcinogenesis and the frequency of microsatellite instability in a widely used model of mammary carcinogenesis induced in the rat by treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Methods DNA was extracted from rat mammary cancers and normal tisues, amplified by PCR, using different polymorphic DNA markers and the reaction products were analyzed for microsatellite instability. Results It was found that irrespectively of the applied diet there was no inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis in the rats due to DMBA. Besides, in the groups supplemented with Cu (II) or Cu (II) and resveratrol the tumor formation was clearly accelerated. Unlike the animals that were fed with standard diet, the supplemented rats were characterized by the loss of heterozygosity of microsatellite D3Mgh9 in cancer tumors (by respectively 50 and 40%). When the animals received Cu (II) and resveratrol supplemented diet the occurrence of genomic instability was additionally found in their livers in the case of microsatellite D1Mgh6 (which was stable in the animals without dietary supplementation). Conclusions Identification of the underlying mechanisms by which dietary factors affect genomic stability might prove useful in the treatment of mammary cancer as well as in the incorporation of dietary factors into mammary cancer prevention strategies. PMID:22192448

  4. Differences in genome-wide repeat sequence instability conferred by proofreading and mismatch repair defects

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Scott A.; Clark, Alan B.; Kunkel, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutation rates are used to calibrate molecular clocks and to link genetic variants with human disease. However, mutation rates are not uniform across each eukaryotic genome. Rates for insertion/deletion (indel) mutations have been found to vary widely when examined in vitro and at specific loci in vivo. Here, we report the genome-wide rates of formation and repair of indels made during replication of yeast nuclear DNA. Using over 6000 indels accumulated in four mismatch repair (MMR) defective strains, and statistical corrections for false negatives, we find that indel rates increase by 100 000-fold with increasing homonucleotide run length, representing the greatest effect on replication fidelity of any known genomic parameter. Nonetheless, long genomic homopolymer runs are overrepresented relative to random chance, implying positive selection. Proofreading defects in the replicative polymerases selectively increase indel rates in short repetitive tracts, likely reflecting the distance over which Pols δ and ϵ interact with duplex DNA upstream of the polymerase active site. In contrast, MMR defects hugely increase indel mutagenesis in long repetitive sequences. Because repetitive sequences are not uniformly distributed among genomic functional elements, the quantitatively different consequences on genome-wide repeat sequence instability conferred by defects in proofreading and MMR have important biological implications. PMID:25824945

  5. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  6. Urinary tract infection drives genome instability in uropathogenic Escherichia coli and necessitates translesion synthesis DNA polymerase IV for virulence.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Damian; Seed, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) produces ~80% of community-acquired UTI, the second most common infection in humans. During UTI, UPEC has a complex life cycle, replicating and persisting in intracellular and extracellular niches. Host and environmental stresses may affect the integrity of the UPEC genome and threaten its viability. We determined how the host inflammatory response during UTI drives UPEC genome instability and evaluated the role of multiple factors of genome replication and repair for their roles in the maintenance of genome integrity and thus virulence during UTI. The urinary tract environment enhanced the mutation frequency of UPEC ~100-fold relative to in vitro levels. Abrogation of inflammation through a host TLR4-signaling defect significantly reduced the mutation frequency, demonstrating in the importance of the host response as a driver of UPEC genome instability. Inflammation induces the bacterial SOS response, leading to the hypothesis that the UPEC SOS-inducible translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases would be key factors in UPEC genome instability during UTI. However, while the TLS DNA polymerases enhanced in vitro, they did not increase in vivo mutagenesis. Although it is not a source of enhanced mutagenesis in vivo, the TLS DNA polymerase IV was critical for the survival of UPEC during UTI during an active inflammatory assault. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of a TLS DNA polymerase being critical for UPEC survival during urinary tract infection and points to independent mechanisms for genome instability and the maintenance of genome replication of UPEC under host inflammatory stress.

  7. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Transgenerational Genomic Instability and Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Gao, Yinglong; Zhang, Baodong

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to genome instability in the germline, and therefore to transgenerational genome and epigenome instability in offspring of exposed males. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced genome instability in directly exposed and in bystander organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in genome instability development. The potential of localized body-part exposures to affect the germline and thus induce genome and epigenome changes in the progeny has not been studied. To investigate whether or not the paternal cranial irradiation can exert deleterious changes in the protected germline and the offsprings, we studied the alteration of DNA methylation in the shielded testes tissue. Here we report that the localized paternal cranial irradiation results in a significant altered DNA methylation in sperm cells and leads to a profound epigenetic dysregulation in the unexposed progeny conceived 3 months after paternal exposure. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Transgenerational effect; Genomic Instability Bystander Effects; DNA methylation.

  8. Genomic instability and cellular stress in organ biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with colorectal cancer and predisposing pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Sara; Fuoco, Ilenia; di Fluri, Giorgia; Costa, Francesco; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Biondi, Graziano; Nardini, Vincenzo; Scarpato, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and polyps, are common colorectal pathologies in western society and are risk factors for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genomic instability is a cancer hallmark and is connected to changes in chromosomal structure, often caused by double strand break formation (DSB), and aneuploidy. Cellular stress, may contribute to genomic instability. In colorectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with IBD, polyps and CRC, we evaluated 1) genomic instability using the γH2AX assay as marker of DSB and micronuclei in mononuclear lymphocytes kept under cytodieresis inhibition, and 2) cellular stress through expression and cellular localization of glutathione-S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1). Colon biopsies showed γH2AX increase starting from polyps, while lymphocytes already from IBD. Micronuclei frequency began to rise in lymphocytes of subjects with polyps, suggesting a systemic genomic instability condition. Colorectal tissues lost GSTO1 expression but increased nuclear localization with pathology progression. Lymphocytes did not change GSTO1 expression and localization until CRC formation, where enzyme expression was increased. We propose that the growing genomic instability found in our patients is connected with the alteration of cellular environment. Evaluation of genomic damage and cellular stress in colorectal pathologies may facilitate prevention and management of CRC. PMID:26046795

  9. From NGS assembly challenges to instability of fungal mitochondrial genomes: A case study in genome complexity.

    PubMed

    Misas, Elizabeth; Muñoz, José Fernando; Gallo, Juan Esteban; McEwen, Juan Guillermo; Clay, Oliver Keatinge

    2016-04-01

    The presence of repetitive or non-unique DNA persisting over sizable regions of a eukaryotic genome can hinder the genome's successful de novo assembly from short reads: ambiguities in assigning genome locations to the non-unique subsequences can result in premature termination of contigs and thus overfragmented assemblies. Fungal mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes are compact (typically less than 100 kb), yet often contain short non-unique sequences that can be shown to impede their successful de novo assembly in silico. Such repeats can also confuse processes in the cell in vivo. A well-studied example is ectopic (out-of-register, illegitimate) recombination associated with repeat pairs, which can lead to deletion of functionally important genes that are located between the repeats. Repeats that remain conserved over micro- or macroevolutionary timescales despite such risks may indicate functionally or structurally (e.g., for replication) important regions. This principle could form the basis of a mining strategy for accelerating discovery of function in genome sequences. We present here our screening of a sample of 11 fully sequenced fungal mitochondrial genomes by observing where exact k-mer repeats occurred several times; initial analyses motivated us to focus on 17-mers occurring more than three times. Based on the diverse repeats we observe, we propose that such screening may serve as an efficient expedient for gaining a rapid but representative first insight into the repeat landscapes of sparsely characterized mitochondrial chromosomes. Our matching of the flagged repeats to previously reported regions of interest supports the idea that systems of persisting, non-trivial repeats in genomes can often highlight features meriting further attention. PMID:26970210

  10. The role of APC/C(Cdh1) in replication stress and origin of genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Greil, C; Krohs, J; Schnerch, D; Follo, M; Felthaus, J; Engelhardt, M; Wäsch, R

    2016-06-01

    It has been proposed that the APC/C(Cdh1) functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability. However, the exact nature of genomic instability following loss of Cdh1 is unclear. Using biochemistry and live cell imaging of single cells we found that Cdh1 knockdown (kd) leads to strong nuclear stabilization of the substrates cyclin A and B and deregulated kinetics of DNA replication. Restoration of the Cdh1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint did not result in G2 arrest but blocked cells in prometaphase, suggesting that these cells enter mitosis despite incomplete replication. This results in DNA double-strand breaks, anaphase bridges, cytokinesis defects and tetraploidization. Tetraploid cells are the source of supernumerary centrosomes following Cdh1-kd, leading to multipolar mitosis or centrosome clustering, in turn resulting in merotelic attachment and lagging chromosomes. Whereas some of these events cause apoptosis during mitosis, surviving cells may accumulate chromosomal aberrations. PMID:26455319

  11. The role of APC/C(Cdh1) in replication stress and origin of genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Greil, C; Krohs, J; Schnerch, D; Follo, M; Felthaus, J; Engelhardt, M; Wäsch, R

    2016-06-01

    It has been proposed that the APC/C(Cdh1) functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability. However, the exact nature of genomic instability following loss of Cdh1 is unclear. Using biochemistry and live cell imaging of single cells we found that Cdh1 knockdown (kd) leads to strong nuclear stabilization of the substrates cyclin A and B and deregulated kinetics of DNA replication. Restoration of the Cdh1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint did not result in G2 arrest but blocked cells in prometaphase, suggesting that these cells enter mitosis despite incomplete replication. This results in DNA double-strand breaks, anaphase bridges, cytokinesis defects and tetraploidization. Tetraploid cells are the source of supernumerary centrosomes following Cdh1-kd, leading to multipolar mitosis or centrosome clustering, in turn resulting in merotelic attachment and lagging chromosomes. Whereas some of these events cause apoptosis during mitosis, surviving cells may accumulate chromosomal aberrations.

  12. Plastid genome instability leads to reactive oxygen species production and plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lepage, Étienne; Zampini, Éric; Brisson, Normand

    2013-10-01

    The plastid genome is highly conserved among plant species, suggesting that alterations of its structure would have dramatic impacts on plant fitness. Nevertheless, little is known about the direct consequences of plastid genome instability. Recently, it was reported that the plastid Whirly proteins WHY1 and WHY3 and a specialized type-I polymerase, POLIB, act as safeguards against plastid genome instability in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In this study, we use ciprofloxacin, an organelle double-strand break-inducing agent, and the why1why3polIb-1 variegated mutant to evaluate the impact of generalized plastid DNA instability. First, we show that in why1why3polIb-1 and ciprofloxacin-treated plants, plastid genome instability is associated with increased reactive oxygen species production. Then, using different light regimens, we show that the elevated reactive oxygen species production correlates with the appearance of a yellow-variegated phenotype in the why1why3polIb-1 population. This redox imbalance also correlates to modifications of nuclear gene expression patterns, which in turn leads to acclimation to high light. Taken together, these results indicate that plastid genome instability induces an oxidative burst that favors, through nuclear genetic reprogramming, adaptation to subsequent oxidative stresses.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of alternative promoters of human genes using a custom promoter tiling array

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Gregory AC; Wu, Jiejun; Yan, Pearlly; Plass, Christoph; Huang, Tim HM; Davuluri, Ramana V

    2008-01-01

    Background Independent lines of evidence suggested that a large fraction of human genes possess multiple promoters driving gene expression from distinct transcription start sites. Understanding which promoter is employed in which cellular context is required to unravel gene regulatory networks within the cell. Results We have developed a custom microarray platform that tiles roughly 35,000 alternative putative promoters from nearly 7,000 genes in the human genome. To demonstrate the utility of this array platform, we have analyzed the patterns of promoter usage in 17β-estradiol (E2)-treated and untreated MCF7 cells and show widespread usage of alternative promoters. Most intriguingly, we show that the downstream promoter in E2-sensitive multiple promoter genes tends to be very close to the 3'-terminus of the gene, suggesting exotic mechanisms of expression regulation in these genes. Conclusion The usage of alternative promoters greatly multiplies the transcriptional complexity available within the human genome. The fact that many of these promoters are incapable of driving the synthesis of a meaningful protein-encoding transcript further complicates the story. PMID:18655706

  14. TopBP1/Dpb11 binds DNA anaphase bridges to prevent genome instability.

    PubMed

    Germann, Susanne M; Schramke, Vera; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Gallina, Irene; Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Oestergaard, Vibe H; Lisby, Michael

    2014-01-01

    DNA anaphase bridges are a potential source of genome instability that may lead to chromosome breakage or nondisjunction during mitosis. Two classes of anaphase bridges can be distinguished: DAPI-positive chromatin bridges and DAPI-negative ultrafine DNA bridges (UFBs). Here, we establish budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the avian DT40 cell line as model systems for studying DNA anaphase bridges and show that TopBP1/Dpb11 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in their metabolism. Together with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, TopBP1/Dpb11 binds to UFBs, and depletion of TopBP1/Dpb11 led to an accumulation of chromatin bridges. Importantly, the NoCut checkpoint that delays progression from anaphase to abscission in yeast was activated by both UFBs and chromatin bridges independently of Dpb11, and disruption of the NoCut checkpoint in Dpb11-depleted cells led to genome instability. In conclusion, we propose that TopBP1/Dpb11 prevents accumulation of anaphase bridges via stimulation of the Mec1/ATR kinase and suppression of homologous recombination.

  15. Mitochondria regulate DNA damage and genomic instability induced by high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Davidson, Mercy M.; Hei, Tom K.

    2014-04-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation including α particles and heavy ions is the major type of radiation found in space and is considered a potential health risk for astronauts. Even though the chance that these high LET particles traversing through the cytoplasm of cells is higher than that through the nuclei, the contribution of targeted cytoplasmic irradiation to the induction of genomic instability and other chromosomal damages induced by high LET radiation is not known. In the present study, we investigated whether mitochondria are the potential cytoplasmic target of high LET radiation in mediating cellular damage using a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depleted (ρ0) human small airway epithelial (SAE) cell model and a precision charged particle microbeam with a beam width of merely one micron. Targeted cytoplasmic irradiation by high LET α particles induced DNA oxidative damage and double strand breaks in wild type ρ+ SAE cells. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in autophagy and micronuclei, which is an indication of genomic instability, together with the activation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling pathways in ρ+ SAE cells. In contrast, ρ0 SAE cells exhibited a significantly lower response to these same endpoints examined after cytoplasmic irradiation with high LET α particles. The results indicate that mitochondria are essential in mediating cytoplasmic radiation induced genotoxic damage in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the findings may shed some light in the design of countermeasures for space radiation.

  16. Genomic Instability and Radiation Risk in Molecular Pathways to Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Jan Christian; Meckbach, Reinhard; Jacob, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer is caused by multiple genomic alterations which lead to genomic instability (GI). GI appears in molecular pathways of microsatellite instability (MSI) and chromosomal instability (CIN) with clinically observed case shares of about 15–20% and 80–85%. Radiation enhances the colon cancer risk by inducing GI, but little is known about different outcomes for MSI and CIN. Computer-based modelling can facilitate the understanding of the phenomena named above. Comprehensive biological models, which combine the two main molecular pathways to colon cancer, are fitted to incidence data of Japanese a-bomb survivors. The preferred model is selected according to statistical criteria and biological plausibility. Imprints of cell-based processes in the succession from adenoma to carcinoma are identified by the model from age dependences and secular trends of the incidence data. Model parameters show remarkable compliance with mutation rates and growth rates for adenoma, which has been reported over the last fifteen years. Model results suggest that CIN begins during fission of intestinal crypts. Chromosomal aberrations are generated at a markedly elevated rate which favors the accelerated growth of premalignant adenoma. Possibly driven by a trend of Westernization in the Japanese diet, incidence rates for the CIN pathway increased notably in subsequent birth cohorts, whereas rates pertaining to MSI remained constant. An imbalance between number of CIN and MSI cases began to emerge in the 1980s, whereas in previous decades the number of cases was almost equal. The CIN pathway exhibits a strong radio-sensitivity, probably more intensive in men. Among young birth cohorts of both sexes the excess absolute radiation risk related to CIN is larger by an order of magnitude compared to the MSI-related risk. Observance of pathway-specific risks improves the determination of the probability of causation for radiation-induced colon cancer in individual patients, if their

  17. Mitochondrial Genome Instability and ROS Enhance Intestinal Tumorigenesis in APCMin/+ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Dong Kyun; Green, Paula D.; Santos, Janine H.; D'Souza, Anthony D.; Walther, Zenta; Martin, W. David; Christian, Brooke E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation have long been documented in tumors. Other types of mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis, also can contribute to tumorigenesis and cancer phenotypes. Furthermore, mutation and altered amounts of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been observed in cancer cells. However, how mtDNA instability per se contributes to cancer remains largely undetermined. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for expression and maintenance of mtDNA. Tfam heterozygous knock-out (Tfam+/−) mice show mild mtDNA depletion, but have no overt phenotypes. We show that Tfam+/− mouse cells and tissues not only possess less mtDNA but also increased oxidative mtDNA damage. Crossing Tfam+/− mice to the adenomatous polyposis coli multiple intestinal neoplasia (APCMin/+) mouse cancer model revealed that mtDNA instability increases tumor number and growth in the small intestine. This was not a result of enhancement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, but rather appears to involve a propensity for increased mitochondrial ROS production. Direct involvement of mitochondrial ROS in intestinal tumorigenesis was shown by crossing APCMin/+ mice to those that have catalase targeted to mitochondria, which resulted in a significant reduction in tumorigenesis in the colon. Thus, mitochondrial genome instability and ROS enhance intestinal tumorigenesis and Tfam+/− mice are a relevant model to address the role of mtDNA instability in disease states in which mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated, such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and aging. PMID:22056359

  18. Long-lasting genomic instability following arsenite exposure in mammalian cells: the role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sciandrello, G; Mauro, M; Catanzaro, I; Saverini, M; Caradonna, F; Barbata, G

    2011-08-01

    Previously, we reported that the progeny of mammalian cells, which has been exposed to sodium arsenite for two cell cycles, exhibited chromosomal instability and concurrent DNA hypomethylation, when they were subsequently investigated after two months of subculturing (about 120 cell generations) in arsenite-free medium. In this work, we continued our investigations of the long-lasting arsenite-induced genomic instability by analyzing additional endpoints at several time points during the cell expanded growth. In addition to the progressive increase of aneuploid cells, we also noted micronucleated and multinucleated cells that continued to accumulate up to the 50th cell generation, as well as dicentric chromosomes and/or telomeric associations and other complex chromosome rearrangements that began to appear much later, at the 90th cell generation following arsenite exposure. The increasing genomic instability was further characterized by an increased frequency of spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the long-lasting genomic instability was related to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which at the 50th cell generation appeared higher than in stable parental cells. To gain additional insight into the continuing genomic instability, we examined several individual clones isolated at different time points from the growing cell population. Chromosomally and morphologically unstable cell clones, the number of which increased with the expanded growth, were also present at early phases of growth without arsenite. All genomically unstable clones exhibited higher ROS levels than untreated cells suggesting that oxidative stress is an important factor for the progression of genomic instability induced by arsenite. PMID:21520292

  19. Genomic Instability and DNA Damage Responses in Progeria Arising from Defective Maturation of Prelamin A

    PubMed Central

    Musich, Phillip R.; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    Progeria syndromes have in common a premature aging phenotype and increased genome instability. The susceptibility to DNA damage arises from a compromised repair system, either in the repair proteins themselves or in the DNA damage response pathways. The most severe progerias stem from mutations affecting lamin A production, a filamentous protein of the nuclear lamina. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) patients are heterozygous for a LMNA gene mutation while Restrictive Dermopathy (RD) individuals have a homozygous deficiency in the processing protease Zmpste24. These mutations generate the mutant lamin A proteins progerin and FC-lamina A, respectively, which cause nuclear deformations and chromatin perturbations. Genome instability is observed even though genome maintenance and repair genes appear normal. The unresolved question is what features of the DNA damage response pathways are deficient in HGPS and RD cells. Here we review and discuss recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how the accumulation of progerin/FC-lamin A proteins may disrupt DNA damage response pathways in HGPS and RD cells. As the mutant lamin proteins accumulate they sequester replication and repair factors, leading to stalled replication forks which collapse into DNA double-strand beaks (DSBs). In a reaction unique to HGPS and RD cells these accessible DSB termini bind Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein which excludes normal binding by DNA DSB repair proteins. The bound XPA also signals activation of ATM and ATR, arresting cell cycle progression, leading to arrested growth. In addition, the effective sequestration of XPA at these DSB damage sites makes HGPS and RD cells more sensitive to ultraviolet light and other mutagens normally repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway of which XPA is a necessary and specific component. PMID:19851476

  20. Computational analysis of core promoters in the Drosophila genome

    PubMed Central

    Ohler, Uwe; Liao, Guo-chun; Niemann, Heinrich; Rubin, Gerald M

    2002-01-01

    Background The core promoter, a region of about 100 base-pairs flanking the transcription start site (TSS), serves as the recognition site for the basal transcription apparatus. Drosophila TSSs have generally been mapped by individual experiments; the low number of accurately mapped TSSs has limited analysis of promoter sequence motifs and the training of computational prediction tools. Results We identified TSS candidates for about 2,000 Drosophila genes by aligning 5' expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from cap-trapped cDNA libraries to the genome, while applying stringent criteria concerning coverage and 5'-end distribution. Examination of the sequences flanking these TSSs revealed the presence of well-known core promoter motifs such as the TATA box, the initiator and the downstream promoter element (DPE). We also define, and assess the distribution of, several new motifs prevalent in core promoters, including what appears to be a variant DPE motif. Among the prevalent motifs is the DNA-replication-related element DRE, recently shown to be part of the recognition site for the TBP-related factor TRF2. Our TSS set was then used to retrain the computational promoter predictor McPromoter, allowing us to improve the recognition performance to over 50% sensitivity and 40% specificity. We compare these computational results to promoter prediction in vertebrates. Conclusions There are relatively few recognizable binding sites for previously known general transcription factors in Drosophila core promoters. However, we identified several new motifs enriched in promoter regions. We were also able to significantly improve the performance of computational TSS prediction in Drosophila. PMID:12537576

  1. Methods to Monitor DNA Repair Defects and Genomic Instability in the Context of a Disrupted Nuclear Lamina

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2016-01-01

    The organization of the genome within the nuclear space is viewed as an additional level of regulation of genome function, as well as a means to ensure genome integrity. Structural proteins associated with the nuclear envelope, in particular lamins (A- and B-type) and lamin-associated proteins, play an important role in genome organization. Interestingly, there is a whole body of evidence that links disruptions of the nuclear lamina with DNA repair defects and genomic instability. Here, we describe a few standard techniques that have been successfully utilized to identify mechanisms behind DNA repair defects and genomic instability in cells with an altered nuclear lamina. In particular, we describe protocols to monitor changes in the expression of DNA repair factors (Western blot) and their recruitment to sites of DNA damage (immunofluorescence); kinetics of DNA double-strand break repair after ionizing radiation (neutral comet assays); frequency of chromosomal aberrations (FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization); and alterations in telomere homeostasis (Quantitative-FISH). These techniques have allowed us to shed some light onto molecular mechanisms by which alterations in A-type lamins induce genomic instability, which could contribute to the pathophysiology of aging and aging-related diseases. PMID:27147057

  2. Lamin A Δexon9 mutation leads to telomere and chromatin defects but not genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arindam; Grotsky, David A; Neumann, Martin A; Kreienkamp, Ray; Gonzalez-Suarez, Ignacio; Redwood, Abena B; Kennedy, Brian K; Stewart, Colin L; Gonzalo, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Over 300 mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins, are associated with 15 human degenerative disorders and premature aging syndromes. Although genomic instability seems to contribute to the pathophysiology of some laminopathies, there is limited information about what mutations cause genomic instability and by which molecular mechanisms. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts depleted of A-type lamins or expressing mutants lacking exons 8–11 (LmnaΔ8–11/Δ8–11) exhibit alterations in telomere biology and DNA repair caused by cathepsin L-mediated degradation of 53BP1 and reduced expression of BRCA1 and RAD51. Thus, a region encompassing exons 8–11 seems essential for genome integrity. Given that deletion of lamin A exon 9 in the mouse (LmnaΔ9/Δ9) results in a progeria phenotype, we tested if this domain is important for genome integrity. LmnaΔ9/Δ9 MEFs exhibit telomere shortening and heterochromatin alterations but do not activate cathepsin L-mediated degradation of 53BP1 and maintain expression of BRCA1 and RAD51. Accordingly, LmnaΔ9/Δ9 MEFs do not present genomic instability, and expression of mutant lamin A Δexon9 in lamin-depleted cells restores DNA repair factors levels and partially rescues nuclear abnormalities. These data reveal that the domain encoded by exon 9 is important to maintain telomere homeostasis and heterochromatin structure but does not play a role in DNA repair, thus pointing to other exons in the lamin A tail as responsible for the genomic instability phenotype in LmnaΔ8–11/Δ8–11 mice. Our study also suggests that the levels of DNA repair factors 53BP1, BRCA1 and RAD51 could potentially serve as biomarkers to identify laminopathies that present with genomic instability. PMID:24153156

  3. The Transient Inactivation of the Master Cell Cycle Phosphatase Cdc14 Causes Genomic Instability in Diploid Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Oliver; Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Petes, Thomas D.; Machín, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a common feature found in cancer cells . Accordingly, many tumor suppressor genes identified in familiar cancer syndromes are involved in the maintenance of the stability of the genome during every cell division and are commonly referred to as caretakers. Inactivating mutations and epigenetic silencing of caretakers are thought to be the most important mechanisms that explain cancer-related genome instability. However, little is known of whether transient inactivation of caretaker proteins could trigger genome instability and, if so, what types of instability would occur. In this work, we show that a brief and reversible inactivation, during just one cell cycle, of the key phosphatase Cdc14 in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is enough to result in diploid cells with multiple gross chromosomal rearrangements and changes in ploidy. Interestingly, we observed that such transient loss yields a characteristic fingerprint whereby trisomies are often found in small-sized chromosomes, and gross chromosome rearrangements, often associated with concomitant loss of heterozygosity, are detected mainly on the ribosomal DNA-bearing chromosome XII. Taking into account the key role of Cdc14 in preventing anaphase bridges, resetting replication origins, and controlling spindle dynamics in a well-defined window within anaphase, we speculate that the transient loss of Cdc14 activity causes cells to go through a single mitotic catastrophe with irreversible consequences for the genome stability of the progeny. PMID:25971663

  4. Solitary fibrous tumors: loss of chimeric protein expression and genomic instability mark dedifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Dagrada, Gian P; Spagnuolo, Rosalin D; Mauro, Valentina; Tamborini, Elena; Cesana, Luca; Gronchi, Alessandro; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Pierotti, Marco A; Negri, Tiziana; Pilotti, Silvana

    2015-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors, which are characterized by their broad morphological spectrum and unpredictable behavior, are rare mesenchymal neoplasias that are currently divided into three main variants that have the NAB2-STAT6 gene fusion as their unifying molecular lesion: usual, malignant and dedifferentiated solitary fibrous tumors. The aims of this study were to validate molecular and immunohistochemical/biochemical approaches to diagnose the range of solitary fibrous tumors by focusing on the dedifferentiated variant, and to reveal the genetic events associated with dedifferentiation by integrating the findings of array comparative genomic hybridization. We studied 29 usual, malignant and dedifferentiated solitary fibrous tumors from 24 patients (including paired samples from five patients whose tumors progressed to the dedifferentiated form) by means of STAT6 immunohistochemistry and (when frozen material was available) reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and biochemistry. In addition, the array comparative genomic hybridization findings were used to profile 12 tumors from nine patients. The NAB2/STAT6 fusion was detected in all of the tumors, but immunohistochemistry and western blotting indicated that chimeric protein expression was atypical or absent in 9 out of 11 dedifferentiated tumors. The comparative genomic hybridization results revealed that the usual and malignant solitary fibrous tumors had a simple profile, whereas the genome of the dedifferentiated tumors was complex and unstable, and suggested that 13q and 17p deletions and TP53 mutations may be present in malignant lesions before the full expression of a dedifferentiated phenotype. Solitary fibrous tumor dedifferentiation is associated with the loss of chimeric oncoprotein expression, genomic instability, and cell decommitment and reprogramming. The assessment of dedifferentiated solitary fibrous tumors is based on the presence of the fusion transcripts and, in principle, negative

  5. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. PMID:24746923

  6. Comparative genomic hybridisation divides retinoblastomas into a high and a low level chromosomal instability group

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, J E; Hermsen, M A J A; Gille, H J P; Schouten-Van Meeteren, N Y N; Moll, A C; Imhof, S M; Meijer, G A; Baak, J P A; van der Valk, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in childhood and is responsible for approximately 1% of all deaths caused by childhood cancer. Aims/methods: Comparative genomic hybridisation was performed on 13 consecutive, histologically confirmed retinoblastomas to analyse patterns of chromosomal changes and correlate these to clinicopathological variables. Six cases were hereditary and seven cases were sporadic. Results: In 11 of the 13 tumours chromosomal abnormalities were detected, most frequently gains. Frequent chromosomal gains concerned 6p (46%), 1q (38%), 2p, 9q (30%), 5p, 7q, 10q, 17q, and 20q (23%). Frequent losses occurred at Xq (46%), 13q14, 16q, and 4q (23%). High level copy number gains were found at 5p15 and 6p11–12. A loss at 13q14 occurred in three cases only. Relatively few events occurred in the hereditary cases (27) compared with the non-hereditary cases (70 events). The number of chromosomal aberrations in these 13 retinoblastomas showed a bimodal distribution. Seven tumours showed less than four chromosomal aberrations, falling into a low level chromosomal instability (CIN) group, and six tumours showed at least eight aberrations, falling into a high level CIN group. In the low level CIN group the mean age was half that seen in the high level CIN group, there were less male patients, and there were more hereditary and bilateral cases. Microsatellite instability was not detected in either of the two groups. Conclusion: Despite the complex pattern of genetic changes in retinoblastomas, certain chromosomal regions appear to be affected preferentially. On the basis of the number of genetic events, retinoblastomas can be divided in low and a high level chromosomal instability groups, which have striking differences in clinical presentation. PMID:12499428

  7. Growth Factor Dependent Regulation of Centrosome Function and Genomic Instability by HuR

    PubMed Central

    Filippova, Natalia; Yang, Xiuhua; Nabors, Louis Burt

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA binding protein HuR is over expressed in cancer cells and contributes to disease progression through post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA. The regulation of HuR and how this relates to glioma is the focus of this report. SRC and c-Abl kinases regulate HuR sub-cellular trafficking and influence accumulation in the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) via a growth factor dependent signaling mechanism. Growth factor stimulation of glioma cell lines results in the associate of HuR with the PCM and amplification of centrosome number. This process is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of HuR and is abolished by mutating tyrosine residues. HuR is overexpressed in tumor samples from patients with glioblastoma and associated with a reduced survival. These findings suggest HuR plays a significant role in centrosome amplification and genomic instability, which contributes to a worse disease outcome. PMID:25803745

  8. Molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liber, Howard L.

    2003-02-13

    The overall strategy was to create a series of isogenic human cell lines that differ in key elements of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, or DNA repair in response to radiation-induced damage. The goal then was to quantify the fractions of cells within a population that exhibit reduced telomere lengths and relate this to the genetic background of the cell, as well as to the response to ionizing radiation. Association between telomere length and degree of genomic instability in the population is being examined for seven closely related cell lines, that vary in p53 status, bcl-2 status, or ability to repair double strand breaks. Experiments utilize gamma rays at doses of 0, 10, and 200 cGy. During this time period the effort concentrated on generating data with two cell lines. Approximately one-third of the required clones were isolated, and analyses for mutagenesis and chromosome aberrations were undertaken.

  9. Yeast Sen1 Helicase Protects the Genome from Transcription-Associated Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mischo, Hannah E.; Gómez-González, Belén; Grzechnik, Pawel; Rondón, Ana G.; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars; Aguilera, Andrés; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Sen1 of S. cerevisiae is a known component of the NRD complex implicated in transcription termination of nonpolyadenylated as well as some polyadenylated RNA polymerase II transcripts. We now show that Sen1 helicase possesses a wider function by restricting the occurrence of RNA:DNA hybrids that may naturally form during transcription, when nascent RNA hybridizes to DNA prior to its packaging into RNA protein complexes. These hybrids displace the nontranscribed strand and create R loop structures. Loss of Sen1 results in transient R loop accumulation and so elicits transcription-associated recombination. SEN1 genetically interacts with DNA repair genes, suggesting that R loop resolution requires proteins involved in homologous recombination. Based on these findings, we propose that R loop formation is a frequent event during transcription and a key function of Sen1 is to prevent their accumulation and associated genome instability. PMID:21211720

  10. Growth factor dependent regulation of centrosome function and genomic instability by HuR.

    PubMed

    Filippova, Natalia; Yang, Xiuhua; Nabors, Louis Burt

    2015-03-20

    The mRNA binding protein HuR is over expressed in cancer cells and contributes to disease progression through post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA. The regulation of HuR and how this relates to glioma is the focus of this report. SRC and c-Abl kinases regulate HuR sub-cellular trafficking and influence accumulation in the pericentriolar matrix (PCM) via a growth factor dependent signaling mechanism. Growth factor stimulation of glioma cell lines results in the associate of HuR with the PCM and amplification of centrosome number. This process is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of HuR and is abolished by mutating tyrosine residues. HuR is overexpressed in tumor samples from patients with glioblastoma and associated with a reduced survival. These findings suggest HuR plays a significant role in centrosome amplification and genomic instability, which contributes to a worse disease outcome.

  11. Warburg effect and translocation-induced genomic instability: two yeast models for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tosato, Valentina; Grüning, Nana-Maria; Breitenbach, Michael; Arnak, Remigiusz; Ralser, Markus; Bruschi, Carlo V.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast has been established as an efficient model system to study biological principles underpinning human health. In this review we focus on yeast models covering two aspects of cancer formation and progression (i) the activity of pyruvate kinase (PK), which recapitulates metabolic features of cancer cells, including the Warburg effect, and (ii) chromosome bridge-induced translocation (BIT) mimiking genome instability in cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study cancer cell metabolism, as exponentially growing yeast cells exhibit many metabolic similarities with rapidly proliferating cancer cells. The metabolic reconfiguration includes an increase in glucose uptake and fermentation, at the expense of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (the Warburg effect), and involves a broad reconfiguration of nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Both in yeast and humans, the regulation of this process seems to have a central player, PK, which is up-regulated in cancer, and to occur mostly on a post-transcriptional and post-translational basis. Furthermore, BIT allows to generate selectable translocation-derived recombinants (“translocants”), between any two desired chromosomal locations, in wild-type yeast strains transformed with a linear DNA cassette carrying a selectable marker flanked by two DNA sequences homologous to different chromosomes. Using the BIT system, targeted non-reciprocal translocations in mitosis are easily inducible. An extensive collection of different yeast translocants exhibiting genome instability and aberrant phenotypes similar to cancer cells has been produced and subjected to analysis. In this review, we hence provide an overview upon two yeast cancer models, and extrapolate general principles for mimicking human disease mechanisms in yeast. PMID:23346549

  12. Bystander effects, genomic instability, adaptive response, and cancer risk assessment for radiation and chemical exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R. Julian . E-mail: preston.julian@epa.gov

    2005-09-01

    There is an increased interest in utilizing mechanistic data in support of the cancer risk assessment process for ionizing radiation and environmental chemical exposures. In this regard, the use of biologically based dose-response models is particularly advocated. The aim is to provide an enhanced basis for describing the nature of the dose-response curve for induced tumors at low levels of exposure. Cellular responses that might influence the nature of the dose-response curve at low exposures are understandably receiving attention. These responses (bystander effects, genomic instability, and adaptive responses) have been studied most extensively for radiation exposures. The former two could result in an enhancement of the tumor response at low doses and the latter could lead to a reduced response compared to that predicted by a linear extrapolation from high dose responses. Bystander responses, whereby cells other than those directly traversed by radiation tracks are damaged, can alter the concept of target cell population per unit dose. Similarly, induced genomic instability can alter the concept of total response to an exposure. There appears to be a role for oxidative damage and cellular signaling in the etiology of these cellular responses. The adaptive response appears to be inducible at very low doses of radiation or of some chemicals and reduces the cellular response to a larger challenge dose. It is currently unclear how these cellular toxic responses might be involved in tumor formation, if indeed they are. In addition, it is not known how widespread they are as regards inducing agents. Thus, their impact on low dose cancer risk remains to be established.

  13. Preventing AID, a physiological mutator, from deleterious activation: regulation of the genomic instability that is associated with antibody diversity.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Tran, Thinh Huy; Kobayashi, Maki; Aida, Masatoshi; Honjo, Tasuku

    2010-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential and sufficient to accomplish class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, which are two genetic events required for the generation of antibody-mediated memory responses. However, AID can also introduce genomic instability, giving rise to chromosomal translocation and/or mutations in proto-oncogenes. It is therefore important for cells to suppress AID expression unless B lymphocytes are stimulated by pathogens. The mechanisms for avoiding the accidental activation of AID and thereby avoiding genomic instability can be classified into three types: (i) transcriptional regulation, (ii) post-transcriptional regulation and (iii) target specificity. This review summarizes the recently elucidated comprehensive transcriptional regulation mechanisms of the AID gene and the post-transcriptional regulation that may be critical for preventing excess AID activity. Finally, we discuss why AID targets not only Igs but also other proto-oncogenes. AID targets many genes but it is not totally promiscuous and the criteria that specify its targets are unclear. A recent finding that a non-B DNA structure forms upon a decrease in topoisomerase 1 expression may explain this paradoxical target specificity determination. Evolution has chosen AID as a mutator of Ig genes because of its efficient DNA cleavage activity, even though its presence increases the risk of genomic instability. This is probably because immediate protection against pathogens is more critical for species survival than complete protection from the slower acting consequences of genomic instability, such as tumor formation.

  14. Tissue-specific genome instability in synthetic interspecific hybrids of Pennisetum purpureum (Napier grass) and Pennisetum glaucum (pearl millet) is caused by micronucleation.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Gabriela Barreto; Ishii, Takayoshi; Fuchs, Joerg; Houben, Andreas; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2016-09-01

    Genome instability is observed in several species hybrids. We studied the mechanisms underlying the genome instability in hexaploid hybrids of Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum R.) and pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) using a combination of different methods. Chromosomes of both parental genomes are lost by micronucleation. Our analysis suggests that genome instability occurs preferentially in meristematic root tissue of hexaploid hybrids, and chromosome elimination is not only caused by centromere inactivation. Likely, beside centromere dysfunction, unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks result in fragmented chromosomes in synthetic hybrids.

  15. Extracellular signaling through the microenvironment: a hypothesis relating carcinogenesis, bystander effects, and genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Brooks, A. L.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Cell growth, differentiation and death are directed in large part by extracellular signaling through the interactions of cells with other cells and with the extracellular matrix; these interactions are in turn modulated by cytokines and growth factors, i.e. the microenvironment. Here we discuss the idea that extracellular signaling integrates multicellular damage responses that are important deterrents to the development of cancer through mechanisms that eliminate abnormal cells and inhibit neoplastic behavior. As an example, we discuss the action of transforming growth factor beta (TGFB1) as an extracellular sensor of damage. We propose that radiation-induced bystander effects and genomic instability are, respectively, positive and negative manifestations of this homeostatic process. Bystander effects exhibited predominantly after a low-dose or a nonhomogeneous radiation exposure are extracellular signaling pathways that modulate cellular repair and death programs. Persistent disruption of extracellular signaling after exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation may lead to the accumulation of aberrant cells that are genomically unstable. Understanding radiation effects in terms of coordinated multicellular responses that affect decisions regarding the fate of a cell may necessitate re-evaluation of radiation dose and risk concepts and provide avenues for intervention.

  16. Genomic instability induced by α-pinene in Chinese hamster cell line.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Irene; Caradonna, Fabio; Barbata, Giusi; Saverini, Marghereth; Mauro, Maurizio; Sciandrello, Giulia

    2012-07-01

    Here, we report the effects of exposure of mammalian cells to α-pinene, a bicyclic monoterpene used in insecticides, solvents and perfumes. Morphological analysis, performed in V79-Cl3 cells exposed for 1 h to increasing concentrations (25 up to 50 μM) of α-pinene, indicated a statistically significant increase in micronucleated and multinucleated cell frequencies; apoptotic cells were seen at 40 and 50 μM. This monoterpene caused genomic instability by interfering with mitotic process; in fact, 50% of cells (versus 19% of control cells) showed irregular mitosis with multipolar or incorrectly localised spindles. Cytogenetic analysis demonstrated high-frequency hypodiploid metaphases as well as endoreduplicated cells and chromosome breaks. Clastogenic damage was prevalent over aneuploidogenic damage as demonstrated by the higher proportion of kinetochore-negative micronuclei. Alkaline comet confirmed that monoterpene exposure caused DNA lesions in a concentration-dependent manner. This damage probably arose by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. In order to assess the generation of ROS, the cells were incubated with CM-H(2)DCFDA and then analysed by flow cytometry. Results demonstrated an increase in fluorescence intensity after α-pinene treatment indicating increased oxidative stress. On the whole, these findings strongly suggest that α-pinene is able to compromise genome stability preferentially through mitotic alterations and to damage DNA through ROS production. PMID:22379123

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    SciTech Connect

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  18. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Methods Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. Results The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Conclusions Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide a

  19. Adoptive T cell therapy promotes the emergence of genomically altered tumor escape variants.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Thompson, Jill M; Kottke, Timothy J; Flynn Gilmer, Heather C; Knutson, Darlene L; Vile, Richard G

    2012-08-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy has been proven effective against melanoma in mice and humans. However, because most responses are incomplete or transient, cures remain rare. To maximize the efficacy of this therapy, it will be essential to gain a better understanding of the processes which result in tumor relapse. We studied these processes using B16ova murine melanoma and adoptive transfer of OT-I T cells. Transfer of T cells as a single therapy provided a significant survival benefit for mice with established subcutaneous tumors. However, tumors which initially regressed often recurred. By analyzing tumors which emerged in the presence of a potent OT-I response, we identified a novel tumor escape mechanism in which tumor cells evaded T cell pressure by undergoing major genomic changes involving loss of the gene encoding the target tumor antigen. Furthermore, we show that these in vivo processes can be recapitulated in vitro using T cell/tumor cell co-cultures. A single round of in vitro co-culture led to significant loss of the ova gene and a tumor cell population with rapidly induced and diverse karyotypic changes. Although these current studies focus on the model OVA antigen, the finding that T cells can directly promote genomic instability has important implications for the development of adoptive T cell therapies.

  20. The Npl3 hnRNP prevents R-loop-mediated transcription–replication conflicts and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Pereira, José M.; Herrero, Ana B.; García-Rubio, María L.; Marín, Antonio; Moreno, Sergio; Aguilera, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Transcription is a major obstacle for replication fork (RF) progression and a cause of genome instability. Part of this instability is mediated by cotranscriptional R loops, which are believed to increase by suboptimal assembly of the nascent messenger ribonucleoprotein particle (mRNP). However, no clear evidence exists that heterogeneous nuclear RNPs (hnRNPs), the basic mRNP components, prevent R-loop stabilization. Here we show that yeast Npl3, the most abundant RNA-binding hnRNP, prevents R-loop-mediated genome instability. npl3Δ cells show transcription-dependent and R-loop-dependent hyperrecombination and genome-wide replication obstacles as determined by accumulation of the Rrm3 helicase. Such obstacles preferentially occur at long and highly expressed genes, to which Npl3 is preferentially bound in wild-type cells, and are reduced by RNase H1 overexpression. The resulting replication stress confers hypersensitivity to double-strand break-inducing agents. Therefore, our work demonstrates that mRNP factors are critical for genome integrity and opens the option of using them as therapeutic targets in anti-cancer treatment. PMID:24240235

  1. Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability: A Role for Secreted Soluble Factors in Communicating the Radiation Response to Non-Irradiated Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Resat, Marianne S.; Morgan, William F.

    2004-06-14

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be described as the increased rate of genomic alterations occurring in the progeny of an irradiated cell. Its manifestations are the dynamic ongoing production of chrososomal rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation, microsatellite instability and/or cell killing. In this prospectus, we present the hypothesis that cellular exposure to ionizing radiation can result in the secretion of soluble factors by irradiated cells and/or their progeny, and that these factors can elicit responses in other cells thereby initiating and perpetuating ongoing genomic instability.

  2. Heat-killed bacteria induce genome instability in mouse small intestine, liver and spleen tissues.

    PubMed

    Koturbash, Igor; Thomas, James E; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2009-06-15

    Bacterial infection has been associated with several malignancies, yet the exact mechanism of infection-associated carcinogenesis remains obscure. Furthermore, it is still not clear whether oncontransformation requires an active infection process, or merely the presence of inactivated bacteria remnants is enough to cause deleterious effects. Here, we analyzed whether or not consumption of non-pathogenic and pathogenic heat-killed Escherichia coli leads to changes in genome stability in somatic tissues of exposed animals. For one week, mice were given to drink filtered or not-filtered water contaminated with heat-killed non-pathogenic E. coli DH5alpha or heat-killed pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 Sakai. Control animals received tap water. One week after exposure, molecular changes were analyzed in the small intestine, an organ that is in immediate contact with contaminated water. Additionally, we studied the effect in the distant spleen and liver, the organs that are involved in an immune response and detoxification, respectively. Finally, muscles were chosen as neutral tissues that were not supposed to be affected. Intestinal, liver and spleen but not muscle cells responded to all bacterial treatments with an increased level of DNA damage monitored by the induction of gammaH2AX foci. In the intestine, elevated levels of DNA damage were in parallel with an increase in Ku70 and p53 expression. We have also found an elevated level of cellular proliferation in the intestine, liver and spleen but not in muscle tissues of all exposed animals as measured by increase in PCNA levels. Our data suggest that exposure to heat-killed filtered bacteria can trigger substantial molecular responses and cause genomic instability in target and distant organs. Even though bacteria were non-pathogenic and unable to cause infection, their remnants still caused a profound effect on exposed animals.

  3. The G2 checkpoint activated by DNA damage does not prevent genome instability in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Jesús A; Pincheira, Juana; de la Torre, Consuelo

    2006-01-01

    Root growth, G2 length, and the frequency of aberrant mitoses and apoptotic nuclei were recorded after a single X-ray irradiation, ranging from 2.5 to 40 Gy, in Allium cepa L. root meristematic cells. After 72 h of recovery, root growth was reduced in a dose-dependent manner from 10 to 40 Gy, but not at 2.5 or 5 Gy doses. Flow cytometry plus TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) showed that activation of apoptosis occurred only after 20 and 40 Gy of X-rays. Nevertheless, irrespective of the radiation dose, conventional flow cytometry showed that cells accumulated in G2 (4C DNA content). Simultaneously, the mitotic index fell, though a mitotic wave appeared later. Cell accumulation in G2 was transient and partially reversed by caffeine, thus it was checkpoint-dependent. Strikingly, the additional G2 time provided by this checkpoint was never long enough to complete DNA repair. Then, in all cases, some G2 cells with still-unrepaired DNA underwent checkpoint adaptation, i.e., they entered into the late mitotic wave with chromatid breaks. These cells and those produced by the breakage of chromosomal bridges in anaphase will reach the G1 of the next cell cycle unrepaired, ensuring the appearance of genome instability.

  4. [Analysis of genome instability in offspring of "Mayak" workers families: minisatellite CEB1].

    PubMed

    Rusinova, G G; Glazkova, I V; Azizova, T V; Osovets, S V; Viazovskaia, N S

    2014-11-01

    Genome instability transmission in offspring was analyzed in order to evaluate the risk of delayed genetic effects of exposure in 95 family triplets in which only fathers experienced prolonged occupational radiation exposure. The mean total preconceptive absorbed dose (TPAD) of external gamma radiation in the paternal gonads was 1.65 ± 0.08 Gy (dose range of 0.57-5.70 Gy), and the mean TPAD of internal alpha radiation from incorporated plutonium-239 in.the gonads was 0.0015 ± 0.0003 Gy (dose range 0.000-0.015 Gy). The control group consisted of 50 family triplets in which parents were not occupationally exposed. The mutation process was studied using PCR based on hypervariable minisatellite marker CEB 1 (chromosome 2, 2q37.3). The paternal type of inheritance of mutations for minisatellite CEB 1 was found in 80% of cases. The analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in minisatellite CEB1 mutations in the common group of families in which fathers experienced prolonged occupational radiation exposure and in the group of families in which fathers were exposed to radiation in a dosage range of 0.5-1.0 Gy as compared to the control, reaching a significance level of p = 0.109 and p = 0.058, respectively. The dose threshold of mutation detection in the off-spring of Mayak PA workers was estimated.

  5. Helq acts in parallel to Fancc to suppress replication-associated genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Luebben, Spencer W.; Kawabata, Tsuyoshi; Akre, Monica K.; Lee, Wai Long; Johnson, Charles S.; O’Sullivan, M. Gerard; Shima, Naoko

    2013-01-01

    HELQ is a superfamily 2 DNA helicase found in archaea and metazoans. It has been implicated in processing stalled replication forks and in repairing DNA double-strand breaks and inter-strand crosslinks. Though previous studies have suggested the possibility that HELQ is involved in the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, a dominant mechanism for inter-strand crosslink repair in vertebrates, this connection remains elusive. Here, we investigated this question in mice using the Helqgt and Fancc− strains. Compared with Fancc−/− mice lacking FANCC, a component of the FA core complex, Helqgt/gt mice exhibited a mild of form of FA-like phenotypes including hypogonadism and cellular sensitivity to the crosslinker mitomycin C. However, unlike Fancc−/− primary fibroblasts, Helqgt/gt cells had intact FANCD2 mono-ubiquitination and focus formation. Notably, for all traits examined, Helq was non-epistatic with Fancc, as Helqgt/gt;Fancc−/− double mutants displayed significantly worsened phenotypes than either single mutant. Importantly, this was most noticeable for the suppression of spontaneous chromosome instability such as micronuclei and 53BP1 nuclear bodies, known consequences of persistently stalled replication forks. These findings suggest that mammalian HELQ contributes to genome stability in unchallenged conditions through a mechanism distinct from the function of FANCC. PMID:24005041

  6. Chromatin remodeller SMARCA4 recruits topoisomerase 1 and suppresses transcription-associated genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Afzal; Begum, Nasim A.; Taniguchi, Takako; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Kobayashi, Maki; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1, an enzyme that relieves superhelical tension, is implicated in transcription-associated mutagenesis and genome instability-associated with neurodegenerative diseases as well as activation-induced cytidine deaminase. From proteomic analysis of TOP1-associated proteins, we identify SMARCA4, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeller; FACT, a histone chaperone; and H3K4me3, a transcriptionally active chromatin marker. Here we show that SMARCA4 knockdown in a B-cell line decreases TOP1 recruitment to chromatin, and leads to increases in Igh/c-Myc chromosomal translocations, variable and switch region mutations and negative superhelicity, all of which are also observed in response to TOP1 knockdown. In contrast, FACT knockdown inhibits association of TOP1 with H3K4me3, and severely reduces DNA cleavage and Igh/c-Myc translocations, without significant effect on TOP1 recruitment to chromatin. We thus propose that SMARCA4 is involved in the TOP1 recruitment to general chromatin, whereas FACT is required for TOP1 binding to H3K4me3 at non-B DNA containing chromatin for the site-specific cleavage. PMID:26842758

  7. Genomic instability in human lymphocytes from male users of crack cocaine.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Thiago Aley Brites; Palazzo, Roberta Passos; de Andrade, Fabiana Michelsen; Reichert, César Luis; Pechansky, Flávio; Kessler, Félix; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; de Andrade, Gisele Gomes; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Maluf, Sharbel Weidner

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that crack cocaine use alters systemic biochemical markers, like oxidative damage and inflammation markers, but very few studies have assessed the potential effects of crack cocaine at the cellular level. We assessed genome instability by means of the comet assay and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus technique in crack cocaine users at the time of admission to a rehabilitation clinic and at two times after the beginning of withdrawal. Thirty one active users of crack cocaine and forty control subjects were evaluated. Comparison between controls and crack cocaine users at the first analysis showed significant differences in the rates of DNA damage (p = 0.037). The frequency of micronuclei (MN) (p < 0.001) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) (p < 0.001) was increased, but not the frequency of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) (p = 0.089). DNA damage decreased only after the end of treatment (p < 0.001). Micronuclei frequency did not decrease after treatment, and nuclear buds increased substantially. The results of this study reveal the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of crack cocaine use in human lymphocytes and pave the way for further research on cellular responses and the possible consequences of DNA damage, such as induction of irreversible neurological disease and cancer. PMID:25264678

  8. Chromosomal Replication Complexity: A Novel DNA Metrics and Genome Instability Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    As the ratio of the copy number of the most replicated to the unreplicated regions in the same chromosome, the definition of chromosomal replication complexity (CRC) appears to leave little room for variation, being either two during S-phase or one otherwise. However, bacteria dividing faster than they replicate their chromosome spike CRC to four and even eight. A recent experimental inquiry about the limits of CRC in Escherichia coli revealed two major reasons to avoid elevating it further: (i) increased chromosomal fragmentation and (ii) complications with subsequent double-strand break repair. Remarkably, examples of stable elevated CRC in eukaryotic chromosomes are well known under various terms like "differential replication," "underreplication," "DNA puffs," "onion-skin replication," or "re-replication" and highlight the phenomenon of static replication fork (sRF). To accurately describe the resulting "amplification by overinitiation," I propose a new term: "replification" (subchromosomal overreplication). In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, replification, via sRF processing, causes double-strand DNA breaks and, with their repair elevating chromosomal rearrangements, represents a novel genome instability factor. I suggest how static replication bubbles could be stabilized and speculate that some tandem duplications represent such persistent static bubbles. Moreover, I propose how static replication bubbles could be transformed into tandem duplications, double minutes, or inverted triplications. Possible experimental tests of these models are discussed. PMID:27711112

  9. Geosmin induces genomic instability in the mammalian cell microplate-based comet assay.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aline Flor; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Geosmin (GEO) (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol) is a metabolite that renders earthy and musty taste and odor to water. Data of GEO genotoxicity on mammalian cells are scarce in the literature. Thus, the present study assessed the genotoxicity of GEO on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in the microplate-based comet assay. The percent of tail DNA (tail intensity (TI)), tail moment (TM), and tail length (TL) were used as parameters for DNA damage assessment. The results demonstrated that concentrations of GEO of 30 and 60 μg/mL were genotoxic to CHO cells after 4- and 24-h exposure periods, in all parameters evaluated, such as TI, TM, and TL. Additionally, GEO 15 μg/mL was genotoxic in the three parameters only in the 24-h exposure time. The same was observed for GEO 7.5 μg/mL, which induced significant DNA damage observed as TI in the 24-h treatment. The results present evidence that exposure to GEO may be associated with genomic instability in mammalian cells.

  10. Chronic inflammation-associated genomic instability paves the way for human esophageal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Dongping; Lei, Zhijin; Chen, Donglin; Xu, Zexin; Su, Min

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with increased risk of cancer development, whereas the link between chronic inflammation and esophageal carcinogenesis is still obscure heretofore. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and DNA damage, as well as the possible role of DNA damage in esophageal carcinogenic process. Endoscopic esophageal biopsies from 109 individuals from Chaoshan littoral, a high-risk region for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), were examined to evaluate the association between chronic inflammation and histological severity, while additional 204 esophageal non-tumor samples from patients with ESCC were collected. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the oxidative DNA damage and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Significantly positive correlation was observed between degree of chronic inflammation and esophageal precursor lesions (rs = 0.37, P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that oxidative DNA damage level was positively correlated with the degree of chronic inflammation (rs = 0.21, P < 0.05). Moreover, the level of oxidative DNA damage positively correlated with histological severity (rs = 0.49, P < 0.01). We found that the extent of DSBs was progressively increased with inflammation degree (P < 0.01) and the progression of precancerous lesions (P < 0.001). Collectively, these findings provide evidence linking chronic inflammation-associated genomic instability with esophageal carcinogenesis and suggest possibilities for early detection and intervention of esophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:27028857

  11. Radiation induces genomic instability and mammary ductal dysplasia in Atm heterozygous mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weil, M. M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Yu, Y.; McCarthy, M.; Zabriskie, R. C.; Ullrich, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a genetic syndrome resulting from the inheritance of two defective copies of the ATM gene that includes among its stigmata radiosensitivity and cancer susceptibility. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that although women with a single defective copy of ATM (AT heterozygotes) appear clinically normal, they may never the less have an increased relative risk of developing breast cancer. Whether they are at increased risk for radiation-induced breast cancer from medical exposures to ionizing radiation is unknown. We have used a murine model of AT to investigate the effect of a single defective Atm allele, the murine homologue of ATM, on the susceptibility of mammary epithelial cells to radiation-induced transformation. Here we report that mammary epithelial cells from irradiated mice with one copy of Atm truncated in the PI-3 kinase domain were susceptible to radiation-induced genomic instability and generated a 10% incidence of dysplastic mammary ducts when transplanted into syngenic recipients, whereas cells from Atm(+/+) mice were stable and formed only normal ducts. Since radiation-induced ductal dysplasia is a precursor to mammary cancer, the results indicate that AT heterozygosity increases susceptibility to radiogenic breast cancer in this murine model system.

  12. Niacin status and genomic instability in bone marrow cells; mechanisms favoring the progression of leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, James B

    2012-01-01

    Niacin deficiency causes dramatic genomic instability in bone marrow cells in an in vivo rat model. The end result is seen in the increased incidence of sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei, chromosomal aberrations and the eventual development of nitrosourea-induced leukemias. From a mechanistic perspective, niacin deficiency delays excision repair and causes double strand break accumulation, which in turn favor chromosome breaks and translocations. Niacin deficiency also impairs cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, which combine to encourage the survival of cells with leukemogenic potential. Niacin deficiency also enhances the level of oxidant damage found in cellular proteins and DNA, but not through depression of GSH levels. Pharmacological supplementation of niacin decreases the development of nitrosourea-induced leukemias, while short term effects of high niacin intake include a large increase in cellular NAD+ and poly(ADP-ribose) content and enhanced apoptosis. These results are important to cancer patients, which tend to be niacin deficient, are exposed to large doses of genotoxic drugs, and suffer short-term bone marrow suppression and long-term development of secondary leukemias. The data from our rat model suggest that niacin supplementation of cancer patients may decrease the severity of short and long-term side effects, and may also improve tumor cell killing through activation of poly(ADP-ribose)-dependent apoptosis pathways.

  13. Is there a common mechanism underlying genomic instability, bystander effects and other nontargeted effects of exposure to ionizing radiation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A number of nontargeted and delayed effects associated with radiation exposure have now been described. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects. It is unlikely that these nontargeted effects are directly induced by cellular irradiation. Instead, it is proposed that some as yet to be identified secreted factor can be produced by irradiated cells that can stimulate effects in nonirradiated cells (death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors) and perpetuate genomic instability in the clonally expanded progeny of an irradiated cell. The proposed factor must be soluble and capable of being transported between cells by cell-to-cell gap junction communication channels. Furthermore, it must have the potential to stimulate cellular cytokines and/or reactive oxygen species. While it is difficult to imagine a role for such a secreted factor in contributing to transgenerational effects, the other nontargeted effects of radiation may all share a common mechanism.

  14. Towards Resolving Conflicting Reports of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Populations Exposed to Ionizing Radiation: Implications for the Hibakusha

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2007-03-30

    Radiation induced genomic instability has been described in a host of normal and transformed cells in vitro (Morgan 2003a). This instability can manifest as cell killing, micronuclei formation, transformation induction, di- and tri- nucleotide repeat instability, gene amplifications and mutations, and chromosomal rearrangements. Cytogenetic alterations are perhaps the best described of these endpoints following radiation exposures and will be the focus of this chapter. Chromosomal instability is characterized as either multiple sub populations of chromosomally rearranged metaphase chromosomes, or as newly arising chromatid and/or chromosomal aberrations occurring in the clonally expanded decedents of an irradiated cell. Some chromosomal changes appear to entail recombination events involving DNA repeat sequences within the genome, e.g., interstitial telomere-repeat like sequences (Day et al. 1998) and may be manifestations of telomere dysfunction in unstable clones of cells (Murnane and Sabatier 2004). Others, including the appearance of chromatid aberrations, indicate that DNA lesions can manifest in the preceding cell cycle multiple cell generations after the initial insult.

  15. A genome-wide view of microsatellite instability: old stories of cancer mutations revisited with new sequencing technologies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Park, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are simple tandem repeats that are present at millions of loci in the human genome. Microsatellite instability (MSI) refers to DNA slippage events on microsatellites that occur frequently in cancer genomes when there is a defect in the DNA mismatch repair system. These somatic mutations can result in inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or disrupt other non-coding regulatory sequences, thereby playing a role in carcinogenesis. Here, we will discuss the ways in which high-throughput sequencing data can facilitate a genome- or exome-wide discovery and more detailed investigation of MSI events in microsatellite-unstable cancer genomes. We will address the methodological aspects of this approach and highlight insights from recent analyses of colorectal and endometrial cancer genomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas project. These include identification of novel MSI targets within and across tumor types and the relationship between the likelihood of MSI events to chromatin structure. Given the increasing popularity of exome and genome sequencing of cancer genomes, a comprehensive characterization of MSI may serve as a valuable marker of cancer evolution and aid in a search for therapeutic targets. PMID:25371413

  16. Mechanism of genomic instability in cells infected with the high-risk human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Isok-Paas, Helen; Laos, Triin; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2009-04-01

    In HPV-related cancers, the "high-risk" human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are frequently found integrated into the cellular genome. The integrated subgenomic HPV fragments express viral oncoproteins and carry an origin of DNA replication that is capable of initiating bidirectional DNA re-replication in the presence of HPV replication proteins E1 and E2, which ultimately leads to rearrangements within the locus of the integrated viral DNA. The current study indicates that the E1- and E2-dependent DNA replication from the integrated HPV origin follows the "onion skin"-type replication mode and generates a heterogeneous population of replication intermediates. These include linear, branched, open circular, and supercoiled plasmids, as identified by two-dimensional neutral-neutral gel-electrophoresis. We used immunofluorescence analysis to show that the DNA repair/recombination centers are assembled at the sites of the integrated HPV replication. These centers recruit viral and cellular replication proteins, the MRE complex, Ku70/80, ATM, Chk2, and, to some extent, ATRIP and Chk1 (S317). In addition, the synthesis of histone gammaH2AX, which is a hallmark of DNA double strand breaks, is induced, and Chk2 is activated by phosphorylation in the HPV-replicating cells. These changes suggest that the integrated HPV replication intermediates are processed by the activated cellular DNA repair/recombination machinery, which results in cross-chromosomal translocations as detected by metaphase FISH. We also confirmed that the replicating HPV episomes that expressed the physiological levels of viral replication proteins could induce genomic instability in the cells with integrated HPV. We conclude that the HPV replication origin within the host chromosome is one of the key factors that triggers the development of HPV-associated cancers. It could be used as a starting point for the "onion skin"-type of DNA replication whenever the HPV plasmid exists in the same cell, which endangers

  17. Mechanism of Genomic Instability in Cells Infected with the High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kadaja, Meelis; Isok-Paas, Helen; Laos, Triin; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2009-01-01

    In HPV–related cancers, the “high-risk” human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are frequently found integrated into the cellular genome. The integrated subgenomic HPV fragments express viral oncoproteins and carry an origin of DNA replication that is capable of initiating bidirectional DNA re-replication in the presence of HPV replication proteins E1 and E2, which ultimately leads to rearrangements within the locus of the integrated viral DNA. The current study indicates that the E1- and E2-dependent DNA replication from the integrated HPV origin follows the “onion skin”–type replication mode and generates a heterogeneous population of replication intermediates. These include linear, branched, open circular, and supercoiled plasmids, as identified by two-dimensional neutral-neutral gel-electrophoresis. We used immunofluorescence analysis to show that the DNA repair/recombination centers are assembled at the sites of the integrated HPV replication. These centers recruit viral and cellular replication proteins, the MRE complex, Ku70/80, ATM, Chk2, and, to some extent, ATRIP and Chk1 (S317). In addition, the synthesis of histone γH2AX, which is a hallmark of DNA double strand breaks, is induced, and Chk2 is activated by phosphorylation in the HPV–replicating cells. These changes suggest that the integrated HPV replication intermediates are processed by the activated cellular DNA repair/recombination machinery, which results in cross-chromosomal translocations as detected by metaphase FISH. We also confirmed that the replicating HPV episomes that expressed the physiological levels of viral replication proteins could induce genomic instability in the cells with integrated HPV. We conclude that the HPV replication origin within the host chromosome is one of the key factors that triggers the development of HPV–associated cancers. It could be used as a starting point for the “onion skin”–type of DNA replication whenever the HPV plasmid exists in the same cell

  18. Genomic Instability Associated with p53 Knockdown in the Generation of Huntington’s Disease Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, Andrew M.; Neely, M. Diana; Chamberlin, Reed; Aboud, Asad A.; Kumar, Kevin K.; Han, Bingying; Bryan, Miles R.; Aschner, Michael; Ess, Kevin C.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in DNA damage response and repair have been observed in Huntington’s disease (HD). We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from primary dermal fibroblasts of 5 patients with HD and 5 control subjects. A significant fraction of the HD iPSC lines had genomic abnormalities as assessed by karyotype analysis, while none of our control lines had detectable genomic abnormalities. We demonstrate a statistically significant increase in genomic instability in HD cells during reprogramming. We also report a significant association with repeat length and severity of this instability. Our karyotypically normal HD iPSCs also have elevated ATM-p53 signaling as shown by elevated levels of phosphorylated p53 and H2AX, indicating either elevated DNA damage or hypersensitive DNA damage signaling in HD iPSCs. Thus, increased DNA damage responses in the HD genotype is coincidental with the observed chromosomal aberrations. We conclude that the disease causing mutation in HD increases the propensity of chromosomal instability relative to control fibroblasts specifically during reprogramming to a pluripotent state by a commonly used episomal-based method that includes p53 knockdown. PMID:26982737

  19. Genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida S11.

    PubMed

    Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Ilakkiam, Devaraj; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2012-11-01

    Here we report the genome sequence of a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas putida S11. The length of the draft genome sequence is approximately 5,970,799 bp, with a G+C content of 62.4%. The genome contains 6,076 protein-coding sequences.

  20. Genomic instability, bystander effect, cytoplasmic irradiation and other phenomena that may achieve fame without fortune.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J

    2001-01-01

    The possible risk of induced malignancies in astronauts, as a consequence of the radiation environment in space, is a factor of concern for long term missions. Cancer risk estimates for high doses of low LET radiation are available from the epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. Cancer risks at lower doses cannot be detected in epidemiological studies and must be inferred by extrapolation from the high dose risks. The standard setting bodies, such as the ICRP recommend a linear, no-threshold extrapolation of risks from high to low doses, but this is controversial. A study of mechanisms of carcinogenesis may shed some light on the validity of a linear extrapolation. The multi-step nature of carcinogenesis suggests that the role of radiation may be to induce a mutation leading to a mutator phenotype. High energy Fe ions, such as those encountered in space are highly effective in inducing genomic instability. Experiments involving the single particle microbeam have demonstrated a "bystander effect", ie a biological effect in cells not themselves hit, but in close proximity to those that are, as well as the induction of mutations in cells where only the cytoplasm, and not the nucleus, have been traversed by a charged particle. These recent experiments cast doubt on the validity of a simple linear extrapolation, but the data are so far fragmentary and conflicting. More studies are necessary. While mechanistic studies cannot replace epidemiology as a source of quantitative risk estimates, they may shed some light on the shape of the dose response relationship and therefore on the limitations of a linear extrapolation to low doses.

  1. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  2. Genomic instability, bystander effect, cytoplasmic irradiation and other phenomena that may achieve fame without fortune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    The possible risk of induced malignancies in astronauts, as a consequence of the radiation environment in space, is a factor of concern for long term missions. Cancer risk estimates for high doses of low LET radiation are available from the epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. Cancer risks at lower doses cannot be detected in epidemiological studies and must be inferred by extrapolation from the high dose risks. The standard setting bodies, such as the ICRP recommend a linear, no-threshold extrapolation of risks from high to low doses, but this is controversial. A study of mechanisms of carcinogenesis may shed some light on the validity of a linear extrapolation. The multi-step nature of carcinogenesis suggests that the role of radiation may be to induce a mutation leading to a mutator phenotype. High energy Fe ions, such as those encountered in space are highly effective in inducing genomic instability. Experiments involving the single particle microbeam have demonstrated a "bystander effect", ie a biological effect in cells not themselves hit, but in close proximity to those that are, as well as the induction of mutations in cells where only the cytoplasm, and not the nucleus, have been traversed by a charged particle. These recent experiments cast doubt on the validity of a simple linear extrapolation, but the data are so far fragmentary and conflicting. More studies are necessary. While mechanistic studies cannot replace epidemiology as a source of quantitative risk estimates, they may shed some light on the shape of the dose response relationship and therefore on the limitations of a linear extrapolation to low doses.

  3. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  4. Genomic instability, bystander effect, cytoplasmic irradiation and other phenomena that may achieve fame without fortune.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J

    2001-01-01

    The possible risk of induced malignancies in astronauts, as a consequence of the radiation environment in space, is a factor of concern for long term missions. Cancer risk estimates for high doses of low LET radiation are available from the epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. Cancer risks at lower doses cannot be detected in epidemiological studies and must be inferred by extrapolation from the high dose risks. The standard setting bodies, such as the ICRP recommend a linear, no-threshold extrapolation of risks from high to low doses, but this is controversial. A study of mechanisms of carcinogenesis may shed some light on the validity of a linear extrapolation. The multi-step nature of carcinogenesis suggests that the role of radiation may be to induce a mutation leading to a mutator phenotype. High energy Fe ions, such as those encountered in space are highly effective in inducing genomic instability. Experiments involving the single particle microbeam have demonstrated a "bystander effect", ie a biological effect in cells not themselves hit, but in close proximity to those that are, as well as the induction of mutations in cells where only the cytoplasm, and not the nucleus, have been traversed by a charged particle. These recent experiments cast doubt on the validity of a simple linear extrapolation, but the data are so far fragmentary and conflicting. More studies are necessary. While mechanistic studies cannot replace epidemiology as a source of quantitative risk estimates, they may shed some light on the shape of the dose response relationship and therefore on the limitations of a linear extrapolation to low doses. PMID:11770531

  5. Asymmetric nucleosomes flank promoters in the budding yeast genome.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Zentner, Gabriel E; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Nucleosomes in active chromatin are dynamic, but whether they have distinct structural conformations is unknown. To identify nucleosomes with alternative structures genome-wide, we used H4S47C-anchored cleavage mapping, which revealed that 5% of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleosome positions have asymmetric histone-DNA interactions. These asymmetric interactions are enriched at nucleosome positions that flank promoters. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) sequence-based profiles of asymmetric nucleosome positions revealed a corresponding asymmetry in MNase protection near the dyad axis, suggesting that the loss of DNA contacts around H4S47 is accompanied by protection of the DNA from MNase. Chromatin immunoprecipitation mapping of selected nucleosome remodelers indicated that asymmetric nucleosomes are bound by the RSC chromatin remodeling complex, which is required for maintaining nucleosomes at asymmetric positions. These results imply that the asymmetric nucleosome-RSC complex is a metastable intermediate representing partial unwrapping and protection of nucleosomal DNA on one side of the dyad axis during chromatin remodeling.

  6. Association between p53-binding protein 1 expression and genomic instability in oncocytic follicular adenoma of the thyroid.

    PubMed

    Mussazhanova, Zhanna; Akazawa, Yuko; Matsuda, Katsuya; Shichijo, Kazuko; Miura, Shiro; Otsubo, Ryota; Oikawa, Masahiro; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Mitsutake, Norisato; Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Saenko, Vladimir; Kozykenova, Zhanna; Zhetpisbaev, Bekbolat; Shabdarbaeva, Dariya; Sayakenov, Nurlan; Amantayev, Bakanay; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Ito, Masahiro; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2016-05-31

    Oncocytic follicular adenomas (FAs) of the thyroid are neoplasms of follicular cell origin that are predominantly composed of large polygonal cells with eosinophilic and granular cytoplasm. However, the pathological characteristics of these tumors are largely unexplored. Both the initiation and progression of cancer can be caused by an accumulation of genetic mutations that can induce genomic instability. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of genomic instability in oncocytic FA. As the presence of p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) in nuclear foci has been found to reflect DNA double-strand breaks that are triggered by various stresses, the immunofluorescence expression pattern of 53BP-1 was assessed in oncocytic and conventional FA. The association with the degree of DNA copy number aberration (CNA) was also evaluated using array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Data from this study demonstrated increased 53BP1 expression (i.e., "unstable" expression) in nuclear foci of oncocytic FA and a higher incidence of CNAs compared with conventional FA. There was also a particular focus on the amplification of chromosome 1p36 in oncocytic FA, which includes the locus for Tumor protein 73, a member of the p53 family implicated as a factor in the development of malignancies. Further evaluations revealed that unstable 53BP1 expression had a significant positive correlation with the levels of expression of Tumor protein 73. These data suggest a higher level of genomic instability in oncocytic FA compared with conventional FA, and a possible relationship between oncocytic FA and abnormal amplification of Tumor protein 73. PMID:26935218

  7. On the role of oil-film bearings in promoting shaft instability: Some experimental observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.

    1980-01-01

    The occurrence of oil whirl instability in rigid and flexible rotor systems was investigated. The effect of various bearing parameters on the oil whirl frequency and amplitude of rigid and flexible shafts supported on fluid film bearings was also studied.

  8. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    DOE Data Explorer

    Loots, Gabriela G. [LLNL; Ovcharenko, I. [LLNL

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. This database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a comprehensive collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes generated using multiple sources of gene annotation. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in evolutionary conserved and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and fugu genomes. (taken from paper in Journal: Bioinformatics, November 7, 2006, pp. 122-124

  9. Genomic instability in quartz dust exposed rat lungs: Is inflammation responsible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, C.; Knaapen, A. M.; Cakmak Demircigil, G.; Coskun, Erdem; van Schooten, F. J.; Borm, P. J. A.; Schins, R. P. F.

    2009-02-01

    the aluminium coated quartz intermediate effects were found. These findings were in line with the kinetics of inflammation and epithelial proliferation in the rat lungs for the different treatments. Notably, a highly significant correlation was observed between neutrophil numbers and micronucleus frequencies, indicative for a role of inflammation in eliciting genomic instability in target cells of quartz-induced carcinogenesis. Our ongoing investigations focus on the evaluation of the causality between both in relation to quartz exposure.

  10. Loss of the Thioredoxin Reductase Trr1 Suppresses the Genomic Instability of Peroxiredoxin tsa1 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Ragu, Sandrine; Dardalhon, Michèle; Sharma, Sushma; Iraqui, Ismail; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Grondin, Virginie; Kienda, Guy; Vernis, Laurence; Chanet, Roland; Kolodner, Richard D.; Huang, Meng-Er; Faye, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    The absence of Tsa1, a key peroxiredoxin that scavenges H2O2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causes the accumulation of a broad spectrum of mutations. Deletion of TSA1 also causes synthetic lethality in combination with mutations in RAD51 or several key genes involved in DNA double-strand break repair. In the present study, we propose that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the primary cause of genome instability of tsa1Δ cells. In searching for spontaneous suppressors of synthetic lethality of tsa1Δ rad51Δ double mutants, we identified that the loss of thioredoxin reductase Trr1 rescues their viability. The trr1Δ mutant displayed a CanR mutation rate 5-fold lower than wild-type cells. Additional deletion of TRR1 in tsa1Δ mutant reduced substantially the CanR mutation rate of tsa1Δ strain (33-fold), and to a lesser extent, of rad51Δ strain (4-fold). Loss of Trr1 induced Yap1 nuclear accumulation and over-expression of a set of Yap1-regulated oxido-reductases with antioxidant properties that ultimately re-equilibrate intracellular redox environment, reducing substantially ROS-associated DNA damages. This trr1Δ -induced effect was largely thioredoxin-dependent, probably mediated by oxidized forms of thioredoxins, the primary substrates of Trr1. Thioredoxin Trx1 and Trx2 were constitutively and strongly oxidized in the absence of Trr1. In trx1Δ trx2Δ cells, Yap1 was only moderately activated; consistently, the trx1Δ trx2Δ double deletion failed to efficiently rescue the viability of tsa1Δ rad51Δ. Finally, we showed that modulation of the dNTP pool size also influences the formation of spontaneous mutation in trr1Δ and trx1Δ trx2Δ strains. We present a tentative model that helps to estimate the respective impact of ROS level and dNTP concentration in the generation of spontaneous mutations. PMID:25247923

  11. Genomic instability induced by 50Hz magnetic fields is a dynamically evolving process not blocked by antioxidant treatment.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Luukkonen, Jukka; Juutilainen, Jukka; Naarala, Jonne

    2015-12-01

    Increased level of micronuclei was observed in SH-SY5Y cells in a previous study at 8 and 15 days after exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF), indicating possible induction of genomic instability in the progeny of the exposed cells. The aim of this study was to further explore the induction of genomic instability by ELF MFs by increasing the follow-up time up to 45 days after exposure. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to a 50Hz, 100μT MF for 24h with or without co-exposure to menadione (MQ), a chemical agent that increases cellular superoxide production. Micronuclei, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were measured at 15, 30 and 45 days after exposure. To study the possible causal role of ROS in the delayed effects of MF, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered before MF exposure. Consistently with the previous study, the level of micronuclei was statistically significantly elevated 15 days after exposure. A similar effect was observed at 30 days, but not at 45 days after exposure. The level of LPO was statically significantly decreased 30 and 45 days after exposure. Consistently with our previous findings, the MF effect did not depend on co-exposure to MQ. Treatment with NAC effectively decreased cellular ROS level and suppressed the effect of MQ on ROS, but it did not block the MF effect, indicating that increase in ROS is not needed as a causal link between MF exposure and induction of delayed effects. The results presented here are consistent with genomic instability that persists in the progeny of MF-exposed cells up to at least 30 days after exposure. Changes in LPO observed at 30 and 45 days after exposure indicates that the MF-initiated process may continue up to at least 45 days after exposure. PMID:26653983

  12. Excess of Yra1 RNA-Binding Factor Causes Transcription-Dependent Genome Instability, Replication Impairment and Telomere Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Gavaldá, Sandra; Santos-Pereira, José M.; García-Rubio, María L.; Luna, Rosa; Aguilera, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Yra1 is an essential nuclear factor of the evolutionarily conserved family of hnRNP-like export factors that when overexpressed impairs mRNA export and cell growth. To investigate further the relevance of proper Yra1 stoichiometry in the cell, we overexpressed Yra1 by transforming yeast cells with YRA1 intron-less constructs and analyzed its effect on gene expression and genome integrity. We found that YRA1 overexpression induces DNA damage and leads to a transcription-associated hyperrecombination phenotype that is mediated by RNA:DNA hybrids. In addition, it confers a genome-wide replication retardation as seen by reduced BrdU incorporation and accumulation of the Rrm3 helicase. In addition, YRA1 overexpression causes a cell senescence-like phenotype and telomere shortening. ChIP-chip analysis shows that overexpressed Yra1 is loaded to transcribed chromatin along the genome and to Y’ telomeric regions, where Rrm3 is also accumulated, suggesting an impairment of telomere replication. Our work not only demonstrates that a proper stoichiometry of the Yra1 mRNA binding and export factor is required to maintain genome integrity and telomere homeostasis, but suggests that the cellular imbalance between transcribed RNA and specific RNA-binding factors may become a major cause of genome instability mediated by co-transcriptional replication impairment. PMID:27035147

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Howard L. Liber; Jeffrey L. Schwartz

    2005-10-31

    There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells has been to isolate individual clones and analyze gene and chromosome mutation frequencies in each. This approach maximizes the possibility of detecting low frequency events that might be selected against in mass cultures.

  14. JAK2 and genomic instability in the myeloproliferative neoplasms: a case of the chicken or the egg?

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Linda M.; Rebel, Vivienne I.

    2012-01-01

    The myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a particularly useful model for studying mutation accumulation in neoplastic and the mechanisms of the molecular cells, understanding underlying defects our current This review summarizes acquisition. present their in patients with an MPN, and the effects of mutations targeting Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)-mediated intracellular signaling on DNA damage, and on the elimination of mutation-bearing cells by programmed cell death. Moreover, we discuss findings that suggest that the acquisition of disease-initiating mutations in hematopoietic stem cells of some MPN patients may be the consequence of an inherent genomic instability that was not previously appreciated. PMID:22641564

  15. Effects of As2O3 on DNA methylation, genomic instability, and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Aydin, Murat; Sigmaz, Burcu; Taspinar, M Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray; Yagci, Semra

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a well-known toxic substance on the living organisms. However, limited efforts have been made to study its DNA methylation, genomic instability, and long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon polymorphism causing properties in different crops. In the present study, effects of As2O3 (arsenic trioxide) on LTR retrotransposon polymorphism and DNA methylation as well as DNA damage in Zea mays seedlings were investigated. The results showed that all of arsenic doses caused a decreasing genomic template stability (GTS) and an increasing Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) profile changes (DNA damage). In addition, increasing DNA methylation and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism characterized a model to explain the epigenetically changes in the gene expression were also found. The results of this experiment have clearly shown that arsenic has epigenetic effect as well as its genotoxic effect. Especially, the increasing of polymorphism of some LTR retrotransposon under arsenic stress may be a part of the defense system against the stress.

  16. The role of topoisomerase I in suppressing genome instability associated with a highly transcribed guanine-rich sequence is not restricted to preventing RNA:DNA hybrid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Puja; Owiti, Norah; Kim, Nayun

    2016-01-01

    Highly transcribed guanine-run containing sequences, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, become unstable when topoisomerase I (Top1) is disrupted. Topological changes, such as the formation of extended RNA:DNA hybrids or R-loops or non-canonical DNA structures including G-quadruplexes has been proposed as the major underlying cause of the transcription-linked genome instability. Here, we report that R-loop accumulation at a guanine-rich sequence, which is capable of assembling into the four-stranded G4 DNA structure, is dependent on the level and the orientation of transcription. In the absence of Top1 or RNase Hs, R-loops accumulated to substantially higher extent when guanine-runs were located on the non-transcribed strand. This coincides with the orientation where higher genome instability was observed. However, we further report that there are significant differences between the disruption of RNase Hs and Top1 in regards to the orientation-specific elevation in genome instability at the guanine-rich sequence. Additionally, genome instability in Top1-deficient yeasts is not completely suppressed by removal of negative supercoils and further aggravated by expression of mutant Top1. Together, our data provide a strong support for a function of Top1 in suppressing genome instability at the guanine-run containing sequence that goes beyond preventing the transcription-associated RNA:DNA hybrid formation. PMID:26527723

  17. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Reinert, Brian L; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A; Hromas, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5' end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3' single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5' end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5' DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5' overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ.

  18. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5’ end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3’ single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5’ end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5’ DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5’ overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  19. Very CIN-ful: whole chromosome instability promotes tumor suppressor loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed

    Sotillo, Rocio; Schvartzman, Juan-Manuel; Benezra, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Mechanisms by which whole chromosome instability lead to tumorigenesis have eluded the cancer research field. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Baker et al. show that CIN induced by a defective mitotic checkpoint, under certain genetic and tissue contexts, leads to accelerated loss of heterozygosity of a tumor suppressor gene.

  20. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BS006

    PubMed Central

    Gamez, Rocío M.; Rodríguez, Fernando; Bernal, Johan F.; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is an important plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences encode genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, ribosomally synthesized antibacterial peptides, in addition to genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:26607897

  1. Genome-wide computational prediction and analysis of core promoter elements across plant monocots and dicots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription initiation, essential to gene expression regulation, involves recruitment of basal transcription factors to the core promoter elements (CPEs). The distribution of currently known CPEs across plant genomes is largely unknown. This is the first large scale genome-wide report on the compu...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diazotrophic, Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of the Pseudomonas syringae Complex.

    PubMed

    Patten, Cheryl L; Jeong, Haeyoung; Blakney, Andrew J C; Wallace, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae GR12-2, a nitrogen-fixing, plant growth-promoting bacterium, isolated from the rhizosphere of an Arctic grass. The 6.6-Mbp genome contains 5,676 protein-coding genes, including a nitrogen-fixation island similar to that in P. stutzeri. PMID:27660794

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a Diazotrophic, Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium of the Pseudomonas syringae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Blakney, Andrew J. C.; Wallace, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas syringae GR12-2, a nitrogen-fixing, plant growth–promoting bacterium, isolated from the rhizosphere of an Arctic grass. The 6.6-Mbp genome contains 5,676 protein-coding genes, including a nitrogen-fixation island similar to that in P. stutzeri. PMID:27660794

  4. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-05-05

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006.

    PubMed

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds. PMID:27151797

  6. Genome-wide analysis of promoter architecture in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Landolin, Jane M.; Brown, James B.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Takahashi, Hazuki; Lassmann, Timo; Yu, Charles; Booth, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Dayu; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Boley, Nathan; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Bickel, Peter J.; Carninci, Piero; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-10-20

    Core promoters are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. However, the boundaries of promoter regions, the relative rates of initiation at the transcription start sites (TSSs) distributed within them, and the functional significance of promoter architecture remain poorly understood. We produced a high-resolution map of promoters active in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo by integrating data from three independent and complementary methods: 21 million cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) tags, 1.2 million RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLMRACE) reads, and 50,000 cap-trapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We defined 12,454 promoters of 8037 genes. Our analysis indicates that, due to non-promoter-associated RNA background signal, previous studies have likely overestimated the number of promoter-associated CAGE clusters by fivefold. We show that TSS distributions form a complex continuum of shapes, and that promoters active in the embryo and adult have highly similar shapes in 95% of cases. This suggests that these distributions are generally determined by static elements such as local DNA sequence and are not modulated by dynamic signals such as histone modifications. Transcription factor binding motifs are differentially enriched as a function of promoter shape, and peaked promoter shape is correlated with both temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression. Our results contribute to the emerging view that core promoters are functionally diverse and control patterning of gene expression in Drosophila and mammals.

  7. mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus and MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 promote chromosomal instability and cell type-dependent phenotype changes of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Andreieva, S V; Korets, K V; Mykytenko, D O; Baklaushev, V P; Chekhonin, V P; Dmitrenko, V V

    2016-03-15

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the RAF/mitogen-activated and extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways are frequently deregulated in cancer. Temsirolimus (TEM) and its primary active metabolite rapamycin allosterically block mTOR complex 1 substrate recruitment. The context-/experimental setup-dependent opposite effects of rapamycin on the multiple centrosome formation, aneuploidy, DNA damage/repair, proliferation, and invasion were reported. Similarly, the context-dependent either tumor-promoting or suppressing effects of RAF-MEK-ERK pathway and its inhibitors were demonstrated. Drug treatment-mediated stress may promote chromosomal instability (CIN), accelerating changes in the genomic landscape and phenotype diversity. Here, we characterized the genomic and phenotypic changes of U251 and T98G glioblastoma cell lines long-term treated with TEM or U0126, an inhibitor of MEK1/2. TEM significantly increased clonal and non-clonal chromosome aberrations. Both TEM and U0126 affected copy number alterations (CNAs) pattern. A proliferation rate of U251TEM and U251U0126 cells was lower and higher, respectively, than control cells. Colony formation efficiency of U251TEM significantly decreased, whereas U251U0126 did not change. U251TEM and U251U0126 cells decreased migration. In contrast, T98GTEM and T98GU0126 cells did not change proliferation, colony formation efficiency, and migration. Changes in the sensitivity of inhibitor-treated cells to the reduction of the glucose concentration were observed. Our results suggest that CIN and adaptive reprogramming of signal transduction pathways may be responsible for the cell type-dependent phenotype changes of long-term TEM- or U0126-treated tumor cells. PMID:26748241

  8. Global genome nucleotide excision repair is organized into domains that promote efficient DNA repair in chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shirong; Evans, Katie; Bennett, Mark; Webster, Richard M.; Leadbitter, Matthew; Teng, Yumin; Waters, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The rates at which lesions are removed by DNA repair can vary widely throughout the genome, with important implications for genomic stability. To study this, we measured the distribution of nucleotide excision repair (NER) rates for UV-induced lesions throughout the budding yeast genome. By plotting these repair rates in relation to genes and their associated flanking sequences, we reveal that, in normal cells, genomic repair rates display a distinctive pattern, suggesting that DNA repair is highly organized within the genome. Furthermore, by comparing genome-wide DNA repair rates in wild-type cells and cells defective in the global genome–NER (GG-NER) subpathway, we establish how this alters the distribution of NER rates throughout the genome. We also examined the genomic locations of GG-NER factor binding to chromatin before and after UV irradiation, revealing that GG-NER is organized and initiated from specific genomic locations. At these sites, chromatin occupancy of the histone acetyl-transferase Gcn5 is controlled by the GG-NER complex, which regulates histone H3 acetylation and chromatin structure, thereby promoting efficient DNA repair of UV-induced lesions. Chromatin remodeling during the GG-NER process is therefore organized into these genomic domains. Importantly, loss of Gcn5 significantly alters the genomic distribution of NER rates; this has implications for the effects of chromatin modifiers on the distribution of mutations that arise throughout the genome. PMID:27470111

  9. Comparative promoter analysis in vertebrate genomes with the CORG workbench.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Christoph; Vingron, Martin

    2006-01-01

    CORG is a versatile web-based workbench for comparative promoter analysis in vertebrate model organisms. Two kinds of information are explicitly considered in the automated annotation process. First, local conservation patterns in upstream regions of homologous genes: These phylogenetic footprints are likely to stem from sequence elements that are under selective pressure. The CORG pipeline detects and exploits patterns of local similarity to annotate promoter regions. Second, experimental data on transcription start sites: exon positions and DNA binding site descriptions complete the promoter annotation. These data are made available via an interactive web portal. Individual promoter studies are supported by a JAVA applet that supplies all data down to the nucleotide level.

  10. miR-28-5p promotes chromosomal instability in VHL-associated cancers by inhibiting Mad2 translation.

    PubMed

    Hell, Michael P; Thoma, Claudio R; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Christinat, Yann; Weber, Thomas C; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal instability enables tumor development, enabled in part by aberrant expression of the mitotic checkpoint protein Mad2. Here we identify a novel regulatory mechanism for Mad2 expression involving miR-28-5p-mediated inhibition of Mad2 translation, and we demonstrate that this mechanism is triggered by inactivation of the tumor suppressor VHL, the most common event in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In VHL-positive cancer cells, enhanced expression of miR-28-5p diminished Mad2 levels and promoted checkpoint weakness and chromosomal instability. Conversely, in checkpoint-deficient VHL-negative renal carcinoma cells, inhibition of miR-28-5p function restored Mad2 levels, mitotic checkpoint proficiency, and chromosomal stability. Notably, chromosome missegregation errors and aneuploidy that were produced in a mouse model of acute renal injury (as a result of kidney-specific ablation of pVHL function) were reverted in vivo also by genetic inhibition of miR-28-5p. Finally, bioinformatic analyses in human ccRCC associated loss of VHL with increased miR-28-5p expression and chromosomal instability. Together, our results defined miR-28-5p as a critical regulator of Mad2 translation and mitotic checkpoint function. By identifying a potential mediator of chromosomal instability in VHL-associated cancers, our work also suggests a novel microRNA-based therapeutic strategy to target aneuploid cells in VHL-associated cancers.

  11. Enhancer-promoter interactions are encoded by complex genomic signatures on looping chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Sean; Truty, Rebecca M.; Pollard, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Discriminating the gene target of a distal regulatory element from other nearby transcribed genes is a challenging problem with the potential to illuminate the causal underpinnings of complex diseases. We present TargetFinder, a computational method that reconstructs regulatory landscapes from genomic features along the genome. The resulting models accurately predict individual enhancer-promoter interactions across diverse cell lines with a false discovery rate up to fifteen times smaller than using the closest gene. By evaluating the genomic features driving this accuracy, we uncover interactions between structural proteins, transcription factors, epigenetic modifications, and transcription that together distinguish interacting from non-interacting enhancer-promoter pairs. Most of this signature is not proximal to the enhancers and promoters, but instead decorates the looping DNA. We conclude that complex but consistent combinations of marks on the one-dimensional genome encode the three-dimensional structure of fine-scale regulatory interactions. PMID:27064255

  12. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  13. Living with genome instability: the adaptation of phytoplasmas todiverse environments of their insect and plant hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Ewing, Adam; Miller, Sally A.; Radek, Agnes; Shevchenko, Dimitriy; Tsukerman, Kiryl; Walunas, Theresa; Lapidus, Alla; Campbell, John W.; Hogenhout Saskia A.

    2006-02-17

    Phytoplasmas (Candidatus Phytoplasma, Class Mollicutes) cause disease in hundreds of economically important plants, and are obligately transmitted by sap-feeding insects of the order Hemiptera, mainly leafhoppers and psyllids. The 706,569-bp chromosome and four plasmids of aster yellows phytoplasma strain witches broom (AY-WB) were sequenced and compared to the onion yellows phytoplasma strain M (OY-M) genome. The phytoplasmas have small repeat-rich genomes. The repeated DNAs are organized into large clusters, potential mobile units (PMUs), which contain tra5 insertion sequences (ISs), and specialized sigma factors and membrane proteins. So far, PMUs are unique to phytoplasmas. Compared to mycoplasmas, phytoplasmas lack several recombination and DNA modification functions, and therefore phytoplasmas probably use different mechanisms of recombination, likely involving PMUs, for the creation of variability, allowing phytoplasmas to adjust to the diverse environments of plants and insects. The irregular GC skews and presence of ISs and large repeated sequences in the AY-WB and OY-M genomes are indicative of high genomic plasticity. Nevertheless, segments of {approx}250 kb, located between genes lplA and glnQ are syntenic between the two phytoplasmas, contain the majority of the metabolic genes and no ISs. AY-WB is further along in the reductive evolution process than OY-M. The AY-WB genome is {approx}154 kb smaller than the OY-M genome, primarily as a result of fewer multicopy sequences, including PMUs. Further, AY-WB lacks genes that are truncated and are part of incomplete pathways in OY-M. This is the first comparative phytoplasma genome analysis and report of the existence of PMUs in phytoplasma genomes.

  14. Social instability promotes hormone-behavior associated patterns in a cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Olinda; Gonçalves-de-Freitas, Eliane; Lopes, João S; Oliveira, Rui F

    2014-07-01

    Androgens are known to respond to social challenges and to control the expression of social behavior and reproductive traits, such as gonadal maturation and sperm production, expression of secondary sex characters and reproductive behaviors. According to the challenge hypothesis variation in androgen levels above a breeding baseline should be explained by the regime of social challenges faced by the individual considering the trade-offs of androgens with other traits (e.g. parental care). One prediction that can be derived from the challenge hypothesis is that androgen levels should increase in response to social instability. Moreover, considering that a tighter association of relevant traits is expected in periods of environmental instability, we also predict that in unstable environments the degree of correlations among different behaviors should increase and hormones and behavior should be associated. These predictions were tested in a polygamous cichlid fish (Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus) with exclusive maternal care. Social instability was produced by swapping dominant males among groups. Stable treatment consisted in removing and placing back dominant males in the same group, in order to control for handling stress. Cortisol levels were also measured to monitor stress levels involved in the procedure and their relation to the androgen patterns and behavior. As predicted androgen levels increased in males in response to the establishment of a social hierarchy and presence of receptive females. However, there were no further differential increases in androgen levels over the social manipulation phase between social stable and social unstable groups. As predicted behaviors were significantly more correlated among themselves in the unstable than in the stable treatment and an associated hormone-behavior pattern was only observed in the unstable treatment. PMID:24973663

  15. Social instability promotes hormone-behavior associated patterns in a cichlid fish.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Olinda; Gonçalves-de-Freitas, Eliane; Lopes, João S; Oliveira, Rui F

    2014-07-01

    Androgens are known to respond to social challenges and to control the expression of social behavior and reproductive traits, such as gonadal maturation and sperm production, expression of secondary sex characters and reproductive behaviors. According to the challenge hypothesis variation in androgen levels above a breeding baseline should be explained by the regime of social challenges faced by the individual considering the trade-offs of androgens with other traits (e.g. parental care). One prediction that can be derived from the challenge hypothesis is that androgen levels should increase in response to social instability. Moreover, considering that a tighter association of relevant traits is expected in periods of environmental instability, we also predict that in unstable environments the degree of correlations among different behaviors should increase and hormones and behavior should be associated. These predictions were tested in a polygamous cichlid fish (Mozambique tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus) with exclusive maternal care. Social instability was produced by swapping dominant males among groups. Stable treatment consisted in removing and placing back dominant males in the same group, in order to control for handling stress. Cortisol levels were also measured to monitor stress levels involved in the procedure and their relation to the androgen patterns and behavior. As predicted androgen levels increased in males in response to the establishment of a social hierarchy and presence of receptive females. However, there were no further differential increases in androgen levels over the social manipulation phase between social stable and social unstable groups. As predicted behaviors were significantly more correlated among themselves in the unstable than in the stable treatment and an associated hormone-behavior pattern was only observed in the unstable treatment.

  16. Crossing the LINE toward genomic instability: LINE-1 retrotransposition in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Jacqueline; Longworth, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Retrotransposons are repetitive DNA sequences that are positioned throughout the human genome. Retrotransposons are capable of copying themselves and mobilizing new copies to novel genomic locations in a process called retrotransposition. While most retrotransposon sequences in the human genome are incomplete and incapable of mobilization, the LINE-1 retrotransposon, which comprises approximately 17% of the human genome, remains active. The disruption of cellular mechanisms that suppress retrotransposon activity is linked to the generation of aneuploidy, a potential driver of tumor development. When retrotransposons insert into a novel genomic region, they have the potential to disrupt the coding sequence of endogenous genes and alter gene expression, which can lead to deleterious consequences for the organism. Additionally, increased LINE-1 copy numbers provide more chances for recombination events to occur between retrotransposons, which can lead to chromosomal breaks and rearrangements. LINE-1 activity is increased in various cancer cell lines and in patient tissues resected from primary tumors. LINE-1 activity also correlates with increased cancer metastasis. This review aims to give a brief overview of the connections between LINE-1 retrotransposition and the loss of genome stability. We will also discuss the mechanisms that repress retrotransposition in human cells and their links to cancer.

  17. Crossing the LINE Toward Genomic Instability: LINE-1 Retrotransposition in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Longworth, Michelle S.

    2015-01-01

    Retrotransposons are repetitive DNA sequences that are positioned throughout the human genome. Retrotransposons are capable of copying themselves and mobilizing new copies to novel genomic locations in a process called retrotransposition. While most retrotransposon sequences in the human genome are incomplete and incapable of mobilization, the LINE-1 retrotransposon, which comprises~17% of the human genome, remains active. The disruption of cellular mechanisms that suppress retrotransposon activity is linked to the generation of aneuploidy, a potential driver of tumor development. When retrotransposons insert into a novel genomic region, they have the potential to disrupt the coding sequence of endogenous genes and alter gene expression, which can lead to deleterious consequences for the organism. Additionally, increased LINE-1 copy numbers provide more chances for recombination events to occur between retrotransposons, which can lead to chromosomal breaks and rearrangements. LINE-1 activity is increased in various cancer cell lines and in patient tissues resected from primary tumors. LINE-1 activity also correlates with increased cancer metastasis. This review aims to give a brief overview of the connections between LINE-1 retrotransposition and the loss of genome stability. We will also discuss the mechanisms that repress retrotransposition in human cells and their links to cancer. PMID:26734601

  18. Altering genomic integrity: heavy metal exposure promotes trans-posable element-mediated damage

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Maria E.; Servant, Geraldine; Ade, Catherine; Roy-Enge, Astrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is critical for cellular homeostasis and survival. The active transposable elements (TEs) composed primarily of three mobile element lineages LINE-1, Alu, and SVA comprise approximately 30% of the mass of the human genome. For the past two decades, studies have shown that TEs significantly contribute to genetic instability and that TE-caused damages are associated with genetic diseases and cancer. Different environmental exposures, including several heavy metals, influence how TEs interact with its host genome increasing their negative impact. This mini-review provides some basic knowledge on TEs, their contribution to disease and an overview of the current knowledge on how heavy metals influence TE-mediated damage. PMID:25774044

  19. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Qin; Du, Li-Qing; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα), RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75) and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18), is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) might be one of the upstream kinases. PMID:26556339

  20. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Qin; Du, Li-Qing; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2015-11-04

    Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα), RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75) and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18), is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) might be one of the upstream kinases.

  1. Induction of genomic instability after an acute whole-body exposure of mice to 56Fe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Supanpaiboon, Wisa; Whorton, Elbert

    Different types of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are present in space and have large mass and energy (HZE particles). Among these, stripped 56 Fe ions are of major concern. Although HZE particles are approximately 1% of GCR, their contribution to health risk could be significant because of (1) their high linear energy transfer (LET) resulting in a larger amount of energy being deposited in the hit cells, and (2) the lack of information on the effectiveness of these particles in cancer induction. To better protect astronauts in space environments, it is essential that we improve our understanding of the 56 Fe-ion-induced damage associated with the increased risk of late occurring diseases (such as cancer). It has been well established that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the major malignancies associated with exposure to ionizing radiation in both human beings and in mice. It is therefore one of the most important cancers related to space flights. For these reasons, it is important to investigate 56 Fe ion-induced damage in in vivo systems, especially in those cells that are known to be at risk for health problems associated with radiation, such as hematopoietic cells, the known target cell for radiation-induced leukemia. Since in vivo studies of humans are not possible, animal studies are critically important. It has been widely suggested that elevation of delayed chromosomal damage (normally known as genomic instability) is associated with cancer risk. We therefore determined dose-response relationships for the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) in mouse blood erythrocytes as a measure of both initial radiation damage and the induction of genomic instability. The frequencies of MN were measured in mature normochromatic-erythrocytes (MN-NCEs) and immature polychromatic-erythrocytes (MN-PCEs). These measurements were made as a function of radiation dose, radiation quality, time after irradiation and the genetic background of exposed mice. Blood samples were

  2. Characteristics of genomic instability in clones of TK6 human lymphoblasts surviving exposure to 56Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, Mireya; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Genomic instability in the human lymphoblast cell line TK6 was studied in clones surviving 36 generations after exposure to accelerated 56Fe ions. Clones were assayed for 20 characteristics, including chromosome aberrations, plating efficiency, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequency at two loci. The primary effect of the 56Fe-ion exposure on the surviving clones was a significant increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations compared to the very low spontaneous frequency, along with an increase in the phenotypic complexity of the unstable clones. The radiation-induced increase in the frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations was much greater than that observed previously in clones of the related cell line, WTK1, which in comparison to the TK6 cell line expresses an increased radiation resistance, a mutant TP53 protein, and an increased frequency of spontaneous unstable chromosome aberrations. The characteristics of the unstable clones of the two cell lines also differed. Most of the TK6 clones surviving exposure to 56Fe ions showed unstable cytogenetic abnormalities, while the phenotype of the WTK1 clones was more diverse. The results underscore the importance of genotype in the characteristics of instability after radiation exposure.

  3. Combining magnetic sorting of mother cells and fluctuation tests to analyze genome instability during mitotic cell aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa N; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For instance, measurements of yeast replicative lifespan through micromanipulation involve very small populations of cells, which prohibit detection of rare mutations. Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. The current protocol takes advantage of magnetic sorting of surface-labeled yeast mother cells to obtain large enough populations of aging mother cells to quantify rare mutations through phenotypic selections. Mutation rates, measured through fluctuation tests, and mutation frequencies are first established for young cells and used to predict the frequency of mutations in mother cells of various replicative ages. Mutation frequencies are then determined for sorted mother cells, and the age of the mother cells is determined using flow cytometry by staining with a fluorescent reagent that detects bud scars formed on their cell surfaces during cell division. Comparison of predicted mutation frequencies based on the number of cell divisions to the frequencies experimentally observed for mother cells of a given replicative age can then identify whether there are age-related changes in the rate of accumulating mutations. Variations of this basic protocol provide the means to investigate the influence of alterations in specific gene functions or specific environmental conditions on

  4. Combining Magnetic Sorting of Mother Cells and Fluctuation Tests to Analyze Genome Instability During Mitotic Cell Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Melissa N.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For instance, measurements of yeast replicative lifespan through micromanipulation involve very small populations of cells, which prohibit detection of rare mutations. Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. The current protocol takes advantage of magnetic sorting of surface-labeled yeast mother cells to obtain large enough populations of aging mother cells to quantify rare mutations through phenotypic selections. Mutation rates, measured through fluctuation tests, and mutation frequencies are first established for young cells and used to predict the frequency of mutations in mother cells of various replicative ages. Mutation frequencies are then determined for sorted mother cells, and the age of the mother cells is determined using flow cytometry by staining with a fluorescent reagent that detects bud scars formed on their cell surfaces during cell division. Comparison of predicted mutation frequencies based on the number of cell divisions to the frequencies experimentally observed for mother cells of a given replicative age can then identify whether there are age-related changes in the rate of accumulating mutations. Variations of this basic protocol provide the means to investigate the influence of alterations in specific gene functions or specific environmental conditions on

  5. Genomic instability of the host cell induced by the human papillomavirus replication machinery.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Sumerina, Alina; Verst, Tatjana; Ojarand, Mari; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2007-04-18

    Development of invasive cervical cancer upon infection by 'high-risk' human papillomavirus (HPV) in humans is a stepwise process in which some of the initially episomal 'high-risk' type of HPVs (HR-HPVs) integrate randomly into the host cell genome. We show that HPV replication proteins E1 and E2 are capable of inducing overamplification of the genomic locus where HPV origin has been integrated. Clonal analysis of the cells in which the replication from integrated HPV origin was induced showed excision, rearrangement and de novo integration of the HPV containing and flanking cellular sequences. These data suggest that papillomavirus replication machinery is capable of inducing genomic changes of the host cell that may facilitate the formation of the HPV-dependent cancer cell. PMID:17396148

  6. Navigating yeast genome maintenance with functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Measday, Vivien; Stirling, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is a fundamental requirement of all organisms. To address this, organisms have evolved extremely faithful modes of replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation to combat the deleterious effects of an unstable genome. Nonetheless, a small amount of genome instability is the driver of evolutionary change and adaptation, and thus a low level of instability is permitted in populations. While defects in genome maintenance almost invariably reduce fitness in the short term, they can create an environment where beneficial mutations are more likely to occur. The importance of this fact is clearest in the development of human cancer, where genome instability is a well-established enabling characteristic of carcinogenesis. This raises the crucial question: what are the cellular pathways that promote genome maintenance and what are their mechanisms? Work in model organisms, in particular the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has provided the global foundations of genome maintenance mechanisms in eukaryotes. The development of pioneering genomic tools inS. cerevisiae, such as the systematic creation of mutants in all nonessential and essential genes, has enabled whole-genome approaches to identifying genes with roles in genome maintenance. Here, we review the extensive whole-genome approaches taken in yeast, with an emphasis on functional genomic screens, to understand the genetic basis of genome instability, highlighting a range of genetic and cytological screening modalities. By revealing the biological pathways and processes regulating genome integrity, these analyses contribute to the systems-level map of the yeast cell and inform studies of human disease, especially cancer.

  7. Navigating yeast genome maintenance with functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Measday, Vivien; Stirling, Peter C

    2016-03-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is a fundamental requirement of all organisms. To address this, organisms have evolved extremely faithful modes of replication, DNA repair and chromosome segregation to combat the deleterious effects of an unstable genome. Nonetheless, a small amount of genome instability is the driver of evolutionary change and adaptation, and thus a low level of instability is permitted in populations. While defects in genome maintenance almost invariably reduce fitness in the short term, they can create an environment where beneficial mutations are more likely to occur. The importance of this fact is clearest in the development of human cancer, where genome instability is a well-established enabling characteristic of carcinogenesis. This raises the crucial question: what are the cellular pathways that promote genome maintenance and what are their mechanisms? Work in model organisms, in particular the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has provided the global foundations of genome maintenance mechanisms in eukaryotes. The development of pioneering genomic tools inS. cerevisiae, such as the systematic creation of mutants in all nonessential and essential genes, has enabled whole-genome approaches to identifying genes with roles in genome maintenance. Here, we review the extensive whole-genome approaches taken in yeast, with an emphasis on functional genomic screens, to understand the genetic basis of genome instability, highlighting a range of genetic and cytological screening modalities. By revealing the biological pathways and processes regulating genome integrity, these analyses contribute to the systems-level map of the yeast cell and inform studies of human disease, especially cancer. PMID:26323482

  8. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum KCTC 12200BP, a probiotic strain promoting the intestinal health.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kwak, Min-Jung; Seo, Jae-Gu; Chung, Myung Jun; Kim, Jihyun F

    2015-11-20

    Bifidobacteria constitute a major group of beneficial intestinal bacteria, and are therefore often used to formulate probiotic products in combination with lactic acid bacteria. The availability of bifidobacterial genome sequences has broadened our knowledge on health-promoting factors as well as their safety assessments. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum CBT BG7 that consists of a 2.45-Mb chromosome and a plasmid.

  9. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  10. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  11. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  12. A novel prokaryotic promoter identified in the genome of some monopartite begomoviruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chen; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng; Wu, Chia-Ying; Lai, Yi-Chin; Hu, Chung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Geminiviruses are known to exhibit both prokaryotic and eukaryotic features in their genomes, with the ability to express their genes and even replicate in bacterial cells. We have demonstrated previously the existence of unit-length single-stranded circular DNAs of Ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV, a species in the genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) in Escherichia coli cells, which prompted our search for unknown prokaryotic functions in the begomovirus genomes. By using a promoter trapping strategy, we identified a novel prokaryotic promoter, designated AV3 promoter, in nts 762-831 of the AYVV genome. Activity assays revealed that the AV3 promoter is strong, unidirectional, and constitutive, with an endogenous downstream ribosome binding site and a translatable short open reading frame of eight amino acids. Sequence analyses suggested that the AV3 promoter might be a remnant of prokaryotic ancestors that could be related to certain promoters of bacteria from marine or freshwater environments. The discovery of the prokaryotic AV3 promoter provided further evidence for the prokaryotic origin in the evolutionary history of geminiviruses.

  13. R-loop-mediated genomic instability is caused by impairment of replication fork progression.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wenjian; Guan, Zhishuang; Liu, Jie; Gui, Ting; Shen, Keng; Manley, James L; Li, Xialu

    2011-10-01

    Transcriptional R loops are anomalous RNA:DNA hybrids that have been detected in organisms from bacteria to humans. These structures have been shown in eukaryotes to result in DNA damage and rearrangements; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects have remained largely unknown. To investigate this, we first show that R-loop formation induces chromosomal DNA rearrangements and recombination in Escherichia coli, just as it does in eukaryotes. More importantly, we then show that R-loop formation causes DNA replication fork stalling, and that this in fact underlies the effects of R loops on genomic stability. Strikingly, we found that attenuation of replication strongly suppresses R-loop-mediated DNA rearrangements in both E. coli and HeLa cells. Our findings thus provide a direct demonstration that R-loop formation impairs DNA replication and that this is responsible for the deleterious effects of R loops on genome stability from bacteria to humans.

  14. The Adaptive Response in p53 Cancer Prone Mice: Loss of heterozygosity and Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Josee, Lavoie; Dolling, Jo-Anna; Mitchel, Ron E.J.; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2004-09-28

    The Trp53 gene is clearly associated with increased cancer risk. This, coupled with the broad understanding of its mode of action at the molecular level, makes this gene a good candidate for investigating the relationship between genetic risk factors and spontaneous cancer occurring in a mouse model exposed to low dose radiation. We have shown that adaptive response to chronic low dose radiation could increase cancer latency, as well as overall lifespan. To better understand the molecular processes that influence cellular risk, modern tools in molecular biology were used to evaluate the loss of heterozigozity (LOH) at the Trp53 locus, and chromosomal instability in the cells from mice exposed to chronic low dose radiation. Female mice carrying a single defective copy of the Trp53 gene were irradiated with doses of gamma-radiation delivered at a low dose rate of about 0.7 mGy/hr. Groups of mice (5 irradiated and 5 unexposed) were exposed to 0.33 mGy per day for 15, 30, 45, 60, 67 and 75 weeks equaling total body doses of 2.4, 4.7, 7.2, 9.7, 10.9 and 12.1 cGy, respectively. The presence of a single defective copy of the Trp53 gene increases cancer risk in these mice. However, in vivo exposure to low dose radiation increased cancer latency. We hypothesized that: (1) These mice might have spontaneous chromosome instability, and (2) that this low dose adaptive exposure would reduce the chromosomal instability. This instability was investigated using spectral karyotyping (SKY). Bone marrow cells from 5 irradiated mice (doses of 10.9 and 12.1 cGy) and 5 control mice were collected for metaphase harvest. Briefly, the cells were incubated at 37 C for 4 hours in RPMI containing 25% heat-inactivated FBS and 0.1 mg/ml colcemid, and then given a hypotonic treatment of 0.075M KCl for 20 minutes at 37 C. An average of 100 metaphases per mouse were karyotyped. The Trp53 heterozygous mice do not show apparent structural chromosome instability. From both unexposed and irradiated

  15. Nucleolin promotes in vitro translation of feline calicivirus genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Beatriz Alvarado; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Green, Kim Y; Gutiérrez-Escolano, Ana Lorena

    2016-02-01

    Feline calicivirus depends on host-cell proteins for its replication. We previously showed that knockdown of nucleolin (NCL), a phosphoprotein involved in ribosome biogenesis, resulted in the reduction of FCV protein synthesis and virus yield. Here, we found that NCL may not be involved in FCV binding and entry into cells, but it binds to both ends of the FCV genomic RNA, and stimulates its translation in vitro. AGRO100, an aptamer that specifically binds and inactivates NCL, caused a strong reduction in FCV protein synthesis. This effect could be reversed by the addition of full-length NCL but not by a ΔrNCL, lacking the N-terminal domain. Consistent with this, FCV infection of CrFK cells stably expressing ΔrNCL led to a reduction in virus protein translation. These results suggest that NCL is part of the FCV RNA translational complex, and that the N-terminal part of the protein is required for efficient FCV replication. PMID:26707270

  16. Increased amounts of the influenza virus nucleoprotein do not promote higher levels of viral genome replication.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Anne E; Dalton, Rosa M; Amorim, Maria Joao; Elton, Debra; Digard, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Influenza virus genome replication requires the virus-encoded nucleoprotein (NP), partly because it is necessary to encapsidate the viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and antigenomic cRNA segments into ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). However, there is also evidence that NP actively regulates viral RNA synthesis and there is a long-standing hypothesis that increased concentrations of NP in the cell are responsible for a switch from genome transcription to replication. Here, this hypothesis is tested in a recombinant setting and in the context of virus infection. In a plasmid-based system for reconstituting active viral RNPs in cells, titration of increasing amounts of NP did not promote higher levels of genome replication relative to transcription, but in fact caused the opposite effect. An approximately fourfold reduction in the ratio of genomic and antigenomic RNAs to mRNA was seen across an 80-fold range of NP plasmid concentrations. When cells were transfected with the same amounts of NP plasmid to establish a concentration gradient of NP prior to virus superinfection, no change in the ratio of cRNA to mRNA was seen for segments 5 and 7, or for the ratio of segment 5 vRNA to mRNA. A slight reduction in the ratio of segment 7 vRNA to mRNA was seen. These findings do not support the simple hypothesis that increased intracellular concentrations of NP promote influenza virus genome replication.

  17. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    SciTech Connect

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  18. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    SciTech Connect

    Neupane, Saraswoti; Hogberg, Nils; Alstrom, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010).

  19. Complete genome sequence of the rapeseed plant-growth promoting Serratia plymuthica strain AS9

    PubMed Central

    Högberg, Nils; Alström, Sadhna; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Lu, Megan; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Tapia, Roxanne; Fiebig, Anne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia plymuthica are plant-associated, plant beneficial species belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The members of the genus Serratia are ubiquitous in nature and their life style varies from endophytic to free-living. S. plymuthica AS9 is of special interest for its ability to inhibit fungal pathogens of rapeseed and to promote plant growth. The genome of S. plymuthica AS9 comprises a 5,442,880 bp long circular chromosome that consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome is part of the project entitled “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010). PMID:22675598

  20. [Genomic instability in chidren born after the Chernobyl nuclear accident (in vivo and in vitro studies)].

    PubMed

    Agadzhanian, A V; Suskov, I I

    2010-06-01

    Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes in children born after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the period from 1987 to 2004 (permanent residents of territories contaminated with radionuclides, n = 92; and children of irradiated fathers-liquidators, n = 88)) revealed increased levels of aberrant cells (ACs) and aberrations of the chromosomal type as compared to the control (P < 0.05). In three subgroups of children with different initial AC frequencies (children with high AC frequencies, > or = 3%; children with medium AC frequencies, 2%; and children with low AC frequencies, > or = 1%), the levels of aberrations of the chromosomal type are increased as compared to the control (P < 0.05). The levels of aberrant cells and chromosome aberrations (CAs) in the subgroup of children with > or = 3% frequencies significantly differ from those in the subgroup of children with > or = 1% AC frequencies. No dependence of the AC and CA frequencies on the year of birth after the Chernobyl accident was revealed. After fractional and single gamma-irradiation (137Cs) of blood in vitro in the 10-30 cGy dose range, the average CA frequencies in the first and second mitoses increased in a similar way depending on the initial AC frequencies in the children and parents. All these results suggest an individual character ofgenomic instability induced by low radiation doses and its transgenerational phenomenon in the organisms of children.

  1. INMAP Overexpression Inhibits Cell Proliferation, Induces Genomic Instability and Functions through p53/p21 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Lei, Yan; Du, Baochen; Zheng, Yanbo; Lu, Xiangfeng; Tan, Tan; Kang, Jingting; Sun, Le; Liang, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    INMAP is a spindle protein that plays essential role for mitosis, by ensuring spindle and centromere integrality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevant functions of INMAP for genomic stability and its functional pathway. We overexpressed INMAP in HeLa cells, resulting in growth inhibition in monolayer cell cultures, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and xenograft growth in nude mice. In this system caused micronuclei (MNi) formation, chromosome distortion and γH2AX expression upregulation, suggesting DNA damage induction and genomic stability impairment. As a tumour biochemical marker, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes were detected to evaluate cell metabolic activity, the results confirming that total activity of LDH, as well as that of its LDH5 isoform, is significantly decreased in INMAP-overexpressing HeLa cells. The levels of p53 and p21 were upregulated, and however, that of PCNA and Bcl-2, downregulated. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) analyses revealed the interaction between INMAP and p21. These results suggest that INMAP might function through p53/p21 pathways. PMID:25635878

  2. Genomic organization and promoter analysis of a transcriptional repressor gene from Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaofang; Shen, Shanrui; Gao, Huan; Yan, Binlun

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we cloned and sequenced genomic sequences from a Fenneropenaeus chinensis transcriptional repressor gene, FcTR. The FcTR gene is 2,671 bp in length and has four exons and three introns. The 873 bp promoter contains several transcription factor binding sites, including a TATA box and a cyclic AMP-responsive element. Promoter deletion analysis using a luciferase reporter gene identified regulatory elements. Challenge with white spot syndrome virus increased expression from the promoter-deletion constructs. These results suggest that FcTR might play an important role in the shrimp immune response.

  3. Genome-culture coevolution promotes rapid divergence of killer whale ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Vijay, Nagarjun; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Baird, Robin W; Durban, John W; Fumagalli, Matteo; Gibbs, Richard A; Hanson, M Bradley; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Martin, Michael D; Robertson, Kelly M; Sousa, Vitor C; Vieira, Filipe G; Vinař, Tomáš; Wade, Paul; Worley, Kim C; Excoffier, Laurent; Morin, Phillip A; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2016-01-01

    Analysing population genomic data from killer whale ecotypes, which we estimate have globally radiated within less than 250,000 years, we show that genetic structuring including the segregation of potentially functional alleles is associated with socially inherited ecological niche. Reconstruction of ancestral demographic history revealed bottlenecks during founder events, likely promoting ecological divergence and genetic drift resulting in a wide range of genome-wide differentiation between pairs of allopatric and sympatric ecotypes. Functional enrichment analyses provided evidence for regional genomic divergence associated with habitat, dietary preferences and post-zygotic reproductive isolation. Our findings are consistent with expansion of small founder groups into novel niches by an initial plastic behavioural response, perpetuated by social learning imposing an altered natural selection regime. The study constitutes an important step towards an understanding of the complex interaction between demographic history, culture, ecological adaptation and evolution at the genomic level. PMID:27243207

  4. Genome-culture coevolution promotes rapid divergence of killer whale ecotypes.

    PubMed

    Foote, Andrew D; Vijay, Nagarjun; Ávila-Arcos, María C; Baird, Robin W; Durban, John W; Fumagalli, Matteo; Gibbs, Richard A; Hanson, M Bradley; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S; Martin, Michael D; Robertson, Kelly M; Sousa, Vitor C; Vieira, Filipe G; Vinař, Tomáš; Wade, Paul; Worley, Kim C; Excoffier, Laurent; Morin, Phillip A; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Wolf, Jochen B W

    2016-05-31

    Analysing population genomic data from killer whale ecotypes, which we estimate have globally radiated within less than 250,000 years, we show that genetic structuring including the segregation of potentially functional alleles is associated with socially inherited ecological niche. Reconstruction of ancestral demographic history revealed bottlenecks during founder events, likely promoting ecological divergence and genetic drift resulting in a wide range of genome-wide differentiation between pairs of allopatric and sympatric ecotypes. Functional enrichment analyses provided evidence for regional genomic divergence associated with habitat, dietary preferences and post-zygotic reproductive isolation. Our findings are consistent with expansion of small founder groups into novel niches by an initial plastic behavioural response, perpetuated by social learning imposing an altered natural selection regime. The study constitutes an important step towards an understanding of the complex interaction between demographic history, culture, ecological adaptation and evolution at the genomic level.

  5. Genome-culture coevolution promotes rapid divergence of killer whale ecotypes

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Andrew D.; Vijay, Nagarjun; Ávila-Arcos, María C.; Baird, Robin W.; Durban, John W.; Fumagalli, Matteo; Gibbs, Richard A.; Hanson, M. Bradley; Korneliussen, Thorfinn S.; Martin, Michael D.; Robertson, Kelly M.; Sousa, Vitor C.; Vieira, Filipe G.; Vinař, Tomáš; Wade, Paul; Worley, Kim C.; Excoffier, Laurent; Morin, Phillip A.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Wolf, Jochen B.W.

    2016-01-01

    Analysing population genomic data from killer whale ecotypes, which we estimate have globally radiated within less than 250,000 years, we show that genetic structuring including the segregation of potentially functional alleles is associated with socially inherited ecological niche. Reconstruction of ancestral demographic history revealed bottlenecks during founder events, likely promoting ecological divergence and genetic drift resulting in a wide range of genome-wide differentiation between pairs of allopatric and sympatric ecotypes. Functional enrichment analyses provided evidence for regional genomic divergence associated with habitat, dietary preferences and post-zygotic reproductive isolation. Our findings are consistent with expansion of small founder groups into novel niches by an initial plastic behavioural response, perpetuated by social learning imposing an altered natural selection regime. The study constitutes an important step towards an understanding of the complex interaction between demographic history, culture, ecological adaptation and evolution at the genomic level. PMID:27243207

  6. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence of plant-growth promoting Serratia proteamaculans S4

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Lynne A.; Högberg, Nils; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Alström, Sadhna; Bruce, David; Quintana, Beverly; Munk, Christine; Daligault, Hajnalka; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen; Reitenga, Krista; Green, Lance; Chain, Patrick; Erkkila, Tracy; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Xu, Yan; Kunde, Yulia; Chertkov, Olga; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Szeto, Ernest; Mavromatis, Kostas; Huntemann, Marcel; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Deshpande, Shweta; Markowitz, Victor; Pagani, Ioanna; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja; Finlay, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans S4 (previously Serratia sp. S4), isolated from the rhizosphere of wild Equisetum sp., has the ability to stimulate plant growth and to suppress the growth of several soil-borne fungal pathogens of economically important crops. Here we present the non-contiguous, finished genome sequence of S. proteamaculans S4, which consists of a 5,324,944 bp circular chromosome and a 129,797 bp circular plasmid. The chromosome contains 5,008 predicted genes while the plasmid comprises 134 predicted genes. In total, 4,993 genes are assigned as protein-coding genes. The genome consists of 22 rRNA genes, 82 tRNA genes and 58 pseudogenes. This genome is a part of the project “Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth-promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens” awarded through the 2010 DOE-JGI’s Community Sequencing Program. PMID:24501629

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain P23, a Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium of Duckweed.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Masayuki; Hosoyama, Akira; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain P23 is a plant growth-promoting bacterium, which was isolated from the surface of duckweed. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain P23. The genome data will serve as a valuable reference for understanding the molecular mechanism of plant growth promotion in aquatic plants.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of core promoter structures in Schizosaccharomyces pombe with DeepCAGE

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Hou, Jingyi; Bai, Ling; Hu, Chuansheng; Tong, Pan; Kang, Yani; Zhao, Xiaodong; Shao, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    The core promoter, which immediately flanks the transcription start site (TSS), plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation of eukaryotes. Recent studies on higher eukaryotes have revealed an unprecedented complexity of core promoter structures that underscores diverse regulatory mechanisms of gene expression. For unicellular eukaryotes, however, the structures of core promoters have not been investigated in detail. As an important model organism, Schizosaccharomyces pombe still lacks the precise annotation for TSSs, thus hampering the analysis of core promoter structures and their relationship to higher eukaryotes. Here we used a deep sequencing-based approach (DeepCAGE) to generate 16 million uniquely mapped tags, corresponding to 93,736 positions in the S. pombe genome. The high-resolution TSS landscape enabled identification of over 8,000 core promoters, characterization of 4 promoter classes and observation of widespread alternative promoters. The landscape also allowed precise determination of the representative TSSs within core promoters, thus redefining the 5' UTR for 82.8% of S. pombe genes. We further identified the consensus initiator (Inr) sequence – PyPyPuN(A/C)(C/A), the TATA-enriched region (between position −25 and −37) and an Inr immediate downstream motif – CC(T/A)(T/C)(T/C/A)(A/G)CCA(A/T/C), all of which were associated with highly expressed promoters. In conclusion, the detailed analysis of core promoters not only significantly improves the genome annotation of S. pombe, but also reveals that this unicellular eukaryote shares a highly similar organization in the core promoters with higher eukaryotes. These findings lend additional evidence for the power of this model system in delineating complex regulatory processes in multicellular organisms, despite its perceived simplicity. PMID:25747261

  9. Environmental versatility promotes modularity in genome-scale metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ubiquity of modules in biological networks may result from an evolutionary benefit of a modular organization. For instance, modularity may increase the rate of adaptive evolution, because modules can be easily combined into new arrangements that may benefit their carrier. Conversely, modularity may emerge as a by-product of some trait. We here ask whether this last scenario may play a role in genome-scale metabolic networks that need to sustain life in one or more chemical environments. For such networks, we define a network module as a maximal set of reactions that are fully coupled, i.e., whose fluxes can only vary in fixed proportions. This definition overcomes limitations of purely graph based analyses of metabolism by exploiting the functional links between reactions. We call a metabolic network viable in a given chemical environment if it can synthesize all of an organism's biomass compounds from nutrients in this environment. An organism's metabolism is highly versatile if it can sustain life in many different chemical environments. We here ask whether versatility affects the modularity of metabolic networks. Results Using recently developed techniques to randomly sample large numbers of viable metabolic networks from a vast space of metabolic networks, we use flux balance analysis to study in silico metabolic networks that differ in their versatility. We find that highly versatile networks are also highly modular. They contain more modules and more reactions that are organized into modules. Most or all reactions in a module are associated with the same biochemical pathways. Modules that arise in highly versatile networks generally involve reactions that process nutrients or closely related chemicals. We also observe that the metabolism of E. coli is significantly more modular than even our most versatile networks. Conclusions Our work shows that modularity in metabolic networks can be a by-product of functional constraints, e.g., the need to

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of four representative plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Some Pseudomonas strains function as predominant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Within this group, Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas fluorescens are non-pathogenic biocontrol agents, and some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains are PGPR. P. chlororaphis GP72 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium with a fully sequenced genome. We conducted a genomic analysis comparing GP72 with three other pseudomonad PGPR: P. fluorescens Pf-5, P. aeruginosa M18, and the nitrogen-fixing strain P. stutzeri A1501. Our aim was to identify the similarities and differences among these strains using a comparative genomic approach to clarify the mechanisms of plant growth-promoting activity. Results The genome sizes of GP72, Pf-5, M18, and A1501 ranged from 4.6 to 7.1 M, and the number of protein-coding genes varied among the four species. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) analysis assigned functions to predicted proteins. The COGs distributions were similar among the four species. However, the percentage of genes encoding transposases and their inactivated derivatives (COG L) was 1.33% of the total genes with COGs classifications in A1501, 0.21% in GP72, 0.02% in Pf-5, and 0.11% in M18. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that GP72 and Pf-5 were the most closely related strains, consistent with the genome alignment results. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) between GP72 and Pf-5 revealed 3544 conserved genes. There were fewer conserved genes when GP72 CDSs were compared with those of A1501 and M18. Comparisons among the four Pseudomonas species revealed 603 conserved genes in GP72, illustrating common plant growth-promoting traits shared among these PGPR. Conserved genes were related to catabolism, transport of plant-derived compounds, stress resistance, and rhizosphere colonization. Some strain-specific CDSs were related to different kinds of biocontrol activities or plant growth promotion. The GP72 genome

  11. Murine double minute 2: p53-independent roads lead to genome instability or death.

    PubMed

    Bouska, Alyssa; Eischen, Christine M

    2009-06-01

    The oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) is frequently overexpressed in many types of human malignancies. Although Mdm2 has an essential role in negatively regulating the p53 tumor suppressor, it also has less well characterized p53-independent functions that influence pathways that are crucial for controlling tumorigenesis. In addition to the impact Mdm2 has on p53-independent apoptosis, mounting evidence is linking increased Mdm2 levels to altered cell-cycle regulation, DNA replication and DNA repair leading to loss of genome stability. Mdm2 involvement in pathways that influence chromosome stability and cell death, distinct from its role in the p53 pathway, strengthens the position of Mdm2 as a desirable therapeutic target for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:19447627

  12. Genomic Instability of the Sex-Determining Locus in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Lubieniecki, Krzysztof P; Lin, Song; Cabana, Emily I; Li, Jieying; Lai, Yvonne Y Y; Davidson, William S

    2015-09-22

    Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, like other members of the subfamily Salmoninae, are gonochoristic with male heterogamety. The finding that sex-linked genetic markers varied between species suggested that the sex-determining gene differs among salmonid species, or that there is one sex-determining gene that has the capacity to move around the genome. The discovery of sdY, the sex-determining gene in rainbow trout, and its presence in many male salmonids gave support to the latter. Additional evidence for a salmonid-specific, sex-determining jumping gene came from the mapping of the sex-determining locus to three different chromosomes in Tasmanian male Atlantic salmon lineages. To characterize the sex-determining region, we isolated three sdY containing BACs from an Atlantic salmon male library. Sequencing of these BACs yielded two contigs, one of which contained the sdY gene. Sequence analysis of the borders of male-specific and female/male common regions revealed highly repetitive sequences associated with mobile elements, which may allow an sdY cassette to jump around the genome. FISH analysis using a BAC or a plasmid containing the sdY gene showed that the sdY gene did indeed localize to the chromosomes where SEX had been mapped in different Tasmanian Atlantic salmon families. Moreover, the plasmid sdY gene probe hybridized primarily to one of the sex chromosomes as would be expected of a male-specific gene. Our results suggest that a common salmonid sex-determining gene (sdY) can move between three specific loci on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6, giving the impression that there are multiple SEX loci both within and between salmonid species.

  13. Genomic Instability of the Sex-Determining Locus in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Lubieniecki, Krzysztof P.; Lin, Song; Cabana, Emily I.; Li, Jieying; Lai, Yvonne Y. Y.; Davidson, William S.

    2015-01-01

    Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout, like other members of the subfamily Salmoninae, are gonochoristic with male heterogamety. The finding that sex-linked genetic markers varied between species suggested that the sex-determining gene differs among salmonid species, or that there is one sex-determining gene that has the capacity to move around the genome. The discovery of sdY, the sex-determining gene in rainbow trout, and its presence in many male salmonids gave support to the latter. Additional evidence for a salmonid-specific, sex-determining jumping gene came from the mapping of the sex-determining locus to three different chromosomes in Tasmanian male Atlantic salmon lineages. To characterize the sex-determining region, we isolated three sdY containing BACs from an Atlantic salmon male library. Sequencing of these BACs yielded two contigs, one of which contained the sdY gene. Sequence analysis of the borders of male-specific and female/male common regions revealed highly repetitive sequences associated with mobile elements, which may allow an sdY cassette to jump around the genome. FISH analysis using a BAC or a plasmid containing the sdY gene showed that the sdY gene did indeed localize to the chromosomes where SEX had been mapped in different Tasmanian Atlantic salmon families. Moreover, the plasmid sdY gene probe hybridized primarily to one of the sex chromosomes as would be expected of a male-specific gene. Our results suggest that a common salmonid sex-determining gene (sdY) can move between three specific loci on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6, giving the impression that there are multiple SEX loci both within and between salmonid species. PMID:26401030

  14. Hsp90 induces increased genomic instability toward DNA-damaging agents by tuning down RAD53 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Nidhi; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K.; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda

    2016-01-01

    It is well documented that elevated body temperature causes tumors to regress upon radiotherapy. However, how hyperthermia induces DNA damage sensitivity is not clear. We show that a transient heat shock and particularly the concomitant induction of Hsp90 lead to increased genomic instability under DNA-damaging conditions. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Hsp90 attenuate efficient DNA damage signaling and dictate preferential use of the potentially mutagenic double-strand break repair pathway. We show that under normal physiological conditions, Hsp90 negatively regulates RAD53 transcription to suppress DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, under DNA damaging conditions, RAD53 is derepressed, and the increased level of Rad53p triggers an efficient DNA damage response. A higher abundance of Hsp90 causes increased transcriptional repression on RAD53 in a dose-dependent manner, which could not be fully derepressed even in the presence of DNA damage. Accordingly, cells behave like a rad53 loss-of-function mutant and show reduced NHEJ efficiency, with a drastic failure to up-regulate RAD51 expression and manifestly faster accumulation of CLN1 and CLN2 in DNA-damaged G1, cells leading to premature release from checkpoint arrest. We further demonstrate that Rad53 overexpression is able to rescue all of the aforementioned deleterious effects caused by Hsp90 overproduction. PMID:27307581

  15. [CHANGING OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF NON-CONTACT (ELECTROCHEMICAL) ACTIVATED DRINKING WATER IS ASSOCIATED WITH INDUCTION OF GENOMIC INSTABILITY OF CULTIVATED HUMAN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES].

    PubMed

    Zatsepina, O V; Ingel, F I

    2016-01-01

    In the article there are presented data which are the fragment of large multidisciplinary study of genetic safety of non-contact electrochemically activated water (NAW). The aim of this study was the analysis of the relation of impacts of genomic instability (micronucleus test with cytochalasin B) detected in human blood cells, cultured in medias prepared on the base of these NAWs, with physical and chemical properties of these NaWs. In experiments there were used catholytes and anolytes obtained by activation of osmotic, tap and dining bottled water As a result of such activation, all waters were shown to acquire the ability to induce genomic instability in cellular cultures. Notably in cell cultures on catholytes and anolytes these effects differed between themselves and have been associated with different physical and chemical properties of the NAWs. PMID:27266021

  16. [CHANGING OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF NON-CONTACT (ELECTROCHEMICAL) ACTIVATED DRINKING WATER IS ASSOCIATED WITH INDUCTION OF GENOMIC INSTABILITY OF CULTIVATED HUMAN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES].

    PubMed

    Zatsepina, O V; Ingel, F I

    2016-01-01

    In the article there are presented data which are the fragment of large multidisciplinary study of genetic safety of non-contact electrochemically activated water (NAW). The aim of this study was the analysis of the relation of impacts of genomic instability (micronucleus test with cytochalasin B) detected in human blood cells, cultured in medias prepared on the base of these NAWs, with physical and chemical properties of these NaWs. In experiments there were used catholytes and anolytes obtained by activation of osmotic, tap and dining bottled water As a result of such activation, all waters were shown to acquire the ability to induce genomic instability in cellular cultures. Notably in cell cultures on catholytes and anolytes these effects differed between themselves and have been associated with different physical and chemical properties of the NAWs.

  17. WO3/Pt nanoparticles promote light-induced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal instability within tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-02-01

    Although metal-metal oxide nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest as catalysts, they have attracted little interest in nanomedicine. This is likely due to the fact that metal oxide semiconductors generally require biologically harmful ultraviolet excitation. In contrast, this study focuses upon WO3/Pt nanoparticles, which can be excited by visible light. To optimize the nanoparticles’ catalytic performance, platinization was performed at alkaline pH. These nanoparticles destroyed organic dyes, consumed dissolved oxygen and produced hydroxyl radicals. 4T1 breast cancer cells internalized WO3/Pt nanoparticles within the membrane-bound endo-lysosomal compartment as shown by electron and fluorescence microscopy. During visible light exposure, but not in darkness, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture reactive oxygen species, promote lipid peroxidation, and trigger lysosomal membrane disruption. As cells of the immune system degrade organic molecules, produce reactive oxygen species, and activate the lipid peroxidation pathway within target cells, these nanoparticles mimic the chemical attributes of immune effector cells. These biomimetic nanoparticles should become useful in managing certain cancers, especially ocular cancer.

  18. Loss of Ewing sarcoma EWS allele promotes tumorigenesis by inducing chromosomal instability in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyewon; Galbraith, Richard; Turner, Thaddeus; Mehojah, Justin; Azuma, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors expresses aberrant EWSR1- (EWS) fusion genes that are derived from chromosomal translocation. Although these fusion genes are well characterized as transcription factors, their formation leaves a single EWS allele in the sarcoma cells, and the contribution that the loss of EWS makes towards disease pathogenesis is unknown. To address this question, we utilized zebrafish mutants for ewsa and tp53. The zebrafish tp53(M214K)w/m line and the ewsaw/m, zygotic ewsam/m, and Maternal-Zygotic (MZ) ewsam/m lines all displayed zero to low incidence of tumorigenesis. However, when the ewsa and tp53 mutant lines were crossed with each other, the incidence of tumorigenesis drastically increased. Furthermore, 27 hour post fertilization (hpf) MZ ewsam/m mutant embryos displayed a higher incidence of aberrant chromosome numbers and mitotic dysfunction compared to wildtype zebrafish embryos. Consistent with this finding, tumor samples obtained from ewsam/m;tp53w/m zebrafish displayed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for the wildtype tp53 locus. These results suggest that wildtype Ewsa inhibits LOH induction, possibly by maintaining chromosomal stability. We propose that the loss of ewsa promotes tumorigenesis, and EWS deficiency may contribute to the pathogenesis of EWS-fusion-expressing sarcomas. PMID:27557633

  19. WO3/Pt nanoparticles promote light-induced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal instability within tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-02-19

    Although metal-metal oxide nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest as catalysts, they have attracted little interest in nanomedicine. This is likely due to the fact that metal oxide semiconductors generally require biologically harmful ultraviolet excitation. In contrast, this study focuses upon WO3/Pt nanoparticles, which can be excited by visible light. To optimize the nanoparticles' catalytic performance, platinization was performed at alkaline pH. These nanoparticles destroyed organic dyes, consumed dissolved oxygen and produced hydroxyl radicals. 4T1 breast cancer cells internalized WO3/Pt nanoparticles within the membrane-bound endo-lysosomal compartment as shown by electron and fluorescence microscopy. During visible light exposure, but not in darkness, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture reactive oxygen species, promote lipid peroxidation, and trigger lysosomal membrane disruption. As cells of the immune system degrade organic molecules, produce reactive oxygen species, and activate the lipid peroxidation pathway within target cells, these nanoparticles mimic the chemical attributes of immune effector cells. These biomimetic nanoparticles should become useful in managing certain cancers, especially ocular cancer.

  20. WO3/Pt nanoparticles promote light-induced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal instability within tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-02-19

    Although metal-metal oxide nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest as catalysts, they have attracted little interest in nanomedicine. This is likely due to the fact that metal oxide semiconductors generally require biologically harmful ultraviolet excitation. In contrast, this study focuses upon WO3/Pt nanoparticles, which can be excited by visible light. To optimize the nanoparticles' catalytic performance, platinization was performed at alkaline pH. These nanoparticles destroyed organic dyes, consumed dissolved oxygen and produced hydroxyl radicals. 4T1 breast cancer cells internalized WO3/Pt nanoparticles within the membrane-bound endo-lysosomal compartment as shown by electron and fluorescence microscopy. During visible light exposure, but not in darkness, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture reactive oxygen species, promote lipid peroxidation, and trigger lysosomal membrane disruption. As cells of the immune system degrade organic molecules, produce reactive oxygen species, and activate the lipid peroxidation pathway within target cells, these nanoparticles mimic the chemical attributes of immune effector cells. These biomimetic nanoparticles should become useful in managing certain cancers, especially ocular cancer. PMID:26788907

  1. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Hoffman, Adam; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Walla, Michael D.; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Newman, Lee; Monchy, Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa×deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plant roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT–PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to

  2. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Christopher A; Cannady, Kimberly R; Hoffman, Jackson A; Trotter, Kevin W; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Bennett, Brian D; Burkholder, Adam B; Burd, Craig J; Fargo, David C; Archer, Trevor K

    2016-08-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  3. Downstream Antisense Transcription Predicts Genomic Features That Define the Specific Chromatin Environment at Mammalian Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Jackson A.; Trotter, Kevin W.; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Bennett, Brian D.; Burkholder, Adam B.; Fargo, David C.; Archer, Trevor K.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense transcription is a prevalent feature at mammalian promoters. Previous studies have primarily focused on antisense transcription initiating upstream of genes. Here, we characterize promoter-proximal antisense transcription downstream of gene transcription starts sites in human breast cancer cells, investigating the genomic context of downstream antisense transcription. We find extensive correlations between antisense transcription and features associated with the chromatin environment at gene promoters. Antisense transcription downstream of promoters is widespread, with antisense transcription initiation observed within 2 kb of 28% of gene transcription start sites. Antisense transcription initiates between nucleosomes regularly positioned downstream of these promoters. The nucleosomes between gene and downstream antisense transcription start sites carry histone modifications associated with active promoters, such as H3K4me3 and H3K27ac. This region is bound by chromatin remodeling and histone modifying complexes including SWI/SNF subunits and HDACs, suggesting that antisense transcription or resulting RNA transcripts contribute to the creation and maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. Downstream antisense transcription overlays additional regulatory features, such as transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility, and the downstream edge of promoter-associated CpG islands. These features suggest an important role for antisense transcription in the regulation of gene expression and the maintenance of a promoter-associated chromatin environment. PMID:27487356

  4. Genome-wide promoter binding profiling of protein phosphatase-1 and its major nuclear targeting subunits.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Toon; Görnemann, Janina; Verbinnen, Iris; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-07-13

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a key regulator of transcription and is targeted to promoter regions via associated proteins. However, the chromatin binding sites of PP1 have never been studied in a systematic and genome-wide manner. Methylation-based DamID profiling in HeLa cells has enabled us to map hundreds of promoter binding sites of PP1 and three of its major nuclear interactors, i.e. RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS. Our data reveal that the α, β and γ isoforms of PP1 largely bind to distinct subsets of promoters and can also be differentiated by their promoter binding pattern. PP1β emerged as the major promoter-associated isoform and shows an overlapping binding profile with PNUTS at dozens of active promoters. Surprisingly, most promoter binding sites of PP1 are not shared with RepoMan, NIPP1 or PNUTS, hinting at the existence of additional, largely unidentified chromatin-targeting subunits. We also found that PP1 is not required for the global chromatin targeting of RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS, but alters the promoter binding specificity of NIPP1. Our data disclose an unexpected specificity and complexity in the promoter binding of PP1 isoforms and their chromatin-targeting subunits. PMID:25990731

  5. A Germline Polymorphism of DNA Polymerase Beta Induces Genomic Instability and Cellular Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Keh, Agnes; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified in the POLB gene, but little is known about their cellular and biochemical impact. DNA Polymerase β (Pol β), encoded by the POLB gene, is the main gap-filling polymerase involved in base excision repair (BER), a pathway that protects the genome from the consequences of oxidative DNA damage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that expression of the POLB germline coding SNP (rs3136797) in mammalian cells could induce a cancerous phenotype. Expression of this SNP in both human and mouse cells induced double-strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and cellular transformation. Following treatment with an alkylating agent, cells expressing this coding SNP accumulated BER intermediate substrates, including single-strand and double-strand breaks. The rs3136797 SNP encodes the P242R variant Pol β protein and biochemical analysis showed that P242R protein had a slower catalytic rate than WT, although P242R binds DNA similarly to WT. Our results suggest that people who carry the rs3136797 germline SNP may be at an increased risk for cancer susceptibility. PMID:23144635

  6. Long duration exposure to cadmium leads to increased cell survival, decreased DNA repair capacity, and genomic instability in mouse testicular Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Kumari, Ragini; Pevey, Christina; Jackson, Desiree; DuMond, James W

    2009-06-28

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have shown that cadmium is carcinogenic to human and experimental animals, however, the mechanism of cadmium-induced carcinogenesis is not clear. The aberrant expression of cell cycle and DNA repair genes resulting in increased cell proliferation and genomic instability are the characteristic features of cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to cadmium can perturb cell proliferation/survival and causes genomic instability in TM3 cells, a mouse testicular Leydig cell line. The results of this study revealed that short-duration exposure to lower doses of cadmium significantly increase the growth of TM3 cells, whereas, higher doses are toxic and cause cell death. The long duration exposure to higher doses of cadmium, however, results in increased cell survival and acquisition of apoptotic resistance. Gene expression analysis by real-time PCR revealed increased expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, whereas decreased expression of pro-apoptotic gene Bax. Decreased expression of genes for maintenance of DNA methylation, DNMT1, and DNA repair, OGG1 and MYH, was also observed in cells exposed to cadmium for 24h. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay revealed genomic instability in cells with chronic exposure to cadmium. The findings of this study indicate that mouse testicular Leydig cells adapt to chronic cadmium exposure by increasing cell survival through increased expression of Bcl-2, and decreased expression of Bax. The increased proliferation of cells with genomic instability may result in malignant transformation, and therefore, could be a viable mechanism for cadmium-induced cancers. PMID:19232459

  7. Hepatitis C virus-cross-reactive TCR gene-modified T cells: a model for immunotherapy against diseases with genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Riley, Timothy P; Lyons, Gretchen E; Callender, Glenda G; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J; Wang, Yuan; Simms, Patricia E; Scurti, Gina M; Foley, Kendra C; Murray, David C; Hellman, Lance M; McMahan, Rachel H; Iwashima, Makio; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rosen, Hugo R; Baker, Brian M; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-09-01

    A major obstacle hindering the development of effective immunity against viral infections, their associated disease, and certain cancers is their inherent genomic instability. Accumulation of mutations can alter processing and presentation of antigens recognized by antibodies and T cells that can lead to immune escape variants. Use of an agent that can intrinsically combat rapidly mutating viral or cancer-associated antigens would be quite advantageous in developing effective immunity against such disease. We propose that T cells harboring cross-reactive TCRs could serve as a therapeutic agent in these instances. With the use of hepatitis C virus, known for its genomic instability as a model for mutated antigen recognition, we demonstrate cross-reactivity against immunogenic and mutagenic nonstructural protein 3:1406-1415 and nonstructural protein 3:1073-1081 epitopes in PBL-derived, TCR-gene-modified T cells. These single TCR-engineered T cells can CD8-independently recognize naturally occurring and epidemiologically relevant mutant variants. TCR-peptide MHC modeling data allow us to rationalize how TCR structural properties accommodate recognition of certain mutated epitopes and how these substitutions impact the requirement of CD8 affinity enhancement for recognition. A better understanding of such TCRs' promiscuous behavior may allow for exploitation of these properties to develop novel, adoptive T cell-based therapies for viral infections and cancers exhibiting similar genomic instability. PMID:26921345

  8. Hepatitis C virus-cross-reactive TCR gene-modified T cells: a model for immunotherapy against diseases with genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Riley, Timothy P; Lyons, Gretchen E; Callender, Glenda G; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J; Wang, Yuan; Simms, Patricia E; Scurti, Gina M; Foley, Kendra C; Murray, David C; Hellman, Lance M; McMahan, Rachel H; Iwashima, Makio; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rosen, Hugo R; Baker, Brian M; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-09-01

    A major obstacle hindering the development of effective immunity against viral infections, their associated disease, and certain cancers is their inherent genomic instability. Accumulation of mutations can alter processing and presentation of antigens recognized by antibodies and T cells that can lead to immune escape variants. Use of an agent that can intrinsically combat rapidly mutating viral or cancer-associated antigens would be quite advantageous in developing effective immunity against such disease. We propose that T cells harboring cross-reactive TCRs could serve as a therapeutic agent in these instances. With the use of hepatitis C virus, known for its genomic instability as a model for mutated antigen recognition, we demonstrate cross-reactivity against immunogenic and mutagenic nonstructural protein 3:1406-1415 and nonstructural protein 3:1073-1081 epitopes in PBL-derived, TCR-gene-modified T cells. These single TCR-engineered T cells can CD8-independently recognize naturally occurring and epidemiologically relevant mutant variants. TCR-peptide MHC modeling data allow us to rationalize how TCR structural properties accommodate recognition of certain mutated epitopes and how these substitutions impact the requirement of CD8 affinity enhancement for recognition. A better understanding of such TCRs' promiscuous behavior may allow for exploitation of these properties to develop novel, adoptive T cell-based therapies for viral infections and cancers exhibiting similar genomic instability.

  9. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-mediated genomic instability in low-dose irradiated human cells through nuclear retention of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are associated with various radiation responses, including adaptive responses, mitophagy, the bystander effect, genomic instability, and apoptosis. We recently identified a unique radiation response in the mitochondria of human cells exposed to low-dose long-term fractionated radiation (FR). Such repeated radiation exposure inflicts chronic oxidative stresses on irradiated cells via the continuous release of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in cellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione. ROS-induced oxidative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage generates mutations upon DNA replication. Therefore, mtDNA mutation and dysfunction can be used as markers to assess the effects of low-dose radiation. In this study, we present an overview of the link between mitochondrial ROS and cell cycle perturbation associated with the genomic instability of low-dose irradiated cells. Excess mitochondrial ROS perturb AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling via oxidative inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A after low-dose long-term FR. The resulting abnormal nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 induces genomic instability in low-dose irradiated cells. PMID:27078622

  10. Cooperative promotion of plasma instabilities for emission of terahertz radiation in an asymmetric dual-grating-gate graphene-channel FET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Akira; Koseki, Yuki; Watanabe, Takayuki; Popov, Vyacheslav V.; Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi

    2016-04-01

    We study instability of plasmons in a dual-grating-gate graphene field-effect transistor induced by dc current injection using self-consistent simulations with the Boltzmann equation. With ultimately high-quality graphene where the electron scattering is only limited by acoustic phonons, it is demonstrated that a total growth rate of the plasmon instability, with the terahertz/mid-infrared range of the frequency, can exceed 4 X 1012 s-1 at room temperature, which is an order of magnitude larger than in two-dimensional electron gases based on usual semiconductors. We show that the giant total growth rate originates from cooperative promotion of the so-called Dyakonov-Shur and Ryzhii-Satou-Shur instabilities.

  11. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Aymeric; de los Santos, Paulina Estrada; Graindorge, Arnault; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2007-01-01

    Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF) or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315) genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function) group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD), alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS), flagellin biosynthesis (fliA), and heat shock (rpoH) factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU). Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2), particular Bcc species (sigI), the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ), certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS), or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes). Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2), recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD), localized (ecfG) and large scale deletions (sigI, sigJ, ecf

  12. Unlocking the steric gate of DNA polymerase η leads to increased genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Donigan, Katherine A.; Cerritelli, Susana M.; McDonald, John P.; Vaisman, Alexandra; Crouch, Robert J.; Woodgate, Roger

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase η (pol η) is best characterized for its ability to perform accurate and efficient translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) through cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). To ensure accurate bypass the polymerase is not only required to select the correct base, but also discriminate between NTPs and dNTPs. Most DNA polymerases have a conserved “steric gate” residue which functions to prevent incorporation of NMPs during DNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that the Phe35 residue of S. cerevisiae pol η functions as a steric gate to limit the use of ribonucleotides during polymerization both in vitro and in vivo. Unlike the related polι enzyme, wild-type pol η does not readily incorporate NMPs in vitro. In contrast, a pol η F35A mutant incorporates NMPs on both damaged and undamaged DNA in vitro with a high degree of base selectivity. An S. cerevisiae strain expressing pol η F35A (rad30-F35A) that is also deficient for nucleotide excision repair (rad1Δ) and the TLS polymerase, pol ζ (rev3Δ), is extremely sensitive to UV-light. The sensitivity is due, in part, to RNaseH2 activity, as an isogenic rnh201Δ strain is roughly 50-fold more UV-resistant than its RNH201+ counterpart. Interestingly the rad1Δ rev3Δ rad30-F35A rnh201Δ strain exhibits a significant increase in the extent of spontaneous mutagenesis with a spectrum dominated by 1 bp deletions at runs of template Ts. We hypothesize that the increased mutagenesis is due to rA incorporation at these sites and that the short poly rA tract is subsequently repaired in an error-prone manner by a novel repair pathway that is specifically targeted to polyribonucleotide tracks. These data indicate that under certain conditions, pol η can compete with the cell’s replicases and gain access to undamaged genomic DNA. Such observations are consistent with a role for pol η in replicating common fragile sites (CFS) in human cells. PMID:26340535

  13. A 5′ RNA element promotes dengue virus RNA synthesis on a circular genome

    PubMed Central

    Filomatori, Claudia V.; Lodeiro, Maria F.; Alvarez, Diego E.; Samsa, Marcelo M.; Pietrasanta, Lía; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms of RNA replication of plus-strand RNA viruses are still unclear. Here, we identified the first promoter element for RNA synthesis described in a flavivirus. Using dengue virus as a model, we found that the viral RdRp discriminates the viral RNA by specific recognition of a 5′ element named SLA. We demonstrated that RNA–RNA interactions between 5′ and 3′ end sequences of the viral genome enhance dengue virus RNA synthesis only in the presence of an intact SLA. We propose a novel mechanism for minus-strand RNA synthesis in which the viral polymerase binds SLA at the 5′ end of the genome and reaches the site of initiation at the 3′ end via long-range RNA–RNA interactions. These findings provide an explanation for the strict requirement of dengue virus genome cyclization during viral replication. PMID:16882970

  14. When aging meets microgravity: whole genome promoters and enchancers transcription landscape in zebrafish onboard ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshanovskii, Kirill; Gusev, Oleg; Sychev, Vladimir; Poddubko, Svetlana; Deviatiiarov, Ruslan

    2016-07-01

    In order to gen new insights of gene regulation changes under conditions of real spaceflight, we have conducted whole-genome analysis of dynamic of promotes and enhancers transcriptional changes in zebrafish during prolonged exposure to real spaceflight. In the frame of Russia-Japan joint experiments "Aquatic Habitat"-"Aquarium" we have conducted Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) assay of zebrafish in the rage from 7 to 40 days of real spaceflight onboard ISS. The analysis showed that both gene expression patterns and architecture of shapes and types of the promoters are affected by spaceflight environment.

  15. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  16. IMP2/p62 induces genomic instability and an aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, S M; Laggai, S; Barghash, A; Schultheiss, C S; Lederer, E; Artl, M; Helms, V; Haybaeck, J; Kiemer, A K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths and commonly develops in inflammatory environments. The IGF2 mRNA-binding protein IMP2-2/IGF2BP2-2/p62 was originally identified as an autoantigen in HCC. Aim of this study was to investigate a potential pathophysiological role of p62 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Human HCC tissue showed overexpression of IMP2, which strongly correlated with the fetal markers AFP and DLK1/Pref-1/FA-1 and was particularly elevated in tumors with stem-like features and hypervascularization. Molecular classification of IMP2-overexpressing tumors revealed an aggressive phenotype. Livers of mice overexpressing the IMP2 splice variant p62 highly expressed the stem cell marker DLK1 and secreted DLK1 into the blood. p62 was oncogenic: diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited a higher tumor incidence and multiplicity than wild types. Tumors of transgenics showed a more aggressive and stem-like phenotype and displayed more oncogenic chromosomal aberrations determined with aCGH analysis. DEN-treated p62 transgenic mice exhibited distinct signs of inflammation, such as inflammatory cytokine expression and oxidative stress markers, that is, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was elevated in HepG2 cells, which either overexpressed p62 or were treated with DLK1. p62 induced this ROS production by a DLK1-dependent induction and activation of the small Rho-GTPase RAC1, activating NADPH oxidase and being overexpressed in human HCC. Our data indicate that p62/IMP2 promotes hepatocarcinogenesis by an amplification of inflammation. PMID:26426686

  17. A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Selby, Edward A.; Cornelius, Talea; Fehling, Kara B.; Kranzler, Amy; Panza, Emily A.; Lavender, Jason M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Engel, Scott G.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Grange, Daniel Le

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as “emotional instability.” The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed. PMID:26379588

  18. A perfect storm: examining the synergistic effects of negative and positive emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Selby, Edward A; Cornelius, Talea; Fehling, Kara B; Kranzler, Amy; Panza, Emily A; Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that both positive and negative emotion potentially influence the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa, through both positive and negative reinforcement of weight loss activities. Such reactive emotional experience may be characterized by frequent and intense fluctuations in emotion, a construct known as "emotional instability." The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between positive emotional instability and weight loss activities in anorexia nervosa, and to investigate the synergistic effects of positive and negative emotional instability on promoting weight loss activities. Using ecological momentary assessment methods, 118 participants with anorexia nervosa reported their emotional experiences and behaviors at least six times daily over 2 weeks using a portable digital device. Using generalized linear modeling, results indicated that high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability, and the interaction between the two, were associated with more frequent weight-loss activities, beyond anorexia subtype and mean levels of emotional intensity. These findings indicate that when women with anorexia exhibit both high levels of both positive and negative emotional instability they are more prone to a variety of weight loss activities. The importance of addressing the role of both positive and negative emotion in anorexia treatment is discussed. PMID:26379588

  19. Genomic Analysis and Isolation of RNA Polymerase II Dependent Promoters from Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Bleckmann, Maren; Fritz, Markus H-Y; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Schürig, Margitta; Geffers, Robert; Benes, Vladimir; Besir, Hüseyin; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2015-01-01

    The Baculoviral Expression Vector System (BEVS) is the most commonly used method for high expression of recombinant protein in insect cells. Nevertheless, expression of some target proteins--especially those entering the secretory pathway--provides a severe challenge for the baculovirus infected insect cells, due to the reorganisation of intracellular compounds upon viral infection. Therefore, alternative strategies for recombinant protein production in insect cells like transient plasmid-based expression or stable expression cell lines are becoming more popular. However, the major bottleneck of these systems is the lack of strong endogenous polymerase II dependent promoters, as the strong baculoviral p10 and polH promoters used in BEVS are only functional in presence of the viral transcription machinery during the late phase of infection. In this work we present a draft genome and a transcriptome analysis of Sf21 cells for the identification of the first known endogenous Spodoptera frugiperda promoters. Therefore, putative promoter sequences were identified and selected because of high mRNA level or in analogy to other strong promoters in other eukaryotic organism. The chosen endogenous Sf21 promoters were compared to early viral promoters for their efficiency to trigger eGFP expression using transient plasmid based transfection in a BioLector Microfermentation system. Furthermore, promoter activity was not only shown in Sf21 cells but also in Hi5 cells. The novel endogenous Sf21 promoters were ranked according to their activity and expand the small pool of available promoters for stable insect cell line development and transient plasmid expression in insect cells. The best promoter was used to improve plasmid based transient transfection in insect cells substantially.

  20. CRISPR Inversion of CTCF Sites Alters Genome Topology and Enhancer/Promoter Function

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya; Xu, Quan; Canzio, Daniele; Shou, Jia; Li, Jinhuan; Gorkin, David U.; Jung, Inkyung; Wu, Haiyang; Zhai, Yanan; Tang, Yuanxiao; Lu, Yichao; Wu, Yonghu; Jia, Zhilian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Michael Q.; Ren, Bing; Krainer, Adrian R.; Maniatis, Tom; Wu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY CTCF/cohesin play a central role in insulator function and higher-order chromatin organization of mammalian genomes. Recent studies identified a correlation between the orientation of CTCF-binding sites (CBSs) and chromatin loops. To test the functional significance of this observation, we combined CRISPR/Cas9-based genomic-DNA-fragment editing with chromosome-conformation-capture experiments to show that the location and relative orientations of CBSs determine the specificity of long-range chromatin looping in mammalian genomes, using protocadherin (Pcdh) and β-globin as model genes. Inversion of CBS elements within the Pcdh enhancer reconfigures the topology of chromatin loops between the distal enhancer and target promoters, and alters gene-expression patterns. Thus, although enhancers can function in an orientation-independent manner in reporter assays, in the native chromosome context the orientation of at least some enhancers carrying CBSs can determine both the architecture of topological chromatin domains and enhancer/promoter specificity. The findings reveal how 3D chromosome architecture can be encoded by genome sequence. PMID:26276636

  1. Assessing the Genome-Wide Effect of Promoter Region Tandem Repeat Natural Variation on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Martha H.; Gibbons, John G.; Rokas, Antonis

    2012-01-01

    Copy number polymorphisms of nucleotide tandem repeat (TR) regions, such as microsatellites and minisatellites, are mutationally reversible and highly abundant in eukaryotic genomes. Studies linking TR polymorphism to phenotypic variation have led some to suggest that TR variation modulates and majorly contributes to phenotypic variation; however, studies in which the authors assess the genome-wide impact of TR variation on phenotype are lacking. To address this question, we quantified relationships between polymorphism levels in 143 genome-wide promoter region TRs across 16 isolates of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus flavus and its ecotype Aspergillus oryzae with expression levels of their downstream genes. We found that only 4.3% of relationships tested were significant; these findings were consistent with models in which TRs act as “tuning,” “volume,” or “optimality” “knobs” of phenotype but not with “switch” models. Furthermore, the promoter regions of differentially expressed genes between A. oryzae and A. flavus did not show TR enrichment, suggesting that genome-wide differences in molecular phenotype between the two species are not significantly associated with TRs. Although in some cases TR polymorphisms do contribute to transcript abundance variation, these results argue that at least in this case, TRs might not be major modulators of variation in phenotype. PMID:23275886

  2. Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophytic Bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638

    SciTech Connect

    Taghavi, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Hoffman, A.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Walla, M. D.; Vangronsveld, J.; Newman, L.; Monchy, S.

    2010-05-13

    Enterobacter sp. 638 is an endophytic plant growth promoting gamma-proteobacterium that was isolated from the stem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides cv. H11-11), a potentially important biofuel feed stock plant. The Enterobacter sp. 638 genome sequence reveals the presence of a 4,518,712 bp chromosome and a 157,749 bp plasmid (pENT638-1). Genome annotation and comparative genomics allowed the identification of an extended set of genes specific to the plant niche adaptation of this bacterium. This includes genes that code for putative proteins involved in survival in the rhizosphere (to cope with oxidative stress or uptake of nutrients released by plant roots), root adhesion (pili, adhesion, hemagglutinin, cellulose biosynthesis), colonization/establishment inside the plant (chemiotaxis, flagella, cellobiose phosphorylase), plant protection against fungal and bacterial infections (siderophore production and synthesis of the antimicrobial compounds 4-hydroxybenzoate and 2-phenylethanol), and improved poplar growth and development through the production of the phytohormones indole acetic acid, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol. Metabolite analysis confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR showed that, the production of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol is induced by the presence of sucrose in the growth medium. Interestingly, both the genetic determinants required for sucrose metabolism and the synthesis of acetoin and 2,3-butanediol are clustered on a genomic island. These findings point to a close interaction between Enterobacter sp. 638 and its poplar host, where the availability of sucrose, a major plant sugar, affects the synthesis of plant growth promoting phytohormones by the endophytic bacterium. The availability of the genome sequence, combined with metabolome and transcriptome analysis, will provide a better understanding of the synergistic interactions between poplar and its growth promoting endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638. This information can be further exploited to

  3. Stochastic models of the bystander effect and of transmissible genomic instability: implications for mechanisms and low dose risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, M. P.

    Bystander effects following exposure to α -particles have been observed in C3H 10T cells and in other experimental systems, and imply that linearly extrapolating low dose risks from high-dose data might materially underestimate risk. In many experimental systems there is evidence of saturation of dose response that would be expected from the bystander effect. The ratio of lung cancer risk among persons exposed to low and high doses of radon daughters is 2.4 -- 4.0, with an upper 95% confidence limit of about 14. Assuming the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T data applies to human lung cells in vivo, the epidemiological data imply that the number of neighbouring cells that can contribute to the bystander effect is between 0 and 1, with an upper 95% confidence limit of about 7. As a consequence, the bystander effect observed in the C3H 10T system probably does not play a large part in the process of radon-induced lung carcinogenesis in humans. Other experimental data relating to the bystander effect after α -particle exposure are surveyed; some of these data are more compatible with the epidemiological data. Three models of genomic instability recently developed by Little and Wright (Math. Biosci. 2003;183:111-34), with two, three and five stages, are compared with the four-stage model proposed by Luebeck and Moolgavkar (PNAS 2002;99:15095-100) and the two-stage model of Nowak et al. (PNAS 2002;99:16226-31). All models are fitted to SEER colon cancer data. Although the five-stage model of Little and Wright (2003) provides the best fit, it is not much superior to that of the model of Nowak et al. (2002) or the two- and three-stage models of Little and Wright (2003). The fit of the model of Luebeck and Moolgavkar (2002) is somewhat worse than these three, particularly for females under the age of 40. Comparison of the predictions of the two-stage models of Little and Wright (2003) and Nowak (2002) with patterns of excess risk in the Japanese atomic bomb

  4. Different sets of translesion synthesis DNA polymerases protect from genome instability induced by distinct food-derived genotoxins.

    PubMed

    Temviriyanukul, Piya; Meijers, Matty; van Hees-Stuivenberg, Sandrine; Boei, Jan J W A; Delbos, Frédéric; Ohmori, Haruo; de Wind, Niels; Jansen, Jacob G

    2012-05-01

    DNA lesions, induced by genotoxic compounds, block the processive replication fork but can be bypassed by specialized translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols). TLS safeguards the completion of replication, albeit at the expense of nucleotide substitution mutations. We studied the in vivo role of individual TLS Pols in cellular responses to benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (BPDE), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a product of lipid peroxidation. To this aim, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts with targeted disruptions in the TLS-associated Pols η, ι, κ, and Rev1 as well as in Rev3, the catalytic subunit of TLS Polζ. After exposure, cellular survival, replication fork progression, DNA damage responses (DDR), and the induction of micronuclei were investigated. The results demonstrate that Rev1, Rev3, and, to a lesser extent, Polη are involved in TLS and the prevention of DDR and of DNA breaks, in response to both agents. Conversely, Polκ and the N-terminal BRCT domain of Rev1 are specifically involved in TLS of BPDE-induced DNA damage. We furthermore describe a novel role of Polι in TLS of 4-HNE-induced DNA damage in vivo. We hypothesize that different sets of TLS polymerases act on structurally different genotoxic DNA lesions in vivo, thereby suppressing genomic instability associated with cancer. Our experimental approach may provide a significant contribution in delineating the molecular bases of the genotoxicity in vivo of different classes of DNA-damaging agents. PMID:22331492

  5. Genome Sequencing of a Mung Bean Plant Growth Promoting Strain of P. aeruginosa with Biocontrol Ability

    PubMed Central

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Shankar, Manoharan; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 is a mung bean rhizosphere strain that produces secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes contributing to excellent antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina, one of the prevalent fungal pathogens of mung bean. Genome sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine generating 1,354,732 reads (6,772,433 sequenced bases) achieving ~25-fold coverage of the genome. Reference genome assembly using MIRA 3.4.0 yielded 198 contigs. The draft genome of PGPR2 encoded 6803 open reading frames, of which 5314 were genes with predicted functions, 1489 were genes of known functions, and 80 were RNA-coding genes. Strain specific and core genes of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 that are relevant to rhizospheric habitat were identified by pangenome analysis. Genes involved in plant growth promoting function such as synthesis of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid, trehalose, mineral scavenging siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, chitinases, acyl homoserine lactones, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and phytases were identified. In addition, niche-specific genes such as phosphate solubilising 3-phytase, adhesins, pathway-specific transcriptional regulators, a diguanylate cyclase involved in cellulose synthesis, a receptor for ferrienterochelin, a DEAD/DEAH-box helicase involved in stress tolerance, chemotaxis/motility determinants, an HtpX protease, and enzymes involved in the production of a chromanone derivative with potent antifungal activity were identified. PMID:25184130

  6. Tumor-promoting/progressing role of additional chromosome instability in hepatic carcinogenesis in Sgo1 (Shugoshin 1) haploinsufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi Y; Zhang, Yuting; Reddy, Arun; Mohammed, Altaf; Lightfoot, Stan; Dai, Wei; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-04-01

    A major etiological risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is infection by Hepatitis viruses, especially hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus do not cause aggressive activation of an oncogenic pathway, but they transactivate a broad array of genes, cause chronic inflammation, and, through interference with mitotic processes, lead to mitotic error-induced chromosome instability (ME-CIN). However, how ME-CIN is involved in the development of HCC remains unclear. Delineating the effect of ME-CIN on HCC development should help in identifying measures to combat HCC. In this study, we used ME-CIN model mice haploinsufficient in Shugoshin 1 (Sgo1(-/+)) to assess the role of ME-CIN in HCC development. Treatment with the carcinogen azoxymethane caused Sgo1(-/+) ME-CIN model mice to develop HCCs within 6 months, whereas control mice developed no HCC (P < 0.003). The HCC development was associated with expression of early HCC markers (glutamine synthetase, glypican 3, heat shock protein 70, and the serum marker alpha fetoprotein), although without fibrosis. ME-CIN preceded the expression of HCC markers, suggesting that ME-CIN is an important early event in HCC development. In 12-month-old untreated Sgo1 mice, persistent DNA damage, altered gene expression, and spontaneous HCCs were observed. Sgo1 protein accumulated in response to DNA damage in vitro. Overall, Sgo1(-/+)-mediated ME-CIN strongly promoted/progressed development of HCC in the presence of an initiator carcinogen, and it had a mild initiator effect by itself. Use of the ME-CIN model mice should help in identifying drugs to counteract the effects of ME-CIN and should accelerate anti-HCC drug development. PMID:25740822

  7. Mitotic degradation of yeast Fkh1 by the Anaphase Promoting Complex is required for normal longevity, genomic stability and stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Mackenzie E.; Postnikoff, Spike D.L.; Arnason, Terra G.; Harkness, Troy A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Forkhead Box (Fox) orthologs, Forkheads (Fkh) 1 and 2, are conserved transcription factors required for stress response, cell cycle progression and longevity. These yeast proteins play a key role in mitotic progression through activation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC) via transcriptional control. Here, we used genetic and molecular analyses to demonstrate that the APC E3 activity is necessary for mitotic Fkh1 protein degradation and subsequent cell cycle progression. We report that Fkh1 protein degradation occurs specifically during mitosis, requires APCCdc20 and proteasome activity, and that a stable Fkh1 mutant reduces normal chronological lifespan, increases genomic instability, and increases sensitivity to stress. Our data supports a model whereby cell cycle progression through mitosis and G1 requires the targeted degradation of Fkh1 by the APC. This is significant to many fields as these results impact our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the control of aging and cancer. PMID:27099939

  8. Genome-wide Mapping Reveals Conservation of Promoter DNA Methylation Following Chicken Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues. PMID:25735894

  9. Genome-wide mapping reveals conservation of promoter DNA methylation following chicken domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues.

  10. A genome-wide analysis of promoter-mediated phenotypic noise in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Silander, Olin K; Nikolic, Nela; Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Kikoin, Ilya; Alon, Uri; Ackermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is subject to random perturbations that lead to fluctuations in the rate of protein production. As a consequence, for any given protein, genetically identical organisms living in a constant environment will contain different amounts of that particular protein, resulting in different phenotypes. This phenomenon is known as "phenotypic noise." In bacterial systems, previous studies have shown that, for specific genes, both transcriptional and translational processes affect phenotypic noise. Here, we focus on how the promoter regions of genes affect noise and ask whether levels of promoter-mediated noise are correlated with genes' functional attributes, using data for over 60% of all promoters in Escherichia coli. We find that essential genes and genes with a high degree of evolutionary conservation have promoters that confer low levels of noise. We also find that the level of noise cannot be attributed to the evolutionary time that different genes have spent in the genome of E. coli. In contrast to previous results in eukaryotes, we find no association between promoter-mediated noise and gene expression plasticity. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in bacteria, natural selection can act to reduce gene expression noise and that some of this noise is controlled through the sequence of the promoter region alone.

  11. A Genome-Wide Analysis of Promoter-Mediated Phenotypic Noise in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Silander, Olin K.; Nikolic, Nela; Zaslaver, Alon; Bren, Anat; Kikoin, Ilya; Alon, Uri; Ackermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression is subject to random perturbations that lead to fluctuations in the rate of protein production. As a consequence, for any given protein, genetically identical organisms living in a constant environment will contain different amounts of that particular protein, resulting in different phenotypes. This phenomenon is known as “phenotypic noise.” In bacterial systems, previous studies have shown that, for specific genes, both transcriptional and translational processes affect phenotypic noise. Here, we focus on how the promoter regions of genes affect noise and ask whether levels of promoter-mediated noise are correlated with genes' functional attributes, using data for over 60% of all promoters in Escherichia coli. We find that essential genes and genes with a high degree of evolutionary conservation have promoters that confer low levels of noise. We also find that the level of noise cannot be attributed to the evolutionary time that different genes have spent in the genome of E. coli. In contrast to previous results in eukaryotes, we find no association between promoter-mediated noise and gene expression plasticity. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in bacteria, natural selection can act to reduce gene expression noise and that some of this noise is controlled through the sequence of the promoter region alone. PMID:22275871

  12. Insights from the draft genome of Paenibacillus lentimorbus NRRL B-30488, a promising plant growth promoting bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Vasvi; Chauhan, Puneet S; Mishra, Aradhana; Goel, Ridhi; Asif, Mehar H; Mantri, Shrikant S; Bag, Sumit K; Singh, Sunil K; Sawant, Samir V; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2013-12-01

    Paenibacillus lentimorbus NRRL B-30488, a plant growth-promoting bacterium was isolated from Sahiwal cow's milk. The strain shows antagonism against phytopathogens, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri and Alternaria solani. Its genome contains gene clusters involved in nonribosomal synthesis of secondary metabolites involved in antimicrobial activities. The genome sequence of P. lentimorbus NRRL B-30488 provides the genetic basis for application of this bacterial strain in plant growth promotion, plant protection and degradation of organic pollutants. PMID:24140292

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Jansson, Janet K; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties. PMID:26272562

  14. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activities against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9 Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens Strain Co1-6, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Jansson, Janet K; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  17. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H.; Osafune, Kenji; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi; Morito, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K inhibited cell proliferation. •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K had the time of mitosis 4-fold and mitotic failure. •R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than wild-type. •iPSECs from the MMD patients had elevated mitotic failure compared from the control. •RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormality and increased risk of aneuploidy. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n = 3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n = 6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; p < 0.01). Aneuploidy was observed more frequently in fibroblasts (p < 0.01) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) (p < 0.03) from patients than from wild-type subjects. Vascular endothelial cells differentiated from iPSCs (iPSECs) of patients and an unaffected carrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (p < 0.05). iPSECs from the patients and unaffected carrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p < 0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability.

  18. Genome-wide patterns of promoter sharing and co-expression in bovine skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene regulation by transcription factors (TF) is species, tissue and time specific. To better understand how the genetic code controls gene expression in bovine muscle we associated gene expression data from developing Longissimus thoracis et lumborum skeletal muscle with bovine promoter sequence information. Results We created a highly conserved genome-wide promoter landscape comprising 87,408 interactions relating 333 TFs with their 9,242 predicted target genes (TGs). We discovered that the complete set of predicted TGs share an average of 2.75 predicted TF binding sites (TFBSs) and that the average co-expression between a TF and its predicted TGs is higher than the average co-expression between the same TF and all genes. Conversely, pairs of TFs sharing predicted TGs showed a co-expression correlation higher that pairs of TFs not sharing TGs. Finally, we exploited the co-occurrence of predicted TFBS in the context of muscle-derived functionally-coherent modules including cell cycle, mitochondria, immune system, fat metabolism, muscle/glycolysis, and ribosome. Our findings enabled us to reverse engineer a regulatory network of core processes, and correctly identified the involvement of E2F1, GATA2 and NFKB1 in the regulation of cell cycle, fat, and muscle/glycolysis, respectively. Conclusion The pivotal implication of our research is two-fold: (1) there exists a robust genome-wide expression signal between TFs and their predicted TGs in cattle muscle consistent with the extent of promoter sharing; and (2) this signal can be exploited to recover the cellular mechanisms underpinning transcription regulation of muscle structure and development in bovine. Our study represents the first genome-wide report linking tissue specific co-expression to co-regulation in a non-model vertebrate. PMID:21226902

  19. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  20. A LDA-based approach to promoting ranking diversity for genomics information retrieval

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the biomedical domain, there are immense data and tremendous increase of genomics and biomedical relevant publications. The wealth of information has led to an increasing amount of interest in and need for applying information retrieval techniques to access the scientific literature in genomics and related biomedical disciplines. In many cases, the desired information of a query asked by biologists is a list of a certain type of entities covering different aspects that are related to the question, such as cells, genes, diseases, proteins, mutations, etc. Hence, it is important of a biomedical IR system to be able to provide relevant and diverse answers to fulfill biologists' information needs. However traditional IR model only concerns with the relevance between retrieved documents and user query, but does not take redundancy between retrieved documents into account. This will lead to high redundancy and low diversity in the retrieval ranked lists. Results In this paper, we propose an approach which employs a topic generative model called Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) to promoting ranking diversity for biomedical information retrieval. Different from other approaches or models which consider aspects on word level, our approach assumes that aspects should be identified by the topics of retrieved documents. We present LDA model to discover topic distribution of retrieval passages and word distribution of each topic dimension, and then re-rank retrieval results with topic distribution similarity between passages based on N-size slide window. We perform our approach on TREC 2007 Genomics collection and two distinctive IR baseline runs, which can achieve 8% improvement over the highest Aspect MAP reported in TREC 2007 Genomics track. Conclusions The proposed method is the first study of adopting topic model to genomics information retrieval, and demonstrates its effectiveness in promoting ranking diversity as well as in improving relevance of ranked

  1. Organelle DNA rearrangement mapping reveals U-turn-like inversions as a major source of genomic instability in Arabidopsis and humans

    PubMed Central

    Zampini, Éric; Lepage, Étienne; Tremblay-Belzile, Samuel; Truche, Sébastien; Brisson, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Failure to maintain organelle genome stability has been linked to numerous phenotypes, including variegation and cytosolic male sterility (CMS) in plants, as well as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases in mammals. Here we describe a next-generation sequencing approach that precisely maps and characterizes organelle DNA rearrangements in a single genome-wide experiment. In addition to displaying global portraits of genomic instability, it surprisingly unveiled an abundance of short-range rearrangements in Arabidopsis thaliana and human organelles. Among these, short-range U-turn-like inversions reach 25% of total rearrangements in wild-type Arabidopsis plastids and 60% in human mitochondria. Furthermore, we show that replication stress correlates with the accumulation of this type of rearrangement, suggesting that U-turn-like rearrangements could be the outcome of a replication-dependent mechanism. We also show that U-turn-like rearrangements are mostly generated using microhomologies and are repressed in plastids by Whirly proteins WHY1 and WHY3. A synergistic interaction is also observed between the genes for the plastid DNA recombinase RECA1 and those encoding plastid Whirly proteins, and the triple mutant why1why3reca1 accumulates almost 60 times the WT levels of U-turn-like rearrangements. We thus propose that the process leading to U-turn-like rearrangements may constitute a RecA-independent mechanism to restart stalled forks. Our results reveal that short-range rearrangements, and especially U-turn-like rearrangements, are a major factor of genomic instability in organelles, and this raises the question of whether they could have been underestimated in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25800675

  2. Mining the genome of Rhodococcus fascians, a plant growth-promoting bacterium gone astray.

    PubMed

    Francis, Isolde M; Stes, Elisabeth; Zhang, Yucheng; Rangel, Diana; Audenaert, Kris; Vereecke, Danny

    2016-09-25

    Rhodococcus fascians is a phytopathogenic Gram-positive Actinomycete with a very broad host range encompassing especially dicotyledonous herbaceous perennials, but also some monocots, such as the Liliaceae and, recently, the woody crop pistachio. The pathogenicity of R. fascians strain D188 is known to be encoded by the linear plasmid pFiD188 and to be dictated by its capacity to produce a mixture of cytokinins. Here, we show that D188-5, the nonpathogenic plasmid-free derivative of the wild-type strain D188 actually has a plant growth-promoting effect. With the availability of the genome sequence of R. fascians, the chromosome of strain D188 was mined for putative plant growth-promoting functions and the functionality of some of these activities was tested. This analysis together with previous results suggests that the plant growth-promoting activity of R. fascians is due to production of plant growth modulators, such as auxin and cytokinin, combined with degradation of ethylene through 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase. Moreover, R. fascians has several functions that could contribute to efficient colonization and competitiveness, but there is little evidence for a strong impact on plant nutrition. Possibly, the plant growth promotion encoded by the D188 chromosome is imperative for the epiphytic phase of the life cycle of R. fascians and prepares the plant to host the bacteria, thus ensuring proper continuation into the pathogenic phase. PMID:26877150

  3. Dicer promotes transcription termination at sites of replication stress to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Stephane E.; Ren, Jie; Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Chang, An-Yun; Sánchez, Mar; Valbuena, Alberto; Antequera, Francisco; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear RNA interference is an important regulator of transcription and epigenetic modification, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using a genome-wide approach in the fission yeast S. pombe we have found that Dcr1, but not other components of the canonical RNAi pathway, promotes the release of Pol II from the 3’ end of highly transcribed genes, and, surprisingly, from antisense transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes, which are normally transcribed by Pol I and Pol III. These Dcr1-terminated loci correspond to sites of replication stress and DNA damage, likely resulting from transcription-replication collisions. At the rDNA loci, release of Pol II facilitates DNA replication and prevents homologous recombination, which would otherwise lead to loss of rDNA repeats especially during meiosis. Our results reveal a novel role for Dcr1-mediated transcription termination in genome maintenance and may account for widespread regulation of genome stability by nuclear RNAi in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25417108

  4. Dicer promotes transcription termination at sites of replication stress to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Castel, Stephane E; Ren, Jie; Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Chang, An-Yun; Sánchez, Mar; Valbuena, Alberto; Antequera, Francisco; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-10-23

    Nuclear RNAi is an important regulator of transcription and epigenetic modification, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using a genome-wide approach in the fission yeast S. pombe, we have found that Dcr1, but not other components of the canonical RNAi pathway, promotes the release of Pol II from the 3? end of highly transcribed genes, and, surprisingly, from antisense transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes, which are normally transcribed by Pol I and Pol III. These Dcr1-terminated loci correspond to sites of replication stress and DNA damage, likely resulting from transcription-replication collisions. At the rDNA loci, release of Pol II facilitates DNA replication and prevents homologous recombination, which would otherwise lead to loss of rDNA repeats especially during meiosis. Our results reveal a novel role for Dcr1-mediated transcription termination in genome maintenance and may account for widespread regulation of genome stability by nuclear RNAi in higher eukaryotes.

  5. Genomic organization and promoter analysis of the Trichomonas vaginalis core histone gene families.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peikuan; Luo, Yingfeng; Bao, Weidong; Hu, Songnian

    2010-03-01

    Core histone gene is a well-established model to study eukaryote gene transcription regulation mechanism. However, the protozoan core histone gene regulation mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we observed almost all protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis core histone genes (60/74) organize as gene pairs in a head-to-head manner, thus facilitating the divergent transcription of both partners. Additionally, the majority of both T. vaginalis core histone genes pairs (50/60) and solitary genes (10/14), contain three over-represented motifs with conserved positional architecture at their promoter regions. Notably of the three motifs, Motif I is highly similar to the Inr which mediates the transcription start site selection in T. vaginalis. Motif II and Motif III preferably locate at the promoter regions of the T. vaginalis genome. Those findings reveal that both genomic organization and cis-acting transcription elements facilitate these large number of T. vaginalis core histone genes under the control of the same transcription machine. PMID:19744576

  6. Genomic organization and promoter analysis of the Trichomonas vaginalis core histone gene families.

    PubMed

    Cong, Peikuan; Luo, Yingfeng; Bao, Weidong; Hu, Songnian

    2010-03-01

    Core histone gene is a well-established model to study eukaryote gene transcription regulation mechanism. However, the protozoan core histone gene regulation mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we observed almost all protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis core histone genes (60/74) organize as gene pairs in a head-to-head manner, thus facilitating the divergent transcription of both partners. Additionally, the majority of both T. vaginalis core histone genes pairs (50/60) and solitary genes (10/14), contain three over-represented motifs with conserved positional architecture at their promoter regions. Notably of the three motifs, Motif I is highly similar to the Inr which mediates the transcription start site selection in T. vaginalis. Motif II and Motif III preferably locate at the promoter regions of the T. vaginalis genome. Those findings reveal that both genomic organization and cis-acting transcription elements facilitate these large number of T. vaginalis core histone genes under the control of the same transcription machine.

  7. Genome-wide discovery of cis-elements in promoter sequences using gene expression.

    PubMed

    Troukhan, Maxim; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Bouck, John; Flavell, Richard B; Alexandrov, Nickolai N

    2009-04-01

    The availability of complete or nearly complete genome sequences, a large number of 5' expressed sequence tags, and significant public expression data allow for a more accurate identification of cis-elements regulating gene expression. We have implemented a global approach that takes advantage of available expression data, genomic sequences, and transcript information to predict cis-elements associated with specific expression patterns. The key components of our approach are: (1) precise identification of transcription start sites, (2) specific locations of cis-elements relative to the transcription start site, and (3) assessment of statistical significance for all sequence motifs. By applying our method to promoters of Arabidopsis thaliana and Mus musculus, we have identified motifs that affect gene expression under specific environmental conditions or in certain tissues. We also found that the presence of the TATA box is associated with increased variability of gene expression. Strong correlation between our results and experimentally determined motifs shows that the method is capable of predicting new functionally important cis-elements in promoter sequences. PMID:19231992

  8. Nucleic Acid Binding by Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus CA Promotes Virus Assembly and Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Füzik, Tibor; Píchalová, Růžena; Schur, Florian K. M.; Strohalmová, Karolína; Křížová, Ivana; Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Briggs, John A. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gag polyprotein of retroviruses drives immature virus assembly by forming hexameric protein lattices. The assembly is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions between capsid (CA) domains and by interactions between nucleocapsid (NC) domains and RNA. Specific interactions between NC and the viral RNA are required for genome packaging. Previously reported cryoelectron microscopy analysis of immature Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) particles suggested that a basic region (residues RKK) in CA may serve as an additional binding site for nucleic acids. Here, we have introduced mutations into the RKK region in both bacterial and proviral M-PMV vectors and have assessed their impact on M-PMV assembly, structure, RNA binding, budding/release, nuclear trafficking, and infectivity using in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data indicate that the RKK region binds and structures nucleic acid that serves to promote virus particle assembly in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RKK region appears to be important for recruitment of viral genomic RNA into Gag particles, and this function could be linked to changes in nuclear trafficking. Together these observations suggest that in M-PMV, direct interactions between CA and nucleic acid play important functions in the late stages of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Assembly of retrovirus particles is driven by the Gag polyprotein, which can self-assemble to form virus particles and interact with RNA to recruit the viral genome into the particles. Generally, the capsid domains of Gag contribute to essential protein-protein interactions during assembly, while the nucleocapsid domain interacts with RNA. The interactions between the nucleocapsid domain and RNA are important both for identifying the genome and for self-assembly of Gag molecules. Here, we show that a region of basic residues in the capsid protein of the betaretrovirus Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) contributes to interaction of Gag with nucleic acid. This

  9. Selection for Unequal Densities of Sigma70 Promoter-like Signalsin Different Regions of Large Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, Araceli M.; Francino, M. Pilar; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2006-03-01

    The evolutionary processes operating in the DNA regions that participate in the regulation of gene expression are poorly understood. In Escherichia coli, we have established a sequence pattern that distinguishes regulatory from nonregulatory regions. The density of promoter-like sequences, that are recognizable by RNA polymerase and may function as potential promoters, is high within regulatory regions, in contrast to coding regions and regions located between convergently-transcribed genes. Moreover, functional promoter sites identified experimentally are often found in the subregions of highest density of promoter-like signals, even when individual sites with higher binding affinity for RNA polymerase exist elsewhere within the regulatory region. In order to investigate the generality of this pattern, we have used position weight matrices describing the -35 and -10 promoter boxes of E. coli to search for these motifs in 43 additional genomes belonging to most established bacterial phyla, after specific calibration of the matrices according to the base composition of the noncoding regions of each genome. We have found that all bacterial species analyzed contain similar promoter-like motifs, and that, in most cases, these motifs follow the same genomic distribution observed in E. coli. Differential densities between regulatory and nonregulatory regions are detectable in most bacterial genomes, with the exception of those that have experienced evolutionary extreme genome reduction. Thus, the phylogenetic distribution of this pattern mirrors that of genes and other genomic features that require weak selection to be effective in order to persist. On this basis, we suggest that the loss of differential densities in the reduced genomes of host-restricted pathogens and symbionts is the outcome of a process of genome degradation resulting from the decreased efficiency of purifying selection in highly structured small populations. This implies that the differential

  10. Bilaterian-like promoters in the highly compact Amphimedon queenslandica genome

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Valverde, Selene L.; Degnan, Bernard M.

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory systems underlying animal development must have evolved prior to the emergence of eumetazoans (cnidarians and bilaterians). Although representatives of earlier-branching animals – sponges ctenophores and placozoans – possess most of the developmental transcription factor families present in eumetazoans, the DNA regulatory elements that these transcription factors target remain uncharted. Here we characterise the core promoter sequences, U1 snRNP-binding sites (5′ splice sites; 5′SSs) and polyadenylation sites (PASs) in the sponge Amphimedon queenslandica. Similar to unicellular opisthokonts, Amphimedon’s genes are tightly packed in the genome and have small introns. In contrast, its genes possess metazoan-like core promoters populated with binding motifs previously deemed to be specific to vertebrates, including Nrf-1 and Krüppel-like elements. Also as in vertebrates, Amphimedon’s PASs and 5′SSs are depleted downstream and upstream of transcription start sites, respectively, consistent with non-elongating transcripts being short-lived; PASs and 5′SSs are more evenly distributed in bidirectional promoters in Amphimedon. The presence of bilaterian-like regulatory DNAs in sponges is consistent with these being early and essential innovations of the metazoan gene regulatory repertoire. PMID:26931148

  11. Genomic structure, gene expression, and promoter analysis of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Hsin-Hsin; Chang, Ming-Shi; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Huang, Jin-Ding

    2002-03-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) subfamily transporters associated with anticancer drug efflux are attributed to the multidrug-resistance of cancer cells. The genomic organization of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 (MRP7) was identified. The human MRP7 gene, consisting of 22 exons and 21 introns, greatly differs from other members of the human MRP subfamily. A splicing variant of human MRP7, MRP7A, expressed in most human tissues, was also characterized. The 1.93-kb promoter region of MRP7 was isolated and shown to support luciferase activity at a level 4- to 5-fold greater than that of the SV40 promoter. Basal MRP7 gene expression was regulated by 2 regions in the 5-flanking region at 1,780 1,287 bp, and at 611 to 208 bp. In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, MRP7 promoter activity was increased by 226 percent by genotoxic 2-acetylaminofluorene and 347 percent by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A. The protein was expressed in the membrane fraction of transfected MDCK cells.

  12. TDP2–Dependent Non-Homologous End-Joining Protects against Topoisomerase II–Induced DNA Breaks and Genome Instability in Cells and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhihong; Álvarez-Quilón, Alejandro; Quintero, Cristina; Ju, Limei; Umans, Lieve; Vermeire, Liesbeth; Huylebroeck, Danny; Caldecott, Keith W.; Cortés-Ledesma, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer topoisomerase “poisons” exploit the break-and-rejoining mechanism of topoisomerase II (TOP2) to generate TOP2-linked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). This characteristic underlies the clinical efficacy of TOP2 poisons, but is also implicated in chromosomal translocations and genome instability associated with secondary, treatment-related, haematological malignancy. Despite this relevance for cancer therapy, the mechanistic aspects governing repair of TOP2-induced DSBs and the physiological consequences that absent or aberrant repair can have are still poorly understood. To address these deficits, we employed cells and mice lacking tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2), an enzyme that hydrolyses 5′-phosphotyrosyl bonds at TOP2-associated DSBs, and studied their response to TOP2 poisons. Our results demonstrate that TDP2 functions in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and liberates DSB termini that are competent for ligation. Moreover, we show that the absence of TDP2 in cells impairs not only the capacity to repair TOP2-induced DSBs but also the accuracy of the process, thus compromising genome integrity. Most importantly, we find this TDP2-dependent NHEJ mechanism to be physiologically relevant, as Tdp2-deleted mice are sensitive to TOP2-induced damage, displaying marked lymphoid toxicity, severe intestinal damage, and increased genome instability in the bone marrow. Collectively, our data reveal TDP2-mediated error-free NHEJ as an efficient and accurate mechanism to repair TOP2-induced DSBs. Given the widespread use of TOP2 poisons in cancer chemotherapy, this raises the possibility of TDP2 being an important etiological factor in the response of tumours to this type of agent and in the development of treatment-related malignancy. PMID:23505375

  13. Genome-wide identification and characterization of transcription start sites and promoters in the tunicate Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Yokomori, Rui; Shimai, Kotaro; Nishitsuji, Koki; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Nakai, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The tunicate Ciona intestinalis, an invertebrate chordate, has recently emerged as a powerful model organism for gene regulation analysis. However, few studies have been conducted to identify and characterize its transcription start sites (TSSs) and promoters at the genome-wide level. Here, using TSS-seq, we identified TSSs at the genome-wide scale and characterized promoters in C. intestinalis. Specifically, we identified TSS clusters (TSCs), high-density regions of TSS-seq tags, each of which appears to originate from an identical promoter. TSCs were found not only at known TSSs but also in other regions, suggesting the existence of many unknown transcription units in the genome. We also identified candidate promoters of 79 ribosomal protein (RP) genes, each of which had the major TSS in a polypyrimidine tract and showed a sharp TSS distribution like human RP gene promoters. Ciona RP gene promoters, however, did not appear to have typical TATA boxes, unlike human RP gene promoters. In Ciona non-RP promoters, two pyrimidine-purine dinucleotides, CA and TA, were frequently used as TSSs. Despite the absence of CpG islands, Ciona TATA-less promoters showed low expression specificity like CpG-associated human TATA-less promoters. By using TSS-seq, we also predicted trans-spliced gene TSSs and found that their downstream regions had higher G+T content than those of non-trans-spliced gene TSSs. Furthermore, we identified many putative alternative promoters, some of which were regulated in a tissue-specific manner. Our results provide valuable information about TSSs and promoter characteristics in C. intestinalis and will be helpful in future analysis of transcriptional regulation in chordates. PMID:26668163

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Shewanella sp. ECSMB14102, a Mussel Recruitment-Promoting Bacterium Isolated from the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Long; Guo, Xing-Pan; Chen, Yu-Ru; Gao, Wei; Ding, De-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella sp. ECSMB14102, which promotes recruitment of the mussel Mytilus coruscus, was isolated from natural biofilms formed on glass slides submerged in the East China Sea. Here, we present the draft genome sequence, which comprises 4.41 Mb with a G+C content of 52.2%. The genomic information in this strain will contribute to deepening our understanding of bacteria-animal interaction. PMID:26089429

  15. Determination and Analysis of the Putative AcaCD-Responsive Promoters of Salmonella Genomic Island 1

    PubMed Central

    Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2016-01-01

    The integrative genomic island SGI1 and its variants confer multidrug resistance in numerous Salmonella enterica serovariants and several Proteus mirabilis and Acinetobacter strains. SGI1 is mobilized by the IncA/C family plasmids. The island exploits not only the conjugation apparatus of the plasmid, but also utilizes the plasmid-encoded master regulator AcaCD to induce the excision and formation of its transfer-competent form, which is a key step in the horizontal transfer of SGI1. Triggering of SGI1 excision occurs via the AcaCD-dependent activation of xis gene expression. AcaCD binds in Pxis to an unusually long recognition sequence. Beside the Pxis promoter, upstream regions of four additional SGI1 genes, S004, S005, S012 and S018, also contain putative AcaCD-binding sites. Furthermore, SGI1 also encodes an AcaCD-related activator, FlhDCSGI1, which has no known function. Here, we have analysed the functionality of the putative AcaCD-dependent promoter regions and proved their activation by either AcaCD or FlhDCSGI1. Moreover, we provide evidence that both activators act on the same binding site in Pxis and that FlhDCSGI1 is able to complement the acaCD deletion of the IncA/C family plasmid R16a. We determined the transcription start sites for the AcaCD-responsive promoters and showed that orf S004 is expressed probably from a different start codon than predicted earlier. Additionally, expression of S003 from promoter PS004 was ruled out. Pxis and the four SGI1 promoters examined here also lack obvious -35 promoter box and their promoter profile is consistent with the class II-type activation pathway. Although the role of the four additionally analysed AcaCD/FlhDCSGI1-controlled genes in transfer and/or maintenance of SGI1 is not yet clear, the conservation of the whole region suggests the existence of some selection for their functionality. PMID:27727307

  16. Genome-Wide Definition of Promoter and Enhancer Usage during Neural Induction of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Valentina; Delli Carri, Alessia; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Faedo, Andrea; Petiti, Luca; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Peano, Clelia; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Miccio, Annarita; Cattaneo, Elena; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide mapping of transcriptional regulatory elements is an essential tool for understanding the molecular events orchestrating self-renewal, commitment and differentiation of stem cells. We combined high-throughput identification of transcription start sites with genome-wide profiling of histones modifications to map active promoters and enhancers in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) induced to neuroepithelial-like stem cells (NESCs). Our analysis showed that most promoters are active in both cell types while approximately half of the enhancers are cell-specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during neural induction, and most likely for the modulation of the promoters to generate cell-specific gene expression programs. Interestingly, the majority of the promoters activated or up-regulated during neural induction have a "bivalent" histone modification signature in ESCs, suggesting that developmentally-regulated promoters are already poised for transcription in ESCs, which are apparently pre-committed to neuroectodermal differentiation. Overall, our study provides a collection of differentially used enhancers, promoters, transcription starts sites, protein-coding and non-coding RNAs in human ESCs and ESC-derived NESCs, and a broad, genome-wide description of promoter and enhancer usage and of gene expression programs characterizing the transition from a pluripotent to a neural-restricted cell fate.

  17. The murine biglycan: Complete cDNA cloning, genomic organization, promoter function, and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wegrowski, Y.; Pillarisetti, J.; Danielson, K.G.; Iozzo, R.V.; Suzuki, S.

    1995-11-01

    Biglycan is a ubiquitous chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that belongs to a growing family of proteins harboring leucine-rich repeats. We have cloned and sequenced the cDNA containing the complete murine biglycan, elucidated its genomic organization, and demonstrated functional promoter activity of its 5{prime} flanking region. The deduced biglycan protein core was highly conserved across species. However, the mouse biglycan (Bgn) gene was significantly larger than the human counterpart, primarily because of a large > 4.5-kb intron between exons 1 and 2. The mouse Bgn gene spanned over 9.5 kb of continuous DNA and comprised 8 exons, with a perfectly conserved intron/exon organization vis-a-vis the human counterpart. The promoter region was enriched in GC dinucleotide and contained numerous cis-acting elements including binding sites for SP-1, AP-1, and AP-2 factors. It lacked TATA and CAAT boxes typical of housekeeping genes. In support of this, primer extension analysis showed the existence of multiple transcription start sites. Transient cell transfection assays with a construct comprising the 548 hp upstream of the major transcription start site fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene showed functional promoter activity. Internal and 5{prime} deletion constructs showed that the distal promoter of the Bgn gene was required for full transcriptional activity. In contrast to the homologous proteoglycan decorin, the highest expression of biglycan mRNA was observed in lung, liver, and spleen of adult mouse and the lowest in skin, heart, and kidney. These results will be useful for the study of biglycan gene regulation and for the generation of mice with targeted null mutation of the Bgn gene. 56 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor Dacapo Promotes Genomic Stability during Premeiotic S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne-Reveau, Karine

    2009-01-01

    The proper execution of premeiotic S phase is essential to both the maintenance of genomic integrity and accurate chromosome segregation during the meiotic divisions. However, the regulation of premeiotic S phase remains poorly defined in metazoa. Here, we identify the p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2-like cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) Dacapo (Dap) as a key regulator of premeiotic S phase and genomic stability during Drosophila oogenesis. In dap−/− females, ovarian cysts enter the meiotic cycle with high levels of Cyclin E/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)2 activity and accumulate DNA damage during the premeiotic S phase. High Cyclin E/Cdk2 activity inhibits the accumulation of the replication-licensing factor Doubleparked/Cdt1 (Dup/Cdt1). Accordingly, we find that dap−/− ovarian cysts have low levels of Dup/Cdt1. Moreover, mutations in dup/cdt1 dominantly enhance the dap−/− DNA damage phenotype. Importantly, the DNA damage observed in dap−/− ovarian cysts is independent of the DNA double-strands breaks that initiate meiotic recombination. Together, our data suggest that the CKI Dap promotes the licensing of DNA replication origins for the premeiotic S phase by restricting Cdk activity in the early meiotic cycle. Finally, we report that dap−/− ovarian cysts frequently undergo an extramitotic division before meiotic entry, indicating that Dap influences the timing of the mitotic/meiotic transition. PMID:19211840

  19. Comparative genomic analysis and phenazine production of Pseudomonas chlororaphis, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yawen; Shen, Xuemei; Peng, Huasong; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis HT66, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that produces phenazine-1-carboxamide with high yield, was compared with three genomic sequenced P. chlororaphis strains, GP72, 30–84 and O6. The genome sizes of four strains vary from 6.66 to 7.30 Mb. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences indicated 4833 conserved genes in 5869–6455 protein-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the four strains are closely related to each other. Its competitive colonization indicates that P. chlororaphis can adapt well to its environment. No virulence or virulence-related factor was found in P. chlororaphis. All of the four strains could synthesize antimicrobial metabolites including different phenazines and insecticidal protein FitD. Some genes related to the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis were detected among the four strains. It was shown that P. chlororaphis is a safe PGPR in agricultural application and could also be used to produce some phenazine antibiotics with high-yield. PMID:26484173

  20. Comparative genomic analysis and phenazine production of Pseudomonas chlororaphis, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yawen; Shen, Xuemei; Peng, Huasong; Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-06-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis HT66, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that produces phenazine-1-carboxamide with high yield, was compared with three genomic sequenced P. chlororaphis strains, GP72, 30-84 and O6. The genome sizes of four strains vary from 6.66 to 7.30 Mb. Comparisons of predicted coding sequences indicated 4833 conserved genes in 5869-6455 protein-encoding genes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the four strains are closely related to each other. Its competitive colonization indicates that P. chlororaphis can adapt well to its environment. No virulence or virulence-related factor was found in P. chlororaphis. All of the four strains could synthesize antimicrobial metabolites including different phenazines and insecticidal protein FitD. Some genes related to the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis were detected among the four strains. It was shown that P. chlororaphis is a safe PGPR in agricultural application and could also be used to produce some phenazine antibiotics with high-yield. PMID:26484173

  1. Testing promoter activity in the trypanosome genome: isolation of a metacyclic-type VSG promoter, and unexpected insights into RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    McAndrew, M; Graham, S; Hartmann, C; Clayton, C

    1998-09-01

    In trypanosomes, most genes are arranged in polycistronic transcription units. Individual mRNAs are generated by 5'-trans splicing and 3' polyadenylation. Remarkably, no regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription has been detected although many RNAs are differentially expressed during kinetoplastid life cycles. Demonstration of specific class II promoters is complicated by the difficulty in distinguishing between genuine promoter activity and stimulation of trans splicing. Using vectors that were designed to allow the detection of low promoter activities in a transcriptionally silent chromosomal context, we isolated a novel trypanosome RNA polymerase I promoter. We were however unable to detect class II promoter activity in any tested DNA fragment. We also integrated genes which were preceded by a T3 promoter into the genome of cells expressing bacteriophage T3 polymerase: surprisingly, transcription was alpha-amanitin sensitive. One possible interpretation of these results is that in trypanosomes, RNA polymerase II initiation is favored by genomic accessibility and double-strand melting. PMID:9709032

  2. Genome-wide identification of human- and primate-specific core promoter short tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Bushehri, A; Barez, M R Mashhoudi; Mansouri, S K; Biglarian, A; Ohadi, M

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports of a link between human- and primate-specific genetic factors and human/primate-specific characteristics and diseases necessitate genome-wide identification of those factors. We have previously reported core promoter short tandem repeats (STRs) of extreme length (≥6-repeats) that have expanded exceptionally in primates vs. non-primates, and may have a function in adaptive evolution. In the study reported here, we extended our study to the human STRs of ≥3-repeats in the category of penta and hexaucleotide STRs, across the entire human protein coding gene core promoters, and analyzed their status in several superorders and orders of vertebrates, using the Ensembl database. The ConSite software was used to identify the transcription factor (TF) sets binding to those STRs. STR specificity was observed at different levels of human and non-human primate (NHP) evolution. 73% of the pentanucleotide STRs and 68% of the hexanucleotide STRs were found to be specific to human and NHPs. AP-2alpha, Sp1, and MZF were the predominantly selected TFs (90%) binding to the human-specific STRs. Furthermore, the number of TF sets binding to a given STR was found to be a selection factor for that STR. Our findings indicate that selected STRs, the cognate binding TFs, and the number of TF set binding to those STRs function as switch codes at different levels of human and NHP evolution and speciation.

  3. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  4. Staining Against Phospho-H2AX (γ-H2AX) as a Marker for DNA Damage and Genomic Instability in Cancer Tissues and Cells.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Span, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Phospho-H2AX or γ-H2AX- is a marker of DNA double-stranded breaks and can therefore be used to monitor DNA repair after, for example, irradiation. In addition, positive staining for phospho-H2AX may indicate genomic instability and telomere dysfunction in tumour cells and tissues. Here, we provide a protocol to perform immunostaining for phospho-H2AX on cells, cryosections and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Crucial steps in the protocol and troubleshooting suggestions are indicated. We also provide suggestions on how to combine staining against γ-H2AX with stainings against components of the tumour microenvironment, such as hypoxia and blood vessels. PMID:27325258

  5. Efficient chimeric promoters derived from full-length and sub-genomic transcript promoters of Figwort mosaic virus (FMV).

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Patro, Sunita; Kumari, Sangeeta; Kumar, Deepak; Dey, Nrisingha; Maiti, Indu B

    2011-03-10

    Addition of multiple repeats of the FS3 upstream activation sequence (FS3-UAS, -270 to -60) intra-molecularly to the TATA containing core-domain of the FS3 (-151 to +31) promoter resulted in 2-3-folds enhanced promoter activity. The chimeric promoter, FS3-UAS-3X with maximum activity, showed 3.31 times stronger activity in root vascular tissue compared to FS3 promoter and could be used efficiently in translational research.

  6. Induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation: comparison to the induction by exposure to accelerated 56Fe particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts by exposure to (137)Cs gamma radiation was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of unstable clones isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure. Clones surviving irradiation and control clones were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the thymidine kinase and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those that exhibited a significant alteration in one or more characteristics compared to the controls. The frequency and characteristics of the unstable clones were compared in clones exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays or (56)Fe particles. The majority of the unstable clones isolated after exposure to either gamma rays or (56)Fe particles exhibited chromosomal instability. Alterations in growth characteristics, radiation response and mutant frequencies occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in these unstable clones. The frequency and complexity of the unstable clones were greater after exposure to (56)Fe particles than to gamma rays. Unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to gamma rays exhibited increases in the incidence of dicentric chromosomes but not of chromatid breaks, whereas unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited increases in both chromatid and chromosome aberrations.

  7. Endoscopic ablation is a cost-effective cancer preventative therapy in patients with Barrett’s esophagus who have elevated genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ananya; Callenberg, Keith M.; Styn, Mindi A.; Jackson, Sara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surveillance of patients with nondysplastic Barrett’s esophagus (NDBE) has a high cost and is of limited effectiveness in preventing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Ablation for NDBE remains expensive and controversial. Biomarkers of genomic instability have shown promise in identifying patients with NDBE at high risk for progression to EAC. Here, we evaluate the cost-effectiveness of using such biomarkers to stratify patients with NDBE by risk for EAC and, subsequently, the cost-effectiveness of ablative therapy. Methods: A Markov decision tree was used to evaluate four strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 50-year old patients with NDBE over their lifetime: strategy I, natural history without surveillance; strategy II, surveillance per current guidelines; strategy III, ablation for all patients; strategy IV, risk stratification with use of a biomarker panel to assess genomic instability (i. e., mutational load [ML]). Patients with no ML underwent minimal surveillance, patients with low ML underwent standard surveillance, and patients with high ML underwent ablation. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and incremental net health benefit (INHB) were assessed. Results: Strategy IV provided the best values for quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), ICER, and INHB in comparison with strategies II and III. Results were robust in sensitivity analysis. In a Monte Carlo analysis, the relative risk for the development of cancer in the patients managed with strategy IV was decreased. Critical determinants of strategy IV cost-effectiveness were the complete response rate, cost of ablation, and surveillance interval in patients with no ML. Conclusion: The use of ML to stratify patients with NDBE by risk was the most cost-effective strategy for preventive EAC treatment. Targeting ablation toward patients with high ML presents an opportunity for a paradigm shift in the management of NDBE. PMID:27227114

  8. Genome Sequence of Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens Strain 90-166, Which Triggers Induced Systemic Resistance and Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Kloepper, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 elicits induced systemic resistance against plant pathogens and herbivores and promotes plant growth under greenhouse and field conditions. Strain 90-166 secretes volatile compounds, siderophores, salicylic acid, and quorum-sensing autoinducers as bacterial determinants toward plant health. Herein, we present its draft genome sequence. PMID:26089427

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter sp. Strain SPG23, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Bottos, Eric M.; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Thijs, Sofie; Rineau, Francois; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Weyens, Nele

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 4.7-Mb draft genome of Arthrobacter sp. SPG23, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium belonging to the Actinobacteria, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain SPG23 is a potent plant growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:26701084

  10. Genome Sequence of Rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens Strain 90-166, Which Triggers Induced Systemic Resistance and Plant Growth Promotion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kloepper, Joseph W; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-06-18

    The rhizobacterium Serratia marcescens strain 90-166 elicits induced systemic resistance against plant pathogens and herbivores and promotes plant growth under greenhouse and field conditions. Strain 90-166 secretes volatile compounds, siderophores, salicylic acid, and quorum-sensing autoinducers as bacterial determinants toward plant health. Herein, we present its draft genome sequence.

  11. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  12. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  13. Promoter-Targeted Histone Acetylation of Chromatinized Parvoviral Genome Is Essential for the Progress of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Salokas, Kari; Oittinen, Mikko; Aho, Vesa; Mäntysaari, Pekka; Palmujoki, Lassi; Kalliolinna, Olli; Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Niskanen, Einari A.; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The association of host histones with parvoviral DNA is poorly understood. We analyzed the chromatinization and histone acetylation of canine parvovirus DNA during infection by confocal imaging and in situ proximity ligation assay combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing. We found that during late infection, parvovirus replication bodies were rich in histones bearing modifications characteristic of transcriptionally active chromatin, i.e., histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac). H3K27ac, in particular, was located in close proximity to the viral DNA-binding protein NS1. Importantly, our results show for the first time that in the chromatinized parvoviral genome, the two viral promoters in particular were rich in H3K27ac. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors efficiently interfered with the expression of viral proteins and infection progress. Altogether, our data suggest that the acetylation of histones on parvoviral DNA is essential for viral gene expression and the completion of the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA introduced into cell nuclei is exposed to cellular responses to foreign DNA, including chromatinization and epigenetic silencing, both of which determine the outcome of infection. How the incoming parvovirus resists cellular epigenetic downregulation of its genes is not understood. Here, the critical role of epigenetic modifications in the regulation of parvovirus infection was demonstrated. We showed for the first time that a successful parvovirus infection is characterized by the deposition of nucleosomes with active histone acetylation on the viral promoter areas. The results provide new insights into the regulation of parvoviral gene expression, which is an important aspect of the development of parvovirus-based virotherapy. PMID:26842481

  14. An array CGH based genomic instability index (G2I) is predictive of clinical outcome in breast cancer and reveals a subset of tumors without lymph node involvement but with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite entering complete remission after primary treatment, a substantial proportion of patients with early stage breast cancer will develop metastases. Prediction of such an outcome remains challenging despite the clinical use of several prognostic parameters. Several reports indicate that genomic instability, as reflected in specific chromosomal aneuploidies and variations in DNA content, influences clinical outcome but no precise definition of this parameter has yet been clearly established. Methods To explore the prognostic value of genomic alterations present in primary tumors, we performed a comparative genomic hybridization study on BAC arrays with a panel of breast carcinomas from 45 patients with metastatic relapse and 95 others, matched for age and axillary node involvement, without any recurrence after at least 11 years of follow-up. Array-CGH data was used to establish a two-parameter index representative of the global level of aneusomy by chromosomal arm, and of the number of breakpoints throughout the genome. Results Application of appropriate thresholds allowed us to distinguish three classes of tumors highly associated with metastatic relapse. This index used with the same thresholds on a published set of tumors confirms its prognostic significance with a hazard ratio of 3.24 [95CI: 1.76-5.96] p = 6.7x10-5 for the bad prognostic group with respect to the intermediate group. The high prognostic value of this genomic index is related to its ability to individualize a specific group of breast cancers, mainly luminal type and axillary node negative, showing very high genetic instability and poor outcome. Indirect transcriptomic validation was obtained on independent data sets. Conclusion Accurate evaluation of genetic instability in breast cancers by a genomic instability index (G2I) helps individualizing specific tumors with previously unexpected very poor prognosis. PMID:23186559

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 nuclear translocation regulates bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity and mediates genomic instability in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Giallongo, Cesarina; Vanella, Luca; Conticello, Concetta; Romano, Alessandra; Saccone, Salvatore; Godos, Justyna; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by an accumulation of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow leading to bone destruction and bone marrow failure. Several molecular mechanisms underlie chemoresistance among which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) could play a major role. The aim of the present research was to evaluate the impact of HO-1 in MM following bortezomib (BTZ) treatment and how HO-1 is implicated in the mechanisms of chemoresistance. MM cells were treated for 24h with BTZ (15 nM), a boronic acid dipeptide inhibitor of the 26S proteasome used in the treatment of patients with MM as first-line therapy. We evaluated cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, HO-1 expression and compartmentalization and cellular genetic instability. Results showed that BTZ significantly reduced cell viability in different MM cell lines and induced ER-stress and ROS formation. Concomitantly, we observed a significant overexpression of both HO-1 gene and protein levels. This effect was abolished by concomitant treatment with 4-phenybutirric acid, a molecular chaperone, which is known to reduce ER-stress. Surprisingly, inhibition of HO activity with SnMP (10μM) failed to increase BTZ sensitivity in MM cells whereas inhibition of HO-1 nuclear translocation by E64d, a cysteine protease inhibitor, increased sensitivity to BTZ and decreased genetic instability as measured by cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. In conclusion, our data suggest that BTZ sensitivity depends on HO-1 nuclear compartmentalization and not on its enzymatic activity and this finding may represent an important tool to overcome BTZ chemoresistance in MM patients. PMID:26930712

  16. Genome-wide Promoter Analysis of the SOX4 Transcriptional Network in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scharer, Christopher D.; McCabe, Colleen D.; Ali-Seyed, Mohamed; Berger, Michael F.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Moreno, Carlos S.

    2008-01-01

    SOX4 is a critical developmental transcription factor in vertebrates and is required for precise differentiation and proliferation in multiple tissues. In addition, SOX4 is overexpressed in many human malignancies, but the exact role of SOX4 in cancer progression is not well understood. Here we have identified the direct transcriptional targets of SOX4 using a combination of genome-wide localization ChIP-chip analysis and transient overexpression followed by expression profiling in a prostate cancer model cell line. We have also used protein-binding microarrays to derive a novel SOX4-specific position-weight matrix and determined that SOX4 binding sites are enriched in SOX4-bound promoter regions. Direct transcriptional targets of SOX4 include several key cellular regulators such as EGFR, HSP70, Tenascin C, Frizzled-5, Patched-1, and Delta-like 1 We also show that SOX4 targets 23 transcription factors such as MLL, FOXA1, ZNF281, and NKX3-1 In addition, SOX4 directly regulates expression of three components of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), namely Dicer, Argonaute 1, and RNA Helicase A. These data provide new insights into how SOX4 impacts developmental signaling pathways and how these changes may influence cancer progression via regulation of gene networks involved in microRNA processing, transcriptional regulation, the TGFβ, Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways, growth factor signaling, and tumor metastasis. PMID:19147588

  17. Conformational instability of the MARK3 UBA domain compromises ubiquitin recognition and promotes interaction with the adjacent kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James M.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Briant, Douglas J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Sicheri, Frank; Kay, Lewis E.; Pawson, Tony

    2012-10-23

    The Par-1/MARK protein kinases play a pivotal role in establishing cellular polarity. This family of kinases contains a unique domain architecture, in which a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain is located C-terminal to the kinase domain. We have used a combination of x-ray crystallography and NMR dynamics experiments to understand the interaction of the human (h) MARK3 UBA domain with the adjacent kinase domain as compared with ubiquitin. The x-ray crystal structure of the linked hMARK3 kinase and UBA domains establishes that the UBA domain forms a stable intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. However, solution-state NMR studies of the isolated UBA domain indicate that it is highly dynamic, undergoing conformational transitions that can be explained by a folding-unfolding equilibrium. NMR titration experiments indicated that the hMARK3 UBA domain has a detectable but extremely weak affinity for mono ubiquitin, which suggests that conformational instability of the isolated hMARK3 UBA domain attenuates binding to ubiquitin despite the presence of residues typically involved in ubiquitin recognition. Our data identify a molecular mechanism through which the hMARK3 UBA domain has evolved to bind the kinase domain, in a fashion that stabilizes an open conformation of the N- and C-terminal lobes, at the expense of its capacity to engage ubiquitin. These results may be relevant more generally to the 30% of UBA domains that lack significant ubiquitin-binding activity, and they suggest a unique mechanism by which interaction domains may evolve new binding properties.

  18. Deregulation of Rb-E2F1 Axis Causes Chromosomal Instability by Engaging the Transactivation Function of Cdc20–Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Somsubhra; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Dey, Sanjib; Roychoudhury, Anirban; Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2014-01-01

    The E2F family of transcription factors regulates genes involved in various aspects of the cell cycle. Beyond the well-documented role in G1/S transition, mitotic regulation by E2F has also been reported. Proper mitotic progression is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The SAC ensures bipolar separation of chromosomes and thus prevents aneuploidy. There are limited reports on the regulation of the SAC by E2F. Our previous work identified the SAC protein Cdc20 as a novel transcriptional regulator of the mitotic ubiquitin carrier protein UbcH10. However, none of the Cdc20 transcription complex proteins have any known DNA binding domain. Here we show that an E2F1-DP1 heterodimer is involved in recruitment of the Cdc20 transcription complex to the UBCH10 promoter and in transactivation of the gene. We further show that inactivation of Rb can facilitate this transactivation process. Moreover, this E2F1-mediated regulation of UbcH10 influences mitotic progression. Deregulation of this pathway results in premature anaphase, chromosomal abnormalities, and aneuploidy. We conclude that excess E2F1 due to Rb inactivation recruits the complex of Cdc20 and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (Cdc20-APC/C) to deregulate the expression of UBCH10, leading to chromosomal instability in cancer cells. PMID:25368385

  19. Deregulation of Rb-E2F1 axis causes chromosomal instability by engaging the transactivation function of Cdc20-anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome.

    PubMed

    Nath, Somsubhra; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Dey, Sanjib; Roychoudhury, Anirban; Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2015-01-01

    The E2F family of transcription factors regulates genes involved in various aspects of the cell cycle. Beyond the well-documented role in G1/S transition, mitotic regulation by E2F has also been reported. Proper mitotic progression is monitored by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The SAC ensures bipolar separation of chromosomes and thus prevents aneuploidy. There are limited reports on the regulation of the SAC by E2F. Our previous work identified the SAC protein Cdc20 as a novel transcriptional regulator of the mitotic ubiquitin carrier protein UbcH10. However, none of the Cdc20 transcription complex proteins have any known DNA binding domain. Here we show that an E2F1-DP1 heterodimer is involved in recruitment of the Cdc20 transcription complex to the UBCH10 promoter and in transactivation of the gene. We further show that inactivation of Rb can facilitate this transactivation process. Moreover, this E2F1-mediated regulation of UbcH10 influences mitotic progression. Deregulation of this pathway results in premature anaphase, chromosomal abnormalities, and aneuploidy. We conclude that excess E2F1 due to Rb inactivation recruits the complex of Cdc20 and the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (Cdc20-APC/C) to deregulate the expression of UBCH10, leading to chromosomal instability in cancer cells.

  20. High-resolution analysis of chromosomal breakpoints and genomic instability identifies PTPRD as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Raymond L; Nair, Prakash; Maris, John M; Catchpoole, Daniel; McDermott, Michael; O'Meara, Anne; Breatnach, Fin

    2006-04-01

    Although neuroblastoma is characterized by numerous recurrent, large-scale chromosomal imbalances, the genes targeted by such imbalances have remained elusive. We have applied whole-genome oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (median probe spacing 6 kb) to 56 neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines to identify genes involved with disease pathogenesis. This set of tumors was selected for having either 11q loss or MYCN amplification, abnormalities that define the two most common genetic subtypes of metastatic neuroblastoma. Our analyses have permitted us to map large-scale chromosomal imbalances and high-level amplifications at exon-level resolution and to identify novel microdeletions and duplications. Chromosomal breakpoints (n = 467) generating imbalances >2 Mb were mapped to intervals ranging between 6 and 50 kb in size, providing substantial information on each abnormality. For example, breakpoints leading to large-scale hemizygous loss of chromosome 11q were highly clustered and preferentially associated with segmental duplications. High-level amplifications of MYCN were extremely complex, often resulting in a series of discontinuous regions of amplification. Imbalances (n = 540) <2 Mb long were also detected. Although the majority (78%) of these imbalances mapped to segmentally duplicated regions and primarily reflect constitutional copy number polymorphisms, many subtle imbalances were detected that are likely somatically acquired alterations and include genes involved with tumorigenesis, apoptosis, or neural cell differentiation. The most frequent microdeletion involved the PTPRD locus, indicating a possible tumor suppressor function for this gene.

  1. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Slupianek, Artur; Falinski, Rafal; Znojek, Pawel; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Flis, Sylwia; Doneddu, Valentina; Pytel, Dariusz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Blasiak, Janusz; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Skorski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of CML-CP. Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50–90% of TKI-responding patients carry CML clones expressing TKI resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1 –transformed cell lines and CD34+ CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na+/K+ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI-resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML. PMID:23047475

  2. 56Fe particle exposure results in a long-lasting increase in a cellular index of genomic instability and transiently suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal R.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24 h), intermediate (7 d), and/or long time points (2-3 mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  3. (56)Fe Particle Exposure Results in a Long-Lasting Increase in a Cellular Index of Genomic Instability and Transiently Suppresses Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Vivo.

    PubMed

    DeCarolis, Nathan A; Rivera, Phillip D; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z; LeBlanc, Junie A; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal; Chen, Benjamin P C; Eisch, Amelia J

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreER(T2)/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to (56)Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24h), intermediate (7d), and/or long time points (2-3mo) post-irradiation. (56)Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, (56)Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. (56)Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, (56)Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, (56)Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These

  4. 56Fe Particle Exposure Results in a Long-Lasting Increase in a Cellular Index of Genomic Instability and Transiently Suppresses Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-01-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24h), intermediate (7d), and/or long time points (2–3mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  5. An imbalance between specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators and pro-inflammatory leukotrienes promotes instability of atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Hellmann, Jason; Proto, Jonathan D.; Kuriakose, George; Colas, Romain A.; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Connolly, E. Sander; Solomon, Robert; Jones, David M.; Heyer, Eric J.; Spite, Matthew; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Chronic unresolved inflammation plays a causal role in the development of advanced atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms that prevent resolution in atherosclerosis remain unclear. Here, we use targeted mass spectrometry to identify specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators (SPM) in histologically-defined stable and vulnerable regions of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques. The levels of SPMs, particularly resolvin D1 (RvD1), and the ratio of SPMs to pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4 (LTB4), are significantly decreased in the vulnerable regions. SPMs are also decreased in advanced plaques of fat-fed Ldlr−/− mice. Administration of RvD1 to these mice during plaque progression restores the RvD1:LTB4 ratio to that of less advanced lesions and promotes plaque stability, including decreased lesional oxidative stress and necrosis, improved lesional efferocytosis, and thicker fibrous caps. These findings provide molecular support for the concept that defective inflammation resolution contributes to the formation of clinically dangerous plaques and offer a mechanistic rationale for SPM therapy to promote plaque stability. PMID:27659679

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus licheniformis Strain GB2, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Plant Growth-Promoting Soil Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Bottos, Eric; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Sillen, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.39 Mb draft genome of Bacillus licheniformis GB2, a hydrocarbonoclastic Gram-positive bacterium of the family Bacillaceae, isolated from diesel-contaminated soil at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB2 is an effective plant-growth promoter useful for diesel fuel remediation applications based on plant-bacterium associations. PMID:27340073

  7. Identification of Genes Promoting Skin Youthfulness by Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anne L.S.; Atzmon, Gil; Bergman, Aviv; Brugmann, Samantha; Atwood, Scott X; Chang, Howard Y; Barzilai, Nir

    2014-01-01

    To identify genes that promote facial skin youthfulness (SY), a genome-wide association study on an Ashkenazi Jewish discovery group (n=428) was performed using Affymetrix 6.0 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Array. After SNP quality controls, 901,470 SNPs remained for analysis. The eigenstrat method showed no stratification. Cases and controls were identified by global facial skin aging severity including intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. Linear regression adjusted for age and gender, with no significant differences in smoking history, body mass index, menopausal status, or personal or family history of centenarians. Six SNPs met the Bonferroni threshold with Pallele<10−8; two of these six had Pgenotype<10−8. Quantitative trait loci mapping confirmed linkage disequilibrium. The six SNPs were interrogated by MassARRAY in a replication group (n=436) with confirmation of rs6975107, an intronic region of KCND2 (potassium voltage-gated channel, Shal-related family member 2) (Pgenotype=0.023). A second replication group (n=371) confirmed rs318125, downstream of DIAPH2 (diaphanous homolog 2 (Drosophila)) (Pallele=0.010, Pgenotype=0.002) and rs7616661, downstream of EDEM1 (ER degradation enhancer, mannosidase α-like 1) (Pgenotype=0.042). DIAPH2 has been associated with premature ovarian insufficiency, an aging phenotype in humans. EDEM1 associates with lifespan in animal models, although not humans. KCND2 is expressed in human skin, but has not been associated with aging. These genes represent new candidate genes to study the molecular basis of healthy skin aging. PMID:24037343

  8. Stat3 and c-Myc Genome-Wide Promoter Occupancy in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Benjamin L.; Yang, Jim; Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency is regulated in part by transcription factor (TF) pathways that maintain self-renewal and inhibit differentiation. Stat3 and c-Myc TFs are essential for maintaining mouse ES cell self-renewal. c-Myc, together with Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, is a reprogramming factor. While previous studies have investigated core transcriptional circuitry in ES cells, other TF pathways that promote ES cell pluripotency have yet to be investigated. Therefore, to further understand ES cell transcriptional networks, we used genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) to map Stat3 and c-Myc binding targets in ES cells. Our results show that Stat3 and c-Myc occupy a significant number of genes whose expression is highly enriched in ES cells. By comparing Stat3 and c-Myc target genes with gene expression data from undifferentiated ES cells and embryoid bodies (EBs), we found that Stat3 binds active and inactive genes in ES cells, while c-Myc binds predominantly active genes. Moreover, the transcriptional states of Stat3 and c-Myc targets are correlated with co-occupancy of pluripotency-related TFs, polycomb group proteins, and active and repressive histone modifications. We also provide evidence that Stat3 targets are differentially expressed in ES cells following removal of LIF, where culture of ES cells in the absence of LIF resulted in downregulation of Stat3 target genes enriched in ES cells, and upregulation of lineage specific Stat3 target genes. Altogether, we reveal transcriptional targets of two key pluripotency-related genes in ES cells – Stat3 and c-Myc, thus providing further insight into the ES cell transcriptional network. PMID:19079543

  9. Identification of genes promoting skin youthfulness by genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Anne L S; Atzmon, Gil; Bergman, Aviv; Brugmann, Samantha; Atwood, Scott X; Chang, Howard Y; Barzilai, Nir

    2014-03-01

    To identify genes that promote facial skin youthfulness (SY), a genome-wide association study on an Ashkenazi Jewish discovery group (n=428) was performed using Affymetrix 6.0 Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Array. After SNP quality controls, 901,470 SNPs remained for analysis. The eigenstrat method showed no stratification. Cases and controls were identified by global facial skin aging severity including intrinsic and extrinsic parameters. Linear regression adjusted for age and gender, with no significant differences in smoking history, body mass index, menopausal status, or personal or family history of centenarians. Six SNPs met the Bonferroni threshold with Pallele<10(-8); two of these six had Pgenotype<10(-8). Quantitative trait loci mapping confirmed linkage disequilibrium. The six SNPs were interrogated by MassARRAY in a replication group (n=436) with confirmation of rs6975107, an intronic region of KCND2 (potassium voltage-gated channel, Shal-related family member 2) (Pgenotype=0.023). A second replication group (n=371) confirmed rs318125, downstream of DIAPH2 (diaphanous homolog 2 (Drosophila)) (Pallele=0.010, Pgenotype=0.002) and rs7616661, downstream of EDEM1 (ER degradation enhancer, mannosidase α-like 1) (Pgenotype=0.042). DIAPH2 has been associated with premature ovarian insufficiency, an aging phenotype in humans. EDEM1 associates with lifespan in animal models, although not humans. KCND2 is expressed in human skin, but has not been associated with aging. These genes represent new candidate genes to study the molecular basis of healthy skin aging.

  10. Comparative genomic and functional analysis reveal conservation of plant growth promoting traits in Paenibacillus polymyxa and its closely related species

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianbo; Shi, Haowen; Du, Zhenglin; Wang, Tianshu; Liu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Sanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa has widely been studied as a model of plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Here, the genome sequences of 9 P. polymyxa strains, together with 26 other sequenced Paenibacillus spp., were comparatively studied. Phylogenetic analysis of the concatenated 244 single-copy core genes suggests that the 9 P. polymyxa strains and 5 other Paenibacillus spp., isolated from diverse geographic regions and ecological niches, formed a closely related clade (here it is called Poly-clade). Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) reveals local diversification of the 14 Poly-clade genomes. SNPs were not evenly distributed throughout the 14 genomes and the regions with high SNP density contain the genes related to secondary metabolism, including genes coding for polyketide. Recombination played an important role in the genetic diversity of this clade, although the rate of recombination was clearly lower than mutation. Some genes relevant to plant-growth promoting traits, i.e. phosphate solubilization and IAA production, are well conserved, while some genes relevant to nitrogen fixation and antibiotics synthesis are evolved with diversity in this Poly-clade. This study reveals that both P. polymyxa and its closely related species have plant growth promoting traits and they have great potential uses in agriculture and horticulture as PGPR. PMID:26856413

  11. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Slupianek, A; Falinski, R; Znojek, P; Stoklosa, T; Flis, S; Doneddu, V; Pytel, D; Synowiec, E; Blasiak, J; Bellacosa, A; Skorski, T

    2013-03-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50-90% of patients developing TKI-resistance carry CML clones expressing TKI-resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species, which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI-resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1-transformed cell lines and CD34(+) CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI, we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML.

  12. Three chromosomal rearrangements promote genomic divergence between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul R; Star, Bastiaan; Pampoulie, Christophe; Sodeland, Marte; Barth, Julia M I; Knutsen, Halvor; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genome-wide patterns of divergence provides insight on how genomes are influenced by selection and can reveal the potential for local adaptation in spatially structured populations. In Atlantic cod - historically a major marine resource - Northeast-Arctic- and Norwegian coastal cod are recognized by fundamental differences in migratory and non-migratory behavior, respectively. However, the genomic architecture underlying such behavioral ecotypes is unclear. Here, we have analyzed more than 8.000 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout all 23 linkage groups and show that loci putatively under selection are localized within three distinct genomic regions, each of several megabases long, covering approximately 4% of the Atlantic cod genome. These regions likely represent genomic inversions. The frequency of these distinct regions differ markedly between the ecotypes, spawning in the vicinity of each other, which contrasts with the low level of divergence in the rest of the genome. The observed patterns strongly suggest that these chromosomal rearrangements are instrumental in local adaptation and separation of Atlantic cod populations, leaving footprints of large genomic regions under selection. Our findings demonstrate the power of using genomic information in further understanding the population dynamics and defining management units in one of the world's most economically important marine resources.

  13. Three chromosomal rearrangements promote genomic divergence between migratory and stationary ecotypes of Atlantic cod

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Paul R.; Star, Bastiaan; Pampoulie, Christophe; Sodeland, Marte; Barth, Julia M. I.; Knutsen, Halvor; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genome-wide patterns of divergence provides insight on how genomes are influenced by selection and can reveal the potential for local adaptation in spatially structured populations. In Atlantic cod – historically a major marine resource – Northeast-Arctic- and Norwegian coastal cod are recognized by fundamental differences in migratory and non-migratory behavior, respectively. However, the genomic architecture underlying such behavioral ecotypes is unclear. Here, we have analyzed more than 8.000 polymorphic SNPs distributed throughout all 23 linkage groups and show that loci putatively under selection are localized within three distinct genomic regions, each of several megabases long, covering approximately 4% of the Atlantic cod genome. These regions likely represent genomic inversions. The frequency of these distinct regions differ markedly between the ecotypes, spawning in the vicinity of each other, which contrasts with the low level of divergence in the rest of the genome. The observed patterns strongly suggest that these chromosomal rearrangements are instrumental in local adaptation and separation of Atlantic cod populations, leaving footprints of large genomic regions under selection. Our findings demonstrate the power of using genomic information in further understanding the population dynamics and defining management units in one of the world’s most economically important marine resources. PMID:26983361

  14. Contrast enhancement in 1p/19q-codeleted anaplastic oligodendrogliomas is associated with 9p loss, genomic instability, and angiogenic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Botero, German; Dehais, Caroline; Idbaih, Ahmed; Martin-Duverneuil, Nadine; Lahutte, Marion; Carpentier, Catherine; Letouzé, Eric; Chinot, Olivier; Loiseau, Hugues; Honnorat, Jerome; Ramirez, Carole; Moyal, Elisabeth; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Ducray, François; Desenclos, Christine; Sevestre, Henri; Menei, Philippe; Michalak, Sophie; Al Nader, Edmond; Godard, Joel; Viennet, Gabriel; Carpentier, Antoine; Eimer, Sandrine; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Quintin-Roué, Isabelle; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Verrelle, Pierre; Faillot, Thierry; Gaultier, Claude; Tortel, Marie Christine; Christov, Christo; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Aubriot-Lorton, Marie-Hélène; Ghiringhelli, Francois; Berger, François; Lacroix, Catherine; Parker, Fabrice; Dubois, François; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Gueye, Edouard-Marcel; Labrousse, Francois; Jouvet, Anne; Bauchet, Luc; Rigau, Valérie; Beauchesne, Patrick; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Campone, Mario; Loussouarn, Delphine; Fontaine, Denys; Vandenbos, Fanny; Campello, Chantal; Roger, Pascal; Fesneau, Melanie; Heitzmann, Anne; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Elouadhani, Selma; Mokhtari, Karima; Polivka, Marc; Ricard, Damien; Levillain, Pierre-Marie; Wager, Michel; Colin, Philippe; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Chiforeanu, Dan; Vauleon, Elodie; Langlois, Olivier; Laquerriere, Annie; Motsuo Fotso, Marie Janette; Peoc'h, Michel; Andraud, Marie; Mouton, Servane; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Noel, Georges; Desse, Nicolas; Soulard, Raoulin; Amiel-Benouaich, Alexandra; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Dhermain, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to correlate MRI features and molecular characteristics in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOs). Methods The MRI characteristics of 50 AO patients enrolled in the French national network for high-grade oligodendroglial tumors were analyzed. The genomic profiles and IDH mutational statuses were assessed using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays and direct sequencing, respectively. The gene expression profiles of 25 1p/19q-codeleted AOs were studied on Affymetrix expression arrays. Results Most of the cases were frontal lobe contrast-enhanced tumors (52%), but the radiological presentations of these cases were heterogeneous, ranging from low-grade glioma-like aspects (26%) to glioblastoma-like aspects (22%). The 1p/19q codeletion (n = 39) was associated with locations in the frontal lobe (P = .001), with heterogeneous intratumoral signal intensities (P = .003) and with no or nonmeasurable contrast enhancements (P = .01). The IDH wild-type AOs (n = 7) more frequently displayed ringlike contrast enhancements (P = .03) and were more frequently located outside of the frontal lobe (P = .01). However, no specific imaging pattern could be identified for the 1p/19q-codeleted AO or the IDH-mutated AO. Within the 1p/19q-codeleted AO, the contrast enhancement was associated with larger tumor volumes (P = .001), chromosome 9p loss and CDKN2A loss (P = .006), genomic instability (P = .03), and angiogenesis-related gene expression (P < .001), particularly for vascular endothelial growth factor A and angiopoietin 2. Conclusion In AOs, the 1p/19q codeletion and the IDH mutation are associated with preferential (but not with specific) imaging characteristics. Within 1p/19q-codeleted AO, imaging heterogeneity is related to additional molecular alterations, especially chromosome 9p loss, which is associated with contrast enhancement and larger tumor volume. PMID:24353325

  15. G-quadruplex forming structural motifs in the genome of Deinococcus radiodurans and their regulatory roles in promoter functions.

    PubMed

    Kota, Swathi; Dhamodharan, V; Pradeepkumar, P I; Misra, Hari S

    2015-11-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans displays compromised radioresistance in the presence of guanine quadruplex (G4)-binding drugs (G4 drugs). Genome-wide scanning showed islands of guanine runs (G-motif) in the upstream regions of coding sequences as well as in the structural regions of many genes, indicating a role for G4 DNA in the regulation of genome functions in this bacterium. G-motifs present upstream to some of the DNA damage-responsive genes like lexA, pprI, recF, recQ, mutL and radA were synthesized, and the formation of G4 DNA structures was probed in vitro. The G-motifs present at the 67th position upstream to recQ and at the 121st position upstream to mutL produced parallel and mixed G4 DNA structures, respectively. Expression of β-galactosidase under recQ and mutL promoters containing respective G-motifs was inhibited by G4 drugs under normal growth conditions in D. radiodurans. However, when such cells were exposed to γ radiation, mutL promoter activity was stimulated while recQ promoter activity was inhibited in the presence of G4 drugs. Deletion of the G-motif from the recQ promoter could relax it from G4 drug repression. D. radiodurans cells treated with G4 drug showed reduction in recQ expression and γ radiation resistance, indicating an involvement of G4 DNA in the radioresistance of this bacterium. These results suggest that G-motifs from D. radiodurans genome form different types of G4 DNA structures at least in vitro, and the recQ and mutL promoters seem to be differentially regulated at the levels of G4 DNA structures.

  16. Whole genome analysis of halotolerant and alkalotolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Klebsiella sp. D5A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wuxing; Wang, Qingling; Hou, Jinyu; Tu, Chen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This research undertook the systematic analysis of the Klebsiella sp. D5A genome and identification of genes that contribute to plant growth-promoting (PGP) traits, especially genes related to salt tolerance and wide pH adaptability. The genome sequence of isolate D5A was obtained using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system with average coverages of 174.7× and 200.1× using the paired-end and mate-pair sequencing, respectively. Predicted and annotated gene sequences were analyzed for similarity with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enzyme database followed by assignment of each gene into the KEGG pathway charts. The results show that the Klebsiella sp. D5A genome has a total of 5,540,009 bp with 57.15% G + C content. PGP conferring genes such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol synthesis, and N2 fixation were determined. Moreover, genes putatively responsible for resistance to high salinity including glycine-betaine synthesis, trehalose synthesis and a number of osmoregulation receptors and transport systems were also observed in the D5A genome together with numerous genes that contribute to pH homeostasis. These genes reveal the genetic adaptation of D5A to versatile environmental conditions and the effectiveness of the isolate to serve as a plant growth stimulator.

  17. Whole genome analysis of halotolerant and alkalotolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Klebsiella sp. D5A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wuxing; Wang, Qingling; Hou, Jinyu; Tu, Chen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This research undertook the systematic analysis of the Klebsiella sp. D5A genome and identification of genes that contribute to plant growth-promoting (PGP) traits, especially genes related to salt tolerance and wide pH adaptability. The genome sequence of isolate D5A was obtained using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system with average coverages of 174.7× and 200.1× using the paired-end and mate-pair sequencing, respectively. Predicted and annotated gene sequences were analyzed for similarity with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enzyme database followed by assignment of each gene into the KEGG pathway charts. The results show that the Klebsiella sp. D5A genome has a total of 5,540,009 bp with 57.15% G + C content. PGP conferring genes such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol synthesis, and N2 fixation were determined. Moreover, genes putatively responsible for resistance to high salinity including glycine-betaine synthesis, trehalose synthesis and a number of osmoregulation receptors and transport systems were also observed in the D5A genome together with numerous genes that contribute to pH homeostasis. These genes reveal the genetic adaptation of D5A to versatile environmental conditions and the effectiveness of the isolate to serve as a plant growth stimulator. PMID:27216548

  18. Whole genome analysis of halotolerant and alkalotolerant plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Klebsiella sp. D5A

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wuxing; Wang, Qingling; Hou, Jinyu; Tu, Chen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This research undertook the systematic analysis of the Klebsiella sp. D5A genome and identification of genes that contribute to plant growth-promoting (PGP) traits, especially genes related to salt tolerance and wide pH adaptability. The genome sequence of isolate D5A was obtained using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system with average coverages of 174.7× and 200.1× using the paired-end and mate-pair sequencing, respectively. Predicted and annotated gene sequences were analyzed for similarity with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enzyme database followed by assignment of each gene into the KEGG pathway charts. The results show that the Klebsiella sp. D5A genome has a total of 5,540,009 bp with 57.15% G + C content. PGP conferring genes such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol synthesis, and N2 fixation were determined. Moreover, genes putatively responsible for resistance to high salinity including glycine-betaine synthesis, trehalose synthesis and a number of osmoregulation receptors and transport systems were also observed in the D5A genome together with numerous genes that contribute to pH homeostasis. These genes reveal the genetic adaptation of D5A to versatile environmental conditions and the effectiveness of the isolate to serve as a plant growth stimulator. PMID:27216548

  19. Effect of 0.2 T static magnetic field on human neurons: remodeling and inhibition of signal transduction without genome instability.

    PubMed

    Pacini, S; Vannelli, G B; Barni, T; Ruggiero, M; Sardi, I; Pacini, P; Gulisano, M

    1999-06-01

    We describe the effect of the static magnetic field generated by a 0.2 T magnetic resonance tomograph on a normal human neuronal cell culture (FNC-B4). After 15 min exposure cells showed dramatic changes of morphology: they formed vortexes of cells and exposed branched neurites featuring synaptic buttons. At the same time, thymidine incorporation and inositol lipid signaling were significantly reduced. Control (sham exposed) or non-neuronal cells (mouse leukemia, and human breast carcinoma cells) did not show any alteration following exposure. Endothelin-1 release from FNC-B4 cells was also dramatically reduced after 5 min exposure. However, PCR analysis of 12 DNA microsatellites selected as gauges of genome instability, did not reveal any alteration following exposure, thus ruling out a direct effect of the magnetic field on DNA stability. These data can be interpreted as a specific effect of the static magnetic field on human neuronal cells and are consistent with the induction of remodeling and differentiation; they demonstrate that fields below 0.5 T have significant biological effects on human neurons. PMID:10381007

  20. Radio-protective effect of cinnamic acid, a phenolic phytochemical, on genomic instability induced by X-rays in human blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cinkilic, Nilufer; Tüzün, Ece; Çetintaş, Sibel Kahraman; Vatan, Özgür; Yılmaz, Dilek; Çavaş, Tolga; Tunç, Sema; Özkan, Lütfi; Bilaloğlu, Rahmi

    2014-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective activity of cinnamic acid against induction by X-rays of genomic instability in normal human blood lymphocytes. This radio-protective activity was assessed by use of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and the alkaline comet assay, with human blood lymphocytes isolated from two healthy donors. A Siemens Mevatron MD2 (Siemens AG, USA, 1994) linear accelerator was used for the irradiation with 1 or 2 Gy. Treatment of the lymphocytes with cinnamic acid prior to irradiation reduced the number of micronuclei when compared with that in control samples. Treatment with cinnamic acid without irradiation did not increase the number of micronuclei and did not show a cytostatic effect in the lymphocytes. The results of the alkaline comet assay revealed that cinnamic acid reduces the DNA damage induced by X-rays, showing a significant radio-protective effect. Cinnamic acid decreased the frequency of irradiation-induced micronuclei by 16-55% and reduced DNA breakage by 17-50%, as determined by the alkaline comet assay. Cinnamic acid may thus act as a radio-protective compound, and future studies may focus on elucidating the mechanism by which cinnamic acid offers radioprotection.

  1. Genetic profile of GNAQ-mutated blue melanocytic neoplasms reveals mutations in genes linked to genomic instability and the PI3K pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Vivancos, Ana; Caratú, Ginevra; Matito, Judit; Ferrer, Berta; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Cortés, Javier; Muñoz, Eva; Garcia-Patos, Vicente; Recio, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanomas arising in association with a common or cellular blue nevus (MABN) comprise a relatively rare and heterogeneous group of lethal melanomas. Although GNAQ is known to be frequently mutated in common blue nevus, cellular blue nevus (CBN) and MABN and these malignant lesions present gross chromosome alterations harboring BAP1 mutations, little is known about other mutations that contribute to the development and progression of these neoplasms. Thus, the genetic profile of these tumors is important to increase the number of intervention and treatment modalities. Here, we characterized and genetically profiled two different sections of a rare MABN and two CBNs from three different patients. All of the samples harbored a GNAQ mutation, exhibited RAS pathway activation, and harbored additional mutations in genes associated with genomic instability and epigenetic regulation (KMT2C, FANCD2, ATR, ATRX, NBN, ERCC2, SETD2, and WHSC1). In addition, all neoplasms harbored mutations that directly or indirectly affected either the regulation or activation of the PI3K pathway (PIK3CA, NF1, INPP5B and GSK3B). Our results not only help understand the genetic complexity of these blue melanocytic lesions but provide a rationale to use the combination of PI3K/MTOR and MEK1/2 inhibitors against these types of tumors. PMID:27057633

  2. Curtobacterium sp. Genome Sequencing Underlines Plant Growth Promotion-Related Traits.

    PubMed

    Bulgari, Daniela; Minio, Andrea; Casati, Paola; Quaglino, Fabio; Delledonne, Massimo; Bianco, Piero A

    2014-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria are microorganisms residing in plant tissues without causing disease symptoms. Here, we provide the high-quality genome sequence of Curtobacterium sp. strain S6, isolated from grapevine plant. The genome assembly contains 2,759,404 bp in 13 contigs and 2,456 predicted genes. PMID:25035321

  3. Sparsely ionizing diagnostic and natural background radiations are likely preventing cancer and other genomic-instability-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Scott, Bobby R; Di Palma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Routine diagnostic X-rays (e.g., chest X-rays, mammograms, computed tomography scans) and routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures using sparsely ionizing radiation forms (e.g., beta and gamma radiations) stimulate the removal of precancerous neo-plastically transformed and other genomically unstable cells from the body (medical radiation hormesis). The indicated radiation hormesis arises because radiation doses above an individual-specific stochastic threshold activate a system of cooperative protective processes that include high-fidelity DNA repair/apoptosis (presumed p53 related), an auxiliary apoptosis process (PAM process) that is presumed p53-independent, and stimulated immunity. These forms of induced protection are called adapted protection because they are associated with the radiation adaptive response. Diagnostic X-ray sources, other sources of sparsely ionizing radiation used in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures, as well as radioisotope-labeled immunoglobulins could be used in conjunction with apoptosis-sensitizing agents (e.g., the natural phenolic compound resveratrol) in curing existing cancer via low-dose fractionated or low-dose, low-dose-rate therapy (therapeutic radiation hormesis). Evidence is provided to support the existence of both therapeutic (curing existing cancer) and medical (cancer prevention) radiation hormesis. Evidence is also provided demonstrating that exposure to environmental sparsely ionizing radiations, such as gamma rays, protect from cancer occurrence and the occurrence of other diseases via inducing adapted protection (environmental radiation hormesis). PMID:18648608

  4. Expansion of the CRISPR-Cas9 genome targeting space through the use of H1 promoter-expressed guide RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Vinod; Wahlin, Karl; Maruotti, Julien; Zack, Donald J

    2014-08-08

    The repurposed CRISPR-Cas9 system has recently emerged as a revolutionary genome-editing tool. Here we report a modification in the expression of the guide RNA (gRNA) required for targeting that greatly expands the targetable genome. gRNA expression through the commonly used U6 promoter requires a guanosine nucleotide to initiate transcription, thus constraining genomic-targeting sites to GN19NGG. We demonstrate the ability to modify endogenous genes using H1 promoter-expressed gRNAs, which can be used to target both AN19NGG and GN19NGG genomic sites. AN19NGG sites occur ~15% more frequently than GN19NGG sites in the human genome and the increase in targeting space is also enriched at human genes and disease loci. Together, our results enhance the versatility of the CRISPR technology by more than doubling the number of targetable sites within the human genome and other eukaryotic species.

  5. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Taisuke; Nagamatsu, Go; Kosaka, Takeo; Takubo, Keiyo; Hotta, Akitsu; Ellis, James; Suda, Toshio

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} iPS cells were induced with a fluorescence monitoring system. {yields} ATM-deficient tail-tip fibroblasts exhibited quite a low reprogramming efficiency. {yields} iPS cells obtained from ATM-deficient cells had pluripotent cell characteristics. {yields} ATM-deficient iPS cells had abnormal chromosomes, which were accumulated in culture. -- Abstract: During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  6. Screening of Tissue-Specific Genes and Promoters in Tomato by Comparing Genome Wide Expression Profiles of Arabidopsis Orthologues

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chan Ju; Lee, Ha Yeon; Kim, Woong Bom; Lee, Bok-Sim; Kim, Jungeun; Ahmad, Raza; Kim, Hyun A; Yi, So Young; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive overexpression of transgenes occasionally interferes with normal growth and developmental processes in plants. Thus, the development of tissue-specific promoters that drive transgene expression has become agriculturally important. To identify tomato tissue-specific promoters, tissue-specific genes were screened using a series of in silico-based and experimental procedures, including genome-wide orthologue searches of tomato and Arabidopsis databases, isolation of tissue-specific candidates using an Arabidopsis microarray database, and validation of tissue specificity by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and promoter assay. Using these procedures, we found 311 tissue-specific candidate genes and validated 10 tissue-specific genes by RT-PCR. Among these identified genes, histochemical analysis of five isolated promoter::GUS transgenic tomato and Arabidopsis plants revealed that their promoters have different but distinct tissue-specific activities in anther, fruit, and root, respectively. Therefore, it appears these in silico-based screening approaches in addition to the identification of new tissue-specific genes and promoters will be helpful for the further development of tailored crop development. PMID:22699756

  7. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  8. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Michele; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando; Calin, George A; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-04-12

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Raoultella ornithinolytica TNT, a Trinitrotoluene-Denitrating and Plant Growth-Promoting Strain Isolated from Explosive-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Thijs, Sofie; Van Hamme, Jonathan; Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2014-05-29

    We report the draft genome of Raoultella ornithinolytica TNT, a Gram-negative bacterium of the Enterobacteriaceae isolated from military soil in Belgium. Strain TNT uses nitrite released from trinitrotoluene (TNT) for growth and is a potent plant growth promoter. An analysis of its 5.6-Mb draft genome will bring insights into TNT degradation-reinforcing bioremediation applications.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of Calendula officinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  11. Shifts in rDNA levels act as a genome buffer promoting chromosome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra; Gurgul, Artur; Skoneczny, Marek; Skoneczna, Adrianna; Szmatola, Tomasz; Jasielczuk, Igor; Magda, Michal; Rawska, Ewa; Pabian, Sylwia; Panek, Anita; Kaplan, Jakub; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is considered to be a stress sensor and rDNA-based regulation of cellular senescence and longevity has been proposed. However, the role of rDNA in the maintenance of genome integrity has not been investigated in detail. Using genomically diverse industrial yeasts as a model and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), we show that chromosome level may be balanced during passages and as a response to alcohol stress that may be associated with changes in rDNA pools. Generation- and ethanol-mediated changes in genes responsible for protein and DNA/RNA metabolism were revealed using next-generation sequencing. Links between redox homeostasis, DNA stability, and telomere and nucleolus states were also established. These results suggest that yeast genome is dynamic and chromosome homeostasis may be controlled by rDNA. PMID:26566866

  12. Adaptation to Low Salinity Promotes Genomic Divergence in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul R; Jentoft, Sissel; Star, Bastiaan; Ring, Kristoffer H; Knutsen, Halvor; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; André, Carl

    2015-06-01

    How genomic selection enables species to adapt to divergent environments is a fundamental question in ecology and evolution. We investigated the genomic signatures of local adaptation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) along a natural salinity gradient, ranging from 35‰ in the North Sea to 7‰ within the Baltic Sea. By utilizing a 12 K SNPchip, we simultaneously assessed neutral and adaptive genetic divergence across the Atlantic cod genome. Combining outlier analyses with a landscape genomic approach, we identified a set of directionally selected loci that are strongly correlated with habitat differences in salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Our results show that discrete regions within the Atlantic cod genome are subject to directional selection and associated with adaptation to the local environmental conditions in the Baltic- and the North Sea, indicating divergence hitchhiking and the presence of genomic islands of divergence. We report a suite of outlier single nucleotide polymorphisms within or closely located to genes associated with osmoregulation, as well as genes known to play important roles in the hydration and development of oocytes. These genes are likely to have key functions within a general osmoregulatory framework and are important for the survival of eggs and larvae, contributing to the buildup of reproductive isolation between the low-salinity adapted Baltic cod and the adjacent cod populations. Hence, our data suggest that adaptive responses to the environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea may contribute to a strong and effective reproductive barrier, and that Baltic cod can be viewed as an example of ongoing speciation.

  13. First draft genome sequencing of indole acetic acid producing and plant growth promoting fungus Preussia sp. BSL10.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Asaf, Sajjad; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-05-10

    Preussia sp. BSL10, family Sporormiaceae, was actively producing phytohormone (indole-3-acetic acid) and extra-cellular enzymes (phosphatases and glucosidases). The fungus was also promoting the growth of arid-land tree-Boswellia sacra. Looking at such prospects of this fungus, we sequenced its draft genome for the first time. The Illumina based sequence analysis reveals an approximate genome size of 31.4Mbp for Preussia sp. BSL10. Based on ab initio gene prediction, total 32,312 coding sequences were annotated consisting of 11,967 coding genes, pseudogenes, and 221 tRNA genes. Furthermore, 321 carbohydrate-active enzymes were predicted and classified into many functional families. PMID:26995610

  14. Better Living through Chemistry: Caloric Restriction (CR) and CR Mimetics Alter Genome Function to Promote Increased Health and Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Zoe E; Pickering, Joshua; Eskiw, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), defined as decreased nutrient intake without causing malnutrition, has been documented to increase both health and lifespan across numerous organisms, including humans. Many drugs and other compounds naturally occurring in our diet (nutraceuticals) have been postulated to act as mimetics of caloric restriction, leading to a wave of research investigating the efficacy of these compounds in preventing age-related diseases and promoting healthier, longer lifespans. Although well studied at the biochemical level, there are still many unanswered questions about how CR and CR mimetics impact genome function and structure. Here we discuss how genome function and structure are influenced by CR and potential CR mimetics, including changes in gene expression profiles and epigenetic modifications and their potential to identify the genetic fountain of youth. PMID:27588026

  15. Better Living through Chemistry: Caloric Restriction (CR) and CR Mimetics Alter Genome Function to Promote Increased Health and Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Zoe E.; Pickering, Joshua; Eskiw, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR), defined as decreased nutrient intake without causing malnutrition, has been documented to increase both health and lifespan across numerous organisms, including humans. Many drugs and other compounds naturally occurring in our diet (nutraceuticals) have been postulated to act as mimetics of caloric restriction, leading to a wave of research investigating the efficacy of these compounds in preventing age-related diseases and promoting healthier, longer lifespans. Although well studied at the biochemical level, there are still many unanswered questions about how CR and CR mimetics impact genome function and structure. Here we discuss how genome function and structure are influenced by CR and potential CR mimetics, including changes in gene expression profiles and epigenetic modifications and their potential to identify the genetic fountain of youth. PMID:27588026

  16. A versatile Multisite Gateway-compatible promoter and transgenic line collection for cell type-specific functional genomics in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Morao, Ana K; Cayrel, Anne; Platre, Matthieu P; Barberon, Marie; Caillieux, Erwann; Colot, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Roudier, François; Vert, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are composed of many cell types that acquire their specific fate through a precisely controlled pattern of gene expression in time and space dictated in part by cell type-specific promoter activity. Understanding the contribution of highly specialized cell types in the development of a whole organism requires the ability to isolate or analyze different cell types separately. We have characterized and validated a large collection of root cell type-specific promoters and have generated cell type-specific marker lines. These benchmarked promoters can be readily used to evaluate cell type-specific complementation of mutant phenotypes, or to knockdown gene expression using targeted expression of artificial miRNA. We also generated vectors and characterized transgenic lines for cell type-specific induction of gene expression and cell type-specific isolation of nuclei for RNA and chromatin profiling. Vectors and seeds from transgenic Arabidopsis plants will be freely available, and will promote rapid progress in cell type-specific functional genomics. We demonstrate the power of this promoter set for analysis of complex biological processes by investigating the contribution of root cell types in the IRT1-dependent root iron uptake. Our findings revealed the complex spatial expression pattern of IRT1 in both root epidermis and phloem companion cells and the requirement for IRT1 to be expressed in both cell types for proper iron homeostasis.

  17. Synthetic RNA Polymerase III Promoters Facilitate High-Efficiency CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Cory M; Hussain, Murtaza Shabbir; Blenner, Mark; Wheeldon, Ian

    2016-04-15

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is a valuable microbial host for chemical production because it has a high capacity to synthesize, modify, and store intracellular lipids; however, rapid strain development has been hampered by the limited availability of genome engineering tools. We address this limitation by adapting the CRISPR-Cas9 system from Streptococcus pyogenes for markerless gene disruption and integration in Y. lipolytica. Single gene disruption efficiencies of 92% and higher were achieved when single guide RNAs (sgRNA) were transcribed with synthetic hybrid promoters that combine native RNA polymerase III (Pol III) promoters with tRNA. The Pol III-tRNA hybrid promoters exploit endogenous tRNA processing to produce mature sgRNA for Cas9 targeting. The highest efficiencies were achieved with a SCR1'-tRNA(Gly) promoter and Y. lipolytica codon-optimized Cas9 expressed from a UAS1B8-TEF promoter. Cotransformation of the Cas9 and sgRNA expressing plasmid with a homologous recombination donor plasmid resulted in markerless homologous recombination efficiency of over 64%. Homologous recombination was observed in 100% of transformants when nonhomologous end joining was disrupted. The end result of these studies was the development of pCRISPRyl, a modular tool for markerless gene disruption and integration in Y. lipolytica.

  18. A versatile Multisite Gateway-compatible promoter and transgenic line collection for cell type-specific functional genomics in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Barberon, Marie; Caillieux, Erwann; Colot, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multicellular organisms are composed of many cell types that acquire their specific fate through a precisely controlled pattern of gene expression in time and space dictated in part by cell type-specific promoter activity. Understanding the contribution of highly specialized cell types in the development of a whole organism requires the ability to isolate or analyze different cell types separately. We have characterized and validated a large collection of root cell type-specific promoters and have generated cell type-specific marker lines. These benchmarked promoters can be readily used to evaluate cell type-specific complementation of mutant phenotypes, or to knockdown gene expression using targeted expression of artificial miRNA. We also generated vectors and characterized transgenic lines for cell type-specific induction of gene expression and cell type-specific isolation of nuclei for RNA and chromatin profiling. Vectors and seeds from transgenic Arabidopsis plants will be freely available, and will promote rapid progress in cell type-specific functional genomics. We demonstrate the power of this promoter set for analysis of complex biological processes by investigating the contribution of root cell types in the IRT1-dependent root iron uptake. Our findings revealed the complex spatial expression pattern of IRT1 in both root epidermis and phloem companion cells and the requirement for IRT1 to be expressed in both cell types for proper iron homeostasis. PMID:26662936

  19. Complete genome sequence of Kibdelosporangium phytohabitans KLBMP 1111(T), a plant growth promoting endophytic actinomycete isolated from oil-seed plant Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sheng; Feng, Wei-Wei; Xing, Ke; Bai, Juan-Luan; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Wei-Jie; Jiang, Ji-Hong

    2015-12-20

    Kibdelosporangium phytohabitans KLBMP 1111(T) is a plant growth promoting endophytic actinomycete isolated from the oil-seed plant Jatropha curcas L. collected from dry-hot valley, in Sichuan, China. The complete genome sequence of this actinomycete consists of one chromosome (11,759,770bp) with no plasmid. From the genome, we identified gene clusters responsible for polyketide and nonribosomal peptide synthesis of natural products, and genes related to the plant growth promoting, such as zeatin, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD) and siderophore. The complete genome information may be useful to understand the beneficial interactions between K. phytohabitans KLBMP 1111(T) and host plants. PMID:26516119

  20. Hip instability.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew V; Sekiya, Jon K

    2010-06-01

    Hip instability is becoming a more commonly recognized source of pain and disability in patients. Traumatic causes of hip instability are often clear. Appropriate treatment includes immediate reduction, early surgery for acetabular rim fractures greater than 25% or incarcerated fragments in the joint, and close follow-up to monitor for avascular necrosis. Late surgical intervention may be necessary for residual symptomatic hip instability. Atraumatic causes of hip instability include repetitive external rotation with axial loading, generalized ligamentous laxity, and collagen disorders like Ehlers-Danlos. Symptoms caused by atraumatic hip instability often have an insidious onset. Patients may have a wide array of hip symptoms while demonstrating only subtle findings suggestive of capsular laxity. Traction views of the affected hip can be helpful in diagnosing hip instability. Open and arthroscopic techniques can be used to treat capsular laxity. We describe an arthroscopic anterior hip capsular plication using a suture technique. PMID:20473129

  1. No evidence for transgenerational genomic instability in the F1 or F2 descendants of Muta™Mouse males exposed to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jason M; Williams, Andrew; Gingerich, John; Douglas, George R; Marchetti, Francesco; Yauk, Carole L

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of male mice to genotoxic agents can increase mutation frequencies in their unexposed descendants. This phenomenon, known as transgenerational genomic instability (TGI), can persist for several generations. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Chemically-induced TGI has been demonstrated in non-coding unstable tandem repeat DNA regions, but it is unclear whether it extends to other genetic endpoints. We investigated whether exposure of Muta™Mouse males to a single dose of 75mg/kg N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) increased the spontaneous frequency of gene mutations or chromosome damage in their offspring. Treated males were mated with untreated females 3 days, 6 weeks or 10 weeks post-exposure to produce the F1 generation. Offspring were thus conceived from germ cells exposed to ENU as mature spermatozoa, dividing spermatogonia, or spermatogonial stem cells, respectively. F2 mice were generated by mating F1 descendants with untreated partners. Mutations in the lacZ transgene were quantified in bone marrow and micronucleus frequencies were evaluated in red blood cells by flow-cytometry for all F0 and their descendants. LacZ mutant frequencies were also determined in sperm for all exposed males and their male descendants. In F0 males, lacZ mutant frequencies were significantly increased in bone marrow at least 10-fold at all three time points investigated. In sperm, lacZ mutant frequency was significantly increased 7-11-fold after exposure of dividing and stem cell spermatogonia, but not in replication-deficient haploid sperm. Micronucleus frequencies assessed two days after ENU treatment were increased 5-fold in F0 males, but returned to control levels after 10 weeks. Despite the strong mutagenic response in F0 males, pre- and post-meiotic ENU exposure did not significantly increase lacZ mutant or micronucleus frequencies in F1 or F2 offspring. These findings suggest that TGI may not extend to all genetic endpoints and that further

  2. Alpha-Particle-Induced Complex Chromosome Exchanges Transmitted through Extra-Thymic Lymphopoiesis In Vitro Show Evidence of Emerging Genomic Instability.

    PubMed

    Sumption, Natalia; Goodhead, Dudley T; Anderson, Rhona M

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to high-linear energy transfer α-particles includes environmental (e.g. radon gas and its decay progeny), medical (e.g. radiopharmaceuticals) and occupational (nuclear industry) sources. The associated health risks of α-particle exposure for lung cancer are well documented however the risk estimates for leukaemia remain uncertain. To further our understanding of α-particle effects in target cells for leukaemogenesis and also to seek general markers of individual exposure to α-particles, this study assessed the transmission of chromosomal damage initially-induced in human haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells after exposure to high-LET α-particles. Cells surviving exposure were differentiated into mature T-cells by extra-thymic T-cell differentiation in vitro. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridisation (M-FISH) analysis of naïve T-cell populations showed the occurrence of stable (clonal) complex chromosome aberrations consistent with those that are characteristically induced in spherical cells by the traversal of a single α-particle track. Additionally, complex chromosome exchanges were observed in the progeny of irradiated mature T-cell populations. In addition to this, newly arising de novo chromosome aberrations were detected in cells which possessed clonal markers of α-particle exposure and also in cells which did not show any evidence of previous exposure, suggesting ongoing genomic instability in these populations. Our findings support the usefulness and reliability of employing complex chromosome exchanges as indicators of past or ongoing exposure to high-LET radiation and demonstrate the potential applicability to evaluate health risks associated with α-particle exposure.

  3. Alpha-Particle-Induced Complex Chromosome Exchanges Transmitted through Extra-Thymic Lymphopoiesis In Vitro Show Evidence of Emerging Genomic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Sumption, Natalia; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Anderson, Rhona M.

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to high-linear energy transfer α-particles includes environmental (e.g. radon gas and its decay progeny), medical (e.g. radiopharmaceuticals) and occupational (nuclear industry) sources. The associated health risks of α-particle exposure for lung cancer are well documented however the risk estimates for leukaemia remain uncertain. To further our understanding of α-particle effects in target cells for leukaemogenesis and also to seek general markers of individual exposure to α-particles, this study assessed the transmission of chromosomal damage initially-induced in human haemopoietic stem and progenitor cells after exposure to high-LET α-particles. Cells surviving exposure were differentiated into mature T-cells by extra-thymic T-cell differentiation in vitro. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridisation (M-FISH) analysis of naïve T-cell populations showed the occurrence of stable (clonal) complex chromosome aberrations consistent with those that are characteristically induced in spherical cells by the traversal of a single α-particle track. Additionally, complex chromosome exchanges were observed in the progeny of irradiated mature T-cell populations. In addition to this, newly arising de novo chromosome aberrations were detected in cells which possessed clonal markers of α-particle exposure and also in cells which did not show any evidence of previous exposure, suggesting ongoing genomic instability in these populations. Our findings support the usefulness and reliability of employing complex chromosome exchanges as indicators of past or ongoing exposure to high-LET radiation and demonstrate the potential applicability to evaluate health risks associated with α-particle exposure. PMID:26252014

  4. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2001-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response.

  5. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2002-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response. (7) Develop tissue explant systems for the measurement of low dose effects in multicellular systems.

  6. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  7. Superpositioning of Deletions Promotes Growth of Escherichia coli with a Reduced Genome

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroshi; Sawano, Yoshie; Kato, Jun-ichi; Mori, Hideo

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli has dispensable genome regions and eliminating them may improve cell use by reducing unnecessary metabolic pathways and complex regulatory networks. Although several strains with reduced genomes have already been constructed, there have been no reports of strains constructed with deletions assayed for influence on growth. To retain robust growth and fundamental metabolic pathways, the growth of each deletion strain and combination effects of deletions were checked using M9 minimal medium. Then a new strain, MGF-01, with a 1 Mb reduced genome was constructed by integrating deletions that did not affect growth. MGF-01 grew as well as the wild type in the exponential phase and continued growing after the wild type had entered the stationary phase. The final cell density of MGF-01 was 1.5 times higher than that of the wild-type strain. Using MGF-01 as a production host, a 2.4-fold increase in l-threonine production was achieved. PMID:18753290

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia ambifaria RZ2MS16, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Guarana, a Tropical Plant.

    PubMed

    Batista, Bruna Durante; Taniguti, Lucas Mitsuo; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia Barros; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Quecine, Maria Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia ambifaria strain RZ2MS16 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Amazon guarana in Brazil. This bacterium exhibits a remarkable capacity to promote the growth of corn and soybean. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of RZ2MS16 and some genes related to multiple traits involved in plant growth promotion. PMID:26988044

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia ambifaria RZ2MS16, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Guarana, a Tropical Plant

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Bruna Durante; Taniguti, Lucas Mitsuo; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia Barros; Azevedo, João Lúcio

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia ambifaria strain RZ2MS16 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Amazon guarana in Brazil. This bacterium exhibits a remarkable capacity to promote the growth of corn and soybean. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of RZ2MS16 and some genes related to multiple traits involved in plant growth promotion. PMID:26988044

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Burkholderia ambifaria RZ2MS16, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from Guarana, a Tropical Plant.

    PubMed

    Batista, Bruna Durante; Taniguti, Lucas Mitsuo; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia Barros; Azevedo, João Lúcio; Quecine, Maria Carolina

    2016-03-17

    Burkholderia ambifaria strain RZ2MS16 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Amazon guarana in Brazil. This bacterium exhibits a remarkable capacity to promote the growth of corn and soybean. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of RZ2MS16 and some genes related to multiple traits involved in plant growth promotion.

  11. Adaptation to Low Salinity Promotes Genomic Divergence in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.).

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul R; Jentoft, Sissel; Star, Bastiaan; Ring, Kristoffer H; Knutsen, Halvor; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; André, Carl

    2015-06-01

    How genomic selection enables species to adapt to divergent environments is a fundamental question in ecology and evolution. We investigated the genomic signatures of local adaptation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) along a natural salinity gradient, ranging from 35‰ in the North Sea to 7‰ within the Baltic Sea. By utilizing a 12 K SNPchip, we simultaneously assessed neutral and adaptive genetic divergence across the Atlantic cod genome. Combining outlier analyses with a landscape genomic approach, we identified a set of directionally selected loci that are strongly correlated with habitat differences in salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Our results show that discrete regions within the Atlantic cod genome are subject to directional selection and associated with adaptation to the local environmental conditions in the Baltic- and the North Sea, indicating divergence hitchhiking and the presence of genomic islands of divergence. We report a suite of outlier single nucleotide polymorphisms within or closely located to genes associated with osmoregulation, as well as genes known to play important roles in the hydration and development of oocytes. These genes are likely to have key functions within a general osmoregulatory framework and are important for the survival of eggs and larvae, contributing to the buildup of reproductive isolation between the low-salinity adapted Baltic cod and the adjacent cod populations. Hence, our data suggest that adaptive responses to the environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea may contribute to a strong and effective reproductive barrier, and that Baltic cod can be viewed as an example of ongoing speciation. PMID:25994933

  12. Adaptation to Low Salinity Promotes Genomic Divergence in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua L.)

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Paul R.; Jentoft, Sissel; Star, Bastiaan; Ring, Kristoffer H.; Knutsen, Halvor; Lien, Sigbjørn; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; André, Carl

    2015-01-01

    How genomic selection enables species to adapt to divergent environments is a fundamental question in ecology and evolution. We investigated the genomic signatures of local adaptation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) along a natural salinity gradient, ranging from 35‰ in the North Sea to 7‰ within the Baltic Sea. By utilizing a 12 K SNPchip, we simultaneously assessed neutral and adaptive genetic divergence across the Atlantic cod genome. Combining outlier analyses with a landscape genomic approach, we identified a set of directionally selected loci that are strongly correlated with habitat differences in salinity, oxygen, and temperature. Our results show that discrete regions within the Atlantic cod genome are subject to directional selection and associated with adaptation to the local environmental conditions in the Baltic- and the North Sea, indicating divergence hitchhiking and the presence of genomic islands of divergence. We report a suite of outlier single nucleotide polymorphisms within or closely located to genes associated with osmoregulation, as well as genes known to play important roles in the hydration and development of oocytes. These genes are likely to have key functions within a general osmoregulatory framework and are important for the survival of eggs and larvae, contributing to the buildup of reproductive isolation between the low-salinity adapted Baltic cod and the adjacent cod populations. Hence, our data suggest that adaptive responses to the environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea may contribute to a strong and effective reproductive barrier, and that Baltic cod can be viewed as an example of ongoing speciation. PMID:25994933

  13. Genomic instability at the 13q31 locus and somatic mtDNA mutation in the D-loop site correlate with tumor aggressiveness in sporadic Brazilian breast cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Gilson Costa; de Souza Góes, Andréa Carla; de Vitto, Humberto; Moreira, Carla Cristina; Avvad, Elizabeth; Rumjanek, Franklin David; de Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitoria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genomic instability is a hallmark of malignant tissues. In this work, we aimed to characterize nuclear and mitochondrial instabilities by determining short tandem repeats and somatic mitochondrial mutations, respectively, in a cohort of Brazilian sporadic breast cancer cases. Furthermore, we performed an association analysis of the molecular findings and the clinical pathological data. METHODS: We analyzed 64 matched pairs of breast cancer and adjacent non-cancerous breast samples by genotyping 13 nuclear short tandem repeat loci (namely, D2S123, TPOX, D3S1358, D3S1611, FGA, D7S820, TH01, D13S317, D13S790, D16S539, D17S796, intron 12 BRCA1 and intron 1 TP53) that were amplified with the fluorescent AmpFlSTR Identifiler Genotyping system (Applied Biosystems, USA) and by silver nitrate staining following 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Somatic mtDNA mutations in the D-loop site were assessed with direct sequencing of the hypervariable HVI and HVII mitochondrial regions. RESULTS: Half of the cancer tissues presented some nuclear instability. Interestingly, the D13S790 locus was the most frequently affected (36%), while the D2S123 locus presented no alterations. Forty-two percent of the cases showed somatic mitochondrial mutations, the majority at region 303-315 poly-C. We identified associations between Elston grade III, instabilities at 13q31 region (p = 0.0264) and mtDNA mutations (p = 0.0041). Furthermore, instabilities at 13q31 region were also associated with TP53 mutations in the invasive ductal carcinoma cases (p = 0.0207). CONCLUSION: Instabilities at 13q31 region and the presence of somatic mtDNA mutations in a D-loop site correlated with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:23070345

  14. Multi-Layered Cancer Chromosomal Instability Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Roschke, Anna V.; Rozenblum, Ester

    2013-01-01

    Whole-chromosomal instability (W-CIN) – unequal chromosome distribution during cell division – is a characteristic feature of a majority of cancer cells distinguishing them from their normal counterparts. The precise molecular mechanisms that may cause mis-segregation of chromosomes in tumor cells just recently became more evident. The consequences of W-CIN are numerous and play a critical role in carcinogenesis. W-CIN mediates evolution of cancer cell population under selective pressure and can facilitate the accumulation of genetic changes that promote malignancy. It has both tumor-promoting and tumor-suppressive effects, and their balance could be beneficial or detrimental for carcinogenesis. The characterization of W-CIN as a complex multi-layered adaptive phenotype highlights the intra- and extracellular adaptations to the consequences of genome reshuffling. It also provides a framework for targeting aggressive chromosomally unstable cancers. PMID:24377086

  15. De novo methylation, long-term promoter silencing, methylation patterns in the human genome, and consequences of foreign DNA insertion.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, W

    2006-01-01

    This chapter presents a personal account of the work on DNA methylation in viral and mammalian systems performed in the author's laboratory in the course of the past 30 years. The text does not attempt to give a complete and meticulous account of the work accomplished in many other laboratories; in that sense it is not a review of the field in a conventional sense. Since the author is also one of the editors of this series of Current Topics in Immunology and Microbiology on DNA methylation, to which contributions by many of our colleagues in this field have been invited, the author's conscience is alleviated that he has not cited many of the relevant and excellent reports by others. The choice of viral model systems in molecular biology is well founded. Over many decades, viruses have proved their invaluable and pioneering role as tools in molecular genetics. When our interest turned to the demonstration of genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation, we focused mainly on the human genome. The following topics in DNA methylation will be treated in detail: (1) The de novo methylation of integrated foreign genomes; (2) the long-term gene silencing effect of sequence-specific promoter methylation and its reversal; (3) the properties and specificity of patterns of DNA methylation in the human genome and their possible relations to pathogenesis; (4) the long-range global effects on cellular DNA methylation and transcriptional profiles as a consequence of foreign DNA insertion into an established genome; (5) the patterns of DNA methylation can be considered part of a cellular defense mechanism against foreign or repetitive DNA; which role has food-ingested DNA played in the elaboration of this mechanism? The interest in problems related to DNA methylation has spread-like the mechanism itself-into many neighboring fields. The nature of the transcriptional programs orchestrating embryonal and fetal development, chromatin structure, genetic imprinting, genetic disease, X

  16. Distribution, silencing potential and evolutionary impact of promoter DNA methylation in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Hellmann, Ines; Stadler, Michael B; Ramos, Liliana; Pääbo, Svante; Rebhan, Michael; Schübeler, Dirk

    2007-04-01

    To gain insight into the function of DNA methylation at cis-regulatory regions and its impact on gene expression, we measured methylation, RNA polymerase occupancy and histone modifications at 16,000 promoters in primary human somatic and germline cells. We find CpG-poor promoters hypermethylated in somatic cells, which does not preclude their activity. This methylation is present in male gametes and results in evolutionary loss of CpG dinucleotides, as measured by divergence between humans and primates. In contrast, strong CpG island promoters are mostly unmethylated, even when inactive. Weak CpG island promoters are distinct, as they are preferential targets for de novo methylation in somatic cells. Notably, most germline-specific genes are methylated in somatic cells, suggesting additional functional selection. These results show that promoter sequence and gene function are major predictors of promoter methylation states. Moreover, we observe that inactive unmethylated CpG island promoters show elevated levels of dimethylation of Lys4 of histone H3, suggesting that this chromatin mark may protect DNA from methylation. PMID:17334365

  17. Characterization of new RNA polymerase III and RNA polymerase II transcriptional promoters in the Bovine Leukemia Virus genome.

    PubMed

    Van Driessche, Benoit; Rodari, Anthony; Delacourt, Nadège; Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Vanhulle, Caroline; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus latency is a viral strategy used to escape from the host immune system and contribute to tumor development. However, a highly expressed BLV micro-RNA cluster has been reported, suggesting that the BLV silencing is not complete. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo recruitment of RNA polymerase III to the BLV miRNA cluster both in BLV-latently infected cell lines and in ovine BLV-infected primary cells, through a canonical type 2 RNAPIII promoter. Moreover, by RPC6-knockdown, we showed a direct functional link between RNAPIII transcription and BLV miRNAs expression. Furthermore, both the tumor- and the quiescent-related isoforms of RPC7 subunits were recruited to the miRNA cluster. We showed that the BLV miRNA cluster was enriched in positive epigenetic marks. Interestingly, we demonstrated the in vivo recruitment of RNAPII at the 3'LTR/host genomic junction, associated with positive epigenetic marks. Functionally, we showed that the BLV LTR exhibited a strong antisense promoter activity and identified cis-acting elements of an RNAPII-dependent promoter. Finally, we provided evidence for an in vivo collision between RNAPIII and RNAPII convergent transcriptions. Our results provide new insights into alternative ways used by BLV to counteract silencing of the viral 5'LTR promoter. PMID:27545598

  18. Characterization of new RNA polymerase III and RNA polymerase II transcriptional promoters in the Bovine Leukemia Virus genome

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, Benoit; Rodari, Anthony; Delacourt, Nadège; Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Vanhulle, Caroline; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2016-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus latency is a viral strategy used to escape from the host immune system and contribute to tumor development. However, a highly expressed BLV micro-RNA cluster has been reported, suggesting that the BLV silencing is not complete. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo recruitment of RNA polymerase III to the BLV miRNA cluster both in BLV-latently infected cell lines and in ovine BLV-infected primary cells, through a canonical type 2 RNAPIII promoter. Moreover, by RPC6-knockdown, we showed a direct functional link between RNAPIII transcription and BLV miRNAs expression. Furthermore, both the tumor- and the quiescent-related isoforms of RPC7 subunits were recruited to the miRNA cluster. We showed that the BLV miRNA cluster was enriched in positive epigenetic marks. Interestingly, we demonstrated the in vivo recruitment of RNAPII at the 3′LTR/host genomic junction, associated with positive epigenetic marks. Functionally, we showed that the BLV LTR exhibited a strong antisense promoter activity and identified cis-acting elements of an RNAPII-dependent promoter. Finally, we provided evidence for an in vivo collision between RNAPIII and RNAPII convergent transcriptions. Our results provide new insights into alternative ways used by BLV to counteract silencing of the viral 5′LTR promoter. PMID:27545598

  19. Genomic analyses of metal resistance genes in three plant growth promoting bacteria of legume plants in Northwest mine tailings, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin; Hao, Xiuli; Herzberg, Martin; Luo, Yantao; Nies, Dietrich H; Wei, Gehong

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the diversity of metal resistance genetic determinant from microbes that survived at metal tailings in northwest of China, a highly elevated level of heavy metal containing region, genomic analyses was conducted using genome sequence of three native metal-resistant plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB). It shows that: Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 contains metal transporters from P-type ATPase, CDF (Cation Diffusion Facilitator), HupE/UreJ and CHR (chromate ion transporter) family involved in copper, zinc, nickel as well as chromate resistance and homeostasis. Meanwhile, the putative CopA/CueO system is expected to mediate copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 while ZntA transporter, assisted with putative CzcD, determines zinc tolerance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens CCNWGS0286. The greenhouse experiment provides the consistent evidence of the plant growth promoting effects of these microbes on their hosts by nitrogen fixation and/or indoleacetic acid (IAA) secretion, indicating a potential in-site phytoremediation usage in the mining tailing regions of China.

  20. Introgressive hybridization as a promoter of genome reshuffling in natural homoploid fish hybrids (Cyprinidae, Leuciscinae).

    PubMed

    Pereira, C S A; Aboim, M A; Ráb, P; Collares-Pereira, M J

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying diversification and speciation by introgressive hybridization is currently one of the major challenges in evolutionary biology. Here, the analysis of hybridization between two pairs of Iberian Leuciscinae provided new data on independent hybrid zones involving Achondrostoma oligolepis (AOL) and Pseudochondrostoma duriense (PDU), and confirmed the occurrence of hybrids between AOL and Pseudochondrostoma polylepis (PPO). A multilevel survey combining morphological, genetic and cytogenomic markers on a vast population screening successfully sorted the selected fishes as admixed. Results were similar in both AOL × PDU and AOL × PPO systems. Overall, hybrid morphotypes, cytogenomic data and genetic profiling indicated preferential backcrossing and suggested AOL as a major genomic contributor. Moreover, results implied AOL as more permissive to introgression than PDU or PPO. Although PDU- and PPO-like individuals appeared more resilient to genome modifications, AOL appeared to be more involved and affected by the ongoing hybridization events, as chromosomal translocations were only found in AOL-like individuals. All hybrids analysed evidenced extensive ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphism that was not found in parental species, but usually seen falling within the range of possible parental combinations. Yet, transgressive phenotypes that cannot be explained by normal recombination, including more rDNA clusters than expected or the occurrence of syntenic rDNAs, were also detected. Present results proved rapid genomic evolution providing the genetic novelty for species to persist. In addition, although the ultimate consequences of such apparently extensive and recurrent events remain unknown, modern genome-wide methodologies are of great promise towards answering questions concerning the causes, dynamics and impacts of hybridization.

  1. Non-genomic estrogen/estrogen receptor α promotes cellular malignancy of immature ovarian teratoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chun; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Ying-Yi; Wu, Ling-Yu; Chung, Wei-Min; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chen, Liang-Chi; Ma, Wen-Lung

    2014-06-01

    Malignant immature ovarian teratomas (IOTs) most often occur in women of reproductive age. It is unclear, however, what roles estrogenic signaling plays in the development of IOT. In this study, we examined whether estrogen receptors (ERα and β) promote the cellular malignancy of IOT. Estradiol (E2), PPT (propylpyrazole), and DPN (diarylpropionitrile) (ERα- and β-specific agonists, respectively), as well as ERα- or ERβ-specific short hairpin (sh)RNA were applied to PA-1 cells, a well-characterized IOT cell line. Cellular tumorigenic characteristics, for example, cell migration/invasion, expression of the cancer stem/progenitor cell marker CD133, and evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were examined. In PA-1 cells that expressed ERα and ERβ, we found that ERα promoted cell migration and invasion. We also found that E2/ERα signaling altered cell behavior through non-classical transactivation function. Our data show non-genomic E2/ERα activations of focal adhesion kinase-Ras homolog gene family member A (FAK-RhoA) and ERK governed cell mobility capacity. Moreover, E2/ERα signaling induces EMT and overexpression of CD133 through upregulation micro-RNA 21 (miR21; IOT stem/progenitor promoter), and ERK phosphorylations. Furthermore, E2/ERα signaling triggers a positive feedback regulatory loop within miR21 and ERK. At last, expression levels of ERα, CD133, and EMT markers in IOT tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that cytosolic ERα was co-expressed with CD133 and mesenchymal cell markers but not epithelial cell markers. In conclusion, estrogenic signals exert malignant transformation capacity of cancer cells, exclusively through non-genomic regulation in female germ cell tumors.

  2. Characterization of promoter region and genomic structure of the murine and human genes encoding Src like adapter protein.

    PubMed

    Kratchmarova, I; Sosinowski, T; Weiss, A; Witter, K; Vincenz, C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-10

    Src-like adapter protein (SLAP) was identified as a signaling molecule in a yeast two-hybrid system using the cytoplasmic domain of EphA2, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase (Pandey et al., 1995. Characterization of a novel Src-like adapter protein that associates with the Eck receptor tyrosine kinase. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19201-19204). It is very similar to members of the Src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in that it contains very homologous SH3 and SH2 domains (Abram and Courtneidge, 2000. Src family tyrosine kinases and growth factor signaling. Exp. Cell. Res. 254, 1-13.). However, instead of a kinase domain at the C-terminus, it contains a unique C-terminal region. In order to exclude the possibility that an alternative form exists, we have isolated genomic clones containing the murine Slap gene as well as the human SLA gene. The coding regions of murine Slap and human SLA genes contain seven exons and six introns. Absence of any kinase domain in the genomic region confirm its designation as an adapter protein. Additionally, we have cloned and sequenced approximately 2.6 kb of the region 5' to the initiator methionine of the murine Slap gene. When subcloned upstream of a luciferase gene, this fragment increased the transcriptional activity about 6-fold in a human Jurkat T cell line and approximately 52-fold in a murine T cell line indicating that this region contains promoter elements that dictate SLAP expression. We have also cloned the promoter region of the human SLA gene. Since SLAP is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid and by activation of B cells, the cloning of its promoter region will permit a detailed analysis of the elements required for its transcriptional regulation.

  3. Non-genomic estrogen/estrogen receptor α promotes cellular malignancy of immature ovarian teratoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chun; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Ying-Yi; Wu, Ling-Yu; Chung, Wei-Min; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chen, Liang-Chi; Ma, Wen-Lung

    2014-06-01

    Malignant immature ovarian teratomas (IOTs) most often occur in women of reproductive age. It is unclear, however, what roles estrogenic signaling plays in the development of IOT. In this study, we examined whether estrogen receptors (ERα and β) promote the cellular malignancy of IOT. Estradiol (E2), PPT (propylpyrazole), and DPN (diarylpropionitrile) (ERα- and β-specific agonists, respectively), as well as ERα- or ERβ-specific short hairpin (sh)RNA were applied to PA-1 cells, a well-characterized IOT cell line. Cellular tumorigenic characteristics, for example, cell migration/invasion, expression of the cancer stem/progenitor cell marker CD133, and evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were examined. In PA-1 cells that expressed ERα and ERβ, we found that ERα promoted cell migration and invasion. We also found that E2/ERα signaling altered cell behavior through non-classical transactivation function. Our data show non-genomic E2/ERα activations of focal adhesion kinase-Ras homolog gene family member A (FAK-RhoA) and ERK governed cell mobility capacity. Moreover, E2/ERα signaling induces EMT and overexpression of CD133 through upregulation micro-RNA 21 (miR21; IOT stem/progenitor promoter), and ERK phosphorylations. Furthermore, E2/ERα signaling triggers a positive feedback regulatory loop within miR21 and ERK. At last, expression levels of ERα, CD133, and EMT markers in IOT tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that cytosolic ERα was co-expressed with CD133 and mesenchymal cell markers but not epithelial cell markers. In conclusion, estrogenic signals exert malignant transformation capacity of cancer cells, exclusively through non-genomic regulation in female germ cell tumors. PMID:24142535

  4. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  5. First high quality draft genome sequence of a plant growth promoting and cold active enzyme producing psychrotrophic Arthrobacter agilis strain L77.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ram N; Gaba, Sonam; Yadav, Ajar N; Gaur, Prakhar; Gulati, Sneha; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    Arthrobacter agilis strain L77, is a plant growth promoting and cold active hydrolytic enzymes producing psychrotrophic bacterium, isolated from Pangong Lake, a subglacial lake in north western Himalayas, India. Genome analysis revealed metabolic versatility with genes involved in metabolism and cold shock adaptation, utilization and biosynthesis of diverse structural and storage polysaccharides such as plant based carbon polymers. The genome of Arthrobacter agilis strain L77 consists of 3,608,439 bp (3.60 Mb) of a circular chromosome. The genome comprises of 3316 protein coding genes and 74 RNA genes, 725 hypothetical proteins, 25 pseudo-genes and 1404 unique genes. PMID:27570579

  6. Caloric restriction promotes genomic stability by induction of base excision repair and reversal of its age-related decline.

    PubMed

    Cabelof, Diane C; Yanamadala, Sunitha; Raffoul, Julian J; Guo, ZhongMao; Soofi, Abdulsalam; Heydari, Ahmad R

    2003-03-01

    Caloric restriction is a potent experimental manipulation that extends mean and maximum life span and delays the onset and progression of tumors in laboratory rodents. While caloric restriction (CR) clearly protects the genome from deleterious damage, the mechanism by which genomic stability is achieved remains unclear. We provide evidence that CR promotes genomic stability by increasing DNA repair capacity, specifically base excision repair (BER). CR completely reverses the age-related decline in BER capacity (P<0.01) in all tissues tested (brain, liver, spleen and testes) providing aged, CR animals with the BER phenotype of young, ad libitum-fed animals. This CR-induced reversal of the aged BER phenotype is accompanied by a reversal in the age-related decline in DNA polymerase beta (beta-pol), a rate-limiting enzyme in the BER pathway. CR significantly reversed the age-related loss of beta-pol protein levels (P<0.01), mRNA levels (P<0.01) and enzyme activity (P<0.01) in all tissues tested. Additionally, in young (4-6-month-old) CR animals a significant up-regulation in BER capacity, beta-pol protein and beta-pol mRNA is observed (P<0.01), demonstrating an early effect of CR that may provide insight in distinguishing the anti-tumor from the anti-aging effects of CR. This up-regulation in BER by caloric restriction in young animals corresponds to increased protection from carcinogen exposure, as mutation frequency is significantly reduced in CR animals exposed to either DMS or 2-nitropropane (2-NP) (P<0.01). Overall the data suggest an important biological consequence of moderate BER up-regulation and provides support for the hormesis theory of caloric restriction.

  7. Inhibition of LSD1 reduces herpesvirus infection, shedding, and recurrence by promoting epigenetic suppression of viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hill, James M.; Quenelle, Debra C.; Cardin, Rhonda D.; Vogel, Jodi L.; Clement, Christian; Bravo, Fernando J.; Foster, Timothy P.; Bosch-Marce, Marta; Raja, Priya; Lee, Jennifer S.; Bernstein, David I.; Krause, Philip R.; Knipe, David M.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of Herpesviruses in the population and the maintenance of lifelong latent reservoirs are challenges to the control of herpetic diseases, despite the availability of antiviral pharmaceuticals that target viral DNA replication. In addition to oral and genital lesions, herpes simplex virus infections and recurrent reactivations from the latent pool can result in severe pathology including neonatal infection and mortality, blindness due to ocular keratitis, and viral-induced complications in immunosuppressed individuals. Herpesviruses, like their cellular hosts, are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin and chromatin modulation machinery that promotes or suppresses gene expression. The initiation of herpes simplex virus infection and reactivation from latency is dependent on a transcriptional coactivator complex that contains two required histone demethylases, LSD1 and JMJD2s. Inhibition of either of these enzymes results in heterochromatic suppression of the viral genome and a block to infection and reactivation in vitro. Here, the concept of epigenetic suppression of viral infection is demonstrated in three animal models of herpes simplex virus infection and disease. Inhibition of LSD1 via treatment of animals with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine results in suppression of viral lytic infection, subclinical shedding, and reactivation from latency in vivo. Phenotypic suppression is correlated with enhanced epigenetic suppression of the viral genome and suggests that, even during latency, the chromatin state of the virus is dynamic. Given the expanding development of epipharmaceuticals, this approach has substantial potential for anti-herpetic treatments with distinct advantages over the present pharmaceutical options. PMID:25473037

  8. Genome editing in butterflies reveals that spalt promotes and Distal-less represses eyespot colour patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Reed, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly eyespot colour patterns are a key example of how a novel trait can appear in association with the co-option of developmental patterning genes. Little is known, however, about how, or even whether, co-opted genes function in eyespot development. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to determine the roles of two co-opted transcription factors that are expressed during early eyespot determination. We found that deletions in a single gene, spalt, are sufficient to reduce or completely delete eyespot colour patterns, thus demonstrating a positive regulatory role for this gene in eyespot determination. Conversely, and contrary to previous predictions, deletions in Distal-less (Dll) result in an increase in the size and number of eyespots, illustrating a repressive role for this gene in eyespot development. Altogether our results show that the presence, absence and shape of butterfly eyespots can be controlled by the activity of two co-opted transcription factors. PMID:27302525

  9. Genome editing in butterflies reveals that spalt promotes and Distal-less represses eyespot colour patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Reed, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Butterfly eyespot colour patterns are a key example of how a novel trait can appear in association with the co-option of developmental patterning genes. Little is known, however, about how, or even whether, co-opted genes function in eyespot development. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to determine the roles of two co-opted transcription factors that are expressed during early eyespot determination. We found that deletions in a single gene, spalt, are sufficient to reduce or completely delete eyespot colour patterns, thus demonstrating a positive regulatory role for this gene in eyespot determination. Conversely, and contrary to previous predictions, deletions in Distal-less (Dll) result in an increase in the size and number of eyespots, illustrating a repressive role for this gene in eyespot development. Altogether our results show that the presence, absence and shape of butterfly eyespots can be controlled by the activity of two co-opted transcription factors. PMID:27302525

  10. Characterization of x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin promoters (x-HGP) from different genomes in Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian-Tao; Zhao, Quan-Zhi; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Wang, Chang-Shui; Zhao, Shan; Cao, Xue; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yu-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The sequences of x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin promoter (x-HGP) from 21 diploid Triticeae species were cloned and sequenced. The lengths of x-HGP varied from 897 to 955 bp, and there are 329 variable sites including 105 singleton sites and 224 polymorphic sites. Genetic distances of pairwise X-HGP sequences ranged from 0.30 to 16.40% within 21 species and four outgroup species of Hordeum. All five recognized regulatory elements emerged and showed higher conservation in the x-HGP of 21 Triticeae species. Most variations were distributed in the regions among or between regulatory elements. A 22 bp and 50 bp insertions which were the copy of adjacent region with minor change, were found in the x-HGP of Ae. speltoides and Ps. Huashanica, and could be regarded as genome specific indels. The phylogeny of media-joining network and neighbour-joining tree both supported the topology were composed of three sperate clusters. Especially, the cluster I comprising the x-HGP sequences of Aegilops, Triticum, Henrardia, Agropyron and Taeniatherum was highly supporting by both network and NJ tree. As conferring to higher level and temporal and spatial expression, x-HGP can used as the source of promoter for constructing transgenic plants which allow endosperm-specific expression of exogenous gene on higher level. In addition, the x-HGP has enough conservation and variation; so it should be valuable in phylogenetic analyses of Triticeae family members.

  11. Characterization of x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin promoters (x-HGP) from different genomes in Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian-Tao; Zhao, Quan-Zhi; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Wang, Chang-Shui; Zhao, Shan; Cao, Xue; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yu-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The sequences of x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin promoter (x-HGP) from 21 diploid Triticeae species were cloned and sequenced. The lengths of x-HGP varied from 897 to 955 bp, and there are 329 variable sites including 105 singleton sites and 224 polymorphic sites. Genetic distances of pairwise X-HGP sequences ranged from 0.30 to 16.40% within 21 species and four outgroup species of Hordeum. All five recognized regulatory elements emerged and showed higher conservation in the x-HGP of 21 Triticeae species. Most variations were distributed in the regions among or between regulatory elements. A 22 bp and 50 bp insertions which were the copy of adjacent region with minor change, were found in the x-HGP of Ae. speltoides and Ps. Huashanica, and could be regarded as genome specific indels. The phylogeny of media-joining network and neighbour-joining tree both supported the topology were composed of three sperate clusters. Especially, the cluster I comprising the x-HGP sequences of Aegilops, Triticum, Henrardia, Agropyron and Taeniatherum was highly supporting by both network and NJ tree. As conferring to higher level and temporal and spatial expression, x-HGP can used as the source of promoter for constructing transgenic plants which allow endosperm-specific expression of exogenous gene on higher level. In addition, the x-HGP has enough conservation and variation; so it should be valuable in phylogenetic analyses of Triticeae family members. PMID:23687628

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus LCR12, a Plant Growth–Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from a Heavy Metal–Contaminated Environment

    PubMed Central

    Egidi, Eleonora; Wood, Jennifer L.; Mathews, Elizabeth; Fox, Edward; Liu, Wuxing

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus LCR12 is a plant growth–promoting rhizobacterium, isolated from a heavy metal–contaminated environment. The 6.01-Mb annotated genome sequence provides the genetic basis for revealing its potential application to remediate contaminated soils in association with plants. PMID:27688340

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus LCR12, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from a Heavy Metal-Contaminated Environment.

    PubMed

    Egidi, Eleonora; Wood, Jennifer L; Mathews, Elizabeth; Fox, Edward; Liu, Wuxing; Franks, Ashley E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus LCR12 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, isolated from a heavy metal-contaminated environment. The 6.01-Mb annotated genome sequence provides the genetic basis for revealing its potential application to remediate contaminated soils in association with plants. PMID:27688340

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Cupriavidus gilardii Strain JZ4 Isolated from the Desert Plant Tribulus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Lafi, Feras F.; Bokhari, Ameerah; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2016-01-01

    We isolated the plant endophytic bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain JZ4 from the roots of the desert plant Tribulus terrestris, collected from the Jizan region, Saudi Arabia. We report here the draft genome sequence of JZ4, together with several enzymes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environmental adaption, and antifungal activity. PMID:27469951

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains SF39a and SF4c, Potential Plant Growth Promotion and Biocontrol Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Lindsey K.; Underwood, Grace E.; McCully, Lucy M.; Bitzer, Adam S.; Godino, Agustina; Bucci, Vanni; Brigham, Christopher J.; Príncipe, Analía; Fischer, Sonia E.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens SF4c and SF39a, strains isolated from wheat rhizosphere, have potential applications in plant growth promotion and biocontrol of fungal diseases of crop plants. We report the draft genome sequences of SF4c and SF39a with estimated sizes of 6.5 Mb and 5.9 Mb, respectively. PMID:25814613

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus LCR12, a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Isolated from a Heavy Metal-Contaminated Environment.

    PubMed

    Egidi, Eleonora; Wood, Jennifer L; Mathews, Elizabeth; Fox, Edward; Liu, Wuxing; Franks, Ashley E

    2016-09-29

    Bacillus cereus LCR12 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, isolated from a heavy metal-contaminated environment. The 6.01-Mb annotated genome sequence provides the genetic basis for revealing its potential application to remediate contaminated soils in association with plants.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Pantoea ananatis GB1, a Plant-Growth-Promoting Hydrocarbonoclastic Root Endophyte, Isolated at a Diesel Fuel Phytoremediation Site Planted with Populus

    PubMed Central

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Van Hamme, Jonathan D.; Bottos, Eric M.; Thijs, Sofie; Balseiro-Romero, Maria; Monterroso, Carmela; Kidd, Petra Suzan; Rineau, Francois; Weyens, Nele

    2016-01-01

    We report the 4.76-Mb draft genome of Pantoea ananatis GB1, a Gram-negative bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae, isolated from the roots of poplars planted for phytoremediation of a diesel-contaminated plume at the Ford Motor Company site in Genk, Belgium. Strain GB1 promotes plant growth in various hosts and metabolizes hydrocarbons. PMID:26950324

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains SF39a and SF4c, Potential Plant Growth Promotion and Biocontrol Agents.

    PubMed

    Ly, Lindsey K; Underwood, Grace E; McCully, Lucy M; Bitzer, Adam S; Godino, Agustina; Bucci, Vanni; Brigham, Christopher J; Príncipe, Analía; Fischer, Sonia E; Silby, Mark W

    2015-03-26

    Pseudomonas fluorescens SF4c and SF39a, strains isolated from wheat rhizosphere, have potential applications in plant growth promotion and biocontrol of fungal diseases of crop plants. We report the draft genome sequences of SF4c and SF39a with estimated sizes of 6.5 Mb and 5.9 Mb, respectively.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Cupriavidus gilardii Strain JZ4 Isolated from the Desert Plant Tribulus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Lafi, Feras F; Bokhari, Ameerah; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B; Hirt, Heribert; Saad, Maged M

    2016-01-01

    We isolated the plant endophytic bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain JZ4 from the roots of the desert plant Tribulus terrestris, collected from the Jizan region, Saudi Arabia. We report here the draft genome sequence of JZ4, together with several enzymes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environmental adaption, and antifungal activity. PMID:27469951

  20. Interplay Between the Cancer Genome and Epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Laird, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer arises as a consequence of cumulative disruptions to cellular growth control, with Darwinian selection for those heritable changes which provide the greatest clonal advantage. These traits can be acquired and stably maintained by either genetic or epigenetic means. Here we explore the ways in which alterations in the genome and epigenome influence each other and cooperate to promote oncogenic transformation. Disruption of epigenomic control is pervasive in malignancy, and can be classified as an enabling characteristic of cancer cells, akin to genome instability and mutation. PMID:23540689

  1. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; White, James P.; Diamond, Michael S.; Weaver, Scott C.; Frolova, Elena I.; Frolov, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5’UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5’UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5’end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5’UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates. PMID:25927359

  2. Inducible HGF-secreting Human Umbilical Cord Blood-derived MSCs Produced via TALEN-mediated Genome Editing Promoted Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Min; Yum, Soo-Young; Choi, Young-Jin; Son, YeonSung; Lee, DaBin; Kang, InSung; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Jang, Goo; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote therapeutic angiogenesis to cure serious vascular disorders. However, their survival period and cytokine-secretory capacity are limited. Although hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) can accelerate the rate of angiogenesis, recombinant HGF is limited because of its very short half-life (<3-5 minutes). Thus, continuous treatment with HGF is required to obtain an effective therapeutic response. To overcome these limitations, we produced genome-edited MSCs that secreted HGF upon drug-specific induction. The inducible HGF expression cassette was integrated into a safe harbor site in an MSC chromosome using the TALEN system, resulting in the production of TetOn-HGF/human umbilical cord blood-derived (hUCB)-MSCs. Functional assessment of the TetOn-HGF/hUCB-MSCs showed that they had enhanced mobility upon the induction of HGF expression. Moreover, long-term exposure by doxycycline (Dox)-treated TetOn-HGF/hUCB-MSCs enhanced the anti-apoptotic responses of genome-edited MSCs subjected to oxidative stress and improved the tube-formation ability. Furthermore, TetOn-HGF/hUCB-MSCs encapsulated by arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD)-alginate microgel induced to express HGF improved in vivo angiogenesis in a mouse hindlimb ischemia model. This study showed that the inducible HGF-expressing hUCB-MSCs are competent to continuously express and secrete HGF in a controlled manner. Thus, the MSCs that express HGF in an inducible manner are a useful therapeutic modality for the treatment of vascular diseases requiring angiogenesis.

  3. Genomic interplay in bacterial communities: implications for growth promoting practices in animal husbandry

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; McKinnon, Jessica; Wyrsch, Ethan; Hammond, Jeffrey M.; Charles, Ian G.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics heralded the start of a “Golden Age” in the history of medicine. Over the years, the use of antibiotics extended beyond medical practice into animal husbandry, aquaculture and agriculture. Now, however, we face the worldwide threat of diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to all existing major classes of antibiotic, reflecting the possibility of an end to the antibiotic era. The seriousness of the threat is underscored by the severely limited production of new classes of antibiotics. Evolution of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics results from the inherent genetic capability that bacteria have to adapt rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Consequently, under antibiotic selection pressures, bacteria have acquired resistance to all classes of antibiotics, sometimes very shortly after their introduction. Arguably, the evolution and rapid dissemination of multiple drug resistant genes en-masse across microbial pathogens is one of the most serious threats to human health. In this context, effective surveillance strategies to track the development of resistance to multiple antibiotics are vital to managing global infection control. These surveillance strategies are necessary for not only human health but also for animal health, aquaculture and plant production. Shortfalls in the present surveillance strategies need to be identified. Raising awareness of the genetic events that promote co-selection of resistance to multiple antimicrobials is an important prerequisite to the design and implementation of molecular surveillance strategies. In this review we will discuss how lateral gene transfer (LGT), driven by the use of low-dose antibiotics in animal husbandry, has likely played a significant role in the evolution of multiple drug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative bacteria and has complicated molecular surveillance strategies adopted for predicting imminent resistance threats. PMID:25161648

  4. Filia is an ESC-specific regulator of DNA damage response and safeguards genomic stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Wei-dao; Duan, Ying-liang; Lu, Yong-qing; Cun, Yi-xian; Li, Chao-hui; Guo, Kun; Nie, Wen-hui; Li, Lei; Zhang, Rugang; Zheng, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in cell-based therapy, but the genomic instability seen in culture hampers full application. Greater understanding of the factors that regulate genomic stability in PSCs could help address this issue. Here we describe the identification of Filia as a specific regulator of genomic stability in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Filia expression is induced by genotoxic stress. Filia promotes centrosome integrity and regulates DNA damage response (DDR) through multiple pathways, including DDR signaling, cell cycle checkpoints and damage repair, ESC differentiation and apoptosis. Filia depletion causes ESC genomic instability, induces resistance to apoptosis and promotes malignant transformation. As part of its role in the DDR, Filia interacts with PARP1 and stimulates its enzymatic activity. Filia also constitutively resides on centrosomes and translocates to DNA damage sites and mitochondria, consistent with its multifaceted roles in regulating centrosome integrity, damage repair and apoptosis. PMID:25936915

  5. Loss of HLTF function promotes intestinal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HLTF (Helicase-like Transcription Factor) is a DNA helicase protein homologous to the SWI/SNF family involved in the maintenance of genomic stability and the regulation of gene expression. HLTF has also been found to be frequently inactivated by promoter hypermethylation in human colon cancers. Whether this epigenetic event is required for intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Results To address the role of loss of HLTF function in the development of intestinal cancer, we generated Hltf deficient mice. These mutant mice showed normal development, and did not develop intestinal tumors, indicating that loss of Hltf function by itself is insufficient to induce the formation of intestinal cancer. On the Apcmin/+ mutant background, Hltf- deficiency was found to significantly increase the formation of intestinal adenocarcinoma and colon cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of colon tumor cells from Hltf -/-/Apcmin/+ mice revealed a high incidence of gross chromosomal instabilities, including Robertsonian fusions, chromosomal fragments and aneuploidy. None of these genetic alterations were observed in the colon tumor cells derived from Apcmin/+ mice. Increased tumor growth and genomic instability was also demonstrated in HCT116 human colon cancer cells in which HLTF expression was significantly decreased. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that loss of HLTF function promotes the malignant transformation of intestinal or colonic adenomas to carcinomas by inducing genomic instability. Our findings highly suggest that epigenetic inactivation of HLTF, as found in most human colon cancers, could play an important role in the progression of colon tumors to malignant cancer. PMID:22452792

  6. The effects of dietary supplementation of methionine on genomic stability and p53 gene promoter methylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cátia Lira Do; Bueno, Rafaela de Barros E Lima; Burim, Regislaine Valéria; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2011-05-18

    Methionine is a component of one-carbon metabolism and a precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor for DNA methylation. When methionine intake is high, an increase of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is expected. DNA methyltransferases convert SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). A high intracellular SAH concentration could inhibit the activity of DNA methyltransferases. Therefore, high methionine ingestion could induce DNA damage and change the methylation pattern of tumor suppressor genes. This study investigated the genotoxicity of a methionine-supplemented diet. It also investigated the diet's effects on glutathione levels, SAM and SAH concentrations and the gene methylation pattern of p53. Wistar rats received either a methionine-supplemented diet (2% methionine) or a control diet (0.3% methionine) for six weeks. The methionine-supplemented diet was neither genotoxic nor antigenotoxic to kidney cells, as assessed by the comet assay. However, the methionine-supplemented diet restored the renal glutathione depletion induced by doxorubicin. This fact may be explained by the transsulfuration pathway, which converts methionine to glutathione in the kidney. Methionine supplementation increased the renal concentration of SAH without changing the SAM/SAH ratio. This unchanged profile was also observed for DNA methylation at the promoter region of the p53 gene. Further studies are necessary to elucidate this diet's effects on genomic stability and DNA methylation.

  7. [Carpal instability].

    PubMed

    Redeker, J; Vogt, P M

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability can be understood as a disturbed anatomical alignment between bones articulating in the carpus. This disturbed balance occurs either only dynamically (with movement) under the effect of physiological force or even statically at rest. The most common cause of carpal instability is wrist trauma with rupture of the stabilizing ligaments and adaptive misalignment following fractures of the radius or carpus. Carpal collapse plays a special role in this mechanism due to non-healed fracture of the scaphoid bone. In addition degenerative inflammatory alterations, such as chondrocalcinosis or gout, more rarely aseptic bone necrosis of the lunate or scaphoid bones or misalignment due to deposition (Madelung deformity) can lead to wrist instability. Under increased pressure the misaligned joint surfaces lead to bone arrosion with secondary arthritis of the wrist. In order to arrest or slow down this irreversible process, diagnosis must occur as early as possible. Many surgical methods have been thought out to regain stability ranging from direct reconstruction of the damaged ligaments, through ligament replacement to partial stiffening of the wrist joint.

  8. Development of a salicylic acid inducible minimal sub-genomic transcript promoter from Figwort mosaic virus with enhanced root- and leaf-activity using TGACG motif rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Patro, Sunita; Ghosh, Jayasish; Das, Abhimanyu; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-15

    In Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (F-Sgt), function of the TGACG-regulatory motif, was investigated in the background of artificially designed promoter sequences. The 131bp (FS, -100 to +31) long F-Sgt promoter sequence containing one TGACG motif [FS-(TGACG)] was engineered to generate a set of three modified promoter constructs: [FS-(TGACG)(2), containing one additional TGACG motif at 7 nucleotides upstream of the original one], [FS-(TGACG)(3), containing two additional TGACG motifs at 7 nucleotides upstream and two nucleotides downstream of the original one] and [FS-(TGCTG)(mu), having a mutated TGACG motif]. EMSA and foot-printing analysis confirmed binding of tobacco nuclear factors with modified TGACG motif/s. The transcription-activation of the GUS gene by the TGACG motif/s in above promoter constructs was examined in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants and observed that the transcription activation was affected by the spacing/s and number/s of the TGACG motif/s. The FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter showed strongest root-activity compared to other modified and CaMV35S promoters. Also under salicylic acid (SA) stress, the leaf-activity of the said promoter was further enhanced. All above findings were confirmed by real-time and semi-qRT PCR analysis. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that the TGACG motif plays an important role in inducing the root-specific expression of the F-Sgt promoter. This study advocates the importance of genetic manipulation of functional cis-motif for amending the tissue specificity of a plant promoter. SA inducible FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter with enhanced activity could be a useful candidate promoter for developing plants with enhanced crop productivity.

  9. The Activity of Sendai Virus Genomic and Antigenomic Promoters Requires a Second Element Past the Leader Template Regions: a Motif (GNNNNN)3 Is Essential for Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tapparel, Caroline; Maurice, Diane; Roux, Laurent

    1998-01-01

    The paramyxovirus genome, a nonsegmented, negative-polarity, single-stranded RNA of ∼15 kb, contains six transcription units flanked at the 3′ and 5′ ends by a short (∼ 50- to 60-nucleotide) extracistronic sequence, dubbed the positive and negative leader regions. These leader template regions, present at the 3′ end of the genome and the antigenome, have been shown to contain essential signals governing RNA replication activity. Whether they are sufficient to promote replication is still open to question. By using a series of Sendai virus defective interfering RNAs carrying a nested set of deletions in the promoter regions, it is shown here that for both the genomic and antigenomic promoters, a 3′-end RNA sequence of 96 nucleotides is required to allow replication. Sequence comparison of active and inactive promoters led to the identification of a set of three nucleotide hexamers (nucleotides 79 to 84, 85 to 90, and 91 to 96) containing a repeated motif RXXYXX [shown as 5′-3′ positive-strand]. Sequential mutation of each hexamer into its complementary sequence confirmed their essential role. The three hexamers are required, and their relative positioning is important, since displacing them by 6 nucleotides destroyed promoter function. RNAs carrying degenerate nucleotides in the three hexamers were used as replication templates. They led to the selection of actively replicating RNA species exclusively carrying the basic motif (GNNNNN)3 from nucleotides 79 to 96. These results clearly show that, apart from the region from nucleotides 1 to 31, previously identified as governing Sendai virus replication activity, a second element, spanning at the most nucleotides 79 to 96, appears essential. Thus, the paramyxovirus replication promoters are not confined to the leader template regions, as seems to be the case for the rhabdoviruses. PMID:9525637

  10. TRIM21 Promotes cGAS and RIG-I Sensing of Viral Genomes during Infection by Antibody-Opsonized Virus

    PubMed Central

    Watkinson, Ruth E.; McEwan, William A.; Tam, Jerry C. H.; Vaysburd, Marina; James, Leo C.

    2015-01-01

    Encapsidation is a strategy almost universally employed by viruses to protect their genomes from degradation and from innate immune sensors. We show that TRIM21, which targets antibody-opsonized virions for proteasomal destruction, circumvents this protection, enabling the rapid detection and degradation of viral genomes before their replication. TRIM21 triggers an initial wave of cytokine transcription that is antibody, rather than pathogen, driven. This early response is augmented by a second transcriptional program, determined by the nature of the infecting virus. In this second response, TRIM21-induced exposure of the viral genome promotes sensing of DNA and RNA viruses by cGAS and RIG-I. This mechanism allows early detection of an infection event and drives an inflammatory response in mice within hours of viral challenge. PMID:26506431

  11. Prenatal stress-induced programming of genome-wide promoter DNA methylation in 5-HTT-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Schraut, K G; Jakob, S B; Weidner, M T; Schmitt, A G; Scholz, C J; Strekalova, T; El Hajj, N; Eijssen, L M T; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Haaf, T; Ortega, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Lesch, K P; Van den Hove, D L

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT/SLC6A4)-linked polymorphic region has been suggested to have a modulatory role in mediating effects of early-life stress exposure on psychopathology rendering carriers of the low-expression short (s)-variant more vulnerable to environmental adversity in later life. The underlying molecular mechanisms of this gene-by-environment interaction are not well understood, but epigenetic regulation including differential DNA methylation has been postulated to have a critical role. Recently, we used a maternal restraint stress paradigm of prenatal stress (PS) in 5-HTT-deficient mice and showed that the effects on behavior and gene expression were particularly marked in the hippocampus of female 5-Htt+/− offspring. Here, we examined to which extent these effects are mediated by differential methylation of DNA. For this purpose, we performed a genome-wide hippocampal DNA methylation screening using methylated-DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Promoter 1.0 R arrays. Using hippocampal DNA from the same mice as assessed before enabled us to correlate gene-specific DNA methylation, mRNA expression and behavior. We found that 5-Htt genotype, PS and their interaction differentially affected the DNA methylation signature of numerous genes, a subset of which showed overlap with the expression profiles of the corresponding transcripts. For example, a differentially methylated region in the gene encoding myelin basic protein (Mbp) was associated with its expression in a 5-Htt-, PS- and 5-Htt × PS-dependent manner. Subsequent fine-mapping of this Mbp locus linked the methylation status of two specific CpG sites to Mbp expression and anxiety-related behavior. In conclusion, hippocampal DNA methylation patterns and expression profiles of female prenatally stressed 5-Htt+/− mice suggest that distinct molecular mechanisms, some of which are promoter methylation-dependent, contribute to the behavioral effects of the 5-Htt

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas trivialis Strain IHBB745 with Multiple Plant Growth-Promoting Activities and Tolerance to Desiccation and Alkalinity

    PubMed Central

    Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Vyas, Pratibha; Rahi, Praveen; Thakur, Rishu; Thakur, Namika; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of 6.45 Mb is reported here for Pseudomonas trivialis strain IHBB745 (MTCC 5336), which is an efficient, stress-tolerant, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. The gene-coding clusters predicted the genes for phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production, and stress response. PMID:26337878

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas trivialis Strain IHBB745 with Multiple Plant Growth-Promoting Activities and Tolerance to Desiccation and Alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Arvind; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Vyas, Pratibha; Rahi, Praveen; Thakur, Rishu; Thakur, Namika; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of 6.45 Mb is reported here for Pseudomonas trivialis strain IHBB745 (MTCC 5336), which is an efficient, stress-tolerant, and broad-spectrum plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. The gene-coding clusters predicted the genes for phosphate solubilization, siderophore production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production, and stress response. PMID:26337878

  14. A Conserved DNA Repeat Promotes Selection of a Diverse Repertoire of Trypanosoma brucei Surface Antigens from the Genomic Archive

    PubMed Central

    Hovel-Miner, Galadriel; Mugnier, Monica R.; Goldwater, Benjamin; Cross, George A. M.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina

    2016-01-01

    African trypanosomes are mammalian pathogens that must regularly change their protein coat to survive in the host bloodstream. Chronic trypanosome infections are potentiated by their ability to access a deep genomic repertoire of Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) genes and switch from the expression of one VSG to another. Switching VSG expression is largely based in DNA recombination events that result in chromosome translocations between an acceptor site, which houses the actively transcribed VSG, and a donor gene, drawn from an archive of more than 2,000 silent VSGs. One element implicated in these duplicative gene conversion events is a DNA repeat of approximately 70 bp that is found in long regions within each BES and short iterations proximal to VSGs within the silent archive. Early observations showing that 70-bp repeats can be recombination boundaries during VSG switching led to the prediction that VSG-proximal 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology. Yet, this long held assumption had not been tested and no specific function for the conserved 70-bp repeats had been demonstrated. In the present study, the 70-bp repeats were genetically manipulated under conditions that induce gene conversion. In this manner, we demonstrated that 70-bp repeats promote access to archival VSGs. Synthetic repeat DNA sequences were then employed to identify the length, sequence, and directionality of repeat regions required for this activity. In addition, manipulation of the 70-bp repeats allowed us to observe a link between VSG switching and the cell cycle that had not been appreciated. Together these data provide definitive support for the long-standing hypothesis that 70-bp repeats provide recombinatorial homology during switching. Yet, the fact that silent archival VSGs are selected under these conditions suggests the 70-bp repeats also direct DNA pairing and recombination machinery away from the closest homologs (silent BESs) and toward the rest of the archive. PMID

  15. Chymotrypsin protease inhibitor gene family in rice: Genomic organization and evidence for the presence of a bidirectional promoter shared between two chymotrypsin protease inhibitor genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amanjot; Sahi, Chandan; Grover, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Protease inhibitors play important roles in stress and developmental responses of plants. Rice genome contains 17 putative members in chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (ranging in size from 7.21 to 11.9 kDa) gene family with different predicted localization sites. Full-length cDNA encoding for a putative subtilisin-chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (OCPI2) was obtained from Pusa basmati 1 (indica) rice seedlings. 620 bp-long OCPI2 cDNA contained 219 bp-long ORF, coding for 72 amino acid-long 7.7 kDa subtilisin-chymotrypsin protease inhibitor (CPI) cytoplasmic protein. Expression analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that OCPI2 transcript is induced by varied stresses including salt, ABA, low temperature and mechanical injury in both root and shoot tissues of the seedlings. Transgenic rice plants produced with OCPI2 promoter-gus reporter gene showed that this promoter directs high salt- and ABA-regulated expression of the GUS gene. Another CPI gene (OCPI1) upstream to OCPI2 (with 1126 bp distance between the transcription initiation sites of the two genes; transcription in the reverse orientation) was noted in genome sequence of rice genome. A vector that had GFP and GUS reporter genes in opposite orientations driven by 1881 bp intergenic sequence between the OCPI2 and OCPI1 (encompassing the region between the translation initiation sites of the two genes) was constructed and shot in onion epidermal cells by particle bombardment. Expression of both GFP and GUS from the same epidermal cell showed that this sequence represents a bidirectional promoter. Examples illustrating gene pairs showing co-expression of two divergent neighboring genes sharing a bidirectional promoter have recently been extensively worked out in yeast and human systems. We provide an example of a gene pair constituted of two homologous genes showing co-expression governed by a bidirectional promoter in rice. PMID:18952157

  16. Hepatitis B virus PreS2-mutant large surface antigen activates store-operated calcium entry and promotes chromosome instability

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Tim Ting-Chung; Yang, Anderson; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Li, Tian-Neng; Wang, Lyu-Han; Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Wang, Hui-Chen; Chen, Linyi; Wang, Wen-Ching; Huang, Wenya; Chang, Chien-Wen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Shen, Meng-Ru; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a driver of hepatocellular carcinoma, and two viral products, X and large surface antigen (LHBS), are viral oncoproteins. During chronic viral infection, immune-escape mutants on the preS2 region of LHBS (preS2-LHBS) are gain-of-function mutations that are linked to preneoplastic ground glass hepatocytes (GGHs) and early disease onset of hepatocellular carcinoma. Here, we show that preS2-LHBS provoked calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and triggered stored-operated calcium entry (SOCE). The activation of SOCE increased ER and plasma membrane (PM) connections, which was linked by ER- resident stromal interaction molecule-1 (STIM1) protein and PM-resident calcium release- activated calcium modulator 1 (Orai1). Persistent activation of SOCE induced centrosome overduplication, aberrant multipolar division, chromosome aneuploidy, anchorage-independent growth, and xenograft tumorigenesis in hepatocytes expressing preS2- LHBS. Chemical inhibitions of SOCE machinery and silencing of STIM1 significantly reduced centrosome numbers, multipolar division, and xenograft tumorigenesis induced by preS2-LHBS. These results provide the first mechanistic link between calcium homeostasis and chromosome instability in hepatocytes carrying preS2-LHBS. Therefore, persistent activation of SOCE represents a novel pathological mechanism in HBV-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:26992221

  17. Retrotransposons and their recognition of pol II promoters: a comprehensive survey of the transposable elements from the complete genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Nathan J; Jordan, I King; Epstein, Jonathan A; Wood, Valerie; Levin, Henry L

    2003-09-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the genome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides the opportunity to investigate the entire complement of transposable elements (TEs), their association with specific sequences, their chromosomal distribution, and their evolution. Using homology-based sequence identification, we found that the sequenced strain of S. pombe contained only one family of full-length transposons. This family, Tf2, consisted of 13 full-length copies of a long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon. We found that LTR-LTR recombination of previously existing transposons had resulted in extensive populations of solo LTRs. These included 35 solo LTRs of Tf2, as well as 139 solo LTRs from other Tf families. Phylogenetic analysis of solo Tf LTRs reveals that Tf1 and Tf2 were the most recently active elements within the genome. The solo LTRs also served as footprints for previous insertion events by the Tf retrotransposons. Analysis of 186 genomic insertion events revealed a close association with RNA polymerase II promoters. These insertions clustered in the promoter-proximal regions of genes, upstream of protein coding regions by 100 to 400 nucleotides. The association of Tf insertions with pol II promoters was very similar to the preference previously observed for Tf1 integration. We found that the recently active Tf elements were absent from centromeres and pericentromeric regions of the genome containing tandem tRNA gene clusters. In addition, our analysis revealed that chromosome III has twice the density of insertion events compared to the other two chromosomes. Finally we describe a novel repetitive sequence, wtf, which was also preferentially located on chromosome III, and was often located near solo LTRs of Tf elements. PMID:12952871

  18. Structural Variation Mutagenesis of the Human Genome: Impact on Disease and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Watson-Crick base-pair changes, or single-nucleotide variants (SNV), have long been known as a source of mutations. However, the extent to which DNA structural variation, including duplication and deletion copy number variants (CNV) and copy number neutral inversions and translocations, contribute to human genome variation and disease has been appreciated only recently. Moreover, the potential complexity of structural variants (SV) was not envisioned; thus, the frequency of complex genomic rearrangements (CGR) and how such events form remained a mystery. The concept of genomic disorders, diseases due to genomic rearrangements and not sequence-based changes for which genomic architecture incite genomic instability, delineated a new category of conditions distinct from chromosomal syndromes and single-gene Mendelian diseases. Nevertheless, it is the mechanistic understanding of CNV/SV formation that has promoted further understanding of human biology and disease and provided insights into human genome and gene evolution. PMID:25892534

  19. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  20. Genome Sequence of Microbacterium sp. Strain 3J1, a Highly Desiccation-Tolerant Bacterium That Promotes Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    García-Fontana, Cristina; Vílchez, Juan Ignacio; Narváez-Reinaldo, Juan Jesús; González-López, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence for Microbacterium sp. strain 3J1, a desiccation-tolerant organism isolated from the Nerium oleander rhizosphere, is reported here. The genome is estimated to be approximately 3.5 Mb in size, with an average G+C content of 67.7% and a predicted number of protein-coding sequences of 3,310. PMID:26316631

  1. Roux-En Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Induces Genome-Wide Promoter-Specific Changes in DNA Methylation in Whole Blood of Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Emil K.; Ernst, Barbara; Voisin, Sarah; Almén, Markus Sällman; Benedict, Christian; Mwinyi, Jessica; Fredriksson, Robert; Schultes, Bernd; Schiöth, Helgi B.

    2015-01-01

    Context DNA methylation has been proposed to play a critical role in many cellular and biological processes. Objective To examine the influence of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery on genome-wide promoter-specific DNA methylation in obese patients. Promoters are involved in the initiation and regulation of gene transcription. Methods Promoter-specific DNA methylation in whole blood was measured in 11 obese patients (presurgery BMI >35 kg/m2, 4 females), both before and 6 months after RYGB surgery, as well as once only in a control group of 16 normal-weight men. In addition, body weight and fasting plasma glucose were measured after an overnight fast. Results The mean genome-wide distance between promoter-specific DNA methylation of obese patients at six months after RYGB surgery and controls was shorter, as compared to that at baseline (p<0.001). Moreover, postsurgically, the DNA methylation of 51 promoters was significantly different from corresponding values that had been measured at baseline (28 upregulated and 23 downregulated, P<0.05 for all promoters, Bonferroni corrected). Among these promoters, an enrichment for genes involved in metabolic processes was found (n = 36, P<0.05). In addition, the mean DNA methylation of these 51 promoters was more similar after surgery to that of controls, than it had been at baseline (P<0.0001). When controlling for the RYGB surgery-induced drop in weight (-24% of respective baseline value) and fasting plasma glucose concentration (-16% of respective baseline value), the DNA methylation of only one out of 51 promoters (~2%) remained significantly different between the pre-and postsurgery time points. Conclusions Epigenetic modifications are proposed to play an important role in the development of and predisposition to metabolic diseases, including type II diabetes and obesity. Thus, our findings may form the basis for further investigations to unravel the molecular effects of gastric bypass surgery. Clinical Trial

  2. Genetic basis of olfactory cognition: extremely high level of DNA sequence polymorphism in promoter regions of the human olfactory receptor genes revealed using the 1000 Genomes Project dataset

    PubMed Central

    Ignatieva, Elena V.; Levitsky, Victor G.; Yudin, Nikolay S.; Moshkin, Mikhail P.; Kolchanov, Nikolay A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of olfactory cognition is very complicated. Olfactory cognition is initiated by olfactory receptor proteins (odorant receptors), which are activated by olfactory stimuli (ligands). Olfactory receptors are the initial player in the signal transduction cascade producing a nerve impulse, which is transmitted to the brain. The sensitivity to a particular ligand depends on the expression level of multiple proteins involved in the process of olfactory cognition: olfactory receptor proteins, proteins that participate in signal transduction cascade, etc. The expression level of each gene is controlled by its regulatory regions, and especially, by the promoter [a region of DNA about 100–1000 base pairs long located upstream of the transcription start site (TSS)]. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms using human whole-genome data from the 1000 Genomes Project and revealed an extremely high level of single nucleotide polymorphisms in promoter regions of olfactory receptor genes and HLA genes. We hypothesized that the high level of polymorphisms in olfactory receptor promoters was responsible for the diversity in regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of olfactory receptor proteins. Such diversity of regulatory mechanisms may cause the great variability of olfactory cognition of numerous environmental olfactory stimuli perceived by human beings (air pollutants, human body odors, odors in culinary etc.). In turn, this variability may provide a wide range of emotional and behavioral reactions related to the vast variety of olfactory stimuli. PMID:24715883

  3. Novel Comparative Pattern Count Analysis Reveals a Chronic Ethanol-Induced Dynamic Shift in Immediate Early NF-κB Genome-wide Promoter Binding During Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a clinically important process that is impaired by adaptation to chronic alcohol intake. We focused on the initial time points following partial hepatectomy (PHx) to analyze genome-wide binding activity of NF-κB, a key immediate early regulator. We investigated the effect of chronic alcohol intake on immediate early NF-κB genome-wide localization, in the adapted state as well as in response to partial hepatectomy, using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promoter microarray analysis. We found many ethanol-specific NF-κB binding target promoters in the ethanol-adapted state, corresponding to regulation of biosynthetic processes, oxidation-reduction and apoptosis. Partial hepatectomy induced a diet-independent shift in NF-κB binding loci relative to the transcription start sites. We employed a novel pattern count analysis to exhaustively enumerate and compare the number of promoters corresponding to the temporal binding patterns in ethanol and pair-fed control groups. The highest pattern count corresponded to promoters with NF-κB binding exclusively in the ethanol group at 1h post PHx. This set was associated with regulation of cell death, response to oxidative stress, histone modification, mitochondrial function, and metabolic processes. Integration with the global gene expression profiles to identify putative transcriptional consequences of NF-κB binding patterns revealed that several of ethanol-specific 1h binding targets showed ethanol-specific differential expression through 6h post PHx. Motif analysis yielded co-incident binding loci for STAT3, AP-1, CREB, C/EBP-β, PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α, likely participating in co-regulatory modules with NF-κB in shaping the immediate early response to PHx. We conclude that adaptation to chronic ethanol intake disrupts the NF-κB promoter binding landscape with consequences for the immediate early gene regulatory response to the acute challenge of PHx. PMID:26847025

  4. Mutations, expression and genomic instability of the H-ras proto-oncogene in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Kiaris, H.; Spandidos, D. A.; Jones, A. S.; Vaughan, E. D.; Field, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    Mutation and overexpression are the main activating mechanisms for the ras family of genes in human cancer and the variable tandem repeat (VTR) located at the 3' end of H-ras has been associated with this risk. In the present study, we have analysed the relative levels of expression of H-ras mRNA in 26 samples of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (competitive RT-PCR) and also investigated whether there is an association between ras expression and alterations in the 3'-VTR region. In addition, we have studied the incidence of point mutations in codon 12 of H-ras, codons 12 and 13 of K-ras and codon 61 of N-ras in 120 SCCHN samples. Our results indicate that only two samples carry mutations, both of which are located in codon 12 of K-ras, but that overexpression of the H-ras proto-oncogene is a frequent event in SCCHN [54% (14/26)] and is associated with a favourable prognosis: 3 of 14 patients with H-ras overexpression have died, whereas 9 of 12 patients with low levels of H-ras expression have died. We have also undertaken an analysis of these results together with our previous investigations on microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in SCCHN, but no associations were found. We therefore conclude that ras mutations are an infrequent event in the progression of the SCCHN in the Western world, whereas overexpression of the H-ras proto-oncogene is a common event. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7599040

  5. Gravitational instabilities in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric stability of self-gravitating, geometrically thick accretion disks has been studied for protostellar systems having a wide range of disk-to-central object mass ratios. Global eigenmodes with four distinctly different characters were identified using numerical, nonlinear hydrodynamic techniques. The mode that appears most likely to arise in normal star formation settings, however, resembles the 'eccentric instability' that was identified earlier in thin, nearly Keplerian disks: It presents an open, one-armed spiral pattern that sweeps continuously in a trailing direction through more than 2-pi radians, smoothly connecting the inner and outer edges of the disk, and requires cooperative motion of the point mass for effective amplification. This particular instability promotes the development of a single, self-gravitating clump of material in orbit about the point mass, so its routine appearance in our simulations supports the conjecture that the eccentric instability provides a primary route to the formation of short-period binaries in protostellar systems.

  6. Molecular instability in the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region of the human mitochondrial genome: multiple origins of the 9-bp deletion and heteroplasmy for expanded repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M G; Cook, C E; Miller, K W; Waring, M J; Hagelberg, E

    1998-01-01

    We have identified two individuals from Glasgow in Scotland who have a deletion of one of two copies of the intergenic 9-bp sequence motif CCCCCTCTA, located between the cytochrome oxidase II (COII) and lysine tRNA (tRNA(Lys)) genes of the human mitochondrial genome. Although this polymorphism is common in Africa and Asia, it has not been reported in Northern Europe. Analysis of the mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of these two individuals suggests that they belong to a lineage that originated independently of the previously characterized African and Asian 9-bp deleted lineages. Among the Scottish population we have also identified a maternal lineage of three generations exhibiting heteroplasmy for two, three and four copies of the CCCCCTCTA motif. Polymerase chain reaction amplification across the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region of these individuals gives different ratios of the three product lengths that are dependent on the concentration of the DNA-binding dye crystal violet. To investigate whether changes in repeat number were generated de novo, we constructed clones containing known numbers of the CCCCCTCTA motif. In the presence of high concentrations of crystal violet we obtained two, three and four copies of this motif when the amplification template contained only four copies. Various DNA-binding drugs are known to stabilize bulged structures in DNA and contribute to the process of slipped-strand mispairing during DNA replication. These results suggest that the COII-tRNA(Lys) intergenic region is unstable owing to slipped-strand mispairing. Although sequences containing four copies of the CCCCCTCTA motif are less stable in vitro, we observed an increase in the proportion of mitochondrial genomes with four repeats between-a mother and a daughter in the heteroplasmic lineage. From this we conclude that drift in the germ-line lineage is a main factor in the maintenance or loss of heteroplasmy. PMID:9684291

  7. Discovery of a Family of Genomic Sequences Which Interact Specifically with the c-MYC Promoter to Regulate c-MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shelia D.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Miller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex forming sequences are particularly enriched in the promoter regions of eukaryotic genes, especially of oncogenes. One of the most well studied G-quadruplex forming sequences is located in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 of the c-MYC promoter region. The oncoprotein c-MYC regulates a large array of genes which play important roles in growth regulation and metabolism. It is dysregulated in >70% of human cancers. The silencer NHEIII1 located upstream of the P1 promoter regulates up-to 80% of c-MYC transcription and includes a G-quadruplex structure (Pu27) that is required for promoter inhibition. We have identified, for the first time, a family of seventeen G-quadruplex-forming motifs with >90% identity with Pu27, located on different chromosomes throughout the human genome, some found near or within genes involved in stem cell maintenance or neural cell development. Notably, all members of the Pu27 family interact specifically with NHEIII1 sequence, in vitro. Crosslinking studies demonstrate that Pu27 oligonucleotide binds specifically to the C-rich strand of the NHEIII1 resulting in the G-quadruplex structure stabilization. Pu27 homologous sequences (Pu27-HS) significantly inhibit leukemic cell lines proliferation in culture. Exposure of U937 cells to the Pu27-HS induces cell growth inhibition associated with cell cycle arrest that is most likely due to downregulation of c-MYC expression at the RNA and/or protein levels. Expression of SOX2, another gene containing a Pu27-HS, was affected by Pu27-HS treatment as well. Our data suggest that the oligonucleotides encoding the Pu27 family target complementary DNA sequences in the genome, including those of the c-MYC and SOX2 promoters. This effect is most likely cell type and cell growth condition dependent. The presence of genomic G-quadruplex-forming sequences homologous to Pu27 of c-MYC silencer and the fact that they interact specifically with the parent sequence suggest a common

  8. Discovery of a Family of Genomic Sequences Which Interact Specifically with the c-MYC Promoter to Regulate c-MYC Expression.

    PubMed

    Rezzoug, Francine; Thomas, Shelia D; Rouchka, Eric C; Miller, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex forming sequences are particularly enriched in the promoter regions of eukaryotic genes, especially of oncogenes. One of the most well studied G-quadruplex forming sequences is located in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 of the c-MYC promoter region. The oncoprotein c-MYC regulates a large array of genes which play important roles in growth regulation and metabolism. It is dysregulated in >70% of human cancers. The silencer NHEIII1 located upstream of the P1 promoter regulates up-to 80% of c-MYC transcription and includes a G-quadruplex structure (Pu27) that is required for promoter inhibition. We have identified, for the first time, a family of seventeen G-quadruplex-forming motifs with >90% identity with Pu27, located on different chromosomes throughout the human genome, some found near or within genes involved in stem cell maintenance or neural cell development. Notably, all members of the Pu27 family interact specifically with NHEIII1 sequence, in vitro. Crosslinking studies demonstrate that Pu27 oligonucleotide binds specifically to the C-rich strand of the NHEIII1 resulting in the G-quadruplex structure stabilization. Pu27 homologous sequences (Pu27-HS) significantly inhibit leukemic cell lines proliferation in culture. Exposure of U937 cells to the Pu27-HS induces cell growth inhibition associated with cell cycle arrest that is most likely due to downregulation of c-MYC expression at the RNA and/or protein levels. Expression of SOX2, another gene containing a Pu27-HS, was affected by Pu27-HS treatment as well. Our data suggest that the oligonucleotides encoding the Pu27 family target complementary DNA sequences in the genome, including those of the c-MYC and SOX2 promoters. This effect is most likely cell type and cell growth condition dependent. The presence of genomic G-quadruplex-forming sequences homologous to Pu27 of c-MYC silencer and the fact that they interact specifically with the parent sequence suggest a common

  9. Genome-Wide Anaplasma phagocytophilum AnkA-DNA Interactions Are Enriched in Intergenic Regions and Gene Promoters and Correlate with Infection-Induced Differential Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dumler, J. Stephen; Sinclair, Sara H.; Pappas-Brown, Valeria; Shetty, Amol C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, an obligate intracellular prokaryote, infects neutrophils, and alters cardinal functions via reprogrammed transcription. Large contiguous regions of neutrophil chromosomes are differentially expressed during infection. Secreted A. phagocytophilum effector AnkA transits into the neutrophil or granulocyte nucleus to complex with DNA in heterochromatin across all chromosomes. AnkA binds to gene promoters to dampen cis-transcription and also has features of matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding proteins that regulate three-dimensional chromatin architecture and coordinate transcriptional programs encoded in topologically-associated chromatin domains. We hypothesize that identification of additional AnkA binding sites will better delineate how A. phagocytophilum infection results in reprogramming of the neutrophil genome. Using AnkA-binding ChIP-seq, we showed that AnkA binds broadly throughout all chromosomes in a reproducible pattern, especially at: (i) intergenic regions predicted to be MARs; (ii) within predicted lamina-associated domains; and (iii) at promoters ≤ 3000 bp upstream of transcriptional start sites. These findings provide genome-wide support for AnkA as a regulator of cis-gene transcription. Moreover, the dominant mark of AnkA in distal intergenic regions known to be AT-enriched, coupled with frequent enrichment in the nuclear lamina, provides strong support for its role as a MAR-binding protein and genome “re-organizer.” AnkA must be considered a prime candidate to promote neutrophil reprogramming and subsequent functional changes that belie improved microbial fitness and pathogenicity. PMID:27703927

  10. Role of genetic background in induced instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadhim, Munira A.; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Genomic instability is effectively induced by ionizing radiation. Recently, evidence has accumulated supporting a relationship between genetic background and the radiation-induced genomic instability phenotype. This is possibly due to alterations in proteins responsible for maintenance of genomic integrity or altered oxidative metabolism. Studies in human cell lines, human primary cells, and mouse models have been performed predominantly using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, or high doses of low LET radiation. The interplay between genetics, radiation response, and genomic instability has not been fully determined at low doses of low LET radiation. However, recent studies using low doses of low LET radiation suggest that the relationship between genetic background and radiation-induced genomic instability may be more complicated than these same relationships at high LET or high doses of low LET radiation. The complexity of this relationship at low doses of low LET radiation suggests that more of the population may be at risk than previously recognized and may have implications for radiation risk assessment.

  11. Non genomic loss of function of tumor suppressors in CML: BCR-ABL promotes IκBα mediated p53 nuclear exclusion.

    PubMed

    Crivellaro, Sabrina; Panuzzo, Cristina; Carrà, Giovanna; Volpengo, Alessandro; Crasto, Francesca; Gottardi, Enrico; Familiari, Ubaldo; Papotti, Mauro; Torti, Davide; Piazza, Rocco; Redaelli, Sara; Taulli, Riccardo; Guerrasio, Angelo; Saglio, Giuseppe; Morotti, Alessandro

    2015-09-22

    Tumor suppressor function can be modulated by subtle variation of expression levels, proper cellular compartmentalization and post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation and sumoylation. The non-genomic loss of function of tumor suppressors offers a challenging therapeutic opportunity. The reactivation of a tumor suppressor could indeed promote selective apoptosis of cancer cells without affecting normal cells. The identification of mechanisms that affect tumor suppressor functions is therefore essential. In this work, we show that BCR-ABL promotes the accumulation of the NFKBIA gene product, IκBα, in the cytosol through physical interaction and stabilization of the protein. Furthermore, BCR-ABL/IκBα complex acts as a scaffold protein favoring p53 nuclear exclusion. We therefore identify a novel BCR-ABL/IκBα/p53 network, whereby BCR-ABL functionally inactivates a key tumor suppressor. PMID:26295305

  12. Bloom’s and Werner’s syndrome genes suppress hyperrecombination in yeast sgs1 mutant: Implication for genomic instability in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Kazutsune; Kato, Jun-ichi; Shimamoto, Akira; Goto, Makoto; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Ikeda, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Bloom’s syndrome (BS) and Werner’s syndrome (WS) are genetic disorders in which an increased rate of chromosomal aberration is detected. The genes responsible for these diseases, BLM and WRN, have been found to be homologs of Escherichia coli recQ and Saccharomyces cerevisiae SGS1 genes. Here we show that yeast Sgs1 helicase acts as a suppressor of illegitimate recombination through homologous recombination and that human BLM and WRN helicases can suppress the increased homologous and illegitimate recombinations in the S. cerevisiae sgs1 mutant. The results imply a role of BLM and WRN helicases to control genomic stability in human cells. Similar to Sgs1 helicase, BLM helicase suppressed the cell growth in the top3 sgs1 mutation background and restored the increased sensitivity of the sgs1 mutant to hydroxyurea, but the WRN helicase did not. We discussed differential roles of BLM and WRN helicases in human cells. BLM- and WRN-bearing yeasts provide new useful models to investigate human BS and WS diseases. PMID:9671747

  13. Novel core promoter elements in the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans and their influence on expression detected by genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The core promoter is the region flanking the transcription start site (TSS) that directs formation of the pre-initiation complex. Core promoters have been studied intensively in mammals and yeast, but not in more diverse eukaryotes. Here we investigate core promoters in oomycetes, a group within the Stramenopile kingdom that includes important plant and animal pathogens. Prior studies of a small collection of genes proposed that oomycete core promoters contain a 16 to 19 nt motif bearing an Initiator-like sequence (INR) flanked by a novel sequence named FPR, but this has not been extended to whole-genome analysis. Results We used expectation maximization to find over-represented motifs near TSSs of Phytophthora infestans, the potato blight pathogen. The motifs corresponded to INR, FPR, and a new element found about 25 nt downstream of the TSS called DPEP. TATA boxes were not detected. Assays of DPEP function by mutagenesis were consistent with its role as a core motif. Genome-wide searches found a well-conserved combined INR+FPR in only about 13% of genes after correcting for false discovery, which contradicted prior reports that INR and FPR are found together in most genes. INR or FPR were found alone near TSSs in 18% and 7% of genes, respectively. Promoters lacking the motifs had pyrimidine-rich regions near the TSS. The combined INR+FPR motif was linked to higher than average mRNA levels, developmentally-regulated transcription, and functions related to plant infection, while DPEP and FPR were over-represented in constitutively-expressed genes. The INR, FPR, and combined INR+FPR motifs were detected in other oomycetes including Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, Phytophthora sojae, Pythium ultimum, and Saprolegnia parasitica, while DPEP was found in all but S. parasitica. Only INR seemed present in a non-oomycete stramenopile. Conclusions The absence of a TATA box and presence of novel motifs show that the oomycete core promoter is diverged from that of

  14. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  15. The bornavirus-derived human protein EBLN1 promotes efficient cell cycle transit, microtubule organisation and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Katie N.; Barone, Giancarlo; Ganesh, Anil; Staples, Christopher J.; Howard, Anna E.; Beveridge, Ryan D.; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J. Mark; Collis, Spencer J.

    2016-01-01

    It was recently discovered that vertebrate genomes contain multiple endogenised nucleotide sequences derived from the non-retroviral RNA bornavirus. Strikingly, some of these elements have been evolutionary maintained as open reading frames in host genomes for over 40 million years, suggesting that some endogenised bornavirus-derived elements (EBL) might encode functional proteins. EBLN1 is one such element established through endogenisation of the bornavirus N gene (BDV N). Here, we functionally characterise human EBLN1 as a novel regulator of genome stability. Cells depleted of human EBLN1 accumulate DNA damage both under non-stressed conditions and following exogenously induced DNA damage. EBLN1-depleted cells also exhibit cell cycle abnormalities and defects in microtubule organisation as well as premature centrosome splitting, which we attribute in part, to improper localisation of the nuclear envelope protein TPR. Our data therefore reveal that human EBLN1 possesses important cellular functions within human cells, and suggest that other EBLs present within vertebrate genomes may also possess important cellular functions. PMID:27739501

  16. Repetitive genomic insertion of gene-sized dsDNAs by targeting the promoter region of a counter-selectable marker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaehwan; Seo, Han Na; Jung, Yu Kyung; Lee, Jeewon; Ryu, Gyuri; Lee, Wookjae; Kwon, Euijin; Ryoo, Keunsoo; Kim, Jungyeon; Cho, Hwa-Young; Cho, Kwang Myung; Park, Jin Hwan; Bang, Duhee

    2015-01-01

    Genome engineering can be used to produce bacterial strains with a wide range of desired phenotypes. However, the incorporation of gene-sized DNA fragments is often challenging due to the intricacy of the procedure, off-target effects, and low insertion efficiency. Here we report a genome engineering method enabling the continuous incorporation of gene-sized double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs) into the Escherichia coli genome. DNA substrates are inserted without introducing additional marker genes, by synchronously turning an endogenous counter-selectable marker gene ON and OFF. To accomplish this, we utilized λ Red protein-mediated recombination to insert dsDNAs within the promoter region of a counter-selectable marker gene, tolC. By repeatedly switching the marker gene ON and OFF, a number of desired gene-sized dsDNAs can be inserted consecutively. With this method, we successfully inserted approximately 13 kb gene clusters to generate engineered E. coli strains producing 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BDO). PMID:25736821

  17. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH): first genome-wide search positions trait-determining variants acting additively in the proximal promoter

    PubMed Central

    Mustapic, Maja; Maihofer, Adam X.; Mahata, Manjula; Chen, Yuqing; Baker, Dewleen G.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) is the biosynthetic enzyme catalyzing formation of norepinephrine. Changes in DBH expression or activity have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric disorders. Genetic determination of DBH enzymatic activity and its secretion are only incompletely understood. We began with a genome-wide association search for loci contributing to DBH activity in human plasma. Initially, in a population sample of European ancestry, we identified the proximal DBH promoter as a region harboring three common trait-determining variants (top hit rs1611115, P = 7.2 × 10−51). We confirmed their effects on transcription and showed that the three variants each acted additively on gene expression. Results were replicated in a population sample of Native American descent (top hit rs1611115, P = 4.1 × 10−15). Jointly, DBH variants accounted for 57% of DBH trait variation. We further identified a genome-wide significant SNP at the LOC338797 locus on chromosome 12 as trans-quantitative trait locus (QTL) (rs4255618, P = 4.62 × 10−8). Conditional analyses on DBH identified a third genomic region contributing to DBH variation: a likely cis-QTL adjacent to DBH in SARDH (rs7040170, P = 1.31 × 10−14) on chromosome 9q. We conclude that three common SNPs in the DBH promoter act additively to control phenotypic variation in DBH levels, and that two additional novel loci (SARDH and LOC338797) may also contribute to the expression of this catecholamine biosynthetic trait. Identification of DBH variants with strong effects makes it possible to take advantage of Mendelian randomization approaches to test causal effects of this intermediate trait on disease. PMID:24986918

  18. Genome-wide Prediction and Functional Validation of Promoter Motifs Regulating Gene Expression in Spore and Infection Stages of Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sourav; Kagda, Meenakshi; Judelson, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Most eukaryotic pathogens have complex life cycles in which gene expression networks orchestrate the formation of cells specialized for dissemination or host colonization. In the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, the potato late blight pathogen, major shifts in mRNA profiles during developmental transitions were identified using microarrays. We used those data with search algorithms to discover about 100 motifs that are over-represented in promoters of genes up-regulated in hyphae, sporangia, sporangia undergoing zoosporogenesis, swimming zoospores, or germinated cysts forming appressoria (infection structures). Most of the putative stage-specific transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) thus identified had features typical of TFBSs such as position or orientation bias, palindromy, and conservation in related species. Each of six motifs tested in P. infestans transformants using the GUS reporter gene conferred the expected stage-specific expression pattern, and several were shown to bind nuclear proteins in gel-shift assays. Motifs linked to the appressoria-forming stage, including a functionally validated TFBS, were over-represented in promoters of genes encoding effectors and other pathogenesis-related proteins. To understand how promoter and genome architecture influence expression, we also mapped transcription patterns to the P. infestans genome assembly. Adjacent genes were not typically induced in the same stage, including genes transcribed in opposite directions from small intergenic regions, but co-regulated gene pairs occurred more than expected by random chance. These data help illuminate the processes regulating development and pathogenesis, and will enable future attempts to purify the cognate transcription factors. PMID:23516354

  19. Critical target and dose and dose-rate responses for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Corcoran, J. J.; Milligan, J. R.; Ward, J. F.; Morgan, W. F.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the critical target, dose response and dose-rate response for the induction of chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-substituted and unsubstituted GM10115 cells were exposed to a range of doses (0.1-10 Gy) and different dose rates (0.092-17.45 Gy min(-1)). The status of chromosomal stability was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization approximately 20 generations after irradiation in clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving acute exposure. Overall, nearly 700 individual clones representing over 140,000 metaphases were analyzed. In cells unsubstituted with BrdU, a dose response was found, where the probability of observing delayed chromosomal instability in any given clone was 3% per gray of X rays. For cells substituted with 25-66% BrdU, however, a dose response was observed only at low doses (<1.0 Gy); at higher doses (>1.0 Gy), the incidence of chromosomal instability leveled off. There was an increase in the frequency and complexity of chromosomal instability per unit dose compared to cells unsubstituted with BrdU. The frequency of chromosomal instability appeared to saturate around approximately 30%, an effect which occurred at much lower doses in the presence of BrdU. Changing the gamma-ray dose rate by a factor of 190 (0.092 to 17.45 Gy min(-1)) produced no significant differences in the frequency of chromosomal instability. The enhancement of chromosomal instability promoted by the presence of the BrdU argues that DNA comprises at least one of the critical targets important for the induction of this end point of genomic instability.

  20. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  1. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  2. Evolution of genetic instability in heterogeneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Ani D; Komarova, Natalia L

    2016-05-01

    Genetic instability is an important characteristic of cancer. While most cancers develop genetic instability at some stage of their progression, sometimes a temporary rise of instability is followed by the return to a relatively stable genome. Neither the reasons for these dynamics, nor, more generally, the role of instability in tumor progression, are well understood. In this paper we develop a class of mathematical models to study the evolutionary competition dynamics among different sub-populations in a heterogeneous tumor. We observe that despite the complexity of this multi-component and multi-process system, there is only a small number of scenarios expected in the context of the evolution of instability. If the penalty incurred by unstable cells (the decrease in the growth due to deleterious mutations) is high compared with the gain (the production rate of advantageous mutations), then instability does not evolve. In the opposite case, instability evolves and comes to dominate the system. In the intermediate parameter regime, instability is generated but later gives way to stable clones. Moreover, the model also informs us of the patterns of instability for cancer lineages corresponding to different stages of progression. It is predicted that mutations causing instability are merely "passengers" in tumors that have undergone only a small number of malignant mutations. Further down the path of carcinogenesis, however, unstable cells are more likely to give rise to the winning clonal wave that takes over the tumor and carries the evolution forward, thus conferring a causal role of the instability in such cases. Further, each individual clonal wave (i.e. cells harboring a fixed number of malignant driver mutations) experiences its own evolutionary history. It can fall under one of three types of temporal behavior: stable throughout, unstable to stable, or unstable throughout. Which scenario is realized depends on the subtle (but predictable) interplay among

  3. Evolution of genetic instability in heterogeneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Ani D; Komarova, Natalia L

    2016-05-01

    Genetic instability is an important characteristic of cancer. While most cancers develop genetic instability at some stage of their progression, sometimes a temporary rise of instability is followed by the return to a relatively stable genome. Neither the reasons for these dynamics, nor, more generally, the role of instability in tumor progression, are well understood. In this paper we develop a class of mathematical models to study the evolutionary competition dynamics among different sub-populations in a heterogeneous tumor. We observe that despite the complexity of this multi-component and multi-process system, there is only a small number of scenarios expected in the context of the evolution of instability. If the penalty incurred by unstable cells (the decrease in the growth due to deleterious mutations) is high compared with the gain (the production rate of advantageous mutations), then instability does not evolve. In the opposite case, instability evolves and comes to dominate the system. In the intermediate parameter regime, instability is generated but later gives way to stable clones. Moreover, the model also informs us of the patterns of instability for cancer lineages corresponding to different stages of progression. It is predicted that mutations causing instability are merely "passengers" in tumors that have undergone only a small number of malignant mutations. Further down the path of carcinogenesis, however, unstable cells are more likely to give rise to the winning clonal wave that takes over the tumor and carries the evolution forward, thus conferring a causal role of the instability in such cases. Further, each individual clonal wave (i.e. cells harboring a fixed number of malignant driver mutations) experiences its own evolutionary history. It can fall under one of three types of temporal behavior: stable throughout, unstable to stable, or unstable throughout. Which scenario is realized depends on the subtle (but predictable) interplay among

  4. A toxin antitoxin system promotes the maintenance of the IncA/C-mobilizable Salmonella Genomic Island 1.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Kevin T; Gonnet, Mathieu; Doublet, Benoît; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The multidrug resistance Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) is an integrative mobilizable element identified in several enterobacterial pathogens. This chromosomal island requires a conjugative IncA/C plasmid to be excised as a circular extrachromosomal form and conjugally mobilized in trans. Preliminary observations suggest stable maintenance of SGI1 in the host chromosome but paradoxically also incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids. Here, using a Salmonella enterica serovar Agona clonal bacterial population as model, we demonstrate that a Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) system encoded by SGI1 plays a critical role in its stable host maintenance when an IncA/C plasmid is concomitantly present. This system, designated sgiAT for Salmonella genomic island 1 Antitoxin and Toxin respectively, thus seems to play a stabilizing role in a situation where SGI1 is susceptible to be lost through plasmid IncA/C-mediated excision. Moreover and for the first time, the incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids was experimentally confirmed. PMID:27576575

  5. A toxin antitoxin system promotes the maintenance of the IncA/C-mobilizable Salmonella Genomic Island 1

    PubMed Central

    Huguet, Kevin T.; Gonnet, Mathieu; Doublet, Benoît; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The multidrug resistance Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) is an integrative mobilizable element identified in several enterobacterial pathogens. This chromosomal island requires a conjugative IncA/C plasmid to be excised as a circular extrachromosomal form and conjugally mobilized in trans. Preliminary observations suggest stable maintenance of SGI1 in the host chromosome but paradoxically also incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids. Here, using a Salmonella enterica serovar Agona clonal bacterial population as model, we demonstrate that a Toxin-Antitoxin (TA) system encoded by SGI1 plays a critical role in its stable host maintenance when an IncA/C plasmid is concomitantly present. This system, designated sgiAT for Salmonella genomic island 1 Antitoxin and Toxin respectively, thus seems to play a stabilizing role in a situation where SGI1 is susceptible to be lost through plasmid IncA/C-mediated excision. Moreover and for the first time, the incompatibility between SGI1 and IncA/C plasmids was experimentally confirmed. PMID:27576575

  6. Genomic variation in the MMP-1 promoter influences estrogen receptor mediated activity in a mechanically activated environment: potential implications for microgravity risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, John; Myers, Ken; Lu, Ting; Hart, David

    examine the potential impact of the 1G/2G SNP on the cellular response to mechanical loading. HIG-82 cells are estrogen receptor (ER) negative and were transiently transfected with SV40 expression vectors for either ER-α or ER-β isoforms. Cells grown on glass slides were also co-transfected with either a 1G or 2G MMP-1 promoter-luciferase construct. Transfected cells were subjected to dynamic shear stress in a Flexcell Streamer Shear Stress D