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Sample records for promoter tissue specificity

  1. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rama, A. R.; Aguilera, A.; Melguizo, C.; Caba, O.; Prados, J.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment. PMID:26648599

  2. Sex and Tissue Specificity of Peg3 Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Bambarendage P. U.; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-01-01

    The expression of mouse Peg3 (Paternally expressed gene 3) is driven by 4 promoters, including its main and three alternative promoters. The sexual, temporal and spatial specificity of these promoters was characterized in the current study. According to the results, the main promoter displays ubiquitous expression patterns throughout different stages and tissues. In contrast, the expression of Peg3 driven by the alternative promoter U2 was detected mainly in muscle and skin, but not in brain, starting from the late embryonic stage, revealing its tissue and stage specificity. The expression levels of both the main and U2 promoters are also sexually biased: the levels in females start higher but become lower than those in males during early postnatal stages. As an imprinted locus, the paternal alleles of these promoters are active whereas the maternal alleles are silent. Interestingly, deletion of the repressed maternal allele of the main promoter has an unusual effect on the opposite paternal allele, causing the up-regulation of both the main and U2 promoters. Overall, the promoters of Peg3 derive sexually biased and tissue-specific expression patterns. PMID:27711129

  3. Rice tissue-specific promoters and condition-dependent promoters for effective translational application.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hee-Jeong; Jung, Ki-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important staple food crops for more than half of the world's population. The demand is increasing for food security because of population growth and environmental challenges triggered by climate changes. This scenario has led to more interest in developing crops with greater productivity and sustainability. The process of genetic transformation, a major tool for crop improvement, utilizes promoters as one of its key elements. Those promoters are generally divided into three types: constitutive, spatiotemporal, and condition-dependent. Transcriptional control of a constitutive promoter often leads to reduced plant growth, due to a negative effect of accumulated molecules during cellular functions or energy consumption. To maximize the effect of a transgene on transgenic plants, it is better to use condition-dependent or tissue-specific promoters. However, until now, those types have not been as widely applied in crop biotechnology. In this review, we introduce and discuss four groups of tissue-specific promoters (50 promoters in total) and six groups of condition-dependent promoters (27 promoters). These promoters can be utilized to fine-tune desirable agronomic traits and develop crops with tolerance to various stresses, enhanced nutritional value, and advanced productivity. PMID:25882130

  4. Tissue-type-specific transcriptome analysis identifies developing xylem-specific promoters in poplar.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Hyun-Tae; Hwang, Ildoo; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2012-06-01

    Plant biotechnology offers a means to create novel phenotypes. However, commercial application of biotechnology in crop improvement programmes is severely hindered by the lack of utility promoters (or freedom to operate the existing ones) that can drive gene expression in a tissue-specific or temporally controlled manner. Woody biomass is gaining popularity as a source of fermentable sugars for liquid fuel production. To improve the quantity and quality of woody biomass, developing xylem (DX)-specific modification of the feedstock is highly desirable. To develop utility promoters that can drive transgene expression in a DX-specific manner, we used the Affymetrix Poplar Genome Arrays to obtain tissue-type-specific transcriptomes from poplar stems. Subsequent bioinformatics analysis identified 37 transcripts that are specifically or strongly expressed in DX cells of poplar. After further confirmation of their DX-specific expression using semi-quantitative PCR, we selected four genes (DX5, DX8, DX11 and DX15) for in vivo confirmation of their tissue-specific expression in transgenic poplars. The promoter regions of the selected DX genes were isolated and fused to a β-glucuronidase (GUS)-reported gene in a binary vector. This construct was used to produce transgenic poplars via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The GUS expression patterns of the resulting transgenic plants showed that these promoters were active in the xylem cells at early seedling growth and had strongest expression in the developing xylem cells at later growth stages of poplar. We conclude that these DX promoters can be used as a utility promoter for DX-specific biomass engineering.

  5. Computational Analyses of Simple Sequence Repeats on Human Tissue Specific Genes Promoters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FeiFei, Zhao; XiuJun, Gong; XinMi, Liu; LiFeng, Dong

    Promoter region of gene closely related with tissue specific expression and SSRs (simple sequence repeats) have been shown to have a variety of effects on an organism. This paper used a heuristic method to find SSRs and compared the most frequently SSRs on promoter region of both human tissues specific genes and human housekeeping genes. We used kidney and testis tissue as examples to show the final results. Especially, we found that (AGG)n is kidney specific SSR and (GCG)n is testis specific SSR. We also analyzed the SSRs frequency density distribution on different promoter regions of both tissue specific genes and housekeeping genes, and we found the density of housekeeping genes on core-promoter region is much higher than on other promoter regions.

  6. Cloning and characterization of a novel Athspr promoter specifically active in vascular tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Yang, Tao; Li, Xiaoying; Hao, Hongyan; Xu, Shengtao; Cheng, Wei; Sun, Yingli; Wang, Chongying

    2014-05-01

    The vascular system--xylem, phloem and the cambium--is essential for water supply, nutrient transport, and physical support in higher plants. Although it is known that vascular-specific gene expression is regulated by cis-acting regulatory sequences in promoters, it is largely unknown how many regulatory elements exist and what their roles are in promoters. To understand the regulatory elements of vascular-specific promoters and their roles in vascular development, a T-DNA insertion mutant showing delayed growth and diminished resistance to environmental stress was isolated using promoter trap strategy. The novel gene, Arabidopsis thaliana heat shock protein-related (Athspr), was cloned from Arabidopsis ecotype C24. Strong GUS (β-glucuronidase) staining in the original promoter trap line was found in the vascular tissues of all organs in the mutant. The Athspr promoter was cloned and fused with GUS and eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) reporter genes to verify its vascular-specific expression in Arabidopsis. Further histochemical analysis in transgenic plants demonstrated a similar GUS expression pattern in the vascular tissues. In addition, ATHSPR-eGFP driven by Athspr promoter was observed in vascular bundles of the transgenic seedling roots. Finally, comparative analysis with promoter motifs from 37 genes involved in vascular development revealed that Athspr and all other promoters active in vascular tissues contained regulatory elements responding to phytohormones, light, biotic and abiotic stresses, as well as those regulating tissue-specific expression. These results demonstrated that the Athspr promoter has a vascular tissue-specific activity and Athspr may have multiple functions in vascular development and resistance against various stresses. PMID:24675528

  7. Improved Specificity of Gene Electrotransfer to Skin Using pDNA Under the Control of Collagen Tissue-Specific Promoter.

    PubMed

    Kos, Spela; Tesic, Natasa; Kamensek, Urska; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Kranjc, Simona; Lavrencak, Jaka; Sersa, Gregor

    2015-10-01

    In order to ensure safe, efficient and controlled gene delivery to skin, the improvement of delivery methods together with proper design of DNA is required. Non-viral delivery methods, such as gene electrotransfer, and the design of tissue-specific promoters are promising tools to ensure the safety of gene delivery to the skin. In the scope of our study, we evaluated a novel skin-specific plasmid DNA with collagen (COL) promoter, delivered to skin cells and skin tissue by gene electrotransfer. In vitro, we determined the specificity of the COL promoter in fibroblast cells. The specific expression under the control of COL promoter was obtained for the reporter gene DsRed as well as for therapeutic gene encoding cytokine IL-12. In vivo, the plasmid with COL promoter encoding the reporter gene DsRed was efficiently transfected to mouse skin. It resulted in the notable and controlled manner, however, in lower and shorter expression, compared to that obtained with ubiquitous promoter. The concentration of the IL-12 in the skin after the in vivo transfection of plasmid with COL promoter was in the same range as after the treatment in control conditions (injection of distilled water followed by the application of electric pulses). Furthermore, this gene delivery was local, restricted to the skin, without any evident systemic shedding of IL-12. Such specific targeting of skin cells, observed with tissue-specific COL promoter, would improve the effectiveness and safety of cutaneous gene therapies and DNA vaccines.

  8. Analysis of tissue-specific region in sericin 1 gene promoter of Bombyx mori

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Yu Lian; Guo Xiuyang; Guo Tingqing; Wang Shengpeng; Lu Changde . E-mail: cdlu@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-03-31

    The gene encoding sericin 1 (Ser1) of silkworm (Bombyx mori) is specifically expressed in the middle silk gland cells. To identify element involved in this transcription-dependent spatial restriction, truncation of the 5' terminal from the sericin 1 (Ser1) promoter is studied in vivo. A 209 bp DNA sequence upstream of the transcriptional start site (-586 to -378) is found to be responsible for promoting tissue-specific transcription. Analysis of this 209 bp region by overlapping deletion studies showed that a 25 bp region (-500 to -476) suppresses the ectopic expression of the Ser1 promoter. An unknown factor abundant in fat body nuclear extracts is shown to bind to this 25 bp fragment. These results suggest that this 25 bp region and the unknown factor are necessary for determining the tissue-specificity of the Ser1 promoter.

  9. Novel strong tissue specific promoter for gene expression in human germ cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tissue specific promoters may be utilized for a variety of applications, including programmed gene expression in cell types, tissues and organs of interest, for developing different cell culture models or for use in gene therapy. We report a novel, tissue-specific promoter that was identified and engineered from the native upstream regulatory region of the human gene NDUFV1 containing an endogenous retroviral sequence. Results Among seven established human cell lines and five primary cultures, this modified NDUFV1 upstream sequence (mNUS) was active only in human undifferentiated germ-derived cells (lines Tera-1 and EP2102), where it demonstrated high promoter activity (~twice greater than that of the SV40 early promoter, and comparable to the routinely used cytomegaloviral promoter). To investigate the potential applicability of the mNUS promoter for biotechnological needs, a construct carrying a recombinant cytosine deaminase (RCD) suicide gene under the control of mNUS was tested in cell lines of different tissue origin. High cytotoxic effect of RCD with a cell-death rate ~60% was observed only in germ-derived cells (Tera-1), whereas no effect was seen in a somatic, kidney-derived control cell line (HEK293). In further experiments, we tested mNUS-driven expression of a hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposase (SB100X). The mNUS-SB100X construct mediated stable transgene insertions exclusively in germ-derived cells, thereby providing further evidence of tissue-specificity of the mNUS promoter. Conclusions We conclude that mNUS may be used as an efficient promoter for tissue-specific gene expression in human germ-derived cells in many applications. Our data also suggest that the 91 bp-long sequence located exactly upstream NDUFV1 transcriptional start site plays a crucial role in the activity of this gene promoter in vitro in the majority of tested cell types (10/12), and an important role - in the rest two cell lines. PMID:20716342

  10. Tissue-specific regulation of the mouse Pkhd1 (ARPKD) gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott S.; Cobo-Stark, Patricia; Hajarnis, Sachin; Aboudehen, Karam; Shao, Xinli; Richardson, James A.; Patel, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder characterized by the formation of cysts in renal collecting ducts and biliary dysgenesis, is caused by mutations of the polycystic kidney and hepatic disease 1 (PKHD1) gene. Expression of PKHD1 is tissue specific and developmentally regulated. Here, we show that a 2.0-kb genomic fragment containing the proximal promoter of mouse Pkhd1 directs tissue-specific expression of a lacZ reporter gene in transgenic mice. LacZ is expressed in renal collecting ducts beginning during embryonic development but is not expressed in extrarenal tissues. The Pkhd1 promoter contains a binding site for the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1β, which is required for activity in transfected cells. Mutation of the HNF-1β-binding site abolishes the expression of the lacZ reporter gene in renal collecting ducts. Transgenes containing the 2.0-kb promoter and 2.7 kb of additional genomic sequence extending downstream to the second exon are expressed in the kidney, intrahepatic bile ducts, and male reproductive tract. This pattern overlaps with the endogenous expression of Pkhd1 and coincides with sites of expression of HNF-1β. We conclude that the proximal 2.0-kb promoter is sufficient for tissue-specific expression of Pkhd1 in renal collecting ducts in vivo and that HNF-1β is required for Pkhd1 promoter activity in collecting ducts. Additional genomic sequences located from exons 1-2 or elsewhere in the gene locus are required for expression in extrarenal tissues. PMID:24899057

  11. Taproot promoters cause tissue specific gene expression within the storage root of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, Heiko; Kloos, Dorothee U; Briess, Waltraud; Pflugmacher, Maike; Stahl, Dietmar J; Hehl, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    The storage root (taproot) of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) originates from hypocotyl and primary root and contains many different tissues such as central xylem, primary and secondary cambium, secondary xylem and phloem, and parenchyma. It was the aim of this work to characterize the promoters of three taproot-expressed genes with respect to their tissue specificity. To investigate this, promoters for the genes Tlp, His1-r, and Mll were cloned from sugar beet, linked to reporter genes and transformed into sugar beet and tobacco. Reporter gene expression analysis in transgenic sugar beet plants revealed that all three promoters are active in the storage root. Expression in storage root tissues is either restricted to the vascular zone (Tlp, His1-r) or is observed in the whole organ (Mll). The Mll gene is highly organ specific throughout different developmental stages of the sugar beet. In tobacco, the Tlp and Mll promoters drive reporter gene expression preferentially in hypocotyl and roots. The properties of the Mll promoter may be advantageous for the modification of sucrose metabolism in storage roots. PMID:16482437

  12. Tissue specificity of enhancer and promoter activities of a HERV-K(HML-2) LTR.

    PubMed

    Ruda, V M; Akopov, S B; Trubetskoy, D O; Manuylov, N L; Vetchinova, A S; Zavalova, L L; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2004-08-01

    Transient expression of a luciferase reporter gene was used to evaluate tissue-specific promoter and enhancer activities of a solitary extraviral long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) in several human and CHO cell lines. The promoter activity of the LTR varied from virtually not detectable (GS and Jurkat cells) to as high as that of the SV40 early promoter (Tera-1 human testicular embryonal carcinoma cells). The negative regulatory element (NRE) of the LTR retained its activity in all cell lines where the LTR could act as a promoter, and was also capable of binding host cell nuclear proteins. The enhancer activity of the LTR towards the SV40 early promoter was detected only in Tera-1 cells and was not observed in a closely related human testicular embryonal carcinoma cell line of different origin, NT2/D1. A comparison of proteins bound to central part of the LTR in nuclear extracts from Tera-1 and NT2/D1 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed striking differences that could be determined by different LTR enhancer activities in these cells. Tissue specificity of the SV40 early promoter activity was also revealed.

  13. Tissue-specific expression and promoter analysis of the tobacco Itp1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Canevascini, S; Caderas, D; Mandel, T; Fleming, A J; Dupuis, I; Kuhlemeier, C

    1996-01-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum Itp1 gene (Ntltp1) encodes a small basic protein that belongs to a class of putative lipid transfer proteins. These proteins transfer lipids between membranes in vitro, but their in vivo function remains hotly debated. This gene also serves as an important early marker for epidermis differentiation. We report here the analysis of the spatial and developmental activity of the Ntltp1 promoter, and we define a sequence element required for epidermis-specific expression. Transgenic plants were created containing 1346 bp of the Ntltp1 promoter fused upstream of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene. In the mature aerial tissues, GUS activity was detected predominantly in the epidermis, whereas in younger aerial tissues, such as the shoot apical meristem and floral meristem, GUS expression was not restricted to the tunica layer. Unexpectedly, GUS activity was also detected in young roots particularly in the root epidermis. Furthermore, the Ntltp1 promoter displayed a tissue and developmental specific pattern of activity during germination. These results suggest that the Ntltp1 gene is highly expressed in regions of the plant that are vulnerable to pathogen attack and are thus consistent with the proposed function of lipid transfer proteins in plant defense. Deletions of the promoter from its 5' end revealed that the 148 bp preceding the translational start site are sufficient for epidermis-specific expression. Sequence comparison identified an eight-nucleotide palindromic sequence CTAGCTAG in the leader of Ntltp1, which is conserved in a number of other Itp genes. By gel retardation analysis, the presence of specific DNA-protein complexes in this region was demonstrated. The characterization of these factors may lead to the identification of factors that control early events in epidermis differentiation. PMID:8883375

  14. Screening of Tissue-Specific Genes and Promoters in Tomato by Comparing Genome Wide Expression Profiles of Arabidopsis Orthologues

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chan Ju; Lee, Ha Yeon; Kim, Woong Bom; Lee, Bok-Sim; Kim, Jungeun; Ahmad, Raza; Kim, Hyun A; Yi, So Young; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive overexpression of transgenes occasionally interferes with normal growth and developmental processes in plants. Thus, the development of tissue-specific promoters that drive transgene expression has become agriculturally important. To identify tomato tissue-specific promoters, tissue-specific genes were screened using a series of in silico-based and experimental procedures, including genome-wide orthologue searches of tomato and Arabidopsis databases, isolation of tissue-specific candidates using an Arabidopsis microarray database, and validation of tissue specificity by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and promoter assay. Using these procedures, we found 311 tissue-specific candidate genes and validated 10 tissue-specific genes by RT-PCR. Among these identified genes, histochemical analysis of five isolated promoter::GUS transgenic tomato and Arabidopsis plants revealed that their promoters have different but distinct tissue-specific activities in anther, fruit, and root, respectively. Therefore, it appears these in silico-based screening approaches in addition to the identification of new tissue-specific genes and promoters will be helpful for the further development of tailored crop development. PMID:22699756

  15. Characterization of tissue-specific transcription by the human synapsin I gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, G. Univ. of Texas, Dallas ); Greengard, P. ); Suedhof, T.C. )

    1991-04-15

    Synapsin Ia and synapsin Ib are abundant synaptic vesicle proteins that are derived by differential splicing from a single gene. To identify control elements directing the neuronal expression of synapsins Ia/b, the authors functionally analyzed the promoter region of the human synapsin I gene. A hybrid gene was constructed containing 2 kilobases of 5{prime} flanking sequence from the synapsin I gene fused to the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase and transfected into 12 different neuronal and nonneuronal cell lines. In general, expression of the chimeric reporter gene showed excellent correlation with endogenous expression of synapsin I in different neuronal cell lines, whereas transcription was low in all nonneuronal cell lines examined. The addition of the simian virus 40 enhancer promoted non-tissue-specific expression. Deletion mutagenesis of the synapsin I promoter revealed the presence of positive and negative sequence elements. A basal (constitutive) promoter that directs reporter gene expression in neuronal and nonneuronal cell lines was mapped to the region {minus}115 to +47. The promoter region from {minus}422 to {minus}22 contains positive elements that upon fusion with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter potentiate its transcription in PC12 and neuroblastoma cells but not in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  16. Tissue-specific and glucose-responsive expression of the pancreatic derived factor (PANDER) promoter.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Brant R; Yang, Michael C; Robert, Claudia E; Greene, Scott R; McFadden, K Kelly; Yang, Jichun; Wu, Jianmei; Gao, Zhiyong; Wolf, Bryan A

    2005-09-25

    Pancreatic derived factor (PANDER) is a recently identified cytokine-like protein that is dominantly expressed in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas. To investigate the mechanism of tissue-specific regulation of PANDER, we identified and characterized the promoter region. The transcriptional start site was identified 520 bp upstream of the translational start codon by 5'-RLM-RACE. Computer algorithms identified several islet-associated and glucose-responsive binding motifs that included A and E boxes, hepatocyte nuclear factors 1 and 4, Oct-1, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and 5. Reporter gene analysis revealed cell type-specific PANDER promoter expression in islet and liver-derived cell lines. Levels of PANDER mRNA were directly concordant to the observed cell type-specific PANDER promoter gene expression. The minimal element was mapped to the 5'-UTR and located between +200 and +491 relative to the transcriptional start site and imparted maximal gene expression. In addition, several putative glucose-responsive binding sites were further functionally characterized to reveal critical regulatory elements of PANDER. The PANDER promoter was demonstrated to be glucose-responsive in a dose-dependent manner in murine insulinoma beta-TC3 cells and primary murine islets, but unresponsive in glucagon-secreting alpha-TC3 cells. Our findings revealed that the 5'-UTR of PANDER contains the minimal element for gene expression and imparts both tissue-specificity and glucose-responsiveness. The regulation of PANDER gene expression mimics that of insulin and suggests a potential biological function of PANDER involved in metabolic homeostasis.

  17. Functional properties of an alternative, tissue-specific promoter for human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1

    PubMed Central

    Barker, David F.; Husain, Anwar; Neale, Jason R.; Martini, Benjamin D.; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Doll, Mark A.; Christopher States, J.; Hein, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Variable expression of human arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) due to genetic polymorphism, gene regulation or environmental influences is associated with individual susceptibility to various cancers. Recent studies of NAT1 transcription showed that most mRNAs originate at a promoter, P1, located 11.8 kb upstream of the single open reading frame (ORF) exon. We have now characterized an alternative NAT1 promoter lying 51.5 kb upstream of the NAT1 ORF. In the present study, analysis of human RNAs representing 27 tissue types by RT-PCR and quantitative RT-PCR showed the upstream 51.5 kb promoter, designated P3, to be most active in specific tissues, including kidney, liver, lung, and trachea. All NAT1 P3 mRNAs included 5’-untranslated region (5’-UTR) internal exons of 61 and 175 nucleotides in addition to the 79 nucleotide 5’-UTR exon present in P1 mRNA. CAP-dependent amplification of 5’ P3 mRNA termini defined an 84 bp transcription start region in which most start sites are centrally clustered. The hepatoma-derived HepG2 cell line expressed a high level of P3 mRNA with the same spliced structure and start site pattern as found in normal tissues. A 435 bp minimal promoter was defined by transfection of HepG2 with luciferase expression constructs containing genomic fragments from the P3 start region. These findings imply a fundamental role for P3 in NAT1 regulation and define additional regions for genetic polymorphisms associated with enhanced cancer risk. PMID:16788383

  18. Highly interactive nature of flower-specific enhancers and promoters, and its potential impact on tissue-specific expression and engineering of multiple genes or agronomic traits.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhifeng; Yang, Yazhou; Zhang, Jinjin; Wang, Xiping; Singer, Stacy; Liu, Zhongchi; Yang, Yingjun; Yan, Guohua; Liu, Zongrang

    2014-09-01

    Molecular stacking enables multiple traits to be effectively engineered in crops using a single vector. However, the co-existence of distinct plant promoters in the same transgenic unit might, like their mammalian counterparts, interfere with one another. In this study, we devised a novel approach to investigate enhancer-promoter and promoter-promoter interactions in transgenic plants and demonstrated that three of four flower-specific enhancer/promoters were capable of distantly activating a pollen- and stigma-specific Pps promoter (fused to the cytotoxic DT-A gene) in other tissues, as revealed by novel tissue ablation phenotypes in transgenic plants. The NtAGI1 enhancer exclusively activated stamen- and carpel-specific DT-A expression, thus resulting in tissue ablation in an orientation-independent manner; this activation was completely abolished by the insertion of an enhancer-blocking insulator (EXOB) between the NtAGI1 enhancer and Pps promoter. Similarly, AGL8 and AP1Lb1, but not AP1La, promoters also activated distinct tissue-specific DT-A expression and ablation, with the former causing global growth retardation and the latter ablating apical inflorescences. While the tissue specificity of the enhancer/promoters generally defined their activation specificities, the strength of their activity in particular tissues or developmental stages appeared to determine whether activation actually occurred. Our findings provide the first evidence that plant-derived enhancer/promoters can distantly interact/interfere with one another, which could pose potential problems for the tissue-specific engineering of multiple traits using a single-vector stacking approach. Therefore, our work highlights the importance of adopting enhancer-blocking insulators in transformation vectors to minimize promoter-promoter interactions. The practical and fundamental significance of these findings will be discussed.

  19. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 promotes brown adipose tissue thermogenesis via repressing glucocorticoid activation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xing; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Chen, Yi; Serag, Sara; Lavery, Gareth G; Gygi, Steve P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-08-15

    Brown adipocytes display phenotypic plasticity, as they can switch between the active states of fatty acid oxidation and energy dissipation versus a more dormant state. Cold exposure or β-adrenergic stimulation favors the active thermogenic state, whereas sympathetic denervation or glucocorticoid administration promotes more lipid accumulation. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these switches is incomplete. Here we found that LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1), a histone demethylase, regulates brown adipocyte metabolism in two ways. On the one hand, LSD1 associates with PRDM16 to repress expression of white fat-selective genes. On the other hand, LSD1 represses HSD11B1 (hydroxysteroid 11-β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1), a key glucocorticoid-activating enzyme, independently from PRDM16. Adipose-specific ablation of LSD1 impaired mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation capacity of the brown adipose tissue, reduced whole-body energy expenditure, and increased fat deposition, which can be significantly alleviated by simultaneously deleting HSD11B1. These findings establish a novel regulatory pathway connecting histone modification and hormone activation with mitochondrial oxidative capacity and whole-body energy homeostasis. PMID:27566776

  20. Evaluation of four phloem-specific promoters in vegetative tissues of transgenic citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Dutt, M; Ananthakrishnan, G; Jaromin, M K; Brlansky, R H; Grosser, J W

    2012-01-01

    'Mexican' lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) was transformed with constructs that contained chimeric promoter-gus gene fusions of phloem-specific rolC promoter of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, Arabidopsis thaliana sucrose-H(+) symporter (AtSUC2) gene promoter of Arabidopsis thaliana, rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV) promoter and sucrose synthase l (RSs1) gene promoter of Oryza sativa (rice). Histochemical β-glucuronidase (GUS) analysis revealed vascular-specific expression of the GUS protein in citrus. The RTBV promoter was the most efficient promoter in this study while the RSs1 promoter could drive low levels of gus gene expression in citrus. These results were further validated by reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction and northern blotting. Southern blot analysis confirmed stable transgene integration, which ranged from a single insertion to four copies per genome. The use of phloem-specific promoters in citrus will allow targeted transgene expression of antibacterial constructs designed to battle huanglongbing disease (HLB or citrus greening disease), associated with a phloem-limited Gram-negative bacterium.

  1. Tissue-specific interactions between nuclear proteins and the aminopeptidase N promoter.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J; Laustsen, L; Kärnström, U; Sjöström, H; Norén, O

    1991-09-25

    Aminopeptidase N/CD13 is a metallopeptidase found in many tissues. Aminopeptidase N activity is high in the small intestinal mucosa, moderate in the liver, and low in the spleen. Using DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays with nuclear extracts from these tissues, three cis elements (DF, LF-B1, UF) were identified in the aminopeptidase N promoter. The DF region (-53 to -30) interacts with the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor Sp1. The LF-B1 region (-85 to -58) interacts with the liver transcription factor LF-B1 (HNF-1) which was detected as well in nuclei from small intestinal mucosa. The UF region (-112 to -90) interacts with nuclear factors which seem to be expressed differentially in the liver and the small intestine. Transfection of promoter deletions into HepG2 cells showed that the LF-B1 region is necessary for high expression of the aminopeptidase N gene in liver cells. LF-B1 could not be detected in spleen nuclei. In accordance with this, RNA analysis demonstrated that the aminopeptidase N promoter operating in the small intestine and in the liver is inactive in the spleen. In this tissue initiation of transcription from the aminopeptidase N gene occurs from an upstream promoter.

  2. A proximal promoter region of Arabidopsis DREB2C confers tissue-specific expression under heat stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Je, Jihyun; Song, Chieun; Hwang, Jung Eun; Lim, Chae Oh

    2012-09-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding factor 2C (DREB2C) is a member of the CBF/DREB subfamily of proteins, which contains a single APETALA2/Ethylene responsive element-binding factor (AP2/ERF) domain. To identify the expression pattern of the DREB2C gene, which contains multiple transcription cis-regulatory elements in its promoter, an approximately 1.4 kb upstream DREB2C sequence was fused to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS) and the recombinant p1244 construct was transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The promoter of the gene directed prominent GUS activity in the vasculature in diverse young dividing tissues. Upon applying heat stress (HS), GUS staining was also enhanced in the vasculature of the growing tissues. Analysis of a series of 5'-deletions of the DREB2C promoter revealed that a proximal upstream sequence sufficient for the tissue-specific spatial and temporal induction of GUS expression by HS is localized in the promoter region between -204 and -34 bps relative to the transcriptional start site. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated that nuclear protein binding activities specific to a -120 to -32 bp promoter fragment increased after HS. These results indicate that the TATA-proximal region and some latent trans-acting factors may cooperate in HS-induced activation of the Arabidopsis DREB2C promoter.

  3. Mining tissue-specific contigs from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) for promoter cloning by deep transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lili; Duan, Xiaohong; Liang, Chun; Shu, Changlong; Song, Fuping; Zhang, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), one of the most important oil legumes in the world, is heavily damaged by white grubs. Tissue-specific promoters are needed to incorporate insect resistance genes into peanut by genetic transformation to control the subterranean pests. Transcriptome sequencing is the most effective way to analyze differential gene expression in this non-model species and contribute to promoter cloning. The transcriptomes of the roots, seeds and leaves of peanut were sequenced using Illumina technology. A simple digital expression profile was established based on number of transcripts per million clean tags (TPM) from different tissues. Subsequently, 584 root-specific candidate transcript assembly contigs (TACs) and 316 seed-specific candidate TACs were identified. Among these candidate TACs, 55.3% were root-specific and 64.6% were seed-specific by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, the consistency of semi-quantitative RT-PCR with the simple digital expression profile was correlated with the length and TPM value of TACs. The results of gene ontology showed that some root-specific TACs are involved in stress resistance and respond to auxin stimulus, whereas, seed-specific candidate TACs are involved in embryo development, lipid storage and long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis. One root-specific promoter was cloned and characterized. We developed a high-yield screening system in peanut by establishing a simple digital expression profile based on Illumina sequencing. The feasible and rapid method presented by this study can be used for other non-model crops to explore tissue-specific or spatially specific promoters.

  4. Mining tissue-specific contigs from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) for promoter cloning by deep transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lili; Duan, Xiaohong; Liang, Chun; Shu, Changlong; Song, Fuping; Zhang, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), one of the most important oil legumes in the world, is heavily damaged by white grubs. Tissue-specific promoters are needed to incorporate insect resistance genes into peanut by genetic transformation to control the subterranean pests. Transcriptome sequencing is the most effective way to analyze differential gene expression in this non-model species and contribute to promoter cloning. The transcriptomes of the roots, seeds and leaves of peanut were sequenced using Illumina technology. A simple digital expression profile was established based on number of transcripts per million clean tags (TPM) from different tissues. Subsequently, 584 root-specific candidate transcript assembly contigs (TACs) and 316 seed-specific candidate TACs were identified. Among these candidate TACs, 55.3% were root-specific and 64.6% were seed-specific by semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, the consistency of semi-quantitative RT-PCR with the simple digital expression profile was correlated with the length and TPM value of TACs. The results of gene ontology showed that some root-specific TACs are involved in stress resistance and respond to auxin stimulus, whereas, seed-specific candidate TACs are involved in embryo development, lipid storage and long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis. One root-specific promoter was cloned and characterized. We developed a high-yield screening system in peanut by establishing a simple digital expression profile based on Illumina sequencing. The feasible and rapid method presented by this study can be used for other non-model crops to explore tissue-specific or spatially specific promoters. PMID:25231965

  5. Manipulation of lignin composition in plants using a tissue-specific promoter

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clinton C. S.

    2003-08-26

    The present invention relates to methods and materials in the field of molecular biology, the manipulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway and the regulation of proteins synthesis through plant genetic engineering. More particularly, the invention relates to the introduction of a foreign nucleotide sequence into a plant genome, wherein the introduction of the nucleotide sequence effects an increase in the syringyl content of the plant's lignin. In one specific aspect, the invention relates to methods for modifying the plant lignin composition in a plant cell by the introduction there into of a foreign nucleotide sequence comprising at issue specific plant promoter sequence and a sequence encoding an active ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H) enzyme. Plant transformants harboring an inventive promoter-F5H construct demonstrate increased levels of syringyl monomer residues in their lignin, rendering the polymer more readily delignified and, thereby, rendering the plant more readily pulped or digested.

  6. Sex-, stage- and tissue-specific regulation by a mosquito hexamerin promoter.

    PubMed

    Jinwal, U K; Zakharkin, S O; Litvinova, O V; Jain, S; Benes, Helen

    2006-06-01

    A portion of the 5'-flanking region of the female-specific hexamerin gene, Hex-1.2, from the mosquito Ochlerotatus atropalpus was used to drive expression of the luciferase reporter gene in Drosophila melanogaster. The proximal 0.7 kb of 5'-flanking DNA were sufficient to partially repress reporter gene activity in males and to drive tissue- and stage-specific expression comparable with that of the endogenous O. atropalpus Hex-1.2 gene. The Drosophila doublesex transcription factor (DSX), expressed in Escherichia coli, bound putative DSX sites of the Hex-1.2 gene differentially in vitro. Blocking expression of the female isoform of the Doublesex transcription factor in transgenic female flies resulted in reduction of luciferase expression to levels comparable with those in males, suggesting that Doublesex could contribute to regulation of female-specific expression of the O. atropalpus Hex-1.2 gene.

  7. Sex-, stage- and tissue-specific regulation by a mosquito hexamerin promoter

    PubMed Central

    Jinwal, U. K.; Zakharkin, S. O.; Litvinova, O. V.; Jain, S.; Beneš, Helen

    2008-01-01

    A portion of the 5′-flanking region of the female-specific hexamerin gene, Hex-1.2, from the mosquito Ochlerotatus atropalpus was used to drive expression of the luciferase reporter gene in Drosophila melanogaster. The proximal 0.7 kb of 5′-flanking DNA were sufficient to partially repress reporter gene activity in males and to drive tissue- and stage-specific expression comparable with that of the endogenous O. atropalpus Hex-1.2 gene. The Drosophila doublesex transcription factor (DSX), expressed in Escherichia coli, bound putative DSX sites of the Hex-1.2 gene differentially in vitro. Blocking expression of the female isoform of the Doublesex transcription factor in transgenic female flies resulted in reduction of luciferase expression to levels comparable with those in males, suggesting that Doublesex could contribute to regulation of female-specific expression of the O. atropalpus Hex-1.2 gene. PMID:16756549

  8. Regulation of tissue-specific expression of alternative peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene transcripts by two promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, P.I.; Schoener-Scott, R.; Lupski, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations affecting the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene have been shown to be associated with inherited peripheral neuropathies. We have cloned and characterized the human PMP22 gene which spans approximately 40 kilobases and contains four coding exons. Towards developing gene therapy regimens for the associated peripheral neuropathies, we have initiated detailed analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of the PMP22 gene and identified two alternatively transcribed, but untranslated exons. Mapping of separate PMP22 mRNA transcription initiation sites to each of these exons indicates that PMP22 expression is regulated by two alternatively used promoters. Both putative promoter sequences demonstrated the ability to drive expression of reporter genes in transfection experiments. Furthermore, the structure of the 5{prime} portion of the PMP22 gene appears to be identical in rat and human, supporting the biological significance of the observed arrangement of regulatory regions. The relative expression of the alternative PMP22 transcripts is tissue-specific and high levels of the exon 1A-containing transcript are tightly coupled to myelin formation. In contrast, exon 1B-containing transcripts are predominant in non-neural tissues and in growth-arrested primary fibroblasts. The observed regulation of the PMP22 by a complex molecular mechanism is consistent with the proposed dual role of PMP22 in neural and non-neural tissue.

  9. Molecular cloning of a small DNA binding protein with specificity for a tissue-specific negative element within the rps1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, D X; Bisanz-Seyer, C; Mache, R

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific binding activity for the tissue-specific negative cis-element S1F binding site of spinach rps1 was isolated from a spinach cDNA expression library. This cDNA of 0.7 kb encodes an unusual small peptide of only 70 amino acids, with a basic domain which contains a nuclear localization signal and a putative DNA binding helix. This protein, named S1Fa, is highly conserved between dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants and may represent a novel class of DNA binding proteins. The corresponding mRNA is accumulated more in roots and in etiolated seedlings than in green leaves. This expression pattern is correlated with the tissue-specific function of the S1F binding site which represses the rps1 promoter preferentially in roots and in etiolated plants. Images PMID:7739894

  10. Targeted expression of suicide gene by tissue-specific promoter and microRNA regulation for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Danda, Ravikanth; Krishnan, Gopinath; Ganapathy, Kalaivani; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Vikas, Khetan; Elchuri, Sailaja; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    In order to realise the full potential of cancer suicide gene therapy that allows the precise expression of suicide gene in cancer cells, we used a tissue specific Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) promoter (EGP-2) that directs transgene Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) expression preferentially in EpCAM over expressing cancer cells. EpCAM levels are considerably higher in retinoblastoma (RB), a childhood eye cancer with limited expression in normal cells. Use of miRNA regulation, adjacent to the use of the tissue-specific promoter, would provide the second layer of control to the transgene expression only in the tumor cells while sparing the normal cells. To test this hypothesis we cloned let-7b miRNA targets in the 3'UTR region of HSV-TK suicide gene driven by EpCAM promoter because let-7 family miRNAs, including let-7b, were found to be down regulated in the RB tumors and cell lines. We used EpCAM over expressing and let-7 down regulated RB cell lines Y79, WERI-Rb1 (EpCAM (+ve)/let-7b(down-regulated)), EpCAM down regulated, let-7 over expressing normal retinal Müller glial cell line MIO-M1(EpCAM (-ve)/let-7b(up-regulated)), and EpCAM up regulated, let-7b up-regulated normal thyroid cell line N-Thy-Ori-3.1(EpCAM (+ve)/let-7b(up-regulated)) in the study. The cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay, apoptosis was measured by probing cleaved Caspase3, EpCAM and TK expression were quantified by Western blot. Our results showed that the EGP2-promoter HSV-TK (EGP2-TK) construct with 2 or 4 copies of let-7b miRNA targets expressed TK gene only in Y79, WERI-Rb-1, while the TK gene did not express in MIO-M1. In summary, we have developed a tissue-specific, miRNA-regulated dual control vector, which selectively expresses the suicide gene in EpCAM over expressing cells. PMID:24391761

  11. A novel strategy to enhance mesenchymal stem cell migration capacity and promote tissue repair in an injury specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Xinaris, C; Morigi, M; Benedetti, V; Imberti, B; Fabricio, A S; Squarcina, E; Benigni, A; Gagliardini, E; Remuzzi, G

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of bone marrow origin appear to be an attractive candidate for cell-based therapies. However, the major barrier to the effective implementation of MSC-based therapies is the lack of specific homing of exogenously infused cells and overall the inability to drive them to the diseased or damaged tissue. In order to circumvent these limitations, we developed a preconditioning strategy to optimize MSC migration efficiency and potentiate their beneficial effect at the site of injury. Initially, we screened different molecules by using an in vitro injury-migration setting, and subsequently, we evaluated the effectiveness of the different strategies in mice with acute kidney injury (AKI). Our results showed that preconditioning of MSCs with IGF-1 before infusion improved cell migration capacity and restored normal renal function after AKI. The present study demonstrates that promoting migration of MSCs could increase their therapeutic potential and indicates a new therapeutic paradigm for organ repair.

  12. Subtissue-Specific Evaluation of Promoter Efficiency by Quantitative Fluorometric Assay in Laser Microdissected Tissues of Rapeseed[W

    PubMed Central

    Jasik, Jan; Schiebold, Silke; Rolletschek, Hardy; Denolf, Peter; Van Adenhove, Katrien; Altmann, Thomas; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2011-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase (GUS) is a useful reporter for the evaluation of promoter characteristics in transgenic plants. Here, we introduce an original technique to quantify the strength of promoters at subtissue resolution of cell clusters. The method combines cryotomy, laser microdissection, and improved fluorometric analysis of GUS activity using 6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide as an efficient fluorogenic substrate for kinetic studies in plants. The laser microdissection/6-chloro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucuronide method is robust and reliable in a wide range of GUS expression levels and requires extremely low (few cells) tissue amounts. Suitability of the assay was demonstrated on rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants transformed with a P35S2::GUS construct. GUS expression patterns were visualized and quantified in approximately 30 tissues of vegetative and generative organs. Considerable differences in promoter activity within the tissues are discussed in relation to the cell type and developmental state. PMID:21825109

  13. Specific collagen XVIII isoforms promote adipose tissue accrual via mechanisms determining adipocyte number and affect fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Aikio, Mari; Elamaa, Harri; Vicente, David; Izzi, Valerio; Kaur, Inderjeet; Seppinen, Lotta; Speedy, Helen E; Kaminska, Dorota; Kuusisto, Sanna; Sormunen, Raija; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Jones, Emma L; Muilu, Mikko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Savolainen, Markku J; Shoulders, Carol C; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2014-07-29

    Collagen XVIII is an evolutionary conserved ubiquitously expressed basement membrane proteoglycan produced in three isoforms via two promoters (P). Here, we assess the function of the N-terminal, domain of unknown function/frizzled-like sequences unique to medium/long collagen XVIII by creating P-specific null mice. P2-null mice, which only produce short collagen XVIII, developed reduced bulk-adiposity, hepatic steatosis, and hypertriglyceridemia. These abnormalities did not develop in P1-null mice, which produce medium/long collagen XVIII. White adipose tissue samples from P2-null mice contain larger reserves of a cell population enriched in early adipocyte progenitors; however, their embryonic fibroblasts had ∼ 50% lower adipocyte differentiation potential. Differentiating 3T3-L1 fibroblasts into mature adipocytes produced striking increases in P2 gene-products and dramatic falls in P1-transcribed mRNA, whereas Wnt3a-induced dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes produced reciprocal changes in P1 and P2 transcript levels. P2-derived gene-products containing frizzled-like sequences bound the potent adipogenic inhibitor, Wnt10b, in vitro. Previously, we have shown that these same sequences bind Wnt3a, inhibiting Wnt3a-mediated signaling. P2-transcript levels in visceral fat were positively correlated with serum free fatty acid levels, suggesting that collagen α1 (XVIII) expression contributes to regulation of adipose tissue metabolism in visceral obesity. Medium/long collagen XVIII is deposited in the Space of Disse, and interaction between hepatic apolipoprotein E and this proteoglycan is lost in P2-null mice. These results describe a previously unidentified extracellular matrix-directed mechanism contributing to the control of the multistep adipogenic program that determines the number of precursors committing to adipocyte differentiation, the maintenance of the differentiated state, and the physiological consequences of its impairment on ectopic fat

  14. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early enhancer/promoter specificity during embryogenesis defines target tissues of congenital HCMV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Koedood, M; Fichtel, A; Meier, P; Mitchell, P J

    1995-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a common cause of deafness and neurological disabilities. Many aspects of this prenatal infection, including which cell types are infected and how infection proceeds, are poorly understood. Transcription of HCMV immediate-early (IE) genes is required for expression of all other HCMV genes and is dependent on host cell transcription factors. Cell type-specific differences in levels of IE transcription are believed to underlie differences in infection permissivity. However, DNA transfection experiments have paradoxically suggested that the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter is a broadly active transcriptional element with little cell type specificity. In contrast, we show here that expression of a lacZ gene driven by the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter -524 to +13 segment is restricted in transgenic mouse embryos to sites that correlate with known sites of congenital HCMV infection in human fetuses. This finding suggests that the IE enhancer/promoter is a major determinant of HCMV infection sites in humans and that transcription factors responsible for its regulation are cell type-specifically conserved between humans and mice. The lacZ expression patterns of these transgenic embryos yield insight into congenital HCMV pathogenesis by providing a spatiotemporal map of the sets of vascular, neural, and epithelial cells that are likely targets of infection. These transgenic mice may constitute a useful model system for investigating IE enhancer/promoter regulation in vivo and for identifying factors that modulate active and latent HCMV infections in humans. PMID:7884867

  15. Analysis of tissue-specific expression of human type II collagen cDNA driven by different sizes of the upstream region of the beta-casein promoter.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Kenji; Yoo, Seung Kwon; Kim, Sun Myoung; Choi, Yun Jaie; Lee, Hong Mie; Jin, Dong Il

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the ability of 1.8 kb or 3.1 kb bovine beta-casein promoter sequences for the expression regulation of transgene in vivo, transgenic mice were produced with human type II collagen gene fused to 1.8 kb and 3.1 kb of bovine beta-casein promoter by DNA microinjection. Five and three transgenic founder mice were produced using transgene constructs with 1.8 kb and 3.1 kb of bovine beta-casein promoters respectively. Founder mice were outbred with the wild type to produce F1 and F2 progenies. Total RNAs were extracted from four tissues (mammary gland, liver, kidney, and muscle) of female F1 transgenic mice of each transgenic line following parturition. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis revealed that the expression level of transgene was variable among the transgenic lines, but transgenic mice containing 1.8 kb of promoter sequences exhibited more leaky expression of transgene in other tissues compared to those with 3.1 kb promoter. Moreover, Western blot analysis of transgenic mouse milk showed that human type II collagen proteins secreted into the milk of lactating transgenic mice contained 1.8 kb and 3.1 kb of bovine beta-casein promoter. These results suggest that promoter sequences of 3.1 kb bovine beta-casein gene can be used for induction of mammary gland-specific expression of transgenes in transgenic animals.

  16. Tissue-specific promoter methylation coincides with Cyp19 gene expression in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) placenta of different stages of gestation.

    PubMed

    Ghai, Sandeep; Monga, Rachna; Mohanty, T K; Chauhan, M S; Singh, Dheer

    2010-11-01

    Aromatase is the key enzyme for estrogen biosynthesis and is encoded by Cyp19 gene. Placental cotyledons are the main site of Cyp19 gene expression during pregnancy. The present study was aimed to investigate if DNA methylation and thus epigenetic mechanisms play a potential role in stage-specific regulation of Cyp19 expression in placental cotyledons of pregnant water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis). Significantly higher expression of Cyp19 gene (p<0.05) in placental cotyledons of early gestation period and post parturition period was found in comparison to mid-gestation placenta. Tissue-specific promoter driven transcript analyses showed that the change in expression was mainly due to change in the relative abundance of transcripts from exon I.1 while the transcripts from exon II showed comparatively less variation. Methylation analysis of 5 CpG dinucleotides of placenta-specific promoter I.1 and proximal promoter, PII showed hypo-methylation of PI.1 in early and term placenta while hyper-methylation in mid-placenta. However, PII was found to be hypomethylated in all the three tissues. In conclusion, result of the present study demonstrated that stage-specific methylation status of PI.1, the major promoter responsible for aromatase expression in buffalo placental cotyledons, coincides with the change in expression of Cyp19 gene in different stages of pregnancy.

  17. Promoter Complexity and Tissue-Specific Expression of Stress Response Components in Mytilus galloprovincialis, a Sessile Marine Invertebrate Species

    PubMed Central

    Pantzartzi, Chrysa; Drosopoulou, Elena; Yiangou, Minas; Drozdov, Ignat; Tsoka, Sophia; Ouzounis, Christos A.; Scouras, Zacharias G.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of stress tolerance in sessile animals, such as molluscs, can offer fundamental insights into the adaptation of organisms for a wide range of environmental challenges. One of the best studied processes at the molecular level relevant to stress tolerance is the heat shock response in the genus Mytilus. We focus on the upstream region of Mytilus galloprovincialis Hsp90 genes and their structural and functional associations, using comparative genomics and network inference. Sequence comparison of this region provides novel evidence that the transcription of Hsp90 is regulated via a dense region of transcription factor binding sites, also containing a region with similarity to the Gamera family of LINE-like repetitive sequences and a genus-specific element of unknown function. Furthermore, we infer a set of gene networks from tissue-specific expression data, and specifically extract an Hsp class-associated network, with 174 genes and 2,226 associations, exhibiting a complex pattern of expression across multiple tissue types. Our results (i) suggest that the heat shock response in the genus Mytilus is regulated by an unexpectedly complex upstream region, and (ii) provide new directions for the use of the heat shock process as a biosensor system for environmental monitoring. PMID:20628614

  18. Three promoters with different tissue specificity and pathogen inducibility express the toll-like-receptor 2 (TLR2)-encoding gene in cattle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guangjun; Xu, Tianle; Brand, Bodo; Petzl, Wolfram; Shen, Xiangzhen; Seyfert, Hans-Martin

    2015-09-15

    Toll-like-receptor 2 (TLR2) is a dominant receptor for perceiving presence of bacterial pathogens. The promoter controlling its tissue specific and infection induced expression in cattle was unknown. We structurally defined with 5'-RACE experiments three promoters (P1-3) controlling TLR2 expression in udder, liver and other tissues of cows suffering from E. coli mastitis. P1 is 5'-adjacent to exon 1 as defined by the prototypical TLR2 cDNA sequence. Exon 1 is spliced to the protein-encoding exon 2. P2 and P3 reside in intron 1, express exon 1A and exon 1B, respectively which are each spliced to exon 2. Infection induced massively (>30-fold) activity of P1 and P2, but not of P3 in udders and also somewhat in liver. However, the GC-rich housekeeping promoter P3 expressed exon1B in many tissues providing the wealth of TLR2-encoding transcripts. Similar induction data were obtained after challenging primary cultures of mammary epithelial cells (pbMEC) with E. coli. Reporter gene analyses in pbMEC and the liver cell line HepG2 collectively validated that P1 and constructs containing segments from P2/P3 are in principle capable to drive gene expression. Our structural data provide the basis for more detailed molecular analyses of the infection and tissue specific regulation of TLR2 expression. PMID:26235600

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomatillo (Physalis ixocarpa) and tissue specific and developmental expression of the CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic tomatillo plants.

    PubMed

    Assad-García, N; Ochoa-Alejo, N; García-Hernández, E; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-10-01

    A protocol for the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomatillo was developed. Up to 40 transgenic plants could be obtained in experiments using 60 cotyledon expiants. The transformed nature of the regenerated plants was confirmed by NPT II and Southern blot hybridization analysis. Using the b-glucuronidase system the tissue specific and developmental patterns of expression of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter were determined in transgenic tomatillo plants. It was found that this promoter is developmentally regulated during fruit and seed formation. PMID:24213286

  20. ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) gene family members of Arabidopsis thaliana: tissue- and organ-specific promoter activities and in vivo heteromerization.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Irene; Otto, Markus; Delker, Carolin; Kirmse, Nils; Schmidt, Diana; Miersch, Otto; Hause, Bettina; Wasternack, Claus

    2012-10-01

    Jasmonates are important signals in plant stress responses and plant development. An essential step in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA) is catalysed by ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) which establishes the naturally occurring enantiomeric structure of jasmonates. In Arabidopsis thaliana, four genes encode four functional AOC polypeptides (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3, and AOC4) raising the question of functional redundancy or diversification. Analysis of transcript accumulation revealed an organ-specific expression pattern, whereas detailed inspection of transgenic lines expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of individual AOC promoters showed partially redundant promoter activities during development: (i) In fully developed leaves, promoter activities of AOC1, AOC2, and AOC3 appeared throughout all leaf tissue, but AOC4 promoter activity was vascular bundle-specific; (ii) only AOC3 and AOC4 showed promoter activities in roots; and (iii) partially specific promoter activities were found for AOC1 and AOC4 in flower development. In situ hybridization of flower stalks confirmed the GUS activity data. Characterization of single and double AOC loss-of-function mutants further corroborates the hypothesis of functional redundancies among individual AOCs due to a lack of phenotypes indicative of JA deficiency (e.g. male sterility). To elucidate whether redundant AOC expression might contribute to regulation on AOC activity level, protein interaction studies using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) were performed and showed that all AOCs can interact among each other. The data suggest a putative regulatory mechanism of temporal and spatial fine-tuning in JA formation by differential expression and via possible heteromerization of the four AOCs. PMID:23028017

  1. Specific interaction of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) with annexin II on the membrane of pancreatic cancer cells activates plasminogen and promotes invasion in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, V M; Hurtado, M; Thomson, T M; Reventós, J; Paciucci, R

    2004-01-01

    Background: Overexpression of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) in pancreatic cancer cells promotes invasion and proliferation in vitro and tumour growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Aims: To understand the mechanisms by which t-PA favours cancer progression, we analysed the surface membrane proteins responsible for binding specifically t-PA and studied the contribution of this interaction to the t-PA promoted invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. Methods: The ability of t-PA to activate plasmin and a fluorogenic plasmin substrate was used to analyse the nature of the binding of active t-PA to cell surfaces. Specific binding was determined in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (SK-PC-1 and PANC-1), and complex formation analysed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments and co-immunolocalisation in tumours. The functional role of the interaction was studied in Matrigel invasion assays. Results: t-PA bound to PANC-1 and SK-PC-1 cells in a specific and saturable manner while maintaining its activity. This binding was competitively inhibited by specific peptides interfering with the interaction of t-PA with annexin II. The t-PA/annexin II interaction on pancreatic cancer cells was also supported by co-immunoprecipitation assays using anti-t-PA antibodies and, reciprocally, with antiannexin II antibodies. In addition, confocal microscopy showed t-PA and annexin II colocalisation in tumour tissues. Finally, disruption of the t-PA/annexin II interaction by a specific hexapeptide significantly decreased the invasive capacity of SK-PC-1 cells in vitro. Conclusion: t-PA specifically binds to annexin II on the extracellular membrane of pancreatic cancer cells where it activates local plasmin production and tumour cell invasion. These findings may be clinically relevant for future therapeutic strategies based on specific drugs that counteract the activity of t-PA or its receptor annexin II, or their interaction at the surface level. PMID:15194650

  2. NOVEL SPLICED VARIANTS OF IONOTROPIC GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR GLUR6 IN NORMAL HUMAN FIBROBLAST AND BRAIN CELLS ARE TRANSCRIBED BY TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTERS

    PubMed Central

    Zhawar, Vikramjit K.; Kaur, Gurpreet; deRiel, Jon K.; Kaur, G. Pal; Kandpal, Raj P.; Athwal, Raghbir S.

    2010-01-01

    The members of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, namely, a-amino-3-hydroxy-S-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), kainate, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, are important mediators of the rapid synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. We have investigated the splicing pattern and expression of the kainate receptor subunit GluR6 in human fibroblast cell lines and brain tissue. We demonstrate the expression of GluR6A variant specifically in brain, and four variants, namely, GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E in fibroblast cell lines. The variants GluR6D and GluR6E have not been described before, and appear to be specific for non-neuronal cells. Genomic analysis and cloning of the sequence preceding the transcribed region led to the identification of two tissue specific promoters designated as neuronal promoter PN and non-neuronal promoter PNN. We have used RNA ligase mediated RACE and in silico analyses to locate two sets of transcription start sites, and confirmed specific transcripts initiated by PN and PNN in brain cells and fibroblasts, respectively. The domain structure of variants GluR6D and GluR6E revealed the absence of three transmembrane domains. The lack of these domains suggests that the mature receptors arising from these variant subunits may not function as active channels. Based on these structural features in GluR6D and GluR6E, and the observations that GluR6B, GluR6C, GluR6D and GluR6E are exclusively expressed in non-neuronal cells, it is likely that these receptor subunits function as non-channel signaling proteins. PMID:20230879

  3. Novel region within the V kappa gene promoter is responsible for tissue and stage-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes in human lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kossakowska, A E; Urbanski, S J

    1989-03-01

    Immunoglobulin gene-specific transacting factors have been shown to play a role in lymphoid tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes. The role of these factors in B-cell differentiation and stage-specific expression of these genes is, however, not fully understood. We have used a model of human lymphoid neoplasia to address this question. Different fragments of unrearranged human variable region of immunoglobulin kappa gene (V kappa) were used for cell-free in vitro transcription and DNA mobility shift assays. Previously described enhancement of in vitro transcription that was only seen with nuclear extracts derived from B-cell neoplasms corresponding to the late stages of B-cell differentiation was shown to be dependent on the actions of these factor(s) on the DNA region within the V kappa gene promoter. This region is located within the 920 bp fragment located 210 bp upstream from the coding region and this fragment represents a possible novel DNA region, which plays a role in the stage- and tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes.

  4. Tissue-specific expression of the PNZIP promoter is mediated by combinatorial interaction of different cis-elements and a novel transcriptional factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Tao; Yu, Yan-Li; Yang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Jie-Dao; Zheng, Cheng-Chao

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that PNZIP and its homologs encode a special cyclase and play an important role in chlorophyll biosynthesis in higher plants. To investigate the molecular mechanism governing the PNZIP gene, the PNZIP promoter was isolated and analyzed. Deletion analysis indicated that G-box is an important element in the regulation of the reporter gene expression. Further mutation assay demonstrated that G-box and GATACT elements are necessary and sufficient for the high and tissue-specific expression of the GUS gene. Using yeast one-hybrid screening, we have isolated a novel tobacco bZIP protein, NtbZIP, which can specifically recognize the G-box of the PNZIP promoter. The NtbZIP protein shares a limited amino acid homology to Arabidopsis ABI5 and AtAREB1 and very low homology to other bZIP proteins. Northern blot analysis showed that the NtbZIP gene is not induced by exogenous ABA and is expressed in different tobacco organs. Cotransformation assays showed that the NtbZIP protein could activate the transcription of the GUS gene driven by the PNZIP promoter. Transgenic tobaccos analysis demonstrated that constitutively expressing antisense NtbZIP gene resulted in a lower NTZIP synthesis and reduced chlorophyll levels. We suggest that NTZIP is a target gene of NtbZIP, which is involved in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis.

  5. Tissue-specific expression of the PNZIP promoter is mediated by combinatorial interaction of different cis-elements and a novel transcriptional factor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Tao; Yu, Yan-Li; Yang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Jie-Dao; Zheng, Cheng-Chao

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that PNZIP and its homologs encode a special cyclase and play an important role in chlorophyll biosynthesis in higher plants. To investigate the molecular mechanism governing the PNZIP gene, the PNZIP promoter was isolated and analyzed. Deletion analysis indicated that G-box is an important element in the regulation of the reporter gene expression. Further mutation assay demonstrated that G-box and GATACT elements are necessary and sufficient for the high and tissue-specific expression of the GUS gene. Using yeast one-hybrid screening, we have isolated a novel tobacco bZIP protein, NtbZIP, which can specifically recognize the G-box of the PNZIP promoter. The NtbZIP protein shares a limited amino acid homology to Arabidopsis ABI5 and AtAREB1 and very low homology to other bZIP proteins. Northern blot analysis showed that the NtbZIP gene is not induced by exogenous ABA and is expressed in different tobacco organs. Cotransformation assays showed that the NtbZIP protein could activate the transcription of the GUS gene driven by the PNZIP promoter. Transgenic tobaccos analysis demonstrated that constitutively expressing antisense NtbZIP gene resulted in a lower NTZIP synthesis and reduced chlorophyll levels. We suggest that NTZIP is a target gene of NtbZIP, which is involved in the regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis. PMID:19270069

  6. P/CAF/p300 complex binds the promoter for the heavy subunit of ferritin and contributes to its tissue-specific expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, M A; Faniello, M C; Russo, T; Cimino, F; Costanzo, F

    1998-01-01

    We analysed the role of the nuclear protein P/CAF in regulating the transcription of the gene for human heavy (H) ferritin in given cell types. P/CAF is a histone acetylase, recruited to specific promoters via interaction with the co-activator molecule p300/CREB-binding protein (CBP). Histone acetylation promoted by P/CAF destabilizes the nucleosome structure, thus contributing to activation of transcription. The transcription of the H ferritin gene is regulated by the transcription factor B-box-binding factor (Bbf), which bridges RNA polymerase II via p300/CBP. Northern blot analyses of RNA species from various human tissues and cell lines demonstrate that the H ferritin gene is expressed at high levels in cells containing high levels of the P/CAF transcript. Moreover, transient overexpression of P/CAF in cells constitutively expressing low levels of this protein activates transcription driven by the region of the H promoter interacting with Bbf. The involvement of p300/CBP in the possible P/CAF-mediated regulation of H promoter was also explored by evaluating the phenomenon in the presence of the oncoprotein E1A. The results of these experiments demonstrate that P/CAF activates the H promoter also in the presence of limited amounts of p300/CBP. We argue that P/CAF is a component of the basal transcription apparatus of the H ferritin gene and that the relative amounts of the P/CAF protein in different cell types could account for the cell-specific control of the H ferritin gene transcription. PMID:9794790

  7. Creation of Bt rice expressing a fusion protein of Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like using a green tissue-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Yi; Mei, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Zhicheng; Fang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The insecticidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) have long been successfully used for development of insect-resistant rice. However, commercial planting of Bt rice has been delayed by the concern over food safety, although no scientific evidence is ever found to justify the concern. To address this safety concern, we developed a transgenic insect-resistant rice line using a green tissue promoter to minimize the Bt protein expression in the rice seeds. The Bt protein expressed in the rice was a fusion protein of two different Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like protein. The fusion of the two toxins may be helpful to delay the development of insect resistance to Bt rice. Laboratory and field bioassays demonstrated that the transgenic rice plants created by this study were highly active against the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) and the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker). Western analysis indicated that the fusion protein was specifically expressed in green tissues but not in seeds. Therefore, the transgenic rice created in this study should be useful to mitigate the food safety concern and to delay the development of insect resistance.

  8. Creation of Bt rice expressing a fusion protein of Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like using a green tissue-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Yi; Mei, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Zhicheng; Fang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The insecticidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) have long been successfully used for development of insect-resistant rice. However, commercial planting of Bt rice has been delayed by the concern over food safety, although no scientific evidence is ever found to justify the concern. To address this safety concern, we developed a transgenic insect-resistant rice line using a green tissue promoter to minimize the Bt protein expression in the rice seeds. The Bt protein expressed in the rice was a fusion protein of two different Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like protein. The fusion of the two toxins may be helpful to delay the development of insect resistance to Bt rice. Laboratory and field bioassays demonstrated that the transgenic rice plants created by this study were highly active against the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) and the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker). Western analysis indicated that the fusion protein was specifically expressed in green tissues but not in seeds. Therefore, the transgenic rice created in this study should be useful to mitigate the food safety concern and to delay the development of insect resistance. PMID:25195461

  9. An Intergenic Region Shared by At4g35985 and At4g35987 in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Tissue Specific and Stress Inducible Bidirectional Promoter Analyzed in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Joydeep; Sahoo, Dipak Kumar; Dey, Nrisingha; Houtz, Robert L.; Maiti, Indu Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    On chromosome 4 in the Arabidopsis genome, two neighboring genes (calmodulin methyl transferase At4g35987 and senescence associated gene At4g35985) are located in a head-to-head divergent orientation sharing a putative bidirectional promoter. This 1258 bp intergenic region contains a number of environmental stress responsive and tissue specific cis-regulatory elements. Transcript analysis of At4g35985 and At4g35987 genes by quantitative real time PCR showed tissue specific and stress inducible expression profiles. We tested the bidirectional promoter-function of the intergenic region shared by the divergent genes At4g35985 and At4g35987 using two reporter genes (GFP and GUS) in both orientations in transient tobacco protoplast and Agro-infiltration assays, as well as in stably transformed transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. In transient assays with GFP and GUS reporter genes the At4g35985 promoter (P85) showed stronger expression (about 3.5 fold) compared to the At4g35987 promoter (P87). The tissue specific as well as stress responsive functional nature of the bidirectional promoter was evaluated in independent transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco lines. Expression of P85 activity was detected in the midrib of leaves, leaf trichomes, apical meristemic regions, throughout the root, lateral roots and flowers. The expression of P87 was observed in leaf-tip, hydathodes, apical meristem, root tips, emerging lateral root tips, root stele region and in floral tissues. The bidirectional promoter in both orientations shows differential up-regulation (2.5 to 3 fold) under salt stress. Use of such regulatory elements of bidirectional promoters showing spatial and stress inducible promoter-functions in heterologous system might be an important tool for plant biotechnology and gene stacking applications. PMID:24260266

  10. Ha-ras oncogene expression directed by a milk protein gene promoter: tissue specificity, hormonal regulation, and tumor induction in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, A.C.; Schoenenberger, C.A.; Groner, B.; Henninghausen, L.; LeMeur, M.; Gelinger, P.

    1987-03-01

    The activated human Ha-ras oncogene was subjected to the control of the promoter region of the murine whey acidic protein (Wap) gene, which is expressed in mammary epithelial cells in response to lactogenic hormones. The Wap-ras gene was stably introduced into the mouse germ line of five transgenic mice (one male and four females). Wap-ras expression was observed in the mammary glands of lactating females in two lines derived from female founders. The tissue-directed and hormone-dependent Wap expression was conferred on the Ha-ras oncogene. The signals governing Wap expression are located within 2.5 kilobases of 5' flanking sequence. The other two lines derived from female founders did not express the chimeric gene. In the line derived from the male founder the Wap-ras gene is integrated into the Y chromosome. Expression was found in the salivary gland of male animals only. After a long latency, Wap-ras-expressing mice developed tumors. The tumors arose in tissues expressing Wap-ras - i.e., mammary or salivary glands. Compared to the corresponding nonmalignant tissues, Wap-ras expression was enhanced in the tumors.

  11. The sweet potato RbcS gene (IbRbcS1) promoter confers high-level and green tissue-specific expression of the GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-08-10

    Sweet potato is an important crop because of its high yield and biomass production. We herein investigated the potential of the promoter activity of a small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RbcS) from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) in order to develop the high expression system of exogenous DNA in Arabidopsis. We isolated two different cDNAs (IbRbcS1 and IbRbcS2) encoding RbcS from sweet potato. Their predicted amino acid sequences were well conserved with the mature RbcS protein of other plants. The tissue-specific expression patterns of these two genes revealed that expression of IbRbcS1 was specific to green tissue, whereas that of IbRbcS2 was non-photosynthetic tissues such as roots and tubers. These results suggested that IbRbcS1 was predominantly expressed in the green tissue-specific of sweet potato over IbRbcS2. Therefore, the IbRbcS1 promoter was transformed into Arabidopsis along with β-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene. GUS staining and semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that the IbRbcS1 promoter conferred the expression of the GUS reporter gene in green tissue-specific and light-inducible manners. Furthermore, qPCR showed that the expression levels of GUS reporter gene in IbRbcS1 pro:GUS were same as those in CaMV 35S pro:GUS plants. These results suggest that the IbRbcS1 promoter is a potentially strong foreign gene expression system for genetic transformation in plants.

  12. Rice oxalate oxidase gene driven by green tissue-specific promoter increases tolerance to sheath blight pathogen (Rhizoctonia solani) in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Molla, Kutubuddin A; Karmakar, Subhasis; Chanda, Palas K; Ghosh, Satabdi; Sarkar, Sailendra N; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2013-12-01

    Rice sheath blight, caused by the necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most devastating and intractable diseases of rice, leading to a significant reduction in rice productivity worldwide. In this article, in order to examine sheath blight resistance, we report the generation of transgenic rice lines overexpressing the rice oxalate oxidase 4 (Osoxo4) gene in a green tissue-specific manner which breaks down oxalic acid (OA), the pathogenesis factor secreted by R. solani. Transgenic plants showed higher enzyme activity of oxalate oxidase (OxO) than nontransgenic control plants, which was visualized by histochemical assays and sodium dodecylsulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Transgenic rice leaves were more tolerant than control rice leaves to exogenous OA. Transgenic plants showed a higher level of expression of other defence-related genes in response to pathogen infection. More importantly, transgenic plants exhibited significantly enhanced durable resistance to R. solani. The overexpression of Osoxo4 in rice did not show any detrimental phenotypic or agronomic effect. Our findings indicate that rice OxO can be utilized effectively in plant genetic manipulation for sheath blight resistance, and possibly for resistance to other diseases caused by necrotrophic fungi, especially those that secrete OA. This is the first report of the expression of defence genes in rice in a green tissue-specific manner for sheath blight resistance.

  13. Targeted gene expression without a tissue-specific promoter: creating mosaic embryos using laser-induced single-cell heat shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halfon, M. S.; Kose, H.; Chiba, A.; Keshishian, H.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a method to target gene expression in the Drosophila embryo to a specific cell without having a promoter that directs expression in that particular cell. Using a digitally enhanced imaging system to identify single cells within the living embryo, we apply a heat shock to each cell individually by using a laser microbeam. A 1- to 2-min laser treatment is sufficient to induce a heat-shock response but is not lethal to the heat-shocked cells. Induction of heat shock was measured in a variety of cell types, including neurons and somatic muscles, by the expression of beta-galactosidase from an hsp26-lacZ reporter construct or by expression of a UAS target gene after induction of hsGAL4. We discuss the applicability of this technique to ectopic gene expression studies, lineage tracing, gene inactivation studies, and studies of cells in vitro. Laser heat shock is a versatile technique that can be adapted for use in a variety of research organisms and is useful for any studies in which it is desirable to express a given gene in only a distinct cell or clone of cells, either transiently or constitutively, at a time point of choice.

  14. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  15. Tissue engineering chamber promotes adipose tissue regeneration in adipose tissue engineering models through induced aseptic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhangsong; Dong, Ziqing; Chang, Qiang; Zhan, Weiqing; Zeng, Zhaowei; Zhang, Shengchang; Lu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering chamber (TEC) makes it possible to generate significant amounts of mature, vascularized, stable, and transferable adipose tissue. However, little is known about the role of the chamber in tissue engineering. Therefore, to investigate the role of inflammatory response and the change in mechanotransduction started by TEC after implantation, we placed a unique TEC model on the surface of the groin fat pads in rats to study the expression of cytokines and tissue development in the TEC. The number of infiltrating cells was counted, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression levels in the chamber at multiple time points postimplantation were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tissue samples were collected at various time points and labeled for specific cell populations. The result showed that new adipose tissue formed in the chamber at day 60. Also, the expression of MCP-1 and VEGF in the chamber decreased slightly from an early stage as well as the number of the infiltrating cells. A large number of CD34+/perilipin- perivascular cells could be detected at day 30. Also, the CD34+/perilipin+ adipose precursor cell numbers increased sharply by day 45 and then decreased by day 60. CD34-/perilipin+ mature adipocytes were hard to detect in the chamber content at day 30, but their number increased and then peaked at day 60. Ki67-positive cells could be found near blood vessels and their number decreased sharply over time. Masson's trichrome showed that collagen was the dominant component of the chamber content at early stage and was replaced by newly formed small adipocytes over time. Our findings suggested that the TEC implantation could promote the proliferation of adipose precursor cells derived from local adipose tissue, increase angiogenesis, and finally lead to spontaneous adipogenesis by inducing aseptic inflammation and changing local mechanotransduction.

  16. Limited specificity of promoter constructs for gene therapy in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Annika; Kabisch, Hartmut; Block, Andreas; Müller, Jürgen; Hellwinkel, Olaf J C

    2004-10-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), a malignant bone neoplasia in childhood, has poor prognosis if metastases appear in the lung. A novel therapeutic approach could consist in a gene therapeutic treatment of OS metastases. However, if promiscuous viral vectors are applied for the delivery of potentially toxic transgenes, their misdelivery into normal tissues could cause severe complications. This problem could be circumvented by application of OS-specific promoters for transgene expression control. We analysed the function of promoters described to be tumour-, osteosarcoma- or osteoblast-specific. Expression rates driven by osteoblast- specific fragments from the collagen1A1-promoter, the human Osteocalcin-promoter, the bone-sialoprotein promoter and the beta-catenin promoter depending on vitamin supplementation were analysed in five OS cell lines, in normal lung fibroblasts and in a non-osteoblastic prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP) by dual luciferase assays. In addition, an unspecific but doxycyclin-repressible promoter construct (pAd.3r-luc) was examined. We found that all constructs were active in OS cell lines to varying extents. The complete human Osteocalcin promoter and the bone-sialoprotein promoter were partially induced by vitamin D3 or C respectively while the pAd.3r-luc activity could be shut down by doxycyclin. In contrast, the human Osteocalcin-promoter was not activated by vitamin D3 in LNCaP cells; its action remained relatively low. Interestingly, excepting the beta-catenin promoter, we measured strong activities of all promoters in lung fibroblast cells. Our study demonstrates that promoter activity should be evaluated not only for the target cells of the gene therapeutic approaches, but also for neighbouring normal tissues. Unspecific but repressible promoters could represent an alternative. PMID:15375610

  17. Tissue-specific and steroid-dependent interaction of transcription factors with the oestrogen-inducible apoVLDL II promoter in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Wijnholds, J; Philipsen, J N; Ab, G

    1988-01-01

    Using in vivo dimethylsulphate footprinting, we have analysed protein--DNA interactions within the promoter region of the oestrogen-inducible gene encoding chicken apo very low density lipoprotein II (apoVLDL II). Most of the guanosine--protein contacts found, are located within the 230-bp DNA 5' flanking the gene and can be grouped into separate protein-binding sites. Two of these sites resemble the oestrogen-responsive element (ERE) which is the target site for the oestrogen receptor. A third site has some features in common with the chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter element binding the COUP transcription factor. All protein contacts identified are present in the apoVLDL-II-expressing liver exclusively, and are not found in the hormone-naive liver, in erythrocytes or the oviduct tubular gland. Our results demonstrate the binding in vivo of a protein, presumably the oestrogen receptor, to the ERE and suggest that the hormone activates transcription by establishing a transcription complex comprising several factors at the apoVLDL II promoter. Images PMID:3181140

  18. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  19. Bovine prolactin elevates hTF expression directed by a tissue-specific goat β-casein promoter through prolactin receptor-mediated STAT5a activation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shizhong; Ren, Zhaorui; Xie, Fei; Yan, Jingbin; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao

    2012-11-01

    Prolactin promotes the expression of exogenous human transferrin gene in the milk of transgenic mice. To elucidate this, a recombinant plasmid of bovine prolactin plus human transferrin vector was co-transfected into cultured murine mammary gland epithelial cells. Prolactin-receptor antagonist and shRNA corresponding to prolactin-receptor mRNA were added into the cell culture mixture to investigate the relations between prolactin-receptor and human transferrin expression after bovine prolactin inducement. Levels of human transferrin in the supernatants were increased under the presentation of bovine prolactin (from 1,076 ± 115 to 1,886 ± 114 pg/ml). With the treatment of prolactin-receptor antagonist or shRNA, human transferrin in cells was declined (1,886 ± 113 vs. 1,233 ± 85 pg/ml or 1,114 ± 75 pg/ml, respectively). An inverse correlation was found between the dosage of prolactin-receptor antagonist and expression level of human transferrin. Real-time qRT-PCR analysis showed that the relative level of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a (STAT5a) transcript in transfected cells correlated with expression levels of human transferrin in the supernatant of the same cells. Bovine prolactin thus improved the expression of human transferrin through such a possible mechanism that bovine prolactin activated STAT5a transcription expression via combined with prolactin-receptor and suggest a potential utility of the bovine prolactin for efficient expression of valuable pharmaceutical proteins in mammary glands of transgenic animals.

  20. A Tissue-Specific Scaffold for Tissue Engineering-Based Ureteral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongde; Fu, Weijun; Wang, Zhongxin; Li, Gang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Terminally differentiated somatic cells can rapidly change phenotypes when they are isolated from their native tissue and cultured in vitro. This problem may become a barrier to tissue engineering-based organ reconstruction, which utilizes somatic cells. The present study was designed to validate the feasibility of maintaining the urothelial cell phenotype in a tissue-specific ureteral scaffold. The tissue-specific scaffold was fabricated by blending poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and ureteral extracellular matrix (UECM) using electrostatic spinning technology. PLLA was used to enhance the mechanical properties, and UECM was used to mimic the natural components of the ureter. Primary urothelial cells (UCs), derived from ureteral mucosa, were seeded onto the tissue-specific scaffold to assess cell adhesion, proliferation and phenotypes at designated time points. The results showed that UCs in the tissue-specific scaffold exhibited better proliferation compared to cells in pure PLLA or a PLLA-small intestinal submucosa (PLLA-SIS) scaffold (p<0.05). At different time points, the expression of a UC-specific marker (UroplakinⅢ) in the tissue-specific scaffold was significantly higher than its expression in pure PLLA or a PLLA-SIS scaffold (p<0.05). Therefore, the tissue-specific scaffold appears to be an ideal substrate for promoting UC survival and phenotype maintenance. PMID:25775033

  1. Gut specific expression using mammalian promoters in transgenic Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Beck, C W; Slack, J M

    1999-11-01

    The recent development of transgenic methods for the frog Xenopus laevis provides the opportunity to study later developmental events, such as organogenesis, at the molecular level. Our studies have focused on the development of the tadpole gut, where tissue specific promoters have yet to be identified. We have used mammalian promoters, for the genes elastase, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, transthyretin, and intestinal fatty acid binding protein to drive green fluorescent protein expression in live tadpoles. All of these were shown to drive appropriate tissue specific expression, suggesting that the molecular mechanisms organising the gut are similar in amphibians and mammals. Furthermore, expression from the elastase promoter is initiated in the pancreatic buds before morphological definition becomes possible, making it a powerful tool for the study of pancreatic determination. PMID:10534620

  2. Thyroid-specific transcription factors control Hex promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Puppin, Cinzia; D'Elia, Angela V.; Pellizzari, Lucia; Russo, Diego; Arturi, Franco; Presta, Ivan; Filetti, Sebastiano; Bogue, Clifford W.; Denson, Lee A.; Damante, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The homeobox-containing gene Hex is expressed in several cell types, including thyroid follicular cells, in which it regulates the transcription of tissue- specific genes. In this study the regulation of Hex promoter activity was investigated. Using co- transfection experiments, we demonstrated that the transcriptional activity of the Hex gene promoter in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells is ∼10-fold greater than that observed in HeLa and NIH 3T3 cell lines (which do not normally express the Hex gene). To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences, we evaluated the effect of the thyroid- specific transcription factor TTF-1 on the Hex promoter activity. TTF-1 produced 3–4-fold increases in the Hex promoter activity. Gel- retardation assays and mutagenesis experiments revealed the presence of functionally relevant TTF-1 binding sites in the Hex promoter region. These in vitro data may also have functional relevance in vivo, since a positive correlation between TTF-1 and Hex mRNAs was demonstrated in human thyroid tissues by means of RT–PCR analysis. The TTF-1 effect, however, is not sufficient to explain the difference in Hex promoter activity between FRTL-5 and cells that do not express the Hex gene. For this reason, we tested whether Hex protein is able to activate the Hex promoter. Indeed, co-transfection experiments indicate that Hex protein is able to increase the activity of its own promoter in HeLa cells ∼4-fold. TTF-1 and Hex effects are additive: when transfected together in HeLa cells, the Hex promoter activity is increased 6–7-fold. Thus, the contemporary presence of both TTF-1 and Hex could be sufficient to explain the higher transcriptional activity of the Hex promoter in thyroid cells with respect to cell lines that do not express the Hex gene. These findings demonstrate the existence of direct cross-regulation between thyroid-specific transcription factors. PMID:12655000

  3. Use of Ferritin Expression, Regulated by Neural Cell-Specific Promoters in Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells, to Monitor Differentiation with Magnetic Resonance Imaging In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Cuiping; Mu, Shuhua; Jiang, Xiaogang; Li, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Shizhen; Zhao, Zhenfu; Zhou, Guangqian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a method for monitoring the neural differentiation of stem cells using ferritin transgene expression, under the control of a neural-differentiation-inducible promoter, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) were transduced with a lentivirus containing the human ferritin heavy chain 1 (FTH1) gene coupled to one of three neural cell-specific promoters: human synapsin 1 promoter (SYN1p, for neurons), human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter (GFAPp, for astrocytes), and human myelin basic protein promoter (MBPp, for oligodendrocytes). Three groups of neural-differentiation-inducible ferritin-expressing (NDIFE) hADMSCs were established: SYN1p-FTH1, GFAPp-FTH1, and MBPp-FTH1. The proliferation rate of the NDIFE hADMSCs was evaluated using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Ferritin expression was assessed with western blotting and immunofluorescent staining before and after the induction of differentiation in NDIFE hADMSCs. The intracellular iron content was measured with Prussian blue iron staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. R2 relaxation rates were measured with MRI in vitro. The proliferation rates of control and NDIFE hADMSCs did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). SYN1p-FTH1, GFAPp-FTH1, and MBPp-FTH1 hADMSCs expressed specific markers of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, respectively, after neural differentiation. Neural differentiation increased ferritin expression twofold, the intracellular iron content threefold, and the R2 relaxation rate two- to threefold in NDIFE hADMSCs, resulting in notable hypointensity in T2-weighted images (P < 0.05). These results were cross-validated. Thus, a link between neural differentiation and MRI signals (R2 relaxation rate) was established in hADMSCs. The use of MRI and neural-differentiation-inducible ferritin expression is a viable method for monitoring the neural differentiation of h

  4. Adipose tissue extract promotes adipose tissue regeneration in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zijing; Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    An adipose tissue engineering chamber model of spontaneous adipose tissue generation from an existing fat flap has been described. However, the chamber does not completely fill with adipose tissue in this model. Here, the effect of adipose tissue extract (ATE) on adipose tissue regeneration was investigated. In vitro, the adipogenic and angiogenic capacities of ATE were evaluated using Oil Red O and tube formation assays on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), respectively. In vivo, saline or ATE was injected into the adipose tissue engineering chamber 1 week after its implantation. At different time points post-injection, the contents were morphometrically, histologically, and immunohistochemically evaluated, and the expression of growth factors and adipogenic genes was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time PCR. With the exception of the baseline control group, in which fat flaps were not inserted into a chamber, the total volume of fat flap tissue increased significantly in all groups, especially in the ATE group. Better morphology and structure, a thinner capsule, and more vessels were observed in the ATE group than in the control group. Expression of angiogenic growth factors and adipogenic markers were significantly higher in the ATE group. ATE therefore significantly promoted adipose tissue regeneration and reduced capsule formation in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model. These data suggest that ATE provides a more angiogenic and adipogenic microenvironment for adipose tissue formation by releasing various cytokines and growth factors that also inhibit capsule formation.

  5. Tissue-specific expression of squirrel monkey chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Vasauskas, Audrey A.; Hubler, Tina R.; Boston, Lori; Scammell, Jonathan G.

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotropins LH and FSH play central roles in reproductive function. In Old World primates, LH stimulates ovulation in females and testosterone production in males. Recent studies have found that squirrel monkeys and other New World primates lack expression of LH in the pituitary. Instead, chorionic gonadotropin (CG), which is normally only expressed in the placenta of Old World primates, is the active luteotropic pituitary hormone in these animals. The goal of this study was to investigate the tissue-specific regulation of squirrel monkey CG. We isolated the squirrel monkey CGβ gene and promoter from genomic DNA from squirrel monkey B-lymphoblasts and compared the promoter sequence to that of the common marmoset, another New World primate, and human CGβ and LHβ. Using reporter gene assays, we found that a squirrel monkey CGβ promoter fragment (−1898/+9) is active in both mouse pituitary LβT2 and human placenta JEG3 cells, but not in rat adrenal PC12 cells. Furthermore, within this construct separate cis-elements are responsible for pituitary- and placenta-specific expression. Pituitary-specific expression is governed by Egr-1 binding sites in the proximal 250 bp of the promoter, whereas placenta-specific expression is controlled by AP-2 sites further upstream. Thus, selective expression of the squirrel monkey CGβ promoter in pituitary and placental cells is governed by distinct cis-elements that exhibit homology with human LHβ and marmoset CGβ promoters, respectively. PMID:21130091

  6. Predicting tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals are encoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the origins of multicellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate gene regulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate this code, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidate tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategy to microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues and identified 7187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking gene expression, the majority of which were located outside of known promoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novo predict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in 57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision in enhancer recognition ranging from 32% to 63% and a sensitivity of 47%. We used the sequence signatures identified by this approach to successfully assign tissue-specific predictions to ∼328,000 human–mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. By overlapping these genome-wide predictions with a data set of enhancers validated in vivo, in transgenic mice, we were able to confirm our results with a 28% sensitivity and 50% precision. These results indicate the power of combining complementary genomic data sets as an initial computational foray into a global view of tissue-specific gene regulation in vertebrates. PMID:17210927

  7. A seed coat-specific promoter for canola.

    PubMed

    El-Mezawy, Aliaa; Wu, Limin; Shah, Saleh

    2009-12-01

    The canola industry generates more than $11 billion of yearly income to the Canadian economy. One problem of meal quality is the dark polyphenolic pigments that accumulate in the seed coat. Seed coat-specific promoters are a pre-requisite to regulate the genes involved in seed coat development and metabolism. The beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene was used to test an Arabidopsis promoter in developing and mature seeds of canola (Brassica napus). The promoter tested is the regulatory region of the laccase gene (AtLAC15) from Arabidopsis thaliana. The AtLAC15 promoter::GUS construct was inserted into canola double haploid line DH12075 using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Southern blot analysis using a 536 bp GUS probe showed variation among the transformed plants in the T-DNA copy numbers and the position of the insertion in their genomes. Histochemical assay of the GUS enzyme in different tissues (roots, leaves, stem, pollen grains, flowers, siliques, embryos and seed coats) showed ascending GUS activity only in the seed coat from 10 days after pollination (DAP) to the fully mature stage (35 DAP). GUS stain was observed in the mucilage cell layer, in the outer integument layer of the seed coat but not in the inner integument. The AtLAC15 promoter exhibited a specificity and expression level that is useful as a seed coat-specific promoter for canola. PMID:19690805

  8. Thymus epithelium induces tissue-specific tolerance

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Most current models of T cell development include a positive selection step in the thymus that occurs when T cells interact with thymic epithelium and a negative selection step after encounters with bone marrow-derived cells. We show here that developing T cells are tolerized when they recognize antigens expressed by thymic epithelium, that the tolerance is tissue specific, and that it can occur by deletion of the reactive T cells. PMID:8459209

  9. Computational analysis of tissue-specific combinatorial gene regulation: predicting interaction between transcription factors in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J.; Qian, Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression is generally regulated by more than a single transcription factor (TF). Multiple TFs work in concert to achieve tissue specificity. In order to explore these complex TF interaction networks, we performed a large-scale analysis of TF interactions for 30 human tissues. We first identified tissue-specific genes for 30 tissues based on gene expression databases. We then evaluated the relationships between TFs using the relative position and co-occurrence of their binding sites in the promoters of tissue-specific genes. The predicted TF–TF interactions were validated by both known protein–protein interactions and co-expression of their target genes. We found that our predictions are enriched in known protein–protein interactions (>80 times that of random expectation). In addition, we found that the target genes show the highest co-expression in the tissue of interest. Our findings demonstrate that non-tissue specific TFs play a large role in regulation of tissue-specific genes. Furthermore, they show that individual TFs can contribute to tissue specificity in different tissues by interacting with distinct TF partners. Lastly, we identified several tissue-specific TF clusters that may play important roles in tissue-specific gene regulation. PMID:16982645

  10. Ribosomopathies: Global process, tissue specific defects

    PubMed Central

    Yelick, Pamela C; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in ribosomal biogenesis would be expected to have global and in fact lethal effects on a developing organism. However, mutations in ribosomal protein genes have been shown in to exhibit tissue specific defects. This seemingly contradictory finding - that globally expressed genes thought to play fundamental housekeeping functions can in fact exhibit tissue and cell type specific functions ‐ provides new insight into roles for ribosomes, the protein translational machinery of the cell, in regulating normal development and disease. Furthermore it illustrates the surprisingly dynamic nature of processes regulating cell type specific protein translation. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of a variety of ribosomal protein mutations associated with human disease, and models to better understand the molecular mechanisms associated with each. We use specific examples to emphasize both the similarities and differences between the effects of various human ribosomal protein mutations. Finally, we discuss areas of future study that are needed to further our understanding of the role of ribosome biogenesis in normal development, and possible approaches that can be used to treat debilitating ribosomopathy diseases. PMID:26442198

  11. Ribosomopathies: Global process, tissue specific defects.

    PubMed

    Yelick, Pamela C; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in ribosomal biogenesis would be expected to have global and in fact lethal effects on a developing organism. However, mutations in ribosomal protein genes have been shown in to exhibit tissue specific defects. This seemingly contradictory finding - that globally expressed genes thought to play fundamental housekeeping functions can in fact exhibit tissue and cell type specific functions - provides new insight into roles for ribosomes, the protein translational machinery of the cell, in regulating normal development and disease. Furthermore it illustrates the surprisingly dynamic nature of processes regulating cell type specific protein translation. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of a variety of ribosomal protein mutations associated with human disease, and models to better understand the molecular mechanisms associated with each. We use specific examples to emphasize both the similarities and differences between the effects of various human ribosomal protein mutations. Finally, we discuss areas of future study that are needed to further our understanding of the role of ribosome biogenesis in normal development, and possible approaches that can be used to treat debilitating ribosomopathy diseases. PMID:26442198

  12. Expression of the CYP4F3 gene. tissue-specific splicing and alternative promoters generate high and low K(m) forms of leukotriene B(4) omega-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Christmas, P; Ursino, S R; Fox, J W; Soberman, R J

    1999-07-23

    Cytochrome P450 4F3 (CYP4F3) catalyzes the inactivation of leukotriene B(4) by omega-oxidation in human neutrophils. To understand the regulation of CYP4F3 expression, we analyzed the CYP4F3 gene and cloned a novel isoform (CYP4F3B) that is expressed in fetal and adult liver, but not in neutrophils. The CYP4F3 gene contains 14 exons and 13 introns. The cDNAs for CYP4F3A (the neutrophil isoform) and CYP4F3B have identical coding regions, except that they contain exons 4 and 3, respectively. Both exons code for amino acids 66-114 but share only 27% identity. When expressed in COS-7 cells, the K(m) of CYP4F3B was determined to be 26-fold higher than the K(m) of CYP4F3A using leukotriene B(4) as a substrate. 5'-Rapid amplification of cDNA end studies reveal that the CYP4F3A and CYP4F3B transcripts have 5'-termini derived from different parts of the gene and are initiated from distinct transcription start sites located 519 and 71 base pairs (bp), respectively, from the ATG initiation codon. A consensus TATA box is located 27 bp upstream of the CYP4F3B transcription start site, and a TATA box-like sequence is located 23 bp upstream of the CYP4F3A transcription start site. The data indicate that the tissue-specific expression of functionally distinct CYP4F3 isoforms is regulated by alternative promoter usage and mutually exclusive exon splicing.

  13. Induction of tissue-specific stem cells by reprogramming factors, and tissue-specific selection.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Saitoh, I; Tsugata, T; Kataoka, H; Watanabe, M; Noguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Although induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have significant implications for overcoming most of the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells, there are still several unresolved issues related to the use of iPS cells for clinical applications, such as teratoma formation. In this study, we were able to generate tissue-specific stem (induced tissue-specific stem; iTS) cells from the pancreas (iTS-P) or liver (iTS-L) by transient overexpression of reprogramming factors, combined with tissue-specific selection. The generation of iTS cells was easier than that of iPS cells. The iTS-P/iTS-L cells express genetic markers of endoderm and pancreatic/hepatic progenitors and were able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells/hepatocytes more efficiently than ES cells. Subcutaneous transplantation of both types of iTS cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in no teratoma formation. The technology used for the transient overexpression of reprogramming factors and tissue-specific selection may be useful for the generation of other tissue-specific stem cells, and the generation of iTS cells could have important implications for the clinical application of stem cells.

  14. Induction of tissue-specific stem cells by reprogramming factors, and tissue-specific selection.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Saitoh, I; Tsugata, T; Kataoka, H; Watanabe, M; Noguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Although induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have significant implications for overcoming most of the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells, there are still several unresolved issues related to the use of iPS cells for clinical applications, such as teratoma formation. In this study, we were able to generate tissue-specific stem (induced tissue-specific stem; iTS) cells from the pancreas (iTS-P) or liver (iTS-L) by transient overexpression of reprogramming factors, combined with tissue-specific selection. The generation of iTS cells was easier than that of iPS cells. The iTS-P/iTS-L cells express genetic markers of endoderm and pancreatic/hepatic progenitors and were able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells/hepatocytes more efficiently than ES cells. Subcutaneous transplantation of both types of iTS cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in no teratoma formation. The technology used for the transient overexpression of reprogramming factors and tissue-specific selection may be useful for the generation of other tissue-specific stem cells, and the generation of iTS cells could have important implications for the clinical application of stem cells. PMID:25190146

  15. KSHV Rta Promoter Specification and Viral Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Guito, Jonathan; Lukac, David M

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens whose biological success depends upon replication and packaging of viral genomes, and transmission of progeny viruses to new hosts. The biological success of herpesviruses is enhanced by their ability to reproduce their genomes without producing progeny viruses or killing the host cells, a process called latency. Latency permits a herpesvirus to remain undetected in its animal host for decades while maintaining the potential to reactivate, or switch, to a productive life cycle when host conditions are conducive to generating viral progeny. Direct interactions between many host and viral molecules are implicated in controlling herpesviral reactivation, suggesting complex biological networks that control the decision. One viral protein that is necessary and sufficient to switch latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) into the lytic infection cycle is called K-Rta. K-Rta is a transcriptional activator that specifies promoters by binding DNA directly and interacting with cellular proteins. Among these cellular proteins, binding of K-Rta to RBP-Jk is essential for viral reactivation. In contrast to the canonical model for Notch signaling, RBP-Jk is not uniformly and constitutively bound to the latent KSHV genome, but rather is recruited to DNA by interactions with K-Rta. Stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding requires high affinity binding of Rta to repetitive and palindromic "CANT DNA repeats" in promoters, and formation of ternary complexes with RBP-Jk. However, while K-Rta expression is necessary for initiating KSHV reactivation, K-Rta's role as the switch is inefficient. Many factors modulate K-Rta's function, suggesting that KSHV reactivation can be significantly regulated post-Rta expression and challenging the notion that herpesviral reactivation is bistable. This review analyzes rapidly evolving research on KSHV K-Rta to consider the role of K-Rta promoter specification in regulating the progression of KSHV

  16. Laminin Mediates Tissue-specific Gene Expression in Mammary Epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Streuli, Charles H; Schmidhauser, Christian; Bailey, Nina; Yurchenco, Peter; Skubitz, Amy P. N.; Roskelley, Calvin; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-04-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta-casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain.

  17. Laminin mediates tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelia

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression in mammary epithelium is dependent on the extracellular matrix as well as hormones. There is good evidence that the basement membrane provides signals for regulating beta-casein expression, and that integrins are involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that in the presence of lactogenic hormones, laminin can direct expression of the beta-casein gene. Mouse mammary epithelial cells plated on gels of native laminin or laminin-entactin undergo functional differentiation. On tissue culture plastic, mammary cells respond to soluble basement membrane or purified laminin, but not other extracellular matrix components, by synthesizing beta-casein. In mammary cells transfected with chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter constructs, laminin activates transcription from the beta- casein promoter through a specific enhancer element. The inductive effect of laminin on casein expression was specifically blocked by the E3 fragment of the carboxy terminal region of the alpha 1 chain of laminin, by antisera raised against the E3 fragment, and by a peptide corresponding to a sequence within this region. Our results demonstrate that laminin can direct tissue-specific gene expression in epithelial cells through its globular domain. PMID:7730398

  18. [Progress on strategies to promote vascularization in bone tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Lu; Mao, Yu-Yan; Lu, Jian-Xi; Chen, Lei

    2015-04-01

    With the continuous development of bone tissue engineering, a variety of emerging bone graft materials provided various methods for repairing bone defects. Early and rapid accomplishment of revascularization of materials interior after implantation of bone transplantation materials is a difficulty faced to bone tissue engineering. Blood vessels ingrowth provides the requisite netritional support for the regeneration reconstruction of bone tissue, for this reason, vascularization plays a significant role in bone tissue engineering. However,there is not a golden standard strategy of vascularization at present. Scaffold materials, cells and growth factors still are three indispensable elements in tissue engineering, and are cardinal points of the promoting vascularization strategies. Multiple growth factors or multiple cells combined with scaffolds, which are hot spots, have obtained excellent vascularization. This review focused on the comprehensive strategies for promoting the successful vascularization of tissue engineered scaffolds.

  19. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. ); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. ); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. ); Te Velde, K. ); Nordmann, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  20. ERAP140, a conserved tissue-specific nuclear receptor coactivator.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenlin; Halachmi, Shlomit; Brown, Myles

    2002-05-01

    We report here the identification and characterization of a novel nuclear receptor coactivator, ERAP140. ERAP140 was isolated in a screen for ER alpha-interacting proteins using the ER alpha ligand binding domain as a probe. The ERAP140 protein shares no sequence and has little structural homology with other nuclear receptor cofactors. However, homologues of ERAP140 have been identified in mouse, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans. The expression of ERAP140 is cell and tissue type specific and is most abundant in the brain, where its expression is restricted to neurons. In addition to interacting with ER alpha, ERAP140 also binds ER beta, TR beta, PPAR gamma, and RAR alpha. ERAP140 interacts with ER alpha via a noncanonical interaction motif. The ER alpha-ERAP140 association can be competed by coactivator NR boxes, indicating ERAP140 binds ER alpha on a surface similar to that of other coactivators. ERAP140 can enhance the transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors with which it interacts. In vivo, ERAP140 is recruited by estrogen-bound ER alpha to the promoter region of endogenous ER alpha target genes. Furthermore, the E(2)-induced recruitment of ERAP140 to the promoter follows a cyclic pattern similar to that of other coactivators. Our results suggest that ERAP140 represents a distinct class of nuclear receptor coactivators that mediates receptor signaling in specific target tissues. PMID:11971969

  1. Tissue-specific control elements of the Thy-1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, M; Morris, R; Grosveld, F; Spanopoulou, E

    1990-01-01

    We have exploited the structural homology, but different patterns of expression of the murine and human Thy-1 genes to map a number of tissue-specific enhancer elements in the genes. All of these are located downstream from the site of transcriptional initiation. The human gene contains separate elements which direct expression to the kidney or spleen epithelium. The murine gene lacks these elements but instead contains a thymocyte specific enhancer in the third intron. Developmentally-regulated expression in nerve cells is directed (at least in part) by an atypical element in the first intron. The latter is active on heterologous promoters, but is position and distance dependent. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1968831

  2. GUS reporter gene expression from Beta vulgaris root-specific promoters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop transgenic sugar beet with specialized agronomic traits for insect and disease tolerance and enhanced sugar accumulation and storage, a larger arsenal of constitutive, tissue-specific and temporal promoters is required. In the present study, a series of sugar beet promoters were tested f...

  3. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  4. Cloning of an ovule specific promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana and expression of beta-glucuronidase.

    PubMed

    Nain, Vikrant; Verma, Anju; Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Priyanka; Ramesh, B; Kumar, P Ananda

    2008-04-01

    Tissue specific expression of transgenes in plant species has several advantages over constitutive expression. Identification of ovule specific promoters would be useful in genetic engineering of plants with a variety of desirable traits such as genetically engineered parthenocarpy, female sterile plants or seedless fruits. Relative inaccessibility and difficulty in harvesting adequate amounts of tissue at known developmental stages has impeded the progress in cloning of promoters involved in ovule development. In the present study an ovule specific promoter was cloned from Arabidopsis AGL11 gene and used to express GUS (beta-glucuronidase) gene in transgenic Arabidopsis. Histochemical staining of GUS appeared in the center of young ovary (ovules), but no detectable GUS activity was observed in vegetative plant tissues, sepals, petals and androecium. AGL11 gene promoter can be useful to modify the developmental path of plants by expressing either plant hormones or lethal genes for agronomic purpose. PMID:18512328

  5. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  6. LSD1 promotes oxidative metabolism of white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Duteil, Delphine; Metzger, Eric; Willmann, Dominica; Karagianni, Panagiota; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Greschik, Holger; Günther, Thomas; Buettner, Reinhard; Talianidis, Iannis; Metzger, Daniel; Schüle, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to environmental cues such as cold or nutritional imbalance requires white adipose tissue (WAT) to adapt its metabolism to ensure survival. Metabolic plasticity is prominently exemplified by the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT in response to cold exposure or β3-adrenergic stimulation. Here we show that these stimuli increase the levels of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in WAT of mice and that elevated LSD1 levels induce mitochondrial activity. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analyses demonstrate that LSD1 directly stimulates the expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in cooperation with nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1). In transgenic (Tg) mice, increased levels of LSD1 promote in a cell-autonomous manner the formation of islets of metabolically active brown-like adipocytes in WAT. Notably, Tg mice show limited weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Taken together, our data establish LSD1 as a key regulator of OXPHOS and metabolic adaptation in WAT. PMID:24912735

  7. LSD1 promotes oxidative metabolism of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Duteil, Delphine; Metzger, Eric; Willmann, Dominica; Karagianni, Panagiota; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Greschik, Holger; Günther, Thomas; Buettner, Reinhard; Talianidis, Iannis; Metzger, Daniel; Schüle, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to environmental cues such as cold or nutritional imbalance requires white adipose tissue (WAT) to adapt its metabolism to ensure survival. Metabolic plasticity is prominently exemplified by the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT in response to cold exposure or β3-adrenergic stimulation. Here we show that these stimuli increase the levels of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in WAT of mice and that elevated LSD1 levels induce mitochondrial activity. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analyses demonstrate that LSD1 directly stimulates the expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in cooperation with nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1). In transgenic (Tg) mice, increased levels of LSD1 promote in a cell-autonomous manner the formation of islets of metabolically active brown-like adipocytes in WAT. Notably, Tg mice show limited weight gain when fed a high-fat diet. Taken together, our data establish LSD1 as a key regulator of OXPHOS and metabolic adaptation in WAT.

  8. DNA methylation signatures of the AIRE promoter in thymic epithelial cells, thymomas and normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kont, Vivian; Murumägi, Astrid; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Kinkel, Sarah A; Webster, Kylie E; Kisand, Kai; Tserel, Liina; Pihlap, Maire; Ströbel, Philipp; Scott, Hamish S; Marx, Alexander; Kyewski, Bruno; Peterson, Pärt

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the AIRE gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), which is associated with autoimmunity towards several peripheral organs. The AIRE protein is almost exclusively expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and CpG methylation in the promoter of the AIRE gene has been suggested to control its tissue-specific expression pattern. We found that in human AIRE-positive medullary and AIRE-negative cortical epithelium, the AIRE promoter is hypomethylated, whereas in thymocytes, the promoter had high level of CpG methylation. Likewise, in mouse mTECs the AIRE promoter was uniformly hypomethylated. In the same vein, the AIRE promoter was hypomethylated in AIRE-negative thymic epithelial tumors (thymomas) and in several peripheral tissues. Our data are compatible with the notion that promoter hypomethylation is necessary but not sufficient for tissue-specific regulation of the AIRE gene. In contrast, a positive correlation between AIRE expression and histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, an active chromatin mark, was found in the AIRE promoter in human and mouse TECs.

  9. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  10. Aire deficiency promotes TRP-1-specific immune rejection of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meng-Lei; Nagavalli, Anil; Su, Maureen A

    2013-04-01

    The thymic transcription factor autoimmune regulator (Aire) prevents autoimmunity in part by promoting expression of tissue-specific self-antigens, which include many cancer antigens. For example, AIRE-deficient patients are predisposed to vitiligo, an autoimmune disease of melanocytes that is often triggered by efficacious immunotherapies against melanoma. Therefore, we hypothesized that Aire deficiency in mice may elevate immune responses to cancer and provide insights into how such responses might be triggered. In this study, we show that Aire deficiency decreases thymic expression of TRP-1 (TYRP1), which is a self-antigen in melanocytes and a cancer antigen in melanomas. Aire deficiency resulted in defective negative selection of TRP-1-specific T cells without affecting thymic numbers of regulatory T cells. Aire-deficient mice displayed elevated T-cell immune responses that were associated with suppression of melanoma outgrowth. Furthermore, transplantation of Aire-deficient thymic stroma was sufficient to confer more effective immune rejection of melanoma in an otherwise Aire wild-type host. Together, our work showed how Aire deficiency can enhance immune responses against melanoma and how manipulating TRP-1-specific T-cell negative selection may offer a logical strategy to enhance immune rejection of melanoma.

  11. Detection of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in tissue and serum samples from breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Eon; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Yoo Duk; Lee, Ji Shin; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Nam, Jong Hee; Choi, Chan; Park, Min Ho; Yoon, Jung Han

    2011-10-01

    Promoter hypermethylation has been shown to be a common mechanism for inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in both the tumor and serum samples of breast cancer patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). The methylation status of Slit2 was investigated in 210 tissue samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 169 IBC samples) and 123 corresponding serum samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 82 IBC samples) using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining for Slit2 was also performed using tissue microarray blocks to determine whether Slit2 promoter hypermethylation correlated with loss of Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was not detected in breast tissue and serum samples from patients with no pathological findings. DCIS or IBC showed a statistically higher frequency of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation compared to breast with no pathological findings in both the tissue and serum samples; however, there were no statistically significant differences between DCIS and IBC samples. Similar Slit2 promoter hypermethylation patterns were seen in the tissue samples and corresponding serum specimens (p < 0.001). Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was associated with loss of Slit2 expression. These results suggest that Slit2 promoter hypermethylation appears to be responsible for functionally silencing Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation may be considered as a possible serum marker for early detection of breast cancer.

  12. Tissue specificity in the nuclear envelope supports its functional complexity

    PubMed Central

    de las Heras, Jose I; Meinke, Peter; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; Srsen, Vlastimil; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair RW; Schirmer, Eric C

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear envelope links to inherited disease gave the conundrum of how mutations in near-ubiquitous proteins can yield many distinct pathologies, each focused in different tissues. One conundrum-resolving hypothesis is that tissue-specific partner proteins mediate these pathologies. Such partner proteins may have now been identified with recent proteome studies determining nuclear envelope composition in different tissues. These studies revealed that the majority of the total nuclear envelope proteins are tissue restricted in their expression. Moreover, functions have been found for a number these tissue-restricted nuclear envelope proteins that fit with mechanisms proposed to explain how the nuclear envelope could mediate disease, including defects in mechanical stability, cell cycle regulation, signaling, genome organization, gene expression, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and differentiation. The wide range of functions to which these proteins contribute is consistent with not only their involvement in tissue-specific nuclear envelope disease pathologies, but also tissue evolution. PMID:24213376

  13. Isolation and functional characterization of a novel seed-specific promoter region from peanut.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Sowmini; Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The importance of using tissue-specific promoters in the genetic transformation of plants has been emphasized increasingly. Here, we report the isolation of a novel seed-specific promoter region from peanut and its validation in Arabidopsis and tobacco seeds. The reported promoter region referred to as groundnut seed promoter (GSP) confers seed-specific expression in heterologous systems, which include putative promoter regions of the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) gene 8A4R19G1. This region was isolated, sequenced, and characterized using gel shift assays. Tobacco transgenics obtained using binary vectors carrying uidA reporter gene driven by GSP and/or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoters were confirmed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR), RT-PCR, and computational analysis of motifs which revealed the presence of TATA, CAAT boxes, and ATG signals. This seed-specific promoter region successfully targeted the reporter uidA gene to seed tissues in both Arabidopsis and tobacco model systems, where its expression was confirmed by histochemical analysis of the transgenic seeds. This promoter region is routinely being used in the genetic engineering studies in legumes aimed at targeting novel transgenes to the seeds, especially those involved in micronutrient enhancement, fungal resistance, and molecular pharming.

  14. Isolation and functional characterization of a novel seed-specific promoter region from peanut.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Sowmini; Bhatnagar-Mathur, Pooja; Sharma, Kiran Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The importance of using tissue-specific promoters in the genetic transformation of plants has been emphasized increasingly. Here, we report the isolation of a novel seed-specific promoter region from peanut and its validation in Arabidopsis and tobacco seeds. The reported promoter region referred to as groundnut seed promoter (GSP) confers seed-specific expression in heterologous systems, which include putative promoter regions of the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) gene 8A4R19G1. This region was isolated, sequenced, and characterized using gel shift assays. Tobacco transgenics obtained using binary vectors carrying uidA reporter gene driven by GSP and/or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoters were confirmed through polymerase chain reaction (PCR), RT-PCR, and computational analysis of motifs which revealed the presence of TATA, CAAT boxes, and ATG signals. This seed-specific promoter region successfully targeted the reporter uidA gene to seed tissues in both Arabidopsis and tobacco model systems, where its expression was confirmed by histochemical analysis of the transgenic seeds. This promoter region is routinely being used in the genetic engineering studies in legumes aimed at targeting novel transgenes to the seeds, especially those involved in micronutrient enhancement, fungal resistance, and molecular pharming. PMID:24078220

  15. A specific sucrose phosphatase from plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hawker, J. S.; Hatch, M. D.

    1966-01-01

    1. A phosphatase that hydrolyses sucrose phosphate (phosphorylated at the 6-position of fructose) was isolated from sugar-cane stem and carrot roots. With partially purified preparations fructose 6-phosphate, glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 1-phosphate, glucose 1-phosphate and fructose 1,6-diphosphate are hydrolysed at between 0 and 2% of the rate for sucrose phosphate. 2. The activity of the enzyme is increased fourfold by the addition of Mg2+ ions and inhibited by EDTA, fluoride, inorganic phosphate, pyrophosphate, Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions. Sucrose (50mm) reduces activity by 60%. 3. The enzyme exhibits maximum activity between pH6·4 and 6·7. The Michaelis constant for sucrose phosphate is between 0·13 and 0·17mm. 4. At least some of the specific phosphatase is associated with particles having the sedimentation properties of mitochondria. 5. A similar phosphatase appears to be present in several other plant species. PMID:4290548

  16. Evolution of a tissue-specific splicing network.

    PubMed

    Taliaferro, J Matthew; Alvarez, Nehemiah; Green, Richard E; Blanchette, Marco; Rio, Donald C

    2011-03-15

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) is a strategy employed by most eukaryotes to increase transcript and proteomic diversity. Many metazoan splicing factors are members of multigene families, with each member having different functions. How these highly related proteins evolve unique properties has been unclear. Here we characterize the evolution and function of a new Drosophila splicing factor, termed LS2 (Large Subunit 2), that arose from a gene duplication event of dU2AF(50), the large subunit of the highly conserved heterodimeric general splicing factor U2AF (U2-associated factor). The quickly evolving LS2 gene has diverged from the splicing-promoting, ubiquitously expressed dU2AF(50) such that it binds a markedly different RNA sequence, acts as a splicing repressor, and is preferentially expressed in testes. Target transcripts of LS2 are also enriched for performing testes-related functions. We therefore propose a path for the evolution of a new splicing factor in Drosophila that regulates specific pre-mRNAs and contributes to transcript diversity in a tissue-specific manner.

  17. Specific white matter tissue microstructure changes associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Callaghan, Martina F; Heni, Martin; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Scheffler, Klaus; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Veit, Ralf; Preissl, Hubert

    2016-01-15

    Obesity-related structural brain alterations point to a consistent reduction in gray matter with increasing body mass index (BMI) but changes in white matter have proven to be more complex and less conclusive. Hence, more recently diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been employed to investigate microstructural changes in white matter structure. Altogether, these studies have mostly shown a loss of white matter integrity with obesity-related factors in several brain regions. However, the variety of these obesity-related factors, including inflammation and dyslipidemia, resulted in competing influences on the DTI indices. To increase the specificity of DTI results, we explored specific brain tissue properties by combining DTI with quantitative multi-parameter mapping in lean, overweight and obese young adults. By means of multi-parameter mapping, white matter structures showed differences in MRI parameters consistent with reduced myelin, increased water and altered iron content with increasing BMI in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, anterior thalamic radiation, internal capsule and corpus callosum. BMI-related changes in DTI parameters revealed mainly alterations in mean and axial diffusivity with increasing BMI in the corticospinal tract, anterior thalamic radiation and superior longitudinal fasciculus. These alterations, including mainly fiber tracts linking limbic structures with prefrontal regions, could potentially promote accelerated aging in obese individuals leading to an increased risk for cognitive decline.

  18. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  19. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V S

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  20. An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vernia, Santiago; Edwards, Yvonne Jk; Han, Myoung Sook; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia. PMID:27635635

  1. Scaffolding in tissue engineering: general approaches and tissue-specific considerations

    PubMed Central

    Leong, K. W.

    2008-01-01

    Scaffolds represent important components for tissue engineering. However, researchers often encounter an enormous variety of choices when selecting scaffolds for tissue engineering. This paper aims to review the functions of scaffolds and the major scaffolding approaches as important guidelines for selecting scaffolds and discuss the tissue-specific considerations for scaffolding, using intervertebral disc as an example. PMID:19005702

  2. Murine tissue factor gene expression in vivo. Tissue and cell specificity and regulation by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Mackman, N.; Sawdey, M. S.; Keeton, M. R.; Loskutoff, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Regulation of tissue factor (TF) gene expression was studied in vivo employing a murine model system. In untreated mice, TF mRNA was detected in brain, lung, kidney, and heart by Northern blot analysis. After administration of lipopolysaccharide, steady-state levels of TF mRNA were unchanged in brain, decreased in heart, and increased in both kidney and lung. In the brain, Bergmann glia within the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum and neuroglia within the cerebral cortex expressed TF mRNA by in situ hybridization. Epidermal cells of the skin and tongue also expressed TF mRNA. At present, we have not identified the cell type(s) in the kidney and lung responsible for increased TF gene expression. These results demonstrate tissue- and cell-specific TF gene expression in vivo. Lipopolysaccharide-mediated increases in TF expression in the kidney and lung may promote fibrin deposition in these organs during Gram-negative sepsis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8317556

  3. Tissue-specific designs of stem cell hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Visvader, Jane E; Clevers, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Recent work in the field of stem cell biology suggests that there is no single design for an adult tissue stem cell hierarchy, and that different tissues employ distinct strategies to meet their self-renewal and repair requirements. Stem cells may be multipotent or unipotent, and can exist in quiescent or actively dividing states. 'Professional' stem cells may also co-exist with facultative stem cells, which are more specialized daughter cells that revert to a stem cell state under specific tissue damage conditions. Here, we discuss stem cell strategies as seen in three solid mammalian tissues: the intestine, mammary gland and skeletal muscle. PMID:26999737

  4. Transcription elongation and tissue-specific somatic CAG instability.

    PubMed

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Stys, Agnieszka; Chan, Jackson P K; Trottier, Yvon; Festenstein, Richard; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is responsible for many diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy 1. CAG/CTG expansions are unstable in selective somatic tissues, which accelerates disease progression. The mechanisms underlying repeat instability are complex, and it remains unclear whether chromatin structure and/or transcription contribute to somatic CAG/CTG instability in vivo. To address these issues, we investigated the relationship between CAG instability, chromatin structure, and transcription at the HD locus using the R6/1 and R6/2 HD transgenic mouse lines. These mice express a similar transgene, albeit integrated at a different site, and recapitulate HD tissue-specific instability. We show that instability rates are increased in R6/2 tissues as compared to R6/1 matched-samples. High transgene expression levels and chromatin accessibility correlated with the increased CAG instability of R6/2 mice. Transgene mRNA and H3K4 trimethylation at the HD locus were increased, whereas H3K9 dimethylation was reduced in R6/2 tissues relative to R6/1 matched-tissues. However, the levels of transgene expression and these specific histone marks were similar in the striatum and cerebellum, two tissues showing very different CAG instability levels, irrespective of mouse line. Interestingly, the levels of elongating RNA Pol II at the HD locus, but not the initiating form of RNA Pol II, were tissue-specific and correlated with CAG instability levels. Similarly, H3K36 trimethylation, a mark associated with transcription elongation, was specifically increased at the HD locus in the striatum and not in the cerebellum. Together, our data support the view that transcription modulates somatic CAG instability in vivo. More specifically, our results suggest for the first time that transcription elongation is regulated in a tissue-dependent manner, contributing to tissue-selective CAG instability. PMID:23209427

  5. Norwalk Virus–specific Binding to Oyster Digestive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Loisy, Fabienne; Atmar, Robert L.; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The primary pathogens related to shellfishborne gastroenteritis outbreaks are noroviruses. These viruses show persistence in oysters, which suggests an active mechanism of virus concentration. We investigated whether Norwalk virus or viruslike particles bind specifically to oyster tissues after bioaccumulation or addition to tissue sections. Since noroviruses attach to carbohydrates of the histo-blood group family, tests using immunohistochemical analysis were performed to evaluate specific binding of virus or viruslike particles to oyster tissues through these ligands. Viral particles bind specifically to digestive ducts (midgut, main and secondary ducts, and tubules) by carbohydrate structures with a terminal N-acetylgalactosamine residue in an α linkage (same binding site used for recognition of human histo-blood group antigens). These data show that the oyster can selectively concentrate a human pathogen and that conventional depuration will not eliminate noroviruses from oyster tissue. PMID:16707048

  6. Tissue-specific tagging of endogenous loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Koles, Kate; Yeh, Anna R.; Rodal, Avital A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fluorescent protein tags have revolutionized cell and developmental biology, and in combination with binary expression systems they enable diverse tissue-specific studies of protein function. However these binary expression systems often do not recapitulate endogenous protein expression levels, localization, binding partners and/or developmental windows of gene expression. To address these limitations, we have developed a method called T-STEP (tissue-specific tagging of endogenous proteins) that allows endogenous loci to be tagged in a tissue specific manner. T-STEP uses a combination of efficient CRISPR/Cas9-enhanced gene targeting and tissue-specific recombinase-mediated tag swapping to temporally and spatially label endogenous proteins. We have employed this method to GFP tag OCRL (a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase in the endocytic pathway) and Vps35 (a Parkinson's disease-implicated component of the endosomal retromer complex) in diverse Drosophila tissues including neurons, glia, muscles and hemocytes. Selective tagging of endogenous proteins allows, for the first time, cell type-specific live imaging and proteomics in complex tissues. PMID:26700726

  7. Alternative promoters of Peg3 with maternal specificity

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Bambarendage P. U.; Kim, Joomyeong

    2016-01-01

    Peg3 (paternally expressed gene 3) is an imprinted gene localized within an evolutionarily conserved 500-kb domain in human chromosome 19q13.4 and mouse proximal chromosome 7. In the current study, we have identified three alternative promoters for mouse Peg3 and one alternative promoter for human PEG3. These alternative promoters are localized within the 200-kb upstream region of human and mouse PEG3, which is well conserved and thus predicted to harbor several cis-regulatory elements for the PEG3 domain. In the mouse, two of these alternative promoters drive maternal-specific expression of Peg3 specifically in the hypothalamus of the adult brain, while the remaining third promoter drives bi-allelic expression of Peg3 with a paternal bias only in the neonatal-stage brain. In human, an alternative transcript is also detected at relatively very low levels in adult brain and placenta. Overall, the identification of alternative promoters in both mouse and human models suggests that these alternative promoters may be functionally selected features for the PEG3 imprinted domain during mammalian evolution. PMID:27075691

  8. Biocompatible tissue scaffold compliance promotes salivary gland morphogenesis and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sarah B; Naim, Nyla; Nelson, Deirdre A; Mosier, Aaron P; Cady, Nathaniel C; Larsen, Melinda

    2014-06-01

    Substrate compliance is reported to alter cell phenotype, but little is known about the effects of compliance on cell development within the context of a complex tissue. In this study, we used 0.48 and 19.66 kPa polyacrylamide gels to test the effects of the substrate modulus on submandibular salivary gland development in culture and found a significant decrease in branching morphogenesis in explants grown on the stiff 19.66 kPa gels relative to those grown on the more physiologically compliant 0.48 kPa gels. While proliferation and apoptosis were not affected by the substrate modulus, tissue architecture and epithelial acinar cell differentiation were profoundly perturbed by aberrant, high stiffness. The glands cultured on 0.48 kPa gels were similar to developing glands in morphology and expression of the differentiation markers smooth muscle alpha-actin (SM α-actin) in developing myoepithelial cells and aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in proacinar cells. At 19.66 kPa, however, tissue morphology and the expression and distribution of SM α-actin and AQP5 were disrupted. Significantly, aberrant gland development at 19.66 kPa could be rescued by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. Transfer of glands from 19.66 to 0.48 kPa gels resulted in substantial recovery of acinar structure and differentiation, and addition of exogenous transforming growth factor beta 1 at 19.66 kPa resulted in a partial rescue of morphology and differentiation within the proacinar buds. These results indicate that environmental compliance is critical for organogenesis, and suggest that both mechanical and chemical stimuli can be exploited to promote organ development in the contexts of tissue engineering and organ regeneration.

  9. Regulatory mechanisms for specification and patterning of plant vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Caño-Delgado, Ana; Lee, Ji-Young; Demura, Taku

    2010-01-01

    Plant vascular tissues, the conduits of water, nutrients, and small molecules, play important roles in plant growth and development. Vascular tissues have allowed plants to successfully adapt to various environmental conditions since they evolved 450 Mya. The majority of plant biomass, an important source of renewable energy, comes from the xylem of the vascular tissues. Efforts have been made to identify the underlying mechanisms of cell specification and patterning of plant vascular tissues and their proliferation. The formation of the plant vascular system is a complex process that integrates signaling and gene regulation at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Recently, a wealth of molecular genetic studies and the advent of cell biology and genomic tools have enabled important progress toward understanding its underlying mechanisms. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the cell and developmental processes of plant vascular tissue and resources recently available for studying them that will enable the discovery of new ways to develop sustainable energy using plant biomass.

  10. An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vernia, Santiago; Edwards, Yvonne JK; Han, Myoung Sook; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17672.001 PMID:27635635

  11. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain. PMID:26055434

  12. Tissue-specific sparse deconvolution for brain CT perfusion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruogu; Jiang, Haodi; Huang, Junzhou

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing perfusion maps in low-dose computed tomography perfusion (CTP) for cerebrovascular disease diagnosis is a challenging task, especially for low-contrast tissue categories where infarct core and ischemic penumbra usually occur. Sparse perfusion deconvolution has been recently proposed to effectively improve the image quality and diagnostic accuracy of low-dose perfusion CT by extracting the complementary information from the high-dose perfusion maps to restore the low-dose using a joint spatio-temporal model. However the low-contrast tissue classes where infarct core and ischemic penumbra are likely to occur in cerebral perfusion CT tend to be over-smoothed, leading to loss of essential biomarkers. In this paper, we propose a tissue-specific sparse deconvolution approach to preserve the subtle perfusion information in the low-contrast tissue classes. We first build tissue-specific dictionaries from segmentations of high-dose perfusion maps using online dictionary learning, and then perform deconvolution-based hemodynamic parameters estimation for block-wise tissue segments on the low-dose CTP data. Extensive validation on clinical datasets of patients with cerebrovascular disease demonstrates the superior performance of our proposed method compared to state-of-art, and potentially improve diagnostic accuracy by increasing the differentiation between normal and ischemic tissues in the brain.

  13. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  14. Pharmacological and nutritional agents promoting browning of white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Bonet, M Luisa; Oliver, Paula; Palou, Andreu

    2013-05-01

    The role of brown adipose tissue in the regulation of energy balance and maintenance of body weight is well known in rodents. Recently, interest in this tissue has re-emerged due to the realization of active brown-like adipose tissue in adult humans and inducible brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue depots in response to appropriate stimuli ("browning process"). Brown-like adipocytes that appear in white fat depots have been called "brite" (from brown-in-white) or "beige" adipocytes and have characteristics similar to brown adipocytes, in particular the capacity for uncoupled respiration. There is controversy as to the origin of these brite/beige adipocytes, but regardless of this, induction of the browning of white fat represents an attractive potential strategy for the management and treatment of obesity and related complications. Here, the different physiological, pharmacological and dietary determinants that have been linked to white-to-brown fat remodeling and the molecular mechanisms involved are reviewed in detail. In the light of available data, interesting therapeutic perspectives can be expected from the use of specific drugs or food compounds able to induce a program of brown fat differentiation including uncoupling protein 1 expression and enhancing oxidative metabolism in white adipose cells. However, additional research is needed, mainly focused on the physiological relevance of browning and its dietary control, where the use of ferrets and other non-rodent animal models with a more similar adipose tissue organization and metabolism to humans could be of much help. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brown and White Fat: From Signaling to Disease.

  15. A seed coat outer integument-specific promoter for Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Limin; El-Mezawy, Aliaa; Shah, Saleh

    2011-01-01

    In search for seed coat-specific promoters for canola (Brassica napus), transgenic plants carrying a 2,121 bp fragment of Arabidopsis thaliana At4g12960 promoter (AtGILTpro) fused to the uidA reporter gene (GUS) were generated. Out of 7 independent events in transgenic canola plants raised, 2 exhibited GUS activity exclusively in the outer integument of the seed coat. GUS activity in other tissues was also observed in the remaining five transformants. Therefore, the AtGILT promoter can be used as a canola seed coat outer integument-specific promoter after the generation and selection of desired transformants from several transgenic lines. PMID:21052676

  16. Environment drives selection and function of enhancers controlling tissue-specific macrophage identities.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, David; Link, Verena M; Romanoski, Casey E; Fonseca, Gregory J; Eichenfield, Dawn Z; Spann, Nathanael J; Stender, Joshua D; Chun, Hyun B; Garner, Hannah; Geissmann, Frederic; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-12-01

    Macrophages reside in essentially all tissues of the body and play key roles in innate and adaptive immune responses. Distinct populations of tissue macrophages also acquire context-specific functions that are important for normal tissue homeostasis. To investigate mechanisms responsible for tissue-specific functions, we analyzed the transcriptomes and enhancer landscapes of brain microglia and resident macrophages of the peritoneal cavity. In addition, we exploited natural genetic variation as a genome-wide "mutagenesis" strategy to identify DNA recognition motifs for transcription factors that promote common or subset-specific binding of the macrophage lineage-determining factor PU.1. We find that distinct tissue environments drive divergent programs of gene expression by differentially activating a common enhancer repertoire and by inducing the expression of divergent secondary transcription factors that collaborate with PU.1 to establish tissue-specific enhancers. These findings provide insights into molecular mechanisms by which tissue environment influences macrophage phenotypes that are likely to be broadly applicable to other cell types.

  17. Identification and characterization of three novel hemocyte-specific promoters in silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Yu, Shuang; Su, Jingjing; Xu, Man; Tan, Peng; Zhang, Yajun; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2015-05-22

    Insect hemocytes play essential roles in the metabolism, metamorphosis and immunity, which are closely related events of growth and development. Here, four novel hemocyte-specific genes were obtained and conformed in our study, namely, Bmintβ2, Bmintβ3, BmCatO, and BmSw04862, respectively. Subsequently, their promoter sequences were cloned, and their activity in hemocytes, fat body, and silk gland were analyzed using recombinant AcNPV vector system in vivo. Our results showed that Bmintβ2, Bmintβ3, and BmCatO were hemocyte-specific promoters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Interestingly, Bmintβ2, and Bmintβ3 promoter regions were both located in their first intron. Further analysis of a series of BmCatO promoter truncations showed that a 254 bp region could function as a promoter element in the tissue-specificity expression. In summary, the results of this study revealed that we have identified three hemocyte-specific promoters in silkworm that will not only great significance for better understanding of hemocyte-specific gene, but also has potential applications in insect hematopoiesis and innate immunity research.

  18. Tissue-autonomous promotion of palisade cell development by phototropin 2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, Toshiaki; Kong, Sam-Geun; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro; Nagatani, Akira

    2011-10-01

    Light is an important environmental information source that plants use to modify their growth and development. Palisade parenchyma cells in leaves develop cylindrical shapes in response to blue light; however, the photosensory mechanism for this response has not been elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the palisade cell response in phototropin-deficient mutants. First, we found that two different light-sensing mechanisms contributed to the response in different proportions depending on the light intensity. One response observed under lower intensities of blue light was mediated exclusively by a blue light photoreceptor, phototropin 2 (PHOT2). Another response was elicited under higher intensities of light in a phototropin-independent manner. To determine the tissue in which PHOT2 perceives the light stimulus to regulate the response, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged PHOT2 (P2G) was expressed under the control of tissue-specific promoters in the phot1 phot2 mutant background. The results revealed that the expression of P2G in the mesophyll, but not in the epidermis, promoted palisade cell development. Furthermore, a constitutively active C-terminal kinase fragment of PHOT2 fused to GFP (P2CG) promoted the development of cylindrical palisade cells in the proper direction without the directional cue provided by light. Hence, in response to blue light, PHOT2 promotes the development of cylindrical palisade cells along a predetermined axis in a tissue-autonomous manner.

  19. Tissue-specific transcriptomics in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Nathan W; Veltsos, Paris; Tan, Yew-Foon; Millar, A Harvey; Ritchie, Michael G; Simmons, Leigh W

    2013-02-01

    Field crickets (family Gryllidae) frequently are used in studies of behavioral genetics, sexual selection, and sexual conflict, but there have been no studies of transcriptomic differences among different tissue types. We evaluated transcriptome variation among testis, accessory gland, and the remaining whole-body preparations from males of the field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. Non-normalized cDNA libraries from each tissue were sequenced on the Roche 454 platform, and a master assembly was constructed using testis, accessory gland, and whole-body preparations. A total of 940,200 reads were assembled into 41,962 contigs, to which 36,856 singletons (reads not assembled into a contig) were added to provide a total of 78,818 sequences used in annotation analysis. A total of 59,072 sequences (75%) were unique to one of the three tissues. Testis tissue had the greatest proportion of tissue-specific sequences (62.6%), followed by general body (56.43%) and accessory gland tissue (44.16%). We tested the hypothesis that tissues expressing gene products expected to evolve rapidly as a result of sexual selection--testis and accessory gland--would yield a smaller proportion of BLASTx matches to homologous genes in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster compared with whole-body tissue. Uniquely expressed sequences in both testis and accessory gland showed a significantly lower rate of matching to annotated D. melanogaster genes compared with those from general body tissue. These results correspond with empirical evidence that genes expressed in testis and accessory gland tissue are rapidly evolving targets of selection.

  20. Uniform accumulation of recombinant miraculin protein in transgenic tomato fruit using a fruit-ripening-specific E8 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Kim, You-Wang; Kato, Kazuhisa; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The E8 promoter, a tomato fruit-ripening-specific promoter, and the CaMV 35S promoter, a constitutive promoter, were used to express the miraculin gene encoding the taste-modifying protein in tomato. The accumulation of miraculin protein and mRNA was compared among transgenic tomatoes expressing the miraculin gene driven by these promoters. Recombinant miraculin protein predominantly accumulated in transgenic tomato lines using the E8 promoter (E8-MIR) only at the red fruit stage. The accumulations were almost uniform among all fruit tissues. When the 35S promoter (35S-MIR) was used, miraculin accumulation in the exocarp was much higher than in other tissues, indicating that the miraculin accumulation pattern can be regulated by using different types of promoters. We also discuss the potential of the E8-MIR lines for practical use. PMID:21359850

  1. Strength, Stability, and cis-Motifs of In silico Identified Phloem-Specific Promoters in Brassica juncea (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Koramutla, Murali Krishna; Bhatt, Deepa; Negi, Manisha; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jain, Pradeep K.; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan

    2016-01-01

    Aphids, a hemipteran group of insects pose a serious threat to many of the major crop species including Brassica oilseeds. Transgenic strategies for developing aphid-resistant plant types necessitate phloem-bound expression of the insecticidal genes. A few known phloem-specific promoters, in spite of tissue-specific activity fail to confer high level gene-expression. Here, we identified seven orthologues of phloem-specific promoters in B. juncea (Indian mustard), and experimentally validated their strength of expression in phloem exudates. Significant cis-motifs, globally occurring in phloem-specific promoters showed variable distribution frequencies in these putative phloem-specific promoters of B. juncea. In RT-qPCR based gene-expression study promoter of Glutamine synthetase 3A (GS3A) showed multifold higher activity compared to others, across the different growth stages of B. juncea plants. A statistical method employing four softwares was devised for rapidly analysing stability of the promoter-activities across the plant developmental stages. Different statistical softwares ranked these B. juncea promoters differently in terms of their stability in promoter-activity. Nevertheless, the consensus in output empirically suggested consistency in promoter-activity of the six B. juncea phloem- specific promoters including GS3A. The study identified suitable endogenous promoters for high level and consistent gene-expression in B. juncea phloem exudate. The study also demonstrated a rapid method of assessing species-specific strength and stability in expression of the endogenous promoters. PMID:27148290

  2. Strength, Stability, and cis-Motifs of In silico Identified Phloem-Specific Promoters in Brassica juncea (L.).

    PubMed

    Koramutla, Murali Krishna; Bhatt, Deepa; Negi, Manisha; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jain, Pradeep K; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan

    2016-01-01

    Aphids, a hemipteran group of insects pose a serious threat to many of the major crop species including Brassica oilseeds. Transgenic strategies for developing aphid-resistant plant types necessitate phloem-bound expression of the insecticidal genes. A few known phloem-specific promoters, in spite of tissue-specific activity fail to confer high level gene-expression. Here, we identified seven orthologues of phloem-specific promoters in B. juncea (Indian mustard), and experimentally validated their strength of expression in phloem exudates. Significant cis-motifs, globally occurring in phloem-specific promoters showed variable distribution frequencies in these putative phloem-specific promoters of B. juncea. In RT-qPCR based gene-expression study promoter of Glutamine synthetase 3A (GS3A) showed multifold higher activity compared to others, across the different growth stages of B. juncea plants. A statistical method employing four softwares was devised for rapidly analysing stability of the promoter-activities across the plant developmental stages. Different statistical softwares ranked these B. juncea promoters differently in terms of their stability in promoter-activity. Nevertheless, the consensus in output empirically suggested consistency in promoter-activity of the six B. juncea phloem- specific promoters including GS3A. The study identified suitable endogenous promoters for high level and consistent gene-expression in B. juncea phloem exudate. The study also demonstrated a rapid method of assessing species-specific strength and stability in expression of the endogenous promoters. PMID:27148290

  3. Tissue-Specific Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Owens, Eric A; Henary, Maged; El Fakhri, Georges; Choi, Hak Soo

    2016-09-20

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence light has been widely utilized in clinical imaging by providing surgeons highly specific images of target tissue. The "NIR window" from 650 to 900 nm is especially useful due to several special features such as minimal autofluorescence and absorption of biomolecules in tissue, as well as low light scattering. Compared with visible wavelengths, NIR fluorescence light is invisible, thus allowing highly sensitivity real-time image guidance in human surgery without changing the surgical field. The benefit of using NIR fluorescence light as a clinical imaging technology can be attributed to its molecular fluorescence as an exogenous contrast agent. Indeed, whole body preoperative imaging of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) remains important in diagnostic utility, but they lack the efficacy of innocuous and targeted NIR fluorophores to simultaneously facilitate the real-time delineation of diseased tissue while preserving vital tissues. Admittedly, NIR imaging technology has been slow to enter clinical use mostly due to the late-coming development of truly breakthrough contrast agents for use with current imaging systems. Therefore, clearly defining the physical margins of tumorous tissue remains of paramount importance in bioimaging and targeted therapy. An equally noteworthy yet less researched goal is the ability to outline healthy vital tissues that should be carefully navigated without transection during the intraoperative surgery. Both of these paths require optimizing a gauntlet of design considerations to obtain not only an effective imaging agent in the NIR window but also high molecular brightness, water solubility, biocompatibility, and tissue-specific targetability. The imaging community recognizes three strategic approaches which include (1) passive targeting via the EPR effect, (2) active targeting using the innate overall biodistribution of known molecules, and (3

  4. Tissue-Specific Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Owens, Eric A; Henary, Maged; El Fakhri, Georges; Choi, Hak Soo

    2016-09-20

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence light has been widely utilized in clinical imaging by providing surgeons highly specific images of target tissue. The "NIR window" from 650 to 900 nm is especially useful due to several special features such as minimal autofluorescence and absorption of biomolecules in tissue, as well as low light scattering. Compared with visible wavelengths, NIR fluorescence light is invisible, thus allowing highly sensitivity real-time image guidance in human surgery without changing the surgical field. The benefit of using NIR fluorescence light as a clinical imaging technology can be attributed to its molecular fluorescence as an exogenous contrast agent. Indeed, whole body preoperative imaging of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) remains important in diagnostic utility, but they lack the efficacy of innocuous and targeted NIR fluorophores to simultaneously facilitate the real-time delineation of diseased tissue while preserving vital tissues. Admittedly, NIR imaging technology has been slow to enter clinical use mostly due to the late-coming development of truly breakthrough contrast agents for use with current imaging systems. Therefore, clearly defining the physical margins of tumorous tissue remains of paramount importance in bioimaging and targeted therapy. An equally noteworthy yet less researched goal is the ability to outline healthy vital tissues that should be carefully navigated without transection during the intraoperative surgery. Both of these paths require optimizing a gauntlet of design considerations to obtain not only an effective imaging agent in the NIR window but also high molecular brightness, water solubility, biocompatibility, and tissue-specific targetability. The imaging community recognizes three strategic approaches which include (1) passive targeting via the EPR effect, (2) active targeting using the innate overall biodistribution of known molecules, and (3

  5. Detection of neuroendocrine tumors using promoter-specific secreted Gaussia luciferase.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Alan Wei-Shun; Akerstrom, Victoria; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate detection of neuroendocrine (NE) tumors is critically important for better prognosis and treatment outcomes in patients. To demonstrate the efficacy of using an adenoviral vector for the detection of NE tumors, we have constructed a pair of adenoviral vectors which, in combination, can conditionally replicate and release Gaussia luciferase into the circulation after infecting the NE tumors. The expression of these two vectors is regulated upstream by an INSM1-promoter (insulinoma-associated-1) that is specifically active in NE tumors and developing NE tissues, but silenced in normal adult tissues. In order to retain the tumor-specificity of the INSM1 promoter, we have modified the promoter using the core insulator sequence from the chicken β-globin HS4 insulator and the neuronal restrictive silencing element (NRSE). This modified INSM1-promoter can retain NE tumor specificity in an adenoviral construct while driving a mutated adenovirus E1A gene (∆24E1A), the Metridia, or Gaussia luciferase gene. The in vitro cell line and mouse xenograft human tumor studies revealed the NE specificity of the INSM1-promoter in NE lung cancer, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma, retinoblastoma, and insulinoma. When we combined the INSM1-promoter driven Gaussia luciferase with ∆24E1A, the co-infected NE tumor secreted higher levels of Gaussia luciferase as compared to the INSM1p-Gaussia virus alone. In a mouse subcutaneous xenograft tumor model, the combination viruses secreted detectable level of Gaussia luciferase after infecting an INSM1-positive NE lung tumor for ≥12 days. Therefore, the INSM1-promoter specific conditional replicating adenovirus represents a sensitive diagnostic tool to aid clinicians in the detection of NE tumors. PMID:26530405

  6. Tissue specific regulation of lipogenesis by thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Blennemann, B.; Freake, H. )

    1990-02-26

    Thyroid hormone stimulates long chain fatty acid synthesis in rat liver by increasing the amounts of key lipogenic enzymes. Sparse and conflicting data exist concerning its action on this pathway in other tissues. The authors recently showed that, in contrast to liver, hypothyroidism stimulates lipogenesis in brown adipose tissue and have now systematically examined the effects of thyroid state on fatty acid synthesis in other rat tissues. Lipogenesis was assessed by tritiated water incorporation. Euthyroid hepatic fatty acid synthesis (16.6um H/g/h) was reduced to 30% in hypothyroid rats and increased 3 fold in hyperthyroidism. Lipogenesis was detected in euthyroid kidney and heart and these levels were also stimulated by thyroid hormone treatment. Brown adipose tissue was unique in showing increased lipogenesis in the hypothyroid state. Hyperthyroid levels were not different from euthyroid. Effects in white adipose tissue were small and inconsistent. Brain, skin and lung were all lipogenically active, but did not respond to changes in thyroid state. Low but detectable levels of fatty acid synthesis were measured in muscle, which also were non-responsive. A wide spectrum of responses to thyroid hormone are seen in different rat tissues and thus the pathway of long chain fatty acid synthesis would appear to be an excellent model for examining the tissue specific regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormone.

  7. Characterization and activity enhancement of the phloem-specific pumpkin PP2 gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongnian; Chen, Xiaoying; Zhang, Haili; Fang, Rongxiang; Yuan, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Zhenshan; Tian, Yingchuan

    2004-12-01

    The promoter of the pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) PP2 gene (designated NP) was isolated from the restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA pool by genome walking and its activity and phloem specificity were examined in transgenic tobacco plants by using GUS as a reporter. Deletion analysis of the promoter revealed that the 473-bp fragment (-465 to + 8 relative to the transcription start site; designated as NPII) exhibited similar activity as the full-length NP promoter and retained its phloem specificity. Furthermore, the sequence from -465 to -171 was shown to contain positive regulatory cis-elements for the promoter activity. An enhanced NP promoter was constructed by duplicating the sequence -465 to -85, and its activity in phloem tissue was shown to be higher than that of the Commelina Yellow Mottle Virus (CoYMV) promoter or a chimeric promoter consisting of the double enhancer sequence from the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) 35S promoter fused upstream to the NPII fragment.

  8. Reconstruction of Tissue-Specific Metabolic Networks Using CORDA

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, André; Qutub, Amina A.

    2016-01-01

    Human metabolism involves thousands of reactions and metabolites. To interpret this complexity, computational modeling becomes an essential experimental tool. One of the most popular techniques to study human metabolism as a whole is genome scale modeling. A key challenge to applying genome scale modeling is identifying critical metabolic reactions across diverse human tissues. Here we introduce a novel algorithm called Cost Optimization Reaction Dependency Assessment (CORDA) to build genome scale models in a tissue-specific manner. CORDA performs more efficiently computationally, shows better agreement to experimental data, and displays better model functionality and capacity when compared to previous algorithms. CORDA also returns reaction associations that can greatly assist in any manual curation to be performed following the automated reconstruction process. Using CORDA, we developed a library of 76 healthy and 20 cancer tissue-specific reconstructions. These reconstructions identified which metabolic pathways are shared across diverse human tissues. Moreover, we identified changes in reactions and pathways that are differentially included and present different capacity profiles in cancer compared to healthy tissues, including up-regulation of folate metabolism, the down-regulation of thiamine metabolism, and tight regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:26942765

  9. Reconstruction of Tissue-Specific Metabolic Networks Using CORDA.

    PubMed

    Schultz, André; Qutub, Amina A

    2016-03-01

    Human metabolism involves thousands of reactions and metabolites. To interpret this complexity, computational modeling becomes an essential experimental tool. One of the most popular techniques to study human metabolism as a whole is genome scale modeling. A key challenge to applying genome scale modeling is identifying critical metabolic reactions across diverse human tissues. Here we introduce a novel algorithm called Cost Optimization Reaction Dependency Assessment (CORDA) to build genome scale models in a tissue-specific manner. CORDA performs more efficiently computationally, shows better agreement to experimental data, and displays better model functionality and capacity when compared to previous algorithms. CORDA also returns reaction associations that can greatly assist in any manual curation to be performed following the automated reconstruction process. Using CORDA, we developed a library of 76 healthy and 20 cancer tissue-specific reconstructions. These reconstructions identified which metabolic pathways are shared across diverse human tissues. Moreover, we identified changes in reactions and pathways that are differentially included and present different capacity profiles in cancer compared to healthy tissues, including up-regulation of folate metabolism, the down-regulation of thiamine metabolism, and tight regulation of oxidative phosphorylation.

  10. Tissue specificity of the heat-shock response in maize.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P; Ho, T H; Hauptmann, R M

    1984-06-01

    The tissue specificity of the heat-shock response in maize was investigated. The ability to synthesize heat shock proteins (hsp) at 40 degrees C, as well as the intensity and duration of that synthesis, was analyzed in coleoptiles, scutella, green and etiolated leaves, suspension-cultured cells, germinating pollen grains, and primary root sections at different stages of development. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of extracted proteins revealed that most of the tissues synthesized the typical set of 10 hsp, but that the exact characteristics of the response depended upon the tissue type. While elongating portions of the primary root exhibited a strong heat shock response, the more mature portions showed a reduced ability to synthesize hsp. Leaves, whether green or etiolated, excised or intact, constitutively synthesized a low level of hsp at 25 degrees C, and high levels could be induced at 40 degrees C. Suspension-cultures of Black Mexican sweet corn synthesized, besides the typical set of hsp, two additional polypeptides. In contrast to all the other tissues, germinating pollen grains could not be induced to synthesize the typical set of hsp but did synthesize two new polypeptides of 92 and 56 kD molecular weight.The heat shock response was transient for most of the tissues which synthesized the standard set of hsp. Hsp synthesis was detected up to 2 to 3 hours, but not at 10 hours of continuous 40 degrees C treatment. The exception was suspension cultured cells, in which hsp synthesis showed only a slight reduction after 10 hours at 40 degrees C. Tissue-specific differences in the heat-shock response suggest that there are differences in the way a given tissue is able to adapt to high temperature.We have confirmed the previous suggestion that maize hsp do not accumulate in substantial quantities. Using two-dimensional gel analysis, hsp could be detected by autoradiography but not by sensitive silver staining techniques. PMID:16663639

  11. Promotion of Growth of Tumour Cells in Acutely Inflamed Tissues

    PubMed Central

    van den Brenk, H. A. S.; Stone, M.; Kelly, H.; Orton, C.; Sharpington, C.

    1974-01-01

    Acute inflammatory reactions were induced in rats by the intravenous injection of cellulose sulphate (CS) or an extract of normal rat lung homogenate (LH), or by intraperitoneal injections of Compound 48/80. These treatments greatly increased survival and clonogenic growth in the lungs of rats of intravenously injected allogeneic W-256 and Y-P388 tumour cells. Increase in the dose of intravenously injected CS caused a logarithmic increase in colony forming efficiency (CFE) of tumour cells in the lungs. CFE was not stimulated by the intravenous injection of rats with pharmacological mediators of inflammation (histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and prostaglandins PGE1 and PGF2α) which are released from tissues by agents which induce inflammation. Stimulation of CFE by CS occurred in adrenalectomized rats but was inhibited by treatment of rats with an anti-inflammatory steroid, dexamethasone. CFE was stimulated by CS in tumour immunized rats; the inflammatory state did not prevent the expression of immunity but “rescued” a proportion (approximately 20%) of the injected tumour cells from immunodestruction in the lungs. A higher proportion of tumours grew in the paws of rats when a small number of W-256 cells were injected interdigitally into the acute inflammatory swellings produced by the local injection of paws with LH or CS. CS is a “synthetic heparin” which causes marked prolongation of blood clotting time and also increases fibrinolytic activity of the blood. Anticoagulant treatment of rats with heparin did not affect CFE. Thus, there was no direct correlation between blood clotting time and CFE of blood borne tumour cells in the rat. The mechanisms which may be responsible for the nonspecific growth promoting effects of inflammatory reactions induced by various types of tissue injury on tumour induction and growth are discussed. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4451630

  12. Human omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibit specific lipidomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Despite their differential effects on human metabolic pathophysiology, the differences in omental and subcutaneous lipidomes are largely unknown. To explore this field, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for lipidome analyses of adipose tissue samples (visceral and subcutaneous) selected from a group of obese subjects (n=38). Transcriptomics and in vitro studies in adipocytes were used to confirm the pathways affected by location. The analyses revealed the existence of obesity-related specific lipidome signatures in each of these locations, attributed to selective enrichment of specific triglycerides, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, because these were not observed in adipose tissues from nonobese individuals. The changes were compatible with subcutaneous enrichment in pathways involved in adipogenesis, triacylglyceride synthesis, and lipid droplet formation, as well as increased α-oxidation. Marked differences between omental and subcutaneous depots in obese individuals were seen in the association of lipid species with metabolic traits (body mass index and insulin sensitivity). Targeted studies also revealed increased cholesterol (Δ56%) and cholesterol epoxide (Δ34%) concentrations in omental adipose tissue. In view of the effects of cholesterol epoxide, which induced enhanced expression of adipocyte differentiation and α-oxidation genes in human omental adipocytes, a novel role for cholesterol epoxide as a signaling molecule for differentiation is proposed. In summary, in obesity, adipose tissue exhibits a location-specific differential lipid profile that may contribute to explaining part of its distinct pathogenic role.

  13. Characterization and purification of Adh distal promoter factor 2, Adf-2, a cell-specific and promoter-specific repressor in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Benyajati, C; Ewel, A; McKeon, J; Chovav, M; Juan, E

    1992-01-01

    Chromatin footprinting in Drosophila tissue culture cells has detected the binding of a non-histone protein at +8 of the distal Adh RNA start site, on a 10-bp direct repeat motif abutting a nucleosome positioned over the inactive Adh distal promoter. Alternatively the active promoter is bound by a transcription initiation complex. We have characterized and purified a protein Adf-2 that binds specifically to this direct repeat motif 5'TCTCAGTGCA3', present at +8 and -202 of the distal RNA start site. DNase I footprinting, methylation interference, and UV-crosslinking analyses showed that both direct repeats interact in vitro with a nuclear protein of approximately 120 kilodaltons (kDa). We purified Adf-2 through multiple rounds of sequence-specific DNA affinity chromatography. Southwestern analysis showed that the purified 120 KDa polypeptide binds the Adf-2 motif efficiently as a monomer or homomultimer. In vivo titrations of Adf-2 activity with the Adf-2 motif by transient co-transfection competitions in different Drosophila cell lines suggested that Adf-2 is a cell-specific repressor. Adf-2 has been detected ubiquitously in vitro, but is functional in vivo as a sequence-specific DNA binding protein and repressor only in the cells that have the inactive distal promoter. We discuss the possibility that an activation process is required for Adf-2 protein to bind DNA and function in vivo. Images PMID:1408750

  14. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of an achene-seed-specific promoter from motherwort (Leonurus japonicus Houtt).

    PubMed

    Xie, Chengjian; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, De; Kou, Fei; Zhao, Xupeng; Yang, Xingyong

    2011-01-01

    LJAMP1 is a small antimicrobial protein purified previously from the seeds of motherwort, and it is expressed preferentially in seeds. A 794-bp upstream sequence of the ATG start codon was isolated using a genome walking method and cloned into the upstream of the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene to determine the GUS tissue-specific expression pattern. The transgenic tobacco showed that pLJAMP1 promoter derived GUS reporter gene special expression in pollen, achene and seed. The analysis of cis-acting elements also revealed pLJAMP1 promoter contained pollen and seed related transcriptional control elements.

  16. Promoter-specific expression and imprint status of marsupial IGF2.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Jessica M; Suzuki, Shunsuke; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2012-01-01

    In mice and humans, IGF2 has multiple promoters to maintain its complex tissue- and developmental stage-specific imprinting and expression. IGF2 is also imprinted in marsupials, but little is known about its promoter region. In this study, three IGF2 transcripts were isolated from placental and liver samples of the tammar wallaby, Macropus eugenii. Each transcript contained a unique 5' untranslated region, orthologous to the non-coding exons derived from promoters P1-P3 in the human and mouse IGF2 locus. The expression of tammar IGF2 was predominantly from the P2 promoter, similar to humans. Expression of IGF2 was higher in pouch young than in the adult and imprinting was highly tissue and developmental-stage specific. Interestingly, while IGF2 was expressed throughout the placenta, imprinting seemed to be restricted to the vascular, trilaminar region. In addition, IGF2 was monoallelically expressed in the adult mammary gland while in the liver it switched from monoalleleic expression in the pouch young to biallelic in the adult. These data suggest a complex mode of IGF2 regulation in marsupials as seen in eutherian mammals. The conservation of the IGF2 promoters suggests they originated before the divergence of marsupials and eutherians, and have been selectively maintained for at least 160 million years.

  17. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  18. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of TCF7L2

    PubMed Central

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Welch, Cullan; Hansson, Ola; Adhikari, Neeta; Scott, Laura J.; Usher, Nicolle; Tong, Maurine; Sprau, Andrew; Swift, Amy; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Erdos, Michael R.; He, Zhi; Saxena, Richa; Harmon, Brennan; Kotova, Olga; Hoffman, Eric P.; Altshuler, David; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S.; Hall, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Common variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been identified as the strongest genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the mechanisms by which these non-coding variants increase risk for T2D are not well-established. We used 13 expression assays to survey mRNA expression of multiple TCF7L2 splicing forms in up to 380 samples from eight types of human tissue (pancreas, pancreatic islets, colon, liver, monocytes, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines) and observed a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing. We tested whether the expression of TCF7L2 splicing forms was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7903146 and rs12255372, located within introns 3 and 4 of the gene and most strongly associated with T2D. Expression of two splicing forms was lower in pancreatic islets with increasing counts of T2D-associated alleles of the SNPs: a ubiquitous splicing form (P = 0.018 for rs7903146 and P = 0.020 for rs12255372) and a splicing form found in pancreatic islets, pancreas and colon but not in other tissues tested here (P = 0.009 for rs12255372 and P = 0.053 for rs7903146). Expression of this form in glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets correlated with expression of proinsulin (r2 = 0.84–0.90, P < 0.00063). In summary, we identified a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of TCF7L2. After adjustment for multiple tests, no association between expression of TCF7L2 in eight types of human tissue samples and T2D-associated genetic variants remained significant. Alternative splicing of TCF7L2 in pancreatic islets warrants future studies. GenBank Accession Numbers: FJ010164–FJ010174. PMID:19602480

  19. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of TCF7L2.

    PubMed

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Welch, Cullan; Hansson, Ola; Adhikari, Neeta; Scott, Laura J; Usher, Nicolle; Tong, Maurine; Sprau, Andrew; Swift, Amy; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Erdos, Michael R; He, Zhi; Saxena, Richa; Harmon, Brennan; Kotova, Olga; Hoffman, Eric P; Altshuler, David; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S; Hall, Jennifer L

    2009-10-15

    Common variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been identified as the strongest genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the mechanisms by which these non-coding variants increase risk for T2D are not well-established. We used 13 expression assays to survey mRNA expression of multiple TCF7L2 splicing forms in up to 380 samples from eight types of human tissue (pancreas, pancreatic islets, colon, liver, monocytes, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines) and observed a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing. We tested whether the expression of TCF7L2 splicing forms was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7903146 and rs12255372, located within introns 3 and 4 of the gene and most strongly associated with T2D. Expression of two splicing forms was lower in pancreatic islets with increasing counts of T2D-associated alleles of the SNPs: a ubiquitous splicing form (P = 0.018 for rs7903146 and P = 0.020 for rs12255372) and a splicing form found in pancreatic islets, pancreas and colon but not in other tissues tested here (P = 0.009 for rs12255372 and P = 0.053 for rs7903146). Expression of this form in glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets correlated with expression of proinsulin (r(2) = 0.84-0.90, P < 0.00063). In summary, we identified a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of TCF7L2. After adjustment for multiple tests, no association between expression of TCF7L2 in eight types of human tissue samples and T2D-associated genetic variants remained significant. Alternative splicing of TCF7L2 in pancreatic islets warrants future studies. GenBank Accession Numbers: FJ010164-FJ010174. PMID:19602480

  20. Controlled release strategies for modulating immune responses to promote tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Courtney M; Park, Jonghyuck; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-12-10

    Advances in the field of tissue engineering have enhanced the potential of regenerative medicine, yet the efficacy of these strategies remains incomplete, and is limited by the innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune response associated with injury or disease combined with that mounted to biomaterials, transplanted cells, proteins, and gene therapies vectors can contribute to the inability to fully restore tissue function. Blocking immune responses such as with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agents are either ineffective, as the immune response contributes significantly to regeneration, or have significant side effects. This review describes targeted strategies to modulate the immune response in order to limit tissue damage following injury, promote an anti-inflammatory environment that leads to regeneration, and induce antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance that can target degenerative diseases that destroy tissues and promote engraftment of transplanted cells. Focusing on targeted immuno-modulation, we describe local delivery techniques to sites of inflammation as well as systemic approaches that preferentially target subsets of immune populations.

  1. Tissue-specific regulatory circuits reveal variable modular perturbations across complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marbach, Daniel; Lamparter, David; Quon, Gerald; Kellis, Manolis; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bergmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the molecular circuits that are perturbed by genetic variants underlying complex traits and diseases remains a great challenge. We present a comprehensive resource of 394 cell type and tissue-specific gene regulatory networks for human, each specifying the genome-wide connectivity between transcription factors, enhancers, promoters and genes. Integration with 37 genome-wide association studies (GWASs) shows that disease-associated genetic variants — including variants that do not reach genome-wide significance — often perturb regulatory modules that are highly specific to disease-relevant cell types or tissues. Our resource opens the door to systematic analysis of regulatory programs across hundreds of human cell types and tissues. PMID:26950747

  2. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  3. A novel, tissue-specific, Drosophila homeobox gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barad, M; Jack, T; Chadwick, R; McGinnis, W

    1988-01-01

    The homeobox gene family of Drosophila appears to control a variety of position-specific patterning decisions during embryonic and imaginal development. Most of these patterning decisions determine groups of cells on the anterior-posterior axis of the Drosophila germ band. We have isolated a novel homeobox gene from Drosophila, designated H2.0. H2.0 has the most diverged homeobox so far characterized in metazoa, and, in contrast to all previously isolated homeobox genes, H2.0 exhibits a tissue-specific pattern of expression. The cells that accumulate transcripts for this novel gene correspond to the visceral musculature and its anlagen. Images PMID:2901348

  4. Post-transcription initiation function of the ubiquitous SAGA complex in tissue-specific gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Weake, Vikki M.; Dyer, Jamie O.; Seidel, Christopher; Box, Andrew; Swanson, Selene K.; Peak, Allison; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Spt–Ada–Gcn5–acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex was discovered from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been well characterized as an important transcriptional coactivator that interacts both with sequence-specific transcription factors and the TATA-binding protein TBP. SAGA contains a histone acetyltransferase and a ubiquitin protease. In metazoans, SAGA is essential for development, yet little is known about the function of SAGA in differentiating tissue. We analyzed the composition, interacting proteins, and genomic distribution of SAGA in muscle and neuronal tissue of late stage Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The subunit composition of SAGA was the same in each tissue; however, SAGA was associated with considerably more transcription factors in muscle compared with neurons. Consistent with this finding, SAGA was found to occupy more genes specifically in muscle than in neurons. Strikingly, SAGA occupancy was not limited to enhancers and promoters but primarily colocalized with RNA polymerase II within transcribed sequences. SAGA binding peaks at the site of RNA polymerase pausing at the 5′ end of transcribed sequences. In addition, many tissue-specific SAGA-bound genes required its ubiquitin protease activity for full expression. These data indicate that in metazoans SAGA plays a prominent post-transcription initiation role in tissue-specific gene expression. PMID:21764853

  5. Specific Neuropilins Expression in Alveolar Macrophages among Tissue-Specific Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Naing Ye; Ohe, Rintaro; Meng, Hongxue; Kabasawa, Takanobu; Yang, Suran; Kato, Tomoya; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2016-01-01

    In the immune system, neuropilins (NRPs), including NRP-1 and NRP-2, are expressed in thymocytes, dendritic cells, regulatory T cells and macrophages. Their functions on immune cells around the neoplastic cells vary into pro-angiogenesis, tumor progression and anti-angiogenesis according to their ligands. Even though NRPs expression on malignant tumors and immune system has studied, a PubMed-based literature query did not yield any articles describing NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages. The aims of this study were (i) to detect NRPs expression on tissue-specific macrophages in the brain, liver, spleen, lymph node and lung; (ii) to observe NRPs expression in classes of macrophages, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), bronchial macrophages (BMs), interstitial macrophages (IMs), intravascular macrophages (IVMs) and macrophage subsets (M1, M2 and Mox) in lung; and (iii) to detect the co-expression of NRPs and dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in AMs. Both NRPs were specifically detected in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages by immunohistochemistry (IHC). NRPs mRNA expression levels were characterized in normal lung by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ-polymerase chain reaction (in situ-PCR). The expression of both NRPs was detected in AMs, BMs and IVMs by IHC. The frequency of NRPs+ AMs in lung tissue adjacent to the cancer margin was significantly higher than the frequencies in inflamed and normal lung tissue. Double and triple IHC demonstrated that NRPs are expressed on all macrophage subsets in lung. Double IHC showed co-expression of DC-SIGN and NRPs in AMs. This study demonstrated for the first time the specific expression of both NRPs in AMs among tissue-specific macrophages and their expression on M1, M2 and Mox macrophages. Furthermore, the possible origin of AMs from blood monocytes could be suggested from a co-expression of NRPs and DC-SIGN. PMID:26900851

  6. The RNA Export Factor, Nxt1, Is Required for Tissue Specific Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianqiao; White-Cooper, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The highly conserved, Nxf/Nxt (TAP/p15) RNA nuclear export pathway is important for export of most mRNAs from the nucleus, by interacting with mRNAs and promoting their passage through nuclear pores. Nxt1 is essential for viability; using a partial loss of function allele, we reveal a role for this gene in tissue specific transcription. We show that many Drosophila melanogaster testis-specific mRNAs require Nxt1 for their accumulation. The transcripts that require Nxt1 also depend on a testis-specific transcription complex, tMAC. We show that loss of Nxt1 leads to reduced transcription of tMAC targets. A reporter transcript from a tMAC-dependent promoter is under-expressed in Nxt1 mutants, however the same transcript accumulates in mutants if driven by a tMAC-independent promoter. Thus, in Drosophila primary spermatocytes, the transcription factor used to activate expression of a transcript, rather than the RNA sequence itself or the core transcription machinery, determines whether this expression requires Nxt1. We additionally find that transcripts from intron-less genes are more sensitive to loss of Nxt1 function than those from intron-containing genes and propose a mechanism in which transcript processing feeds back to increase activity of a tissue specific transcription complex. PMID:23754955

  7. Tissue-Specific Gene Delivery via Nanoparticle Coating

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Todd J.; Green, Jordan J.; Fung, Peter W.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of biomaterials for gene delivery can potentially avoid many of the safety concerns with viral gene delivery. However, the efficacy of polymeric gene delivery methods is low, particularly in vivo. One significant concern is that the interior and exterior composition of polymeric gene delivery nanoparticles are often coupled, with a single polymer backbone governing all functions from biophysical properties of the polymer/DNA particle to DNA condensation and release. In this work we develop electrostatically adsorbed poly(glutamic acid)-based peptide coatings to alter the exterior composition of a core gene delivery particle and thereby affect tissue-specificity of gene delivery function in vivo. We find that with all coating formulations tested, the coatings reduce potential toxicity associated with uncoated cationic gene delivery nanoparticles following systemic injection. Particles coated with a low 2.5:1 peptide:DNA weight ratio (w/w) form large 2 micron sized particles in the presence of serum that can facilitate specific gene delivery to the liver. The same particles coated at a higher 20:1 w/w form small 200 nm particles in the presence of serum that can facilitate specific gene delivery to the spleen and bone marrow. Thus, variations in nanoparticle peptide coating density can alter the tissue-specificity of gene delivery in vivo. PMID:19850333

  8. Flowering regulation by tissue specific functions of photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Motomu

    2008-01-01

    Flowering is one of the most important steps in a plant life cycle. Plants utilize light as an informational source to determine the timing of flowering. In Arabidopsis, phytochrome A (phyA), phyB and cryptochrome2 (cry2) are major photoreceptors that regulate flowering. These photoreceptors perceive light stimuli by leaves for the regulation of flowering. A leaf is an organ consisting of different tissues such as epidermis, mesophyll and vascular bundles. In the present study, we examined in which tissue the light signals are perceived and how those signals are integrated within a leaf to regulate flowering. For this purpose, we established transgenic Arabidopsis lines that expressed a phyB-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein or a cry2-GFP fusion protein in organ/tissue-specific manners. Consequently, phyB was shown to perceive light stimuli in mesophyll. By contrast, cry2 functioned only in vascular bundles. We further confirmed that both phyB-GFP and cry2-GFP regulated flowering by altering the expression of a key flowering gene, FT, in vascular bundles. In summary, perception sites for different spectra of light are spatially separated within a leaf and the signals are integrated through the inter-tissue communication. PMID:19704768

  9. Light-regulated and cell-specific methylation of the maize PEPC promoter

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, Ben J.; Woodfield, Helen; Wanchana, Samart; Bruskiewich, Richard; Hibberd, Julian M.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing PEPC expression in maize remain to be fully defined. Differential methylation of a region in the PEPC promoter has been shown to correlate with transcript accumulation, however, to date, investigations into the role of DNA methylation in maize PEPC expression have relied on the use of methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. Bisulphite sequencing was used here to provide a single-base resolution methylation map of the maize PEPC promoter. It is shown that four cytosine residues in the PEPC promoter are heavily methylated in maize root tissue. In leaves, de-methylation of these cytosines is dependent on illumination and is coincident with elevated PEPC expression. Furthermore, light-regulated de-methylation of these cytosines occurs only in mesophyll cells. No methylation was discovered in the 0.6 kb promoter required for mesophyll-specific expression indicating that cytosine methylation is not required to direct the cell-specificity of PEPC expression. This raises interesting questions regarding the function of the cell-specific cytosine de-methylation observed in the upstream region of the PEPC promoter. PMID:22143916

  10. Site-specific methylation of the rat prolactin and growth hormone promoters correlates with gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ngô, V; Gourdji, D; Laverrière, J N

    1996-01-01

    The methylation patterns of the rat prolactin (rPRL) (positions -440 to -20) and growth hormone (rGH) (positions -360 to -110) promoters were analyzed by bisulfite genomic sequencing. Two normal tissues, the anterior pituitary and the liver, and three rat pituitary GH3 cell lines that differ considerably in their abilities to express both genes were tested. High levels of rPRL gene expression were correlated with hypomethylation of the CpG dinucleotides located at positions -277 and -97, near or within positive cis-acting regulatory elements. For the nine CpG sites analyzed in the rGH promoter, an overall hypomethylation-expression coupling was also observed for the anterior pituitary, the liver, and two of the cell lines. The effect of DNA methylation was tested by measuring the transient expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene driven by a regionally methylated rPRL promoter. CpG methylation resulted in a decrease in the activity of the rPRL promoter which was proportional to the number of modified CpG sites. The extent of the inhibition was also found to be dependent on the position of methylated sites. Taken together, these data suggest that site-specific methylation may modulate the action of transcription factors that dictate the tissue-specific expression of the rPRL and rGH genes in vivo. PMID:8668139

  11. Two tobacco AP1-like gene promoters with highly specific, tightly regulated and uniquely expressed activity during floral transition, initiation and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotech engineering of agronomic traits requires an array of highly specific and tightly regulated promoters in flower or other tissues. In this study, we isolated and characterized two tobacco AP1-like promoters (termed NtAP1La and NtAP1Lb1) in transgenic plants using GUS reporter and tissue-speci...

  12. Tissue specific metal characterization of selected fish species in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Ahmad, Taufiq; Liaquat, Muhammad; Abbasi, Kashif Sarfraz; Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi Abdel; Jahangir, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Concentration of various metals, i.e., zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), and silver (Ag), was evaluated in five indigenous fish species (namely, silver carp, common carp, mahseer, thela fish, and rainbow trout), by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. It is proved from this study that, overall, mahseer and rainbow trout had high amount of zinc, whereas thela fish and silver carp had high concentration of copper, chromium, silver, nickel, and lead, while common carp had highest amount of iron contents. Furthermore, a tissue-specific discrimination among various fish species was observed, where higher metal concentrations were noticed in fish liver, with decreasing concentration in other organs like skin, gills, and finally the least contents in fish muscle. Multivariate data analysis showed not only a variation in heavy metals among the tissues but also discrimination among the selected fish species. PMID:26951449

  13. Tissue specific metal characterization of selected fish species in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mukhtiar; Ahmad, Taufiq; Liaquat, Muhammad; Abbasi, Kashif Sarfraz; Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi Abdel; Jahangir, Muhammad

    2016-04-01

    Concentration of various metals, i.e., zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), and silver (Ag), was evaluated in five indigenous fish species (namely, silver carp, common carp, mahseer, thela fish, and rainbow trout), by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. It is proved from this study that, overall, mahseer and rainbow trout had high amount of zinc, whereas thela fish and silver carp had high concentration of copper, chromium, silver, nickel, and lead, while common carp had highest amount of iron contents. Furthermore, a tissue-specific discrimination among various fish species was observed, where higher metal concentrations were noticed in fish liver, with decreasing concentration in other organs like skin, gills, and finally the least contents in fish muscle. Multivariate data analysis showed not only a variation in heavy metals among the tissues but also discrimination among the selected fish species.

  14. Tissue specific response to DNA damage: C. elegans as role model.

    PubMed

    Lans, Hannes; Vermeulen, Wim

    2015-08-01

    The various symptoms associated with hereditary defects in the DNA damage response (DDR), which range from developmental and neurological abnormalities and immunodeficiency to tissue-specific cancers and accelerated aging, suggest that DNA damage affects tissues differently. Mechanistic DDR studies are, however, mostly performed in vitro, in unicellular model systems or cultured cells, precluding a clear and comprehensive view of the DNA damage response of multicellular organisms. Studies performed in intact, multicellular animals models suggest that DDR can vary according to the type, proliferation and differentiation status of a cell. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become an important DDR model and appears to be especially well suited to understand in vivo tissue-specific responses to DNA damage as well as the impact of DNA damage on development, reproduction and health of an entire multicellular organism. C. elegans germ cells are highly sensitive to DNA damage induction and respond via classical, evolutionary conserved DDR pathways aimed at efficient and error-free maintenance of the entire genome. Somatic tissues, however, respond differently to DNA damage and prioritize DDR mechanisms that promote growth and function. In this mini-review, we describe tissue-specific differences in DDR mechanisms that have been uncovered utilizing C. elegans as role model. PMID:25957488

  15. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  16. Promoter methylation analysis on microdissected paraffin-embedded tissues using bisulfite treatment and PCR-SSCP.

    PubMed

    Bian, Y S; Yan, P; Osterheld, M C; Fontolliet, C; Benhattar, J

    2001-01-01

    Methylation-sensitive single-strand conformation analysis (MS-SSCA) is a new method of screening for DNA methylation changes. The combination of bisulfite modification and PCR results in the conversion of unmethylated cytosines to thymines, whereas methylated cytosines remain unchanged. This sequence conversion can lead to methylation-dependent alterations of single-strand conformation, which can be detected by SSCA. An analysis of mixtures of methylated and unmethylated DNA at known ratios revealed that the relative intensities of the corresponding bands following MS-SSCA were maintained. MS-SSCA was applied for methylation analysis of human p16 promoter region using genomic DNA obtained from either frozen, fixed, or microdissected fixed tissue sections. MS-SSCA is a rapid, specific, and semiquantitative approach that allows the detection of methylation of the p16 gene promoter. In reconstruction experiments, the method permits the detection of 10% or less of cells harboring a methylated p16 promoter. We have been successful in analyzing by MS-SSCA almost all (96%) tumor samples microdissected from archival paraffin-embedded fixed tissue sections and obtaining reproducible results. In addition, when microdissection was performed, the clonality of this genetic alteration could be identified.

  17. Alternative promoter usage and mRNA splicing pathways for parathyroid hormone-related protein in normal tissues and tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Southby, J.; O'Keeffe, L. M.; Martin, T. J.; Gillespie, M. T.

    1995-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) gene consists of nine exons and allows the production of multiple PTHrP mRNA species via the use of three promoters and 5' and 3' alternative splicing; as a result of 3' alternative splicing one of three protein isoforms may be produced. This organisation has potential for tissue-specific splicing patterns. We examined PTHrP mRNA expression and splicing patterns in a series of tumours and normal tissues, using the sensitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Use of promoter 3 and mRNA specifying the 141 amino acid PTHrP isoform were detected in all samples. Transcripts encoding the 139 amino acid isoform were detected in all but two samples. Use of promoters 1 and 2 was less widespread as was detection of mRNA encoding the 173 amino acid isoform. While different PTHrP splicing patterns were observed between tumours, no tissue- or tumour-specific transcripts were detected. In comparing normal and tumour tissue from the same patient, an increase in the number of promoters utilised was observed in the tumour tissue. Furthermore, mRNA for the PTH/PTHrP receptor was detected in all samples, thus the PTHrP produced by these tumours may potentially act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 2 PMID:7669584

  18. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  19. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis

    2016-02-09

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer.

  20. Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing of Mef2D required for muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Runfola, Valeria; Sebastian, Soji; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-02-15

    Among the Mef2 family of transcription factors, Mef2D is unique in that it undergoes tissue-specific splicing to generate an isoform that is essential for muscle differentiation. However, the mechanisms mediating this muscle-specific processing of Mef2D remain unknown. Using bioinformatics, we identified Rbfox proteins as putative modulators of Mef2D muscle-specific splicing. Accordingly, we found direct and specific Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 binding to Mef2D pre-mRNA in vivo. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 cooperate in promoting Mef2D splicing and subsequent myogenesis. Thus, our findings reveal a new role for Rbfox proteins in regulating myogenesis through activation of essential muscle-specific splicing events.

  1. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-01-01

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease. PMID:27045658

  2. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-04-05

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease.

  3. Isolation and functional characterization of a stolon specific promoter from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Trindade, Luisa M; Horvath, Beatrix; Bachem, Christian; Jacobsen, Evert; Visser, Richard G F

    2003-01-16

    In the search for time- and tissue-specific promoters an RNA fingerprinting technique called cDNA-AFLP was used. A transcript derived fragment (TDF511) was isolated which showed high similarity to alcohol dehydrogenases. The gene corresponding to this TDF, named Stgan, is likely to be involved in biosynthesis or breakdown of compounds affecting gibberellic acid (GA) levels in the plant [Plant J. 25(6) (2001) 595]. In this article the isolation and characterization of a Stgan promoter region is reported. The promoter region of this gene was fused to a reporter gene encoding beta-glucuronidase (GUS) and introduced in potato plants. GUS staining was detected uniquely in stolon tips and nodes. RNA in situ hybridization experiments revealed that this gene was specifically expressed in parenchyma cells, in the stolon cortex. Comparison of this promoter sequence with several promoter databases resulted in the identification of several potential binding sites for transcription factors. From the in vitro-culture experiments Stgan transcription appears to be induced by long days, sucrose and different hormones such as gibberellic acid, ancymidol, ethylene and cytokinins.

  4. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  5. A hierarchy of ECM-mediated signalling tissue-specific gene expression regulates tissue-specific gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Roskelley, Calvin D; Srebrow, Anabella; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-10-07

    A dynamic and reciprocal flow of information between cells and the extracellular matrix contributes significantly to the regulation of form and function in developing systems. Signals generated by the extracellular matrix do not act in isolation. Instead, they are processed within the context of global signalling hierarchies whose constituent inputs and outputs are constantly modulated by all the factors present in the cell's surrounding microenvironment. This is particularly evident in the mammary gland, where the construction and subsequent destruction of such a hierarchy regulates changes in tissue-specific gene expression, morphogenesis and apoptosis during each developmental cycle of pregnancy, lactation and involution.

  6. Tissue-specific knockouts of steroidogenic factor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liping; Bakke, Marit; Hanley, Neil A; Majdic, Gregor; Stallings, Nancy R; Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Parker, Keith L

    2004-02-27

    Targeted gene disruption has produced knockout (KO) mice globally deficient in the orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1). These SF-1 KO mice lacked adrenal glands and gonads, and also had impaired expression of gonadotropins in pituitary gonadotropes and marked structural abnormalities of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). To define the roles of SF-1 within discrete sites of the hypothalamic-pituitary-steroidogenic organ axis, we have sought to make tissue-specific SF-1 KO mice (as reviewed here). We first used adrenal transplants to restore adrenal function in global SF-1 KO mice, providing a physiological form of a "VMH-specific" KO to study the roles of SF-1 in weight regulation. These adrenal-transplanted SF-1 KO mice became obese due to decreased locomotor activity, providing a novel model of hypothalamic obesity. Mice with a pituitary-specific KO of SF-1 mediated by the Cre-loxP recombination strategy exhibited hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, revealing essential roles of SF-1 in pituitary function in vivo. Ongoing studies seek to inactivate SF-1 in the brain or specific gonadal cell types, thereby defining its roles in development and function at these sites. In addition, we review our use of bacterial artificial chromosome transgenesis to develop a fluorescent marker for cells that express SF-1.

  7. Caries management pathways preserve dental tissues and promote oral health.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amid I; Tellez, Marisol; Pitts, Nigel B; Ekstrand, Kim R; Ricketts, David; Longbottom, Christopher; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn; Deery, Christopher; Fisher, Julian; Young, Douglas A; Featherstone, John D B; Evans, Wendell; Zeller, Gregory G; Zero, Domenick; Martignon, Stefania; Fontana, Margherita; Zandona, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    In May 2012, cariologists, dentists, representatives of dental organizations, manufacturers, and third party payers from several countries, met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to define a common mission; goals and strategic approaches for caries management in the 21th century. The workshop started with an address by Mr. Stanley Bergman, CEO of Henry Schein Inc. which focused on the imperative for change in academia, clinical practice, and public health. For decades, new scientific evidence on caries and how it should be managed have been discussed among experts in the field. However, there has been some limited change, except in some Scandinavian countries, in the models of caries management and reimbursement which have been heavily skewed toward 'drilling and filling'. There is no overall agreement on a caries' case definition or on when to surgically intervene. The participants in the workshop defined a new mission for all caries management approaches, both conventional and new. The mission of each system should be to preserve the tooth structure, and restore only when necessary. This mission marks a pivotal line for judging when to surgically intervene and when to arrest or remineralize early noncavitated lesions. Even when restorative care is necessary, the removal of hard tissues should be lesion-focused and aim to preserve, as much as possible, sound tooth structure. Continuing management of the etiological factors of caries and the use of science-based preventive regimens also will be required to prevent recurrence and re-restoration. These changes have been debated for over a decade. The Caries Management Pathways includes all systems and philosophies, conventional and new, of caries management that can be used or modified to achieve the new mission. The choice of which system to use to achieve the mission of caries management is left to the users and should be based on the science supporting each approach or philosophy, experience, utility, and ease of use

  8. Implanted scaffold-free prevascularized constructs promote tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Czajka, Caitlin A.; Calder, Bennet W.; Yost, Michael J.; Drake, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the anastomotic potential of prevascular tissue constructs generated from scaffold-free self-assembly of human endothelial and fibroblast cells, tissue constructs were implanted into athymic mice and immune-competent rats. Analysis of xenografts placed into hind limb muscle defects showed vascular anastomotic activity by 3 days following implantation and persisting for 2 weeks. Integration of the implanted prevascular tissue constructs with the host circulatory system was evident from presence of red blood cells in the implant as early as 3 days following implantation. Additionally, analysis of 3-day xenografts in the rat model showed activation of skeletal muscle satellite cells based on Pax-7 and MyoD expression. We conclude that prevascular tissue constructs generated from scaffold-free self-assembly of human endothelial and fibroblast cells are a promising tool to provide both vascular supply and satellite cell activation toward the resolution of skeletal muscle injury. PMID:25668498

  9. Restricted Transgene Expression in the Brain with Cell-Type Specific Neuronal Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Delzor, Aurélie; Dufour, Noelle; Petit, Fanny; Guillermier, Martine; Houitte, Diane; Auregan, Gwennaelle; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Hantraye, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Tissue-targeted expression is of major interest for studying the contribution of cellular subpopulations to neurodegenerative diseases. However, in vivo methods to investigate this issue are limited. Here, we report an analysis of the cell specificity of expression of fluorescent reporter genes driven by six neuronal promoters, with the ubiquitous phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK) promoter used as a reference. Quantitative analysis of AcGFPnuc expression in the striatum and hippocampus of rodents showed that all lentiviral vectors (LV) exhibited a neuronal tropism; however, there was substantial diversity of transcriptional activity and cell-type specificity of expression. The promoters with the highest activity were those of the 67 kDa glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), homeobox Dlx5/6, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and preprotachykinin 1 (Tac1) genes. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and dopaminergic receptor 1 (Drd1a) promoters showed weak activity, but the integration of an amplification system into the LV overcame this limitation. In the striatum, the expression profiles of Tac1 and Drd1a were not limited to the striatonigral pathway, whereas in the hippocampus, Drd1a and Dlx5/6 showed the expected restricted pattern of expression. Regulation of the Dlx5/6 promoter was observed in a disease condition, whereas Tac1 activity was unaffected. These vectors provide safe tools that are more selective than others available, for the administration of therapeutic molecules in the central nervous system (CNS). Nevertheless, additional characterization of regulatory elements in neuronal promoters is still required. PMID:22934828

  10. Modifications to the INSM1 promoter to preserve specificity and activity for use in adenoviral gene therapy of neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Akerstrom, V; Chen, C; Lan, M S; Breslin, M B

    2012-12-01

    The INSM1 gene encodes a transcriptional repressor that is exclusively expressed in neuronal and neuroendocrine tissue during embryonic development that is re-activated in neuroendocrine tumors. Using the 1.7 kbp INSM1 promoter, an adenoviral HSV thymidine kinase gene therapy was tested for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. An unforeseen interference on the INSM1 promoter specificity from the adenoviral genome was observed. Attempts were made to protect the INSM1 promoter from the influence of essential adenoviral sequences and to further enhance the tissue specificity of the INSM1 promoter region. Using the chicken β-globin HS4 insulator sequence, we eliminated off-target tissue expression from the Ad-INSM1 promoter-luciferase2 constructs in vivo. In addition, inclusion of two copies of the mouse nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (n(AchR)) neuronal-restrictive silencer element (NRSE) reduced nonspecific activation of the INSM1 promoter both in vitro and in vivo. Further, inclusion of both the HS4 insulator with the n(AchR) 2 × NRSE modification showed a two log increase in luciferase activity measured from the NCI-H1155 xenograft tumors compared with the original adenovirus construct. The alterations increase the therapeutic potential of adenoviral INSM1 promoter-driven suicide gene therapy for the treatment of a variety of neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:23079673

  11. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes) shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases. PMID:24921629

  12. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    PubMed

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-06-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes) shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases. PMID:24921629

  13. Tissue-Specific Expression of Cell Wall Proteins in Developing Soybean Tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, ZH; Varner, JE

    1991-01-01

    Cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) and glycine-rich proteins (GRPs) were examined at the protein and at the mRNA levels in developing soybean tissues by tissue print immunoblots and RNA blots. In young soybean stems, HRGPs are expressed most heavily in cambium cells, in a few layers of cortex cells surrounding primary phloem, and in some parenchyma cells around the primary xylem, whereas GRPs are highly expressed in the primary xylem and also in the primary phloem. In older soybean stems, HRGP genes are expressed exclusively in cambium cells and GRP genes are most heavily expressed in newly differentiated secondary xylem cells. Similar expression patterns of HRGPs and of GRPs were found in soybean petioles, seedcoats, and young hypocotyls, and also in bean petioles and stems. HRGPs and GRPs become insolubilized in soybean stem cell walls. Three major HRGP mRNAs and two major GRP mRNAs accumulate in soybean stems. Soluble HRGPs are abundant in young hypocotyl apical regions and young root apical regions, whereas in hypocotyl and root mature regions, soluble HRGPs are found only in a few layers of cortex cells surrounding the vascular bundles. GRPs are specifically localized in primary xylem cell walls of young root. These results show that the gene expression of HRGPs and GRPs is developmentally regulated in a tissue-specific manner. In soybean tissues, HRGPs are most heavily expressed in meristematic cells and in some of those cells that may be under stress, whereas GRPs are expressed in all cells that are or are going to be lignified. PMID:12324579

  14. Identification of Tissue-Specific Protein-Coding and Noncoding Transcripts across 14 Human Tissues Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinhang; Chen, Geng; Zhu, Sibo; Li, Suqing; Wen, Zhuo; Bin Li; Zheng, Yuanting; Shi, Leming

    2016-01-01

    Many diseases and adverse drug reactions exhibit tissue specificity. To better understand the tissue-specific expression characteristics of transcripts in different human tissues, we deeply sequenced RNA samples from 14 different human tissues. After filtering many lowly expressed transcripts, 24,729 protein-coding transcripts and 1,653 noncoding transcripts were identified. By analyzing highly expressed tissue-specific protein-coding transcripts (TSCTs) and noncoding transcripts (TSNTs), we found that testis expressed the highest numbers of TSCTs and TSNTs. Brain, monocytes, ovary, and heart expressed more TSCTs than the rest tissues, whereas brain, placenta, heart, and monocytes expressed more TSNTs than other tissues. Co-expression network constructed based on the TSCTs and TSNTs showed that each hub TSNT was co-expressed with several TSCTs, allowing functional annotation of TSNTs. Important biological processes and KEGG pathways highly related to the specific functions or diseases of each tissue were enriched with the corresponding TSCTs. These TSCTs and TSNTs may participate in the tissue-specific physiological or pathological processes. Our study provided a unique data set and systematic analysis of expression characteristics and functions of both TSCTs and TSNTs based on 14 distinct human tissues, and could facilitate future investigation of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific diseases and adverse drug reactions. PMID:27329541

  15. Identification of Tissue-Specific Protein-Coding and Noncoding Transcripts across 14 Human Tissues Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinhang; Chen, Geng; Zhu, Sibo; Li, Suqing; Wen, Zhuo; Bin Li; Zheng, Yuanting; Shi, Leming

    2016-06-22

    Many diseases and adverse drug reactions exhibit tissue specificity. To better understand the tissue-specific expression characteristics of transcripts in different human tissues, we deeply sequenced RNA samples from 14 different human tissues. After filtering many lowly expressed transcripts, 24,729 protein-coding transcripts and 1,653 noncoding transcripts were identified. By analyzing highly expressed tissue-specific protein-coding transcripts (TSCTs) and noncoding transcripts (TSNTs), we found that testis expressed the highest numbers of TSCTs and TSNTs. Brain, monocytes, ovary, and heart expressed more TSCTs than the rest tissues, whereas brain, placenta, heart, and monocytes expressed more TSNTs than other tissues. Co-expression network constructed based on the TSCTs and TSNTs showed that each hub TSNT was co-expressed with several TSCTs, allowing functional annotation of TSNTs. Important biological processes and KEGG pathways highly related to the specific functions or diseases of each tissue were enriched with the corresponding TSCTs. These TSCTs and TSNTs may participate in the tissue-specific physiological or pathological processes. Our study provided a unique data set and systematic analysis of expression characteristics and functions of both TSCTs and TSNTs based on 14 distinct human tissues, and could facilitate future investigation of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific diseases and adverse drug reactions.

  16. Fusarium oxysporum Triggers Tissue-Specific Transcriptional Reprogramming in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Rebecca; Stiller, Jiri; Powell, Jonathan; Rusu, Anca; Manners, John M.; Kazan, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most devastating agricultural diseases are caused by root-infecting pathogens, yet the majority of studies on these interactions to date have focused on the host responses of aerial tissues rather than those belowground. Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting pathogen that causes wilt disease on several plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana. To investigate and compare transcriptional changes triggered by F. oxysporum in different Arabidopsis tissues, we infected soil-grown plants with F. oxysporum and subjected root and leaf tissue harvested at early and late timepoints to RNA-seq analyses. At least half of the genes induced or repressed by F. oxysporum showed tissue-specific regulation. Regulators of auxin and ABA signalling, mannose binding lectins and peroxidases showed strong differential expression in root tissue. We demonstrate that ARF2 and PRX33, two genes regulated in the roots, promote susceptibility to F. oxysporum. In the leaves, defensins and genes associated with the response to auxin, cold and senescence were strongly regulated while jasmonate biosynthesis and signalling genes were induced throughout the plant. PMID:25849296

  17. Stress causes tissue-specific changes in the sialyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Dabelic, Sanja; Flögel, Mirna; Maravić, Gordana; Lauc, Gordan

    2004-01-01

    Numerous pathological conditions are associated with specific changes in glycosylation. Recent studies clearly demonstrated a link between stress and the development and course of many diseases. Biochemical mechanisms that link stress and diseases are still not fully understood, but there are some indications that changes in glycosylation are involved in this process. Influence of acute and chronic psychological stress on protein sialylation as well as the activity of sialyltransferases, enzymes that synthesize sialoglycoproteins, has been studied on Fischer rats. Liver, spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle, heart, adrenal gland, serum, cerebellum, hippocampus, medulla oblongata and cortex have been analyzed. Statistically significant tissue- and type of stress-specific changes in total sialyltransferase (ST) activity were observed. Acute stress resulted in 39% increase of ST activity in liver and spleen, while at the same time there was 43% decrease in ST activity in cerebellum. In chronic stress, ST activity increased in spleen (93%) and decreased in liver (17%), cerebellum (38%) and hippocampus (64%). Western-blot analysis using Maackia amurensis and Sambucus nigra lectins did not reveal any difference in protein sialylation. The results of serum corticosterone analysis indicate that showed increase in acute stress and decrease in chronic stress are in good accordance with the hypothesis that corticosterone has a role in the regulation of liver ST activity. PMID:15241940

  18. Stress causes tissue-specific changes in the sialyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Dabelic, Sanja; Flögel, Mirna; Maravić, Gordana; Lauc, Gordan

    2004-01-01

    Numerous pathological conditions are associated with specific changes in glycosylation. Recent studies clearly demonstrated a link between stress and the development and course of many diseases. Biochemical mechanisms that link stress and diseases are still not fully understood, but there are some indications that changes in glycosylation are involved in this process. Influence of acute and chronic psychological stress on protein sialylation as well as the activity of sialyltransferases, enzymes that synthesize sialoglycoproteins, has been studied on Fischer rats. Liver, spleen, kidney, skeletal muscle, heart, adrenal gland, serum, cerebellum, hippocampus, medulla oblongata and cortex have been analyzed. Statistically significant tissue- and type of stress-specific changes in total sialyltransferase (ST) activity were observed. Acute stress resulted in 39% increase of ST activity in liver and spleen, while at the same time there was 43% decrease in ST activity in cerebellum. In chronic stress, ST activity increased in spleen (93%) and decreased in liver (17%), cerebellum (38%) and hippocampus (64%). Western-blot analysis using Maackia amurensis and Sambucus nigra lectins did not reveal any difference in protein sialylation. The results of serum corticosterone analysis indicate that showed increase in acute stress and decrease in chronic stress are in good accordance with the hypothesis that corticosterone has a role in the regulation of liver ST activity.

  19. A transgenic approach to control hemipteran insects by expressing insecticidal genes under phloem-specific promoters

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Shaista; Amin, Imran; Jander, Georg; Mukhtar, Zahid; Saeed, Nasir A.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    The first generation transgenic crops used strong constitutive promoters for transgene expression. However, tissue-specific expression is desirable for more precise targeting of transgenes. Moreover, piercing/sucking insects, which are generally resistant to insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, have emerged as a major pests since the introduction of transgenic crops expressing these toxins. Phloem-specific promoters isolated from Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were used for the expression of two insecticidal proteins, Hadronyche versuta (Blue Mountains funnel-web spider) neurotoxin (Hvt) and onion leaf lectin, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Here we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing Hvt alone or in combination with onion leaf lectin are resistant to Phenacoccus solenopsis (cotton mealybug), Myzus persicae (green peach aphids) and Bemisia tabaci (silver leaf whitefly). The expression of both proteins under different phloem-specific promoters resulted in close to 100% mortality and provided more rapid protection than Hvt alone. Our results suggest the employment of the Hvt and onion leaf lectin transgenic constructs at the commercial level will reduce the use of chemical pesticides for control of hemipteran insect pests. PMID:27708374

  20. Development of vascular tissue and stress inducible hybrid-synthetic promoters through dof-1 motifs rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajiv; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-01

    A Caulimovirus-based hybrid-promoter, EFCFS, was derived by fusing the distal region (-227 to -54, FUAS) of Figwort mosaic virus full-length transcript promoter (F20) with the core promoter (-151 to +12, FS3CP) domain of Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (FS3). The hybrid-promoter (EFCFS) showed enhanced activity compared to the CaMV35S, F20 and FS3 promoters; while it showed equivalent activity with that of the CAMV35S(2) promoter in both transient protoplast (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi Brad) and transgenic plants (Nicotiana tabacum; Samsun NN). Further, we have engineered the EFCFS promoter sequence by inserting additional copies of the stress-inducible 'AAAG' cis-motif (Dof-1) to generate a set of three hybrid-synthetic promoters namely; EFCFS-HS-1, EFCFS-HS-2 and EFCFS-HS-3-containing 10, 11 and 13 'AAAG' motif, respectively. Transgenic plants expressing these hybrid synthetic promoters coupled to the GUS reporter were developed and their transcriptional activities were compared with F20, FS3, 35S and 35S(2) promoters, respectively. The relative levels of uidA-mRNA accumulation in transgenic plants driven by above promoters individually were compared by qRT-PCR. Localization of GUS reporter activity in plant tissue was assayed by histochemical approach. CLSM-based study revealed that hybrid-synthetic promoters namely; EFCFS-HS-1, EFCFS-HS-2 and EFCFS-HS-3 showed enhanced activity in vascular tissue compared to the CaMV35S promoter. In the presence of abiotic stress elicitors, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid, the EFCFS-HS-1 promoters showed enhanced activity compared to the 35S promoter. Newly derived hybrid-synthetic promoter/s with enhanced activity and stress inducibility could become efficient tools for advancement of plant biotechnology.

  1. Sharing and Specificity of Co-expression Networks across 35 Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Emma; Koller, Daphne; Battle, Alexis; Mostafavi, Sara; Ardlie, Kristin G; Getz, Gad; Wright, Fred A; Kellis, Manolis; Volpi, Simona; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T

    2015-05-01

    To understand the regulation of tissue-specific gene expression, the GTEx Consortium generated RNA-seq expression data for more than thirty distinct human tissues. This data provides an opportunity for deriving shared and tissue specific gene regulatory networks on the basis of co-expression between genes. However, a small number of samples are available for a majority of the tissues, and therefore statistical inference of networks in this setting is highly underpowered. To address this problem, we infer tissue-specific gene co-expression networks for 35 tissues in the GTEx dataset using a novel algorithm, GNAT, that uses a hierarchy of tissues to share data between related tissues. We show that this transfer learning approach increases the accuracy with which networks are learned. Analysis of these networks reveals that tissue-specific transcription factors are hubs that preferentially connect to genes with tissue specific functions. Additionally, we observe that genes with tissue-specific functions lie at the peripheries of our networks. We identify numerous modules enriched for Gene Ontology functions, and show that modules conserved across tissues are especially likely to have functions common to all tissues, while modules that are upregulated in a particular tissue are often instrumental to tissue-specific function. Finally, we provide a web tool, available at mostafavilab.stat.ubc.ca/GNAT, which allows exploration of gene function and regulation in a tissue-specific manner.

  2. Tissue-specificity of heparan sulfate biosynthetic machinery in cancer.

    PubMed

    Suhovskih, Anastasia V; Domanitskaya, Natalya V; Tsidulko, Alexandra Y; Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans are key components of cell microenvironment and fine structure of their polysaccharide HS chains plays an important role in cell-cell interactions, adhesion, migration and signaling. It is formed on non-template basis, so, structure and functional activity of HS biosynthetic machinery is crucial for correct HS biosynthesis and post-synthetic modification. To reveal cancer-related changes in transcriptional pattern of HS biosynthetic system, the expression of HS metabolism-involved genes (EXT1/2, NDST1/2, GLCE, 3OST1/HS3ST1, SULF1/2, HPSE) in human normal (fibroblasts, PNT2) and cancer (MCF7, LNCaP, PC3, DU145, H157, H647, A549, U2020, U87, HT116, KRC/Y) cell lines and breast, prostate, colon tumors was studied. Real-time RT-PCR and Western-blot analyses revealed specific transcriptional patterns and expression levels of HS biosynthetic system both in different cell lines in vitro and cancers in vivo. Balance between transcriptional activities of elongation- and post-synthetic modification- involved genes was suggested as most informative parameter for HS biosynthetic machinery characterization. Normal human fibroblasts showed elongation-oriented HS biosynthesis, while PNT2 prostate epithelial cells had modification-oriented one. However, cancer epithelial cells demonstrated common tendency to acquire fibroblast-like elongation-oriented mode of HS biosynthetic system. Surprisingly, aggressive metastatic cancer cells (U2020, DU145, KRC/Y) retained modification-oriented HS biosynthesis similar to normal PNT2 cells, possibly enabling the cells to keep like-to-normal cell surface glycosylation pattern to escape antimetastatic control. The obtained results show the cell type-specific changes of HS-biosynthetic machinery in cancer cells in vitro and tissue-specific changes in different cancers in vivo, supporting a close involvement of HS biosynthetic system in carcinogenesis. PMID:26120938

  3. Tissue-specific targeting of cell fate regulatory genes by E2f factors.

    PubMed

    Julian, L M; Liu, Y; Pakenham, C A; Dugal-Tessier, D; Ruzhynsky, V; Bae, S; Tsai, S-Y; Leone, G; Slack, R S; Blais, A

    2016-04-01

    Cell cycle proteins are important regulators of diverse cell fate decisions, and in this capacity have pivotal roles in neurogenesis and brain development. The mechanisms by which cell cycle regulation is integrated with cell fate control in the brain and other tissues are poorly understood, and an outstanding question is whether the cell cycle machinery regulates fate decisions directly or instead as a secondary consequence of proliferative control. Identification of the genes targeted by E2 promoter binding factor (E2f) transcription factors, effectors of the pRb/E2f cell cycle pathway, will provide essential insights into these mechanisms. We identified the promoter regions bound by three neurogenic E2f factors in neural precursor cells in a genome-wide manner. Through bioinformatic analyses and integration of published genomic data sets we uncovered hundreds of transcriptionally active E2f-bound promoters corresponding to genes that control cell fate processes, including key transcriptional regulators and members of the Notch, fibroblast growth factor, Wnt and Tgf-β signaling pathways. We also demonstrate a striking enrichment of the CCCTC binding factor transcription factor (Ctcf) at E2f3-bound nervous system-related genes, suggesting a potential regulatory co-factor for E2f3 in controlling differentiation. Finally, we provide the first demonstration of extensive tissue specificity among E2f target genes in mammalian cells, whereby E2f3 promoter binding is well conserved between neural and muscle precursors at genes associated with cell cycle processes, but is tissue-specific at differentiation-associated genes. Our findings implicate the cell cycle pathway as a widespread regulator of cell fate genes, and suggest that E2f3 proteins control cell type-specific differentiation programs by regulating unique sets of target genes. This work significantly enhances our understanding of how the cell cycle machinery impacts cell fate and differentiation, and will

  4. AIRE activated tissue specific genes have histone modifications associated with inactive chromatin.

    PubMed

    Org, Tõnis; Rebane, Ana; Kisand, Kai; Laan, Martti; Haljasorg, Uku; Andreson, Reidar; Peterson, Pärt

    2009-12-15

    The Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) protein is expressed in thymic medullary epithelial cells, where it promotes the ectopic expression of tissue-restricted antigens needed for efficient negative selection of developing thymocytes. Mutations in AIRE cause APECED syndrome, which is characterized by a breakdown of self-tolerance. The molecular mechanism by which AIRE increases the expression of a variety of different genes remains unknown. Here, we studied AIRE-regulated genes using whole genome expression analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation. We show that AIRE preferentially activates genes that are tissue-specific and characterized by low levels of initial expression in stably transfected HEK293 cell model and mouse thymic medullary epithelial cells. In addition, the AIRE-regulated genes lack active chromatin marks, such as histone H3 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and acetylation (AcH3), on their promoters. We also show that during activation by AIRE, the target genes acquire histone H3 modifications associated with transcription and RNA polymerase II. In conclusion, our data show that AIRE is able to promote ectopic gene expression from chromatin associated with histone modifications characteristic to inactive genes.

  5. Multivalent integrin-specific ligands enhance tissue healing and biomaterial integration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Timothy A; Raynor, Jenny E; Dumbauld, David W; Lee, Ted T; Jagtap, Subodh; Templeman, Kellie L; Collard, David M; García, Andrés J

    2010-08-18

    Engineered biointerfaces covered with biomimetic motifs, including short bioadhesive ligands, are a promising material-based strategy for tissue repair in regenerative medicine. Potentially useful coating molecules are ligands for the integrins, major extracellular matrix receptors that require both ligand binding and nanoscale clustering for maximal signaling efficiency. We prepared coatings consisting of well-defined multimer constructs with a precise number of recombinant fragments of fibronectin (monomer, dimer, tetramer, and pentamer) to assess how nanoscale ligand clustering affects integrin binding, stem cell responses, tissue healing, and biomaterial integration. Clinical-grade titanium was grafted with polymer brushes that presented monomers, dimers, trimers, or pentamers of the alpha(5)beta(1) integrin-specific fibronectin III (7 to 10) domain (FNIII(7-10)). Coatings consisting of trimers and pentamers enhanced integrin-mediated adhesion in vitro, osteogenic signaling, and differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells more than did surfaces presenting monomers and dimers. Furthermore, ligand clustering promoted bone formation and functional integration of the implant into bone in rat tibiae. This study establishes that a material-based strategy in which implants are coated with clustered bioadhesive ligands can promote robust implant-tissue integration. PMID:20720217

  6. Tissue specificity of the hormonal response in sex accessory tissues is associated with nuclear matrix protein patterns.

    PubMed

    Getzenberg, R H; Coffey, D S

    1990-09-01

    The DNA of interphase nuclei have very specific three-dimensional organizations that are different in different cell types, and it is possible that this varying DNA organization is responsible for the tissue specificity of gene expression. The nuclear matrix organizes the three-dimensional structure of the DNA and is believed to be involved in the control of gene expression. This study compares the nuclear structural proteins between two sex accessory tissues in the same animal responding to the same androgen stimulation by the differential expression of major tissue-specific secretory proteins. We demonstrate here that the nuclear matrix is tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, and undergoes characteristic alterations in its protein composition upon androgen withdrawal. Three types of nuclear matrix proteins were observed: 1) nuclear matrix proteins that are different and tissue specific in the rat ventral prostate and seminal vesicle, 2) a set of nuclear matrix proteins that either appear or disappear upon androgen withdrawal, and 3) a set of proteins that are common to both the ventral prostate and seminal vesicle and do not change with the hormonal state of the animal. Since the nuclear matrix is known to bind androgen receptors in a tissue- and steroid-specific manner, we propose that the tissue specificity of the nuclear matrix arranges the DNA in a unique conformation, which may be involved in the specific interaction of transcription factors with DNA sequences, resulting in tissue-specific patterns of secretory protein expression.

  7. The promoter of the barley aleurone-specific gene encoding a putative 7 kDa lipid transfer protein confers aleurone cell-specific expression in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Kalla, R; Shimamoto, K; Potter, R; Nielsen, P S; Linnestad, C; Olsen, O A

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes the aleurone-specific gene Ltp2 from barley, which encodes a putative 7 kDa non-specific lipid transfer protein. As shown by Northern and in situ hybridization analyses, the Ltp2 transcript is present in barley aleurone cells shortly after the initiation of aleurone cell differentiation. The expression of Ltp2 increases until grain mid-maturity, but the mRNA is absent from mature grains. The Ltp2 transcript is undetectable in the embryo and vegetative tissues, confirming the aleurone specificity of the Ltp2 gene. The ability of the isolated 801 bp Ltp2 promoter to direct aleurone-specific expression in immature barley grains is demonstrated by particle bombardment experiments. In these experiments, the activity of the Ltp2 promoter is 5% of the activity of the strong constitutive Actin1 promoter from rice, as quantified by GUS activity measurements. In stably transformed rice plants containing the Ltp2 promoter-Gus construct, the specificity of the Ltp2 promoter is confirmed in vivo by the presence of GUS activity exclusively in the aleurone layer. This study demonstrates the conserved nature of the regulatory signals involved in aleurone-specific gene transcription in cereal grains.

  8. The Tissue-Specific Expression of a Tobacco Phytochrome B Gene.

    PubMed Central

    Adam, E.; Kozma-Bognar, L.; Kolar, C.; Schafer, E.; Nagy, F.

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a genomic clone from Nicotiana tabacum, designated Nt-PHYB-1, encoding a type-II, "green tissue" phytochrome apoprotein. Recombinant genes, consisting of the 3319-bp promoter of the Nt-PHYB-1 gene (including the entire 5[prime] untranslated sequence but not the ATG) or its deletion derivatives and the bacterial [beta]-glucuronidase reporter gene, were constructed and transferred into tobacco. The expression patterns and levels of the endogenous Nt-PHYB-1, as well as those of the transgenes, were determined by RNase protection assays and by [beta]-glucuronidase histochemical staining. We show that (a) the PHYB-1 gene has three transcription start sites, (b) the abundance of the three PHYB-1-specific mRNAs is different, and that (c) it is not regulated by light. However, we do demonstrate that transcription of the endogenous PHYB-1 gene and that of the recombinant genes exhibit a well-defined organ and tissue specificity. This tobacco PHYB gene is relatively highly expressed in leaf, stem, and different floral organs but not in root. Deletion analysis of the Nt-PHYB-1 promoter indicates that a 382-bp region, located between -1472 and -1089, is required for high-level expression of this gene. PMID:12226242

  9. A C++ framework for creating tissue specific segmentation-pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Bernhard; Hanser, Friedrich; Seger, Michael; Hintermueller, Christoph; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Fischer, Gerald; Muehlthaler, Hannes; Trieb, Thomas; Tilg, Bernhard

    2005-04-01

    For a clinical application of the inverse problem of electrocardiography, a flexible and fast generation of a patient's volume conductor model is essential. The volume conductor model includes compartments like chest, lungs, ventricles, atria and the associated blood masses. It is a challenging task to create an automatic or semi-automatic segmentation procedure for each compartment. For the extraction of the lungs, as one example, a region growing algorithm can be used, to extract the blood masses of the ventricles Active Appearance Models may succeed, and to construct the atrial myocardium a multiplicity of operations are necessary. These examples illustrate that there is no common method that will succeed for all compartments like a least common denominator. Another problem is the automatization of combining different methods and the origination of a segmentation pipeline in order to extract a compartment and, accordingly, the desired model - in our case the complete volume conductor model for estimating the spread of electrical excitation in the patient's heart. On account of this, we developed a C++ framework and a special application with the goal of creating tissue-specific segmentation pipelines. The C++ framework uses different standard frameworks like DCMTK for handling medical images (http://dicom.offis.de/dcmtk.php.en), ITK (http://www.itk.org/) for some segmentation methods, and Qt (http://www.trolltech.com/) for creating user interfaces. Our Medical Segmentation Toolkit (MST) enables to combine different segmentation techniques for each compartment. In addition, the framework enables to create user-defined compartment pipelines.

  10. Gender-specific reproductive tissue in ratites and Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Mary H; Wittmeyer, Jennifer L; Horner, John R

    2005-06-01

    Unambiguous indicators of gender in dinosaurs are usually lost during fossilization, along with other aspects of soft tissue anatomy. We report the presence of endosteally derived bone tissues lining the interior marrow cavities of portions of Tyrannosaurus rex (Museum of the Rockies specimen number 1125) hindlimb elements, and we hypothesize that these tissues are homologous to specialized avian tissues known as medullary bone. Because medullary bone is unique to female birds, its discovery in extinct dinosaurs solidifies the link between dinosaurs and birds, suggests similar reproductive strategies, and provides an objective means of gender differentiation in dinosaurs.

  11. A conserved CATTCCT motif is required for skeletal muscle-specific activity of the cardiac troponin T gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Mar, J H; Ordahl, C P

    1988-01-01

    Transcription of the cardiac troponin T (cTNT) gene is restricted to cardiac and embryonic skeletal muscle tissue. A DNA segment containing 129 nucleotides upstream from the cTNT transcription initiation site (cTNT-129) directs expression of a heterologous marker gene in transfected embryonic skeletal muscle cells but is inactive in embryonic cardiac or fibroblast cells. By using chimeric promoter constructions, in which distal and proximal segments of cTNT-129 are fused to reciprocal segments of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV tk) gene promoter, the DNA segment responsible for this cell specificity can be localized to the cTNT distal promoter region, located between 50 and 129 nucleotides upstream of the transcription initiation site. The ability of the cTNT distal promoter region to confer skeletal muscle-specific activity upon a heterologous promoter is abolished when it is displaced 60 nucleotides upstream, indicating that its ability to direct skeletal muscle-specific transcription probably requires proximity to other components of the transcription initiation region. Two copies of the heptamer, CATTCCT ("muscle-CAT" or "M-CAT" motif), reside within the 80-nucleotide cTNT distal promoter region. A 3-nucleotide mutation in one of these copies inactivates the cTNT promoter in skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, the M-CAT motif is a distal promoter element required for expression of the cTNT promoter in embryonic skeletal muscle cells. Since the M-CAT motif is found in other contractile protein gene promoters, it may represent one example of a muscle-specific promoter element. Images PMID:3413104

  12. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis.

  13. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  14. Immune modulation by MANF promotes tissue repair and regenerative success in the retina.

    PubMed

    Neves, Joana; Zhu, Jie; Sousa-Victor, Pedro; Konjikusic, Mia; Riley, Rebeccah; Chew, Shereen; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich; Lamba, Deepak A

    2016-07-01

    Regenerative therapies are limited by unfavorable environments in aging and diseased tissues. A promising strategy to improve success is to balance inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signals and enhance endogenous tissue repair mechanisms. Here, we identified a conserved immune modulatory mechanism that governs the interaction between damaged retinal cells and immune cells to promote tissue repair. In damaged retina of flies and mice, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like signaling induced mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) in innate immune cells. MANF promoted alternative activation of innate immune cells, enhanced neuroprotection and tissue repair, and improved the success of photoreceptor replacement therapies. Thus, immune modulation is required during tissue repair and regeneration. This approach may improve the efficacy of stem-cell-based regenerative therapies. PMID:27365452

  15. The bone-specific Runx2-P1 promoter displays conserved three-dimensional chromatin structure with the syntenic Supt3h promoter

    PubMed Central

    Barutcu, A. Rasim; Tai, Phillip W. L.; Wu, Hai; Gordon, Jonathan A. R.; Whitfield, Troy W.; Dobson, Jason R.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, André J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional organization of chromatin is fundamental for transcriptional regulation. Tissue-specific transcriptional programs are orchestrated by transcription factors and epigenetic regulators. The RUNX2 transcription factor is required for differentiation of precursor cells into mature osteoblasts. Although organization and control of the bone-specific Runx2-P1 promoter have been studied extensively, long-range regulation has not been explored. In this study, we investigated higher-order organization of the Runx2-P1 promoter during osteoblast differentiation. Mining the ENCODE database revealed interactions between Runx2-P1 and Supt3h promoters in several non-mesenchymal human cell lines. Supt3h is a ubiquitously expressed gene located within the first intron of Runx2. These two genes show shared synteny across species from humans to sponges. Chromosome conformation capture analysis in the murine pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line revealed increased contact frequency between Runx2-P1 and Supt3h promoters during differentiation. This increase was accompanied by enhanced DNaseI hypersensitivity along with RUNX2 and CTCF binding at the Supt3h promoter. Furthermore, interplasmid-3C and luciferase reporter assays showed that the Supt3h promoter can modulate Runx2-P1 activity via direct association. Taken together, our data demonstrate physical proximity between Runx2-P1 and Supt3h promoters, consistent with their syntenic nature. Importantly, we identify the Supt3h promoter as a potential regulator of the bone-specific Runx2-P1 promoter. PMID:25120271

  16. Tissue Specificity of Human Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Kryukova, Olga V.; Tikhomirova, Victoria E.; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Evdokimov, Valery V.; Kalantarov, Gavreel F.; Trakht, Ilya N.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Gusakov, Alexander V.; Uporov, Igor V.; Kost, Olga A.; Danilov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), which metabolizes many peptides and plays a key role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling, as well as in reproductive functions, is expressed as a type-1 membrane glycoprotein on the surface of endothelial and epithelial cells. ACE also presents as a soluble form in biological fluids, among which seminal fluid being the richest in ACE content - 50-fold more than that in blood. Methods/Principal Findings We performed conformational fingerprinting of lung and seminal fluid ACEs using a set of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to 17 epitopes of human ACE and determined the effects of potential ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these two different ACEs. Patterns of mAbs binding to ACEs from lung and from seminal fluid dramatically differed, which reflects difference in the local conformations of these ACEs, likely due to different patterns of ACE glycosylation in the lung endothelial cells and epithelial cells of epididymis/prostate (source of seminal fluid ACE), confirmed by mass-spectrometry of ACEs tryptic digests. Conclusions Dramatic differences in the local conformations of seminal fluid and lung ACEs, as well as the effects of ACE-binding partners on mAbs binding to these ACEs, suggest different regulation of ACE functions and shedding from epithelial cells in epididymis and prostate and endothelial cells of lung capillaries. The differences in local conformation of ACE could be the base for the generation of mAbs distingushing tissue-specific ACEs. PMID:26600189

  17. Tissue-specific downregulation of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase in hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Sanjana; Rodionov, Roman N.; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Kimoto, Masumi; Murry, Daryl J.; Cooke, John P.; Faraci, Frank M.; Lentz, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, has been proposed to be a mediator of vascular dysfunction during hyperhomocysteinemia. Levels of ADMA are regulated by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH). Using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, we tested the hypothesis that hyperhomocysteinemia causes downregulation of the two genes encoding DDAH (Ddah1 and Ddah2). In the MS-1 murine endothelial cell line, the addition of homocysteine decreased NO production but did not elevate ADMA or alter levels of Ddah1 or Ddah2 mRNA. Mice heterozygous for cystathionine β-synthase (Cbs) and their wild-type littermates were fed either a control diet or a high-methionine/low-folate (HM/LF) diet to produce varying degrees of hyperhomocysteinemia. Maximal relaxation of the carotid artery to the endothelium-dependent dilator acetylcholine was decreased by ∼50% in Cbs+/− mice fed the HM/LF diet compared with Cbs+/+ mice fed the control diet (P < 0.001). Compared with control mice, hyperhomocysteinemic mice had lower levels of Ddah1 mRNA in the liver (P < 0.001) and lower levels of Ddah2 mRNA in the liver, lung, and kidney (P < 0.05). Downregulation of DDAH expression in hyperhomocysteinemic mice did not result in an increase in plasma ADMA, possibly due to a large decrease in hepatic methylation capacity (S-adenosylmethionine-to-S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio). Our findings demonstrate that hyperhomocysteinemia causes tissue-specific decreases in DDAH expression without altering plasma ADMA levels in mice with endothelial dysfunction. PMID:18567702

  18. Tissue-specific effects of genetic and epigenetic variation on gene regulation and splicing.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Ongen, Halit; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Montgomery, Stephen B; Buil, Alfonso; Yurovsky, Alisa; Bryois, Julien; Padioleau, Ismael; Romano, Luciana; Planchon, Alexandra; Falconnet, Emilie; Bielser, Deborah; Gagnebin, Maryline; Giger, Thomas; Borel, Christelle; Letourneau, Audrey; Makrythanasis, Periklis; Guipponi, Michel; Gehrig, Corinne; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how genetic variation affects distinct cellular phenotypes, such as gene expression levels, alternative splicing and DNA methylation levels, is essential for better understanding of complex diseases and traits. Furthermore, how inter-individual variation of DNA methylation is associated to gene expression is just starting to be studied. In this study, we use the GenCord cohort of 204 newborn Europeans' lymphoblastoid cell lines, T-cells and fibroblasts derived from umbilical cords. The samples were previously genotyped for 2.5 million SNPs, mRNA-sequenced, and assayed for methylation levels in 482,421 CpG sites. We observe that methylation sites associated to expression levels are enriched in enhancers, gene bodies and CpG island shores. We show that while the correlation between DNA methylation and gene expression can be positive or negative, it is very consistent across cell-types. However, this epigenetic association to gene expression appears more tissue-specific than the genetic effects on gene expression or DNA methylation (observed in both sharing estimations based on P-values and effect size correlations between cell-types). This predominance of genetic effects can also be reflected by the observation that allele specific expression differences between individuals dominate over tissue-specific effects. Additionally, we discover genetic effects on alternative splicing and interestingly, a large amount of DNA methylation correlating to alternative splicing, both in a tissue-specific manner. The locations of the SNPs and methylation sites involved in these associations highlight the participation of promoter proximal and distant regulatory regions on alternative splicing. Overall, our results provide high-resolution analyses showing how genome sequence variation has a broad effect on cellular phenotypes across cell-types, whereas epigenetic factors provide a secondary layer of variation that is more tissue-specific. Furthermore, the details of

  19. Human keratin diseases: hereditary fragility of specific epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Corden, L D; McLean, W H

    1996-12-01

    Keratins are heteropolymeric proteins which form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton in epithelial cells. Since 1991, mutations in several keratin genes have been found to cause a variety of human diseases affecting the epidermis and other epithelial structures. Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was the first mechanobullous disease for which the underlying genetic lesion was found, with mutations in both the K5 and K14 genes rendering basal epidermal keratinocytes less resilient to trauma, resulting in skin fragility. The site of mutation in the keratin protein correlates with phenotypic severity in this disorder. Since mutations were identified in the basal cell keratins, the total number of keratin genes associated with diseases has risen to eleven. The rod domains of suprabasal keratins K1 and K10 are mutated in bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (BCIE; also called epidermolytic hyperkeratosis, EH) and mosaicism for K1/K10 mutations results in a nevoid distribution of EH. An unusual mutation in the VI domain of K1 has also been found to cause diffuse non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (DNEPPK). Mutations in palmoplantar specific keratin K9 cause epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) and mutations in the late differentiation suprabasal keratin K2e cause ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens (IBS). In the last year or so, mutations were discovered in differentiation specific keratins K6a and K16 causing pachyonychia congenita type 1 and K17 mutations occur in pachyonychia congenita type 2. K16 and K17 mutations have also been reported to produce phenotypes with little or no nail changes: K16 mutations can present as focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (NEPPK) and K17 mutations can result in a phenotype resembling steatocystoma multiplex. Recently, mutation of mucosal keratin pair K4 and K13 has been shown to underlie white sponge nevus (WSN). This year, the first mutations in a keratin-associated protein, plectin, were shown to

  20. Pollen- and anther-specific chi promoters from petunia: tandem promoter regulation of the chiA gene.

    PubMed

    van Tunen, A J; Mur, L A; Brouns, G S; Rienstra, J D; Koes, R E; Mol, J N

    1990-05-01

    We have analyzed the spatial and temporal activities of chalcone flavanone isomerase (chi) A and B gene promoters from petunia. To study the tandem promoter regulation of chiA, various chiA promoter fragments were fused with the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. Analysis of transgenic plants containing these chimeric genes provided definitive proof that the chiA coding region is regulated by two distinct promoters (designated PA1 and PA2). We also showed that both promoters can function independently and that the chiA PA1 promoter is expressed in limb (epidermal and parenchyma cells), tube (inner epidermal and parenchyma cells), seed (seed coat, endosperm, and embryo), sepal, leaf, and stem. The use of chiA and chiB promoters in the regulation of anther- and pollen-specific gene expression has been studied. By analyzing transgenic plants containing chimeric genes consisting of chiA and B promoter fragments and the GUS reporter gene, we were able to identify a 0.44-kilobase chiA PA2 promoter fragment that drives pollen-specific gene expression and a 1.75-kilobase chiB PB promoter fragment that confers anther-specific (pollen and tapetum cells) expression to the GUS gene.

  1. Cooperative activation of tissue-specific genes by pRB and E2F1.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Stephen; Xu, Fuhua; Moran, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein pRB is conventionally regarded as an inhibitor of the E2F family of transcription factors. Conversely, pRB is also recognized as an activator of tissue-specific gene expression along various lineages including osteoblastogenesis. During osteoblast differentiation, pRB directly targets Alpl and Bglap, which encode the major markers of osteogenesis alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Surprisingly, p130 and repressor E2Fs were recently found to cooccupy and repress Alpl and Bglap in proliferating osteoblast precursors before differentiation. This raises the further question of whether these genes convert to E2F activation targets when differentiation begins, which would constitute a remarkable situation wherein pRB and E2F would be cotargeting genes for activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in an osteoblast differentiation model shows that Alpl and Bglap are indeed targeted by an activator E2F, i.e., is E2F1. Promoter occupation of Alpl and Bglap by E2F1 occurs specifically during activation, and depletion of E2F1 severely impairs their induction. Mechanistically, promoter occupation by E2F1 and pRB is mutually dependent, and without this cooperative effect, activation steps previously shown to be dependent on pRB, including recruitment of RNA polymerase II, are impaired. Myocyte- and adipocyte-specific genes are also cotargeted by E2F1 and pRB during differentiation along their respective lineages. The finding that pRB and E2F1 cooperate to activate expression of tissue-specific genes is a paradigm distinct from the classical concept of pRB as an inhibitor of E2F1, but is consistent with the observed roles of these proteins in physiological models.

  2. Group A Streptococcus intranasal infection promotes CNS infiltration by streptococcal-specific Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Dileepan, Thamotharampillai; Smith, Erica D.; Knowland, Daniel; Hsu, Martin; Platt, Maryann; Bittner-Eddy, Peter; Cohen, Brenda; Southern, Peter; Latimer, Elizabeth; Harley, Earl; Agalliu, Dritan; Cleary, P. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) infection induces the production of Abs that cross-react with host neuronal proteins, and these anti-GAS mimetic Abs are associated with autoimmune diseases of the CNS. However, the mechanisms that allow these Abs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and induce neuropathology remain unresolved. We have previously shown that GAS infection in mouse models induces a robust Th17 response in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). Here, we identified GAS-specific Th17 cells in tonsils of humans naturally exposed to GAS, prompting us to explore whether GAS-specific CD4+ T cells home to mouse brains following i.n. infection. Intranasal challenge of repeatedly GAS-inoculated mice promoted migration of GAS-specific Th17 cells from NALT into the brain, BBB breakdown, serum IgG deposition, microglial activation, and loss of excitatory synaptic proteins under conditions in which no viable bacteria were detected in CNS tissue. CD4+ T cells were predominantly located in the olfactory bulb (OB) and in other brain regions that receive direct input from the OB. Together, these findings provide insight into the immunopathology of neuropsychiatric complications that are associated with GAS infections and suggest that crosstalk between the CNS and cellular immunity may be a general mechanism by which infectious agents exacerbate symptoms associated with other CNS autoimmune disorders. PMID:26657857

  3. Specific and non-specific folate binding protein in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Corrocher, R.; De Sandre, G.; Ambrosetti, A.; Pachor, M. L.; Bambara, L. M.; Hoffbrand, A. V.

    1978-01-01

    Binding of tritiated folic acid by supernatants prepared from extracts of normal and leukaemic leucocytes, normal mucosa, and malignant tumours from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract has been measured using Sephadex-gel filtration and albumin-coated charcoal techniques. Non-specific binding (measured by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration) was almost invariably greater than specific binding measured by albumin-coated charcoal separation of bound and unbound folate. In nine normal leucocyte extracts, binding measured by Sephadex G-75 filtration ranged from 1·3 to 18·2 (mean 8·2) pg/mg protein and by albumin-coated charcoal from 1·0 to 14·8 (mean 6·7) pg/mg protein. Raised specific binding was found in the extracts from leucocytes of eight of 14 patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia, in four substantially so (389, 121, 108, 59·7 pg/mg protein), but was only marginally increased in one of eight cases of acute myeloid leukaemia and in two of five cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Binding was normal in the extracts of all three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia tested. Among the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract binding was greatest by the duodenal mucosa and liver. Extracts of carcinoma of the stomach and colon bound greater amounts of 3H-folic acid than the corresponding normal mucosal extracts but the differences were not large. Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography showed more than one binding peak in the extracts of liver and duodenum but only one peak in the other tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, and only one peak, of molecular weight either about 50 000 or over 200 000, in the leucocyte extracts. PMID:670421

  4. Sequence- and Structure-Based Analysis of Tissue-Specific Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Nermin Pinar; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most widespread and well studied reversible posttranslational modification. Discovering tissue-specific preferences of phosphorylation sites is important as phosphorylation plays a role in regulating almost every cellular activity and disease state. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of global and tissue-specific sequence and structure properties of phosphorylation sites utilizing recent proteomics data. We identified tissue-specific motifs in both sequence and spatial environments of phosphorylation sites. Target site preferences of kinases across tissues indicate that, while many kinases mediate phosphorylation in all tissues, there are also kinases that exhibit more tissue-specific preferences which, notably, are not caused by tissue-specific kinase expression. We also demonstrate that many metabolic pathways are differentially regulated by phosphorylation in different tissues. PMID:27332813

  5. Genome-wide survey of tissue-specific microRNA and transcription factor regulatory networks in 12 tissues.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiyun; Maki, Miranda; Ding, Ruofan; Yang, Yalan; Zhang, Bao; Xiong, Lili

    2014-06-03

    Tissue-specific miRNAs (TS miRNA) specifically expressed in particular tissues play an important role in tissue identity, differentiation and function. However, transcription factor (TF) and TS miRNA regulatory networks across multiple tissues have not been systematically studied. Here, we manually extracted 116 TS miRNAs and systematically investigated the regulatory network of TF-TS miRNA in 12 human tissues. We identified 2,347 TF-TS miRNA regulatory relations and revealed that most TF binding sites tend to enrich close to the transcription start site of TS miRNAs. Furthermore, we found TS miRNAs were regulated widely by non-tissue specific TFs and the tissue-specific expression level of TF have a close relationship with TF-genes regulation. Finally, we describe TSmiR (http://bioeng.swjtu.edu.cn/TSmiR), a novel and web-searchable database that houses interaction maps of TF-TS miRNA in 12 tissues. Taken together, these observations provide a new suggestion to better understand the regulatory network and mechanisms of TF-TS miRNAs underlying different tissues.

  6. Association of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation with reduced NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer cells and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojing; Zhang, Shuanglong; Ma, Jinguo; Li, Zhenhua; Zhi, Yu; Chen, Jing; Lu, Yao; Dai, Dongqiu

    2013-05-01

    NDRG1 (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1) plays a role in cell differentiation and suppression of tumor metastasis. This study aims to determine the expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein in gastric cancer cell lines and tissue specimens and then assess the possible cause of its aberrant expression. Six gastric cancer cell lines and 20 pairs of normal and gastric cancer tissue samples were used to assess NDRG1 expression using Real-time PCR and Western blot. High-resolution melting analysis (HRM) and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) were performed to detect gene mutation and methylation, respectively, in cell lines and tissues samples. Expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was downregulated in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues. Specifically, expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was lower in all six gastric cancer cell lines than that of normal gastric cells, while 15 out of 20 cases of gastric cancer tissues had the reduced levels of NDRG1 mRNA and protein. HRM data showed that there was no mutation in NDRG1 gene, but MSP data showed high levels of NDRG1 gene promoter methylation in the CpG islands in both cell lines and tissue samples. Moreover, treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine upregulated NDRG1 expression in gastric cancer HGC27 cells, but not in the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A-treated HGC27 cells. In conclusion, this study has shown that expression of NDRG1 mRNA and protein was reduced in gastric cancer cell lines and tissues, which is due to methylation of NDRG1 gene promoter. Further study will unearth the clinical significance of the reduced NDRG1 protein in gastric cancer.

  7. Subchronic Sleep Restriction Causes Tissue-Specific Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Neylan, Thomas C.; Grunfeld, Carl; Mulligan, Kathleen; Schambelan, Morris; Schwarz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Context: Short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Subchronic sleep restriction (SR) causes insulin resistance, but the mechanisms and roles of specific tissues are unclear. Objective: The purpose of this article was to determine whether subchronic SR altered (1) hepatic insulin sensitivity, (2) peripheral insulin sensitivity, and (3) substrate utilization. Design: This was a randomized crossover study in which 14 subjects underwent 2 admissions separated by a washout period. Each admission had 2 acclimatization nights followed by 5 nights of either SR (4 hours time in bed) or normal sleep (8 hours time in bed). Main Outcome Measure/Methods: Insulin sensitivity (measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) and hepatic insulin sensitivity (measured by stable isotope techniques) were measured. In addition, we assayed stress hormone (24-hour urine free cortisol, metanephrine, and normetanephrine), nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OH butyrate) levels. Resting energy expenditure (REE) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured by indirect calorimetry. Results: Compared to normal sleep, whole-body insulin sensitivity decreased by 25% (P = .008) with SR and peripheral insulin sensitivity decreased by 29% (P = .003). Whereas hepatic insulin sensitivity (endogenous glucose production) did not change significantly, percent gluconeogenesis increased (P = .03). Stress hormones increased modestly (cortisol by 21%, P = .04; metanephrine by 8%, P = .014; normetanephrine by 18%, P = .002). Fasting NEFA and β-OH butyrate levels increased substantially (62% and 55%, respectively). REE did not change (P = 0.98), but RQ decreased (0.81±.02 vs 0.75±0.02, P = .045). Conclusion: Subchronic SR causes unique metabolic disturbances characterized by peripheral, but not hepatic, insulin resistance; this was associated with a robust increase in fasting NEFA levels (indicative of increased lipolysis), decreased RQ, and

  8. Evidence that estrogen receptor beta enhances MMP-13 promoter activity in HIG-82 cells and that this enhancement can be influenced by ligands and involves specific promoter sites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ting; Achari, Yamini; Rattner, Jerome B; Hart, David A

    2007-06-01

    Degradation of articular cartilage is characteristic of osteoarthritis, and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has been implicated in this condition. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are present in connective tissues, indicating these tissues' potential responsiveness to estrogen. We based this study on the hypothesis that estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) can modulate MMP-13 promoter activity. Transfection of cells with ERbeta constructs led to the induction of the endogenous MMP-13 gene, as evidenced by increased mRNA levels. The results also indicated that MMP-13 promoter construct activity in the HIG-82 cell line significantly increased when ERbeta was present, and that estrogen downregulated this response in a dose-dependent manner. ERbeta was shown to enhance MMP-13 expression somewhat more strongly than ERalpha, and the impact of a number of selective ER modulators (tamoxifen, raloxifene, and ICI 182,780) on ERbeta enhancement of promoter activity was found to be significantly less than that of estrogen. Furthermore, transcription regulatory sites in the MMP-13 promoter, specifically AP-1 and PEA-3, were shown to act in conjunction to mediate ERbeta effects. Thus, ERbeta likely influences MMP-13 promoter expression in normal and disease processes.

  9. Specific binding and biological effects of tumor promoting phorbol esters on sponges.

    PubMed

    Mazzorana, M; Garrone, R; Martel, N; Yamasaki, H

    1984-01-01

    Sponges grown in the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) show deep alterations of their structure and development. Their aquiferous system (flagellated cells and canals) is largely altered and the tissues show an unusually high cell density. This focalized effect of TPA on the aquiferous system seems specific and is reversible at low concentrations (100 ng/ml). A toxic, non-specific effect is also noted, particularly at high concentrations (5000 ng/ml). Using 3H-phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (3H-PDBu), we demonstrate a class of specific binding sites for phorbol esters in the homogenates of sponges. These binding sites have high affinity (Kd = 26.0 nM) for PDBu and at saturation about 20 pmoles of 3H-PDBu is bound per mg protein of sponge homogenates. The binding of 3H-PDBu was inhibited by other phorbol esters and their congeners, and there was a good correlation between their potency in binding inhibition and their tumor promoting activity. It is concluded that sponges have a class of specific saturable and high affinity receptors for phorbol esters and that there is a very high conservation of these receptors during evolution. Such specific binding may be responsible for subsequent biological effect of TPA on sponges.

  10. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Andre; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Beckert, Annika; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Franta, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1). Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder) were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body). The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2), which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1) was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold). The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body) was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge. PMID:26252388

  11. Selection and Evaluation of Tissue Specific Reference Genes in Lucilia sericata during an Immune Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Andre; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Beckert, Annika; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Franta, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    The larvae of the common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) have been used for centuries to promote wound healing, but the molecular basis of their antimicrobial, debridement and healing functions remains largely unknown. The analysis of differential gene expression in specific larval tissues before and after immune challenge could be used to identify key molecular factors, but the most sensitive and reproducible method qRT-PCR requires validated reference genes. We therefore selected 10 candidate reference genes encoding products from different functional classes (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, actin, β-tubulin, RPS3, RPLP0, EF1α, PKA, GAPDH and GST1). Two widely applied algorithms (GeNorm and Normfinder) were used to analyze reference gene candidates in different larval tissues associated with secretion, digestion, and antimicrobial activity (midgut, hindgut, salivary glands, crop and fat body). The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was then used to boost the larval immune system and the stability of reference gene expression was tested in comparison to three immune genes (lucimycin, defensin-1 and attacin-2), which target different pathogen classes. We observed no differential expression of the antifungal peptide lucimycin, whereas the representative targeting Gram-positive bacteria (defensin-1) was upregulated in salivary glands, crop, nerve ganglion and reached its maximum in fat body (up to 300-fold). The strongest upregulation in all immune challenged tissues (over 50,000-fold induction in the fat body) was monitored for attacin-2, the representative targeting Gram-negative bacteria. Here we identified and validated a set of reference genes that allows the accurate normalization of gene expression in specific tissues of L. sericata after immune challenge.

  12. Regulation of gene expression in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba invadens: identification of core promoter elements and promoters with stage-specific expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Manna, Dipak; Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M; Singh, Upinder

    2014-10-01

    Developmental switching between life-cycle stages is a common feature among many pathogenic organisms. Entamoeba histolytica is an important human pathogen and is a leading parasitic cause of death globally. During its life cycle, Entamoeba converts between cysts (essential for disease transmission) and trophozoites (responsible for tissue invasion). Despite being central to its biology, the triggers that are involved in the developmental pathways of this parasite are not well understood. In order to define the transcriptional network associated with stage conversion we used Entamoeba invadens which serves as a model system for Entamoeba developmental biology, and performed RNA sequencing at different developmental time points. In this study RNA-Seq data was utilised to define basal transcriptional control elements as well as to identify promoters which regulate stage-specific gene expression patterns. We discovered that the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of E. invadens genes are short, a median of 20 nucleotides (nt) and 26 nt respectively. Bioinformatics analysis of DNA sequences proximate to the start and stop codons identified two conserved motifs: (i) E. invadens Core Promoter Motif - GAAC-Like (EiCPM-GL) (GAACTACAAA), and (ii) E. invadens 3'-U-Rich Motif (Ei3'-URM) (TTTGTT) in the 5' and 3' flanking regions, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that both motifs specifically bind nuclear protein(s) from E. invadens trophozoites. Additionally, we identified select genes with stage-specific expression patterns and analysed the ability of each gene promoter to drive a luciferase reporter gene during the developmental cycle. This approach confirmed three trophozoite-specific, four encystation-specific and two excystation-specific promoters. This work lays the framework for use of stage-specific promoters to express proteins of interest in a particular life-cycle stage, adding to the molecular toolbox for genetic manipulation of E

  13. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote tissue factor-dependent angiogenic switch and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-Yuan; V Nguyen, Andrew; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Loh, Mingyu; Vu, Michelle; Zou, Yiyu; Liu, Qiang; Guo, Peng; Wang, Yanhua; Montgomery, Leslie L; Orlofsky, Amos; Rand, Jacob H; Lin, Elaine Y

    2014-12-01

    Progression to an angiogenic state is a critical event in tumor development, yet few patient characteristics have been identified that can be mechanistically linked to this transition. Antiphospholipid autoantibodies (aPLs) are prevalent in many human cancers and can elicit proangiogenic expression in several cell types, but their role in tumor biology is unknown. Herein, we observed that the elevation of circulating aPLs among breast cancer patients is specifically associated with invasive-stage tumors. By using multiple in vivo models of breast cancer, we demonstrated that aPL-positive IgG from patients with autoimmune disease rapidly accelerates tumor angiogenesis and consequent tumor progression, particularly in slow-growing avascular tumors. The action of aPLs was local to the tumor site and elicited leukocytic infiltration and tumor invasion. Tumor cells treated with aPL-positive IgG expressed multiple proangiogenic genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, tissue factor (TF), and colony-stimulating factor 1. Knockdown and neutralization studies demonstrated that the effects of aPLs on tumor angiogenesis and growth were dependent on tumor cell-derived TF. Tumor-derived TF was essential for the development of pericyte coverage of tumor microvessels and aPL-induced tumor cell expression of chemokine ligand 2, a mediator of pericyte recruitment. These findings identify antiphospholipid autoantibodies as a potential patient-specific host factor promoting the transition of indolent tumors to an angiogenic malignant state through a TF-mediated pathogenic mechanism.

  14. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  15. Tissue-specific implications of mitochondrial alterations in aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Danhui; Li, Hongzhi; Lu, Jianxin; Bai, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process during which physiological alterations occur in all tissues. A decline in mitochondrial function plays an important role in the process of aging and in aging-associated diseases. The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of protein complexes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation system, while most of the mitochondria-related genes are encoded by the nuclear genome. Coordination between the nucleus and mitochondria is crucial for the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. In this review, we will discuss aging-related mitochondrial dysfunction in various tissues and its implication in aging-related diseases and the aging process. PMID:23277028

  16. Gene expression analysis distinguishes tissue-specific and gender-related functions among adult Ascaris suum tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Gao, Xin; Martin, John; Yin, Yong; Abubucker, Sahar; Rash, Amy C; Li, Ben-Wen; Nash, Bill; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kym; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2013-06-01

    Over a billion people are infected by Ascaris spp. intestinal parasites. To clarify functional differences among tissues of adult A. suum, we compared gene expression by various tissues of these worms by expression microarray methods. The A. suum genome was sequenced and assembled to allow generation of microarray elements. Expression of over 40,000 60-mer elements was investigated in a variety of tissues from both male and female adult worms. Nearly 50 percent of the elements for which signal was detected exhibited differential expression among different tissues. The unique profile of transcripts identified for each tissue clarified functional distinctions among tissues, such as chitin binding in the ovary and peptidase activity in the intestines. Interestingly, hundreds of gender-specific elements were characterized in multiple non-reproductive tissues of female or male worms, with most prominence of gender differences in intestinal tissue. A. suum genes from the same family were frequently expressed differently among tissues. Transcript abundance for genes specific to A. suum, by comparison to Caenorhabditis elegans, varied to a greater extent among tissues than for genes conserved between A. suum and C. elegans. Analysis using C. elegans protein interaction data identified functional modules conserved between these two nematodes, resulting in identification of functional predictions of essential subnetworks of protein interactions and how these networks may vary among nematode tissues. A notable finding was very high module similarity between adult reproductive tissues and intestine. Our results provide the most comprehensive assessment of gene expression among tissues of a parasitic nematode to date. PMID:23572074

  17. Macro- to microscale strain transfer in fibrous tissues is heterogeneous and tissue-specific.

    PubMed

    Han, Woojin M; Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P; Smith, Lachlan J; Mauck, Robert L; Elliott, Dawn M

    2013-08-01

    Mechanical deformation applied at the joint or tissue level is transmitted through the macroscale extracellular matrix to the microscale local matrix, where it is transduced to cells within these tissues and modulates tissue growth, maintenance, and repair. The objective of this study was to investigate how applied tissue strain is transferred through the local matrix to the cell and nucleus in meniscus, tendon, and the annulus fibrosus, as well as in stem cell-seeded scaffolds engineered to reproduce the organized microstructure of these native tissues. To carry out this study, we developed a custom confocal microscope-mounted tensile testing device and simultaneously monitored strain across multiple length scales. Results showed that mean strain was heterogeneous and significantly attenuated, but coordinated, at the local matrix level in native tissues (35-70% strain attenuation). Conversely, freshly seeded scaffolds exhibited very direct and uniform strain transfer from the tissue to the local matrix level (15-25% strain attenuation). In addition, strain transfer from local matrix to cells and nuclei was dependent on fiber orientation and tissue type. Histological analysis suggested that different domains exist within these fibrous tissues, with most of the tissue being fibrous, characterized by an aligned collagen structure and elongated cells, and other regions being proteoglycan (PG)-rich, characterized by a dense accumulation of PGs and rounder cells. In meniscus, the observed heterogeneity in strain transfer correlated strongly with cellular morphology, where rounder cells located in PG-rich microdomains were shielded from deformation, while elongated cells in fibrous microdomains deformed readily. Collectively, these findings suggest that different tissues utilize distinct strain-attenuating mechanisms according to their unique structure and cellular phenotype, and these differences likely alter the local biologic response of such tissues and constructs in

  18. Identifying and functionally characterizing tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed human lncRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianping; Chen, Hong; Ding, Na; Wang, Guangjuan; Xu, Juan; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in transcriptome sequencing have made it possible to distinguish ubiquitously expressed long non-coding RNAs (UE lncRNAs) from tissue-specific lncRNAs (TS lncRNAs), thereby providing clues to their cellular functions. Here, we assembled and functionally characterized a consensus lncRNA transcriptome by curating hundreds of RNA-seq datasets across normal human tissues from 16 independent studies. In total, 1,184 UE and 2,583 TS lncRNAs were identified. These different lncRNA populations had several distinct features. Specifically, UE lncRNAs were associated with genomic compaction and highly conserved exons and promoter regions. We found that UE lncRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional level (with especially strong regulation of enhancers) and are associated with epigenetic modifications and post-transcriptional regulation. Based on these observations we propose a novel way to predict the functions of UE and TS lncRNAs through analysis of their genomic location and similarities in epigenetic modifications. Our characterization of UE and TS lncRNAs may provide a foundation for lncRNA genomics and the delineation of complex disease mechanisms. PMID:26760768

  19. Human fibroblast collagenase: glycosylation and tissue-specific levels of enzyme synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, S M; Eisen, A Z; Teter, M; Clark, S D; Kronberger, A; Goldberg, G

    1986-01-01

    Human skin fibroblasts secrete collagenase as two proenzyme forms (57 and 52 kDa). The minor (57-kDa) proenzyme form is the result of a partial posttranslational modification of the major (52-kDa) proenzyme through the addition of N-linked complex oligosaccharides. Human endothelial cells as well as fibroblasts from human colon, cornea, gingiva, and lung also secrete collagenase in two forms indistinguishable from those of the skin fibroblast enzyme. In vitro tissue culture studies have shown that the level of constitutive synthesis of this fibroblast-type interstitial collagenase is tissue specific, varies widely, and correlates with the steady-state level of a single collagenase-specific mRNA of 2.5 kilobases. The tumor promoter, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, apparently blocks the control of collagenase synthesis resulting in a similarly high level of collagenase expression (approximately equal to 3-7 micrograms of collagenase per 10(6) cells per 24 hr) in all examined cells. The constitutive level of synthesis of a 28-kDa collagenase inhibitor does not correlate with that of the enzyme. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulates the production of this inhibitor that in turn modulates the activity of collagenase in the conditioned media. As a result, the apparent activity of the enzyme present in the medium does not accurately reflect the rate of its synthesis and secretion. Images PMID:3012533

  20. A gene-type-specific enhancer regulates the carbamyl phosphate synthetase I promoter by cooperating with the proximal GAG activating element.

    PubMed Central

    Goping, I S; Lamontagne, S; Shore, G C; Nguyen, M

    1995-01-01

    The rat carbamyl phosphate synthetase I gene is expressed in two cell types: hepatocytes and epithelial cells of the intestinal mucosa. The proximal promoter contains a single activating element, GAG, two repressor elements (sites I and III) and an anti-repressor element (site II). Although these elements together exhibit the potential for complex regulation, they are unable to confer tissue-specific promoter activity. Here we have identified a cell-type-specific enhancer that lies 10 kilobases upstream of the promoter. Unexpectedly, the enhancer also functioned in a gene-type-specific manner. The enhancer stimulated promoter activity exclusively through the proximal GAG element. Abrogation of GAG, either directly by mutation of GAG or indirectly by sites I and III repressors, abolished enhancer activation. Conversely, activation of the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter by the enhancer required the introduction of GAG. The requirement for GAG, therefore, functions to constrain the enhancer to a specific target promoter. PMID:7784176

  1. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Katter, Katharina; Geurts, Aron M.; Hoffmann, Orsolya; Mátés, Lajos; Landa, Vladimir; Hiripi, László; Moreno, Carol; Lazar, Jozef; Bashir, Sanum; Zidek, Vaclav; Popova, Elena; Jerchow, Boris; Becker, Katja; Devaraj, Anantharam; Walter, Ingrid; Grzybowksi, Michael; Corbett, Molly; Filho, Artur Rangel; Hodges, Matthew R.; Bader, Michael; Ivics, Zoltán; Jacob, Howard J.; Pravenec, Michal; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Rülicke, Thomas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2013-01-01

    Germline transgenesis is an important procedure for functional investigation of biological pathways, as well as for animal biotechnology. We have established a simple, nonviral protocol in three important biomedical model organisms frequently used in physiological studies. The protocol is based on the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system, SB100X, which reproducibly promoted generation of transgenic founders at frequencies of 50–64, 14–72, and 15% in mice, rats, and rabbits, respectively. The SB100X-mediated transgene integrations are less prone to genetic mosaicism and gene silencing as compared to either the classical pronuclear injection or to lentivirus-mediated transgenesis. The method was successfully applied to a variety of transgenes and animal models, and can be used to generate founders with single-copy integrations. The transposon vector also allows the generation of transgenic lines with tissue-specific expression patterns specified by promoter elements of choice, exemplified by a rat reporter strain useful for tracking serotonergic neurons. As a proof of principle, we rescued an inborn genetic defect in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat by SB100X transgenesis. A side-by-side comparison of the SB100X- and piggyBac-based protocols revealed that the two systems are complementary, offering new opportunities in genome manipulation.—Katter, K., Geurts, A. M., Hoffmann, O., Mátés, L., Landa,V., Hiripi, L., Moreno, C., Lazar, J., Bashir, S., Zidek, V., Popova, E., Jerchow, B., Becker, K., Devaraj, A., Walter, I., Grzybowksi, M., Corbett, M., Rangel Filho, A., Hodges, M. R., Bader, M., Ivics, Z., Jacob, H. J., Pravenec, M., Bősze, Z., Rülicke, T., Izsvák, Z. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits. PMID:23195032

  2. COX-2 gene expression in colon cancer tissue related to regulating factors and promoter methylation status

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased cyclooxygenase activity promotes progression of colorectal cancer, but the mechanisms behind COX-2 induction remain elusive. This study was therefore aimed to define external cell signaling and transcription factors relating to high COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue. Method Tumor and normal colon tissue were collected at primary curative operation in 48 unselected patients. COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue was quantified including microarray analyses on tumor mRNA accounting for high and low tumor COX-2 expression. Cross hybridization was performed between tumor and normal colon tissue. Methylation status of up-stream COX-2 promoter region was evaluated. Results Tumors with high COX-2 expression displayed large differences in gene expression compared to normal colon. Numerous genes with altered expression appeared in tumors of high COX-2 expression compared to tumors of low COX-2. COX-2 expression in normal colon was increased in patients with tumors of high COX-2 compared to normal colon from patients with tumors of low COX-2. IL1β, IL6 and iNOS transcripts were up-regulated among external cell signaling factors; nine transcription factors (ATF3, C/EBP, c-Fos, Fos-B, JDP2, JunB, c-Maf, NF-κB, TCF4) showed increased expression and 5 (AP-2, CBP, Elk-1, p53, PEA3) were decreased in tumors with high COX-2. The promoter region of COX-2 gene did not show consistent methylation in tumor or normal colon tissue. Conclusions Transcription and external cell signaling factors are altered as covariates to COX-2 expression in colon cancer tissue, but DNA methylation of the COX-2 promoter region was not a significant factor behind COX-2 expression in tumor and normal colon tissue. PMID:21668942

  3. Somatotroph- and lactotroph-specific interactions with the homeobox protein binding sites in the rat growth hormone gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Schaufele, F; West, B L; Reudelhuber, T

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear extracts prepared from growth hormone-secreting (GC) and prolactin-secreting (235-1) rat anterior pituitary cell lines were compared for their ability to bind to the DNA sequences conferring tissue-specificity to the expression of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene promoter. Cell-specific differences in the interaction of Pit-1, a tissue-specific member of the POU-domain transcription factor family, with the pGHF1 binding site were detected by methylation interference experiments; otherwise the Pit-1 proteins present in GC cell and 235-1 cell extracts were similar. Two other protein/DNA complexes, GHF5 and GHF7, were detected by gel mobility shift assays and the binding of both complexes to the rGH promoter depended upon DNA sequences contained within the two binding sites for Pit-1. In contrast to Pit-1 which can bind to either of the two sites independently, a single Pit-1 binding site was insufficient for GHF5 and GHF7 binding; i.e. both Pit-1 binding sites within the rGH promoter were required. Whereas GHF5 was present in nuclear extracts of GC cells and a variety of cells not producing growth hormone, GHF7 binding activity was detected only in the GC cell line (and not in the 235-1 cell line). GHF7 binding activity was therefore more closely correlated with growth hormone gene transcription than was Pit-1. rGH promoters containing mutations which inhibited GHF5, GHF7 and Pit-1 binding were expressed less efficiently than the wild type promoter after transfection into GC cells. One promoter mutation to which the GHF7 complex but not the Pit-1 factor can bind was also transcription deficient demonstrating that Pit-1 binding, independent of GHF7 binding, was nevertheless important to the expression of the rat growth hormone promoter. Images PMID:1976240

  4. Epigenomic footprints across 111 reference epigenomes reveal tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs.

    PubMed

    Amin, Viren; Harris, R Alan; Onuchic, Vitor; Jackson, Andrew R; Charnecki, Tim; Paithankar, Sameer; Lakshmi Subramanian, Sai; Riehle, Kevin; Coarfa, Cristian; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-18

    Tissue-specific expression of lincRNAs suggests developmental and cell-type-specific functions, yet tissue specificity was established for only a small fraction of lincRNAs. Here, by analysing 111 reference epigenomes from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics project, we determine tissue-specific epigenetic regulation for 3,753 (69% examined) lincRNAs, with 54% active in one of the 14 cell/tissue clusters and an additional 15% in two or three clusters. A larger fraction of lincRNA TSSs is marked in a tissue-specific manner by H3K4me1 than by H3K4me3. The tissue-specific lincRNAs are strongly linked to tissue-specific pathways and undergo distinct chromatin state transitions during cellular differentiation. Polycomb-regulated lincRNAs reside in the bivalent state in embryonic stem cells and many of them undergo H3K27me3-mediated silencing at early stages of differentiation. The exquisitely tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs and the assignment of a majority of them to specific tissue types will inform future studies of this newly discovered class of genes.

  5. Isolation and partial characterization of a root-specific promoter for stacking multiple traits into cassava (Manihot esculenta CRANTZ).

    PubMed

    Gbadegesin, M A; Beeching, J R

    2011-06-07

    Cassava can be cultivated on impoverished soils with minimum inputs, and its storage roots are a staple food for millions in Africa. However, these roots are low in bioavailable nutrients and in protein content, contain cyanogenic glycosides, and suffer from a very short post-harvest shelf-life, and the plant is susceptible to viral and bacterial diseases prevalent in Africa. The demand for improvement of cassava with respect to these traits comes from both farmers and national agricultural institutions. Genetic improvement of cassava cultivars by molecular biology techniques requires the availability of appropriate genes, a system to introduce these genes into cassava, and the use of suitable gene promoters. Cassava root-specific promoter for auxin-repressed protein was isolated using the gene walking approach, starting with a cDNA sequence. In silico analysis of promoter sequences revealed putative cis-acting regulatory elements, including root-specific elements, which may be required for gene expression in vascular tissues. Research on the activities of this promoter is continuing, with the development of plant expression cassettes for transformation into major African elite lines and farmers' preferred cassava cultivars to enable testing of tissue-specific expression patterns in the field.

  6. Glycosaminoglycan binding by Borrelia burgdorferi adhesin BBK32 specifically and uniquely promotes joint colonization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Chen, Qiang; Ritchie, Jennifer A.; Dufour, Nicholas P.; Fischer, Joshua R.; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Microbial pathogens that colonize multiple tissues commonly produce adhesive surface proteins that mediate attachment to cells and/or extracellular matrix in target organs. Many of these ‘adhesins’ bind to multiple ligands, complicating efforts to understand the role of each ligand-binding activity. Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, produces BBK32, first identified as a fibronectin-binding adhesin that promotes skin and joint colonization. BBK32 also binds to glycosaminoglycan (GAG), which, like fibronectin is ubiquitously present on cell surfaces. To determine which binding activity is relevant for BBK32-promoted infectivity, we generated a panel of BBK32 truncation and internal deletion mutants, and identified variants specifically defective for binding to either fibronectin or GAG. These variants promoted bacterial attachment to different mammalian cell types in vitro, suggesting that fibronectin and GAG binding may play distinct roles during infection. Intravenous inoculation of mice with a high-passage non-infectious B. burgdorferi strain that produced wild type BBK32 or BBK32 mutants defective for GAG or fibronectin binding, revealed that only GAG-binding activity was required for significant localization to joints at 60 minutes post-infection. An otherwise infectious B. burgdorferi strain producing BBK32 specifically deficient in fibronectin binding was fully capable of both skin and joint colonization in the murine model, whereas a strain producing BBK32 selectively attenuated for GAG binding colonized the inoculation site but not knee or tibiotarsus joints. Thus, the BBK32 fibronectin- and GAG-binding activities are separable in vivo, and BBK32-mediated GAG binding, but not fibronectin binding, contributes to joint colonization. PMID:25486989

  7. [Primary targeting of functional regions involved in transcriptional regulation on watermelon fruit-specific promoter WSP].

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Ying; Liu, Jing-Mei; Yang, Xin-Ting; Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Shou, Sen-Yan

    2003-03-01

    Fruit ripening is associated with a number of physiological and biochemical changes. They include degradation of chlorophyll, synthesis of flavor compounds, carotenoid biosynthesis, conversion of starch to sugars, cell wall solublisation and fruit softening. These changes are brought about by the expression of specific genes. People are interested in the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of gene transcription during fruit ripening. Many fruit-specific promoters such as PG, E4, E8, and 2A11 have been characterized and shown to direct ripening-specific expression of reporter genes. AGPase plays the key role in catalyzing the biosynthesis of starch in plants. It is a heterotetrameric enzyme with two small subunits and two large subunits, which are encoded by different genes. In higher plants, small subunits are highly conserved among plant species and expressed in all tissues. And the large subunits are present at multiple isoforms and expressed in a tissue-specific pattern. In fruits, the expression pattern of the large subunits varies with plant species. That made it important to study the transcriptional regulation of the large subunits of AGPase in different plant species. Northern-blot analysis indicates in watermelon, an isoform of the large subunits Wml1 expressed specifically in fruits, not in leaves. The 5' flanking region of Wml1, which covers 1573bp, has been isolated through the method of uneven PCR. And transient expression assay has shown that the 1573bp (named WSP) can direct fruit-specific expression of GUS gene. Our goal in this study was to scan the promoter region for main regulatory regions involved in fruit-specific expression. A chimaeric gene was constructed containing the WSP promoter, the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) structural sequence as a reporter gene and the nopaline synthase polyadenylation site (NOS-ter). The plasmid pSPA was digested with Hind III + Hinc II and promoter fragment of 1573bp (from 180bp to 1752bp) was cut out and

  8. A major role of insulin in promoting obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, David J.; Guilherme, Adilson; Danai, Laura V.; Heyda, Lauren; Matevossian, Anouch; Cohen, Jessica; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Straubhaar, Juerg; Noh, Hye Lim; Jung, DaeYoung; Kim, Jason K.; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is associated with systemic insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia in obese rodents and humans. A longstanding concept is that hyperinsulinemia may promote systemic insulin resistance through downregulation of its receptor on target tissues. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that insulin also impairs systemic insulin sensitivity by specifically enhancing adipose inflammation. Methods Circulating insulin levels were reduced by about 50% in diet-induced and genetically obese mice by treatments with diazoxide or streptozotocin, respectively. We then examined AT crown-like structures, macrophage markers and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in AT. AT lipogenesis and systemic insulin sensitivity was also monitored. Conversely, insulin was infused into lean mice to determine its affects on the above parameters. Results Lowering circulating insulin levels in obese mice by streptozotocin treatment decreased macrophage content in AT, enhancing insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Moreover, responsiveness of blood glucose levels to injected insulin was improved by streptozotocin and diazoxide treatments of obese mice without changes in body weight. Remarkably, even in lean mice, infusion of insulin under constant euglycemic conditions stimulated expression of cytokines in AT. Consistent with these findings, insulin treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes caused a 10-fold increase in CCL2 mRNA levels within 6 h, which was blocked by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that obesity-associated hyperinsulinemia unexpectedly drives AT inflammation in obese mice, which in turn contributes to factors that suppress insulin-stimulated adipocyte DNL and systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:26137438

  9. Gcsf-Chr19 promotes neutrophil migration to damaged tissue through blood vessels in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Galdames, Jorge A; Zuñiga-Traslaviña, Constanza; Reyes, Ariel E; Feijóo, Carmen G

    2014-07-01

    G-CSF is an essential cytokine that regulates proliferation and differentiation of granulocytes from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. In mammals G-CSF has been identified as a key factor that promotes the release of neutrophils from the bone marrow into the blood circulation. In silico analysis indicates that zebrafish has two gcsf genes, gcsf-chr12 in chromosome 12 and gcsf-chr19 in chromosome 19. Gcsf-Chr12 participates in emergency myelopoiesis, but, in contrast to its mammalian orthologue, is not involved in neutrophil migration toward damaged tissue. In turn, the function of Gcsf-Chr19 has not been examined yet. In this study, we analyzed the role of Gcsf-Chr19 in regulating neutrophil migration toward the wound. Our results indicated that during the first h after caudal fin transection, neutrophils migrate from the hematopoietic tissue toward the injury, using the extracellular matrix as a substrate. Later, between 3 and 4 h postdamage, the recruitment mainly occurs through the bloodstream, and only a few neutrophils still use the extracellular matrix to migrate. During this process, the transcriptional levels of gcsf-chr19 are considerably increased, reaching a peak 1 h postdamage. The knockdown of Gcsf-chr19 indicated that the percentage of neutrophils that reach the wound decreased after the first h postinjury, suggesting that the knockdown specifically affects neutrophils that travel to the wound through blood vessels. Together, our data provide novel information about the regulation of neutrophil migration in zebrafish, positioning Gcsf-Chr19 as a key signal during the course of an inflammatory process triggered by severe damage.

  10. Chronic social isolation is associated with metabolic gene expression changes specific to mammary adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Volden, Paul A; Wonder, Erin L; Skor, Maxwell N; Carmean, Christopher M; Patel, Feenalie N; Ye, Honggang; Kocherginsky, Masha; McClintock, Martha K; Brady, Matthew J; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2013-07-01

    Chronic social isolation is linked to increased mammary tumor growth in rodent models of breast cancer. In the C3(1)/SV40 T-antigen FVB/N (TAg) mouse model of "triple-negative" breast cancer, the heightened stress response elicited by social isolation has been associated with increased expression of metabolic genes in the mammary gland before invasive tumors develop (i.e., during the in situ carcinoma stage). To further understand the mechanisms underlying how accelerated mammary tumor growth is associated with social isolation, we separated the mammary gland adipose tissue from adjacent ductal epithelial cells and analyzed individual cell types for changes in metabolic gene expression. Specifically, increased expression of the key metabolic genes Acaca, Hk2, and Acly was found in the adipocyte, rather than the epithelial fraction. Surprisingly, metabolic gene expression was not significantly increased in visceral adipose depots of socially isolated female mice. As expected, increased metabolic gene expression in the mammary adipocytes of socially isolated mice coincided with increased glucose metabolism, lipid synthesis, and leptin secretion from this adipose depot. Furthermore, application of media that had been cultured with isolated mouse mammary adipose tissue (conditioned media) resulted in increased proliferation of mammary cancer cells relative to group-housed-conditioned media. These results suggest that exposure to a chronic stressor (social isolation) results in specific metabolic reprogramming in mammary gland adipocytes that in turn contributes to increased proliferation of adjacent preinvasive malignant epithelial cells. Metabolites and/or tumor growth-promoting proteins secreted from adipose tissue could identify biomarkers and/or targets for preventive intervention in breast cancer.

  11. Sequence specific protein binding to and activation of the TGF-beta 3 promoter through a repeated TCCC motif.

    PubMed Central

    Lafyatis, R; Denhez, F; Williams, T; Sporn, M; Roberts, A

    1991-01-01

    We have previously characterized the TGF-beta 3 promoter and shown that the activity of this promoter is highly variable in different cell types. Although the promoter contains a proximal cAMP responsive element, which is critical to basal and forskolin-induced promoter activity, this element is not responsible for the variable, cell-specific regulation of the promoter. In this paper, we identify a 25 base pair sequence in the proximal region of the TGF-beta 3 promoter that binds a novel DNA-binding protein. This region includes the sequence T-CCCTCCCTCCC, (3 x TCCC), and mutation of these T-CCC repeats inhibits protein binding. Further, we show that in the cell line A375, which we have previously shown expresses high levels of TGF-beta 3 mRNA, this region is responsible for mediating high level TGF-beta 3 promoter activity. Immediately 3' to the 3 x TCCC sequence is a consensus AP-2 binding site, however, we show that this region does not bind AP-2, and AP-2 does not transactivate the TGF-beta 3 promoter. Therefore, we provide strong evidence that high level expression of TGF-beta 3 in A375 cells results from transactivation of the TGF-beta 3 promoter by a protein that binds to a repeated TCCC motif in the promoter and suggest that this DNA-binding protein likely also regulates aspects of developmental and tissue-specific expression of this cytokine. Images PMID:1754378

  12. Activity and Accumulation of Cell Division-Promoting Phenolics in Tobacco Tissue Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Teutonico, Rita A.; Dudley, Matthew W.; Orr, John D.; Lynn, David G.; Binns, Andrew N.

    1991-01-01

    Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucosides (DCGs) are derivatives of the phenylpropanoid pathway that have been isolated from Catharansus roseus L. (Vinca rosea) crown gall tumors. Fractions containing purified DCGs have been shown previously to promote the growth of cytokinin-requiring tissues of tobacco in the absence of exogenous cytokinins. In this study, we utilized synthetic DCG isomers to confirm the cell division-promoting activity of DCG isomers A and B and show that they neither promote shoot meristem initiation on Nicotiana tabacum L., cv Havana 425, leaf explants nor induce betacyanin synthesis in amaranth seedlings. Analysis of cultured tobacco pith tissue demonstrated that DCG accumulation was stimulated by cytokinin treatment and correlated with cytokinin-induced cell division. Thus, the accumulation of metabolites that could replace cytokinin in cell division bioassays is stimulated by cytokinins. These data support the model that DCGs are a component of a cytokinin-mediated regulatory circuit controlling cell division. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668384

  13. Ack promotes tissue growth via phosphorylation and suppression of the Hippo pathway component Expanded

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lianxin; Xu, Jiajun; Yin, Meng-Xin; Zhang, Liguo; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Xue, Zhaoyu; Ho, Margaret S; Gao, Guanjun; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Non-receptor tyrosine kinase activated cdc42 kinase was reported to participate in several types of cancers in mammals. It is also believed to have an anti-apoptotic function in Drosophila. Here, we report the identification of Drosophila activated cdc42 kinase as a growth promoter and a novel Hippo signaling pathway regulator. We find that activated cdc42 kinase promotes tissue growth through modulating Yorkie activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activated cdc42 kinase interacts with Expanded and induces tyrosine phosphorylation of Expanded on multiple sites. We propose a model that activated cdc42 kinase negatively regulates Expanded by changing its phosphorylation status to promote tissue growth. Moreover, we show that ack genetically interacts with merlin and expanded. Thus, we identify Drosophila activated cdc42 kinase as a Hippo pathway regulator. PMID:27462444

  14. Promoter competition assay for analyzing gene regulation in joint tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui Bin; Malacinski, George M; Yokota, Hiroki

    2002-08-01

    We describe a new biochemical technique, "promoter competition assay," for examining the role of cis-acting DNA elements in tissue cultures. Recent advances in tissue engineering permit the culture of a variety of cells. Many tissues are engineered, however, without an appropriate understanding of molecular machinery that regulates gene expression and cellular growth. For elucidating the role of cis-acting regulatory elements in cellular differentiation and growth, we developed the promoter competition assay. This assay uses a transient transfer into cells of double-stranded DNA fragments consisting of cis-acting regulatory elements. The transferred DNA fragments act as a competitor and titrate the function of their genomic counterparts. Using synovial cells derived from a rheumatoid arthritis patient, we examined a role of NF-kappa B binding sites in the regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) genes. The results support a stimulatory role of NF-kappa B in transcriptional regulation of MMP-1 and MMP-13.

  15. Tissue-specific metabolic responses of Cyprinus flammans to copper.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ming-Yan; Ye, Yang-Fang; Xue, Liang-Yi; Tang, Ze-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Copper (Cu) contamination is serious in China, with ≤2.76 mg/L in some waters. Exposure to Cu causes a high toxicity to the aquatic organisms and subsequent ecological risk. To understand fish responses to Cu exposure, we analyzed the metabonomic changes in multiple tissues (gill, liver, and muscle) of Cyprinus flammans using an nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic technique. Our results showed that metabolic alterations are dose-dependent. No significant metabolic alterations in three tissues of fish are caused by 0.25 mg/L Cu. However, 1.53 mg/L Cu caused changes of energy-related metabolites and amino acids, which we suggest are due to enhanced metabolic acidosis in gill and muscle, decreased tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in muscle, increased gluconeogenesis from amino acids in liver, and improved glycogenesis in liver and muscle. The Cori cycle between liver and muscle is concurrently triggered. Furthermore, high concentration of Cu resulted in the alteration of choline metabolism such that we hypothesize that Cu induces membrane damage and detoxification of CuSO4 in gill as well as altered osmoregulation in all three tissues. Choline-O-sulfate in gill may be used as a biomarker to provide an early warning of Cu exposure in C. flammans. Moreover, Cu exposure caused alterations of nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism in both gill and muscle. These findings provide a new insight into the metabolic effects of Cu exposure on C. flammans and highlight the value of metabonomics in the study of metabolic metal disturbance in fish.

  16. Factors promoting increased rate of tissue regeneration: the zebrafish fin as a tool for examining tissue engineering design concepts.

    PubMed

    Boominathan, Vijay P; Ferreira, Tracie L

    2012-12-01

    Student interest in topics of tissue engineering is increasing exponentially as the number of universities offering programs in bioengineering are on the rise. Bioengineering encompasses all of the STEM categories: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Inquiry-based learning is one of the most effective techniques for promoting student learning and has been demonstrated to have a high impact on learning outcomes. We have designed program outcomes for our bioengineering program that require tiered activities to develop problem solving skills, peer evaluation techniques, and promote team work. While it is ideal to allow students to ask unique questions and design their own experiments, this can be difficult for instructors to have reagents and supplies available for a variety of activities. Zebrafish can be easily housed, and multiple variables can be tested on a large enough group to provide statistical value, lending them well to inquiry-based learning modules. We have designed a laboratory activity that takes observation of fin regeneration to the next level: analyzing conditions that may impact regeneration. Tissue engineers seek to define the optimum conditions to grow tissue for replacement parts. The field of tissue engineering is likely to benefit from understanding natural mechanisms of regeneration and the factors that influence the rate of regeneration. We have outlined the results of varying temperature on fin regeneration and propose other inquiry modules such as the role of pH in fin regeneration. Furthermore, we have provided useful tools for developing critical thinking and peer review of research ideas, assessment guidelines, and grading rubrics for the activities associated with this exercise. PMID:23244692

  17. Factors promoting increased rate of tissue regeneration: the zebrafish fin as a tool for examining tissue engineering design concepts.

    PubMed

    Boominathan, Vijay P; Ferreira, Tracie L

    2012-12-01

    Student interest in topics of tissue engineering is increasing exponentially as the number of universities offering programs in bioengineering are on the rise. Bioengineering encompasses all of the STEM categories: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Inquiry-based learning is one of the most effective techniques for promoting student learning and has been demonstrated to have a high impact on learning outcomes. We have designed program outcomes for our bioengineering program that require tiered activities to develop problem solving skills, peer evaluation techniques, and promote team work. While it is ideal to allow students to ask unique questions and design their own experiments, this can be difficult for instructors to have reagents and supplies available for a variety of activities. Zebrafish can be easily housed, and multiple variables can be tested on a large enough group to provide statistical value, lending them well to inquiry-based learning modules. We have designed a laboratory activity that takes observation of fin regeneration to the next level: analyzing conditions that may impact regeneration. Tissue engineers seek to define the optimum conditions to grow tissue for replacement parts. The field of tissue engineering is likely to benefit from understanding natural mechanisms of regeneration and the factors that influence the rate of regeneration. We have outlined the results of varying temperature on fin regeneration and propose other inquiry modules such as the role of pH in fin regeneration. Furthermore, we have provided useful tools for developing critical thinking and peer review of research ideas, assessment guidelines, and grading rubrics for the activities associated with this exercise.

  18. A convex optimization approach for identification of human tissue-specific interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Shahin; Grama, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Analysis of organism-specific interactomes has yielded novel insights into cellular function and coordination, understanding of pathology, and identification of markers and drug targets. Genes, however, can exhibit varying levels of cell type specificity in their expression, and their coordinated expression manifests in tissue-specific function and pathology. Tissue-specific/tissue-selective interaction mechanisms have significant applications in drug discovery, as they are more likely to reveal drug targets. Furthermore, tissue-specific transcription factors (tsTFs) are significantly implicated in human disease, including cancers. Finally, disease genes and protein complexes have the tendency to be differentially expressed in tissues in which defects cause pathology. These observations motivate the construction of refined tissue-specific interactomes from organism-specific interactomes. Results: We present a novel technique for constructing human tissue-specific interactomes. Using a variety of validation tests (Edge Set Enrichment Analysis, Gene Ontology Enrichment, Disease-Gene Subnetwork Compactness), we show that our proposed approach significantly outperforms state-of-the-art techniques. Finally, using case studies of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, we show that tissue-specific interactomes derived from our study can be used to construct pathways implicated in pathology and demonstrate the use of these pathways in identifying novel targets. Availability and implementation: http://www.cs.purdue.edu/homes/mohammas/projects/ActPro.html Contact: mohammadi@purdue.edu PMID:27307623

  19. Tissue-Specific Effects of Vitamin E Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Eugene; Viezeliene, Dale; Beekhof, Piet; Gremmer, Eric; Ivanov, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    A multivitamin and mineral supplementation study of 6 weeks was conducted with male and female mice. The control group received a standard dose of vitamins and minerals of 1× the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI), whereas a second group received 3× RDI. A third group received a high dose of vitamin E (25× RDI), close to the upper limit of toxicity (UL), but still recommended and considered to be harmless and beneficial. The high dose of vitamin E caused a number of beneficial, but also adverse effects. Different biomarkers of tissue toxicity, oxidative stress related processes and inflammation were determined. These biomarkers did not change in plasma and erythrocytes to a large extent. In the liver of male mice, some beneficial effects were observed by a lower concentration of several biomarkers of inflammation. However, in the kidney of male mice, a number of biomarkers increased substantially with the higher dose of vitamin E, indicating tissue toxicity and an increased level of inflammation. Since this dose of vitamin E, which is lower than the UL, cause some adverse effects, even after a short exposure period, further studies are required to reconsider the UL for vitamin E. PMID:27447613

  20. Tissue-Specific Effects of Vitamin E Supplementation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Eugene; Viezeliene, Dale; Beekhof, Piet; Gremmer, Eric; Ivanov, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    A multivitamin and mineral supplementation study of 6 weeks was conducted with male and female mice. The control group received a standard dose of vitamins and minerals of 1× the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI), whereas a second group received 3× RDI. A third group received a high dose of vitamin E (25× RDI), close to the upper limit of toxicity (UL), but still recommended and considered to be harmless and beneficial. The high dose of vitamin E caused a number of beneficial, but also adverse effects. Different biomarkers of tissue toxicity, oxidative stress related processes and inflammation were determined. These biomarkers did not change in plasma and erythrocytes to a large extent. In the liver of male mice, some beneficial effects were observed by a lower concentration of several biomarkers of inflammation. However, in the kidney of male mice, a number of biomarkers increased substantially with the higher dose of vitamin E, indicating tissue toxicity and an increased level of inflammation. Since this dose of vitamin E, which is lower than the UL, cause some adverse effects, even after a short exposure period, further studies are required to reconsider the UL for vitamin E. PMID:27447613

  1. Promoting Social Communication in a Child with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Handley, Roderick D.; Radley, Keith C.; Lum, John D. K.

    2016-01-01

    Social difficulties represent a major area of concern in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Social skills interventions targeting communication or language skills of children with SLI have been generally ineffective. The current study tested the efficacy of a social skills intervention consisting of multiple behavioral interventions…

  2. Tissue- and Time-Specific Expression of Otherwise Identical tRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Adir, Idan; Dahan, Orna; Broday, Limor; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Rechavi, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Codon usage bias affects protein translation because tRNAs that recognize synonymous codons differ in their abundance. Although the current dogma states that tRNA expression is exclusively regulated by intrinsic control elements (A- and B-box sequences), we revealed, using a reporter that monitors the levels of individual tRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, that eight tryptophan tRNA genes, 100% identical in sequence, are expressed in different tissues and change their expression dynamically. Furthermore, the expression levels of the sup-7 tRNA gene at day 6 were found to predict the animal’s lifespan. We discovered that the expression of tRNAs that reside within introns of protein-coding genes is affected by the host gene’s promoter. Pairing between specific Pol II genes and the tRNAs that are contained in their introns is most likely adaptive, since a genome-wide analysis revealed that the presence of specific intronic tRNAs within specific orthologous genes is conserved across Caenorhabditis species. PMID:27560950

  3. Tissue- and Time-Specific Expression of Otherwise Identical tRNA Genes.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Dror; Rak, Roni; Gingold, Hila; Adir, Idan; Maayan, Gadi; Dahan, Orna; Broday, Limor; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Rechavi, Oded

    2016-08-01

    Codon usage bias affects protein translation because tRNAs that recognize synonymous codons differ in their abundance. Although the current dogma states that tRNA expression is exclusively regulated by intrinsic control elements (A- and B-box sequences), we revealed, using a reporter that monitors the levels of individual tRNA genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, that eight tryptophan tRNA genes, 100% identical in sequence, are expressed in different tissues and change their expression dynamically. Furthermore, the expression levels of the sup-7 tRNA gene at day 6 were found to predict the animal's lifespan. We discovered that the expression of tRNAs that reside within introns of protein-coding genes is affected by the host gene's promoter. Pairing between specific Pol II genes and the tRNAs that are contained in their introns is most likely adaptive, since a genome-wide analysis revealed that the presence of specific intronic tRNAs within specific orthologous genes is conserved across Caenorhabditis species. PMID:27560950

  4. Maternal undernutrition programs tissue-specific epigenetic changes in the glucocorticoid receptor in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Begum, Ghazala; Davies, Alison; Stevens, Adam; Oliver, Mark; Jaquiery, Anne; Challis, John; Harding, Jane; Bloomfield, Frank; White, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that an adverse maternal environment during pregnancy predisposes offspring to metabolic syndrome with increased obesity, and type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms are still unclear although epigenetic modifications are implicated and the hypothalamus is a likely target. We hypothesized that maternal undernutrition (UN) around conception in sheep would lead to epigenetic changes in hypothalamic neurons regulating energy balance in the offspring, up to 5 years after the maternal insult. We found striking evidence of decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) promoter methylation, decreased histone lysine 27 trimethylation, and increased histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation in hypothalami from male and female adult offspring of UN mothers. These findings are entirely compatible with the increased GR mRNA and protein observed in the hypothalami. The increased GR predicted the decreased hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin expression and increased obesity that we observed in the 5-year-old adult males. The epigenetic and expression changes in GR were specific to the hypothalamus. Hippocampal GR mRNA and protein were decreased in UN offspring, whereas pituitary GR was altered in a sex-specific manner. In peripheral polymorphonuclear leukocytes there were no changes in GR methylation or protein, indicating that this epigenetic analysis did not predict changes in the brain. Overall, these results suggest that moderate changes in maternal nutrition, around the time of conception, signal life-long and tissue-specific epigenetic alterations in a key gene regulating energy balance in the hypothalamus.

  5. Measurement of temperature-dependent specific heat of biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Schutt, David J; dos Santos, Icaro; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2005-02-01

    We measured specific heat directly by heating a sample uniformly between two electrodes by an electric generator. We minimized heat loss by styrofoam insulation. We measured temperature from multiple thermocouples at temperatures from 25 degrees C to 80 degrees C while heating the sample, and corrected for heat loss. We confirm method accuracy with a 2.5% agar-0.4% saline physical model and obtain specific heat of 4121+/-89 J (kg K)(-1), with an average error of 3.1%.

  6. Transposon-mediated transgenesis, transgenic rescue, and tissue-specific gene expression in rodents and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Katter, Katharina; Geurts, Aron M; Hoffmann, Orsolya; Mátés, Lajos; Landa, Vladimir; Hiripi, László; Moreno, Carol; Lazar, Jozef; Bashir, Sanum; Zidek, Vaclav; Popova, Elena; Jerchow, Boris; Becker, Katja; Devaraj, Anantharam; Walter, Ingrid; Grzybowksi, Michael; Corbett, Molly; Filho, Artur Rangel; Hodges, Matthew R; Bader, Michael; Ivics, Zoltán; Jacob, Howard J; Pravenec, Michal; Bosze, Zsuzsanna; Rülicke, Thomas; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna

    2013-03-01

    Germline transgenesis is an important procedure for functional investigation of biological pathways, as well as for animal biotechnology. We have established a simple, nonviral protocol in three important biomedical model organisms frequently used in physiological studies. The protocol is based on the hyperactive Sleeping Beauty transposon system, SB100X, which reproducibly promoted generation of transgenic founders at frequencies of 50-64, 14-72, and 15% in mice, rats, and rabbits, respectively. The SB100X-mediated transgene integrations are less prone to genetic mosaicism and gene silencing as compared to either the classical pronuclear injection or to lentivirus-mediated transgenesis. The method was successfully applied to a variety of transgenes and animal models, and can be used to generate founders with single-copy integrations. The transposon vector also allows the generation of transgenic lines with tissue-specific expression patterns specified by promoter elements of choice, exemplified by a rat reporter strain useful for tracking serotonergic neurons. As a proof of principle, we rescued an inborn genetic defect in the fawn-hooded hypertensive rat by SB100X transgenesis. A side-by-side comparison of the SB100X- and piggyBac-based protocols revealed that the two systems are complementary, offering new opportunities in genome manipulation.

  7. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    PubMed

    Chausse, Bruno; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Sanchez, Angélica B; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR) and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart. PMID:25749501

  8. Cloning, expression, and regulation of tissue-specific genes in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Korochkin, L.I.

    1995-08-01

    The family of esterase genes was studied in various Drosophilia species. These genes are classified as tissue-specific and housekeeping ones. The expression of tissue-specific esterases in the male reproductive system of Drosophilia species from the virilis and melanogaster groups was thoroughly examined. Modifier genes controlling activity level, time of synthesis, and distribution in cells of the tissue-specific esterase isozyme from the ejaculatory bulb were revealed. The structural gene coding of this enzyme was isolated, cloned, and sequenced. This gene was shown to be similar in different Drosophilia species; the transcriptional level of tissue specificity of this gene was determined. The possibility of transformating the tissue-specific gene into a housekeeping one was demonstrated. In different Drosophilia species, this gene can be expressed in different parts of the reproductive system. In transgenic males carrying the gene of another species, the foreign gene is expressed as in the donor. 68 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Functional architecture of two exclusively late stage pollen-specific promoters in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuo; Wang, Zhongni; Liu, Yuan; Li, Wei; Wu, Feng; Lin, Xuelei; Meng, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Late stage pollen-specific promoters are important tools in crop molecular breeding. Several such promoters, and their functional motifs, have been well characterized in dicotyledonous plants such as tomato and tobacco. However, knowledge about the functional architecture of such promoters is limited in the monocotyledonous plant rice. Here, pollen-late-stage-promoter 1 (PLP1) and pollen-late-stage-promoter 2 (PLP2) were characterized using a stable transformation system in rice. Histochemical staining showed that the two promoters exclusively drive GUS expression in late-stage pollen grains in rice. 5' deletion analysis revealed that four regions, including the -1159 to -720 and the -352 to -156 regions of PLP1 and the -740 to -557 and the -557 to -339 regions of PLP2, are important in maintaining the activity and specificity of these promoters. Motif mutation analysis indicated that 'AGAAA' and 'CAAT' motifs in the -740 to -557 region of PLP2 act as enhancers in the promoter. Gain of function experiments indicated that the novel TA-rich motif 'TACATAA' and 'TATTCAT' in the core region of the PLP1 and PLP2 promoters is necessary, but not sufficient, for pollen-specific expression in rice. Our results provide evidence that the enhancer motif 'AGAAA' is conserved in the pollen-specific promoters of both monocots and eudicots, but that some functional architecture characteristics are different.

  10. Transcriptional activation of lck by retrovirus promoter insertion between two lymphoid-specific promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, H T; Reynolds, P J; Kelley, C M; Sefton, B M

    1988-01-01

    p56lck, a member of the src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine protein kinases, is expressed primarily in lymphoid cells. Previous RNase protection data demonstrated the existence of at least two lck mRNAs (type I and type II) with different 5' untranslated regions in most T cells. These have been found here to arise from two separate promoters. S1 nuclease analysis and primer extension were used to locate the site of initiation of type I lck mRNA. The nucleotide sequence of the region upstream of this start site contains no classical promoter motifs. A cDNA clone of type II lck mRNA was isolated. The promoter of this mRNA must be more than 10 kilobases upstream of the type I promoter region. In two murine thymoma cell lines, LSTRA and Thy19, lck is expressed at elevated levels as a result of Moloney murine leukemia virus retrovirus promoter insertion. p56lck is encoded in these cells by a hybrid virus-lck mRNA containing the 5' untranslated region of Moloney virus mRNA. The structures and the sites of integration of the proviruses upstream of lck in these cells were examined by molecular cloning and Southern analysis. A truncated and rearranged provirus, flanked by 554 nucleotides (nt) of duplicated cellular sequences, was found 962 nt upstream of the start site for type I lck mRNA in LSTRA cells. What appears to be a Moloney mink cytopathic focus-forming provirus was found between 584 to 794 nt upstream of the start site for type I lck mRNA in Thy19 cells. Thus in both tumor cell lines, viral DNA is present between the promoters for type I and type II lck mRNAs. Comparison of the sequences of the 5' ends of the lck and c-src genes suggests that divergence of these two genes involved exon shuffling and that a homolog of the neuronal c-src(+) exon is not present in lck. Images PMID:2845126

  11. The tissue microarray data exchange specification: A community-based, open source tool for sharing tissue microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jules J; Edgerton, Mary E; Friedman, Bruce A

    2003-01-01

    Background Tissue Microarrays (TMAs) allow researchers to examine hundreds of small tissue samples on a single glass slide. The information held in a single TMA slide may easily involve Gigabytes of data. To benefit from TMA technology, the scientific community needs an open source TMA data exchange specification that will convey all of the data in a TMA experiment in a format that is understandable to both humans and computers. A data exchange specification for TMAs allows researchers to submit their data to journals and to public data repositories and to share or merge data from different laboratories. In May 2001, the Association of Pathology Informatics (API) hosted the first in a series of four workshops, co-sponsored by the National Cancer Institute, to develop an open, community-supported TMA data exchange specification. Methods A draft tissue microarray data exchange specification was developed through workshop meetings. The first workshop confirmed community support for the effort and urged the creation of an open XML-based specification. This was to evolve in steps with approval for each step coming from the stakeholders in the user community during open workshops. By the fourth workshop, held October, 2002, a set of Common Data Elements (CDEs) was established as well as a basic strategy for organizing TMA data in self-describing XML documents. Results The TMA data exchange specification is a well-formed XML document with four required sections: 1) Header, containing the specification Dublin Core identifiers, 2) Block, describing the paraffin-embedded array of tissues, 3)Slide, describing the glass slides produced from the Block, and 4) Core, containing all data related to the individual tissue samples contained in the array. Eighty CDEs, conforming to the ISO-11179 specification for data elements constitute XML tags used in the TMA data exchange specification. A set of six simple semantic rules describe the complete data exchange specification. Anyone

  12. Proteomic survey towards the tissue-specific proteins of mouse mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Sun, HaiDan; Ru, YaWei; Yin, SongYue; Yin, Liang; Liu, SiQi

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrion plays the key functions in mammalian cells. It is believed that mitochondrion exerts the common biologic functions in many tissues, but also performs some specific functions correspondent with tissues where it is localized. To identify the tissue-specific mitochondrial proteins, we carried out a systematic survey towards mitochondrial proteins in the tissues of C57BL/6J mouse, such as liver, kidney and heart. The mitochondrial proteins were separated by 2DE and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Total of 87 unique proteins were identified as the tissue-specific ones, and some representatives were further verified through ICPL quantification and Western blot. Because these issue-specific proteins are coded from nuclear genes, real-time PCR was employed to examine the mRNA status of six typical genes found in the tissues.With combining of the expression data and the co-localization images obtained from confocal microscope, we came to the conclusion that the tissue-specifically mitochondrial proteins were widely distributed among the mouse tissues. Our investigation, therefore, indeed provides a solid base to further explore the biological significance of the mitochondrial proteins with tissue-orientation.

  13. Reproductive Organ and Vascular Specific Promoter of the Rice Plasma Membrane Ca2+ATPase Mediates Environmental Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Kazi Md. Kamrul; Banu, Mst. Sufara Akhter; Pathi, Krishna Mohan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase is a transport protein in the plasma membrane of cells and helps in removal of calcium (Ca2+) from the cell, hence regulating Ca2+ level within cells. Though plant Ca2+ATPases have been shown to be involved in plant stress responses but their promoter regions have not been well studied. Results The 1478 bp promoter sequence of rice plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase contains cis-acting elements responsive to stresses and plant hormones. To identify the functional region, serial deletions of the promoter were fused with the GUS sequence and four constructs were obtained. These were differentially activated under NaCl, PEG cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate treatments. We demonstrated that the rice plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase promoter is responsible for vascular-specific and multiple stress-inducible gene expression. Only full-length promoter showed specific GUS expression under stress conditions in floral parts. High GUS activity was observed in roots with all the promoter constructs. The −1478 to −886 bp flanking region responded well upon treatment with salt and drought. Only the full-length promoter presented cold-induced GUS expression in leaves, while in shoots slight expression was observed for −1210 and −886 bp flanking region. The −1210 bp deletion significantly responded to exogenous methyl viologen and abscisic acid induction. The −1210 and −886 bp flanking region resulted in increased GUS activity in leaves under methyl jasmonate treatments, whereas in shoots the −886 bp and −519 bp deletion gave higher expression. Salicylic acid failed to induce GUS activities in leaves for all the constructs. Conclusions The rice plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase promoter is a reproductive organ-specific as well as vascular-specific. This promoter contains drought, salt, cold, methyl viologen, abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate related cis-elements, which regulated gene expression. Overall, the tissue-specificity

  14. Genome-wide de Novo Prediction of Proximal and Distal Tissue-Specific Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I V

    2005-11-03

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory networks are encoded in the human genome is essential for understanding how cellular processes are directed. Here, we present a novel approach for systematically predicting tissue specific regulatory elements (REs) that blends genome-wide expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and pattern analysis of transcription factor binding sites. This analysis yields 4,670 candidate REs in the human genome with distinct tissue specificities, the majority of which reside far away from transcription start sites. We identify key transcription factors (TFs) for 34 distinct tissues and demonstrate that tissue-specific gene expression relies on multiple regulatory pathways employing similar, but different cohorts of interacting TFs. The methods and results we describe provide a global view of tissue specific gene regulation in humans, and propose a strategy for deciphering the transcriptional regulatory code in eukaryotes.

  15. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing maps from multiple human tissues reveal novel CpG islands associated with tissue-specific regulation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Yi, Soojin V

    2016-01-01

    CpG islands (CGIs) are one of the most widely studied regulatory features of the human genome, with critical roles in development and disease. Despite such significance and the original epigenetic definition, currently used CGI sets are typically predicted from DNA sequence characteristics. Although CGIs are deeply implicated in practical analyses of DNA methylation, recent studies have shown that such computational annotations suffer from inaccuracies. Here we used whole-genome bisulfite sequencing from 10 diverse human tissues to identify a comprehensive, experimentally obtained, single-base resolution CGI catalog. In addition to the unparalleled annotation precision, our method is free from potential bias due to arbitrary sequence features or probe affinity differences. In addition to clarifying substantial false positives in the widely used University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) annotations, our study identifies numerous novel epigenetic loci. In particular, we reveal significant impact of transposable elements on the epigenetic regulatory landscape of the human genome and demonstrate ubiquitous presence of transcription initiation at CGIs, including alternative promoters in gene bodies and non-coding RNAs in intergenic regions. Moreover, coordinated DNA methylation and chromatin modifications mark tissue-specific enhancers at novel CGIs. Enrichment of specific transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq supports mechanistic roles of CGIs on the regulation of tissue-specific transcription. The new CGI catalog provides a comprehensive and integrated list of genomic hotspots of epigenetic regulation.

  16. A CRISPR/Cas9 vector system for tissue-specific gene disruption in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Durand, Ellen M; Yang, Song; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-03-23

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology of genome editing has greatly facilitated the targeted inactivation of genes in vitro and in vivo in a wide range of organisms. In zebrafish, it allows the rapid generation of knockout lines by simply injecting a guide RNA (gRNA) and Cas9 mRNA into one-cell stage embryos. Here, we report a simple and scalable CRISPR-based vector system for tissue-specific gene inactivation in zebrafish. As proof of principle, we used our vector with the gata1 promoter driving Cas9 expression to silence the urod gene, implicated in heme biosynthesis, specifically in the erythrocytic lineage. Urod targeting yielded red fluorescent erythrocytes in zebrafish embryos, recapitulating the phenotype observed in the yquem mutant. While F0 embryos displayed mosaic gene disruption, the phenotype appeared very penetrant in stable F1 fish. This vector system constitutes a unique tool to spatially control gene knockout and greatly broadens the scope of loss-of-function studies in zebrafish.

  17. A CRISPR/Cas9 vector system for tissue-specific gene disruption in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Durand, Ellen M; Yang, Song; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-03-23

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology of genome editing has greatly facilitated the targeted inactivation of genes in vitro and in vivo in a wide range of organisms. In zebrafish, it allows the rapid generation of knockout lines by simply injecting a guide RNA (gRNA) and Cas9 mRNA into one-cell stage embryos. Here, we report a simple and scalable CRISPR-based vector system for tissue-specific gene inactivation in zebrafish. As proof of principle, we used our vector with the gata1 promoter driving Cas9 expression to silence the urod gene, implicated in heme biosynthesis, specifically in the erythrocytic lineage. Urod targeting yielded red fluorescent erythrocytes in zebrafish embryos, recapitulating the phenotype observed in the yquem mutant. While F0 embryos displayed mosaic gene disruption, the phenotype appeared very penetrant in stable F1 fish. This vector system constitutes a unique tool to spatially control gene knockout and greatly broadens the scope of loss-of-function studies in zebrafish. PMID:25752963

  18. Distal cis-regulatory elements are required for tissue-specific expression of enamelin (Enam)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Papagerakis, Petros; Ye, Ling; Feng, Jerry Q.; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2009-01-01

    Enamel formation is orchestrated by the sequential expression of genes encoding enamel matrix proteins; however, the mechanisms sustaining the spatio–temporal order of gene transcription during amelogenesis are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the cis-regulatory sequences necessary for normal expression of enamelin (Enam). Several enamelin transcription regulatory regions, showing high sequence homology among species, were identified. DNA constructs containing 5.2 or 3.9 kb regions upstream of the enamelin translation initiation site were linked to a LacZ reporter and used to generate transgenic mice. Only the 5.2-Enam–LacZ construct was sufficient to recapitulate the endogenous pattern of enamelin tooth-specific expression. The 3.9-Enam–LacZ transgenic lines showed no expression in dental cells, but ectopic β-galactosidase activity was detected in osteoblasts. Potential transcription factor-binding sites were identified that may be important in controlling enamelin basal promoter activity and in conferring enamelin tissue-specific expression. Our study provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms governing enamelin expression. PMID:18353004

  19. Cone specific promoter for use in gene therapy of retinal degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Dyka, Frank M; Boye, Sanford L; Ryals, Renee C; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W

    2014-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is caused by a progressive loss of cone photoreceptors leading to color blindness and poor visual acuity. Animal studies and human clinical trials have shown that gene replacement therapy with adeno-associate virus (AAV) is a viable treatment option for this disease. Although there have been successful attempts to optimize capsid proteins for increased specificity, it is simpler to restrict expression via the use of cell type-specific promoters. To target cone photoreceptors, a chimeric promoter consisting of an enhancer element of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein promoter and a minimal sequence of the human transducin alpha-subunit promoter (IRBPe/GNAT2) was created. Additionally, a synthetic transducin alpha-subunit promoter (synGNAT2/GNAT2) containing conserved sequence blocks located downstream of the transcriptional start was created. The strength and specificity of these promoters were evaluated in murine retina by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the chimeric, (IRBPe/GNAT2) promoter is more efficient and specific than the synthetic, synGNAT2/GNAT2 promoter. Additionally, IRBPe/GNAT2-mediated expression was found in all cone subtypes and it was improved over existing promoters currently used for gene therapy of achromatopsia. PMID:24664760

  20. Whole-Organ Isolation Approach as a Basis for Tissue-Specific Analyses in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Hahnel, Steffen; Lu, Zhigang; Wilson, R. Alan; Grevelding, Christoph G.; Quack, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases worldwide, second only to malaria. Schistosomes exhibit an exceptional reproductive biology since the sexual maturation of the female, which includes the differentiation of the reproductive organs, is controlled by pairing. Pathogenicity originates from eggs, which cause severe inflammation in their hosts. Elucidation of processes contributing to female maturation is not only of interest to basic science but also considering novel concepts combating schistosomiasis. Methodology/Principal Findings To get direct access to the reproductive organs, we established a novel protocol using a combined detergent/protease-treatment removing the tegument and the musculature of adult Schistosoma mansoni. All steps were monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and bright-field microscopy (BF). We focused on the gonads of adult schistosomes and demonstrated that isolated and purified testes and ovaries can be used for morphological and structural studies as well as sources for RNA and protein of sufficient amounts for subsequent analyses such as RT-PCR and immunoblotting. To this end, first exemplary evidence was obtained for tissue-specific transcription within the gonads (axonemal dynein intermediate chain gene SmAxDynIC; aquaporin gene SmAQP) as well as for post-transcriptional regulation (SmAQP). Conclusions/Significance The presented method provides a new way of getting access to tissue-specific material of S. mansoni. With regard to many still unanswered questions of schistosome biology, such as elucidating the molecular processes involved in schistosome reproduction, this protocol provides opportunities for, e.g., sub-transcriptomics and sub-proteomics at the organ level. This will promote the characterisation of gene-expression profiles, or more specifically to complete knowledge of signalling pathways contributing to differentiation processes, so discovering involved molecules that may

  1. Sinusoidal electromagnetic fields promote bone formation and inhibit bone resorption in rat femoral tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Gao, Yu-Hai; Yan, Juan-Li; Shi, Wen-Gui; Xian, Cory J; Chen, Ke-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Effects of sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SEMFs) on bone metabolism have not yet been well defined. The present study investigated SEMF effects on bone formation and resorption in rat femur bone tissues in vitro. Cultured femur diaphyseal (cortical bone) and metaphyseal (trabecular bone) tissues were treated with 50 Hz 1.8 mT SEMFs 1.5 h per day for up to 12 days and treatment effects on bone formation and resorption markers and associated gene expression were examined. Treatment with SEMFs caused a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibited the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) activity in the femoral diaphyseal or metaphyseal tissues. SEMFs also significantly increased levels of mRNA expression of osterix (OSX), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and ALP in the bone tissues. SEMF treatment decreased glucose content and increased lactic acid contents in the culture conditioned medium. In addition, treatment with SEMFs decreased mRNA expression levels of bone resorption-related genes TRACP, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and cathepsin K (CTSK) in the cultured bone tissues. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that treatment with 1.8 mT SEMFs at 1.5 h per day promoted bone formation, increased metabolism and inhibited resorption in both metaphyseal and diaphyseal bone tissues in vitro.

  2. A comparative approach to understanding tissue-specific expression of uncoupling protein 1 expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Shore, Andrew; Emes, Richard D; Wessely, Frank; Kemp, Paul; Cillo, Clemente; D'Armiento, Maria; Hoggard, Nigel; Lomax, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The thermoregulatory function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is due to the tissue-specific expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) which is thought to have evolved in early mammals. We report that a CpG island close to the UCP1 transcription start site is highly conserved in all 29 vertebrates examined apart from the mouse and xenopus. Using methylation sensitive restriction digest and bisulfite mapping we show that the CpG island in both the bovine and human is largely un-methylated and is not related to differences in UCP1 expression between white and BAT. Tissue-specific expression of UCP1 has been proposed to be regulated by a conserved 5' distal enhancer which has been reported to be absent in marsupials. We demonstrate that the enhancer, is also absent in five eutherians as well as marsupials, monotremes, amphibians, and fish, is present in pigs despite UCP1 having become a pseudogene, and that absence of the enhancer element does not relate to BAT-specific UCP1 expression. We identify an additional putative 5' regulatory unit which is conserved in 14 eutherian species but absent in other eutherians and vertebrates, but again unrelated to UCP1 expression. We conclude that despite clear evidence of conservation of regulatory elements in the UCP1 5' untranslated region, this does not appear to be related to species or tissues-specific expression of UCP1. PMID:23293654

  3. Effects of ingesting supplements designed to promote lean tissue accretion on body composition during resistance training.

    PubMed

    Kreider, R B; Klesges, R; Harmon, K; Grindstaff, P; Ramsey, L; Bullen, D; Wood, L; Li, Y; Almada, A

    1996-09-01

    This study examined the effects of ingesting nutritional supplements designed to promote lean tissue accretion on body composition alterations during resistance training. Twenty-eight resistance-trained males blindly supplemented their diets with maltodextrin (M), Gainers Fuel 1000 (GF), or Phosphagain (P). No significant differences were observed in absolute or relative total body water among groups. Energy intake and body weight significantly increased in all groups combined throughout the study with no group or interaction differences observed. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry-determined body mass significantly increased in each group throughout the study with significantly greater gains observed in the GF and P groups. Lean tissue mass (excluding bone) gain was significantly greater in the P group, while fat mass and percent body fat were significantly increased in the GF group. Results indicate that total body weight significantly increased in each group and that P supplementation resulted in significantly greater gains in lean tissue mass during resistance training.

  4. Microbiota depletion promotes browning of white adipose tissue and reduces obesity.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Zamorano, Nicolas; Fabbiano, Salvatore; Chevalier, Claire; Stojanović, Ozren; Colin, Didier J; Stevanović, Ana; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Tarallo, Valentina; Rigo, Dorothée; Germain, Stéphane; Ilievska, Miroslava; Montet, Xavier; Seimbille, Yann; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2015-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) promotes a lean and healthy phenotype and improves insulin sensitivity. In response to cold or exercise, brown fat cells also emerge in the white adipose tissue (WAT; also known as beige cells), a process known as browning. Here we show that the development of functional beige fat in the inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ingSAT) and perigonadal visceral adipose tissue (pgVAT) is promoted by the depletion of microbiota either by means of antibiotic treatment or in germ-free mice. This leads to improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and decreased white fat and adipocyte size in lean mice, obese leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mice and high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Such metabolic improvements are mediated by eosinophil infiltration, enhanced type 2 cytokine signaling and M2 macrophage polarization in the subcutaneous white fat depots of microbiota-depleted animals. The metabolic phenotype and the browning of the subcutaneous fat are impaired by the suppression of type 2 cytokine signaling, and they are reversed by recolonization of the antibiotic-treated or germ-free mice with microbes. These results provide insight into the microbiota-fat signaling axis and beige-fat development in health and metabolic disease.

  5. Inhibition of Notch signaling by Dll4-Fc promotes reperfusion of acutely ischemic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ren; Trindade, Alexandre; Sun, Zhanfeng; Kumar, Ram; Weaver, Fred A.; Krasnoperov, Valery; Naga, Kranthi; Duarte, Antonio; Gill, Parkash S.

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low dose Dll4-Fc increases vascular proliferation and overall perfusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low dose Dll4-Fc helps vascular injury recovery in hindlimb ischemia model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low dose Dll4-Fc helps vascular injury recovery in skin flap model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dll4 heterozygous deletion promotes vascular injury recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dll4 overexpression delays vascular injury recovery. -- Abstract: Notch pathway regulates vessel development and maturation. Dll4, a high-affinity ligand for Notch, is expressed predominantly in the arterial endothelium and is induced by hypoxia among other factors. Inhibition of Dll4 has paradoxical effects of reducing the maturation and perfusion in newly forming vessels while increasing the density of vessels. We hypothesized that partial and/or intermittent inhibition of Dll4 may lead to increased vascular response and still allow vascular maturation to occur. Thus tissue perfusion can be restored rapidly, allowing quicker recovery from ischemia or tissue injury. Our studies in two different models (hindlimb ischemia and skin flap) show that inhibition of Dll4 at low dose allows faster recovery from vascular and tissue injury. This opens a new possibility for Dll4 blockade's therapeutic application in promoting recovery from vascular injury and restoring blood supply to ischemic tissues.

  6. An atlas of tissue-specific conserved coexpression for functional annotation and disease gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Rosario Michael; Ala, Ugo; Molineris, Ivan; Grassi, Elena; Bracco, Chiara; Perego, Gian Paolo; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2011-01-01

    Gene coexpression relationships that are phylogenetically conserved between human and mouse have been shown to provide important clues about gene function that can be efficiently used to identify promising candidate genes for human hereditary disorders. In the past, such approaches have considered mostly generic gene expression profiles that cover multiple tissues and organs. The individual genes of multicellular organisms, however, can participate in different transcriptional programs, operating at scales as different as single-cell types, tissues, organs, body regions or the entire organism. Therefore, systematic analysis of tissue-specific coexpression could be, in principle, a very powerful strategy to dissect those functional relationships among genes that emerge only in particular tissues or organs. In this report, we show that, in fact, conserved coexpression as determined from tissue-specific and condition-specific data sets can predict many functional relationships that are not detected by analyzing heterogeneous microarray data sets. More importantly, we find that, when combined with disease networks, the simultaneous use of both generic (multi-tissue) and tissue-specific conserved coexpression allows a more efficient prediction of human disease genes than the use of generic conserved coexpression alone. Using this strategy, we were able to identify high-probability candidates for 238 orphan disease loci. We provide proof of concept that this combined use of generic and tissue-specific conserved coexpression can be very useful to prioritize the mutational candidates obtained from deep-sequencing projects, even in the case of genetic disorders as heterogeneous as XLMR. PMID:21654723

  7. Global indiscriminate methylation in cell-specific gene promoters following reprogramming into human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Bar-Nur, Ori; Ben-David, Eyal; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Molecular reprogramming of somatic cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is accompanied by extensive changes in gene expression patterns and epigenetic marks. To better understand the link between gene expression and DNA methylation, we have profiled human somatic cells from different embryonic cell types (endoderm, mesoderm, and parthenogenetic germ cells) and the iPSCs generated from them. We show that reprogramming is accompanied by extensive DNA methylation in CpG-poor promoters, sparing CpG-rich promoters. Intriguingly, methylation in CpG-poor promoters occurred not only in downregulated genes, but also in genes that are not expressed in the parental somatic cells or their respective iPSCs. These genes are predominantly tissue-specific genes of other cell types from different lineages. Our results suggest a role of DNA methylation in the silencing of the somatic cell identity by global nonspecific methylation of tissue-specific genes from all lineages, regardless of their expression in the parental somatic cells. PMID:24371806

  8. Global indiscriminate methylation in cell-specific gene promoters following reprogramming into human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Bar-Nur, Ori; Ben-David, Eyal; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Molecular reprogramming of somatic cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is accompanied by extensive changes in gene expression patterns and epigenetic marks. To better understand the link between gene expression and DNA methylation, we have profiled human somatic cells from different embryonic cell types (endoderm, mesoderm, and parthenogenetic germ cells) and the iPSCs generated from them. We show that reprogramming is accompanied by extensive DNA methylation in CpG-poor promoters, sparing CpG-rich promoters. Intriguingly, methylation in CpG-poor promoters occurred not only in downregulated genes, but also in genes that are not expressed in the parental somatic cells or their respective iPSCs. These genes are predominantly tissue-specific genes of other cell types from different lineages. Our results suggest a role of DNA methylation in the silencing of the somatic cell identity by global nonspecific methylation of tissue-specific genes from all lineages, regardless of their expression in the parental somatic cells.

  9. Global Indiscriminate Methylation in Cell-Specific Gene Promoters following Reprogramming into Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Bar-Nur, Ori; Ben-David, Eyal; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2013-01-01

    Summary Molecular reprogramming of somatic cells into human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is accompanied by extensive changes in gene expression patterns and epigenetic marks. To better understand the link between gene expression and DNA methylation, we have profiled human somatic cells from different embryonic cell types (endoderm, mesoderm, and parthenogenetic germ cells) and the iPSCs generated from them. We show that reprogramming is accompanied by extensive DNA methylation in CpG-poor promoters, sparing CpG-rich promoters. Intriguingly, methylation in CpG-poor promoters occurred not only in downregulated genes, but also in genes that are not expressed in the parental somatic cells or their respective iPSCs. These genes are predominantly tissue-specific genes of other cell types from different lineages. Our results suggest a role of DNA methylation in the silencing of the somatic cell identity by global nonspecific methylation of tissue-specific genes from all lineages, regardless of their expression in the parental somatic cells. PMID:24371806

  10. Porcine tissue-specific regulatory networks derived from meta-analysis of the transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montarelo, Dafne; Hudson, Nicholas J; Fernández, Ana I; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Dalrymple, Brian P; Reverter, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The processes that drive tissue identity and differentiation remain unclear for most tissue types. So are the gene networks and transcription factors (TF) responsible for the differential structure and function of each particular tissue, and this is particularly true for non model species with incomplete genomic resources. To better understand the regulation of genes responsible for tissue identity in pigs, we have inferred regulatory networks from a meta-analysis of 20 gene expression studies spanning 480 Porcine Affymetrix chips for 134 experimental conditions on 27 distinct tissues. We developed a mixed-model normalization approach with a covariance structure that accommodated the disparity in the origin of the individual studies, and obtained the normalized expression of 12,320 genes across the 27 tissues. Using this resource, we constructed a network, based on the co-expression patterns of 1,072 TF and 1,232 tissue specific genes. The resulting network is consistent with the known biology of tissue development. Within the network, genes clustered by tissue and tissues clustered by site of embryonic origin. These clusters were significantly enriched for genes annotated in key relevant biological processes and confirm gene functions and interactions from the literature. We implemented a Regulatory Impact Factor (RIF) metric to identify the key regulators in skeletal muscle and tissues from the central nervous systems. The normalization of the meta-analysis, the inference of the gene co-expression network and the RIF metric, operated synergistically towards a successful search for tissue-specific regulators. Novel among these findings are evidence suggesting a novel key role of ERCC3 as a muscle regulator. Together, our results recapitulate the known biology behind tissue specificity and provide new valuable insights in a less studied but valuable model species.

  11. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurayoshi, Kenta; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P.; Komori, Hideyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  12. Translation efficiency in humans: tissue specificity, global optimization and differences between developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Yedael Y; Tuller, Tamir; Shlomi, Tomer; Sharan, Roded; Ruppin, Eytan

    2010-05-01

    Various studies in unicellular and multicellular organisms have shown that codon bias plays a significant role in translation efficiency (TE) by co-adaptation to the tRNA pool. Yet, in humans and other mammals the role of codon bias is still an open question, with contradictory results from different studies. Here we address this question, performing a large-scale tissue-specific analysis of TE in humans, using the tRNA Adaptation Index (tAI) as a direct measure for TE. We find tAI to significantly correlate with expression levels both in tissue-specific and in global expression measures, testifying to the TE of human tissues. Interestingly, we find significantly higher correlations in adult tissues as opposed to fetal tissues, suggesting that the tRNA pool is more adjusted to the adult period. Optimization based analysis suggests that the tRNA pool-codon bias co-adaptation is globally (and not tissue-specific) driven. Additionally, we find that tAI correlates with several measures related to the protein functionally importance, including gene essentiality. Using inferred tissue-specific tRNA pools lead to similar results and shows that tissue-specific genes are more adapted to their tRNA pool than other genes and that related sets of functional gene groups are translated efficiently in each tissue. Similar results are obtained for other mammals. Taken together, these results demonstrate the role of codon bias in TE in humans, and pave the way for future studies of tissue-specific TE in multicellular organisms. PMID:20097653

  13. Understanding multicellular function and disease with human tissue-specific networks

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Casey S.; Krishnan, Arjun; Wong, Aaron K.; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Zelaya, Rene A.; Himmelstein, Daniel S.; Zhang, Ran; Hartmann, Boris M.; Zaslavsky, Elena; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Dolinski, Kara; Grosser, Tilo; Troyanskaya, Olga G.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue and cell-type identity lie at the core of human physiology and disease. Understanding the genetic underpinnings of complex tissues and individual cell lineages is crucial for developing improved diagnostics and therapeutics. We present genome-wide functional interaction networks for 144 human tissues and cell types developed using a data-driven Bayesian methodology that integrates thousands of diverse experiments spanning tissue and disease states. Tissue-specific networks predict lineage-specific responses to perturbation, reveal genes’ changing functional roles across tissues, and illuminate disease-disease relationships. We introduce NetWAS, which combines genes with nominally significant GWAS p-values and tissue-specific networks to identify disease-gene associations more accurately than GWAS alone. Our webserver, GIANT, provides an interface to human tissue networks through multi-gene queries, network visualization, analysis tools including NetWAS, and downloadable networks. GIANT enables systematic exploration of the landscape of interacting genes that shape specialized cellular functions across more than one hundred human tissues and cell types. PMID:25915600

  14. A tissue-specific endothelial cell molecule involved in lymphocyte homing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streeter, Philip R.; Berg, Ellen Lakey; Rouse, Bich Tien N.; Bargatze, Robert F.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    1988-01-01

    An endothelial cell surface molecule that is selectively expressed in mucosal organs is required for lymphocyte homing to mucosal lymphoid tissues. This 'vascular addressin' appears to function as a tissue-specific marker or address signal for recognition by lymphocytes circulating in the blood.

  15. Tissue-specific Regulation of Porcine Prolactin Receptor Expression by Estrogen, Progesterone and Prolactin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prolactin (PRL) acts through its receptor (PRLR) via both endocrine and local paracrine/autocrine pathways to regulate biological processes including reproduction and lactation. We analyzed the tissue and stage of gestation-specific regulation of PRL and PRLR expression in various tissues of pigs. ...

  16. SPECTRA: An Integrated Knowledge Base for Comparing Tissue and Tumor-Specific PPI Networks in Human.

    PubMed

    Micale, Giovanni; Ferro, Alfredo; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks available in public repositories usually represent relationships between proteins within the cell. They ignore the specific set of tissues or tumors where the interactions take place. Indeed, proteins can form tissue-selective complexes, while they remain inactive in other tissues. For these reasons, a great attention has been recently paid to tissue-specific PPI networks, in which nodes are proteins of the global PPI network whose corresponding genes are preferentially expressed in specific tissues. In this paper, we present SPECTRA, a knowledge base to build and compare tissue or tumor-specific PPI networks. SPECTRA integrates gene expression and protein interaction data from the most authoritative online repositories. We also provide tools for visualizing and comparing such networks, in order to identify the expression and interaction changes of proteins across tissues, or between the normal and pathological states of the same tissue. SPECTRA is available as a web server at http://alpha.dmi.unict.it/spectra.

  17. Transgenic characterization of two testis-specific promoters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Bi, H; Chen, R; Aslam, A F M; Li, Z; Ling, L; Zeng, B; Huang, Y; Tan, A

    2015-04-01

    Sex-specific regulatory elements are key components for developing insect genetic sexing systems. The current insect genetic sexing system mainly uses a female-specific modification system whereas little success was reported on male-specific genetic modification. In the silkworm Bombyx mori, a lepidopteran model insect with economic importance, a transgene-based, female-specific lethality system has been established based on sex-specific alternative splicing factors and a female-specific promoter BmVgp (vitellogenin promoter) has been identified. However, no male-specific regulatory elements have yet been identified. Here we report the transgenic identification of two promoters that drive reporter gene expression in a testis-specific manner in B. mori. Putative promoter sequences from the B. mori Radial spoke head 1 gene (BmR1) and beta-tubulin 4 gene (Bmβ4) were introduced using piggybac-based germline transformation. In transgenic silkworms, expression of the reporter gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) directed by either BmR1 promoter (BmR1p) or Bmβ4p showed precisely testis-specific manners from the larval to adult stage. Furthermore, EGFP expression of these two transgenic lines showed different localization in the testis, indicating that BmR1p or Bmβ4p might be used as distinct regulatory elements in directing testis-specific gene expression. Identification of these testis-specific promoters not only contributes to a better understanding of testis-specific gene function in insects, but also has potential applications in sterile insect techniques for pest management.

  18. Transgenic characterization of two testis-specific promoters in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Bi, H; Chen, R; Aslam, A F M; Li, Z; Ling, L; Zeng, B; Huang, Y; Tan, A

    2015-04-01

    Sex-specific regulatory elements are key components for developing insect genetic sexing systems. The current insect genetic sexing system mainly uses a female-specific modification system whereas little success was reported on male-specific genetic modification. In the silkworm Bombyx mori, a lepidopteran model insect with economic importance, a transgene-based, female-specific lethality system has been established based on sex-specific alternative splicing factors and a female-specific promoter BmVgp (vitellogenin promoter) has been identified. However, no male-specific regulatory elements have yet been identified. Here we report the transgenic identification of two promoters that drive reporter gene expression in a testis-specific manner in B. mori. Putative promoter sequences from the B. mori Radial spoke head 1 gene (BmR1) and beta-tubulin 4 gene (Bmβ4) were introduced using piggybac-based germline transformation. In transgenic silkworms, expression of the reporter gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) directed by either BmR1 promoter (BmR1p) or Bmβ4p showed precisely testis-specific manners from the larval to adult stage. Furthermore, EGFP expression of these two transgenic lines showed different localization in the testis, indicating that BmR1p or Bmβ4p might be used as distinct regulatory elements in directing testis-specific gene expression. Identification of these testis-specific promoters not only contributes to a better understanding of testis-specific gene function in insects, but also has potential applications in sterile insect techniques for pest management. PMID:25387604

  19. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter.

    PubMed

    Rama, Ana R; Hernandez, Rosa; Perazzoli, Gloria; Burgos, Miguel; Melguizo, Consolación; Vélez, Celia; Prados, Jose

    2015-06-04

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA) to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E) towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  20. Spatio-Temporal Imaging of Promoter Activity in Intact Plant Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tou Cheu; Sanchez, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-François; Gaymard, Frédéric; Dubos, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Localization and quantification of expression levels of genes help to determine their function. Localization of gene expression is often achieved through the study of their promoter activity. Three main reporter genes β-glucuronidase (GUS), green fluorescent protein (GFP), and luciferase (LUC) have been intensively used to characterize promoter activities, each having its own specificities and advantages. Among them, the LUC reporter gene is best suitable for the analysis of the promoter activity of genes in intact living plants. Here, we describe a LUC-based method that allows to precisely localize and quantify promoter activity at the whole plant level, and to study the mechanisms that are involved in long-distance regulation of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. Imaging LUC signals with a low-light CCD camera allows monitoring promoter activity in time and space in the transgenic plant harboring the promoter fused with the LUC gene. In addition, it allows quantifying change of promoter activities in plant during several hours. PMID:27557763

  1. Rapid ablation of dental hard tissue using promoter-assisted pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Christopher J.; Lu, Quiang; Hayes, Donald J.; Wallace, David B.; Grove, Michael E.; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Rastegar, Sohi; Wright, C. G.; Arcoria, Charles J.

    1997-05-01

    Nd:YAG lasers have been used previously for selective removal of various material from teeth. To permit ablation of healthy enamel with the Nd:YAG laser, we have adopted a strategy in which micro-drops of photoabsorptive 'promoters' are placed on the enamel to enhance absorption of individual laser pulses. Ink-jet technology dispenses the micro-drops with micron- and millisecond-scale precision. Various promoters using drug and cosmetic dyes, indocyanine green, or carbon-black pigments have been studied. Typical ablation parameters are 1.064 micrometers ; 20-180 mJ per pulse; 100 microsecond(s) ; 10-30 pulses/sec; 0.2-2.0 nl drops. Recent results from the program include: (1) For a variety of promoters, a monotonic relationship obtains between absorption coefficient at 1.064 micrometers and the efficiency of ablation of enamel. (2) With different promoter volumes, the efficiency of ablation rises, plateaus, then falls with increasing volume. (3) At drilling rates of 30 pulses/sec, ablation efficiency approaches rates of 0.1 mm3/sec. LM and SEM observations show a glassy 'pebbled' crater surface indicative of hydroxyapatite that has cooled, condensed, and solidified on the crater walls. Together these results favor the view that a micro-drop promoter-assisted Nd:YAG drill can five clinically useful ablations hard dental tissue.

  2. The Somatic Reproductive Tissues of C. elegans Promote Longevity through Steroid Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yamawaki, Tracy M.; Berman, Jennifer R.; Suchanek-Kavipurapu, Monika; McCormick, Mark; Gaglia, Marta Maria; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, removing the germline precursor cells increases lifespan. In worms, and possibly also in flies, this lifespan extension requires the presence of somatic reproductive tissues. How the somatic gonad signals other tissues to increase lifespan is not known. The lifespan increase triggered by loss of the germ cells is known to require sterol hormone signaling, as reducing the activity of the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12, or genes required for synthesis of the DAF-12 ligand dafachronic acid, prevents germline loss from extending lifespan. In addition to sterol signaling, the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is required to extend lifespan in animals that lack germ cells. DAF-12/NHR is known to assist with the nuclear accumulation of DAF-16/FOXO in these animals, yet we find that loss of DAF-12/NHR has little or no effect on the expression of at least some DAF-16/FOXO target genes. In this study, we show that the DAF-12-sterol signaling pathway has a second function to activate a distinct set of genes and extend lifespan in response to the somatic reproductive tissues. When germline-deficient animals lacking somatic reproductive tissues are given dafachronic acid, their expression of DAF-12/NHR-dependent target genes is restored and their lifespan is increased. Together, our findings indicate that in C. elegans lacking germ cells, the somatic reproductive tissues promote longevity via steroid hormone signaling to DAF-12. PMID:20824162

  3. Human miR223 promoter as a novel myelo-specific promoter for chronic granulomatous disease gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Christian; Hänseler, Walther; Wohlgensinger, Vital; Bianchi, Matteo; Tokmak, Serap; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Kuzmenko, Elena; Cesarovic, Nikola; Nicholls, Flora; Reichenbach, Janine; Seger, Reinhard; Grez, Manuel; Siler, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    Targeting transgene expression to specific hematopoietic cell lineages could contribute to the safety of retroviral vectors in gene therapeutic applications. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a defect of phagocytic cells, can be managed by gene therapy, using retroviral vectors with targeted expression to myeloid cells. In this context, we analyzed the myelospecificity of the human miR223 promoter, which is known to be strongly upregulated during myeloid differentiation, to drive myeloid-restricted expression of p47(phox) and gp91(phox) in mouse models of CGD and in primary patient-derived cells. The miR223 promoter restricted the expression of p47(phox), gp91(phox), and green fluorescent protein (GFP) within self-inactivating (SIN) gamma- and lentiviral vectors to granulocytes and macrophages, with only marginal expression in lymphocytes or hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Furthermore, gene transfer into primary CD34+ cells derived from a p47(phox) patient followed by ex vivo differentiation to neutrophils resulted in restoration of Escherichia coli killing activity by miR223 promoter-mediated p47(phox) expression. These results indicate that the miR223 promoter as an internal promoter within SIN gene therapy vectors is able to efficiently correct the CGD phenotype with negligible activity in hematopoietic progenitors, thereby limiting the risk of insertional oncogenesis and development of clonal dominance.

  4. Regulation of transcription of the adenovirus EII promoter by gene products: Absence of sequence specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, R.E.; Kaufman, R.J.; Sharp, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    During adenovirus infection, the EII promoter is positively regulated by products of the EIa region. The authors have studied this regulation by fusing a DNA segment containing the adenovirus EII promoter to a dihydrofolate reductase cDNA segment. Expression of this hybrid gene is stimulated in trans when cell lines containing an integrated copy are either transfected with plasmids carrying the EIa region or infected with adenovirus. This suggests that EIa activity regulates transcription of the EII promoter in the absence of other viral proteins and that this stimulation can occur when the EII promoter is organized in cellular chromatin. Transcription from the EII promoter is initiated at two sites in cell lines lacking EIa activity. Introduction of the EIa region preferentially stimulated transcription from one of these two sites. A sensitive, stable cotransfection assay was used to test for specific EII sequences required for stimulation. EIa activity stimulates all mutaant promoters; the most extensive deletion retained only 18 base pairs of sequences upstream of the initiation site. They suggest that regulation of a promoter by the EIa region does not depend on the presence of a set of specific sequences, but instead reflects a characteristic of promoters that have been exogenously introduced into cells. Insertion of the 72-base-pair repeat of simian-virus 40 in cis enhances transcription from the EII promoter. The stimulatory effects of EIa activity and of the simian virus 40 sequence are additive and appear to differ mechanistically.

  5. Chimeric promoter mediates guard cell-specific gene expression in tobacco under water deficit.

    PubMed

    Na, Jong-Kuk; Metzger, James D

    2014-09-01

    The engineering of stomatal activity under water deficit through guard cell-specific gene regulation is an effective approach to improve drought tolerance of crops but it requires an appropriate promoter(s) inducible by water deficit in guard cells. We report that a chimeric promoter can induce guard cell-specific gene expression under water deficit. A chimeric promoter, p4xKST82-rd29B, was constructed using a tetramer of the 82 bp guard cell-specific regulatory region of potato KST1 promoter (4xKST82) and Arabidopsis dehydration-responsive rd29B promoter. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying p4xKST82-rd29B:mGFP-GUS exhibited GUS expression in response to water deficit. GUS enzyme activity of p4xKST82-rd29B:mGFP-GUS transgenic plants increased ~300 % by polyethylene glycol treatment compared to that of control plant but not by abscisic acid (ABA), indicating that the p4xKST82-rd29B chimeric promoter can be used to induce the guard cell-specific expression of genes of interest in response to water deficit in an ABA-independent manner.

  6. Effects of adeno-associated virus serotype and tissue-specific expression on circulating biomarkers of propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Guenzel, Adam J; Hillestad, Matthew L; Matern, Dietrich; Barry, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). This enzyme is composed of six PCCA and six PCCB subunits and mediates a critical step in catabolism of odd chain fatty acids and certain amino acids. Current treatment options for PA are limited to stringent dietary restriction of protein consumption and some patients undergo elective liver transplantation. We previously generated a hypomorphic model of PA, designated Pcca(-/-)(A138T), with 2% of wild-type enzyme activity that mimics many aspects of the human disease. In this study, we used the differing tissue tropisms of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to probe the ability of liver or muscle-directed gene therapy to treat systemic aspects of this disease that affects many cell types. Systemic therapy with muscle-biased AAV1, liver-biased AAV8, and broadly tropic AAVrh10 mediated significant biochemical corrections in circulating propionylcarnitine (C3) and methyl citrate by all vectors. The innate tissue bias of AAV1 and AAV8 gene expression was made more specific by the use of muscle-specific muscle creatine kinase (specifically MCK6) and hepatocyte-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoters, respectively. Under these targeted conditions, both vectors mediated significant long-term correction of circulating metabolites, demonstrating that correction of muscle and likely other tissue types in addition to liver is necessary to fully correct pathology caused by PA. Liver-specific AAV8-TTR-PCCA mediated better correction than AAV1-MCK-PCCA. These data suggest that targeted gene therapy may be a viable alternative to liver transplantation for PA. They also demonstrate the effects of tissue-specific and broad gene therapy on a cell autonomous systemic genetic disease. PMID:25046265

  7. Diabetes impairs adipose tissue-derived stem cell function and efficiency in promoting wound healing.

    PubMed

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Toietta, Gabriele; Di Rocco, Giuliana; Cesareo, Eleonora; Zambruno, Giovanna; Odorisio, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are gaining increasing consideration in tissue repair therapeutic application. Recent evidence indicates that ASCs enhance skin repair in animal models of impaired wound healing. To assess the therapeutic activity of autologous vs. allogeneic ASCs in the treatment of diabetic ulcers, we functionally characterized diabetic ASCs and investigated their potential to promote wound healing with respect to nondiabetic ones. Adipose tissue-derived cells from streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice were analyzed either freshly isolated as stromal vascular fraction (SVF), or following a single passage of culture (ASCs). Diabetic ASCs showed decreased proliferative potential and migration. Expression of surface markers was altered in diabetic SVF and cultured ASCs, with a reduction in stem cell marker-positive cells. ASCs from diabetic mice released lower amounts of hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and insulin-like growth factor-1, growth factors playing important roles in skin repair. Accordingly, the supernatant of diabetic ASCs manifested reduced capability to promote keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation and migration. Therapeutic potential of diabetic SVF administered to wounds of diabetic mice was blunted as compared with cells isolated from nondiabetic mice. Our data indicate that diabetes alters ASC intrinsic properties and impairs their function, thus affecting therapeutic potential in the autologous treatment for diabetic ulcers. PMID:23627689

  8. Microbiota depletion promotes browning of white adipose tissue and reduces obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Claire; Stojanović, Ozren; Colin, Didier J.; Stevanović, Ana; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Tarallo, Valentina; Rigo, Dorothée; Germain, Stéphane; Ilievska, Miroslava; Montet, Xavier; Seimbille, Yann; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Trajkovski, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) promotes a lean and healthy phenotype and improves insulin sensitivity1. In response to cold or exercise brown fat cells also emerge in the white adipose tissue (named beige cells), a process known as browning2,3,4. Here, we show that the development of functional beige fat is promoted by microbiota depletion either by antibiotic treatment or in germ-free mice within the inguinal subcutaneous and perigonadal visceral adipose tissues (ingSAT and pgVAT, respectively). This leads to improved glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and decreased white fat and adipocyte size in lean mice and obese leptin-deficient (ob/ob) and high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. These metabolic improvements are mediated by eosinophil infiltration and enhanced type 2 cytokine signaling and M2 macrophage polarization in the subcutaneous white fat depots of microbiota-depleted animals. The metabolic phenotype and the browning of the subcutaneous fat are impaired by suppression of the type 2 signaling and are reversed by recolonization of the antibiotic-treated, or the germ-free mice with microbes. These results provide insight into microbiota-fat signaling axis and beige fat development in health and metabolic disease. PMID:26569380

  9. Tissue-specific and cation/anion-specific DNA methylation variations occurred in C. virgata in response to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Cao, Donghui; Liu, Jie; Wang, Xiaoping; Geng, Shujuan; Liu, Bao; Shi, Decheng

    2013-01-01

    Salinity is a widespread environmental problem limiting productivity and growth of plants. Halophytes which can adapt and resist certain salt stress have various mechanisms to defend the higher salinity and alkalinity, and epigenetic mechanisms especially DNA methylation may play important roles in plant adaptability and plasticity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the different influences of various single salts (NaCl, Na2SO4, NaHCO3, Na2CO3) and their mixed salts on halophyte Chloris. virgata from the DNA methylation prospective, and discover the underlying relationships between specific DNA methylation variations and specific cations/anions through the methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis. The results showed that the effects on DNA methylation variations of single salts were ranked as follows: Na2CO3> NaHCO3> Na2SO4> NaCl, and their mixed salts exerted tissue-specific effects on C. virgata seedlings. Eight types of DNA methylation variations were detected and defined in C. virgata according to the specific cations/anions existed in stressful solutions; in addition, mix-specific and higher pH-specific bands were the main type in leaves and roots independently. These findings suggested that mixed salts were not the simple combination of single salts. Furthermore, not only single salts but also mixed salts showed tissue-specific and cations/anions-specific DNA methylation variations. PMID:24223802

  10. Correlating Molecular Character of NIR Imaging Agents with Tissue-Specific Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Eric A.; Hyun, Hoon; Tawney, Joseph G.; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents are emerging in optical imaging as sensitive, cost-effective, and nonharmful alternatives to current agents that emit harmful ionizing radiation. Developing spectrally distinct NIR fluorophores to visualize sensitive vital tissues to selectively avoid them during surgical resection of diseased tissue is of great significance. Herein, we report the synthetic variation of pentamethine cyanine fluorophores with modifications of physicochemical properties toward prompting tissue-specific uptake into sensitive tissues (i.e., endocrine glands). Tissue-specific targeting and biodistribution studies revealed localization of contrast agents in the adrenal and pituitary glands, pancreas, and lymph nodes with dependence on molecular characteristics. Incorporation of hydrophobic heterocyclic rings, alkyl groups, and halogens allowed a fine-tuning capability to the hydrophobic character and dipole moment for observing perturbation in biological activity in response to minor structural alterations. These NIR contrast agents have potential for clinical translation for intraoperative imaging in the delineation of delicate glands. PMID:25923454

  11. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  12. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  13. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  14. HdhQ111 Mice Exhibit Tissue Specific Metabolite Profiles that Include Striatal Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Jeffrey B.; Deik, Amy; Fossale, Elisa; Weston, Rory M.; Guide, Jolene R.; Arjomand, Jamshid; Kwak, Seung; Clish, Clary B.; MacDonald, Marcy E.

    2015-01-01

    The HTT CAG expansion mutation causes Huntington’s Disease and is associated with a wide range of cellular consequences, including altered metabolism. The mutant allele is expressed widely, in all tissues, but the striatum and cortex are especially vulnerable to its effects. To more fully understand this tissue-specificity, early in the disease process, we asked whether the metabolic impact of the mutant CAG expanded allele in heterozygous B6.HdhQ111/+ mice would be common across tissues, or whether tissues would have tissue-specific responses and whether such changes may be affected by diet. Specifically, we cross-sectionally examined steady state metabolite concentrations from a range of tissues (plasma, brown adipose tissue, cerebellum, striatum, liver, white adipose tissue), using an established liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry pipeline, from cohorts of 8 month old mutant and wild-type littermate mice that were fed one of two different high-fat diets. The differential response to diet highlighted a proportion of metabolites in all tissues, ranging from 3% (7/219) in the striatum to 12% (25/212) in white adipose tissue. By contrast, the mutant CAG-expanded allele primarily affected brain metabolites, with 14% (30/219) of metabolites significantly altered, compared to wild-type, in striatum and 11% (25/224) in the cerebellum. In general, diet and the CAG-expanded allele both elicited metabolite changes that were predominantly tissue-specific and non-overlapping, with evidence for mutation-by-diet interaction in peripheral tissues most affected by diet. Machine-learning approaches highlighted the accumulation of diverse lipid species as the most genotype-predictive metabolite changes in the striatum. Validation experiments in cell culture demonstrated that lipid accumulation was also a defining feature of mutant HdhQ111 striatal progenitor cells. Thus, metabolite-level responses to the CAG expansion mutation in vivo were tissue specific and most evident

  15. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Verghese, Arun; Byers, Stephen W; Ochs, Michael; Tozeren, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Signaling

  16. An octopine synthase enhancer element directs tissue-specific expression and binds ASF-1, a factor from tobacco nuclear extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, H; Katagiri, F; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the expression pattern conferred by a cis-regulatory element (-212 to -154) from the upstream region of the octopine synthase (ocs) gene in transgenic tobacco plants. Analysis of beta-glucuronidase expression driven by the ocs regulatory element revealed a pattern that is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. In young seedlings, expression is confined primarily to root tips. In older seedlings, expression is stronger and becomes apparent also in the shoot apex. Insertion of a 16-base pair palindromic sequence (-193 to -178), which is included in the regulatory element, into an rbcS promoter results in the expression of rbcS in roots. The 16-base pair palindrome binds activation sequence factor (ASF)-1, a factor from tobacco nuclear extracts that interacts with the sequence between -83 to -63, designated as activation sequence (as)-1, of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter [Lam et al. (1989). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86, in press]. The in vivo expression patterns and in vitro binding properties of the ocs palindromic sequence are remarkably similar to those of the as-1 element of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. These results suggest the involvement of ASF-1 in the transcriptional regulation of the ocs promoter and the 35S promoter. PMID:2562557

  17. The receptor tyrosine kinase Pvr promotes tissue closure by coordinating corpse removal and epidermal zippering

    PubMed Central

    Garlena, Rebecca A.; Lennox, Ashley L.; Baker, Lewis R.; Parsons, Trish E.; Weinberg, Seth M.; Stronach, Beth E.

    2015-01-01

    A leading cause of human birth defects is the incomplete fusion of tissues, often manifested in the palate, heart or neural tube. To investigate the molecular control of tissue fusion, embryonic dorsal closure and pupal thorax closure in Drosophila are useful experimental models. We find that Pvr mutants have defects in dorsal midline closure with incomplete amnioserosa internalization and epidermal zippering, as well as cardia bifida. These defects are relatively mild in comparison to those seen with other signaling mutants, such as in the JNK pathway, and we demonstrate that JNK signaling is not perturbed by altering Pvr receptor tyrosine kinase activity. Rather, modulation of Pvr levels in the ectoderm has an impact on PIP3 membrane accumulation, consistent with a link to PI3K signal transduction. Polarized PI3K activity influences protrusive activity from the epidermal leading edge and the protrusion area changes in accord with Pvr signaling intensity, providing a possible mechanism to explain Pvr mutant phenotypes. Tissue-specific rescue experiments indicate a partial requirement in epithelial tissue, but confirm the essential role of Pvr in hemocytes for embryonic survival. Taken together, we argue that inefficient removal of the internalizing amnioserosa tissue by mutant hemocytes coupled with impaired midline zippering of mutant epithelium creates a situation in some embryos whereby dorsal midline closure is incomplete. Based on these observations, we suggest that efferocytosis (corpse clearance) could contribute to proper tissue closure and thus might underlie some congenital birth defects. PMID:26293306

  18. The receptor tyrosine kinase Pvr promotes tissue closure by coordinating corpse removal and epidermal zippering.

    PubMed

    Garlena, Rebecca A; Lennox, Ashley L; Baker, Lewis R; Parsons, Trish E; Weinberg, Seth M; Stronach, Beth E

    2015-10-01

    A leading cause of human birth defects is the incomplete fusion of tissues, often manifested in the palate, heart or neural tube. To investigate the molecular control of tissue fusion, embryonic dorsal closure and pupal thorax closure in Drosophila are useful experimental models. We find that Pvr mutants have defects in dorsal midline closure with incomplete amnioserosa internalization and epidermal zippering, as well as cardia bifida. These defects are relatively mild in comparison to those seen with other signaling mutants, such as in the JNK pathway, and we demonstrate that JNK signaling is not perturbed by altering Pvr receptor tyrosine kinase activity. Rather, modulation of Pvr levels in the ectoderm has an impact on PIP3 membrane accumulation, consistent with a link to PI3K signal transduction. Polarized PI3K activity influences protrusive activity from the epidermal leading edge and the protrusion area changes in accord with Pvr signaling intensity, providing a possible mechanism to explain Pvr mutant phenotypes. Tissue-specific rescue experiments indicate a partial requirement in epithelial tissue, but confirm the essential role of Pvr in hemocytes for embryonic survival. Taken together, we argue that inefficient removal of the internalizing amnioserosa tissue by mutant hemocytes coupled with impaired midline zippering of mutant epithelium creates a situation in some embryos whereby dorsal midline closure is incomplete. Based on these observations, we suggest that efferocytosis (corpse clearance) could contribute to proper tissue closure and thus might underlie some congenital birth defects. PMID:26293306

  19. Concise Review: Tissue-Specific Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Hannah K.; Canfield, Scott G.; Shusta, Eric V.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) display significant heterogeneity across tissue types, playing an important role in tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Recent work demonstrating the derivation of tissue-specific microvascular endothelial cells (TS-MVECs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has ignited the potential to generate tissue-specific models which may be applied to regenerative medicine and in vitro modeling applications. Here we review techniques by which hPSC-derived TS-MVECs have been made to date and discuss how current hPSC-EC differentiation protocols may be directed towards tissue-specific fates. We begin by discussing the nature of EC tissue specificity in vivo and review general hPSC-EC differentiation protocols generated over the last decade. Finally, we describe how specificity can be integrated into hPSC-EC protocols to generate hPSC-derived TS-MVECs in vitro, including EC and parenchymal cell co-culture, directed differentiation, and direct reprogramming strategies. PMID:25070152

  20. Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury: mechanisms of brain tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-qiang; Song, Jun-ying; Jia, Ya-quan; Zhang, Yun-ke

    2016-01-01

    Buyanghuanwu decoction has been shown to protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, rats were intragastrically given Buyanghuanwu decoction, 15 mL/kg, for 3 days. A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was established by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In rats administered Buyanghuanwu decoction, infarct volume was reduced, serum vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin αvβ3 levels were increased, and brain tissue vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34 expression levels were increased compared with untreated animals. These effects of Buyanghuanwu decoction were partially suppressed by an angiogenesis inhibitor (administered through the lateral ventricle for 7 consecutive days). These data suggest that Buyanghuanwu decoction promotes angiogenesis, improves cerebral circulation, and enhances brain tissue repair after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27127482

  1. Instructive role of the vascular niche in promoting tumour growth and tissue repair by angiocrine factors

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jason M.; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rafii, Shahin

    2010-01-01

    The precise mechanisms whereby anti-angiogenesis therapy blocks tumour growth or causes vascular toxicity are unknown. We propose that endothelial cells establish a vascular niche that promotes tumour growth and tissue repair not only by delivering nutrients and O2 but also through an ‘angiocrine’ mechanism by producing stem and progenitor cell-active trophogens. Identification of endothelial-derived instructive angiocrine factors will allow direct tumour targeting, while diminishing the unwanted side effects associated with the use of anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:20094048

  2. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuez, George; Burtscher, Ashley; Sawant, Ketki; Majumder, Pralay; McDonald, Jocelyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Migrating cells need to overcome physical constraints from the local microenvironment to navigate their way through tissues. Cells that move collectively have the additional challenge of negotiating complex environments in vivo while maintaining cohesion of the group as a whole. The mechanisms by which collectives maintain a migratory morphology while resisting physical constraints from the surrounding tissue are poorly understood. Drosophila border cells represent a genetic model of collective migration within a cell-dense tissue. Border cells move as a cohesive group of 6−10 cells, traversing a network of large germ line–derived nurse cells within the ovary. Here we show that the border cell cluster is compact and round throughout their entire migration, a shape that is maintained despite the mechanical pressure imposed by the surrounding nurse cells. Nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) activity at the cluster periphery becomes elevated in response to increased constriction by nurse cells. Furthermore, the distinctive border cell collective morphology requires highly dynamic and localized enrichment of Myo-II. Thus, activated Myo-II promotes cortical tension at the outer edge of the migrating border cell cluster to resist compressive forces from nurse cells. We propose that dynamic actomyosin tension at the periphery of collectives facilitates their movement through restrictive tissues. PMID:27122602

  3. 25-Hydroxycholesterol promotes fibroblast-mediated tissue remodeling through NF-κB dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Koarai, Akira; Kikuchi, Takashi; Hiramatsu, Masataka; Kawabata, Hiroki; Akamatsu, Keiichiro; Hirano, Tsunahiko; Nakanishi, Masanori; Matsunaga, Kazuto; Minakata, Yoshiaki; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2013-05-01

    Abnormal structural alterations termed remodeling, including fibrosis and alveolar wall destruction, are important features of the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is enzymatically produced by cholesterol 25-hydorxylase (CH25H) in macrophages and is reported to be involved in the formation of arteriosclerosis. We previously demonstrated that the expression of CH25H and production of 25HC were increased in the lungs of COPD. However, the role of 25-HC in lung tissue remodeling is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of 25-HC on fibroblast-mediated tissue remodeling using human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) in vitro. 25-HC significantly augmented α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) (P<0.001) and collagen I (P<0.001) expression in HFL-1. 25-HC also significantly enhanced the release and activation of matrix metallaoproteinase (MMP)-2 (P<0.001) and MMP-9 (P<0.001) without any significant effect on the production of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. 25-HC stimulated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β{sub 1} production (P<0.01) and a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody restored these 25-HC-augmented pro-fibrotic responses. 25-HC significantly promoted the translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 into the nuclei (P<0.01), but not phospholylated-c-jun, a complex of activator protein-1. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB restored the 25-HC-augmented pro-fibrotic responses and TGF-β{sub 1} release. These results suggest that 25-HC could contribute to fibroblast-mediated lung tissue remodeling by promoting myofibroblast differentiation and the excessive release of extracellular matrix protein and MMPs via an NF-κB-TGF-β dependent pathway.

  4. Resolvin D1 prevents smoking-induced emphysema and promotes lung tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang-Hyun; Park, Tai Sun; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Sei Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Emphysema is an irreversible disease that is characterized by destruction of lung tissue as a result of inflammation caused by smoking. Resolvin D1 (RvD1), derived from docosahexaenoic acid, is a novel lipid that resolves inflammation. The present study tested whether RvD1 prevents smoking-induced emphysema and promotes lung tissue regeneration. Materials and methods C57BL/6 mice, 8 weeks of age, were randomly divided into four groups: control, RvD1 only, smoking only, and smoking with RvD1 administration. Four different protocols were used to induce emphysema and administer RvD1: mice were exposed to smoking for 4 weeks with poly(I:C) or to smoking only for 24 weeks, and RvD1 was injected within the smoking exposure period to prevent regeneration or after completion of smoking exposure to assess regeneration. The mean linear intercept and inflammation scores were measured in the lung tissue, and inflammatory cells and cytokines were measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Results Measurements of mean linear intercept showed that RvD1 significantly attenuated smoking-induced lung destruction in all emphysema models. RvD1 also reduced smoking-induced inflammatory cell infiltration, which causes the structural derangements observed in emphysema. In the 4-week prevention model, RvD1 reduced the smoking-induced increase in eosinophils and interleukin-6 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In the 24-week prevention model, RvD1 also reduced the increased neutrophils and total cell counts induced by smoking. Conclusion RvD1 attenuated smoking-induced emphysema in vivo by reducing inflammation and promoting tissue regeneration. This result suggests that RvD1 may be useful in the prevention and treatment of emphysema. PMID:27313451

  5. Different promoter affinities account for specificity in MYC-dependent gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzin, Francesca; Benary, Uwe; Baluapuri, Apoorva; Walz, Susanne; Jung, Lisa Anna; von Eyss, Björn; Kisker, Caroline; Wolf, Jana; Eilers, Martin; Wolf, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced expression of the MYC transcription factor is observed in the majority of tumors. Two seemingly conflicting models have been proposed for its function: one proposes that MYC enhances expression of all genes, while the other model suggests gene-specific regulation. Here, we have explored the hypothesis that specific gene expression profiles arise since promoters differ in affinity for MYC and high-affinity promoters are fully occupied by physiological levels of MYC. We determined cellular MYC levels and used RNA- and ChIP-sequencing to correlate promoter occupancy with gene expression at different concentrations of MYC. Mathematical modeling showed that binding affinities for interactions of MYC with DNA and with core promoter-bound factors, such as WDR5, are sufficient to explain promoter occupancies observed in vivo. Importantly, promoter affinity stratifies different biological processes that are regulated by MYC, explaining why tumor-specific MYC levels induce specific gene expression programs and alter defined biological properties of cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15161.001 PMID:27460974

  6. Isolation and sequence analysis of napin seed specific promoter from Iranian Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Maryam; Zebarjadi, Alireza; Najaphy, Abdollah; Kahrizi, Danial

    2015-06-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) has become an important crop during the last 30years. In addition to a high lipid level, the seeds also have a significant protein content, which constitutes 20-25% of the dry seed weight. The synthesis of storage proteins is primarily controlled at transcriptional level and seed-specific expression has been shown to be conferred upon the promoter regions of many storage protein genes. Napin is one of the main storage proteins in rapeseed(')s embryo that is produced in seed developing stage. Its promoter region located at 5' upstream of the napin gene has already been isolated (GenBank number, EU416279.1). In current research, seed-specific promoter (napin) of Iranian B. napus L. was isolated from the genomic DNA and cloned into pBI121 plant binary vector to use in future researches. For this purpose, the napin promoter was amplified by PCR method using specific primers, cloned in pSK(+) vector and sequenced. Sequencing analysis showed that the cloned promoter contained all of conserved motifs such as TATA box (TATAAA), RY repeats (CATGCA), dist-B (TCAAACACC) and prox-B elements (GCCACTTGTC), G-box (CACGTG) and CAAT Motifs, which constituted the seed-specific promoter activity and according to this analysis, the seed-specific promoter activity of cloned sequence was predicted. Based on sequence distances of nucleotide sequences, our sequence had the highest similarity (99.8%) whit B. napus sequence (with EU416279.1 accession number). Finally the promoter obtained might be interesting not only as a useful tool for biotechnological application but also for fundamental research.

  7. Isolation and sequence analysis of napin seed specific promoter from Iranian Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Maryam; Zebarjadi, Alireza; Najaphy, Abdollah; Kahrizi, Danial

    2015-06-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) has become an important crop during the last 30years. In addition to a high lipid level, the seeds also have a significant protein content, which constitutes 20-25% of the dry seed weight. The synthesis of storage proteins is primarily controlled at transcriptional level and seed-specific expression has been shown to be conferred upon the promoter regions of many storage protein genes. Napin is one of the main storage proteins in rapeseed(')s embryo that is produced in seed developing stage. Its promoter region located at 5' upstream of the napin gene has already been isolated (GenBank number, EU416279.1). In current research, seed-specific promoter (napin) of Iranian B. napus L. was isolated from the genomic DNA and cloned into pBI121 plant binary vector to use in future researches. For this purpose, the napin promoter was amplified by PCR method using specific primers, cloned in pSK(+) vector and sequenced. Sequencing analysis showed that the cloned promoter contained all of conserved motifs such as TATA box (TATAAA), RY repeats (CATGCA), dist-B (TCAAACACC) and prox-B elements (GCCACTTGTC), G-box (CACGTG) and CAAT Motifs, which constituted the seed-specific promoter activity and according to this analysis, the seed-specific promoter activity of cloned sequence was predicted. Based on sequence distances of nucleotide sequences, our sequence had the highest similarity (99.8%) whit B. napus sequence (with EU416279.1 accession number). Finally the promoter obtained might be interesting not only as a useful tool for biotechnological application but also for fundamental research. PMID:25797503

  8. Tissue-Specific Immune Gene Expression in the Migratory Locust, Locusta Migratoria.

    PubMed

    Pulpitel, Tamara; Pernice, Mathieu; Simpson, Stephen J; Ponton, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    The ability of hosts to respond to infection involves several complex immune recognition pathways. Broadly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) allow individuals to target a range of invading microbes. Recently, studies on insect innate immunity have found evidence that a single pathogen can activate different immune pathways across species. In this study, expression changes in immune genes encoding peptidoglycan-recognition protein SA (PGRP-SA), gram-negative binding protein 1 (GNBP1) and prophenoloxidase (ProPO) were investigated in Locusta migratoria, following an immune challenge using injected lipopolysaccharide (LPS) solution from Escherichia coli. Since immune activation might also be tissue-specific, gene expression levels were followed across a range of tissue types. For PGRP-SA, expression increased in response to LPS within all seven of the tissue-types assayed and differed significantly between tissues. Expression of GNBP1 similarly varied across tissue types, yet showed no clear expression difference between LPS-injected and uninfected locusts. Increases in ProPO expression in response to LPS, however, could only be detected in the gut sections. This study has revealed tissue-specific immune response to add a new level of complexity to insect immune studies. In addition to variation in recognition pathways identified in previous works, tissue-specificity should be carefully considered in similar works. PMID:26463191

  9. Tissue-Specific Venom Composition and Differential Gene Expression in Sea Anemones.

    PubMed

    Macrander, Jason; Broe, Michael; Daly, Marymegan

    2016-01-01

    Cnidarians represent one of the few groups of venomous animals that lack a centralized venom transmission system. Instead, they are equipped with stinging capsules collectively known as nematocysts. Nematocysts vary in abundance and type across different tissues; however, the venom composition in most species remains unknown. Depending on the tissue type, the venom composition in sea anemones may be vital for predation, defense, or digestion. Using a tissue-specific RNA-seq approach, we characterize the venom assemblage in the tentacles, mesenterial filaments, and column for three species of sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata, Heteractis crispa, and Megalactis griffithsi). These taxa vary with regard to inferred venom potency, symbiont abundance, and nematocyst diversity. We show that there is significant variation in abundance of toxin-like genes across tissues and species. Although the cumulative toxin abundance for the column was consistently the lowest, contributions to the overall toxin assemblage varied considerably among tissues for different toxin types. Our gene ontology (GO) analyses also show sharp contrasts between conserved GO groups emerging from whole transcriptome analysis and tissue-specific expression among GO groups in our differential expression analysis. This study provides a framework for future characterization of tissue-specific venom and other functionally important genes in this lineage of simple bodied animals. PMID:27389690

  10. Tissue-Specific Venom Composition and Differential Gene Expression in Sea Anemones

    PubMed Central

    Macrander, Jason; Broe, Michael; Daly, Marymegan

    2016-01-01

    Cnidarians represent one of the few groups of venomous animals that lack a centralized venom transmission system. Instead, they are equipped with stinging capsules collectively known as nematocysts. Nematocysts vary in abundance and type across different tissues; however, the venom composition in most species remains unknown. Depending on the tissue type, the venom composition in sea anemones may be vital for predation, defense, or digestion. Using a tissue-specific RNA-seq approach, we characterize the venom assemblage in the tentacles, mesenterial filaments, and column for three species of sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata, Heteractis crispa, and Megalactis griffithsi). These taxa vary with regard to inferred venom potency, symbiont abundance, and nematocyst diversity. We show that there is significant variation in abundance of toxin-like genes across tissues and species. Although the cumulative toxin abundance for the column was consistently the lowest, contributions to the overall toxin assemblage varied considerably among tissues for different toxin types. Our gene ontology (GO) analyses also show sharp contrasts between conserved GO groups emerging from whole transcriptome analysis and tissue-specific expression among GO groups in our differential expression analysis. This study provides a framework for future characterization of tissue-specific venom and other functionally important genes in this lineage of simple bodied animals. PMID:27389690

  11. Comprehensive Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Regulatory Programs during Early Tomato Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Richard J; Csukasi, Fabiana; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; van der Knaap, Esther; Catalá, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Fruit formation and early development involve a range of physiological and morphological transformations of the various constituent tissues of the ovary. These developmental changes vary considerably according to tissue type, but molecular analyses at an organ-wide level inevitably obscure many tissue-specific phenomena. We used laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze the transcriptome of ovaries and fruit tissues of the wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium. This laser-capture microdissection-high-throughput RNA sequencing approach allowed quantitative global profiling of gene expression at previously unobtainable levels of spatial resolution, revealing numerous contrasting transcriptome profiles and uncovering rare and cell type-specific transcripts. Coexpressed gene clusters linked specific tissues and stages to major transcriptional changes underlying the ovary-to-fruit transition and provided evidence of regulatory modules related to cell division, photosynthesis, and auxin transport in internal fruit tissues, together with parallel specialization of the pericarp transcriptome in stress responses and secondary metabolism. Analysis of transcription factor expression and regulatory motifs indicated putative gene regulatory modules that may regulate the development of different tissues and hormonal processes. Major alterations in the expression of hormone metabolic and signaling components illustrate the complex hormonal control underpinning fruit formation, with intricate spatiotemporal variations suggesting separate regulatory programs. PMID:26099271

  12. Does GATA3 act in tissue-specific pathways? A meta-analysis-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The GATA3 transcription factor is expressed in many tissues such as the immune system, kidney, brain, endometrium, and mammary epithelial cells. As such it must co-ordinate a diverse transcriptional program to achieve specific outcomes in different tissues. One of the most interesting questions raised is whether GATA3 will be involved in the same pathways in every tissue or will be involved in distinct regulatory networks within different tissue types? While previous studies may imply the latter, with some known targets of GATA3 perhaps being specific to cell-type or tissue-type, the question has not been systematically addressed until now. With the advent of techniques such as co-expression meta-analysis a better understanding of the pathway partners of GATA3 can be obtained and specifically the partners within different tissue types can be found, yielding leads for future studies. Here, a recent technique of meta-analysis from the Oncomine database has been employed to probe this very question. Data obtained implies that GATA3 is involved in distinct pathways in different tissue types. PMID:19008565

  13. Tissue-specific autophagy responses to aging and stress in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Hannah C; Okada, Megan; Merz, Alexey J; Miller, Dana L

    2015-06-01

    Cellular function relies on a balance between protein synthesis and breakdown. Macromolecular breakdown through autophagy is broadly required for cellular and tissue development, function, and recovery from stress. While Caenorhabditis elegans is frequently used to explore cellular responses to development and stress, the most common assays for autophagy in this system lack tissue-level resolution. Different tissues within an organism have unique functional characteristics and likely vary in their reliance on autophagy under different conditions. To generate a tissue-specific map of autophagy in C. elegans we used a dual fluorescent protein (dFP) tag that releases monomeric fluorescent protein (mFP) upon arrival at the lysosome. Tissue-specific expression of dFP::LGG-1 revealed autophagic flux in all tissues, but mFP accumulation was most dramatic in the intestine. We also observed variable responses to stress: starvation increased autophagic mFP release in all tissues, whereas anoxia primarily increased intestinal autophagic flux. We observed autophagic flux with tagged LGG-1, LGG-2, and two autophagic cargo reporters: a soluble cytoplasmic protein, and mitochondrial TOMM-7. Finally, an increase in mFP in older worms was consistent with an age-dependent shift in proteostasis. These novel measures of autophagic flux in C. elegans reveal heterogeneity in autophagic response across tissues during stress and aging.

  14. Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Imanaka, K.; Ashida, C.; Takashima, H.; Imajo, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1983-04-01

    Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue was studied on the transplanted MM46 tumor of female C3H/He mice after radiotherapy. MM46 tumor cells were inoculated into the right hind paws of mice. On the 5th day, irradiation with the dose irradiated tumor tissue (2000 rad on the fifth day), were injected into the left hind paws of the tumor-bearing mice. Effectiveness of this active specific immunotherapy against tumor was evaluated by the regression of tumor and survival rate of mice. Tumor was markedly regressed and survival rate was significantly increased by the active specific immunitherapy.

  15. Inducing tissue specific tolerance in autoimmune disease with tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Suwandi, Jessica S; Toes, René E M; Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O

    2015-01-01

    Current immunosuppressive therapy acts systemically, causing collateral damage and does not necessarily cope with the cause of rheumatoid arthritis. Tissue specific immune modulation may restore tolerance in patients with autoimmune diseases such as RA, but desires knowledge on relevant target autoantigens. We present the case of type 1 diabetes as prototype autoimmune disease with established autoantigens to set the stage for tissue-specific immune modulation using tolerogenic dendritic cells pulsed with autoantigen in RA. This approach induces autoantigen-specific regulatory T cells that exert their tissue-specific action through a combination of linked suppression and infectious tolerance, introducing a legacy of targeted, localised immune regulation in the proximity of the lesion. Several trials are in progress in RA employing various types of tolerogenic DCs. With knowledge on mode of action and confounding effects of concomitant immunosuppressive therapy, this strategy may provide novel immune intervention that may also prevent RA in high-risk subjects. PMID:26458178

  16. Biokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in heterotransplanted nude rats: Evaluation of corrected specific tissue uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ingvar, C.; Norrgren, K.; Strand, S.E.; Brodin, T.; Joensson, P.E.S.; Sjoegren, H.O. )

    1989-07-01

    A tumor model is presented to study the biokinetics and localization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the nude rat (Rowett RNu/RNu) heterotransplanted with human melanoma metastases. The nude rat is larger, less sensitive, and lives longer than the nude mouse. It is, therefore, well suited for in vivo studies of tumor localization with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The tumor-to-host weight ratio was closer to the human situation for the nude rat than for the mouse, and quantitative imaging could be performed with a parallel hole collimator. We followed the antibody biokinetics for as long as 8 days, with repeated blood sampling and imaging. Specific uptake of MAb was higher in tumor tissue than in all other tissues except blood. Initial high uptake was also recorded in the bone marrow. The lymph glands showed a slow uptake of specific and control antibody. A simple in vitro correction procedure is described to calculate the corrected specific tissue uptake (STUcorr) that takes the blood activity into account. Thus it was shown that 80% of the tissue uptake in the dissected liver at 30 hr was due to labeled antibodies circulating in the blood. The specific tissue uptake ratio of antibodies 96.5 and OKT3 (nonspecific control) was unity for all other organs except for tumor tissue, where the ratio was greater than two and even higher when correction for blood content of labeled antibody was made.

  17. Identification of the promoter sequences involved in the cell specific expression of the rat somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Andrisani, O M; Hayes, T E; Roos, B; Dixon, J E

    1987-01-01

    DNA sequences containing the 5' flanking region of the rat somatostatin gene were linked to the coding sequence of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. This recombinant plasmid is active in expressing CAT activity in the neuronally derived, somatostatin producing CA-77 cell line. Deletion analyses of the somatostatin promoter show that the sequences proximal to position -60, relative to the cap site are required for expression of this promoter. A 4 base pair deletion of residues -46 through -43 within the somatostatin promoter results in a down mutation in vivo suggesting the existence of an element critical for the expression of the promoter in CA-77 cells. In addition, the somatostatin recombinant and its 5' deletion constructs preferentially express CAT activity in CA-77 cells, whereas only basal level of expression is observed in HeLa, BSC40, and RIN-5F cell lines, pointing to the cell specific nature of this promoter. Images PMID:2886975

  18. Tissue-specific N-glycosylation, site-specific oligosaccharide patterns and lentil lectin recognition of rat Thy-1.

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, R B; Tse, A G; Dwek, R A; Williams, A F; Rademacher, T W

    1987-01-01

    To examine the extent to which protein structure and tissue-type influence glycosylation, we have determined the oligosaccharide structures at each of the three glycosylation sites (Asn-23, 74 and 98) of the cell surface glycoprotein Thy-1 isolated from rat brain and thymus. The results show that there is tissue-specificity of glycosylation and that superimposed on this is a significant degree of site-specificity. On the basis of the site distribution of oligosaccharides, we find that no Thy-1 molecules are in common between the two tissues despite the amino acid sequences being identical. We suggest, therefore, that by controlling N-glycosylation a tissue creates an unique set of glycoforms (same polypeptide but with oligosaccharides that differ either in sequence or disposition). The structures at each of the three sites were also determined for the thymocyte Thy-1 that binds to lentil lectin (Thy-1 L+) and for that which does not (Thy-1 L-). Segregation of intact thymus Thy-1 into two distinct sets of glycoforms by lentil lectin was found to be due to the structures at site 74. Analysis of oligosaccharide structures at the 'passenger' sites (23 and 98) suggests that either Thy-1 L+ and Thy-1 L- molecules are made in different cell-types or that the biosynthesis of oligosaccharides at one site is influenced by the glycosylation at other sites. PMID:2886334

  19. Putative storage root specific promoters from cassava and yam: cloning and evaluation in transgenic carrots as a model system.

    PubMed

    Arango, Jacobo; Salazar, Bertha; Welsch, Ralf; Sarmiento, Felipe; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2010-06-01

    A prerequisite for biotechnological improvements of storage roots is the availability of tissue-specific promoters enabling high expression of transgenes. In this work, we cloned two genomic fragments, pMe1 and pDJ3S, controlling the expression of a gene with unknown function from cassava (Manihot esculenta) and of the storage protein dioscorin 3 small subunit gene from yam (Dioscorea japonica), respectively. Using beta-glucuronidase as a reporter, the activities of pMe1 and pDJ3S were evaluated in independent transgenic carrot lines and compared to the constitutive CaMV35S and the previously described cassava p15 promoters. Activities of pMe1 and pDJ3S in storage roots were assessed using quantitative GUS assays that showed pDJ3S as the most active one. To determine organ specificities, uidA transcript levels in leaves, stems and roots were measured by real-time RT-PCR analyses showing highest storage root specificity for pDJ3S. Root cross sections revealed that pMe1 was highly active in secondary xylem. In contrast, pDJ3S was active in all root tissues except for the central xylem. The expression patterns caused by the cassava p15 promoter in carrot storage roots were consistent with its previously described activities for the original storage organ. Our data demonstrate that the pDJ3S and, to a lesser extent, the pMe1 regulatory sequences represent feasible candidates to drive high and preferential expression of genes in carrot storage roots.

  20. A feedback amplification loop between stem cells and their progeny promotes tissue regeneration and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Na; Huang, Huanwei; Cai, Tao; Xi, Rongwen

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic renewal of many adult tissues requires balanced self-renewal and differentiation of local stem cells, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we identified a novel feedback mechanism in controlling intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis in Drosophila. Sox21a, a group B Sox protein, is preferentially expressed in the committed progenitor named enteroblast (EB) to promote enterocyte differentiation. In Sox21a mutants, EBs do not divide, but cannot differentiate properly and have increased expression of mitogens, which then act as paracrine signals to promote intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation. This leads to a feedback amplification loop for rapid production of differentiation-defective EBs and tumorigenesis. Notably, in normal intestine following damage, Sox21a is temporally downregulated in EBs to allow the activation of the ISC-EB amplification loop for epithelial repair. We propose that executing a feedback amplification loop between stem cells and their progeny could be a common mechanism underlying tissue regeneration and tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14330.001 PMID:27187149

  1. Hair growth promoting potential of phospholipids purified from porcine lung tissues.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Su; Jeon, Byung-Suk; Jeon, Yeon-Jeong; Yoon, Byung-Il; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-03-01

    BP201, porcine lung tissue-derived phospholipids, consists of phosphatidylcholine as a major phospholipid species. BP201 promoted hair growth after application onto the shaved backs of BALB/c and C3H mice. Its effect was enhanced when applied together with minoxidil (MNX) in C3H mice. When the tissue specimens prepared from the shaved skins of BP201-treated and control mice were microscopically examined, the total numbers of hair follicles in both anagen and telogen phases of BP201-treated mice were significantly higher than those of control mice. The numbers of hair follicles in the anagen phase of BP201-treated mice were also higher than those of control mice. In combination with MNX, BP201 further increased the total number of hair follicles, but did not alter the percentage of hair follicles in the anagenic phase. BP201 also increased the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells. Collectively, BP201 possesses hair growth promoting potential, which would suggest its use singly or in combination for hair growth products. PMID:25767686

  2. Tissue transglutaminase-2 promotes gastric cancer progression via the ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wu, Xiongyan; Chen, Xuehua; Li, Jianfang; Zhu, Zhenggang; Liu, Bingya; Su, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common tumors worldwide and involves extensive local tumor invasion, metastasis, and poor prognosis. Understanding mechanisms regulating progression of GC is necessary for developing effective therapeutic strategies. Tissue transglutaminase-2 (TG2), a multifunctional member of the transglutaminase family, has been shown to be critical for tumor initiation and progression. However, how TG2 promotes the progression of GC is unknown. We report that TG2 was highly expressed in GC tissues and positively associated with depth of tumor invasion and late TNM stage. With gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we observed that TG2 promoted GC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, as well as tumorigenesis and peritoneal metastasis in vivo. These events were associated with the ERK1/2 pathway activation and an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion induced by overexpression of TG2. In summary, TG2 contributes to tumorigenesis and progression of GC by activating the ERK1/2 signaling pathway and is a potential therapeutic target of metastatic gastric cancer. PMID:26771235

  3. Hair Growth Promoting Potential of Phospholipids Purified from Porcine Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Su; Jeon, Byung-Suk; Jeon, Yeon-Jeong; Yoon, Byung-Il; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    BP201, porcine lung tissue-derived phospholipids, consists of phosphatidylcholine as a major phospholipid species. BP201 promoted hair growth after application onto the shaved backs of BALB/c and C3H mice. Its effect was enhanced when applied together with minoxidil (MNX) in C3H mice. When the tissue specimens prepared from the shaved skins of BP201-treated and control mice were microscopically examined, the total numbers of hair follicles in both anagen and telogen phases of BP201-treated mice were significantly higher than those of control mice. The numbers of hair follicles in the anagen phase of BP201-treated mice were also higher than those of control mice. In combination with MNX, BP201 further increased the total number of hair follicles, but did not alter the percentage of hair follicles in the anagenic phase. BP201 also increased the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells. Collectively, BP201 possesses hair growth promoting potential, which would suggest its use singly or in combination for hair growth products. PMID:25767686

  4. Efficient, Glucose Responsive, and Islet-Specific Transgene Expression by a Modified Rat Insulin Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Renjie; Chen, Shuyuan; Ding, Jiahuan; Grayburn, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    This study was done to improve efficiency and islet specificity of the rat insulin promoter (RIP). Various rat insulin promoter lengths were prepared and tested in vitro to drive luciferase reporter gene expression in INS1-cells, alpha-cells, acinar cells, ductal cells, and fibroblasts. The CMV promoter was used as a positive control. In addition, the DsRed reporter gene was administered in vivo to rat pancreas by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). Confocal microscopy was used to detect the presence and distribution of DsRed within the pancreas after UTMD. A modified RIP3.1 promoter, which includes portions of the insulin gene after its transcription start site is 5-fold more active in INS-1 cells than the full length RIP promoter or the CMV promoter. RIP3.1 is regulated by glucose level and various islet transcription factors in vitro, and exhibits activity in alpha-cells, but not exocrine cells. In vivo delivery of RIP3.1-DsRed resulted in expression of DsRed protein in beta-cells, and to a lesser extent alpha cells under normal glucose conditions. No DsRed signal was present in exocrine pancreas under RIP3.1. A modified rat insulin promoter, RIP3.1, efficiently and specifically directs gene expression to endocrine pancreas. PMID:19727136

  5. The Adipose Tissue Microenvironment Regulates Depot-Specific Adipogenesis in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Elise; Wing, Allison; Holtrup, Brandon; Sebo, Zachary; Kaplan, Jennifer L; Saavedra-Peña, Rocio; Church, Christopher D; Colman, Laura; Berry, Ryan; Rodeheffer, Matthew S

    2016-07-12

    The sexually dimorphic distribution of adipose tissue influences the development of obesity-associated pathologies. The accumulation of visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) that occurs in males is detrimental to metabolic health, while accumulation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SWAT) seen in females may be protective. Here, we show that adipocyte hyperplasia contributes directly to the differential fat distribution between the sexes. In male mice, high-fat diet (HFD) induces adipogenesis specifically in VWAT, while in females HFD induces adipogenesis in both VWAT and SWAT in a sex hormone-dependent manner. We also show that the activation of adipocyte precursors (APs), which drives adipocyte hyperplasia in obesity, is regulated by the adipose depot microenvironment and not by cell-intrinsic mechanisms. These findings indicate that APs are plastic cells, which respond to both local and systemic signals that influence their differentiation potential independent of depot origin. Therefore, depot-specific AP niches coordinate adipose tissue growth and distribution. PMID:27320063

  6. Systems Biology of Tissue-Specific Response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum Reveals Differentiated Apoptosis in the Tick Vector Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Ayllón, Nieves; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Šíma, Radek; López, Juan A.; Vázquez, Jesús; Alberdi, Pilar; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Infection with this zoonotic pathogen affects cell function in both vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Global tissue-specific response and apoptosis signaling pathways were characterized in I. scapularis nymphs and adult female midguts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum using a systems biology approach combining transcriptomics and proteomics. Apoptosis was selected for pathway-focused analysis due to its role in bacterial infection of tick cells. The results showed tissue-specific differences in tick response to infection and revealed differentiated regulation of apoptosis pathways. The impact of bacterial infection was more pronounced in tick nymphs and midguts than in salivary glands, probably reflecting bacterial developmental cycle. All apoptosis pathways described in other organisms were identified in I. scapularis, except for the absence of the Perforin ortholog. Functional characterization using RNA interference showed that Porin knockdown significantly increases tick colonization by A. phagocytophilum. Infection with A. phagocytophilum produced complex tissue-specific alterations in transcript and protein levels. In tick nymphs, the results suggested a possible effect of bacterial infection on the inhibition of tick immune response. In tick midguts, the results suggested that A. phagocytophilum infection inhibited cell apoptosis to facilitate and establish infection through up-regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Bacterial infection inhibited the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in tick salivary glands by down-regulating Porin expression that resulted in the inhibition of Cytochrome c release as the anti-apoptotic mechanism to facilitate bacterial infection. However, tick salivary glands may promote apoptosis to limit bacterial infection through induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. These dynamic changes in response to A

  7. Systems biology of tissue-specific response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum reveals differentiated apoptosis in the tick vector Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, Nieves; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C; Kocan, Katherine M; Šíma, Radek; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Alberdi, Pilar; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-03-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Infection with this zoonotic pathogen affects cell function in both vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Global tissue-specific response and apoptosis signaling pathways were characterized in I. scapularis nymphs and adult female midguts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum using a systems biology approach combining transcriptomics and proteomics. Apoptosis was selected for pathway-focused analysis due to its role in bacterial infection of tick cells. The results showed tissue-specific differences in tick response to infection and revealed differentiated regulation of apoptosis pathways. The impact of bacterial infection was more pronounced in tick nymphs and midguts than in salivary glands, probably reflecting bacterial developmental cycle. All apoptosis pathways described in other organisms were identified in I. scapularis, except for the absence of the Perforin ortholog. Functional characterization using RNA interference showed that Porin knockdown significantly increases tick colonization by A. phagocytophilum. Infection with A. phagocytophilum produced complex tissue-specific alterations in transcript and protein levels. In tick nymphs, the results suggested a possible effect of bacterial infection on the inhibition of tick immune response. In tick midguts, the results suggested that A. phagocytophilum infection inhibited cell apoptosis to facilitate and establish infection through up-regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Bacterial infection inhibited the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in tick salivary glands by down-regulating Porin expression that resulted in the inhibition of Cytochrome c release as the anti-apoptotic mechanism to facilitate bacterial infection. However, tick salivary glands may promote apoptosis to limit bacterial infection through induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. These dynamic changes in response to A

  8. Systems biology of tissue-specific response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum reveals differentiated apoptosis in the tick vector Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, Nieves; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C; Kocan, Katherine M; Šíma, Radek; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Alberdi, Pilar; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-03-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Infection with this zoonotic pathogen affects cell function in both vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Global tissue-specific response and apoptosis signaling pathways were characterized in I. scapularis nymphs and adult female midguts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum using a systems biology approach combining transcriptomics and proteomics. Apoptosis was selected for pathway-focused analysis due to its role in bacterial infection of tick cells. The results showed tissue-specific differences in tick response to infection and revealed differentiated regulation of apoptosis pathways. The impact of bacterial infection was more pronounced in tick nymphs and midguts than in salivary glands, probably reflecting bacterial developmental cycle. All apoptosis pathways described in other organisms were identified in I. scapularis, except for the absence of the Perforin ortholog. Functional characterization using RNA interference showed that Porin knockdown significantly increases tick colonization by A. phagocytophilum. Infection with A. phagocytophilum produced complex tissue-specific alterations in transcript and protein levels. In tick nymphs, the results suggested a possible effect of bacterial infection on the inhibition of tick immune response. In tick midguts, the results suggested that A. phagocytophilum infection inhibited cell apoptosis to facilitate and establish infection through up-regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Bacterial infection inhibited the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in tick salivary glands by down-regulating Porin expression that resulted in the inhibition of Cytochrome c release as the anti-apoptotic mechanism to facilitate bacterial infection. However, tick salivary glands may promote apoptosis to limit bacterial infection through induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. These dynamic changes in response to A

  9. Comprehensive benchmarking reveals H2BK20 acetylation as a distinctive signature of cell-state-specific enhancers and promoters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vibhor; Rayan, Nirmala Arul; Muratani, Masafumi; Lim, Stefan; Elanggovan, Bavani; Xin, Lixia; Lu, Tess; Makhija, Harshyaa; Poschmann, Jeremie; Lufkin, Thomas; Ng, Huck Hui; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2016-05-01

    Although over 35 different histone acetylation marks have been described, the overwhelming majority of regulatory genomics studies focus exclusively on H3K27ac and H3K9ac. In order to identify novel epigenomic traits of regulatory elements, we constructed a benchmark set of validated enhancers by performing 140 enhancer assays in human T cells. We tested 40 chromatin signatures on this unbiased enhancer set and identified H2BK20ac, a little-studied histone modification, as the most predictive mark of active enhancers. Notably, we detected a novel class of functionally distinct enhancers enriched in H2BK20ac but lacking H3K27ac, which was present in all examined cell lines and also in embryonic forebrain tissue. H2BK20ac was also unique in highlighting cell-type-specific promoters. In contrast, other acetylation marks were present in all active promoters, regardless of cell-type specificity. In stimulated microglial cells, H2BK20ac was more correlated with cell-state-specific expression changes than H3K27ac, with TGF-beta signaling decoupling the two acetylation marks at a subset of regulatory elements. In summary, our study reveals a previously unknown connection between histone acetylation and cell-type-specific gene regulation and indicates that H2BK20ac profiling can be used to uncover new dimensions of gene regulation. PMID:26957309

  10. А new Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin from the mussel Mytilus trossulus: Structure, tissue specificity, antimicrobial and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Chikalovets, Irina V; Kovalchuk, Svetlana N; Litovchenko, Alina P; Molchanova, Valentina I; Pivkin, Mikhail V; Chernikov, Oleg V

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, a new Gal/GalNAc specific lectin from the mussel Mytilus trossulus (designated as MTL) was identified, and its expression levels, both in tissues and toward pathogen stimulation, were then characterized. The MTL primary structure was determined via cDNA sequencing. Deduced sequence of 150 amino acid residues showed 89% similarity to lectins from the mussels Crenomytilus grayanus and Mytilus galloprovincialis that were the first members of a new family of zoolectins. The results indicated that the MTL might be involved in immune response toward pathogen infection, and it might perform different recognition specificity toward bacteria or fungi.

  11. Stichopin-containing nerves and secretory cells specific to connective tissues of the sea cucumber.

    PubMed

    Tamori, Masaki; Saha, Apurba Kumar; Matsuno, Akira; Noskor, Sukumar Chandra; Koizumi, Osamu; Kobayakawa, Yoshitaka; Nakajima, Yoko; Motokawa, Tatsuo

    2007-09-22

    Stichopin, a 17-amino acid peptide isolated from a sea cucumber, affects the stiffness change of the body-wall catch connective tissues and the contraction of the body-wall muscles. The localization of stichopin in sea cucumbers was studied by indirect immunohistochemistry using antiserum against stichopin. Double staining was performed with both stichopin antiserum and 1E11, the monoclonal antibody specific to echinoderm nerves. A stichopin-like immunoreactivity (stichopin-LI) was exclusively found in the connective tissues of various organs. Many fibres and cells with processes were stained by both the anti-stichopin antibody and 1E11. They were found in the body-wall dermis and the connective tissue layer of the cloacae and were suggested to be connective tissue-specific nerves. Oval cells with stichopin-LI (OCS) without processes were found in the body-wall dermis, the connective tissue sheath of the longitudinal body-wall muscles, the connective tissue layer of the tube feet and tentacles, and the connective tissue in the radial nerves separating the ectoneural part from the hyponeural part. Electron microscopic observations of the OCSs in the radial nerves showed that they were secretory cells. The OCSs were located either near the well-defined neural structures or near the water-filled cavities, such as the epineural sinus and the canals of the tube feet. The location near the water-filled cavities might suggest that stichopin was secreted into these cavities to function as a hormone.

  12. The role of the endocrine system in feeding-induced tissue-specific circadian entrainment.

    PubMed

    Sato, Miho; Murakami, Mariko; Node, Koichi; Matsumura, Ritsuko; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-07-24

    The circadian clock is entrained to environmental cycles by external cue-mediated phase adjustment. Although the light input pathway has been well defined, the mechanism of feeding-induced phase resetting remains unclear. The tissue-specific sensitivity of peripheral entrainment to feeding suggests the involvement of multiple pathways, including humoral and neuronal signals. Previous in vitro studies with cultured cells indicate that endocrine factors may function as entrainment cues for peripheral clocks. However, blood-borne factors that are well characterized in actual feeding-induced resetting have yet to be identified. Here, we report that insulin may be involved in feeding-induced tissue-type-dependent entrainment in vivo. In ex vivo culture experiments, insulin-induced phase shift in peripheral clocks was dependent on tissue type, which was consistent with tissue-specific insulin sensitivity, and peripheral entrainment in insulin-sensitive tissues involved PI3K- and MAPK-mediated signaling pathways. These results suggest that insulin may be an immediate early factor in feeding-mediated tissue-specific entrainment.

  13. Simultaneous immunochemical detection of four banned antibiotic growth promoters in raw and cooked poultry tissue.

    PubMed

    McNamee, S E; Cunningham, R; Elliott, C T

    2013-01-01

    Spiramycin, tylosin, bacitracin and virginiamycin are among a group of antibiotic growth promoters that have been banned in the European Union since the 1999 Council. This was due to concerns over the development of resistant bacteria emerging between humans and animals with the threat of antibiotics no longer being able to be used effectively to treat human infections. A sensitive and fast immunochemical method is presented for the determination of these four antibiotic growth promoters simultaneously in poultry tissue. The method employs methanol extraction followed by sample clean-up by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with determination by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA). The limit of detection (LOD) was less than 1 ng g(-1) and the detection capability (CCβ) was 3 ng g(-1) or less for all four antibiotic growth promoters. Validation was completed with both raw and cooked chicken, therefore either matrix could be used for the monitoring of these banned drugs. In a feeding trial no residues of either bacitracin or virginiamycin were found in medicated birds even without a withdrawal period. In the case of tylosin and spiramycin much higher residues level were detected immunochemically than was the case by mass spectrometry. PMID:23789918

  14. Promoting epithelium regeneration for esophageal tissue engineering through basement membrane reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jingjing; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Yabin; Hou, Lei; Liu, Yuxin

    2014-04-01

    Scaffolds mimicking hierarchical features of native extracellular matrices may facilitate cell growth and anatomical tissue regeneration. In our previous study, esophageal basement membrane (BM) was shown to be composed of interwoven fibers with mean diameter of 66 ± 24 nm (range 28-165 nm) and with abundant pores of unequal sizes. The main extracellular matrix (ECM) contents found in porcine esophageal BM were collagen IV, laminin, entactin, and proteoglycans. In this work, biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) and silk fibroin (SF) were spun with electrospinning technology, both individually and in combination, to fabricate fibrous scaffolds with diameters between 64 and 200 nm. The surface morphologies of PCL, PCL/SF, and SF scaffolds were observed under scanning electron microscopy. Their mechanical properties were tested and the cytocompatibility was evaluated in vitro via culture of primary epithelial cells (ECs). The SF or PCL/SF scaffold favorably promoted epithelial cell attachment and proliferation comparing with PCL scaffold. However, mitochondrial activity of epithelial cells was greatly promoted when major BM proteins were coated onto the electrospun scaffold to provide an ECM-like structure. Results from in vivo tests revealed that the electrospun scaffolds coated with BM protein possess good biocompatibility and capability to promote epithelium regeneration.

  15. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics. PMID:26976580

  16. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Schatz, Desmond A.; Greenbaum, Carla J.; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A.; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A. M. James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics. PMID:26976580

  17. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics.

  18. Evaluation of the specificity of lectin binding to sections of plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Guinel, F C; McCully, M E

    1985-01-01

    Hand sections of young corn root tips have been used in a study of problems encountered in the binding of fluorescently-labelled lectins to plant tissues. It was found, surprisingly, that with lectins specific for a sugar known to be present (Lotus and Ulex lectins for L-fucose), with a lectin specific for a sugar thought not to be present (wheat-germ agglutinin for N-acetylglucosamine), with non-lectin glycoprotein and protein (gamma-globulin and bovine serum albumin) and with basophilic dyes (alcian blue and toluidine blue), a coincidental binding pattern similar to the pattern of autofluorescence in the same tissue was obtained. Corn root tissues include cell walls composed of complex polysaccharides esterified with ferulic acid residues, as well as mucilages which are highly hydrated and expanded. In such material, neither standard inhibition controls with haptens nor the use of a wide range of lectin concentrations are adequate to distinguish clearly specific and non-specific binding of fluorescently-labelled lectin. Therefore, lectins are not the simple test probes they have been supposed. Before interpreting results obtained in using fluorescently-labelled lectins on any tissue sections, all available information (biochemical as well as histochemical) about the tissue must be considered.

  19. Characterization of thyroid hormone transporter expression during tissue-specific metamorphic events in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Connors, Kristin A; Korte, Joseph J; Anderson, Grant W; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2010-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) induces the dramatic morphological and physiological changes that together comprise amphibian metamorphosis. TH-responsive tissues vary widely with developmental timing of TH-induced changes. How larval tadpole tissues are able to employ distinct metamorphic programs in a developmental stage- and TH-dependent manner is still unknown. Recently, several proteins capable of transporting TH have been identified. TH action and metabolism occurs primarily intracellularly, highlighting the importance of TH transporters. We examined the hypothesis that TH transporter expression and tissue distribution play an important role in mediating TH-induced metamorphic events. Xenopus tropicalis homologs for known TH transporting OATP, MCT and LAT family proteins were identified and gene specific qRT-PCR primers were developed. Total RNA was extracted from tissues representing three unique developmental fates including: growth/differentiation (hind limb), death/resorption (gill, tail) and remodeling (brain, liver, kidney). For growing and resorbing tissues, results showed the general trend of low initial expression levels of MCT8 and MCT10 transporters, followed by a several-fold increase of expression as the tissue undergoes TH-dependent metamorphic changes. The expression pattern in remodeling tissues was less uniform: a general decrease in transporter expression was observed in the liver, while the kidney and brain exhibited a range of expression patterns for several TH transporters. Collectively, these developmental expression patterns are consistent with TH transporting proteins playing a role in the effects of TH in peripheral tissues.

  20. Tissue-Specific Metabolic Profile Study of Moringa oleifera L. Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Iqbal; Chowdhury, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera, an important multipurpose crop, is rich in various phytochemicals: flavonoids, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and carotenes. The purpose of this study was to profile the groups of metabolites in leaf and stem tissues of M. oleifera. Various sugars, amino acids, and organic acid derivatives were found in all of the M. oleifera tissues with different profiles/peak intensities depending on the tissue. 1D proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was applied for collecting metabolite spectra. Approximately 30 metabolites with 2 unknown peaks were identified with Chenomx and verified with MMCD databases using carbon data. Among these metabolites, 22 metabolites were identified as common in both leaf and stem tissues. Of the remaining 8 metabolites, 4-aminobutyrate, adenosine, guanosine, tyrosine, and p-cresol were found only in leaf tissues; however, glutamate, glutamine, and tryptophan were found only in stem tissues. Biochemical pathway analysis revealed that 28 identified metabolites were interconnected with 36 different pathways as well as related to different fatty acids and secondary metabolites synthesis biochemical pathways. It is well known that different tissues of M. oleifera have nutritional, medicinal, and therapeutic values; therefore, our main objective is to provide a publicly available M. oliefera tissue specific metabolite database. PMID:26366209

  1. A GWAS SNP for Schizophrenia Is Linked to the Internal MIR137 Promoter and Supports Differential Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Alix; Breen, Gerome; Bubb, Vivien J.; Quinn, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MIR137 gene locus have been shown to confer risk for schizophrenia through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The expression levels of microRNA-137 (miR-137) and its validated gene targets have also been shown to be disrupted in several neuropsychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia. Regulation of miR-137 expression is thus imperative for normal neuronal functioning. We previously characterized an internal promoter domain within the MIR137 gene that contained a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and could alter the in vitro levels of miR-137 in a stimulus-induced and allele-specific manner. We now demonstrate that haplotype tagging-SNP analysis linked the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia to this internal MIR137 promoter through a proxy SNP rs2660304 located at this domain. We postulated that the rs2660304 promoter SNP may act as predisposing factor for schizophrenia through altering the levels of miR-137 expression in a genotype-dependent manner. Reporter gene analysis of the internal MIR137 promoter containing the common VNTR variant demonstrated genotype-dependent differences in promoter activity with respect to rs2660304. In line with previous reports, the major allele of the rs2660304 proxy SNP, which has previously been linked with schizophrenia risk through genetic association, resulted in downregulation of reporter gene expression in a tissue culture model. The genetic influence of the rs2660304 proxy SNP on the transcriptional activity of the internal MIR137 promoter, and thus the levels of miR-137 expression, therefore offers a distinct regulatory mechanism to explain the functional significance of the rs1625579 GWAS SNP for schizophrenia risk. PMID:26429811

  2. Cell-specific expression of the promoters of two nonlegume hemoglobin genes in a transgenic legume, Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, C R; Llewellyn, D J; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1997-01-01

    The promoters of the hemoglobin genes from the nitrogen-fixing tree Parasponia andersonii and the related nonnitrogen-fixing Trema tomentosa both confer beta-glucuronidase reporter gene expression to the central zone of the nodules of a transgenic legume, Lotus corniculatus. beta-Glucuronidase expression was high in the uninfected interstitial cells and parenchyma of the surrounding boundary layer and was low in the Rhizobium-infected cells. This contrasts with the expression of both the P. andersonii hemoglobin protein in P. andersonii nodules and the endogenous Lotus leghemoglobins that are expressed in the infected cells at very high levels. The expression pattern of the P. andersonii and T. tomentosa hemoglobin promoters in L. corniculatus resembles that of a nonsymbiotic hemoglobin gene from Casuarina glauca, which was introduced into this legume, and suggests that only the nonsymbiotic functions of the P. andersonii promoter are being recognized. Deletion of the distal segments of both the P. andersonii and T. tomentosa promoters identified regions important for the control of their tissue-specific and temporal activity in Lotus. Potential regulatory elements, which enhance nodule expression and suppress nonnodule expression, were also identified and localized to a distal promoter segment. A proximal AAGAG motif is present in the P. andersonii, T. tomentosa, and nonsymbiotic Casuarina hemoglobin genes. Mutation of this motif in the P. andersonii promoter resulted in a significant reduction in both the nodule and root expression levels in L. corniculatus. Some of the regulatory motifs characterized are similar to, but different from, the nodulin motifs of the leghemoglobins. PMID:9008386

  3. Development of Plant Gene Vectors for Tissue-Specific Expression Using GFP as a Reporter Gene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jacquelyn; Egnin, Marceline; Xue, Qi-Han; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    Reporter genes are widely employed in plant molecular biology research to analyze gene expression and to identify promoters. Gus (UidA) is currently the most popular reporter gene but its detection requires a destructive assay. The use of jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from Aequorea Victoria holds promise for noninvasive detection of in vivo gene expression. To study how various plant promoters are expressed in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), we are transcriptionally fusing the intron-modified (mGFP) or synthetic (modified for codon-usage) GFP coding regions to these promoters: double cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV 35S) with AMV translational enhancer, ubiquitin7-intron-ubiquitin coding region (ubi7-intron-UQ) and sporaminA. A few of these vectors have been constructed and introduced into E. coli DH5a and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105. Transient expression studies are underway using protoplast-electroporation and particle bombardment of leaf tissues.

  4. The intergenic region of the maize defensin-like protein genes Def1 and Def2 functions as an embryo-specific asymmetric bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Wenzhu; Li, Ye; Li, Suzhen; Zhou, Xiaojin; Zhao, Qianqian; Fan, Yunliu; Lin, Min; Chen, Rumei

    2016-07-01

    Bidirectional promoters are identified in diverse organisms with widely varied genome sizes, including bacteria, yeast, mammals, and plants. However, little research has been done on any individual endogenous bidirectional promoter from plants. Here, we describe a promoter positioned in the intergenic region of two defensin-like protein genes, Def1 and Def2 in maize (Zea mays). We examined the expression profiles of Def1 and Def2 in 14 maize tissues by qRT-PCR, and the results showed that this gene pair was expressed abundantly and specifically in seeds. When fused to either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter genes, P ZmBD1 , P ZmDef1 , and P ZmDef2 were active and reproduced the expression patterns of both Def1 and Def2 genes in transformed immature maize embryos, as well as in developing seeds of transgenic maize. Comparative analysis revealed that PZmBD1 shared most of the expression characteristics of the two polar promoters, but displayed more stringent embryo specificity, delayed expression initiation, and asymmetric promoter activity. Moreover, a truncated promoter study revealed that the core promoters only exhibit basic bidirectional activity, while interacting with necessary cis-elements, which leads to polarity and different strengths. The sophisticated interaction or counteraction between the core promoter and cis-elements may potentially regulate bidirectional promoters. PMID:27279278

  5. Research Resource: Tissue- and Pathway-Specific Metabolomic Profiles of the Steroid Receptor Coactivator (SRC) Family

    PubMed Central

    York, Brian; Sagen, Jørn V.; Tsimelzon, Anna; Louet, Jean-Francios; Chopra, Atul R.; Reineke, Erin L.; Zhou, Suoling; Stevens, Robert D.; Wenner, Brett R.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Bain, James R.; Xu, Jianming; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Newgard, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly growing family of transcriptional coregulators includes coactivators that promote transcription and corepressors that harbor the opposing function. In recent years, coregulators have emerged as important regulators of metabolic homeostasis, including the p160 steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family. Members of the SRC family have been ascribed important roles in control of gluconeogenesis, fat absorption and storage in the liver, and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. To provide a deeper and more granular understanding of the metabolic impact of the SRC family members, we performed targeted metabolomic analyses of key metabolic byproducts of glucose, fatty acid, and amino acid metabolism in mice with global knockouts (KOs) of SRC-1, SRC-2, or SRC-3. We measured amino acids, acyl carnitines, and organic acids in five tissues with key metabolic functions (liver, heart, skeletal muscle, brain, plasma) isolated from SRC-1, -2, or -3 KO mice and their wild-type littermates under fed and fasted conditions, thereby unveiling unique metabolic functions of each SRC. Specifically, SRC-1 ablation revealed the most significant impact on hepatic metabolism, whereas SRC-2 appeared to impact cardiac metabolism. Conversely, ablation of SRC-3 primarily affected brain and skeletal muscle metabolism. Surprisingly, we identified very few metabolites that changed universally across the three SRC KO models. The findings of this Research Resource demonstrate that coactivator function has very limited metabolic redundancy even within the homologous SRC family. Furthermore, this work also demonstrates the use of metabolomics as a means for identifying novel metabolic regulatory functions of transcriptional coregulators. PMID:23315938

  6. Urinary bladder matrix promotes site appropriate tissue formation following right ventricle outflow tract repair

    PubMed Central

    Remlinger, Nathaniel T; Gilbert, Thomas W; Yoshida, Masahiro; Guest, Brogan N; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Weaver, Michelle L; Wagner, William R; Brown, Bryan N; Tobita, Kimimasa; Wearden, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    The current prevalence and severity of heart defects requiring functional replacement of cardiac tissue pose a serious clinical challenge. Biologic scaffolds are an attractive tissue engineering approach to cardiac repair because they avoid sensitization associated with homograft materials and theoretically possess the potential for growth in similar patterns as surrounding native tissue. Both urinary bladder matrix (UBM) and cardiac ECM (C-ECM) have been previously investigated as scaffolds for cardiac repair with modest success, but have not been compared directly. In other tissue locations, bone marrow derived cells have been shown to play a role in the remodeling process, but this has not been investigated for UBM in the cardiac location, and has never been studied for C-ECM. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effectiveness of an organ-specific C-ECM patch with a commonly used ECM scaffold for myocardial tissue repair of the right ventricle outflow tract (RVOT), and to examine the role of bone marrow derived cells in the remodeling response. A chimeric rat model in which all bone marrow cells express green fluorescent protein (GFP) was generated and used to show the ability of ECM scaffolds derived from the heart and bladder to support cardiac function and cellular growth in the RVOT. The results from this study suggest that urinary bladder matrix may provide a more appropriate substrate for myocardial repair than cardiac derived matrices, as shown by differences in the remodeling responses following implantation, as well as the presence of site appropriate cells and the formation of immature, myocardial tissue. PMID:23974174

  7. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA. PMID:26707880

  8. Cell type-specific modulation of lipid mediator's formation in murine adipose tissue by omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuda, Ondrej; Rombaldova, Martina; Janovska, Petra; Flachs, Pavel; Kopecky, Jan

    2016-01-15

    Mutual interactions between adipocytes and immune cells in white adipose tissue (WAT) are involved in modulation of lipid metabolism in the tissue and also in response to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), which counteract adverse effects of obesity. This complex interplay depends in part on in situ formed anti- as well as pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, but cell types engaged in the synthesis of the specific mediators need to be better characterized. We used tissue fractionation and metabolipidomic analysis to identify cells producing lipid mediators in epididymal WAT of mice fed for 5 weeks obesogenic high-fat diet (lipid content 35% wt/wt), which was supplemented or not by omega-3 PUFA (4.3 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 14.7 mg docosahexaenoic acid per g of diet). Our results demonstrate selective increase in levels of anti-inflammatory lipid mediators in WAT in response to omega-3, reflecting either their association with adipocytes (endocannabinoid-related N-docosahexaenoylethanolamine) or with stromal vascular cells (pro-resolving lipid mediator protectin D1). In parallel, tissue levels of obesity-associated pro-inflammatory endocannabinoids were suppressed. Moreover, we show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which could be isolated using magnetic force from the stromal vascular fraction, are not the major producers of protectin D1 and that omega-3 PUFA lowered lipid load in ATMs while promoting their less-inflammatory phenotype. Taken together, these results further document specific roles of various cell types in WAT in control of WAT inflammation and metabolism and they suggest that also other cells but ATMs are engaged in production of pro-resolving lipid mediators in response to omega-3 PUFA.

  9. Evaluation of two-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry for tissue-specific protein profiling of laser-microdissected plant samples

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, Martina; Lipton, Mary S.; Giavalisco, Patrick; Smith, Richard D.; Kehr, Julia

    2005-07-14

    Laser microdissection (LM) allows the collection of homogeneous tissue- and cell specific plant samples. The employment of this technique with subsequent protein analysis has thus far not been reported for plant tissues, probably due to the difficulties associated with defining a reasonable cellular morphology and, in parallel, allowing efficient protein extraction from tissue samples. The relatively large sample amount needed for successful proteome analysis is an additional issue that complicates protein profiling on a tissue- or even cell-specific level. In contrast to transcript profiling that can be performed from very small sample amounts due to efficient amplification strategies, there is as yet no amplification procedure for proteins available. In the current study, we compared different tissue preparation techniques prior to LM/laser pressure catapulting (LMPC) with respect to their suitability for protein retrieval. Cryosectioning was identified as the best compromise between tissue morphology and effective protein extraction. After collection of vascular bundles from Arabidopsis thaliana stem tissue by LMPC, proteins were extracted and subjected to protein analysis, either by classical two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), or by high-efficiency liquid chromatography (LC) in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Our results demonstrate that both methods can be used with LMPC collected plant material. But because of the significantly lower sample amount required for LC-MS/MS than for 2-DE, the combination of LMPC and LC-MS/MS has a higher potential to promote comprehensive proteome analysis of specific plant tissues.

  10. De novo assembly and analysis of tissue-specific transcriptomes revealed the tissue-specific genes and profile of immunity from Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yadong; Chang, Yaqing; Wang, Xiuli; Qiu, Xuemei; Liu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Strongylocentrotus intermedius is an important marine species in north China and Japan. Recent years, diseases are threating the sea urchin aquaculture industry seriously. To provide a genetic resource for S. intermedius as well as overview the immune-related genes of S. intermedius, we performed transcriptome sequencing of three cDNA libraries representing three tissues, coelomocytes, gut and peristomial membrane respectively. In total 138,421 contigs were assembled from all sequencing data. 96,764 contigs were annotated according to bioinformatics databases, including NT, nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG. 49,336 Contigs were annotated as CDS. In this study, we obtained 24,778 gene families from S. intermedius transcriptome. The gene expression analysis revealed that more genes were expressed in gut, more high expression level genes in coelomocytes when compared with other tissues. Specific expressed contigs in coelomocytes, gut, and peristomial membrane were 546, 1136, and 1012 respectively. Pathway analysis suggested 25, 17 and 36 potential specifically pathways may specific progressed in peristomial membrane, gut and coelomocytes respectively. Similarities and differences between S. intermedius and other echinoderms were analyzed. S. intermedius was more homology to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus than others sea urchin. Of 24,778 genes, 1074 genes are immune-related, immune genes were expressed with a higher level in coelomocytes than other tissues. Complement system may be the most important immune system in sea urchin. We also identified 2438 SSRs and 16,236 SNPs for S. intermedius. These results provide a transcriptome resource and foundation to study molecular mechanisms of sea urchin immune system.

  11. Cloning and characterization of a tuberous root-specific promoter from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Koehorst-van Putten, Herma J J; Wolters, Anne-Marie A; Pereira-Bertram, Isolde M; van den Berg, Hans H J; van der Krol, Alexander R; Visser, Richard G F

    2012-12-01

    In order to obtain a tuberous root-specific promoter to be used in the transformation of cassava, a 1,728 bp sequence containing the cassava granule-bound starch synthase (GBSSI) promoter was isolated. The sequence proved to contain light- and sugar-responsive cis elements. Part of this sequence (1,167 bp) was cloned into binary vectors to drive expression of the firefly luciferase gene. Cassava cultivar Adira 4 was transformed with this construct or a control construct in which the luciferase gene was cloned behind the 35S promoter. Luciferase activity was measured in leaves, stems, roots and tuberous roots. As expected, the 35S promoter induced luciferase activity in all organs at similar levels, whereas the GBSSI promoter showed very low expression in leaves, stems and roots, but very high expression in tuberous roots. These results show that the cassava GBSSI promoter is an excellent candidate to achieve tuberous root-specific expression in cassava.

  12. Tissue Specificity and Sex-Specific Regulatory Variation Permit the Evolution of Sex-Biased Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Mank, Judith E

    2016-09-01

    Genetic correlations between males and females are often thought to constrain the evolution of sexual dimorphism. However, sexually dimorphic traits and the underlying sexually dimorphic gene expression patterns are often rapidly evolving. We explore this apparent paradox by measuring the genetic correlation in gene expression between males and females (Cmf) across broad evolutionary timescales, using two RNA-sequencing data sets spanning multiple populations and multiple species. We find that unbiased genes have higher Cmf than sex-biased genes, consistent with intersexual genetic correlations constraining the evolution of sexual dimorphism. However, we found that highly sex-biased genes (both male and female biased) also had higher tissue specificity, and unbiased genes had greater expression breadth, suggesting that pleiotropy may constrain the breakdown of intersexual genetic correlations. Finally, we show that genes with high Cmf showed some degree of sex-specific changes in gene expression in males and females. Together, our results suggest that genetic correlations between males and females may be less important in constraining the evolution of sex-biased gene expression than pleiotropy. Sex-specific regulatory variation and tissue specificity may resolve the paradox of widespread sex bias within a largely shared genome.

  13. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  14. ZNF143 provides sequence specificity to secure chromatin interactions at gene promoters

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Swneke D.; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Desai, Kinjal; Aid, Malika; Corradin, Olivia; Cowper-Sal·lari, Richard; Akhtar-Zaidi, Batool; Scacheri, Peter C.; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Lupien, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin interactions connect distal regulatory elements to target gene promoters guiding stimulus- and lineage-specific transcription. Few factors securing chromatin interactions have so far been identified. Here by integrating chromatin interaction maps with the large collection of transcription factor binding profiles provided by the ENCODE project, we demonstrate that the zinc-finger protein ZNF143 preferentially occupies anchors of chromatin interactions connecting promoters with distal regulatory elements. It binds directly to promoters and associates with lineage-specific chromatin interactions and gene expression. Silencing ZNF143 or modulating its DNA-binding affinity using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as a surrogate of site-directed mutagenesis reveals the sequence dependency of chromatin interactions at gene promoters. We also find that chromatin interactions alone do not regulate gene expression. Together, our results identify ZNF143 as a novel chromatin-looping factor that contributes to the architectural foundation of the genome by providing sequence specificity at promoters connected with distal regulatory elements. PMID:25645053

  15. Promoter-Specific Hypomethylation Correlates with IL-1β Overexpression in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC).

    PubMed

    Fuso, A; Iyer, A M; van Scheppingen, J; Maccarrone, M; Scholl, T; Hainfellner, J A; Feucht, M; Jansen, F E; Spliet, W G; Krsek, P; Zamecnik, J; Mühlebner, A; Aronica, E

    2016-08-01

    In tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), overexpression of numerous genes associated with inflammation has been observed. Among different proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) has been shown to be significantly involved in epileptogenesis and maintenance of seizures. Recent evidence indicates that IL-1β gene expression can be regulated by DNA methylation of its promoter. In the present study, we hypothesized that hypomethylation in the promoter region of the IL-1β gene may underlie its overexpression observed in TSC brain tissue. Bisulfite sequencing was used to study the methylation status of the promoter region of the IL-1β gene in TSC and control samples. We identified hypomethylation in the promoter region of the IL-1β gene in TSC samples. IL-1β is overexpressed in tubers, and gene expression is correlated with promoter hypomethylation at CpG and non-CpG sites. Our results provide the first evidence of epigenetic modulation of the IL-1β signaling in TSC. Thus, strategies that target epigenetic alterations could offer new therapeutic avenues to control the persistent activation of interleukin-1β-mediated inflammatory signaling in TSC brain. PMID:27122151

  16. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  17. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B; Hitchcock, Robert W; Kaza, Aditya K

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2 ± 0.3% and 98.0 ± 0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2 ± 0.3% and 94.0 ± 2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease.

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of Cardiac Tissue Discrimination Using Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Sachse, Frank B.; Hitchcock, Robert W.; Kaza, Aditya K.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances of the cardiac conduction system constitute a major risk after surgical repair of complex cases of congenital heart disease. Intraoperative identification of the conduction system may reduce the incidence of these disturbances. We previously developed an approach to identify cardiac tissue types using fiber-optics confocal microscopy and extracellular fluorophores. Here, we applied this approach to investigate sensitivity and specificity of human and automated classification in discriminating images of atrial working myocardium and specialized tissue of the conduction system. Two-dimensional image sequences from atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue of isolated perfused rodent hearts were acquired using a fiber-optics confocal microscope (Leica FCM1000). We compared two methods for local application of extracellular fluorophores: topical via pipette and with a dye carrier. Eight blinded examiners evaluated 162 randomly selected images of atrial working myocardium (n = 81) and nodal tissue (n = 81). In addition, we evaluated the images using automated classification. Blinded examiners achieved a sensitivity and specificity of 99.2±0.3% and 98.0±0.7%, respectively, with the dye carrier method of dye application. Sensitivity and specificity was similar for dye application via a pipette (99.2±0.3% and 94.0±2.4%, respectively). Sensitivity and specificity for automated methods of tissue discrimination were similarly high. Human and automated classification achieved high sensitivity and specificity in discriminating atrial working myocardium and nodal tissue. We suggest that our findings facilitate clinical translation of fiber-optics confocal microscopy as an intraoperative imaging modality to reduce the incidence of conduction disturbances during surgical correction of congenital heart disease. PMID:26808149

  19. Visualizing Oxazine 4 nerve-specific fluorescence ex vivo in frozen tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Connor W.; Gibbs, Summer L.

    2016-03-01

    Nerve damage plagues surgical outcomes and remains a major burden for patients, surgeons, and the healthcare system. Fluorescence image-guided surgery using nerve specific small molecule fluorophores offers a solution to diminish surgical nerve damage through improved intraoperative nerve identification and visualization. Oxazine 4 has shown superior nerve specificity in initial testing in vivo, while exhibiting a red shifted excitation and emission spectra compared to other nerve-specific fluorophores. However, Oxazine 4 does not exhibit near-infrared (NIR) excitation and emission, which would be ideal to improve penetration depth and nerve signal to background ratios for in vivo imaging. Successful development of a NIR nerve-specific fluorophore will require understanding of the molecular target of fluorophore nerve specificity. While previous small molecule nerve-specific fluorophores have demonstrated excellent ex vivo nerve specificity, Oxazine 4 ex vivo nerve specific fluorescence has been difficult to visualize. In the present study, we examined each step of the ex vivo fluorescence microscopy sample preparation procedure to discover how in vivo nerve-specific fluorescence is changed during ex vivo tissue sample preparation. Through step-by-step examination we found that Oxazine 4 fluorescence was significantly diminished by washing and mounting tissue sections for microscopy. A method to preserve Oxazine 4 nerve specific fluorescence ex vivo was determined, which can be utilized for visualization by fluorescence microscopy.

  20. eQTL mapping identify insertion and deletion specific eQTLs in multiple tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinyan; Chen, Jun; Esparza, Jorge; Ding, Jun; Elder, James; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lee, Young-Ae; Lathrop, G. Mark; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C; Liang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    GenomeC wide gene expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) mapping have been focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms and have helped interpret findings from diseases mapping studies. The functional effect of structure variants, especially short insertions and deletions (indel) has not been well investigated. Here we imputed 1,380,133 indels based on the latest 1000 Genomes Project panel into 3 eQTL datasets from multiple tissues. Imputation of indels increased 9.9% power and identified indel specific eQTLs for 325 genes. We found introns and vicinities of UTRs were more enriched of indel eQTLs and 3.6 (singleC tissue)C 9.2%(multiC tissue) of previous identified eSNPs were taggers of eindels. Functional analyses identified epigenetics marks, gene ontology categories and disease GWAS loci affected by SNPs and indels eQTLs showing tissueC consistent or tissueC specific effects. This study provides new insights into the underlying genetic architecture of gene expression across tissues and new resource to interpret function of diseases and traits associated structure variants. PMID:25951796

  1. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were ‘transcriptional regulation’ and ‘hormone metabolism’, indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  2. The impact of laser ablation on optical soft tissue differentiation for tissue specific laser surgery-an experimental ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Optical diffuse reflectance can remotely differentiate various bio tissues. To implement this technique in an optical feedback system to guide laser surgery in a tissue-specific way, the alteration of optical tissue properties by laser ablation has to be taken into account. It was the aim of this study to evaluate the general feasibility of optical soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy under the influence of laser ablation, comparing the tissue differentiation results before and after laser intervention. Methods A total of 70 ex vivo tissue samples (5 tissue types) were taken from 14 bisected pig heads. Diffuse reflectance spectra were recorded before and after Er:YAG-laser ablation. The spectra were analyzed and differentiated using principal component analysis (PCA), followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). To assess the potential of tissue differentiation, area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity was computed for each pair of tissue types before and after laser ablation, and compared to each other. Results Optical tissue differentiation showed good results before laser exposure (total classification error 13.51%). However, the tissue pair nerve and fat yielded lower AUC results of only 0.75. After laser ablation slightly reduced differentiation results were found with a total classification error of 16.83%. The tissue pair nerve and fat showed enhanced differentiation (AUC: 0.85). Laser ablation reduced the sensitivity in 50% and specificity in 80% of the cases of tissue pair comparison. The sensitivity of nerve–fat differentiation was enhanced by 35%. Conclusions The observed results show the general feasibility of tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy even under conditions of tissue alteration by laser ablation. The contrast enhancement for the differentiation between nerve and fat tissue after ablation is assumed to be due to laser removal of the surrounding lipid-rich nerve

  3. Mechanism of the tissue-specific action of the selective androgen receptor modulator S-101479.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ohyabu, Yuki; Morikyu, Teruyuki; Ishige, Hirohide; Albers, Michael; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) comprise a new class of molecules that induce anabolic effects with fewer side effects than those of other anabolic agents. We previously reported that the novel SARM S-101479 had a tissue-selective bone anabolic effect with diminished side effects in female animals. However, the mechanism of its tissue selectivity is not well known. In this report, we show that S-101479 increased alkaline phosphatase activity and androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cell lines in the same manner as the natural androgen ligand dihydrotestosterone (DHT); conversely, stimulation of AR dimerization was very low compared with that of DHT (34.4%). S-101479 increased bone mineral content in ovariectomized rats without promoting endometrial proliferation. Yeast two-hybrid interaction assays revealed that DHT promoted recruitment of numerous cofactors to AR such as TIF2, SRC1, β-catenin, NCoA3, gelsolin and PROX1 in a dose-dependent manner. SARMs induced recruitment of fewer cofactors than DHT; in particular, S-101479 failed to induce recruitment of canonical p160 coactivators such as SRC1, TIF2 and notably NCoA3 but only stimulated binding of AR to gelsolin and PROX1. The results suggest that a full capability of the AR to dimerize and to effectively and unselectively recruit all canonical cofactors is not a prerequisite for transcriptional activity in osteoblastic cells and resulting anabolic effects in bone tissues. Instead, few relevant cofactors might be sufficient to promote AR activity in these tissues.

  4. Tissue-specific patterning of host innate immune responses by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

    PubMed

    Becker, Russell E N; Berube, Bryan J; Sampedro, Georgia R; DeDent, Andrea C; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory cytotoxins are prominent virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial sepsis, skin infection, and pneumonia. S. aureus α-toxin is a pore-forming toxin that utilizes a widely expressed receptor, ADAM10, to injure the host epithelium, endothelium, and immune cells. As each host tissue is characterized by a unique composition of resident cells and recruited immune cells, the outcome of α-toxin-mediated injury may depend on the infected tissue environment. Utilizing myeloid lineage-specific Adam10 knockout mice, we show that α-toxin exerts tissue-specific effects on innate immunity to staphylococcal infection. Loss of ADAM10 expression exacerbates skin infection, yet affords protection against lethal pneumonia. These diverse outcomes are not related to altered immune cell recruitment, but rather correlate with a defect in toxin-induced IL-1β production. Extension of these studies through analysis of ADAM10 double-knockout mice affecting both the myeloid lineage and either the skin or lung epithelium highlight the prominence of toxin-induced injury to the epithelium in governing the outcome of infection. Together, these studies provide evidence of tissue specificity of pore-forming cytotoxin action in the modulation of host immunity, and illustrate that the outcome of infection is a collective manifestation of all effects of the toxin within the tissue microenvironment.

  5. Tissue-specific Patterning of the Host Innate Immune Response by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Russell E. N.; Berube, Bryan J.; Sampedro, Georgia R.; DeDent, Andrea C.; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory cytotoxins are prominent virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial sepsis, skin infection, and pneumonia. S. aureus α-toxin is a pore-forming toxin that utilizes a widely-expressed receptor, ADAM10, to injure the host epithelium, endothelium, and immune cells. As each host tissue is characterized by a unique composition of resident cells and recruited immune cells, the outcome of α-toxin-mediated injury may depend on the infected tissue environment. Utilizing myeloid lineage-specific Adam10 knockout mice, we show that α-toxin exerts tissue-specific effects on innate immunity to staphylococcal infection. Loss of ADAM10 expression exacerbates skin infection, yet affords protection against lethal pneumonia. These diverse outcomes are not related to altered immune cell recruitment, but rather correlate with a defect in toxin-induced IL-1β production. Extension of these studies through analysis of ADAM10 double knockout mice affecting both the myeloid lineage and either the skin or lung epithelium highlight the prominence of toxin-induced injury to the epithelium in governing the outcome of infection. Together, these studies provide evidence of tissue specificity of pore-forming cytotoxin action in modulation of host immunity, and illustrate that the outcome of infection is a collective manifestation of all effects of the toxin within the tissue microenvironment. PMID:24820433

  6. Characterization of the Promoter Regions of Two Sheep Keratin-Associated Protein Genes for Hair Cortex-Specific Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhichao; Liu, Guangbin; Li, Xinyun; Huang, Ji; Xiao, Yujing; Du, Xiaoyong; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are the structural proteins of hair fibers and are thought to play an important role in determining the physical properties of hair fibers. These proteins are activated in a striking sequential and spatial pattern in the keratinocytes of hair fibers. Thus, it is important to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the specific transcriptional activity of these genes. In this study, sheep KRTAP 3-3 and KRTAP11-1 genes were found to be highly expressed in wool follicles in a tissue-specific manner. Subsequently, the promoter regions of the two genes that contained the 5' flanking/5' untranslated regions and the coding regions were cloned. Using an in vivo transgenic approach, we found that the promoter regions from the two genes exhibited transcriptional activity in hair fibers. A much stronger and more uniformly expressed green fluorescent signal was observed in the KRTAP11-1-ZsGreen1 transgenic mice. In situ hybridization revealed the symmetrical expression of sheep KRTAP11-1 in the entire wool cortex. Consistently, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the pattern of ZsGreen1 expression in the hair cortex of transgenic mice matches that of the endogenous KRTAP11-1 gene, indicating that the cloned promoter region contains elements that are sufficient to govern the wool cortex-specific transcription of KRTAP11-1. Furthermore, regulatory regions in the 5' upstream sequence of the sheep KRTAP11-1 gene that may regulate the observed hair keratinocyte specificity were identified using in vivo reporter assays. PMID:27100288

  7. Characterization of the Promoter Regions of Two Sheep Keratin-Associated Protein Genes for Hair Cortex-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhichao; Liu, Guangbin; Li, Xinyun; Huang, Ji; Xiao, Yujing; Du, Xiaoyong; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are the structural proteins of hair fibers and are thought to play an important role in determining the physical properties of hair fibers. These proteins are activated in a striking sequential and spatial pattern in the keratinocytes of hair fibers. Thus, it is important to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the specific transcriptional activity of these genes. In this study, sheep KRTAP 3–3 and KRTAP11-1 genes were found to be highly expressed in wool follicles in a tissue-specific manner. Subsequently, the promoter regions of the two genes that contained the 5′ flanking/5′ untranslated regions and the coding regions were cloned. Using an in vivo transgenic approach, we found that the promoter regions from the two genes exhibited transcriptional activity in hair fibers. A much stronger and more uniformly expressed green fluorescent signal was observed in the KRTAP11-1-ZsGreen1 transgenic mice. In situ hybridization revealed the symmetrical expression of sheep KRTAP11-1 in the entire wool cortex. Consistently, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the pattern of ZsGreen1 expression in the hair cortex of transgenic mice matches that of the endogenous KRTAP11-1 gene, indicating that the cloned promoter region contains elements that are sufficient to govern the wool cortex-specific transcription of KRTAP11-1. Furthermore, regulatory regions in the 5′ upstream sequence of the sheep KRTAP11-1 gene that may regulate the observed hair keratinocyte specificity were identified using in vivo reporter assays. PMID:27100288

  8. Characterization of the Promoter Regions of Two Sheep Keratin-Associated Protein Genes for Hair Cortex-Specific Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhichao; Liu, Guangbin; Li, Xinyun; Huang, Ji; Xiao, Yujing; Du, Xiaoyong; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are the structural proteins of hair fibers and are thought to play an important role in determining the physical properties of hair fibers. These proteins are activated in a striking sequential and spatial pattern in the keratinocytes of hair fibers. Thus, it is important to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the specific transcriptional activity of these genes. In this study, sheep KRTAP 3-3 and KRTAP11-1 genes were found to be highly expressed in wool follicles in a tissue-specific manner. Subsequently, the promoter regions of the two genes that contained the 5' flanking/5' untranslated regions and the coding regions were cloned. Using an in vivo transgenic approach, we found that the promoter regions from the two genes exhibited transcriptional activity in hair fibers. A much stronger and more uniformly expressed green fluorescent signal was observed in the KRTAP11-1-ZsGreen1 transgenic mice. In situ hybridization revealed the symmetrical expression of sheep KRTAP11-1 in the entire wool cortex. Consistently, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the pattern of ZsGreen1 expression in the hair cortex of transgenic mice matches that of the endogenous KRTAP11-1 gene, indicating that the cloned promoter region contains elements that are sufficient to govern the wool cortex-specific transcription of KRTAP11-1. Furthermore, regulatory regions in the 5' upstream sequence of the sheep KRTAP11-1 gene that may regulate the observed hair keratinocyte specificity were identified using in vivo reporter assays.

  9. Chronic Alcohol Consumption Leads to a Tissue Specific Expression of Uncoupling Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Graw, Jan A.; von Haefen, Clarissa; Poyraz, Deniz; Möbius, Nadine; Sifringer, Marco; Spies, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are anion channels that can decouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain. "Mild uncoupling" of internal respiration reduces free radical production and oxidative cell stress. Chronic alcohol consumption is a potent inducer of oxidative stress in multiple tissues and regulates UCP-2 and -4 expression in the brain. To analyse the impact of chronic alcohol intake on UCP-2 expression in tissues with high endogenous UCP-2 contents, male Wistar rats (n=34) were treated with a 12-week 5% alcohol diet. In the lungs and the spleen of rats with a chronic alcohol diet cytochrome c release from mitochondria was significantly increased. Both organs did not show any altered gene and protein expression of UCP-2. Different to cerebral tissue chronic alcohol consumption has no regulatory effect on UCP-2 gene and protein expression in organs with a high endogenous UCP-2 content. Therefore, chronic alcohol consumption leads to a tissue specific expression of UCP-2. PMID:26664262

  10. Chronic Alcohol Consumption Leads to a Tissue Specific Expression of Uncoupling Protein-2.

    PubMed

    Graw, Jan A; von Haefen, Clarissa; Poyraz, Deniz; Möbius, Nadine; Sifringer, Marco; Spies, Claudia D

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are anion channels that can decouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain. "Mild uncoupling" of internal respiration reduces free radical production and oxidative cell stress. Chronic alcohol consumption is a potent inducer of oxidative stress in multiple tissues and regulates UCP-2 and -4 expression in the brain. To analyse the impact of chronic alcohol intake on UCP-2 expression in tissues with high endogenous UCP-2 contents, male Wistar rats (n=34) were treated with a 12-week 5% alcohol diet. In the lungs and the spleen of rats with a chronic alcohol diet cytochrome c release from mitochondria was significantly increased. Both organs did not show any altered gene and protein expression of UCP-2. Different to cerebral tissue chronic alcohol consumption has no regulatory effect on UCP-2 gene and protein expression in organs with a high endogenous UCP-2 content. Therefore, chronic alcohol consumption leads to a tissue specific expression of UCP-2. PMID:26664262

  11. Integrated interactions database: tissue-specific view of the human and model organism interactomes.

    PubMed

    Kotlyar, Max; Pastrello, Chiara; Sheahan, Nicholas; Jurisica, Igor

    2016-01-01

    IID (Integrated Interactions Database) is the first database providing tissue-specific protein-protein interactions (PPIs) for model organisms and human. IID covers six species (S. cerevisiae (yeast), C. elegans (worm), D. melonogaster (fly), R. norvegicus (rat), M. musculus (mouse) and H. sapiens (human)) and up to 30 tissues per species. Users query IID by providing a set of proteins or PPIs from any of these organisms, and specifying species and tissues where IID should search for interactions. If query proteins are not from the selected species, IID enables searches across species and tissues automatically by using their orthologs; for example, retrieving interactions in a given tissue, conserved in human and mouse. Interaction data in IID comprises three types of PPI networks: experimentally detected PPIs from major databases, orthologous PPIs and high-confidence computationally predicted PPIs. Interactions are assigned to tissues where their proteins pairs or encoding genes are expressed. IID is a major replacement of the I2D interaction database, with larger PPI networks (a total of 1,566,043 PPIs among 68,831 proteins), tissue annotations for interactions, and new query, analysis and data visualization capabilities. IID is available at http://ophid.utoronto.ca/iid.

  12. Chromatin immunoprecipitation from fixed clinical tissues reveals tumor-specific enhancer profiles.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Paloma; Li, Lewyn; O'Neill, Nicholas K; Duarte, Melissa; Rao, Prakash; Bowden, Michaela; Zhou, Chensheng W; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Feliu, Jaime; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Guadalajara, Héctor; Moreno, Víctor; García-Olmo, Damián; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Mullane, Stephanie; Hirsch, Michelle; Sweeney, Christopher J; Richardson, Andrea; Liu, X Shirley; Brown, Myles; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Long, Henry W

    2016-06-01

    Extensive cross-linking introduced during routine tissue fixation of clinical pathology specimens severely hampers chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis from archived tissue samples. This limits the ability to study the epigenomes of valuable, clinically annotated tissue resources. Here we describe fixed-tissue chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (FiT-seq), a method that enables reliable extraction of soluble chromatin from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for accurate detection of histone marks. We demonstrate that FiT-seq data from FFPE specimens are concordant with ChIP-seq data from fresh-frozen samples of the same tumors. By using multiple histone marks, we generate chromatin-state maps and identify cis-regulatory elements in clinical samples from various tumor types that can readily allow us to distinguish between cancers by the tissue of origin. Tumor-specific enhancers and superenhancers that are elucidated by FiT-seq analysis correlate with known oncogenic drivers in different tissues and can assist in the understanding of how chromatin states affect gene regulation. PMID:27111282

  13. Equal modulation of endothelial cell function by four distinct tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate multiple end-stage mesenchymal cell types and constitute a promising population of cells for regenerative therapies. Additionally, there is increasing evidence supporting other trophic activities of MSCs, including the ability to enable formation of vasculature in vivo. Although MSCs were originally isolated from the bone marrow, the presence of these cells in the stromal vascular fraction of multiple adult tissues has been recently recognized. However, it is unknown whether the capacity to modulate vasculogenesis is ubiquitous to all MSCs regardless of their tissue of origin. Here, we demonstrated that tissue-resident MSCs isolated from four distinct tissues have equal capacity to modulate endothelial cell function, including formation of vascular networks in vivo. MSCs were isolated from four murine tissues, including bone marrow, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. In culture, all four MSC populations secreted a plethora of pro-angiogenic factors that unequivocally induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). In vivo, co-implantation of MSCs with ECFCs into mice generated an extensive network of blood vessels with ECFCs specifically lining the lumens and MSCs occupying perivascular positions. Importantly, there were no differences among all four MSCs evaluated. Our studies suggest that the capacity to modulate the formation of vasculature is a ubiquitous property of all MSCs, irrespective of their original anatomical location. These results validate multiple tissues as potential sources of MSCs for future cell-based vascular therapies.

  14. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Liu, Jinze; MacLeod, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6%) were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3%) were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression. PMID:26713731

  15. Multiple tissue response modifiers to promote angiogenesis and prevent the foreign body reaction around subcutaneous implants.

    PubMed

    Kastellorizios, Michail; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Burgess, Diane J

    2015-09-28

    Dexamethasone-releasing PLGA poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microsphere/PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) hydrogel composite coatings have been shown to prevent the foreign body reaction (FBR) to subcutaneous implants in small and large animal models. Such coatings were developed to extend the lifetime of implantable biosensors. However, long-term exposure of tissue to low levels of dexamethasone results in a reduction in blood vessel density due to the anti-angiogenic effect of dexamethasone. This mild effect, while not threatening to the subject's health, may interfere with analyte detection and the sensor response time over the long-term. The present work is focused on the development of coatings that deliver combinations of three tissue response modifiers (TRMs): dexamethasone, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and PDGF (platelet derived growth factor). Dexamethasone, VEGF and PDGF prevent the FBR, increase angiogenesis and promote blood vessel maturation (which increases blood flow), respectively. To minimize any potential interference among these three TRMs (for example, PDGF increases fibrosis), the relative doses of dexamethasone, VEGF and PDGF were adjusted. It was determined that: a) all three TRMs are required for maximum promotion of angiogenesis, blood vessel maturation and prevention of the FBR; b) VEGF has to be administered at higher doses than PDGF; c) an increase in dexamethasone dosing must be accompanied by a proportional increase in growth factor dosing; and d) modification of the TRM ratio can achieve a constant capillary density throughout the implantation period which is important for applications such as biosensors to maintain sensitivity and a stable sensor baseline. Moreover, an osmosis-driven process for encapsulation of proteins in PLGA microspheres that showed low burst release was developed. PMID:26216396

  16. Sex- and tissue-specific functions of Drosophila doublesex transcription factor target genes.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Jimenez, Erin; Kim, Yoo-Ah; Whitworth, Cale; Neville, Megan C; Hempel, Leonie U; Pavlou, Hania J; Chen, Zhen-Xia; Sturgill, David; Dale, Ryan K; Smith, Harold E; Przytycka, Teresa M; Goodwin, Stephen F; Van Doren, Mark; Oliver, Brian

    2014-12-22

    Primary sex-determination "switches" evolve rapidly, but Doublesex (DSX)-related transcription factors (DMRTs) act downstream of these switches to control sexual development in most animal species. Drosophila dsx encodes female- and male-specific isoforms (DSX(F) and DSX(M)), but little is known about how dsx controls sexual development, whether DSX(F) and DSX(M) bind different targets, or how DSX proteins direct different outcomes in diverse tissues. We undertook genome-wide analyses to identify DSX targets using in vivo occupancy, binding site prediction, and evolutionary conservation. We find that DSX(F) and DSX(M) bind thousands of the same targets in multiple tissues in both sexes, yet these targets have sex- and tissue-specific functions. Interestingly, DSX targets show considerable overlap with targets identified for mouse DMRT1. DSX targets include transcription factors and signaling pathway components providing for direct and indirect regulation of sex-biased expression.

  17. Highly parallel assays of tissue-specific enhancers in whole Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Barrera, Luis A.; Porsch, Martin; Aboukhalil, Anton; Estep, Preston W.; Vedenko, Anastasia; Palagi, Alexandre; Kim, Yongsok; Zhu, Xianmin; Busser, Brian W.; Gamble, Caitlin E.; Iagovitina, Antonina; Singhania, Aditi; Michelson, Alan M.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are a primary mechanism by which tissue-specific gene expression is achieved. Despite the importance of these regulatory elements in development, responses to environmental stresses, and disease, testing enhancer activity in animals remains tedious, with a minority of enhancers having been characterized. Here, we have developed ‘enhancer-FACS-Seq’ (eFS) technology for highly parallel identification of active, tissue-specific enhancers in Drosophila embryos. Analysis of enhancers identified by eFS to be active in mesodermal tissues revealed enriched DNA binding site motifs of known and putative, novel mesodermal transcription factors (TFs). Naïve Bayes classifiers using TF binding site motifs accurately predicted mesodermal enhancer activity. Application of eFS to other cell types and organisms should accelerate the cataloging of enhancers and understanding how transcriptional regulation is encoded within them. PMID:23852450

  18. GLITTER: a web-based application for gene link inspection through tissue-specific coexpression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangtao; Yu, Pengfei; Cheng, Chao; Potash, James B.; Han, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the polygenic nature of most complex diseases, suggesting the involvement of many susceptibility genes with small effect sizes. Although hundreds of genes may underlie the genetic architecture of complex diseases, those involved in a given disease are probably not randomly distributed, but likely to be functionally related. Protein-protein interaction networks have been used to evaluate the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes. However, these networks do not account for tissue specificity, are limited to protein-coding genes, and are typically biased by incomplete biological knowledge. Here, we present Gene Link Inspector Through Tissue-specific coExpRession (GLITTER), a web-based application for assessing the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes, either coding or noncoding, according to tissue-specific gene expression profiles. GLITTER can also shed light on the specific tissues in which susceptibility genes might exert their functions. We further demonstrate examples of how GLITTER can evaluate the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes underlying schizophrenia and breast cancer, and provide clues about etiology. PMID:27623690

  19. GLITTER: a web-based application for gene link inspection through tissue-specific coexpression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangtao; Yu, Pengfei; Cheng, Chao; Potash, James B; Han, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the polygenic nature of most complex diseases, suggesting the involvement of many susceptibility genes with small effect sizes. Although hundreds of genes may underlie the genetic architecture of complex diseases, those involved in a given disease are probably not randomly distributed, but likely to be functionally related. Protein-protein interaction networks have been used to evaluate the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes. However, these networks do not account for tissue specificity, are limited to protein-coding genes, and are typically biased by incomplete biological knowledge. Here, we present Gene Link Inspector Through Tissue-specific coExpRession (GLITTER), a web-based application for assessing the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes, either coding or noncoding, according to tissue-specific gene expression profiles. GLITTER can also shed light on the specific tissues in which susceptibility genes might exert their functions. We further demonstrate examples of how GLITTER can evaluate the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes underlying schizophrenia and breast cancer, and provide clues about etiology.

  20. GLITTER: a web-based application for gene link inspection through tissue-specific coexpression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangtao; Yu, Pengfei; Cheng, Chao; Potash, James B; Han, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the polygenic nature of most complex diseases, suggesting the involvement of many susceptibility genes with small effect sizes. Although hundreds of genes may underlie the genetic architecture of complex diseases, those involved in a given disease are probably not randomly distributed, but likely to be functionally related. Protein-protein interaction networks have been used to evaluate the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes. However, these networks do not account for tissue specificity, are limited to protein-coding genes, and are typically biased by incomplete biological knowledge. Here, we present Gene Link Inspector Through Tissue-specific coExpRession (GLITTER), a web-based application for assessing the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes, either coding or noncoding, according to tissue-specific gene expression profiles. GLITTER can also shed light on the specific tissues in which susceptibility genes might exert their functions. We further demonstrate examples of how GLITTER can evaluate the functional relatedness of susceptibility genes underlying schizophrenia and breast cancer, and provide clues about etiology. PMID:27623690

  1. Quality assessment and control of tissue specific RNA-seq libraries of Drosophila transgenic RNAi models.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Andreia J; Brito, Francisco F; Chobanyan, Tamar; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Yokokura, Takakazu; Van Vactor, David; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is rapidly emerging as the technology of choice for whole-transcriptome studies. However, RNA-seq is not a bias free technique. It requires large amounts of RNA and library preparation can introduce multiple artifacts, compounded by problems from later stages in the process. Nevertheless, RNA-seq is increasingly used in multiple studies, including the characterization of tissue-specific transcriptomes from invertebrate models of human disease. The generation of samples in this context is complex, involving the establishment of mutant strains and the delicate contamination prone process of dissecting the target tissue. Moreover, in order to achieve the required amount of RNA, multiple samples need to be pooled. Such datasets pose extra challenges due to the large variability that may occur between similar pools, mostly due to the presence of cells from surrounding tissues. Therefore, in addition to standard quality control of RNA-seq data, analytical procedures for control of "biological quality" are critical for successful comparison of gene expression profiles. In this study, the transcriptome of the central nervous system (CNS) of a Drosophila transgenic strain with neuronal-specific RNAi of an ubiquitous gene was profiled using RNA-seq. After observing the existence of an unusual variance in our dataset, we showed that the expression profile of a small panel of marker genes, including GAL4 under control of a tissue specific driver, can identify libraries with low levels of contamination from neighboring tissues, enabling the selection of a robust dataset for differential expression analysis. We further analyzed the potential of profiling a complex tissue to identify cell-type specific changes in response to target gene down-regulation. Finally, we showed that trimming 5' ends of reads decreases nucleotide frequency biases, increasing the coverage of protein coding genes with a potential positive impact in the incurrence of systematic

  2. CD4(+) lymphoid tissue-inducer cells promote innate immunity in the gut.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Monticelli, Laurel A; Elloso, M Merle; Fouser, Lynette A; Artis, David

    2011-01-28

    Fetal CD4(+) lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells play a critical role in the development of lymphoid tissues. Recent studies identified that LTi cells persist in adults and are related to a heterogeneous population of innate lymphoid cells that have been implicated in inflammatory responses. However, whether LTi cells contribute to protective immunity remains poorly defined. We demonstrate that after infection with Citrobacter rodentium, CD4(+) LTi cells were a dominant source of interleukin-22 (IL-22) early during infection. Infection-induced CD4(+) LTi cell responses were IL-23 dependent, and ablation of IL-23 impaired innate immunity. Further, depletion of CD4(+) LTi cells abrogated infection-induced expression of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptides, resulting in exacerbated host mortality. LTi cells were also found to be essential for host protective immunity in lymphocyte-replete hosts. Collectively these data demonstrate that adult CD4(+) LTi cells are a critical source of IL-22 and identify a previously unrecognized function for CD4(+) LTi cells in promoting innate immunity in the intestine.

  3. Curcumin promotes browning of white adipose tissue in a norepinephrine-dependent way.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Wang, Xiuchao; Ye, Zichen; Xu, Chengming; Zhang, Ming; Ruan, Banjun; Wei, Ming; Jiang, Yinghao; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Li; Lei, Xiaoying; Lu, Zifan

    2015-10-16

    Brown adipose tissue converts energy from food into heat via the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP1, defending against cold. In some conditions, inducible 'brown-like' adipocytes, also known as beige adipocytes, can develop within white adipose tissue (WAT). These beige adipocytes have characteristics similar to classical brown adipocytes and thus can burn lipids to produce heat. In the current study, we demonstrated that curcumin (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) decreased bodyweight and fat mass without affecting food intake in mice. We further demonstrated that curcumin improves cold tolerance in mice. This effect was possibly mediated by the emergence of beige adipocytes and the increase of thermogenic gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in inguinal WAT. In addition, curcumin promotes β3AR gene expression in inguinal WAT and elevates the levels of plasma norepinephrine, a hormone that can induce WAT browning. Taken together, our data suggest that curcumin can potentially prevent obesity by inducing browning of inguinal WAT via the norepinephrine-β3AR pathway.

  4. Organ-specific gene expression: the bHLH protein Sage provides tissue specificity to Drosophila FoxA.

    PubMed

    Fox, Rebecca M; Vaishnavi, Aria; Maruyama, Rika; Andrew, Deborah J

    2013-05-01

    FoxA transcription factors play major roles in organ-specific gene expression, regulating, for example, glucagon expression in the pancreas, GLUT2 expression in the liver, and tyrosine hydroxylase expression in dopaminergic neurons. Organ-specific gene regulation by FoxA proteins is achieved through cooperative regulation with a broad array of transcription factors with more limited expression domains. Fork head (Fkh), the sole Drosophila FoxA family member, is required for the development of multiple distinct organs, yet little is known regarding how Fkh regulates tissue-specific gene expression. Here, we characterize Sage, a bHLH transcription factor expressed exclusively in the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). We show that Sage is required for late SG survival and normal tube morphology. We find that many Sage targets, identified by microarray analysis, encode SG-specific secreted cargo, transmembrane proteins, and the enzymes that modify these proteins. We show that both Sage and Fkh are required for the expression of Sage target genes, and that co-expression of Sage and Fkh is sufficient to drive target gene expression in multiple cell types. Sage and Fkh drive expression of the bZip transcription factor Senseless (Sens), which boosts expression of Sage-Fkh targets, and Sage, Fkh and Sens colocalize on SG chromosomes. Importantly, expression of Sage-Fkh target genes appears to simply add to the tissue-specific gene expression programs already established in other cell types, and Sage and Fkh cannot alter the fate of most embryonic cell types even when expressed early and continuously.

  5. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J.; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration. PMID:25136093

  6. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nisarg J; Hyder, Md Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration.

  7. Development of functionalized nanodiamond fluorescence detection platform: Analysis the specific promoter regulated by p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Diansyue; Chu, Hsueh-Liang; Chuang, Hung; Lu, Yu-Ning; Ho, Li-Ping; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Hsu, Ming-Hua; Chang, Chia-Ching

    2014-03-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) is one of the biocompatible nanomaterials with large tunable surface for chemical modification. It possesses unique mechanical, spectroscopy, and thermal properties. It is an excellent molecular vehicle to deliver specific molecules in biological system. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a protein that emits strong green fluorescence when it is excited by ultra-violet to blue light. It makes GFP a good indicator. By combining ND-GFP, a visible biocompatible delivery system will be developed. p53 is a tumor suppressor protein encoded by the TP53 gene. P53 plays an important role in apoptosis, genomic stability, and inhibition of angiogenesis by interacting with specific DNA sequence of promoter of related genes. In this study, a p53 functionalized ND-GFP will be developed. This complex can recognize the specific DNA sequence of promoter and the intermolecular interactions can be monitored directly by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy both in vivo and in vitro.

  8. Co-cultured tissue-specific scaffolds for tendon/bone interface engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bumgardner, Joel D; Cole, Judith A; Smith, Richard A; Haggard, Warren O

    2014-01-01

    The tendon/ligament-to-bone interface has a complex organization to enable transfer of forces through the tendon/ligament to the bone. The purpose of this study is to create a co-culture environment enabling a tissue-specific tendon region and tissue-specific bone region on a degradable scaffold, using NIH 3T3 fibroblast–deposited extracellular matrix and MC 3T3 osteoblast–deposited extracellular matrix, respectively. Before full characterization of the deposited extracellular matrix coating can be analyzed, co-culture parameters including culture medium and seeding technique should be addressed. An appropriate medium formulation was developed to reduce fibroblast to osteoblast mineralization by adjusting beta-glycerophosphate concentrations. Standard growth medium with fetal bovine serum + 3 mM beta-glycerophosphate + 25 µg/mL ascorbic acid was found to be the most suitable formulation evaluated in these study conditions. Seeding and cell migration studies of co-cultured fibroblast- and osteoblast-specific scaffolds were performed to identify whether tissue regions could be created on the scaffold. Fibroblast and osteoblast regions were successfully seeded and little to no cell migration was observed up to 42 h after seeding. Finally, a preliminary analysis of basic extracellular matrix components was measured in the fibroblast, osteoblast, and transition regions. Tissue-specific DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen were found in uniform amounts on the scaffolds and were not different significantly between scaffold regions. In conclusion, initial steps to create tissue-specific fibroblast and osteoblast regions on a degradable scaffold were successful in preparation for further characterization investigations as a tendon-to-bone interface scaffold. PMID:25383167

  9. Co-cultured tissue-specific scaffolds for tendon/bone interface engineering.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jared O; Bumgardner, Joel D; Cole, Judith A; Smith, Richard A; Haggard, Warren O

    2014-01-01

    The tendon/ligament-to-bone interface has a complex organization to enable transfer of forces through the tendon/ligament to the bone. The purpose of this study is to create a co-culture environment enabling a tissue-specific tendon region and tissue-specific bone region on a degradable scaffold, using NIH 3T3 fibroblast-deposited extracellular matrix and MC 3T3 osteoblast-deposited extracellular matrix, respectively. Before full characterization of the deposited extracellular matrix coating can be analyzed, co-culture parameters including culture medium and seeding technique should be addressed. An appropriate medium formulation was developed to reduce fibroblast to osteoblast mineralization by adjusting beta-glycerophosphate concentrations. Standard growth medium with fetal bovine serum + 3 mM beta-glycerophosphate + 25 µg/mL ascorbic acid was found to be the most suitable formulation evaluated in these study conditions. Seeding and cell migration studies of co-cultured fibroblast- and osteoblast-specific scaffolds were performed to identify whether tissue regions could be created on the scaffold. Fibroblast and osteoblast regions were successfully seeded and little to no cell migration was observed up to 42 h after seeding. Finally, a preliminary analysis of basic extracellular matrix components was measured in the fibroblast, osteoblast, and transition regions. Tissue-specific DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen were found in uniform amounts on the scaffolds and were not different significantly between scaffold regions. In conclusion, initial steps to create tissue-specific fibroblast and osteoblast regions on a degradable scaffold were successful in preparation for further characterization investigations as a tendon-to-bone interface scaffold.

  10. Construction of efficient, tuber-specific, and cold-inducible promoters in potato.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Xie, Conghua; Song, Botao; Ou, Yongbin; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Xun; Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Promoter activity is crucial for precise gene expression. Previously, a synthetic tuber-specific and cold-inducible promoter, pCL, containing a C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element (CRT/DRE) cassette and a tuber-specific fragment, was constructed in order to regulate cold-induced sweetening (CIS) in potatoes. However, the utility of pCL is limited due to its low activity. To improve its inducibility in response to low temperatures, we modified the CRT/DRE and flanking sequences. In particular, promoter activity was significantly improved by site-specific mutation of flanking sequences next to the core element (CCGAC) of CRT/DRE. We also inserted a modified CRT/DRE cassette into pCL; although this enhanced activity, it was not more effective than mutation of the flanking sequences. Indeed, up to 20-fold enhanced pCL activity could be achieved by replacing the CRT/DRE cassette in pCL with tandem repeats of two mutated CRT/DRE cassettes. This improvement was due to an enhanced affinity between the CRT/DRE cassette(s) and the StCBF1 transcription factor. Together, these data suggest that altering the structure of CRT/DRE can enhance CBF-related transcription complex formation and thus improve the activity of this cold-inducible promoter.

  11. The Suppressor of Hairy-Wing Protein Regulates the Tissue-Specific Expression of the Drosophila Gypsy Retrotransposon

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P. A.; Corces, V. G.

    1995-01-01

    The gypsy retrotransposon of Drosophila melanogaster causes mutations that show temporal and tissue-specific phenotypes. These mutant phenotypes can be reversed by mutations in su(Hw), a gene that also regulates the transcription of the gypsy element. Gypsy encodes a full-length 7.0-kb RNA that is expressed in the salivary gland precursors and fat body of the embryo, imaginal discs and fat body of larvae, and fat body and ovaries of adult females. The su(Hw)-binding region inserted upstream of the promoter of a lacZ reporter gene can induce β-galactosidase expression in a subset of the embryonic and larval tissues where gypsy is normally transcribed. This expression is dependent on the presence of a functional su(Hw) product, suggesting that this protein is a positive activator of gypsy transcription. Flies transformed with a construct in which the 5' LTR and leader sequences of gypsy are fused to lacZ show β-galactosidase expression in all tissues where gypsy is normally expressed, indicating that sequences other than the su(Hw)-binding site are required for proper spatial and temporal expression of gypsy. Mutations in the zinc fingers of su(Hw) affect its ability to bind DNA and to induce transcription of the lacZ reporter gene. Two other structural domains of su(Hw) also play an important role in transcriptional regulation of gypsy. Deletion of the amino-terminal acidic domain results in the loss of lacZ expression in larval fat body and adult ovaries, whereas mutations in the leucine zipper region result in an increase of lacZ expression in larval fat body and a decrease in adult ovaries. These effects might be the result of interactions of su(Hw) with activator and repressor proteins through the acidic and leucine zipper domains to produce the final pattern of tissue-specific expression of gypsy. PMID:7705625

  12. Unexpected Roles for Core Promoter Recognition Factors in Cell-type Specific Transcription and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, the eukaryotic core promoter recognition complex was generally thought to play an essential but passive role in the regulation of gene expression. However, recent evidence indicates that core-promoter recognition complexes in conjunction with “non-prototypic” subunits may play a critical regulatory role in driving cell specific programs of transcription during development. Furthermore, new roles for components of these complexes have been identified beyond development, for example in mediating interactions with chromatin and in maintaining active gene expression across cell divisions. PMID:20628347

  13. Molecular basis of RNA polymerase promoter specificity switch revealed through studies of Thermus bacteriophage transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Lopatina, Anna; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the central point of gene expression regulation. Understanding of molecular mechanism of transcription regulation requires, ultimately, the structural understanding of consequences of transcription factors binding to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme of transcription. We recently determined a structure of a complex between transcription factor gp39 encoded by a Thermus bacteriophage and Thermus RNAP holoenzyme. In this addendum to the original publication, we highlight structural insights that explain the ability of gp39 to act as an RNAP specificity switch which inhibits transcription initiation from a major class of bacterial promoters, while allowing transcription from a minor promoter class to continue. PMID:25105059

  14. Regulation of tissue-specific expression of SPATULA, a bHLH gene involved in carpel development, seedling germination, and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Groszmann, Michael; Bylstra, Yasmin; Lampugnani, Edwin R; Smyth, David R

    2010-03-01

    SPATULA is a bHLH transcription factor that promotes growth of tissues arising from the carpel margins, including the septum and transmitting tract. It is also involved in repressing germination of newly harvested seeds, and in inhibiting cotyledon, leaf, and petal expansion. Using a reporter gene construct, its expression profile was fully defined. Consistent with its known functions, SPT was expressed in developing carpel margin tissues, and in the hypocotyls and cotyledons of germinating seedlings, and in developing leaves and petals. It was also strongly expressed in tissues where no functions have been identified to date, including the dehiscence zone of fruits, developing anthers, embryos, and in the epidermal initials and new stele of root tips. The promoter region of SPT was dissected by truncation and deletion, and two main regions occupied by tissue-specific enhancers were identified. These were correlated with eight regions conserved between promoter regions of Arabidopsis, Brassica oleracea, and Brassica rapa. When transformed into Arabidopsis, the B. oleracea promoter drove expression in reproductive tissues mostly comparable to the equivalent Arabidopsis promoter. There is genetic evidence that SPT function in the gynoecium is associated with the perception of auxin. However, site-directed mutagenesis of three putative auxin-response elements had no detectable effect on SPT expression patterns. Even so, disruption of a putative E-box variant adjacent to one of these resulted in a loss of valve dehiscence zone expression. This expression was also specifically lost in mutants of another bHLH gene INDEHISCENT, indicating that IND may directly regulate SPT expression through this variant E-box.

  15. Regulation of tissue-specific expression of SPATULA, a bHLH gene involved in carpel development, seedling germination, and lateral organ growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Groszmann, Michael; Bylstra, Yasmin; Lampugnani, Edwin R.; Smyth, David R.

    2010-01-01

    SPATULA is a bHLH transcription factor that promotes growth of tissues arising from the carpel margins, including the septum and transmitting tract. It is also involved in repressing germination of newly harvested seeds, and in inhibiting cotyledon, leaf, and petal expansion. Using a reporter gene construct, its expression profile was fully defined. Consistent with its known functions, SPT was expressed in developing carpel margin tissues, and in the hypocotyls and cotyledons of germinating seedlings, and in developing leaves and petals. It was also strongly expressed in tissues where no functions have been identified to date, including the dehiscence zone of fruits, developing anthers, embryos, and in the epidermal initials and new stele of root tips. The promoter region of SPT was dissected by truncation and deletion, and two main regions occupied by tissue-specific enhancers were identified. These were correlated with eight regions conserved between promoter regions of Arabidopsis, Brassica oleracea, and Brassica rapa. When transformed into Arabidopsis, the B. oleracea promoter drove expression in reproductive tissues mostly comparable to the equivalent Arabidopsis promoter. There is genetic evidence that SPT function in the gynoecium is associated with the perception of auxin. However, site-directed mutagenesis of three putative auxin-response elements had no detectable effect on SPT expression patterns. Even so, disruption of a putative E-box variant adjacent to one of these resulted in a loss of valve dehiscence zone expression. This expression was also specifically lost in mutants of another bHLH gene INDEHISCENT, indicating that IND may directly regulate SPT expression through this variant E-box. PMID:20176890

  16. Linear elastic properties of the facial soft tissues using an aspiration device: towards patient specific characterization.

    PubMed

    Luboz, V; Promayon, E; Payan, Y

    2014-11-01

    Biomechanical modeling of the facial soft tissue behavior is needed in aesthetic or maxillo-facial surgeries where the simulation of the bone displacements cannot accurately predict the visible outcome on the patient's face. Because these tissues have different nature and elastic properties across the face, depending on their thickness, and their content in fat or muscle, individualizing their mechanical parameters could increase the simulation accuracy. Using a specifically designed aspiration device, the facial soft tissues deformation is measured at four different locations (cheek, cheekbone, forehead, and lower lip) on 16 young subjects. The stiffness is estimated from the deformations generated by a set of negative pressures using an inverse analysis based on a Neo Hookean model. The initial Young's modulus of the cheek, cheekbone, forehead, and lower lip are respectively estimated to be 31.0 kPa±4.6, 34.9 kPa±6.6, 17.3 kPa±4.1, and 33.7 kPa±7.3. Significant intra-subject differences in tissue stiffness are highlighted by these estimations. They also show important inter-subject variability for some locations even when mean stiffness values show no statistical difference. This study stresses the importance of using a measurement device capable of evaluating the patient specific tissue stiffness during an intervention.

  17. Selection of cell-type specific antibodies on tissue-sections using phage display.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-08-01

    With the advent of modern technologies enabling single cell analysis, it has become clear that small sub-populations of cells or even single cells can drive the phenotypic appearance of tissue, both diseased and normal. Nucleic acid based technologies allowing single cell analysis has been faster to mature, while technologies aimed at analysing the proteome at a single cell level is still lacking behind, especially technologies which allow single cell analysis in tissue. Introducing methods, that allows such analysis, will pave the way for discovering new biomarkers with more clinical relevance, as these may be unique for microenvironments only present in tissue and will avoid artifacts introduced by in vitro studies. Here, we introduce a technology enabling biomarker identification on small sub-populations of cells within a tissue section. Phage antibody libraries are applied to the tissue sections, followed by washing to remove non-bound phage particles. To eliminate phage antibodies binding to antigens ubiquitously expressed and retrieve phage antibodies binding specifically to antigens expressed by the sub-population of cells, the area of interest is protected by a 'shadow stick'. The phage antibodies on the remaining areas on the slide are exposed to UV light, which introduces cross-links in the phage genome, thus rendering them non-replicable. In this work we applied the technology, guided by CD31 expressing endothelial cells, to isolate recombinant antibodies specifically binding biomarkers expressed either by the cell or in the microenvironment surrounding the endothelial cell.

  18. Selection of cell-type specific antibodies on tissue-sections using phage display

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Lykkemark, Simon; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of modern technologies enabling single cell analysis, it has become clear that small sub-populations of cells or even single cells can drive the phenotypic appearance of tissue, both diseased and normal. Nucleic acid based technologies allowing single cell analysis has been faster to mature, while technologies aimed at analysing the proteome at a single cell level is still lacking behind, especially technologies which allow single cell analysis in tissue. Introducing methods, that allows such analysis, will pave the way for discovering new biomarkers with more clinical relevance, as these may be unique for microenvironments only present in tissue and will avoid artifacts introduced by in vitro studies. Here, we introduce a technology enabling biomarker identification on small sub-populations of cells within a tissue section. Phage antibody libraries are applied to the tissue sections, followed by washing to remove non-bound phage particles. To eliminate phage antibodies binding to antigens ubiquitously expressed and retrieve phage antibodies binding specifically to antigens expressed by the sub-population of cells, the area of interest is protected by a ‘shadow stick’. The phage antibodies on the remaining areas on the slide are exposed to UV light, which introduces cross-links in the phage genome, thus rendering them non-replicable. In this work we applied the technology, guided by CD31 expressing endothelial cells, to isolate recombinant antibodies specifically binding biomarkers expressed either by the cell or in the microenvironment surrounding the endothelial cell. PMID:25808085

  19. Adipose tissue depot specific differences of PLIN protein content in endurance trained rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sofhia V; Turnbull, Patrick C; MacPherson, Rebecca E K

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue is classified as either white (WAT) or brown (BAT) and differs not only by anatomical location but also in function. WAT is the main source of stored energy and releases fatty acids in times of energy demand, whereas BAT plays a role in regulating non-shivering thermogenesis and oxidizes fatty acids released from the lipid droplet. The PLIN family of proteins has recently emerged as being integral in the regulation of fatty acid storage and release in adipose tissue. Previous work has demonstrated that PLIN protein content varies among adipose tissue depots, however an examination of endurance training-induced depot specific changes in PLIN protein expression has yet to be done. Male Sprague-dawley rats (n = 10) underwent 8-weeks of progressive treadmill training (18-25 m/min for 30-60 min at 10% incline) or remained sedentary as control. Following training, under isoflurane induced anesthesia epidydmal (eWAT), inguinal subcutaneous (iWAT) and intrascapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) was excised, and plasma was collected. Endurance training resulted in an increase in BAT PLIN5 and iWAT PLIN3 content, while there was no difference in PLIN protein content in endurance trained eWAT. Interestingly, endurance training resulted in a robust increase in ATGL and CGI-58 in eWAT alone. Together these results suggest the potential of a depot specific function of PLIN3 and PLIN5 in adipose tissue in response to endurance training. PMID:27386161

  20. Tissue Microbiome Profiling Identifies an Enrichment of Specific Enteric Bacteria in Opisthorchis viverrini Associated Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chng, Kern Rei; Chan, Sock Hoai; Ng, Amanda Hui Qi; Li, Chenhao; Jusakul, Apinya; Bertrand, Denis; Wilm, Andreas; Choo, Su Pin; Tan, Damien Meng Yew; Lim, Kiat Hon; Soetinko, Roy; Ong, Choon Kiat; Duda, Dan G; Dima, Simona; Popescu, Irinel; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Feng, Zhu; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Teh, Bin Tean; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Sopit; Bhudhisawasdi, Vajaraphongsa; Khuntikeo, Narong; Tan, Patrick; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Ngeow, Joanne; Nagarajan, Niranjan

    2016-06-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is the primary cancer of the bile duct system. The role of bile duct tissue microbiomes in CCA tumorigenesis is unestablished. To address this, sixty primary CCA tumors and matched normals, from both liver fluke (Opisthorchis viverrini) associated (OVa, n=28) and non-O. viverrini associated (non-OVa, n=32) cancers, were profiled using high-throughput 16S rRNA sequencing. A distinct, tissue-specific microbiome dominated by the bacterial families Dietziaceae, Pseudomonadaceae and Oxalobacteraceae was observed in bile duct tissues. Systemic perturbation of the microbiome was noted in tumor and paired normal samples (vs non-cancer normals) for several bacterial families with a significant increase in Stenotrophomonas species distinguishing tumors vs paired normals. Comparison of parasite associated (OVa) vs non-associated (non-OVa) groups identified enrichment for specific enteric bacteria (Bifidobacteriaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and Enterococcaceae). One of the enriched families, Bifidobacteriaceae, was found to be dominant in the O. viverrini microbiome, providing a mechanistic link to the parasite. Functional analysis and comparison of CCA microbiomes revealed higher potential for producing bile acids and ammonia in OVa tissues, linking the altered microbiota to carcinogenesis. These results define how the unique microbial communities resident in the bile duct, parasitic infections and the tissue microenvironment can influence each other, and contribute to cancer. PMID:27428430

  1. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  2. Both the constitutive Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S and tissue-specific AGAMOUS enhancers activate transcription autonomously in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of multiple enhancers and promoters within a single vector often provokes complicated mutual interaction and crosstalk, thereby, altering promoter specificity, which causes serious problems for precisely engineering gene function and agronomic traits in transgenic plants. Enhancer elem...

  3. Effective delivery of a nematode-repellent peptide using a root-cap-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Lilley, Catherine J; Wang, Dong; Atkinson, Howard J; Urwin, Peter E

    2011-02-01

    The potential of the MDK4-20 promoter of Arabidopsis thaliana to direct effective transgenic expression of a secreted nematode-repellent peptide was investigated. Its expression pattern was studied in both transgenic Arabidopsis and Solanum tuberosum (potato) plants. It directed root-specific β-glucuronidase expression in both species that was chiefly localized to cells of the root cap. Use of the fluorescent timer protein dsRED-E5 established that the MDK4-20 promoter remains active for longer than the commonly used constitutive promoter CaMV35S in separated potato root border cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines that expressed the nematode-repellent peptide under the control of either AtMDK4-20 or CaMV35S reduced the establishment of the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. The best line using the AtMDK4-20 promoter displayed a level of resistance >80%, comparable to that of lines using the CaMV35S promoter. In transgenic potato plants, 94.9 ± 0.8% resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida was achieved using the AtMDK4-20 promoter, compared with 34.4 ± 8.4% resistance displayed by a line expressing the repellent peptide from the CaMV35S promoter. These results establish the potential of the AtMDK4-20 promoter to limit expression of a repellent peptide whilst maintaining or even improving the efficacy of the cyst-nematode defence.

  4. Increase of AKR-specific sequences in tumor tissues of leukemic AKR mice.

    PubMed Central

    Berns, A; Jaenisch, R

    1976-01-01

    AKR mice produce, from shortly after birth, high titers of their endogenous Gross type murine leukemia virus, and develop a thymus-derived leukemia at 7-9 months of age. We show that this oncogenesis is accompanied by an increase in the number of AKR-specific DNA sequences in the tumor tissues, whereas the "non-target" organs are not affected. Sequence increase was determined by kinetic analysis of DNA reassociation using an AKR-murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-specific cDNA and also by hybridization with excess AKR cDNA. The AKR cDNA was selected to recognize AKR sequences without significant crossreaction with DNA sequences of other endogenous viruses. The results show that during the development of the leukemia, the number of AKR-MuLV-specific genes increases in tumor tissues by a factor of 1 1/2 to 2. PMID:181752

  5. Determination of /sup 35/S-aminoacyl-transfer ribonucleic acid specific radioactivity in small tissue samples

    SciTech Connect

    Samarel, A.M.; Ogunro, E.A.; Ferguson, A.G.; Lesch, M.

    1981-11-15

    Rate determination of protein synthesis utilizing tracer amino acid incorporation requires accurate assessment of the specific radioactivity of the labeled precursor aminoacyl-tRNA pool. Previously published methods presumably useful for the measurement of any aminoacyl-tRNA were unsuccessful when applied to (/sup 35/S)methionine, due to the unique chemical properties of this amino acid. Herein we describe modifications of these methods necessary for the measurement of /sup 35/S-aminoacyl-tRNA specific radioactivity from small tissue samples incubated in the presence of (/sup 35/S)methionine. The use of (/sup 35/S)methionine of high specific radioactivity enables analysis of the methionyl-tRNA from less than 100 mg of tissue. Conditions for optimal recovery of /sup 35/S-labeled dansyl-amino acid derivatives are presented and possible applications of this method are discussed.

  6. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  7. Light-regulated, tissue-specific immunophilins in a higher plant.

    PubMed

    Luan, S; Albers, M W; Schreiber, S L

    1994-02-01

    In addition to their application in organ transplantation, immunosuppressive drugs are valuable tools for studying signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Using affinity chromatography, we have purified immunosuppressive drug receptors (immunophilins) from fava bean. Proteins belonging to both major classes of the immunophilin family identified from animal sources [FK506- and rapamycin-binding proteins (FKBPs) and cyclophilins] were present in this higher plant. FKBP13, the most abundant FKBP family member in leaf tissues, was not detected in root tissues, whereas other FKBPs were present in both tissues. While the abundance of cyclophilin A in leaves was similar to that in roots, cyclophilin B/C was expressed at a much higher level in leaf tissues than in root tissues. Subcellular localization of immunophilins in mesophyll cells showed that chloroplasts contained FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C but not other members, which explains the preferential expression of these two proteins in leaves over roots. The abundance of chloroplast-localized immunophilins, FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C, was regulated by light. Although etiolated leaves produced detectable levels of cyclophilin B/C, they did not express FKBP13. Illumination of etiolated plants dramatically increased the expression of both FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C. The light-induced expression of FKBP13 is closely correlated with the accumulation of chlorophyll in the leaf tissue. Our findings suggest that FKBP13 and cyclophilin B/C may play a specific role in chloroplasts. PMID:7508125

  8. Tissue-Specific Evolution of Protein Coding Genes in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkova-Mostacci, Nadezda; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding genes evolve at different rates, and the influence of different parameters, from gene size to expression level, has been extensively studied. While in yeast gene expression level is the major causal factor of gene evolutionary rate, the situation is more complex in animals. Here we investigate these relations further, especially taking in account gene expression in different organs as well as indirect correlations between parameters. We used RNA-seq data from two large datasets, covering 22 mouse tissues and 27 human tissues. Over all tissues, evolutionary rate only correlates weakly with levels and breadth of expression. The strongest explanatory factors of purifying selection are GC content, expression in many developmental stages, and expression in brain tissues. While the main component of evolutionary rate is purifying selection, we also find tissue-specific patterns for sites under neutral evolution and for positive selection. We observe fast evolution of genes expressed in testis, but also in other tissues, notably liver, which are explained by weak purifying selection rather than by positive selection. PMID:26121354

  9. Tissue specific characterisation of Lim-kinase 1 expression during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Nils O; Neves, Carlos; McIntosh, Rebecca; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Vargesson, Neil; Collinson, J Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Lim-kinase (LIMK) proteins are important for the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the control of actin nucleation and depolymerisation via regulation of cofilin, and hence may control a large number of processes during development, including cell tensegrity, migration, cell cycling, and axon guidance. LIMK1/LIMK2 knockouts disrupt spinal cord morphogenesis and synapse formation but other tissues and developmental processes that require LIMK are yet to be fully determined. To identify tissues and cell-types that may require LIMK, we characterised the pattern of LIMK1 protein during mouse embryogenesis. We showed that LIMK1 displays an expression pattern that is temporally dynamic and tissue-specific. In several tissues LIMK1 is detected in cell-types that also express Wilms' tumour protein 1 and that undergo transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states, including the pleura, epicardium, kidney nephrons, and gonads. LIMK1 was also found in a subset of cells in the dorsal retina, and in mesenchymal cells surrounding the peripheral nerves. This detailed study of the spatial and temporal expression of LIMK1 shows that LIMK1 expression is more dynamic than previously reported, in particular at sites of tissue-tissue interactions guiding multiple developmental processes. PMID:21167960

  10. Estradiol effects on subcutaneous adipose tissue lipolysis in premenopausal women are adipose tissue depot specific and treatment dependent.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Cooper, Elizabeth E; Raymer, Dustin K; Hickner, Robert C

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen has direct effects within adipose tissue and has been implicated in regional adiposity; however, the influence of estrogen on in vivo lipolysis is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of local 17β-estradiol (E(2)) on subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) lipolysis in premenopausal women. In vivo lipolysis (dialysate glycerol) was measured in 17 women (age 27.4 ± 2.0 yr, BMI 29.7 ± 0.5 kg/m(2)) via microdialysis of abdominal (AB) and gluteal (GL) SAT. Glycerol was measured at baseline and during acute interventions to increase lipolysis including local perfusion of isoproterenol (ISO, β-adrenergic agonist, 1.0 μmol/l), phentolamine (PHEN, α-adrenergic antagonist, 0.1 mmol/l), and submaximal exercise (60% Vo(2peak), 30 min); all with and without coperfusion of E(2) (500 nmol/l). E(2) coperfusion blunted the lipolytic response to ISO in AB (E(2) 196 ± 31%, control 258 ± 26%, P = 0.003) but not in GL (E(2) 113 ± 14%, control 111 ± 12%, P = 0.43) adipose tissue. At rest, perfusion of PHEN with ISO did not change dialysate glycerol. Submaximal exercise during ISO + PHEN increased dialysate glycerol in the AB (56 ± 9%) and GL (62 ± 12%) regions. Probes perfused with E(2) during exercise and ISO + PHEN had an increased lipolytic response in AB (90 ± 9%, P = 0.007) but a lower response in GL (35 ± 7%, P = 0.05) SAT compared with no-E(2) conditions. E(2) effects on lipolysis are region specific and may work through both adrenergic and adrenergic-independent mechanisms to potentiate and/or blunt SAT lipolysis in premenopausal women. PMID:23531620

  11. Automated tissue classification of pediatric brains from magnetic resonance images using age-specific atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Andrew; Benavides, Amanda; Nopoulos, Peg; Magnotta, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this project was to develop two age appropriate atlases (neonatal and one year old) that account for the rapid growth and maturational changes that occur during early development. Tissue maps from this age group were initially created by manually correcting the resulting tissue maps after applying an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and an adult atlas to pediatric subjects. The EM algorithm classified each voxel into one of ten possible tissue types including several subcortical structures. This was followed by a novel level set segmentation designed to improve differentiation between distal cortical gray matter and white matter. To minimize the req uired manual corrections, the adult atlas was registered to the pediatric scans using high -dimensional, symmetric image normalization (SyN) registration. The subject images were then mapped to an age specific atlas space, again using SyN registration, and the resulting transformation applied to the manually corrected tissue maps. The individual maps were averaged in the age specific atlas space and blurred to generate the age appropriate anatomical priors. The resulting anatomical priors were then used by the EM algorithm to re-segment the initial training set as well as an independent testing set. The results from the adult and age-specific anatomical priors were compared to the manually corrected results. The age appropriate atlas provided superior results as compared to the adult atlas. The image analysis pipeline used in this work was built using the open source software package BRAINSTools.

  12. miTALOS v2: Analyzing Tissue Specific microRNA Function

    PubMed Central

    Preusse, Martin; Theis, Fabian J.; Mueller, Nikola S.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in almost all biological processes and have emerged as regulators of signaling pathways. We show that miRNA target genes and pathway genes are not uniformly expressed across human tissues. To capture tissue specific effects, we developed a novel methodology for tissue specific pathway analysis of miRNAs. We incorporated the most recent and highest quality miRNA targeting data (TargetScan and StarBase), RNA-seq based gene expression data (EBI Expression Atlas) and multiple new pathway data sources to increase the biological relevance of the predicted miRNA-pathway associations. We identified new potential roles of miR-199a-3p, miR-199b-3p and the miR-200 family in hepatocellular carcinoma, involving the regulation of metastasis through MAPK and Wnt signaling. Also, an association of miR-571 and Notch signaling in liver fibrosis was proposed. To facilitate data update and future extensions of our tool, we developed a flexible database backend using the graph database neo4j. The new backend as well as the novel methodology were included in the updated miTALOS v2, a tool that provides insights into tissue specific miRNA regulation of biological pathways. miTALOS v2 is available at http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/mitalos. PMID:26998997

  13. Estimating patient-specific soft-tissue properties in a TKA knee.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Joseph A; Kaufman, Michelle K; Hutter, Erin E; Granger, Jeffrey F; Beal, Matthew D; Piazza, Stephen J; Siston, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical technique is one factor that has been identified as critical to success of total knee arthroplasty. Researchers have shown that computer simulations can aid in determining how decisions in the operating room generally affect post-operative outcomes. However, to use simulations to make clinically relevant predictions about knee forces and motions for a specific total knee patient, patient-specific models are needed. This study introduces a methodology for estimating knee soft-tissue properties of an individual total knee patient. A custom surgical navigation system and stability device were used to measure the force-displacement relationship of the knee. Soft-tissue properties were estimated using a parameter optimization that matched simulated tibiofemoral kinematics with experimental tibiofemoral kinematics. Simulations using optimized ligament properties had an average root mean square error of 3.5° across all tests while simulations using generic ligament properties taken from literature had an average root mean square error of 8.4°. Specimens showed large variability among ligament properties regardless of similarities in prosthetic component alignment and measured knee laxity. These results demonstrate the importance of soft-tissue properties in determining knee stability, and suggest that to make clinically relevant predictions of post-operative knee motions and forces using computer simulations, patient-specific soft-tissue properties are needed. PMID:26291455

  14. Artemisia extracts activate PPARγ, promote adipogenesis, and enhance insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue of obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Allison J.; Burris, Thomas P.; Sanchez-Infantes, David; Wang, Yongjun; Ribnicky, David M.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Studies have shown that the inability of adipose tissue to properly expand during the obese state or respond to insulin can lead to metabolic dysfunction. Artemisia is a diverse group of plants that has a history of medicinal use. This study examines the ability of ethanolic extracts of Artemisia scoparia (SCO) and Artemisia santolinifolia (SAN) to modulate adipocyte development in cultured adipocytes and white adipose tissue (WAT) function in vivo using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Research Design & Procedures Adipogenesis was assessed using Oil Red O staining and immunoblotting. A nuclear receptor specificity assay was used to examine the specificity of SCO- and SAN-induced PPARγ activation. C57BL/6J mice, fed a high-fat diet, were gavaged with saline, SCO, or SAN for 2 weeks. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was examined using insulin tolerance tests. WAT depots were assessed via immunoblotting for markers of insulin action and adipokine production. Results We established that SCO and SAN were highly specific activators of PPARγ and did not activate other nuclear receptors. After a one-week daily gavage, SCO- and SAN-treated mice had lower insulin-induced glucose disposal rates than control mice. At the end of the 2-week treatment period, SCO- and SAN-treated mice had enhanced insulin-responsive Akt serine-473 phosphorylation and significantly decreased MCP-1 levels in visceral WAT relative to control mice; these differences were depot specific. Moreover, plasma adiponectin levels were increased following SCO treatment. Conclusion Overall, these studies demonstrate that extracts from two Artemisia species can have metabolically favorable effects on adipocytes and WAT. PMID:24985103

  15. Shade-induced stem elongation in rice seedlings: Implication of tissue-specific phytohormone regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihui; Yang, Chuanwei; Li, Lin

    2016-07-01

    A better understanding of shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) is an urgent need because of its effect on energy reallocation. Leverage-related mechanism in crops is of potential economic interest for agricultural applications. Here we report the SAS phenotype at tissue level rice seedlings. Tissue-specific RNA-sequencing indicates auxin plays different roles between coleoptile and the first leaf. Phenotypes of wild type treated by gibberellin and brassinosteroid biosynthesis inhibitors and of related mutants suggest these two hormones positively regulate SAS. Our work reveals the diversity of hormone responses in different organs and different species in shade conditions. PMID:26888633

  16. A sugar beet chlorophyll a/b binding protein promoter void of G-box like elements confers strong and leaf specific reporter gene expression in transgenic sugar beet

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Dietmar J; Kloos, Dorothee U; Hehl, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    Background Modification of leaf traits in sugar beet requires a strong leaf specific promoter. With such a promoter, expression in taproots can be avoided which may otherwise take away available energy resources for sugar accumulation. Results Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) was utilized to generate an enriched and equalized cDNA library for leaf expressed genes from sugar beet. Fourteen cDNA fragments corresponding to thirteen different genes were isolated. Northern blot analysis indicates the desired tissue specificity of these genes. The promoters for two chlorophyll a/b binding protein genes (Bvcab11 and Bvcab12) were isolated, linked to reporter genes, and transformed into sugar beet using promoter reporter gene fusions. Transient and transgenic analysis indicate that both promoters direct leaf specific gene expression. A bioinformatic analysis revealed that the Bvcab11 promoter is void of G-box like regulatory elements with a palindromic ACGT core sequence. The data indicate that the presence of a G-box element is not a prerequisite for leaf specific and light induced gene expression in sugar beet. Conclusions This work shows that SSH can be successfully employed for the identification and subsequent isolation of tissue specific sugar beet promoters. These promoters are shown to drive strong leaf specific gene expression in transgenic sugar beet. The application of these promoters for expressing resistance improving genes against foliar diseases is discussed. PMID:15579211

  17. Prolonged hyperinsulinemia affects metabolic signal transduction markers in a tissue specific manner.

    PubMed

    Campolo, A; de Laat, M A; Keith, L; Gruntmeir, K J; Lacombe, V A

    2016-04-01

    Insulin dysregulation is common in horses although the mechanisms of metabolic dysfunction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that insulin signaling in striated (cardiac and skeletal) muscle and lamellae may be mediated through different receptors as a result of receptor content, and that transcriptional regulation of downstream signal transduction and glucose transport may also differ between tissues sites during hyperinsulinemia. Archived samples from horses treated with a prolonged insulin infusion or a balanced electrolyte solution were used. All treated horses developed marked hyperinsulinemia and clinical laminitis. Protein expression was compared across tissues for the insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) by immunoblotting. Gene expression of metabolic insulin-signaling markers (insulin receptor substrate 1, Akt2, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta [GSK-3β]) and glucose transport (basal glucose transporter 1 and insulin-sensitive glucose transporter 4) was evaluated using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Lamellar tissue contained significantly more IGF-1R protein than skeletal muscle, indicating the potential significance of IGF-1R signaling for this tissue. Gene expression of the selected markers of insulin signaling and glucose transport in skeletal muscle and lamellar tissues was unaffected by prolonged hyperinsulinemia. In contrast, the significant upregulation of Akt2, GSK-3β, GLUT1, and GLUT4 gene expression in cardiac tissue suggested that the prolonged hyperinsulinemia induced an increase in insulin sensitivity and a transcriptional activation of glucose transport. Responses to insulin are tissue-specific, and extrapolation of data across tissue sites is inappropriate. PMID:26773366

  18. Specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins can promote the location of chromosomes to and from the nuclear periphery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Different cell types have distinctive patterns of chromosome positioning in the nucleus. Although ectopic affinity-tethering of specific loci can be used to relocate chromosomes to the nuclear periphery, endogenous nuclear envelope proteins that control such a mechanism in mammalian cells have yet to be widely identified. Results To search for such proteins, 23 nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins were screened for their ability to promote peripheral localization of human chromosomes in HT1080 fibroblasts. Five of these proteins had strong effects on chromosome 5, but individual proteins affected different subsets of chromosomes. The repositioning effects were reversible and the proteins with effects all exhibited highly tissue-restricted patterns of expression. Depletion of two nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins that were preferentially expressed in liver each reduced the normal peripheral positioning of chromosome 5 in liver cells. Conclusions The discovery of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins that can modulate chromosome position and have restricted patterns of expression may enable dissection of the functional relevance of tissue-specific patterns of radial chromosome positioning. PMID:23414781

  19. Considerations of anthropometric, tissue volume, and tissue mass scaling for improved patient specificity of skeletal S values.

    PubMed

    Bolch, W E; Patton, R W; Shah, A R; Rajon, D A; Jokisch, D W

    2002-06-01

    It is generally acknowledged that reference man (70 kg in mass and 170 cm in height) does not adequately represent the stature and physical dimensions of many patients undergoing radionuclide therapy, and thus scaling of radionuclide S values is required for patient specificity. For electron and beta sources uniformly distributed within internal organs, the mean dose from self-irradiation is noted to scale inversely with organ mass, provided no escape of electron energy occurs at the organ boundaries. In the skeleton, this same scaling approach is further assumed to be correct for marrow dosimetry; nevertheless, difficulties in quantitative assessments of marrow mass in specific skeletal regions of the patient make this approach difficult to implement clinically. Instead, scaling of marrow dose is achieved using various anthropometric parameters that presumably scale in the same proportion. In this study, recently developed three-dimensional macrostructural transport models of the femoral head and humeral epiphysis in three individuals (51-year male, 82-year female, and 86-year female) are used to test the abilities of different anthropometric parameters (total body mass, body surface area, etc.) to properly scale radionuclide S values from reference man models. The radionuclides considered are 33P, 177Lu, 153Sm, 186Re, 89Sr, 166Ho, 32P, 188Re, and 90Y localized in either the active marrow or endosteal tissues of the bone trabeculae. S value scaling is additionally conducted in which the 51-year male subject is assigned as the reference individual; scaling parameters are then expanded to include tissue volumes and masses for both active marrow and skeletal spongiosa. The study concludes that, while no single anthropometric parameter emerges as a consistent scaler of reference man S values, lean body mass is indicated as an optimal scaler when the reference S values are based on 3D transport techniques. Furthermore, very exact patient-specific scaling of

  20. [Fundamental problems and improved methods in the measurement of specific gravity of cerebral tissues. (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Shigeno, T; Shigeno, S; Cervós-Navarro, J; Brock, M

    1981-12-01

    Gravimetric determination of brain tissue water content through the measurement of specific gravity (SG) still poses some basic problems. We have studied some of them with the aid of a new gradient column. Using a specially designed conical cylinder to distribute the solution in a graded manner, and a floating apparatus, a gradient column was automatically prepared with a high linearity (r greater than 0.99990). Analysis of equilibration time-course curves of cat brain tissue fragments with various sizes showed that it was more accurate to use volumes as large as 50 mg, and to measure as early as one minute after tissue insertion. In normal brain, SG of grey matter was usually higher than that of white matter. In contrast, in a brain with oligemia or with low hemoglobin contents of blood, this relationship was reversed. Thus, SG can be influenced not only by water content, but also by other factors. As SG of blood is higher than that of brain tissue, cerebral blood volume (CBV) is of particular interest. Assuming the total brain volume as equal to 1, CBV and volume of brain proper excluding intravascular blood can be expressed as x and 1-x respectively. In a given brain tissue, SG of blood or perfusate a, and SG of whole brain tissue A can be measured. If SG of brain proper is expressed as y, the following equation can be introduced: ax + y(1-x)=A. If a and A are obtained from two different brains under the condition of constant CBV, x, 1-x and y can be calculated. For this purpose, values from normal brain and those from perfused brain with isotonic saline were applied. The calculated CBV was 7% in the grey and 3% in the white. SG of brain proper was as low as 0.002 in the grey and 0.001 in the white as compared to that of whole brain tissue. When these values are applied to the equation of percent change in tissue volume as water = (SG of control tissue-1)-(SG of experimental tissue-1)/(SG of experimental tissue-1) x 100%, the false positive increase of water in

  1. Genetic and molecular analysis of Sn, a light-inducible, tissue specific regulatory gene in maize.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, C; Consonni, G; Dolfini, S F; Dellaporta, S L; Viotti, A; Gavazzi, G

    1991-03-01

    The Sn locus of maize is functionally similar to the R and B loci, in that Sn differentially controls the tissue-specific deposition of anthocyanin pigments in certain seedling and plant cells. We show that Sn shows molecular similarity to the R gene and have used R DNA probes to characterize several Sn alleles. Northern analysis demonstrates that all Sn alleles encode a 2.5 kb transcript, which is expressed in a tissue-specific fashion consistent with the distribution of anthocyanins. Expression of the Sn gene is light-regulated. However, the Sn: bol3 allele allows Sn mRNA transcription to occur in the dark, leading to pigmentation in dark-grown seedlings and cob integuments. We report the isolation of genomic and cDNA clones of the light-independent Sn: bol3 allele. Using Sn cDNA as a probe, the spatial and temporal expression of Sn has been examined. The cell-specific localization of Sn mRNA has been confirmed by in situ hybridization using labelled antisense RNA probes. According to its proposed regulatory role, expression of Sn precedes and, in turn, causes a coordinate and tissue-specific accumulation of mRNA of structural genes for pigment synthesis and deposition, such as A1 and C2. The functional and structural relationship between R, B, Lc and Sn is discussed in terms of an evolutionary derivation from a single ancestral gene which gave rise this diverse gene family by successive duplication events.

  2. Tissue specificity and variability of imprinted IGF2 expression in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Giannoukakis, N.; Rouleau, G.; Polychronakos, C.

    1994-09-01

    Parental genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon where expression of a gene copy depends on the sex of the parent from which it is derived. The human insulin-like growth factor II gene, IGF2, is parentally imprinted with the paternal gene copy exclusively expressed in fetal and term placenta as well as in fetal kidney. In mice, imprinted IGF2 expression is tissue-specific. In a preliminary approach to investigate tissue-specific IGF2 imprinting in humans, we evaluated allele-specific expression in four samples of umbilical cord blood leukocytes of fetuses found to imprint IGF2 in placenta. IGF2 mRNA transcripts from the gene copy transmitted from each parent were distinguished using a transcribed ApaI polymorphism by performing reverse transcription-PCR on total RNA from cord blood leukocytes. Postnatal peripheral blood was examined using the same method. Of 77 informative individuals, 68 expressed both IGF2 copies, but 9 individuals showed unambiguous monoallelic expression. Two individuals from each category were screened again and the results were identical. These data indicate that imprinted IGF2 expression is tissue-specific and show variability of IGF2 imprinting among individuals. This variability may be genetic. We are in the process of screening large pedigrees to test this hypothesis.

  3. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  4. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development.

  5. Glow in the dark: fluorescent proteins as cell and tissue-specific markers in plants.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Caragea, Adriana E; Goldstein, Rochelle S; Berleth, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Since the hallmark discovery of Aequorea victoria's Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and its adaptation for efficient use in plants, fluorescent protein tags marking expression profiles or genuine proteins of interest have been used to recognize plant tissues and cell types, to monitor dynamic cell fate selection processes, and to obtain cell type-specific transcriptomes. Fluorescent tagging enabled visualization in living tissues and the precise recordings of dynamic expression pattern changes. The resulting accurate recording of cell fate acquisition kinetics in space and time has strongly stimulated mathematical modeling of self-organizing feedback mechanisms. In developmental studies, the use of fluorescent proteins has become critical, where morphological markers of tissues, cell types, or differentiation stages are either not known or not easily recognizable. In this review, we focus on the use of fluorescent markers to identify and illuminate otherwise invisible cell states in plant development. PMID:21772029

  6. Functional dissection of a strong and specific microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Kanofsky, Konstantin; Hanko, Erik K R; Ahrendt, Sarah; Wehrs, Maren; Machens, Fabian; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic promoters are important for temporal and spatial gene expression in transgenic plants. To identify novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-regulatory sequences for synthetic promoter design, a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches was employed. One cis-sequence was identified which confers strong MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity with low background activity. The 35-bp-long cis-sequence was identified in the promoter of the Arabidopsis thaliana DJ1E gene, a homologue of the human oncogene DJ1. In this study, this cis-sequence is shown to be a tripartite cis-regulatory module (CRM). A synthetic promoter with four copies of the CRM linked to a minimal promoter increases MAMP-responsive reporter gene expression compared to the wild-type DJ1E promoter. The CRM consists of two WT-boxes (GGACTTTT and GGACTTTG) and a variant of the GCC-box (GCCACC), all required for MAMP and salicylic acid (SA) responsivity. Yeast one-hybrid screenings using a transcription factor (TF)-only prey library identified two AP2/ERFs, ORA59 and ERF10, interacting antagonistically with the CRM. ORA59 activates reporter gene activity and requires the consensus core sequence GCCNCC for gene expression activation. ERF10 down-regulates MAMP-responsive gene expression. No TFs interacting with the WT-boxes GGACTTTT and GGACTTTG were selected in yeast one-hybrid screenings with the TF-only prey library. In transgenic Arabidopsis, the synthetic promoter confers strong and specific reporter gene activity in response to biotrophs and necrotrophs as well as SA.

  7. Functional dissection of a strong and specific microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Kanofsky, Konstantin; Hanko, Erik K R; Ahrendt, Sarah; Wehrs, Maren; Machens, Fabian; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic promoters are important for temporal and spatial gene expression in transgenic plants. To identify novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-regulatory sequences for synthetic promoter design, a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches was employed. One cis-sequence was identified which confers strong MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity with low background activity. The 35-bp-long cis-sequence was identified in the promoter of the Arabidopsis thaliana DJ1E gene, a homologue of the human oncogene DJ1. In this study, this cis-sequence is shown to be a tripartite cis-regulatory module (CRM). A synthetic promoter with four copies of the CRM linked to a minimal promoter increases MAMP-responsive reporter gene expression compared to the wild-type DJ1E promoter. The CRM consists of two WT-boxes (GGACTTTT and GGACTTTG) and a variant of the GCC-box (GCCACC), all required for MAMP and salicylic acid (SA) responsivity. Yeast one-hybrid screenings using a transcription factor (TF)-only prey library identified two AP2/ERFs, ORA59 and ERF10, interacting antagonistically with the CRM. ORA59 activates reporter gene activity and requires the consensus core sequence GCCNCC for gene expression activation. ERF10 down-regulates MAMP-responsive gene expression. No TFs interacting with the WT-boxes GGACTTTT and GGACTTTG were selected in yeast one-hybrid screenings with the TF-only prey library. In transgenic Arabidopsis, the synthetic promoter confers strong and specific reporter gene activity in response to biotrophs and necrotrophs as well as SA. PMID:25819608

  8. Identification and cell type specificity of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, C A; Lewis, E J; Krzemien, D; Chikaraishi, D M

    1987-01-01

    Genomic DNA encoding the rat tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene was isolated from a lambda phage library using a nick-translated fragment from a cDNA clone for rat TH. We have determined the initiation site for TH RNA synthesis and have sequenced 1100 bases of the primary transcript and 5' flanking region. The 5' end of the transcript is the same in several rat tissues in which TH is expressed as well as in rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC). RNA prepared from PC cells that had been stimulated with dexamethasone also mapped to the same transcription start site. Sequence upstream from the initiation site contains the canonical TATA box, but no apparent CAAT box. When a portion of the 5' flanking region of the TH gene (-773 to + 27) is fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, it promotes expression of CAT in pheochromocytoma cells and GH4 cells, but not in two neural tumour lines, RT4-D and B103, nor in several non neural cell lines. This suggests that this region of the TH gene has features that confer tissue-restricted expression on the TH promoter. Images PMID:2882469

  9. Analysis of tissue specific progenitor cell differentiation using FT-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kimura, Akinori; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-07-01

    Tissue specific progenitor cells and its differentiations have got a lot of attentions in regenerative medicine. The process of differentiations, the formation of tissues, has become better understood by the study using a lot of cell types progressively. These studies of cells and tissue dynamics at molecular levels are carried out through various approaches like histochemical methods, application of molecular biology and immunology. However, in case of using regenerative sources (cells, tissues and biomaterials etc.) clinically, they are measured and quality-controlled by non-contact and non-destructive methods from the view point of safety. Or the analysis with small quantities of materials could be possible if the quantities of materials are acceptable. A non-contact and non-destructive quality control method has been required. Recently, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) has been used to monitor biochemical changes in cells, and has gained considerable importance. The changes in the cells and tissues, which are subtle and often not obvious in the histpathological studies, are shown to be well resolved using FT-IR. Moreover, although most techniques designed to detect one or a few changes, FT-IR is possible to identify the changes in the levels of various cellular biochemicals simultaneously under in vivo and in vitro conditions. The objective of this study is to establish the infrared spectroscopy of tissue specific progenitor cell differentiations as a quality control of cell sources for regenerative medicine. In the present study, as a basic study, we examine the adipose differentiation kinetics of preadipose cells (3T3-L1) and the osteoblast differentiation kinetics of mesenchymal stem cells (Kusa-A1) to analyze the infrared absorption spectra.

  10. Adiponectin Reduces Hepatic Stellate Cell Migration by Promoting Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) Secretion*

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani-Moghadam, Mehdi; Wang, Jianhua; Ho, Vikki; Iseli, Tristan J.; Alzahrani, Badr; Xu, Aimin; Van der Poorten, David; Qiao, Liang; George, Jacob; Hebbard, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSC) are central players in liver fibrosis that when activated, proliferate, migrate to sites of liver injury, and secrete extracellular matrix. Obesity, a known risk factor for liver fibrosis is associated with reduced levels of adiponectin, a protein that inhibits liver fibrosis in vivo and limits HSC proliferation and migration in vitro. Adiponectin-mediated activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits HSC proliferation, but the mechanism by which it limits HSC migration to sites of injury is unknown. Here we sought to elucidate how adiponectin regulates HSC motility. Primary rat HSCs were isolated and treated with adiponectin in migration assays. The in vivo actions of adiponectin were examined by treating mice with carbon tetrachloride for 12 weeks and then injecting them with adiponectin. Cell and tissue samples were collected and analyzed for gene expression, signaling, and histology. Serum from patients with liver fibrosis was examined for adiponectin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) protein. Adiponectin administration into mice increased TIMP-1 gene and protein expression. In cultured HSCs, adiponectin promoted TIMP-1 expression and through binding of TIMP-1 to the CD63/β1-integrin complex reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase to limit HSC migration. In mice with liver fibrosis, adiponectin had similar effects and limited focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Finally, in patients with advanced fibrosis, there was a positive correlation between serum adiponectin and TIMP-1 levels. In sum, these data show that adiponectin stimulates TIMP-1 secretion by HSCs to retard their migration and contributes to the anti-fibrotic effects of adiponectin. PMID:25575598

  11. Single cell analysis reveals gametic and tissue-specific instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.S.; McCall, A.E.; Cota, J.

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the SCA1 gene on chromosome 6p22-23. We performed a comparative analysis of the SCA1 CAG repeat from blood and sperm of an affected male. Genomic amplification revealed a broader smear of the SCA1 allele product from sperm compared to that from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). To resolve this observed difference, we analyzed single sperm directly and demonstrate that the SCA1 allele in PBL is also heterogeneous, although the range of variability in allele sizes is much less than that observed in sperm. Limited genome analysis was also performed on PBL DNA from an unaffected individual with an upper normal allele of 36 repeats in parallel with an affected individual with an expanded allele of 40 repeats. The 36 repeat normal allele, which contains a CAT interruption, was completely stable compared to the uninterrupted repeat of the SCA1 allele, demonstrating a direct correlation between absence of a CAT interruption and somatic instability of the repeat. We also analyzed the size of the CAG repeat in tissues derived from various brain regions from a patient with juvenile-onset disease to determine if the size of the expansion correlated with the site of neuropathology. The results clearly show tissue-specific differences in mosaicism of repeat length. More importantly, the pattern of tissue-specific differences in repeat-length mosaicism in SCA1 within the brain parallels those seen in Huntington disease. In both disorders the expanded alleles are smaller in cerebellar tissue. These results suggest that the observed tissue-specific differences in instability of the SCA1 CAG repeat, either within the brain or between blood and sperm, are a function of the intracellular milieu or the intrinsic replicative potential of the various celltypes.

  12. Denovo assembly and characterization of tissue-specific transcriptome in the endangered golden mahseer, Tor putitora

    PubMed Central

    Barat, Ashoktaru; Kumar, Rohit; Goel, Chirag; Singh, Atul Kumar; Sahoo, Prabhati Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The golden mahseer (Tor putitora) graces most of the Himalayan Rivers of India and neighboring South Asian countries. Despite its several importance as a research model, as food, and in sport fishing, knowledge on transcriptome database is nil. Therefore, it was targeted to develop reference transcriptome databases of the species using next-generation sequencing. In the present study, 100,540,130 high-quality paired-end reads were obtained from six cDNA libraries of spleen, liver, gill, kidney, muscle, and brain with 28.4 GB data using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. Tissue-specific transcriptomes as well as complete transcriptome assembly were analyzed for concise representation of the study. In brief, the de novo assembly of individual tissue resulted in an average of 31,829 (18,512–46,348) contigs per sample, while combined transcriptome comprised 77,907 unique transcript fragments (unigenes) assembled from reads of six tissues. Approximately 75,407 (96.8%) unigenes could be annotated according to their homology matches in the nr, SwisseProt, GO, or KEGG databases. Comparative analysis showed that 84% of the unigenes have significant similarity to zebra fish RefSeq proteins. Tissue-specific-dominated genes were also identified to hypothesize their localization and expression in individual tissue. In addition, 2485 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected from 77,907 transcripts in the combined transcriptome of the golden mahseer. This study has generated organ-specific transcriptome profiles, which will be helpful to understand the local adaptation, genome evolution, and also future functional studies on immune system of the golden mahseer. PMID:26702399

  13. Ubiquitously expressed genes participate in cell-specific functions via alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guihai; Tong, Man; Xia, Baolong; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Wang, Meng; Xie, Dongfang; Wan, Haifeng; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Xiu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    How do different cell types acquire their specific identities and functions is a fundamental question of biology. Previously significant efforts have been devoted to search for cell-type-specifically expressed genes, especially transcription factors, yet how do ubiquitously expressed genes participate in the formation or maintenance of cell-type-specific features remains largely unknown. Here, we have identified 110 mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) specifically expressed transcripts with cell-stage-specific alternative transcription start sites (SATS isoforms) from 104 ubiquitously expressed genes, majority of which have active epigenetic modification- or stem cell-related functions. These SATS isoforms are specifically expressed in mESCs, and tend to be transcriptionally regulated by key pluripotency factors through direct promoter binding. Knocking down the SATS isoforms of Nmnat2 or Usp7 leads to differentiation-related phenotype in mESCs. These results demonstrate that cell-type-specific transcription factors are capable to produce cell-type-specific transcripts with alternative transcription start sites from ubiquitously expressed genes, which confer ubiquitously expressed genes novel functions involved in the establishment or maintenance of cell-type-specific features. PMID:27466324

  14. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Christopoulou, Maria; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2010-04-01

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  15. Analysis of circadian pattern reveals tissue-specific alternative transcription in leptin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ptitsyn, Andrey A; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been previously reported that most mammalian genes display a circadian oscillation in their baseline expression. Consequently, the phase and amplitude of each component of a signal transduction cascade has downstream consequences. Results Here, we report our analysis of alternative transcripts in the leptin signaling pathway which is responsible for the systemic regulation of macronutrient storage and energy balance. We focused on the circadian expression pattern of a critical component of the leptin signaling system, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3). On an Affymetrix GeneChip 430A2 microarray, this gene is represented by three probe sets targeting different regions within the 3' end of the last exon. We demonstrate that in murine brown adipose tissue two downstream 3' probe sets experience circadian baseline oscillation in counter-phase to the upstream probe set. Such differences in expression patterns are a telltale sign of alternative splicing within the last exon of SOCS3. In contrast, all three probe sets oscillated in a common phase in murine liver and white adipose tissue. This suggests that the regulation of SOCS3 expression in brown fat is tissue specific. Another component of the signaling pathway, Janus kinase (JAK), is directly regulated by SOCS and has alternative transcript probe sets oscillating in counter-phase in a white adipose tissue specific manner. Conclusion We hypothesize that differential oscillation of alternative transcripts may provide a mechanism to maintain steady levels of expression in spite of circadian baseline variation. PMID:18047714

  16. Tissue-Specific Genetic Control of Splicing: Implications for the Study of Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Kenneth D; Maia, Jessica M; Shianna, Kevin V; Gabriel, Willow N; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Hulette, Christine M; Denny, Thomas N; Goldstein, David B

    2008-01-01

    Numerous genome-wide screens for polymorphisms that influence gene expression have provided key insights into the genetic control of transcription. Despite this work, the relevance of specific polymorphisms to in vivo expression and splicing remains unclear. We carried out the first genome-wide screen, to our knowledge, for SNPs that associate with alternative splicing and gene expression in human primary cells, evaluating 93 autopsy-collected cortical brain tissue samples with no defined neuropsychiatric condition and 80 peripheral blood mononucleated cell samples collected from living healthy donors. We identified 23 high confidence associations with total expression and 80 with alternative splicing as reflected by expression levels of specific exons. Fewer than 50% of the implicated SNPs however show effects in both tissue types, reflecting strong evidence for distinct genetic control of splicing and expression in the two tissue types. The data generated here also suggest the possibility that splicing effects may be responsible for up to 13 out of 84 reported genome-wide significant associations with human traits. These results emphasize the importance of establishing a database of polymorphisms affecting splicing and expression in primary tissue types and suggest that splicing effects may be of more phenotypic significance than overall gene expression changes. PMID:19222302

  17. Tissue-Specific Expression Phenotypes of Hawaiian Drosophila Adh Genes in Drosophila Melanogaster Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C. Y.; Mote-Jr., J.; Brennan, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Interspecific differences in the tissue-specific patterns of expression displayed by the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) genes within the Hawaiian picture-winged Drosophila represent a rich source of evolutionary variation in gene regulation. Study of the cis-acting elements responsible for regulatory differences between Adh genes from various species is greatly facilitated by analyzing the behavior of the different Adh genes in a homogeneous background. Accordingly, the Adh gene from Drosophila grimshawi was introduced into the germ line of Drosophila melanogaster by means of P element-mediated transformation, and transformants carrying this gene were compared to transformants carrying the Adh genes from Drosophila affinidisjuncta and Drosophila hawaiiensis. The results indicate that the D. affinidisjuncta and D. grimshawi genes have relatively higher levels of expression and broader tissue distribution of expression than the D. hawaiiensis gene in larvae. All three genes are expressed at similar overall levels in adults, with differences in tissue distribution of enzyme activity corresponding to the pattern in the donor species. However, certain systematic differences between Adh gene expression in transformants and in the Hawaiian Drosophila are noted along with tissue-specific position effects in some cases. The implications of these findings for the understanding of evolved regulatory variation are discussed. PMID:2165967

  18. Identification of spermatozoa by tissue-specific differential DNA methylation using bisulfite modification and pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Bombardi, Robin; Duncan, George; McCord, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this study is to evaluate the application of epigenetic markers as a forensic tool for the determination of semen present in sexual assault cases. A series of genetic loci were screened in order to identify certain epigenetic markers displaying differential methylation that can allow semen to be differentiated from blood, buccal cells, skin epidermis, and vaginal epithelial cells. Of the different loci tested, a panel of six markers, DACT1, USP49, DDX4, Hs_INSL6_03, Hs_ZC3H12D_05, and B_SPTB_03 were identified to contain tissue-specific differential methylation. Samples ranging from 9-21 for each tissue type were collected and subjected to bisulfite modification. The bisulfite modified DNA was amplified by PCR, and analyzed by pyrosequencing to quantitate the level of methylation at each marker. All six markers successfully differentiated semen samples from the other four tissue types analyzed. Sperm DNA was hypomethylated in all but one marker, B_SPTB_03, where this marker showed hypermethylation. Mean methylation percentages for semen samples were statistically significant from mean methylation percentages of the other four tissues studied (p < 0.01). The results of this study demonstrate the applicability of epigenetic markers as a novel tool for determination of spermatozoa and to identify the tissue source of origin of a DNA sample. PMID:24913642

  19. Assessing allele-specific expression across multiple tissues from RNA-seq read data

    PubMed Central

    Pirinen, Matti; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Donnelly, Peter; McCarthy, Mark I.; Rivas, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: RNA sequencing enables allele-specific expression (ASE) studies that complement standard genotype expression studies for common variants and, importantly, also allow measuring the regulatory impact of rare variants. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project is collecting RNA-seq data on multiple tissues of a same set of individuals and novel methods are required for the analysis of these data. Results: We present a statistical method to compare different patterns of ASE across tissues and to classify genetic variants according to their impact on the tissue-wide expression profile. We focus on strong ASE effects that we are expecting to see for protein-truncating variants, but our method can also be adjusted for other types of ASE effects. We illustrate the method with a real data example on a tissue-wide expression profile of a variant causal for lipoid proteinosis, and with a simulation study to assess our method more generally. Availability and implementation: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/~rivas/mamba/. R-sources and data examples http://www.iki.fi/mpirinen/ Contact: matti.pirinen@helsinki.fi or rivas@well.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25819081

  20. Metabolic profiling of the tissue-specific responses in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-08-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish distributing widely along the coast in north China. In this work, we studied the differential metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in digestive gland and gill tissues from M. galloprovincialis using NMR-based metabolomics. The differential metabolic responses in the two tissue types were detected, except the similarly altered taurine and betaine. These metabolic responses suggested that V. harveyi mainly induced osmotic disruption and reduced energy demand via the metabolic pathways of glucose synthesis and ATP/AMP conversion in mussel digestive gland. In mussel gill tissues, V. harveyi basically caused osmotic stress and possible reduced energy demand as shown by the elevated phosphocholine that is involved in one of the metabolic pathways of ATP synthesis from ADP and phosphocholine. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (superoxide dismutase with copper and zinc, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear oxidative and immune stresses in both digestive gland and gill tissues. However, the mRNA expression levels of both lysozyme and defensin in digestive gland were more significantly up-regulated than those in gill from V. harveyi-challenged mussel M. galloprovincialis, meaning that the immune organ, digestive gland, was more sensitive than gill. Overall, our results indicated that V. harveyi could induce tissue-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis.

  1. Method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Studier, F. William; Kieleczawa, Jan; Dunn, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for promoting specific alignment of short oligonucleotides on a nucleic acid polymer. The nucleic acid polymer is incubated in a solution containing a single-stranded DNA-binding protein and a plurality of oligonucleotides which are perfectly complementary to distinct but adjacent regions of a predetermined contiguous nucleotide sequence in the nucleic acid polymer. The plurality of oligonucleotides anneal to the nucleic acid polymer to form a contiguous region of double stranded nucleic acid. Specific application of the methods disclosed include priming DNA synthesis and template-directed ligation.

  2. Targeting tissue-specific metabolic signaling pathways in aging: the promise and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that most of the age-related diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis are all closely related to metabolic dysfunction. On the other hand, interventions on metabolism such as calorie restriction or genetic manipulations of key metabolic signaling pathways such as the insulin and mTOR signaling pathways slow down the aging process and improve healthy aging. These findings raise an important question as to whether improving energy homeostasis by targeting certain metabolic signaling pathways in specific tissues could be an effective anti-aging strategy. With a more comprehensive understanding of the tissue-specific roles of distinct metabolic signaling pathways controlling energy homeostasis and the cross-talks between these pathways during aging may lead to the development of more effective therapeutic interventions not only for metabolic dysfunction but also for aging.

  3. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Steffensen, Annette B; Acha, Moshe Rav; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lynch, Stacey N; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Brunak, Søren; Ellinor, Patrick T; Jukema, J Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Stricker, Bruno H; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J; Asselbergs, Folkert W; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS). We integrated the LQTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT-interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LQTS protein network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics. PMID:24952909

  4. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.; Rav Acha, Moshe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lynch, Stacey N.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Brunak, Søren; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated wtih complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS). We integrated the LQTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LQTS protein network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics. PMID:24952909

  5. Genome-wide identification of human- and primate-specific core promoter short tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Bushehri, A; Barez, M R Mashhoudi; Mansouri, S K; Biglarian, A; Ohadi, M

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports of a link between human- and primate-specific genetic factors and human/primate-specific characteristics and diseases necessitate genome-wide identification of those factors. We have previously reported core promoter short tandem repeats (STRs) of extreme length (≥6-repeats) that have expanded exceptionally in primates vs. non-primates, and may have a function in adaptive evolution. In the study reported here, we extended our study to the human STRs of ≥3-repeats in the category of penta and hexaucleotide STRs, across the entire human protein coding gene core promoters, and analyzed their status in several superorders and orders of vertebrates, using the Ensembl database. The ConSite software was used to identify the transcription factor (TF) sets binding to those STRs. STR specificity was observed at different levels of human and non-human primate (NHP) evolution. 73% of the pentanucleotide STRs and 68% of the hexanucleotide STRs were found to be specific to human and NHPs. AP-2alpha, Sp1, and MZF were the predominantly selected TFs (90%) binding to the human-specific STRs. Furthermore, the number of TF sets binding to a given STR was found to be a selection factor for that STR. Our findings indicate that selected STRs, the cognate binding TFs, and the number of TF set binding to those STRs function as switch codes at different levels of human and NHP evolution and speciation.

  6. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    SciTech Connect

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue