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Sample records for promotes episomal replication

  1. Identification of a 450-bp region of human papillomavirus type 1 that promotes episomal replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Schmidt, Martin C.; Khan, Saleem A. . E-mail: khan@pitt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) replicate as nuclear plasmids in infected cells. Since the DNA replication machinery is generally conserved between humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we studied whether HPV-1 DNA can replicate in yeast. Plasmids containing a selectable marker (with or without a yeast centromere) and either the full-length HPV-1 genome or various regions of the viral long control region (LCR) and the 3' end of the L1 gene were introduced into S. cerevisiae and their ability to replicate episomally was investigated. Our results show that HPV-1 sequences promote episomal replication of plasmids although the yeast centromere is required for plasmid retention. We have mapped the autonomously replicating sequence activity of HPV-1 DNA to a 450 base-pair sequence (HPV-1 nt 6783-7232) that includes 293 nucleotides from the 5' region of the viral LCR and 157 nucleotides from the 3' end of the L1 gene. The HPV-1 ARS does not include the binding sites for the viral E1 and E2 proteins, and these proteins are dispensable for replication in S. cerevisiae.

  2. G-quadruplex-interacting compounds alter latent DNA replication and episomal persistence of KSHV

    PubMed Central

    Madireddy, Advaitha; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Loosbroock, Christopher P.; Robertson, Erle S.; Schildkraut, Carl L.; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long latent infection by persisting as an extra-chromosomal episome in the infected cells and by maintaining its genome in dividing cells. KSHV achieves this by tethering its epigenome to the host chromosome by latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which binds in the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Sequence analysis of the TR, a GC-rich DNA element, identified several potential Quadruplex G-Rich Sequences (QGRS). Since quadruplexes have the tendency to obstruct DNA replication, we used G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds to examine their effect on latent DNA replication and the persistence of viral episomes. Our results showed that these G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds led to the activation of dormant origins of DNA replication, with preferential bi-directional pausing of replications forks moving out of the TR region, implicating the role of the G-rich TR in the perturbation of episomal DNA replication. Over time, treatment with PhenDC3 showed a loss of viral episomes in the infected cells. Overall, these data show that G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds retard the progression of replication forks leading to a reduction in DNA replication and episomal maintenance. These results suggest a potential role for G-quadruplex stabilizers in the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:26837574

  3. Differential use of multiple replication origins in the ribosomal DNA episome of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soma; Satish, S; Tyagi, Sonika; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2003-04-15

    The factors that control the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication from defined origins (oris) on the chromosome remain incompletely resolved. Here we show that the circular rDNA episome of the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica contains multiple potential oris, which are utilized in a differential manner. The primary ori in exponentially growing cells was mapped close to the promoter of rRNA genes in the upstream intergenic spacer (IGS) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Replication initiated predominantly from the upstream IGS and terminated in the downstream IGS. However, when serum-starved cells were allowed to resume growth, the early oris which became activated were located in other parts of the molecule. Later the ori in the upstream IGS became activated, with concomitant silencing of the early oris. When the upstream IGS was located ectopically in an artificial plasmid, it again lost ori activity, while other parts of the rDNA episome could function as oris in this system. Therefore, the activation or silencing of the ori in this episome is context dependent, as is also the case with many eukaryotic replicons. This is the first replication origin to be mapped in this primitive protozoan and will provide an opportunity to define the factors involved in differential ori activity, and their comparison with metazoans. PMID:12682354

  4. Epstein-Barr-based episomal chromosomes shuttle 100 kb of self-replicating circular human DNA in mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Z.T.; Fu, H.; Livanos, E.; Wendelburg, B.; Gulino, S.; Vos, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    The authors describe the microcell fusion transfer of 100--200 kb self-replicating circular human minichromosomes from human into mouse cells. This experimental approach is illustrated through the shuttling of the latent 170 kb double-stranded DNA genome from the human herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, into nonpermissive rodent cells. Using this interspecies transfer strategy, circular episomes carrying 95--105 kb of human DNA were successfully established at low copy number in mouse A9 cells. Selected episomes were stably maintained for 6 months, and unselected episomes were characterized by a 95% episomal retention per cell division. The establishment of a mouse artificial episomal chromosome system should facilitate evolutionary and therapeutic studies of large human DNA in rodent genetic backgrounds.

  5. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  6. Excision and episomal replication of cauliflower mosaic virus integrated into a plant genome.

    PubMed

    Squires, Julie; Gillespie, Trudi; Schoelz, James E; Palukaitis, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants containing a monomeric copy of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) genome exhibited the generation of infectious, episomally replicating virus. The circular viral genome had been split within the nonessential gene II for integration into the Arabidopsis genome by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic plants were assessed for episomal infections at flowering, seed set, and/or senescence. The infections were confirmed by western blot for the CaMV P6 and P4 proteins, electron microscopy for the presence of icosahedral virions, and through polymerase chain reaction across the recombination junction. By the end of the test period, a majority of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants had developed episomal infections. The episomal form of the virus was infectious to nontransgenic plants, indicating that no essential functions were lost after release from the Arabidopsis chromosome. An analysis of the viral genomes recovered from either transgenic Arabidopsis or nontransgenic turnip (Brassica rapa var rapa) revealed that the viruses contained deletions within gene II, and in some cases, the deletions extended to the beginning of gene III. In addition, many of the progeny viruses contained small regions of nonviral sequence derived from the flanking transformation vector. The nature of the nucleotide sequences at the recombination junctions in the circular progeny virus indicated that most were generated by nonhomologous recombination during the excision event. The release of the CaMV viral genomes from an integrated copy was not dependent upon the application of environmental stresses but occurred with greater frequency with either age or the late stages of plant maturation.

  7. Autonomously replicating episomes contain mdr1 genes in a multidrugresistant human cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, J.C.; Wahl, G.M.; Choi, K.; Roninson, I.B.; VonHoff, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Gene amplification in human tumor cells is frequently mediated by extrachromosomal elements (e.g., double minute chromosomes (DMs)). Recent experiments have shown that DMs can be formed from smaller, submicroscopic circular precursors referred to as episomes. To investigate whether episomes are generally involved as intermediates in gene amplification, the authors determined whether they mediate the amplification of the mdr1 gene, which when overexpressed engenders cross resistance to multiple lipophilic drugs. A variety of methods including electrophoresis of undigested DNAs in high-voltage gradients, NotI digestion, and production of double-strand breaks by gamma radiation were used to distinguish between mdr1 sequences amplified on submicroscopic circular molecules and those amplified within DMs or chromosomal DNA. The gamma-irradiation procedure provides a new method for detecting and determining the size of circular molecules from 50 kilobases (kb) to greater than 1,000 kb. These methods revealed that some of the amplified mdr1 genes in vinblastine-resistant KB-V1 cells are contained in supercoiled circular molecules of --600 and --750 kb. Analysis of the replication of these molecules by a Meselson-Stahl density shift experiment demonstrated that they replicate approximately once in a cell cycle. The data lend further support to a model for gene amplification in which DMs are generally formed from smaller, autonomously replicating precursors.

  8. Topology and replication of a nuclear episomal plasmid in the rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Donald H.; Janse, Chris J.; Moore, Peter W.; Waters, Andrew P.; Preiser, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    The rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei is one of a small number of species of Plasmodium that can currently be genetically transformed through experimentally controlled uptake of exogenous DNA by bloodstage parasites. Circular DNA containing a selectable marker replicates and is maintained under selection pressure in a randomly segregating episomal form during the first weeks after transformation. In this study, using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and ionising radiation, we show that in dividing asexual blood stage parasites the episomes are completely converted, within 2 weeks post-infection, into non-rearranged circular concatamers ranging in size between about 9 and 15 copies of the monomer. These occur as slow-moving aggregates held together by radiation-sensitive linkers consisting partly of single-stranded DNA. The process generating these complexes is not clear but 2D gel analysis showed that Cairns-type replication origins were absent and it seems most likely that the initial concatamerisation takes place using a rolling circle mechanism followed by circularisation through internal recombination. We propose a model in which continued rolling circle replication of the large circular concatamers and the recombinational activity of the tails of the rolling circles could lead to the formation of the large aggregates. PMID:11809885

  9. Glucocorticoid regulation of transcription at an amplified, episomal promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrowski, M.C.; Richard-Foy, H.; Wolford, R.G.; Berard, D.S.; Hager, G.L.

    1983-11-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) has been introduced into cultured murine cells, using the 69% transforming fragment of bovine papiloma virus type 1 (BVP). Transformed cells contain up to 200 copies of the chimeric molecules per diploid genome. The restriction endonuclease map of the acquired recombinants, as well as the physical structure of the DNA, indicates that the LTR-BVP molecules present in these cells occur exclusively as unintegrated, extrachromosomal episome. When a 72-base pair direct repeat ''enhancer'' element (derived from the Harvey sarcoma retrovirus) was included in the MMTV LTR-BPV chimeric plasmids, DNA acquired through transfection, with a single exception, was integrated or rearranged or both. Two approaches showed that the MMTV LTR present in the episomal state was capable of supporting glucocorticoid hormone-regulated transcription. The authors have therefore demonstrated the hormone response for the first time in a totally defined primary sequence environment. Significant differences both in the basal level of MMTV-initiated transcription and in the extend of glucocorticoid induction were observed in individual cell lines with similar episomal copy numbers. These phenotypic variations suggest that epigenetic structure is an important component of the mechanism of regulation.

  10. Autonomously replicating episomes contain mdr1 genes in a multidrug-resistant human cell line.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J C; Choi, K H; von Hoff, D D; Roninson, I B; Wahl, G M

    1989-01-01

    Gene amplification in human tumor cells is frequently mediated by extrachromosomal elements (e.g., double minute chromosomes [DMs]). Recent experiments have shown that DMs can be formed from smaller, submicroscopic circular precursors referred to as episomes (S. M. Carroll, M. L. DeRose, P. Gaudray, C. M. Moore, D. R. Needham-Vandevanter, D. D. Von Hoff and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Biol. 8:1525-1533, 1988). To investigate whether episomes are generally involved as intermediates in gene amplification, we determined whether they mediate the amplification of the mdr1 gene, which when overexpressed engenders cross resistance to multiple lipophilic drugs. A variety of methods including electrophoresis of undigested DNAs in high-voltage gradients, NotI digestion, and production of double-strand breaks by gamma irradiation were used to distinguish between mdr1 sequences amplified on submicroscopic circular molecules and those amplified within DMs or chromosomal DNA. The gamma-irradiation procedure provides a new method for detecting and determining the size of circular molecules from 50 kilobases (kb) to greater than 1,000 kb. These methods revealed that some of the amplified mdr1 genes in vinblastine-resistant KB-V1 cells are contained in supercoiled circular molecules of approximately 600 and approximately 750 kb. Analysis of the replication of these molecules by a Meselson-Stahl density shift experiment demonstrated that they replicate approximately once in a cell cycle. The data lend further support to a model for gene amplification in which DMs are generally formed from smaller, autonomously replicating precursors.

  11. Impact of Different Promoters on Episomal Vectors Harbouring Characteristic Motifs of Matrix Attachment Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yin; Zhang, Jun-He; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Qiu-Li; Zhao, Chun-Peng; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the characteristic sequence of matrix attachment regions (MARs) allows transgenes to be maintained episomally in CHO cells. In the present study, six commonly used promoters from human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early (CMV), simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40), Rous sarcoma virus, Homo sapiens ubiquitin C, phosphoglycerate kinase, and β-globin, respectively, were evaluated to determine their effects on transgene expression and stability in CHO cells stably transfected via the episomal vector harbouring characteristic MAR motifs. The CHO cells were transfected with vectors and then screened using G418, after which the stably transfected cells were split into two and further cultured either in the presence or absence of G418. Of the six promoters, the CMV promoter yielded the highest transgene expression levels and the highest transfection efficiency, whereas the SV40 promoter maintained transgene expression more stably during long-term culture than the other promoters did. The CMV and SV40 promoter-containing vectors were furthermore episomally maintained and conferred sustained eGFP expression in the cells even under nonselective conditions. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the CMV promoter performs best in terms of yielding both high expression levels and high levels of stability using this episomal vector system.

  12. Impact of Different Promoters on Episomal Vectors Harbouring Characteristic Motifs of Matrix Attachment Regions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yin; Zhang, Jun-He; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Qiu-Li; Zhao, Chun-Peng; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the characteristic sequence of matrix attachment regions (MARs) allows transgenes to be maintained episomally in CHO cells. In the present study, six commonly used promoters from human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early (CMV), simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40), Rous sarcoma virus, Homo sapiens ubiquitin C, phosphoglycerate kinase, and β-globin, respectively, were evaluated to determine their effects on transgene expression and stability in CHO cells stably transfected via the episomal vector harbouring characteristic MAR motifs. The CHO cells were transfected with vectors and then screened using G418, after which the stably transfected cells were split into two and further cultured either in the presence or absence of G418. Of the six promoters, the CMV promoter yielded the highest transgene expression levels and the highest transfection efficiency, whereas the SV40 promoter maintained transgene expression more stably during long-term culture than the other promoters did. The CMV and SV40 promoter-containing vectors were furthermore episomally maintained and conferred sustained eGFP expression in the cells even under nonselective conditions. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the CMV promoter performs best in terms of yielding both high expression levels and high levels of stability using this episomal vector system. PMID:27226236

  13. Impact of Different Promoters on Episomal Vectors Harbouring Characteristic Motifs of Matrix Attachment Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Yin; Zhang, Jun-He; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Qiu-Li; Zhao, Chun-Peng; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the characteristic sequence of matrix attachment regions (MARs) allows transgenes to be maintained episomally in CHO cells. In the present study, six commonly used promoters from human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early (CMV), simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40), Rous sarcoma virus, Homo sapiens ubiquitin C, phosphoglycerate kinase, and β-globin, respectively, were evaluated to determine their effects on transgene expression and stability in CHO cells stably transfected via the episomal vector harbouring characteristic MAR motifs. The CHO cells were transfected with vectors and then screened using G418, after which the stably transfected cells were split into two and further cultured either in the presence or absence of G418. Of the six promoters, the CMV promoter yielded the highest transgene expression levels and the highest transfection efficiency, whereas the SV40 promoter maintained transgene expression more stably during long-term culture than the other promoters did. The CMV and SV40 promoter-containing vectors were furthermore episomally maintained and conferred sustained eGFP expression in the cells even under nonselective conditions. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the CMV promoter performs best in terms of yielding both high expression levels and high levels of stability using this episomal vector system. PMID:27226236

  14. Increased episomal replication accounts for the high rate of adaptive mutation in recD mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P L; Rosche, W A

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive mutation has been studied extensively in FC40, a strain of Escherichia coli that cannot metabolize lactose (Lac-) because of a frameshift mutation affecting the lacZ gene on its episome. recD mutants of FC40, in which the exonuclease activity of RecBCD (ExoV) is abolished but its helicase activity is retained, have an increased rate of adaptive mutation. The results presented here show that, in several respects, adaptive mutation to Lac+ involves different mechanisms in recD mutant cells than in wild-type cells. About half of the apparent increase in the adaptive mutation rate of recD mutant cells is due to a RecA-dependent increase in episomal copy number and to growth of the Lac- cells on the lactose plates. The remaining increase appears to be due to continued replication of the episome, with the extra copies being degraded or passed to recD+ recipients. In addition, the increase in adaptive mutation rate in recD mutant cells is (i) dependent on activities of the single-stranded exonucleases, RecJ and ExoI, which are not required for (in fact, slightly inhibit) adaptive mutation in wild-type cells, and (ii) enhanced by RecG, which opposes adaptive mutation in wild-type cells. PMID:10224241

  15. Episomal Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Promote Functional Recovery of Transected Murine Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Cardona, Esteban; Chuang, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve neurotmesis occurs frequently and functional recovery is often slow and impaired. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have shown much promise in recent years due to its regenerative properties similar to that of embryonic stem cells. However, the potential of iPSCs in promoting the functional recovery of a transected peripheral nerve is largely unknown. This study is the first to investigate in vivo effects of episomal iPSCs (EiPSCs) on peripheral nerve regeneration in a murine sciatic nerve transection model. Episomal iPSCs refer to iPSCs that are generated via Oct3/4-Klf4-Sox2 plasmid reprogramming instead of the conventional viral insertion techniques. It represents a relatively safer form of iPSC production without permanent transgene integration which may raise questions regarding risks of genomic mutation. A minimal number of EiPSCs were added directly to the transected nerve. Functional recovery of the EiPSC group was significantly improved compared to the negative control group when assessed via serial five-toe spread measurement and gait analysis of ankle angles. EiPSC promotion of nerve regeneration was also evident on stereographic analysis of axon density, myelin thickness, and axonal cross-sectional surface area. Most importantly, the results observed in EiPSCs are similar to that of the embryonic stem cell group. A roughly ten-fold increase in neurotrophin-3 levels was seen in EiPSCs which could have contributed to peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery. No abnormal masses or adverse effects were noted with EiPSC administration after one year of follow-up. We have hence shown that functional recovery of the transected peripheral nerve can be improved with the use of EiPSC therapy, which holds promise for the future of nerve regeneration. PMID:27736950

  16. Designer diatom episomes delivered by bacterial conjugation.

    PubMed

    Karas, Bogumil J; Diner, Rachel E; Lefebvre, Stephane C; McQuaid, Jeff; Phillips, Alex P R; Noddings, Chari M; Brunson, John K; Valas, Ruben E; Deerinck, Thomas J; Jablanovic, Jelena; Gillard, Jeroen T F; Beeri, Karen; Ellisman, Mark H; Glass, John I; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Venter, J Craig; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic microalgae hold great promise for the bioproduction of fuels and higher value chemicals. However, compared with model genetic organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, characterization of the complex biology and biochemistry of algae and strain improvement has been hampered by the inefficient genetic tools. To date, many algal species are transformable only via particle bombardment, and the introduced DNA is integrated randomly into the nuclear genome. Here we describe the first nuclear episomal vector for diatoms and a plasmid delivery method via conjugation from Escherichia coli to the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We identify a yeast-derived sequence that enables stable episome replication in these diatoms even in the absence of antibiotic selection and show that episomes are maintained as closed circles at copy number equivalent to native chromosomes. This highly efficient genetic system facilitates high-throughput functional characterization of algal genes and accelerates molecular phytoplankton research. PMID:25897682

  17. Designer diatom episomes delivered by bacterial conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Bogumil J.; Diner, Rachel E.; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; McQuaid, Jeff; Phillips, Alex P.R.; Noddings, Chari M.; Brunson, John K.; Valas, Ruben E.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Jablanovic, Jelena; Gillard, Jeroen T.F.; Beeri, Karen; Ellisman, Mark H.; Glass, John I.; Hutchison III, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Venter, J. Craig; Allen, Andrew E.; Dupont, Christopher L.; Weyman, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic microalgae hold great promise for the bioproduction of fuels and higher value chemicals. However, compared with model genetic organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, characterization of the complex biology and biochemistry of algae and strain improvement has been hampered by the inefficient genetic tools. To date, many algal species are transformable only via particle bombardment, and the introduced DNA is integrated randomly into the nuclear genome. Here we describe the first nuclear episomal vector for diatoms and a plasmid delivery method via conjugation from Escherichia coli to the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We identify a yeast-derived sequence that enables stable episome replication in these diatoms even in the absence of antibiotic selection and show that episomes are maintained as closed circles at copy number equivalent to native chromosomes. This highly efficient genetic system facilitates high-throughput functional characterization of algal genes and accelerates molecular phytoplankton research. PMID:25897682

  18. How dormant origins promote complete genome replication.

    PubMed

    Blow, J Julian; Ge, Xin Quan; Jackson, Dean A

    2011-08-01

    Many replication origins that are licensed by loading MCM2-7 complexes in G1 are not normally used. Activation of these dormant origins during S phase provides a first line of defence for the genome if replication is inhibited. When replication forks fail, dormant origins are activated within regions of the genome currently engaged in replication. At the same time, DNA damage-response kinases activated by the stalled forks preferentially suppress the assembly of new replication factories, thereby ensuring that chromosomal regions experiencing replicative stress complete synthesis before new regions of the genome are replicated. Mice expressing reduced levels of MCM2-7 have fewer dormant origins, are cancer-prone and are genetically unstable, demonstrating the importance of dormant origins for preserving genome integrity. We review the function of dormant origins, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and their physiological implications.

  19. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism. PMID:16277552

  20. KSHV Genome Replication and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Dabral, Prerna; Gupta, Namrata; Sarkar, Roni; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) is a major etiological agent for multiple severe malignancies in immune-compromised patients. KSHV establishes lifetime persistence in the infected individuals and displays two distinct life cycles, generally a prolonged passive latent, and a short productive or lytic cycle. During latent phase, the viral episome is tethered to the host chromosome and replicates once during every cell division. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is a predominant multifunctional nuclear protein expressed during latency, which plays a central role in episome tethering, replication and perpetual segregation of the episomes during cell division. LANA binds cooperatively to LANA binding sites (LBS) within the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral episome as well as to the cellular nucleosomal proteins to tether viral episome to the host chromosome. LANA has been shown to modulate multiple cellular signaling pathways and recruits various cellular proteins such as chromatin modifying enzymes, replication factors, transcription factors, and cellular mitotic framework to maintain a successful latent infection. Although, many other regions within the KSHV genome can initiate replication, KSHV TR is important for latent DNA replication and possible segregation of the replicated episomes. Binding of LANA to LBS favors the recruitment of various replication factors to initiate LANA dependent DNA replication. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms relevant to KSHV genome replication, segregation, and maintenance of latency. PMID:26870016

  1. HCF1 and OCT2 Cooperate with EBNA1 To Enhance OriP-Dependent Transcription and Episome Maintenance of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Sentana-Lledo, Daniel; Cassel, Joel; Messick, Troy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes latent infections as multicopy episomes with complex patterns of viral gene transcription and chromatin structure. The EBV origin of plasmid replication (OriP) has been implicated as a critical control element for viral transcription, as well as viral DNA replication and episome maintenance. Here, we examine cellular factors that bind OriP and regulate histone modification, transcription regulation, and episome maintenance. We found that OriP is enriched for histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation in multiple cell types and latency types. Host cell factor 1 (HCF1), a component of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methyltransferase complex, and transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding transcription factor 2) bound cooperatively with EBNA1 (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1) at OriP. Depletion of OCT2 or HCF1 deregulated latency transcription and histone modifications at OriP, as well as the OriP-regulated latency type-dependent C promoter (Cp) and Q promoter (Qp). HCF1 depletion led to a loss of histone H3K4me3 (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4) and H3 acetylation at Cp in type III latency and Qp in type I latency, as well as an increase in heterochromatic H3K9me3 at these sites. HCF1 depletion resulted in the loss of EBV episomes from Burkitt's lymphoma cells with type I latency and reactivation from lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) with type III latency. These findings indicate that HCF1 and OCT2 function at OriP to regulate viral transcription, histone modifications, and episome maintenance. As HCF1 is best known for its function in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene transcription, our findings suggest that EBV latency transcription shares unexpected features with HSV gene regulation. IMPORTANCE EBV latency is associated with several human cancers. Viral latent cycle gene expression is regulated by the epigenetic control of the OriP enhancer region. Here, we show that cellular factors

  2. Claspin promotes normal replication fork rates in human cells.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas; Caldecott, Keith W

    2008-06-01

    The S phase-specific adaptor protein Claspin mediates the checkpoint response to replication stress by facilitating phosphorylation of Chk1 by ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR). Evidence suggests that these components of the ATR pathway also play a critical role during physiological S phase. Chk1 is required for high rates of global replication fork progression, and Claspin interacts with the replication machinery and might therefore monitor normal DNA replication. Here, we have used DNA fiber labeling to investigate, for the first time, whether human Claspin is required for high rates of replication fork progression during normal S phase. We report that Claspin-depleted HeLa and HCT116 cells display levels of replication fork slowing similar to those observed in Chk1-depleted cells. This was also true in primary human 1BR3 fibroblasts, albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that Claspin is a universal requirement for high replication fork rates in human cells. Interestingly, Claspin-depleted cells retained significant levels of Chk1 phosphorylation at both Ser317 and Ser345, raising the possibility that Claspin function during normal fork progression may extend beyond facilitating phosphorylation of either individual residue. Consistent with this possibility, depletion of Chk1 and Claspin together doubled the percentage of very slow forks, compared with depletion of either protein alone.

  3. Metnase promotes restart and repair of stalled and collapsed replication forks.

    PubMed

    De Haro, Leyma P; Wray, Justin; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Durant, Stephen T; Corwin, Lori; Gentry, Amanda C; Osheroff, Neil; Lee, Suk-Hee; Hromas, Robert; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2010-09-01

    Metnase is a human protein with methylase (SET) and nuclease domains that is widely expressed, especially in proliferating tissues. Metnase promotes non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), and knockdown causes mild hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Metnase also promotes plasmid and viral DNA integration, and topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα)-dependent chromosome decatenation. NHEJ factors have been implicated in the replication stress response, and TopoIIα has been proposed to relax positive supercoils in front of replication forks. Here we show that Metnase promotes cell proliferation, but it does not alter cell cycle distributions, or replication fork progression. However, Metnase knockdown sensitizes cells to replication stress and confers a marked defect in restart of stalled replication forks. Metnase promotes resolution of phosphorylated histone H2AX, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks at collapsed forks, and it co-immunoprecipitates with PCNA and RAD9, a member of the PCNA-like RAD9-HUS1-RAD1 intra-S checkpoint complex. Metnase also promotes TopoIIα-mediated relaxation of positively supercoiled DNA. Metnase is not required for RAD51 focus formation after replication stress, but Metnase knockdown cells show increased RAD51 foci in the presence or absence of replication stress. These results establish Metnase as a key factor that promotes restart of stalled replication forks, and implicate Metnase in the repair of collapsed forks.

  4. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  5. Cdc6 ATPase activity disengages Cdc6 from the pre-replicative complex to promote DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Chang, FuJung; Riera, Alberto; Evrin, Cecile; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Speck, Christian; Weinreich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To initiate DNA replication, cells first load an MCM helicase double hexamer at origins in a reaction requiring ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1, also called pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) assembly. The essential mechanistic role of Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis in this reaction is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that although Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is essential to initiate DNA replication, it is not essential for MCM loading. Using purified proteins, an ATPase-defective Cdc6 mutant ‘Cdc6-E224Q’ promoted MCM loading on DNA. Cdc6-E224Q also promoted MCM binding at origins in vivo but cells remained blocked in G1-phase. If after loading MCM, Cdc6-E224Q was degraded, cells entered an apparently normal S-phase and replicated DNA, a phenotype seen with two additional Cdc6 ATPase-defective mutants. Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is therefore required for Cdc6 disengagement from the pre-RC after helicase loading to advance subsequent steps in helicase activation in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05795.001 PMID:26305410

  6. Cdc6 ATPase activity disengages Cdc6 from the pre-replicative complex to promote DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Chang, FuJung; Riera, Alberto; Evrin, Cecile; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Speck, Christian; Weinreich, Michael

    2015-08-25

    To initiate DNA replication, cells first load an MCM helicase double hexamer at origins in a reaction requiring ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1, also called pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) assembly. The essential mechanistic role of Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis in this reaction is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that although Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is essential to initiate DNA replication, it is not essential for MCM loading. Using purified proteins, an ATPase-defective Cdc6 mutant 'Cdc6-E224Q' promoted MCM loading on DNA. Cdc6-E224Q also promoted MCM binding at origins in vivo but cells remained blocked in G1-phase. If after loading MCM, Cdc6-E224Q was degraded, cells entered an apparently normal S-phase and replicated DNA, a phenotype seen with two additional Cdc6 ATPase-defective mutants. Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is therefore required for Cdc6 disengagement from the pre-RC after helicase loading to advance subsequent steps in helicase activation in vivo.

  7. FANCM interacts with PCNA to promote replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Rohleder, Florian; Huang, Jing; Xue, Yutong; Kuper, Jochen; Round, Adam; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    FANCM is a highly conserved DNA remodeling enzyme that promotes the activation of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway and facilitates replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks. However, how FANCM interacts with the replication machinery to promote traverse remains unclear. Here, we show that FANCM and its archaeal homolog Hef from Thermoplasma acidophilum interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential co-factor for DNA polymerases in both replication and repair. The interaction is mediated through a conserved PIP-box; and in human FANCM, it is strongly stimulated by replication stress. A FANCM variant carrying a mutation in the PIP-box is defective in promoting replication traverse of interstrand crosslinks and is also inefficient in promoting FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a key step of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Our data reveal a conserved interaction mode between FANCM and PCNA during replication stress, and suggest that this interaction is essential for FANCM to aid replication machines to traverse DNA interstrand crosslinks prior to post-replication repair. PMID:26825464

  8. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability.

    PubMed

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2012-03-15

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA-protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA-protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability.

  9. Human Choline Kinase-α Promotes Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication through Modulation of Membranous Viral Replication Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mun-Teng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reorganizes cellular membranes to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). The role that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) plays in HCV replication remains elusive. Here, we first showed that hCKα activity, not the CDP-choline pathway, promoted viral RNA replication. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation of HCV-infected cells revealed that a small fraction of hCKα colocalized with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that HCV infection increased hCKα localization to the ER. In the pTM-NS3-NS5B model, NS3-NS5B expression increased the localization of the wild-type, not the inactive D288A mutant, hCKα on the ER, and hCKα activity was required for effective trafficking of hCKα and NS5A to the ER. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that hCKα was recruited onto the viral RC presumably through its binding to NS5A domain 1 (D1). hCKα silencing or treatment with CK37, an hCKα activity inhibitor, abolished HCV-induced MW formation. In addition, hCKα depletion hindered NS5A localization on the ER, interfered with NS5A and NS5B colocalization, and mitigated NS5A-NS5B interactions but had no apparent effect on NS5A-NS4B and NS4B-NS5B interactions. Nevertheless, hCKα activity was not essential for the binding of NS5A to hCKα or NS5B. These findings demonstrate that hCKα forms a complex with NS5A and that hCKα activity enhances the targeting of the complex to the ER, where hCKα protein, not activity, mediates NS5A binding to NS5B, thereby promoting functional membranous viral RC assembly and viral RNA replication. IMPORTANCE HCV infection reorganizes the cellular membrane to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). Here, we report that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) acts as an essential host factor for HCV RNA replication. A fraction of hCKα colocalizes with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum

  10. E1a promotes c-Myc-dependent replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Valero, María Llanos; Cimas, Francisco Jose; Arias, Laura; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García, Elena; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; García-Cano, Jesús; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Ángel de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel; Sánchez-Pérez, Isabel; Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The E1a gene from adenovirus is known to be a potent inducer of chemo/radiosensitivity in a wide range of tumors. However, the molecular bases of its radiosensitizer properties are still poorly understood. In an attempt to study this effect, U87MG cells, derived from a radio-resistant tumor as glioblastoma, where infected with lentivirus carrying E1a gene developing an acute sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The induction of radiosensitivity correlated with a marked G2/M phase accumulation and a potent apoptotic response. Our findings demonstrate that c-Myc plays a pivotal role in E1a-associated radiosensitivity through the induction of a replicative stress situation, as our data support by genetic approaches, based in interference and overexpression in U87MG cells. In fact, we present evidence showing that Chk1 is a novel transcriptional target of E1a gene through the effect exerted by this adenoviral protein onto c-Myc. Moreover, c-Myc upregulation also explains the marked phosphorylation of H2AX associated to E1a expression in the absence of DNA damage. Indeed, all these observations were applicable to other experimental models, such as T98G, LN-405 and A172, rendering the same pattern in terms of radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, upregulation of Chk1, c-Myc, and phosphorylation pattern of H2AX. In summary, our data propose a novel mechanism to explain how E1a mediates radiosensitivity through the signaling axis E1a→c-Myc→ replicative stress situation. This novel mechanism of E1a-mediated radiosensitivity could be the key to open new possibilities in the current therapy of glioblastoma. PMID:24196438

  11. WRNIP1 protects stalled forks from degradation and promotes fork restart after replication stress.

    PubMed

    Leuzzi, Giuseppe; Marabitti, Veronica; Pichierri, Pietro; Franchitto, Annapaola

    2016-07-01

    Accurate handling of stalled replication forks is crucial for the maintenance of genome stability. RAD51 defends stalled replication forks from nucleolytic attack, which otherwise can threaten genome stability. However, the identity of other factors that can collaborate with RAD51 in this task is poorly elucidated. Here, we establish that human Werner helicase interacting protein 1 (WRNIP1) is localized to stalled replication forks and cooperates with RAD51 to safeguard fork integrity. We show that WRNIP1 is directly involved in preventing uncontrolled MRE11-mediated degradation of stalled replication forks by promoting RAD51 stabilization on ssDNA We further demonstrate that replication fork protection does not require the ATPase activity of WRNIP1 that is however essential to achieve the recovery of perturbed replication forks. Loss of WRNIP1 or its catalytic activity causes extensive DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Intriguingly, downregulation of the anti-recombinase FBH1 can compensate for loss of WRNIP1 activity, since it attenuates replication fork degradation and chromosomal aberrations in WRNIP1-deficient cells. Therefore, these findings unveil a unique role for WRNIP1 as a replication fork-protective factor in maintaining genome stability.

  12. Promotion of Hendra virus replication by microRNA 146a.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cameron R; Marsh, Glenn A; Jenkins, Kristie A; Gantier, Michael P; Tizard, Mark L; Middleton, Deborah; Lowenthal, John W; Haining, Jessica; Izzard, Leonard; Gough, Tamara J; Deffrasnes, Celine; Stambas, John; Robinson, Rachel; Heine, Hans G; Pallister, Jackie A; Foord, Adam J; Bean, Andrew G; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2013-04-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus. Thirty-nine outbreaks of Hendra virus have been reported since its initial identification in Queensland, Australia, resulting in seven human infections and four fatalities. Little is known about cellular host factors impacting Hendra virus replication. In this work, we demonstrate that Hendra virus makes use of a microRNA (miRNA) designated miR-146a, an NF-κB-responsive miRNA upregulated by several innate immune ligands, to favor its replication. miR-146a is elevated in the blood of ferrets and horses infected with Hendra virus and is upregulated by Hendra virus in human cells in vitro. Blocking miR-146a reduces Hendra virus replication in vitro, suggesting a role for this miRNA in Hendra virus replication. In silico analysis of miR-146a targets identified ring finger protein (RNF)11, a member of the A20 ubiquitin editing complex that negatively regulates NF-κB activity, as a novel component of Hendra virus replication. RNA interference-mediated silencing of RNF11 promotes Hendra virus replication in vitro, suggesting that increased NF-κB activity aids Hendra virus replication. Furthermore, overexpression of the IκB superrepressor inhibits Hendra virus replication. These studies are the first to demonstrate a host miRNA response to Hendra virus infection and suggest an important role for host miRNAs in Hendra virus disease.

  13. Inhibition of TGF-β Signaling Promotes Human Pancreatic β-Cell Replication.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sangeeta; Dirice, Ercument; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Bhushan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of functional pancreatic β-cells, and restoration of β-cells is a major goal for regenerative therapies. Endogenous regeneration of β-cells via β-cell replication has the potential to restore cellular mass; however, pharmacological agents that promote regeneration or expansion of endogenous β-cells have been elusive. The regenerative capacity of β-cells declines rapidly with age, due to accumulation of p16(INK4a), resulting in limited capacity for adult endocrine pancreas regeneration. Here, we show that transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling via Smad3 integrates with the trithorax complex to activate and maintain Ink4a expression to prevent β-cell replication. Importantly, inhibition of TGF-β signaling can result in repression of the Ink4a/Arf locus, resulting in increased β-cell replication in adult mice. Furthermore, small molecule inhibitors of the TGF-β pathway promote β-cell replication in human islets transplanted into NOD-scid IL-2Rg(null) mice. These data reveal a novel role for TGF-β signaling in the regulation of the Ink4a/Arf locus and highlight the potential of using small molecule inhibitors of TGF-β signaling to promote human β-cell replication. PMID:26936960

  14. ZEB2 inhibits HBV transcription and replication by targeting its core promoter.

    PubMed

    He, Qiao; Li, Wanyu; Ren, Jihua; Huang, Yecai; Huang, Ying; Hu, Qin; Chen, Juan; Chen, Weixian

    2016-03-29

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of liver diseases, especially liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the interaction between host and HBV has not been fully elucidated. ZEB2 is a Smad-interacting, multi-zinc finger protein that acts as a transcription factor or repressor for several signaling pathways. This study found that the expression of ZEB2 was decreased in HBV-expressing cells. Overexpression of ZEB2 inhibited HBV DNA replicative intermediates, 3.5kb mRNA, core protein level, and the secretion of HBsAg and HBeAg. In contrast, ZEB2 knockdown promoted HBV replication. Furthermore, ZEB2 could bind to HBV core promoter and inhibit its promoter activity. Mutation at the ZEB2 binding site in HBV core promoter eradicated ZEB2-mediated inhibition of HBV replication. This study identifies ZEB2 as a novel host restriction factor that inhibits HBV replication in hepatocytes. These data may shed light on development of new antiviral strategies.

  15. Adenosine kinase inhibition selectively promotes rodent and porcine islet β-cell replication

    PubMed Central

    Annes, Justin P.; Ryu, Jennifer Hyoje; Lam, Kelvin; Carolan, Peter J.; Utz, Katrina; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Arvanites, Anthony C.; Rubin, Lee L.; Weir, Gordon; Melton, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a pathological condition characterized by relative insulin deficiency, persistent hyperglycemia, and, consequently, diffuse micro- and macrovascular disease. One therapeutic strategy is to amplify insulin-secretion capacity by increasing the number of the insulin-producing β cells without triggering a generalized proliferative response. Here, we present the development of a small-molecule screening platform for the identification of molecules that increase β-cell replication. Using this platform, we identify a class of compounds [adenosine kinase inhibitors (ADK-Is)] that promote replication of primary β cells in three species (mouse, rat, and pig). Furthermore, the replication effect of ADK-Is is cell type-selective: treatment of islet cell cultures with ADK-Is increases replication of β cells but not that of α cells, PP cells, or fibroblasts. Short-term in vivo treatment with an ADK-I also increases β-cell replication but not exocrine cell or hepatocyte replication. Therefore, we propose ADK inhibition as a strategy for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22345561

  16. Leader of the Capsid Protein in Feline Calicivirus Promotes Replication of Norwalk Virus in Cell Culture▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok; George, David W.; Patton, John B.; Green, Kim Y.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.

    2008-01-01

    The inability to grow human noroviruses in cell culture has greatly impeded the studies of their pathogenesis and immunity. Vesiviruses, in the family Caliciviridae, grow efficiently in cell culture and encode a unique protein in the subgenomic region designated as leader of the capsid protein (LC). We hypothesized that LC might be associated with the efficient replication of vesiviruses in cell culture and promote the replication of human norovirus in cells. To test this hypothesis, a recombinant plasmid was engineered in which the LC region of feline calicivirus (FCV) was placed under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter (pCI-LC) so that the LC protein could be provided in trans to replicating calicivirus genomes bearing a reporter gene. We constructed pNV-GFP, a recombinant plasmid containing a full-length NV genome with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the place of VP1. The transfection of pNV-GFP in MVA-T7-infected cells produced few GFP-positive cells detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. When pNV-GFP was cotransfected with pCI-LC in MVA-T7-infected cells, we observed an increase in the number of GFP-positive cells (ca. 3% of the whole-cell population). Using this cotransfection method with mutagenesis study, we identified potential cis-acting elements at the start of subgenomic RNA and the 3′ end of NV genome for the virus replication. We conclude that LC may be a viral factor which promotes the replication of NV in cells, which could provide a clue to growing the fastidious human noroviruses in cell culture. PMID:18632864

  17. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  18. Increased amounts of the influenza virus nucleoprotein do not promote higher levels of viral genome replication.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Anne E; Dalton, Rosa M; Amorim, Maria Joao; Elton, Debra; Digard, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Influenza virus genome replication requires the virus-encoded nucleoprotein (NP), partly because it is necessary to encapsidate the viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and antigenomic cRNA segments into ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). However, there is also evidence that NP actively regulates viral RNA synthesis and there is a long-standing hypothesis that increased concentrations of NP in the cell are responsible for a switch from genome transcription to replication. Here, this hypothesis is tested in a recombinant setting and in the context of virus infection. In a plasmid-based system for reconstituting active viral RNPs in cells, titration of increasing amounts of NP did not promote higher levels of genome replication relative to transcription, but in fact caused the opposite effect. An approximately fourfold reduction in the ratio of genomic and antigenomic RNAs to mRNA was seen across an 80-fold range of NP plasmid concentrations. When cells were transfected with the same amounts of NP plasmid to establish a concentration gradient of NP prior to virus superinfection, no change in the ratio of cRNA to mRNA was seen for segments 5 and 7, or for the ratio of segment 5 vRNA to mRNA. A slight reduction in the ratio of segment 7 vRNA to mRNA was seen. These findings do not support the simple hypothesis that increased intracellular concentrations of NP promote influenza virus genome replication.

  19. Structural and Functional Studies of the Promoter Element for Dengue Virus RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lodeiro, María F.; Filomatori, Claudia V.; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2009-01-01

    The 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the dengue virus (DENV) genome contains two defined elements essential for viral replication. At the 5′ end, a large stem-loop (SLA) structure functions as the promoter for viral polymerase activity. Next to the SLA, there is a short stem-loop that contains a cyclization sequence known as the 5′ upstream AUG region (5′UAR). Here, we analyzed the secondary structure of the SLA in solution and the structural requirements of this element for viral replication. Using infectious DENV clones, viral replicons, and in vitro polymerase assays, we defined two helical regions, a side stem-loop, a top loop, and a U bulge within SLA as crucial elements for viral replication. The determinants for SLA-polymerase recognition were found to be common in different DENV serotypes. In addition, structural elements within the SLA required for DENV RNA replication were also conserved among different mosquito- and tick-borne flavivirus genomes, suggesting possible common strategies for polymerase-promoter recognition in flaviviruses. Furthermore, a conserved oligo(U) track present downstream of the SLA was found to modulate RNA synthesis in transfected cells. In vitro polymerase assays indicated that a sequence of at least 10 residues following the SLA, upstream of the 5′UAR, was necessary for efficient RNA synthesis using the viral 3′UTR as template. PMID:19004935

  20. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-11-18

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce (1)O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial (1)O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by (1)O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro.

  1. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen (1O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce 1O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial 1O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by 1O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro. PMID:26577055

  2. Accurate quantification of episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat circles by use of optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2015-02-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation.

  3. Innate lymphotoxin receptor mediated signaling promotes HSV-1 associated neuroinflammation and viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yong; Yang, Kaiting; Guo, Jingya; Wroblewska, Joanna; Fu, Yang-Xin; Peng, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Host anti-viral innate immunity plays important roles in the defense against HSV-1 infection. In this study, we find an unexpected role for innate LT/LIGHT signaling in promoting HSV-1 replication and virus induced inflammation in immunocompromised mice. Using a model of footpad HSV-1 infection in Rag1–/– mice, we observed that blocking LT/LIGHT signaling with LTβR-Ig could significantly delay disease progression and extend the survival of infected mice. LTβR-Ig treatment reduced late proinflammatory cytokine release in the serum and nervous tissue, and inhibited chemokine expression and inflammatory cells infiltration in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Intriguingly, LTβR-Ig treatment restricted HSV-1 replication in the DRG but not the footpad. These findings demonstrate a critical role for LT/LIGHT signaling in modulating innate inflammation and promoting HSV-1 replication in the nervous system, and suggest a new target for treatment of virus-induced adverse immune response and control of severe HSV-1 infection. PMID:25993659

  4. RecA protein promotes the regression of stalled replication forks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Robu, M E; Inman, R B; Cox, M M

    2001-07-17

    Replication forks are halted by many types of DNA damage. At the site of a leading-strand DNA lesion, forks may stall and leave the lesion in a single-strand gap. Fork regression is the first step in several proposed pathways that permit repair without generating a double-strand break. Using model DNA substrates designed to mimic one of the known structures of a fork stalled at a leading-strand lesion, we show here that RecA protein of Escherichia coli will promote a fork regression reaction in vitro. The regression process exhibits an absolute requirement for ATP hydrolysis and is enhanced when dATP replaces ATP. The reaction is not affected by the inclusion of the RecO and R proteins. We present this reaction as one of several potential RecA protein roles in the repair of stalled and/or collapsed replication forks in bacteria. PMID:11459955

  5. Mapping of a replication origin within the promoter region of two unlinked, abundantly transcribed actin genes of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Bénard, M; Lagnel, C; Pallotta, D; Pierron, G

    1996-03-01

    We analyzed the replication of two unlinked actin genes, ardB and ardC , which are abundantly transcribed in the naturally synchronous plasmodium of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum. Detection and size measurements of single-stranded nascent replication intermediates (RIs) demonstrate that these two genes are concomitantly replicated at the onset of the 3-h S phase and tightly linked to replication origins. Appearance of RIs on neutral-neutral two-dimensional gels at specific time points in early S phase and analysis of their structure confirmed these results and further established that, in both cases, an efficient, site-specific, bidirectional origin of replication is localized within the promoter region of the gene. We also determined similar elongation rates for the divergent replication forks of the ardC gene replicon. Finally, taking advantage of a restriction fragment length polymorphism, we studied allelic replicons and demonstrate similar localizations and a simultaneous firing of allelic replication origins. Computer search revealed a low level of homology between the promoters of ardB and ardC and, most notably, the absence of DNA sequences similar to the yeast autonomously replicating sequence consensus sequence in these Physarum origin regions. Our results with the ardB and ardC actin genes support the model of early replicating origins located within the promoter regions of abundantly transcribed genes in P. polycephalum. PMID:8622700

  6. Activation domains of transcription factors mediate replication dependent transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R D; Lee, B A; Jackson, S P; Proudfoot, N J

    1996-01-01

    Transcription from a minimal HIV-1 promoter containing the three Sp1 binding sites and TATA box can be activated without Tat by template DNA replication. Here we show that this activation can also be mediated by recombinant GAL4 fusion proteins containing the activation domains of Sp1, VP16 or CTF (or by full-length GAL4) targeted to the HIV-1 promoter by replacing the Sp1 sites with five GAL4 binding sites. Thus Sp1 is not unique in its ability to mediate replication activated transcription, although the degree of processivity elicited by the different activators varied significantly from strongly processive (GAL4-VP16) to relatively non-processive (GAL4-Sp1 or -CTF). Processive GAL4-VP16-activated transcription, but not efficient initiation, required multiple GAL4 binding sites. In the presence of Tat, transcription with GAL4-SP1 and GAL4-CTF was further activated (principally at the level of processivity) but GAL4-VP16-potentiated transcription was only slightly stimulated. The Tat-dependent switch from non-processive to fully processive transcription was particularly marked for GAL4-Sp1, an effect which may be relevant to the selection of Sp1 binding sites by the HIV-1 promoter. PMID:8604293

  7. MAR characteristic motifs mediate episomal vector in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Li, Zhaoxi; Wang, Tianyun; Wang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li; Dong, Weihua; Jing, Changqin; Yang, Xianjun

    2015-04-01

    An ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent transgene expression without limitations in safety and reproducibility. Recent researches' insight into the ability of chromosomal matrix attachment regions (MARs) to mediate episomal maintenance of genetic elements allowed the development of a circular episomal vector. Although a MAR-mediated engineered vector has been developed, little is known on which motifs of MAR confer this function during interaction with the host genome. Here, we report an artificially synthesized DNA fragment containing only characteristic motif sequences that served as an alternative to human beta-interferon matrix attachment region sequence. The potential of the vector to mediate gene transfer in CHO cells was investigated. The short synthetic MAR motifs were found to mediate episomal vector at a low copy number for many generations without integration into the host genome. Higher transgene expression was maintained for at least 4 months. In addition, MAR was maintained episomally and conferred sustained EGFP expression even in nonselective CHO cells. All the results demonstrated that MAR characteristic sequence-based vector can function as stable episomes in CHO cells, supporting long-term and effective transgene expression.

  8. RASSF4 promotes EV71 replication to accelerate the inhibition of the phosphorylation of AKT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengfeng; Liu, Yongjuan; Chen, Xiong; Dong, Lanlan; Zhou, Bingfei; Cheng, Qingqing; Han, Song; Liu, Zhongchun; Peng, Biwen; He, Xiaohua; Liu, Wanhong

    2015-03-20

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), occasionally leading to death. As a member of the RAS association domain family (RASSFs), RASSF4 plays important roles in cell death, tumor development and signal transduction. However, little is known about the relationship between RASSF4 and EV71. Our study reveals for the first time that RASSF4 promotes EV71 replication and then accelerates AKT phosphorylation inhibition in EV71-infected 293T cells, suggesting that RASSF4 may be a potential new target for designing therapeutic measures to prevent and control EV71 infection.

  9. Dicer promotes transcription termination at sites of replication stress to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Castel, Stephane E.; Ren, Jie; Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Chang, An-Yun; Sánchez, Mar; Valbuena, Alberto; Antequera, Francisco; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear RNA interference is an important regulator of transcription and epigenetic modification, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using a genome-wide approach in the fission yeast S. pombe we have found that Dcr1, but not other components of the canonical RNAi pathway, promotes the release of Pol II from the 3’ end of highly transcribed genes, and, surprisingly, from antisense transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes, which are normally transcribed by Pol I and Pol III. These Dcr1-terminated loci correspond to sites of replication stress and DNA damage, likely resulting from transcription-replication collisions. At the rDNA loci, release of Pol II facilitates DNA replication and prevents homologous recombination, which would otherwise lead to loss of rDNA repeats especially during meiosis. Our results reveal a novel role for Dcr1-mediated transcription termination in genome maintenance and may account for widespread regulation of genome stability by nuclear RNAi in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25417108

  10. Dicer promotes transcription termination at sites of replication stress to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Castel, Stephane E; Ren, Jie; Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Chang, An-Yun; Sánchez, Mar; Valbuena, Alberto; Antequera, Francisco; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-10-23

    Nuclear RNAi is an important regulator of transcription and epigenetic modification, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Using a genome-wide approach in the fission yeast S. pombe, we have found that Dcr1, but not other components of the canonical RNAi pathway, promotes the release of Pol II from the 3? end of highly transcribed genes, and, surprisingly, from antisense transcription of rRNA and tRNA genes, which are normally transcribed by Pol I and Pol III. These Dcr1-terminated loci correspond to sites of replication stress and DNA damage, likely resulting from transcription-replication collisions. At the rDNA loci, release of Pol II facilitates DNA replication and prevents homologous recombination, which would otherwise lead to loss of rDNA repeats especially during meiosis. Our results reveal a novel role for Dcr1-mediated transcription termination in genome maintenance and may account for widespread regulation of genome stability by nuclear RNAi in higher eukaryotes.

  11. Taz1-Shelterin Promotes Facultative Heterochromatin Assembly at Chromosome-Internal Sites Containing Late Replication Origins.

    PubMed

    Zofall, Martin; Smith, Deborah R; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Dhakshnamoorthy, Jothy; Grewal, Shiv I S

    2016-06-16

    Facultative heterochromatin regulates gene expression, but its assembly is poorly understood. Previously, we identified facultative heterochromatin islands in the fission yeast genome and found that RNA elimination machinery promotes island assembly at meiotic genes. Here, we report that Taz1, a component of the telomere protection complex Shelterin, is required to assemble heterochromatin islands at regions corresponding to late replication origins that are sites of double-strand break formation during meiosis. The loss of Taz1 or other Shelterin subunits, including Ccq1 that interacts with Clr4/Suv39h, abolishes heterochromatin at late origins and causes derepression of associated genes. Moreover, the late-origin regulator Rif1 affects heterochromatin at Taz1-dependent islands and subtelomeric regions. We explore the connection between facultative heterochromatin and replication control and show that heterochromatin machinery affects replication timing. These analyses reveal the role of Shelterin in facultative heterochromatin assembly at late origins, which has important implications for genome stability and gene regulation. PMID:27264871

  12. Coxiella burnetii Effector Proteins That Localize to the Parasitophorous Vacuole Membrane Promote Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.; Howe, Dale; Cockrell, Diane C.; Bastidas, Robert J.; Valdivia, Raphael H.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii directs biogenesis of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that acquires host endolysosomal components. Formation of a PV that supports C. burnetii replication requires a Dot/Icm type 4B secretion system (T4BSS) that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytosol. Thus, a subset of T4BSS effectors are presumed to direct PV biogenesis. Recently, the PV-localized effector protein CvpA was found to promote C. burnetii intracellular growth and PV expansion. We predict additional C. burnetii effectors localize to the PV membrane and regulate eukaryotic vesicle trafficking events that promote pathogen growth. To identify these vacuolar effector proteins, a list of predicted C. burnetii T4BSS substrates was compiled using bioinformatic criteria, such as the presence of eukaryote-like coiled-coil domains. Adenylate cyclase translocation assays revealed 13 proteins were secreted in a Dot/Icm-dependent fashion by C. burnetii during infection of human THP-1 macrophages. Four of the Dot/Icm substrates, termed Coxiella vacuolar protein B (CvpB), CvpC, CvpD, and CvpE, labeled the PV membrane and LAMP1-positive vesicles when ectopically expressed as fluorescently tagged fusion proteins. C. burnetii ΔcvpB, ΔcvpC, ΔcvpD, and ΔcvpE mutants exhibited significant defects in intracellular replication and PV formation. Genetic complementation of the ΔcvpD and ΔcvpE mutants rescued intracellular growth and PV generation, whereas the growth of C. burnetii ΔcvpB and ΔcvpC was rescued upon cohabitation with wild-type bacteria in a common PV. Collectively, these data indicate C. burnetii encodes multiple effector proteins that target the PV membrane and benefit pathogen replication in human macrophages. PMID:25422265

  13. Robust In Vivo Transduction of a Genetically Stable Epstein-Barr Virus Episome to Hepatocytes in Mice by a Hybrid Viral Vector▿

    PubMed Central

    Gallaher, Sean D.; Gil, Jose S.; Dorigo, Oliver; Berk, Arnold J.

    2009-01-01

    To make a safe, long-lasting gene delivery vehicle, we developed a hybrid vector that leverages the relative strengths of adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). A fully gene-deleted helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd) is used as the delivery vehicle for its scalability and high transduction efficiency. Upon delivery, a portion of the HDAd vector is recombined to form a circular plasmid. This episome includes two elements from EBV: an EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) expression cassette and an EBNA1 binding region. Along with a human replication origin, these elements provide considerable genetic stability to the episome in replicating cells while avoiding insertional mutagenesis. Here, we demonstrate that this hybrid approach is highly efficient at delivering EBV episomes to target cells in vivo. We achieved nearly 100% transduction of hepatocytes after a single intravenous injection in mice. This is a substantial improvement over the transduction efficiency of previously available physical and viral methods. Bioluminescent imaging of vector-transduced mice demonstrated that luciferase transgene expression from the hybrid was robust and compared well to a traditional HDAd vector. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that the EBV episome was stable at approximately 30 copies per cell for up to 50 weeks and that it remained circular and extrachromosomal. Approaches for adapting the HDAd-EBV hybrid to a variety of disease targets and the potential benefits of this approach are discussed. PMID:19158239

  14. Utilization of a thermosensitive episome bearing transposon TN10 to isolate Hfr donor strains of Erwinia carotovora subsp. chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Kotoujansky, A; Lemattre, M; Boistard, P

    1982-04-01

    A thermosensitive episome bearing the transposon Tn10, F(Ts)::Tn10 Lac+, has been successfully transferred from Escherichia coli to several wild strains of the enterobacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. chrysanthemi, which are pathogenic on Saintpaulia ionantha. In one of these strains, all of the characters controlled by this episome (Lac+, Tetr, Tra+) were expressed, and its replication was stopped at 40 degrees C and above. At 30 degrees C, the episome was easily transferred between strains derived from E. carotovora subsp. chrysanthemi 3937j and to E coli. Hfr donor strains were obtained from a F' strain of 3937j by selecting clones which grew at 40 degrees C on plates containing tetracycline. One of these strains, Hfrq, was examined in more detail: the characters Lac+ and Tetr were stabilized and did not segregate higher than its parental F' strain. The mating was most efficient at 37 degrees C on a membrane. Hfrq transferred its chromosome to recipient strains at high frequency and in a polarized fashion, as evidenced by the gradient of transfer frequencies, the kinetics of marker entry (in interrupted mating experiments), and the analysis of linkage between different markers. The chromosome of Hfrq was most probably transferred in the following sequence: origin...met...xyl...arg...ile...leu...thr...cys...pan...ura...gal...trp...his. ..pur... Moreover, this genetic transfer system proved to be efficient in strain construction. PMID:6277860

  15. Establishment of a promoter-based chromatin architecture on recently replicated DNA can accommodate variable inter-nucleosome spacing

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Ross T.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the fundamental subunits of eukaryotic chromatin, are organized with respect to transcriptional start sites. A major challenge to the persistence of this organization is the disassembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication. Here, we use complimentary approaches to map the locations of nucleosomes on recently replicated DNA. We find that nucleosomes are substantially realigned with promoters during the minutes following DNA replication. As a result, the nucleosomal landscape is largely re-established before newly replicated chromosomes are partitioned into daughter cells and can serve as a platform for the re-establishment of gene expression programmes. When the supply of histones is disrupted through mutation of the chaperone Caf1, a promoter-based architecture is generated, but with increased inter-nucleosomal spacing. This indicates that the chromatin remodelling enzymes responsible for spacing nucleosomes are capable of organizing nucleosomes with a range of different linker DNA lengths. PMID:27106059

  16. Accurate episomal HIV 2-LTR circles quantification using optimized DNA isolation and droplet digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), the detection of episomal HIV 2-LTR circles is a potential marker for ongoing viral replication. Quantification of 2-LTR circles is based on quantitative PCR or more recently on digital PCR assessment, but is hampered due to its low abundance. Sample pre-PCR processing is a critical step for 2-LTR circles quantification, which has not yet been sufficiently evaluated in patient derived samples. Materials and Methods We compared two sample processing procedures to more accurately quantify 2-LTR circles using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Episomal HIV 2-LTR circles were either isolated by genomic DNA isolation or by a modified plasmid DNA isolation, to separate the small episomal circular DNA from chromosomal DNA. This was performed in a dilution series of HIV-infected cells and HIV-1 infected patient derived samples (n=59). Samples for the plasmid DNA isolation method were spiked with an internal control plasmid. Results Genomic DNA isolation enables robust 2-LTR circles quantification. However, in the lower ranges of detection, PCR inhibition caused by high genomic DNA load substantially limits the amount of sample input and this impacts sensitivity and accuracy. Moreover, total genomic DNA isolation resulted in a lower recovery of 2-LTR templates per isolate, further reducing its sensitivity. The modified plasmid DNA isolation with a spiked reference for normalization was more accurate in these low ranges compared to genomic DNA isolation. A linear correlation of both methods was observed in the dilution series (R2=0.974) and in the patient derived samples with 2-LTR numbers above 10 copies per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), (R2=0.671). Furthermore, Bland–Altman analysis revealed an average agreement between the methods within the 27 samples in which 2-LTR circles were detectable with both methods (bias: 0.3875±1.2657 log10). Conclusions 2-LTR circles

  17. A Yeast GSK-3 Kinase Mck1 Promotes Cdc6 Degradation to Inhibit DNA Re-Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ikui, Amy E.; Rossio, Valentina; Schroeder, Lea; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Cdc6p is an essential component of the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC), which binds to DNA replication origins to promote initiation of DNA replication. Only once per cell cycle does DNA replication take place. After initiation, the pre-RC components are disassembled in order to prevent re-replication. It has been shown that the N-terminal region of Cdc6p is targeted for degradation after phosphorylation by Cyclin Dependent Kinase (CDK). Here we show that Mck1p, a yeast homologue of GSK-3 kinase, is also required for Cdc6 degradation through a distinct mechanism. Cdc6 is an unstable protein and is accumulated in the nucleus only during G1 and early S-phase in wild-type cells. In mck1 deletion cells, CDC6p is stabilized and accumulates in the nucleus even in late S phase and mitosis. Overexpression of Mck1p induces rapid Cdc6p degradation in a manner dependent on Threonine-368, a GSK-3 phosphorylation consensus site, and SCFCDC4. We show evidence that Mck1p-dependent degradation of Cdc6 is required for prevention of DNA re-replication. Loss of Mck1 activity results in synthetic lethality with other pre-RC mutants previously implicated in re-replication control, and these double mutant strains over-replicate DNA within a single cell cycle. These results suggest that a GSK3 family protein plays an unexpected role in preventing DNA over-replication through Cdc6 degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We propose that both CDK and Mck1 kinases are required for Cdc6 degradation to ensure a tight control of DNA replication. PMID:23236290

  18. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  19. Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene accelerates DNA replication fork elongation and promotes genetic instability in the absence of DNA breakage.

    PubMed

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Komatsu, Jun; Hupé, Philippe; Roulin, Christophe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Dutreix, Marie; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Bensimon, Aaron; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Guillouf, Christel

    2010-09-01

    The multistage process of cancer formation is driven by the progressive acquisition of somatic mutations. Replication stress creates genomic instability in mammals. Using a well-defined multistep leukemia model driven by Spi-1/PU.1 overexpression in the mouse and Spi-1/PU.1-overexpressing human leukemic cells, we investigated the relationship between DNA replication and cancer progression. Here, using DNA molecular combing and flow cytometry methods, we show that Spi-1 increases the speed of replication by acting specifically on elongation rather than enhancing origin firing. This shortens the S-phase duration. Combining data from Spi-1 knockdown in murine cells with Spi-1 overexpression in human cells, we provide evidence that inappropriate Spi-1 expression is directly responsible for the replication alteration observed. Importantly, the acceleration of replication progression coincides with an increase in the frequency of genomic mutations without inducing DNA breakage. Thus, we propose that the hitherto unsuspected role for spi-1 oncogene in promoting replication elongation and genomic mutation promotes blastic progression during leukemic development.

  20. Induction of the Bovine Papillomavirus Origin “Onion Skin”-Type DNA Replication at High E1 Protein Concentrations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Andres; Rünkorg, Kertu; Jaanson, Nele; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Ene

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the replication of plasmids composed of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) origin of replication and expression cartridges for viral proteins E1 and E2 in hamster and mouse cells. We found that the replication mode changed dramatically at different expression levels of the E1 protein. At high levels of the E1 protein, overreplication of the origin region of the plasmid was observed. Analysis of the replication products by one-dimensional and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis suggested that initially “onion skin”-type replication intermediates were generated, presumably resulting from initiation of the new replication forks before the leading fork completed the synthesis of the DNA on the episomal plasmid. These replication intermediates served as templates for generation of a heterogeneous set of origin region-containing linear fragments by displacement synthesis at the partially replicated plasmid. Additionally, the linear fragments may have been generated by DNA break-up of the onion skin-type intermediates. Analysis of replication products indicated that generated linear fragments recombined and formed concatemers or circular molecules, which presumably were able to replicate in an E1- and E2-dependent fashion. At moderate and low levels of E1, generated by transcription of the E1 open reading frame using weaker promoters, DNA replication was initiated at much lower levels, which allowed elongation of the replication fork starting from the origin to be more balanced and resulted in the generation of full-sized replication products. PMID:11992014

  1. Tousled-like kinases phosphorylate Asf1 to promote histone supply during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Klimovskaia, Ilnaz M; Young, Clifford; Strømme, Caroline B; Menard, Patrice; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Mejlvang, Jakob; Ask, Katrine; Ploug, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L; Jensen, Ole N; Groth, Anja

    2014-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes are rapidly assembled on newly synthesized DNA to restore chromatin organization. Asf1, a key histone H3-H4 chaperone required for this process, is phosphorylated by Tousled-Like Kinases (TLKs). Here, we identify TLK phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry and dissect how phosphorylation impacts on human Asf1 function. The divergent C-terminal tail of Asf1a is phosphorylated at several sites and this is required for timely progression through S phase. Consistent with this, biochemical analysis of wild-type and phosphomimetic Asf1a shows that phosphorylation enhances binding to histones and the downstream chaperones CAF-1 and HIRA. Moreover, we find that TLK phosphorylation of Asf1a is induced in cells experiencing deficiency of new histones and that TLK interaction with Asf1a involves its histone-binding pocket. We thus propose that TLK signaling promotes histone supply in S phase by targeting histone-free Asf1 and stimulating its ability to shuttle histones to sites of chromatin assembly. PMID:24598821

  2. Quinacrine promotes replication and conformational mutation of chronic wasting disease prions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jifeng; Kang, Hae-Eun; Telling, Glenn C

    2014-04-22

    Quinacrine's ability to reduce levels of pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in mouse cells infected with experimentally adapted prions led to several unsuccessful clinical studies in patients with prion diseases, a 10-y investment to understand its mechanism of action, and the production of related compounds with expectations of greater efficacy. We show here, in stark contrast to this reported inhibitory effect, that quinacrine enhances deer and elk PrP(Sc) accumulation and promotes propagation of prions causing chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal, transmissible, neurodegenerative disorder of cervids of uncertain zoonotic potential. Surprisingly, despite increased prion titers in quinacrine-treated cells, transmission of the resulting prions produced prolonged incubation times and altered PrP(Sc) deposition patterns in the brains of diseased transgenic mice. This unexpected outcome is consistent with quinacrine affecting the intrinsic properties of the CWD prion. Accordingly, quinacrine-treated CWD prions were comprised of an altered PrP(Sc) conformation. Our findings provide convincing evidence for drug-induced conformational mutation of prions without the prerequisite of generating drug-resistant variants of the original strain. More specifically, they show that a drug capable of restraining prions in one species/strain setting, and consequently used to treat human prion diseases, improves replicative ability in another and therefore force reconsideration of current strategies to screen antiprion compounds.

  3. Staufen1 promotes HCV replication by inhibiting protein kinase R and transporting viral RNA to the site of translation and replication in the cells

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Updesh; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Mishra, Priya; Sengupta, Amitabha; Pandey, Virendra N.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic hepatitis C (CHC), which often progresses to liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The molecular mechanisms that establish CHC and cause its subsequent development into LC and HCC are poorly understood. We have identified a cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA binding protein, Stau1, which is crucial for HCV replication. In this study, Stau1 specifically interacted with the variable-stem-loop region in the 3′ NTR and domain IIId of the HCV-IRES in the 5′ NTR, and promoted HCV replication and translation. Stau1 coimmunoprecipitates HCV NS5B and a cell factor, protein kinase R (PKR), which is critical for interferon-induced cellular antiviral and antiproliferative responses. Like Stau1, PKR displayed binding specificity to domain IIId of HCV-IRES. Stau1 binds to PKR and strongly inhibits PKR-autophosphorylation. We demonstrated that the transport of HCV RNA on the polysomes is Stau1-dependent, being mainly localized in the monosome fractions when Stau1 is downregulated and exclusively localized in the polysomes when Stau1 is overexpressed. Our findings suggest that HCV may appropriate Stau1 to its advantage to prevent PKR-mediated inhibition of eIF2α, which is required for the synthesis of HCV proteins for translocation of viral RNA genome to the polysomes for efficient translation and replication. PMID:27106056

  4. Identification of a heteromeric complex that promotes DNA replication origin firing in human cells.

    PubMed

    Boos, Dominik; Yekezare, Mona; Diffley, John F X

    2013-05-24

    Treslin/TICRR (TopBP1-interacting, replication stimulating protein/TopBP1-interacting, checkpoint, and replication regulator), the human ortholog of the yeast Sld3 protein, is an essential DNA replication factor that is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases and the DNA damage checkpoint. We identified MDM two binding protein (MTBP) as a factor that interacts with Treslin/TICRR throughout the cell cycle. We show that MTBP depletion by means of small interfering RNA inhibits DNA replication by preventing assembly of the CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) holohelicase during origin firing. Although MTBP has been implicated in the function of the p53 tumor suppressor, we found MTBP is required for DNA replication irrespective of a cell's p53 status. We propose that MTBP acts with Treslin/TICRR to integrate signals from cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways to control the initiation of DNA replication in human cells.

  5. Nucleolin is important for Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-mediated episome binding, maintenance, and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Zhao, Bo; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Shen, Chih-Long; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-wen

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for EBV episome maintenance, replication, and transcription. These effects are mediated by EBNA1 binding to cognate oriP DNA, which comprise 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp dyad symmetry enhancer and an origin for DNA replication. To identify cell proteins essential for these EBNA1 functions, EBNA1 associated cell proteins were immune precipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nucleolin (NCL) was identified to be EBNA1 associated. EBNA1's N-terminal 100 aa and NCL's RNA-binding domains were critical for EBNA1/NCL interaction. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated NCL depletion substantially reduced EBNA1 recruitment to oriP DNA, EBNA1-dependent transcription of an EBV oriP luciferase reporter, and EBV genome maintenance in lymphoblastoid cell lines. NCL RNA-binding domain K429 was critical for ATP and EBNA1 binding. NCL overexpression increased EBNA1 binding to oriP and transcription, whereas NCL K429A was deficient. Moreover, NCL silencing impaired lymphoblastoid cell line growth. These experiments reveal a surprisingly critical role for NCL K429 in EBNA1 episome maintenance and transcription, which may be a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24344309

  6. Phosphatidic Acid Produced by Phospholipase D Promotes RNA Replication of a Plant RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Kiwamu; Taniguchi, Takako; Manabe, Yuki; Kaido, Masanori; Mise, Kazuyuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Taniguchi, Hisaaki; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses are intracellular obligate parasites replicate using the membrane-bound replicase complexes that contain multiple viral and host components. To replicate, (+)RNA viruses exploit host resources and modify host metabolism and membrane organization. Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing enzyme that catalyzes the production of phosphatidic acid (PA), a lipid second messenger that modulates diverse intracellular signaling in various organisms. PA is normally present in small amounts (less than 1% of total phospholipids), but rapidly and transiently accumulates in lipid bilayers in response to different environmental cues such as biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. However, the precise functions of PLD and PA remain unknown. Here, we report the roles of PLD and PA in genomic RNA replication of a plant (+)RNA virus, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV). We found that RCNMV RNA replication complexes formed in Nicotiana benthamiana contained PLDα and PLDβ. Gene-silencing and pharmacological inhibition approaches showed that PLDs and PLDs-derived PA are required for viral RNA replication. Consistent with this, exogenous application of PA enhanced viral RNA replication in plant cells and plant-derived cell-free extracts. We also found that a viral auxiliary replication protein bound to PA in vitro, and that the amount of PA increased in RCNMV-infected plant leaves. Together, our findings suggest that RCNMV hijacks host PA-producing enzymes to replicate. PMID:26020241

  7. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture.

  8. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

  9. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

  10. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Reinert, Brian L; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A; Hromas, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5' end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3' single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5' end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5' DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5' overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ.

  11. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5’ end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3’ single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5’ end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5’ DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5’ overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  12. Hepatitis B virus basal core promoter mutations show lower replication fitness associated with cccDNA acetylation status.

    PubMed

    Koumbi, Lemonica; Pollicino, Teresa; Raimondo, Giovanni; Stampoulis, Dimitrios; Khakoo, Salim; Karayiannis, Peter

    2016-07-15

    In chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, variants with mutations in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore region predominate and associate with more severe disease forms. Studies on their effect on viral replication remain controversial. Increasing evidence shows that epigenetic modifications of cccDNA regulate HBV replication and disease outcome. Here we determined the transcription and viral replication efficiency of well-defined BCP and precore mutations and their effect on cccDNA epigenetic control. HBV monomers bearing BCP mutations A1762T/G1764A and A1762T/G1764A/C1766T, and precore mutations G1896A, G1899A and G1896A/G1899A, were transfected into HepG2 cells using a plasmid-free approach. Viral RNA transcripts were detected by Northern blot hybridization and RT PCR, DNA replicative intermediates by Southern blotting and RT PCR, and viral release was measured by ELISA. Acetylation of cccDNA-bound histones was assessed by Chromatin ImmunoPrecipitation (ChIP) assay and methylation of cccDNA by bisulfite sequencing. BCP mutations resulted in low viral release, mRNA transcription and pgRNA/cccDNA ratios that paralleled the acetylation of cccDNA-bound H4 histone and inversely correlated with the HDAC1 recruitment onto cccDNA. Independently of the mutations, cccDNA was a target for methylation, accompanied by the upregulation of DNMT1 expression and DNMT1 recruitment onto cccDNA. Our results suggest that BCP mutations decrease viral replication capacity possibly by modulating the acetylation and deacetylation of cccDNA-bound histones while precore mutations do not have a significant effect on viral replication. These data provide evidence that epigenetic factors contribute to the regulation of HBV viral replication.

  13. FKBP8 interact with classical swine fever virus NS5A protein and promote virus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Helin; Zhang, Chengcheng; Cui, Hongjie; Guo, Kangkang; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Tianyue; Liang, Wulong; Lv, Qizhuang; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    The non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is proven to be involved in viral replication and can also modulate cellular signaling and host cellular responses via to its ability to interact with various cellular proteins. FKBP8 is also reported to promote virus replication. Here, we show that NS5A specifically interacts with FKBP8 through coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pulldown studies. Additionally, confocal microscopy study showed that NS5A and FKBP8 colocalized in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of FKBP8 via the eukaryotic expression plasmid pDsRED N1 significantly promoted viral RNA synthesis. The cells knockdown of FKBP8 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA markedly decreased the virus replication when infected with CSFV. These data suggest that FKBP8 plays a critical role in the viral life cycle, particularly during the virus RNA replication period. The investigation of FKBP8 protein functions may be beneficial for developing new strategies to treat CSFV infection. PMID:26748656

  14. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-01-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3′ end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3′ end protection and 5′–3′ decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes. PMID:26092942

  15. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-08-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3' end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3' end protection and 5'-3' decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes.

  16. Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics of Episomes among Ecologically Cohesive Bacterial Populations

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hong; Cordero, Otto X.; Camas, Francisco M.; Trimble, William; Meyer, Folker; Guglielmini, Julien; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Polz, Martin F.

    2015-05-05

    Although plasmids and other episomes are recognized as key players in horizontal gene transfer among microbes, their diversity and dynamics among ecologically structured host populations in the wild remain poorly understood. Here, we show that natural populations of marine Vibrionaceae bacteria host large numbers of families of episomes, consisting of plasmids and a surprisingly high fraction of plasmid-like temperate phages. Episomes are unevenly distributed among host populations, and contrary to the notion that high-density communities in biofilms act as hot spots of gene transfer, we identified a strong bias for episomes to occur in free-living as opposed to particle-attached cells. Mapping of episomal families onto host phylogeny shows that, with the exception of all phage and a few plasmid families, most are of recent evolutionary origin and appear to have spread rapidly by horizontal transfer. Such high eco-evolutionary turnover is particularly surprising for plasmids that are, based on previously suggested categorization, putatively nontransmissible, indicating that this type of plasmid is indeed frequently transferred by currently unknown mechanisms. Finally, analysis of recent gene transfer among plasmids reveals a network of extensive exchange connecting nearly all episomes. Genes functioning in plasmid transfer and maintenance are frequently exchanged, suggesting that plasmids can be rapidly transformed from one category to another. The broad distribution of episomes among distantly related hosts and the observed promiscuous recombination patterns show how episomes can offer their hosts rapid assembly and dissemination of novel functions.

  17. Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics of Episomes among Ecologically Cohesive Bacterial Populations

    DOE PAGES

    Xue, Hong; Cordero, Otto X.; Camas, Francisco M.; Trimble, William; Meyer, Folker; Guglielmini, Julien; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Polz, Martin F.

    2015-05-05

    Although plasmids and other episomes are recognized as key players in horizontal gene transfer among microbes, their diversity and dynamics among ecologically structured host populations in the wild remain poorly understood. Here, we show that natural populations of marine Vibrionaceae bacteria host large numbers of families of episomes, consisting of plasmids and a surprisingly high fraction of plasmid-like temperate phages. Episomes are unevenly distributed among host populations, and contrary to the notion that high-density communities in biofilms act as hot spots of gene transfer, we identified a strong bias for episomes to occur in free-living as opposed to particle-attached cells.more » Mapping of episomal families onto host phylogeny shows that, with the exception of all phage and a few plasmid families, most are of recent evolutionary origin and appear to have spread rapidly by horizontal transfer. Such high eco-evolutionary turnover is particularly surprising for plasmids that are, based on previously suggested categorization, putatively nontransmissible, indicating that this type of plasmid is indeed frequently transferred by currently unknown mechanisms. Finally, analysis of recent gene transfer among plasmids reveals a network of extensive exchange connecting nearly all episomes. Genes functioning in plasmid transfer and maintenance are frequently exchanged, suggesting that plasmids can be rapidly transformed from one category to another. The broad distribution of episomes among distantly related hosts and the observed promiscuous recombination patterns show how episomes can offer their hosts rapid assembly and dissemination of novel functions.« less

  18. STAT3 Activation Promotes Oncolytic HSV1 Replication in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okemoto, Kazuo; Wagner, Benjamin; Meisen, Hans; Haseley, Amy; Kaur, Balveen; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies report that STAT3 signaling is a master regulator of mesenchymal transformation of gliomas and that STAT3 modulated genes are highly expressed in the mesenchymal transcriptome of gliomas. A currently studied experimental treatment for gliomas consists of intratumoral injection of oncolytic viruses (OV), such as oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (oHSV). We have described one particular oHSV (rQNestin34.5) that exhibits potent anti-glioma activity in animal models. Here, we hypothesized that alterations in STAT3 signaling in glioma cells may affect the replicative ability of rQNestin34.5. In fact, human U251 glioma cells engineered to either over-express STAT3 or with genetic down-regulation of STAT3 supported oHSV replication to a significantly higher or lesser degree, respectively, when compared to controls. Administration of pharmacologic agents that increase STAT3 phosphorylation/activation (Valproic Acid) or increase STAT3 levels (Interleukin 6) also significantly enhanced oHSV replication. Instead, administration of inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation/activation (LLL12) significantly reduced oHSV replication. STAT3 led to a reduction in interferon signaling in oHSV infected cells and inhibition of interferon signaling abolished the effect of STAT3 on oHSV replication. These data thus indicate that STAT3 signaling in malignant gliomas enhances oHSV replication, likely by inhibiting the interferon response in infected glioma cells, thus suggesting avenues for possible potentiation of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:23936533

  19. An Origin of DNA Replication in the Promoter Region of the Human Fragile X Mental Retardation (FMR1) Gene▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Steven J.; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Doerfler, Walter; Small, Lawrence E.; Fanning, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation in males, arises when the normally stable 5 to 50 CGG repeats in the 5′ untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation protein 1 (FMR1) gene expand to over 200, leading to DNA methylation and silencing of the FMR1 promoter. Although the events that trigger local CGG expansion remain unknown, the stability of trinucleotide repeat tracts is affected by their position relative to an origin of DNA replication in model systems. Origins of DNA replication in the FMR1 locus have not yet been described. Here, we report an origin of replication adjacent to the FMR1 promoter and CGG repeats that was identified by scanning a 35-kb region. Prereplication proteins Orc3p and Mcm4p bind to chromatin in the FMR1 initiation region in vivo. The position of the FMR1 origin relative to the CGG repeats is consistent with a role in repeat maintenance. The FMR1 origin is active in transformed cell lines, fibroblasts from healthy individuals, fibroblasts from patients with fragile X syndrome, and fetal cells as early as 8 weeks old. The potential role of the FMR1 origin in CGG tract instability is discussed. PMID:17101793

  20. CUL4B promotes replication licensing by up-regulating the CDK2-CDC6 cascade.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongxin; Mi, Jun; Wang, Wenxing; Lu, Juanjuan; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Zhaojian; Hu, Huili; Yang, Yang; Gao, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Baichun; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2013-03-18

    Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) participate in the regulation of diverse cellular processes including cell cycle progression. Mutations in the X-linked CUL4B, a member of the cullin family, cause mental retardation and other developmental abnormalities in humans. Cells that are deficient in CUL4B are severely selected against in vivo in heterozygotes. Here we report a role of CUL4B in the regulation of replication licensing. Strikingly, CDC6, the licensing factor in replication, was positively regulated by CUL4B and contributed to the loading of MCM2 to chromatin. The positive regulation of CDC6 by CUL4B depends on CDK2, which phosphorylates CDC6, protecting it from APC(CDH1)-mediated degradation. Thus, aside being required for cell cycle reentry from quiescence, CDK2 also contributes to pre-replication complex assembly in G1 phase of cycling cells. Interestingly, the up-regulation of CDK2 by CUL4B is achieved via the repression of miR-372 and miR-373, which target CDK2. Our findings thus establish a CUL4B-CDK2-CDC6 cascade in the regulation of DNA replication licensing.

  1. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    SciTech Connect

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K.; James, John; Prescott, Alan; Haga, Ismar R.; Beard, Philippa M.

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  2. Replication fork blockage by RTS1 at an ectopic site promotes recombination in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jong Sook; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2005-06-01

    Homologous recombination is believed to play important roles in processing stalled/blocked replication forks in eukaryotes. In accordance with this, recombination is induced by replication fork barriers (RFBs) within the rDNA locus. However, the rDNA locus is a specialised region of the genome, and therefore the action of recombinases at its RFBs may be atypical. We show here for the first time that direct repeat recombination, dependent on Rad22 and Rhp51, is induced by replication fork blockage at a site-specific RFB (RTS1) within a 'typical' genomic locus in fission yeast. Importantly, when the RFB is positioned between the direct repeat, conservative gene conversion events predominate over deletion events. This is consistent with recombination occurring without breakage of the blocked fork. In the absence of the RecQ family DNA helicase Rqh1, deletion events increase dramatically, which correlates with the detection of one-sided DNA double-strand breaks at or near RTS1. These data indicate that Rqh1 acts to prevent blocked replication forks from collapsing and thereby inducing deletion events.

  3. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  4. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease.

  5. Slx5/Slx8 promotes replication stress tolerance by facilitating mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Yee Mon; Van Riper, Susan Kaye; Higgins, LeeAnn; Zhang, Tianji; Becker, Jordan Robert; Markowski, Todd William; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Griffin, Timothy Jon; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) causes replication stress. We uncovered that S. cerevisiae mcm10-1 mutants rely on the E3 SUMO ligase Mms21 and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase complex Slx5/8 for survival. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified changes in the SUMO proteome of mcm10-1 mutants and revealed candidates regulated by Slx5/8. Such candidates included subunits of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC), Bir1 and Sli15, known to facilitate spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation. We show here that Slx5 counteracts SAC activation in mcm10-1 mutants under conditions of moderate replication stress. This coincides with the proteasomal degradation of sumoylated Bir1. Importantly, Slx5-dependent mitotic relief was not only triggered by Mcm10 deficiency but also by treatment with low doses of the alkylating drug methyl methanesulfonate. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which Slx5/8 allows for passage through mitosis when replication stress is tolerable. PMID:27134171

  6. Replication of the TNFSF4 (OX40L) Promoter Region Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Witte, Torsten; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Galeazzi, Mauro; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 4 gene (TNFSF4) encodes the OX40 ligand (OX40L), a co-stimulatory molecule involved in T-cell activation. A recent study demonstrated the association ofTNFSF4 haplotypes located in the upstream region with risk for- or protection from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) (Graham et al, 2008). In order to replicate this association, five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the previously associated haplotypes and passing the proper quality control filters were tested in 1312 cases and 1801 controls from Germany, Italy, Spain, and Argentina. The association of TNFSF4 with SLE was replicated in all the sets except Spain. There was a unique risk haplotype tagged by the minor alleles of the SNPs rs1234317 (pooled OR=1.39, p=0.0009) and rs12039904 (pooled OR=1.38, p=0.0012). We did not observe association to a single protective marker (rs844644) or haplotype as the first study reported; instead, we observed different protective haplotypes, all carrying the major alleles of both SNPs rs1234317 and rs12039904. Association analysis conditioning on the haplotypic background confirmed that these two SNPs explain the entire haplotype effect. This is the first replication study that confirms the association of genetic variation in the upstream region of TNFSF4 with susceptibility to SLE. PMID:19092840

  7. Structural Insights into Bunyavirus Replication and Its Regulation by the vRNA Promoter.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Piotr; Malet, Hélène; Cusack, Stephen; Reguera, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Segmented negative-strand RNA virus (sNSV) polymerases transcribe and replicate the viral RNA (vRNA) within a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). We present cryo-EM and X-ray structures of, respectively, apo- and vRNA bound La Crosse orthobunyavirus (LACV) polymerase that give atomic-resolution insight into how such RNPs perform RNA synthesis. The complementary 3' and 5' vRNA extremities are sequence specifically bound in separate sites on the polymerase. The 5' end binds as a stem-loop, allosterically structuring functionally important polymerase active site loops. Identification of distinct template and product exit tunnels allows proposal of a detailed model for template-directed replication with minimal disruption to the circularised RNP. The similar overall architecture and vRNA binding of monomeric LACV to heterotrimeric influenza polymerase, despite high sequence divergence, suggests that all sNSV polymerases have a common evolutionary origin and mechanism of RNA synthesis. These results will aid development of replication inhibitors of diverse, serious human pathogenic viruses.

  8. Structural Insights into Bunyavirus Replication and Its Regulation by the vRNA Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Piotr; Malet, Hélène; Cusack, Stephen; Reguera, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Segmented negative-strand RNA virus (sNSV) polymerases transcribe and replicate the viral RNA (vRNA) within a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). We present cryo-EM and X-ray structures of, respectively, apo- and vRNA bound La Crosse orthobunyavirus (LACV) polymerase that give atomic-resolution insight into how such RNPs perform RNA synthesis. The complementary 3′ and 5′ vRNA extremities are sequence specifically bound in separate sites on the polymerase. The 5′ end binds as a stem-loop, allosterically structuring functionally important polymerase active site loops. Identification of distinct template and product exit tunnels allows proposal of a detailed model for template-directed replication with minimal disruption to the circularised RNP. The similar overall architecture and vRNA binding of monomeric LACV to heterotrimeric influenza polymerase, despite high sequence divergence, suggests that all sNSV polymerases have a common evolutionary origin and mechanism of RNA synthesis. These results will aid development of replication inhibitors of diverse, serious human pathogenic viruses. PMID:26004069

  9. Cell type-specific replication of simian virus 40 conferred by hormone response elements in the late promoter.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael L; Mertz, Janet E

    2002-07-01

    The late genes of SV40 are not expressed at significant levels until after the onset of viral DNA replication. We previously identified two hormone response elements (HREs) in the late promoter that contribute to this delay. Mutants defective in these HREs overexpress late RNA at early, but not late, times after transfection of CV-1PD cells. Overexpression of nuclear receptors (NRs) that recognize these HREs leads to repression of the late promoter in a sequence-specific and titratable manner, resulting in a delay in late gene expression. These observations led to a model in which the late promoter is repressed at early times after infection by NRs, with this repression being relieved by titration of these repressors through simian virus 40 (SV40) genome replication to high copy number. Here, we tested this model in the context of the viral life cycle. SV40 genomes containing mutations in either or both HREs that significantly reduce NR binding without altering the coding of any proteins were constructed. Competition for replication between mutant and wild-type viruses in low-multiplicity coinfections indicated that the +1 HRE offered a significant selective advantage to the virus within a few cycles of infection in African green monkey kidney cell lines CV-1, CV-1P, TC-7, MA-134, and Vero but not in CV-1PD' cells. Interestingly, the +55 HRE offered a selective disadvantage in MA-134 cells but had no effect in CV-1, CV-1P, TC-7, Vero, and CV-1PD' cells. Thus, we conclude that these HREs are biologically important to the virus, but in a cell type-specific manner.

  10. Delivery of episomal vectors into primary cells by means of commercial transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Han, Na Rae; Lee, Hyun; Baek, Song; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Seung Tae

    2015-05-29

    Although episomal vectors are commonly transported into cells by electroporation, a number of electroporation-derived problems have led to the search for alternative transfection protocols, such as the use of transfection reagents, which are inexpensive and easy to handle. Polyplex-mediated transport of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm has been conducted successfully in immortalized cell lines, but no report exists of successful transfection of primary cells using this method. Accordingly, we sought to optimize the conditions for polyplex-mediated transfection for effective delivery of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Episomal vectors were complexed with the commercially available transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000, FuGEND HD and jetPEI. The ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vectors was varied, and the subsequent transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of the complexes were analyzed using flow cytometry and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. No cytotoxicity and the highest transfection yield were observed when the ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vector was 4 (v/wt) in the cases of Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGENE HD, and 2 in the case of jetPEI. Of the three transfection reagents tested, jetPEI showed the highest transfection efficiency without any cytotoxicity. Thus, we confirmed that the transfection reagent jetPEI could be used to effectively deliver episomal vectors into primary cells without electroporation.

  11. Barriers for Deriving Transgene-Free Pig iPS Cells with Episomal Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xuguang; Feng, Tao; Yu, Dawei; Wu, Yuanyuan; Zou, Huiying; Ma, Shuangyu; Feng, Chong; Huang, Yongye; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Pan, Dengke; Li, Ning; Wu, Sen

    2016-01-01

    To date no authentic embryonic stem cell (ESC) line or germline-competent-induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line has been established for large animals. Despite this fact, there is an impression in the field that large animal ESCs or iPSCs are as good as mouse counterparts. Clarification of this issue is important for a healthy advancement of the stem cell field. Elucidation of the causes of this failure in obtaining high quality iPSCs/ESCs may offer essential clues for eventual establishment of authentic ESCs for large animals including humans. To this end, we first generated porcine iPSCs using nonintegrating replicating episomal plasmids. Although these porcine iPSCs met most pluripotency criteria, they could neither generate cloned piglets through nuclear transfer, nor contribute to later stage chimeras through morula injections or aggregations. We found that the reprogramming genes in iPSCs could not be removed even under negative selection, indicating they are required to maintain self-renewal. The persistent expression of these genes in porcine iPSCs in turn caused differentiation defects in vivo. Therefore, incomplete reprogramming manifested by a reliance on sustained expression of exogenous-reprogramming factors appears to be the main reason for the inability of porcine iPSCs to form iPSC-derived piglets. PMID:26138940

  12. Dichloroacetate blocks aerobic glycolytic adaptation to attenuated measles virus and promotes viral replication leading to enhanced oncolysis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Meng, Gang; Su, Lei; Chen, Aiping; Xia, Mao; Xu, Chun; Yu, Decai; Jiang, Aiqin; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-01-30

    Targeting reprogrammed energy metabolism such as aerobic glycolysis is a potential strategy for cancer treatment. However, tumors exhibiting low-rate glycolysis or metabolic heterogeneity might be resistant to such treatment. We hypothesized that a therapeutic modality that drove cancer cells to high-rate glycolysis might sensitize cancer cells to interference directed against metabolic flux. In this study, we found that attenuated oncolytic measles virus Edmonston strain (MV-Edm) caused glioblastoma cells to shift to high-rate aerobic glycolysis; this adaptation was blocked by dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of glycolysis, leading to profound cell death of cancer cells but not of normal cells. DCA enhanced viral replication by mitigating mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-mediated innate immune responses. In a subcutaneous glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft mouse model, low-dose MV-Edm and DCA significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. We found that DCA impaired glycolysis (blocking bioenergetic generation) and enhanced viral replication (increasing bioenergetic consumption), which, in combination, accelerated bioenergetic exhaustion leading to necrotic cell death. Taken together, oncolytic MV-Edm sensitized cancer cells to DCA, and in parallel, DCA promoted viral replication, thus, improving oncolysis. This novel therapeutic approach should be readily incorporated into clinical trials.

  13. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Promotes Degradation of SMC5/6 to Enhance HBV Replication.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christopher M; Xu, Yanping; Li, Feng; Nio, Kouki; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaxu; Yu, Yanbao; Xiong, Yue; Su, Lishan

    2016-09-13

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) regulatory protein X (HBx) activates gene expression from the HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) genome. Interaction of HBx with the DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 (CRL4) E3 ligase is critical for this function. Using substrate-trapping proteomics, we identified the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complex proteins SMC5 and SMC6 as CRL4(HBx) substrates. HBx expression and HBV infection degraded the SMC5/6 complex in human hepatocytes in vitro and in humanized mice in vivo. HBx targets SMC5/6 for ubiquitylation by the CRL4(HBx) E3 ligase and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Using a minicircle HBV (mcHBV) reporter system with HBx-dependent activity, we demonstrate that SMC5/6 knockdown, or inhibition with a dominant-negative SMC6, enhance HBx null mcHBV-Gluc gene expression. Furthermore, SMC5/6 knockdown rescued HBx-deficient HBV replication in human hepatocytes. These results indicate that a primary function of HBx is to degrade SMC5/6, which restricts HBV replication by inhibiting HBV gene expression. PMID:27626656

  14. Expression of Factor X in BHK-21 Cells Promotes Low Pathogenic Influenza Viruses Replication.

    PubMed

    Shahsavandi, Shahla; Ebrahimi, Mohammad Majid; Masoudi, Shahin; Izadi, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    A cDNA clone for factor 10 (FX) isolated from chicken embryo inserted into the mammalian cell expression vector pCDNA3.1 was transfected into the baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell line. The generated BHK-21 cells with inducible expression of FX were used to investigate the efficacy of the serine transmembrane protease to proteolytic activation of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) with monobasic cleavage site. Data showed that the BHK-21/FX stably expressed FX after ten serial passages. The cells could proteolytically cleave the HA of low pathogenic avian influenza virus at multiplicity of infection 0.01. Growth kinetics of the virus on BHK-21/FX, BHK-21, and MDCK cells were evaluated by titrations of virus particles in each culture supernatant. Efficient multicycle viral replication was markedly detected in the cell at subsequent passages. Virus titration demonstrated that BHK-21/FX cell supported high-titer growth of the virus in which the viral titer is comparable to the virus grown in BHK-21 or MDCK cells with TPCK-trypsin. The results indicate potential application for the BHK-21/FX in influenza virus replication procedure and related studies.

  15. Recombinant plasmids carrying promoters, genes and the origin of DNA replication of the early region of bacteriophage T7.

    PubMed Central

    Scherzinger, E; Lauppe, H F; Voll, N; Wanke, M

    1980-01-01

    Two full-length contiguous HpaI fragments of the 0 to 18.2% region of T7 H DNA (HpF-H and HpG) were inserted into plasmids pHV14 or pC194 using oligo(dG . dC) connectors or synthetic HindIII adaptors. Amplification of the two early T7 fragments was achieved by transforming lysostaphin-treated S. aureus W57 with the hybrid plasmids. Experimental evidence is presented suggesting that neither of these T7 segments can be cloned in an intact form in E. coli. One of the hybrids, pHV14-HpF-H, proved to be unstable even in B. subtilis 168. The supercoiled recombinant plasmids were tested for their capacity to support RNA synthesis by purified E. coli or T7 RNA polymerases and to serve as templates in a cell-free T7 DNA replication system. The results of these in vitro studies indicate the presence of active "early" promoters in the cloned fragment HpF-H and active "late" promoters, as well as a functional origin of replication in the cloned fragment HpG. Images PMID:7433121

  16. Duck hepatitis B virus integrations in LMH chicken hepatoma cells: identification and characterization of new episomally derived integrations.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, S S; Jensen, A D; Wang, H; Rogler, C E

    1995-01-01

    While the cytoplasmic phase of the hepadnavirus replication cycle is well understood, very little is known about the nuclear phase. In contrast to retroviruses, proviral integration is not required for hepadnavirus replication; however, some of the viral DNAs in the nucleus are diverted into an integration pathway. Under certain conditions these integrations function as carcinogenic agents. In order to study the integration process, we have utilized LMH-D2 cells, which replicate wild-type duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), to develop the first protocol to detect and characterize integrations of DHBV originating from episomal viral DNAs. Contrary to expectations, our results showed that stable new integrations are readily detectable in subclones of LMH-D2 cells. Complete characterization of one integration revealed a single-genome-length integrant with the structure of double-stranded linear (DSL) DHBV DNAs which are produced by in situ priming during viral replication. The integration contained a terminal redundancy of 6 bp from the r region of the virus DNA minus strand as well as a direct repeat of 70 bp of cellular DNA. On the basis of the structure of the integrant and the cellular DNA target site, we propose a molecular model for the integration mechanism that has some similarities to that of retroviruses. Identification of DSL hepadnavirus DNA integration suggests the possibility that modified DSL viral DNAs may be the precursors to a class of simple, unrearranged hepadnavirus integrations. PMID:7494330

  17. Pragmatic Replication Trial of Health Promotion Coaching for Obesity in Serious Mental Illness and Maintenance of Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Barre, Laura K.; Naslund, John A.; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Xie, Haiyi; McHugo, Gregory J.; Jimenez, Daniel E.; Jue, Ken; Feldman, James; Bird, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few studies targeting obesity in serious mental illness report clinically significant risk reduction, and none have been replicated within community settings or have demonstrated sustained outcomes after intervention withdrawal. This pragmatic clinical trial aims to replicate positive health outcomes demonstrated in a prior randomized effectiveness study of the In SHAPE program across urban community mental health organizations serving an ethnically diverse population. Methods Persons with serious mental illness and BMI>25 receiving services in three community mental health organizations were randomized to the 12-month In SHAPE program (health promotion coach and membership to a public fitness club) or to fitness club membership alone. Primary outcomes were weight and cardiorespiratory fitness (measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test) collected at baseline, 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, and 18-months. Results Participants (N=210) were ethnically diverse (46% non-White) with mean baseline BMI=36.8±8.2. At 12-months In SHAPE (n=104) compared to a fitness club membership alone (n=106) contributed to greater reduction in weight and improved fitness. Primary outcomes were maintained at 18-months follow-up. Approximately half of In SHAPE participants (51% at 12-month program completion and 46% at 18-month follow-up) achieved clinically significant cardiovascular risk reduction (≥5% weight loss or >50 meter increase on the 6-Minute Walk Test). Conclusions Sustained weight loss and improved fitness can be achieved by community mental health organizations providing health promotion coaching and access to fitness facilities. Health promotion should be integrated into mental health services for persons with serious mental illness at risk for cardiovascular disease and early mortality. PMID:25827032

  18. RNA Replication from the Simian Virus 5 Antigenomic Promoter Requires Three Sequence-Dependent Elements Separated by Sequence-Independent Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael A.; Murphy, Susan K.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown for the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that a functional promoter for RNA replication requires proper spacing between two discontinuous elements: a 19-base segment at the 3′ terminus (conserved region I [CRI]) and an 18-base internal region (CRII) that is contained within the coding region of the L protein gene. In the work described here, we have used a reverse-genetics system to determine if the 53-base segment between CRI and CRII contains additional sequence-specific signals required for optimal replication or if this segment functions solely as a sequence-independent spacer region. A series of copyback defective interfering minigenome analogs were constructed to contain substitutions of nonviral sequences in place of bases 21 to 72 of the antigenomic promoter, and the relative level of RNA replication was measured by Northern blot analysis. The results from our mutational analysis indicate that in addition to CRI and CRII, optimal replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires a third sequence-dependent element located 51 to 66 bases from the 3′ end of the RNA. Minigenome RNA replication was not affected by changes in the either the position of this element in relation to CRI and CRII or the predicted hexamer phase of NP encapsidation. Thus, optimal RNA replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires three sequence-dependent elements, CRI, CRII and bases 51 to 66. PMID:11264390

  19. Nuclear Envelope Protein SUN2 Promotes Cyclophilin-A-Dependent Steps of HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Xavier; Satoh, Takeshi; Gentili, Matteo; Cerboni, Silvia; Silvin, Aymeric; Conrad, Cécile; Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Rodriguez, Elisa C.; Guichou, Jean-François; Bosquet, Nathalie; Piel, Matthieu; Le Grand, Roger; King, Megan C.; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Manel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the early phase of replication, HIV reverse transcribes its RNA and crosses the nuclear envelope while escaping host antiviral defenses. The host factor Cyclophilin A (CypA) is essential for these steps and binds the HIV capsid; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. Here, we identify related capsid mutants in HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVmac that are restricted by CypA. This antiviral restriction of mutated viruses is conserved across species and prevents nuclear import of the viral cDNA. Importantly, the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN2 is required for the antiviral activity of CypA. We show that wild-type HIV exploits SUN2 in primary CD4+ T cells as an essential host factor that is required for the positive effects of CypA on reverse transcription and infection. Altogether, these results establish essential CypA-dependent functions of SUN2 in HIV infection at the nuclear envelope. PMID:27149839

  20. The Activity of Sendai Virus Genomic and Antigenomic Promoters Requires a Second Element Past the Leader Template Regions: a Motif (GNNNNN)3 Is Essential for Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tapparel, Caroline; Maurice, Diane; Roux, Laurent

    1998-01-01

    The paramyxovirus genome, a nonsegmented, negative-polarity, single-stranded RNA of ∼15 kb, contains six transcription units flanked at the 3′ and 5′ ends by a short (∼ 50- to 60-nucleotide) extracistronic sequence, dubbed the positive and negative leader regions. These leader template regions, present at the 3′ end of the genome and the antigenome, have been shown to contain essential signals governing RNA replication activity. Whether they are sufficient to promote replication is still open to question. By using a series of Sendai virus defective interfering RNAs carrying a nested set of deletions in the promoter regions, it is shown here that for both the genomic and antigenomic promoters, a 3′-end RNA sequence of 96 nucleotides is required to allow replication. Sequence comparison of active and inactive promoters led to the identification of a set of three nucleotide hexamers (nucleotides 79 to 84, 85 to 90, and 91 to 96) containing a repeated motif RXXYXX [shown as 5′-3′ positive-strand]. Sequential mutation of each hexamer into its complementary sequence confirmed their essential role. The three hexamers are required, and their relative positioning is important, since displacing them by 6 nucleotides destroyed promoter function. RNAs carrying degenerate nucleotides in the three hexamers were used as replication templates. They led to the selection of actively replicating RNA species exclusively carrying the basic motif (GNNNNN)3 from nucleotides 79 to 96. These results clearly show that, apart from the region from nucleotides 1 to 31, previously identified as governing Sendai virus replication activity, a second element, spanning at the most nucleotides 79 to 96, appears essential. Thus, the paramyxovirus replication promoters are not confined to the leader template regions, as seems to be the case for the rhabdoviruses. PMID:9525637

  1. SWI/SNF and Asf1 independently promote derepression of the DNA damage response genes under conditions of replication stress.

    PubMed

    Minard, Laura V; Lin, Ling-ju; Schultz, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    The histone chaperone Asf1 and the chromatin remodeler SWI/SNF have been separately implicated in derepression of the DNA damage response (DDR) genes in yeast cells treated with genotoxins that cause replication interference. Using genetic and biochemical approaches, we have tested if derepression of the DDR genes in budding yeast involves functional interplay between Asf1 and SWI/SNF. We find that Asf1 and SWI/SNF are both recruited to DDR genes under replication stress triggered by hydroxyurea, and have detected a soluble complex that contains Asf1 and the Snf2 subunit of SWI/SNF. SWI/SNF recruitment to DDR genes however does not require Asf1, and deletion of Snf2 does not affect Asf1 occupancy of DDR gene promoters. A checkpoint engagement defect is sufficient to explain the synthetic effect of deletion of ASF1 and SNF2 on derepression of the DDR genes in hydroxyurea-treated cells. Collectively, our results show that the DDR genes fall into a class in which Asf1 and SWI/SNF independently control transcriptional induction.

  2. The cAMP phosphodiesterase Prune localizes to the mitochondrial matrix and promotes mtDNA replication by stabilizing TFAM

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Qi, Yun; Zhou, Kiet; Zhang, Guofeng; Linask, Kaari; Xu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Compartmentalized cAMP signaling regulates mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and oxidative phosphorylation. However, regulators of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway, and its broad impact on organelle function, remain to be explored. Here, we report that Drosophila Prune is a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase that localizes to the mitochondrial matrix. Knocking down prune in cultured cells reduces mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels. Our data suggest that Prune stabilizes TFAM and promotes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication through downregulation of mitochondrial cAMP signaling. In addition, our work demonstrates the prevalence of mitochondrial cAMP signaling in metazoan and its new role in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25648146

  3. Annexin V Incorporated into Influenza Virus Particles Inhibits Gamma Interferon Signaling and Promotes Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Berri, Fatma; Haffar, Ghina; Lê, Vuong Ba; Sadewasser, Anne; Paki, Katharina; Lina, Bruno; Wolff, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the budding process, influenza A viruses (IAVs) incorporate multiple host cell membrane proteins. However, for most of them, their significance in viral morphogenesis and infectivity remains unknown. We demonstrate here that the expression of annexin V (A5) is upregulated at the cell surface upon IAV infection and that a substantial proportion of the protein is present in lipid rafts, the site of virus budding. Western blotting and immunogold analysis of highly purified IAV particles showed the presence of A5 in the virion. Significantly, gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-induced Stat phosphorylation and IFN-γ-induced 10-kDa protein (IP-10) production in macrophage-derived THP-1 cells was inhibited by purified IAV particles. Disruption of the IFN-γ signaling pathway was A5 dependent since downregulation of its expression or its blockage reversed the inhibition and resulted in decreased viral replication in vitro. The functional significance of these results was also observed in vivo. Thus, IAVs can subvert the IFN-γ antiviral immune response by incorporating A5 into their envelope during the budding process. IMPORTANCE Many enveloped viruses, including influenza A viruses, bud from the plasma membrane of their host cells and incorporate cellular surface proteins into viral particles. However, for the vast majority of these proteins, only the observation of their incorporation has been reported. We demonstrate here that the host protein annexin V is specifically incorporated into influenza virus particles during the budding process. Importantly, we showed that packaged annexin V counteracted the antiviral activity of gamma interferon in vitro and in vivo. Thus, these results showed that annexin V incorporated in the viral envelope of influenza viruses allow viral escape from immune surveillance. Understanding the role of host incorporated protein into virions may reveal how enveloped RNA viruses hijack the host cell machinery for their own purposes. PMID

  4. Type I Interferon Counters or Promotes Coxiella burnetii Replication Dependent on Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Jodi F; Robison, Amanda; Kimmel, Emily; Christensen, Kelly; Lucas, Erin; Ramstead, Andrew; Jutila, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen and the cause of Q fever. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is critical for host protection from infection, but a role for type I IFN in C. burnetii infection has not been determined. Type I IFN supports host protection from a related pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, and we hypothesized that it would be similarly protective in C. burnetii infection. In contrast to our prediction, IFN-α receptor-deficient (IFNAR(-/-)) mice were protected from C. burnetii-induced infection. Therefore, the role of type I IFN in C. burnetii infection was distinct from that in L. pneumophila Mice treated with a double-stranded-RNA mimetic were protected from C. burnetii-induced weight loss through an IFNAR-independent pathway. We next treated mice with recombinant IFN-α (rIFN-α). When rIFN-α was injected by the intraperitoneal route during infection, disease-induced weight loss was exacerbated. Mice that received rIFN-α by this route had dampened interleukin 1β (IL-1β) expression in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. However, when rIFN-α was delivered to the lung, bacterial replication was decreased in all tissues. Thus, the presence of type I IFN in the lung protected from infection, but when delivered to the periphery, type I IFN enhanced disease, potentially by dampening inflammatory cytokines. To better characterize the capacity for type I IFN induction by C. burnetii, we assessed expression of IFN-β transcripts by human macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from C. burnetii Understanding innate responses in C. burnetii infection will support the discovery of novel therapies that may be alternative or complementary to the current antibiotic treatment. PMID:27068091

  5. Chromatin remodeler sucrose nonfermenting 2 homolog (SNF2H) is recruited onto DNA replication origins through interaction with Cdc10 protein-dependent transcript 1 (Cdt1) and promotes pre-replication complex formation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Nozomi; Yugawa, Takashi; Iizuka, Masayoshi; Kiyono, Tohru; Fujita, Masatoshi

    2011-11-11

    From late mitosis to the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 form the machinery necessary to load MCM2-7 complexes onto DNA. Here, we show that SNF2H, a member of the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, is recruited onto DNA replication origins in human cells in a Cdt1-dependent manner and positively regulates MCM loading. SNF2H physically interacted with Cdt1. ChIP assays indicated that SNF2H associates with replication origins specifically during the G(1) phase. Binding of SNF2H at origins was decreased by Cdt1 silencing and, conversely, enhanced by Cdt1 overexpression. Furthermore, SNF2H silencing prevented MCM loading at origins and moderately inhibited S phase progression. Although neither SNF2H overexpression nor SNF2H silencing appeared to impact rereplication induced by Cdt1 overexpression, Cdt1-induced checkpoint activation was inhibited by SNF2H silencing. Collectively, these data suggest that SNF2H may promote MCM loading at DNA replication origins via interaction with Cdt1 in human cells. Because efficient loading of excess MCM complexes is thought to be required for cells to tolerate replication stress, Cdt1- and SNF2H-mediated promotion of MCM loading may be biologically relevant for the regulation of DNA replication.

  6. Identification of an Rta responsive promoter involved in driving gammaHV68 v-cyclin expression during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert D; DeZalia, Mark N; Speck, Samuel H

    2007-09-01

    Among the distinguishing characteristics of members of the gamma-2 herpesvirus family is the expression of a mammalian D-type cyclin homolog, termed v-cyclin. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68) is a gamma2-herpesvirus that can infect inbred and outbred strains of mice, providing a genetic system for the study of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis. Disruption of the v-cyclin gene of gammaHV68 results in a virus that establishes latency in infected mice to wild-type levels, but is severely attenuated for virus reactivation [van Dyk, L.F., Virgin IV, H.W., Speck, S.H., 2000. J. Virol. 74:7451-7461]. Transcriptional regulation of the gammaHV68 v-cyclin has not been defined. We report here the initial characterization of the v-cyclin transcript expressed in permissive murine fibroblasts. Based on 5' mapping of the v-cyclin transcript, we identified a promoter that is involved in driving v-cyclin expression during virus replication. In addition, we determined that the promoter is responsive to the major viral lytic transactivator, Rta, encoded by orf 50. Using reporter plasmids we have analyzed both basal and Rta-induced v-cyclin promoter activity, initially identifying two regions of the v-cyclin promoter important for both basal and Rta-induced activity. Notably, only one of these regions could be shown to confer Rta responsiveness on a reporter construct containing the hsp70 TATA box. The importance of this region in regulating v-cyclin expression during virus replication was confirmed by introducing these mutations into the context of the viral genome and assessing v-cyclin expression following infection of permissive murine fibroblasts in tissue culture. In addition, we show that mutations that severely cripple Rta-induction of v-cyclin expression did not adversely impact virus reactivation from splenocytes recovered from latently infected mice, indicating that alternatively regulated v-cyclin gene expression is required for virus reactivation.

  7. Complementation of the beige mutation in cultured cells by episomally replicating murine yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Perou, C.M.; Pryor, R.J.; Kaplan, J.; Justice, M.J.

    1996-06-11

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome in man and the beige mutation of mice are phenotypically similar disorders that have profound effects upon lysosome and melansosome morphology and function. We isolated two murine yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that, when introduced into beige mouse fibroblasts, complement the beige mutation. The complementing YACs exist as extrachromosomal elements that are amplified in high concentrations of G418. When YAC-complemented beige cells were fused to human Chediak-Higashi syndrome or Aleutian mink fibroblasts, complementation of the mutant phenotype also occurred. These results localize the beige gene to a 500-kb interval and demonstrate that the same or homologous genes are defective in mice, minks, and humans. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Sequences within the early and late promoters of archetype JC virus restrict viral DNA replication and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Daniel, A M; Swenson, J J; Mayreddy, R P; Khalili, K; Frisque, R J

    1996-02-01

    Two forms of JC virus (JCV) have been isolated from its human host, an archetype found in kidney tissue and urine of nonimmunocompromised individuals and a rearranged type detected in lymphocytes and brain tissue of patients with and without progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. To investigate the hypothesis that alterations to the archetype transcriptional control region yield rearranged forms of the virus exhibiting new tissue tropic and pathogenic potentials, attempts were made to propagate archetype JCV in human renal and glial cell cultures. Although rearranged forms of JCV multiplied in these cells, archetype JCV failed to do so. Through the use of chimeric and mutant viral genomes, and a cell line that constitutively expresses viral T protein, we demonstrated that archetype's inactivity relative to that of rearranged forms was due to differences in the promoter-enhancer and not in the protein coding regions or origin of DNA replication. Additional analyses revealed that the absence of a large tandem duplication and the presence of a 23- and a 66-base pair sequence in the archetype transcriptional control region were responsible for this restricted lytic behavior. We discuss the possibility that deletion and duplication events within the archetype promoter-enhancer might yield more active viral variants via the loss of a negative, or the creation of a positive, transcriptional control signal(s).

  9. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yingyu; Dai, Yue; Fan, Yimei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection. PMID:27764245

  10. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; White, James P.; Diamond, Michael S.; Weaver, Scott C.; Frolova, Elena I.; Frolov, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5’UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5’UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5’end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5’UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates. PMID:25927359

  11. Visualization of episomal and integrated Epstein-Barr virus DNA by fiber fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Jürgen; Rumpler, Silvia; Lion, Thomas; Ambros, Peter F

    2006-04-01

    For many Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated malignancies, it is still a matter of controversy whether infected cells harbor episomal or chromosomally integrated EBV genomes or both. It is well established that the expression of EBV genes per se carries oncogenic potential, but the discrimination between episomal and integrated forms is of great relevance because integration events can contribute to the oncogenic properties of EBV, whereas host cells that exclusively harbor viral episomes may not carry the risks mediated by chromosomal integration. This notion prompted us to establish a reliable technique that not only allows to unequivocally discriminate episomal from integrated EBV DNA, but also provides detailed insights into the genomic organization of the virus. Here, we show that dynamic molecular combing of host cell DNA combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using EBV-specific DNA probes facilitate unambiguous discrimination of episomal from integrated viral DNA. Furthermore, the detection of highly elongated internal repeat 1 (IR1) sequences provides evidence that this method permits detection of major genomic alterations within the EBV genome. Thus, fiber FISH may also provide valuable insights into the genomic organization of viral genomes other than EBV. PMID:16217752

  12. Nucleobase-mediated, photocatalytic production of amphiphiles to promote the self-assembly of a simple self-replicating protocell.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Maurer, Sarah, E.; Albertsen, Anders, N.; Boncella, James, M.; Cape, Jonathan, L.

    Living cells are in many respects the ultimate nanoscale chemical system. Within a very small volume they can produce highly specific useful products by extracting resources and free energy from the environment. They are also self-organized, self-controlled, and capable of self-repair and self-replication. Designing artificial chemical systems (artificial cells or protocells) that would be endowed with these powerful capabilities has been investigated extensively in the recent years. Chemical systems usually studied were based on the encapsulation of a set of genes along with catalytic protein machinery within the self-assembled boundaries of liposome/vesicles. The generated systems have many of the characteristics of a living system, but lack the regulation by genetic information of all protocell functions. Departing from these encapsulated models, we have been attempting to implement a simple, chemical system in which the regulation of the metabolism is truly mediated by information molecules. Our proposed system is composed of a chemical mixture composed of fatty acids that form bilayers (compartment), amphiphilic information molecules (nucleic acids -NA), and metabolic complexes (photosensitizers). Due to the intrinsic properties of all its components, a chemical system will self-assemble into aqueous, colloid mixtures that will be conducive to the metabolic steps, the non-enzymatic polymerization of the information, and the photochemical fatty acid production from its oil-like precursor. The reaction products (e.g., the container molecules) will in turn promote system growth and replication. In this scheme, the NA acts as an information molecule mediating the metabolic catalysis (electron donor/relay system) with a ruthenium metal complex as a cofactor and sensitizer, which is used to convert the hydrophobic precursor container molecules into amphiphiles, thus directly linking protocell metabolism with information. In a first experimental design, NA has been

  13. Connecting Replication and Repair: YoaA, a Helicase-Related Protein, Promotes Azidothymidine Tolerance through Association with Chi, an Accessory Clamp Loader Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Laura T.; Sutera, Vincent A.; Zhou, Shen; Weitzel, Christopher S.; Cheng, Yisha; Lovett, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Elongating DNA polymerases frequently encounter lesions or structures that impede progress and require repair before DNA replication can be completed. Therefore, directing repair factors to a blocked fork, without interfering with normal replication, is important for proper cell function, and it is a process that is not well understood. To study this process, we have employed the chain-terminating nucleoside analog, 3’ azidothymidine (AZT) and the E. coli genetic system, for which replication and repair factors have been well-defined. By using high-expression suppressor screens, we identified yoaA, encoding a putative helicase, and holC, encoding the Chi component of the replication clamp loader, as genes that promoted tolerance to AZT. YoaA is a putative Fe-S helicase in the XPD/RAD3 family for which orthologs can be found in most bacterial genomes; E. coli has a paralog to YoaA, DinG, which possesses 5’ to 3’ helicase activity and an Fe-S cluster essential to its activity. Mutants in yoaA are sensitive to AZT exposure; dinG mutations cause mild sensitivity to AZT and exacerbate the sensitivity of yoaA mutant strains. Suppression of AZT sensitivity by holC or yoaA was mutually codependent and we provide evidence here that YoaA and Chi physically interact. Interactions of Chi with single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB) and with Psi were required to aid AZT tolerance, as was the proofreading 3’ exonuclease, DnaQ. Our studies suggest that repair is coupled to blocked replication through these interactions. We hypothesize that SSB, through Chi, recruits the YoaA helicase to replication gaps and that unwinding of the nascent strand promotes repair and AZT excision. This recruitment prevents the toxicity of helicase activity and aids the handoff of repair with replication factors, ensuring timely repair and resumption of replication. PMID:26544712

  14. Refinement of the Diatom Episome Maintenance Sequence and Improvement of Conjugation-Based DNA Delivery Methods

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Rachel E.; Bielinski, Vincent A.; Dupont, Christopher L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Weyman, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation of episomal plasmids from bacteria to diatoms advances diatom genetic manipulation by simplifying transgene delivery and providing a stable and consistent gene expression platform. To reach its full potential, this nascent technology requires new optimized expression vectors and a deeper understanding of episome maintenance. Here, we present the development of an additional diatom vector (pPtPBR1), based on the parent plasmid pBR322, to add a plasmid maintained at medium copy number in Escherichia coli to the diatom genetic toolkit. Using this new vector, we evaluated the contribution of individual yeast DNA elements comprising the 1.4-kb tripartite CEN6-ARSH4-HIS3 sequence that enables episome maintenance in Phaeodactylum tricornutum. While various combinations of these individual elements enable efficient conjugation and high exconjugant yield in P. tricornutum, individual elements alone do not. Conjugation of episomes containing CEN6-ARSH4 and a small sequence from the low GC content 3′ end of HIS3 produced the highest number of diatom exconjugant colonies, resulting in a smaller and more efficient vector design. Our findings suggest that the CEN6 and ARSH4 sequences function differently in yeast and diatoms, and that low GC content regions of greater than ~500 bp are a potential indicator of a functional diatom episome maintenance sequence. Additionally, we have developed improvements to the conjugation protocol including a high-throughput option utilizing 12-well plates and plating methods that improve exconjugant yield and reduce time and materials required for the conjugation protocol. The data presented offer additional information regarding the mechanism by which the yeast-derived sequence enables diatom episome maintenance and demonstrate options for flexible vector design. PMID:27551676

  15. Refinement of the Diatom Episome Maintenance Sequence and Improvement of Conjugation-Based DNA Delivery Methods.

    PubMed

    Diner, Rachel E; Bielinski, Vincent A; Dupont, Christopher L; Allen, Andrew E; Weyman, Philip D

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation of episomal plasmids from bacteria to diatoms advances diatom genetic manipulation by simplifying transgene delivery and providing a stable and consistent gene expression platform. To reach its full potential, this nascent technology requires new optimized expression vectors and a deeper understanding of episome maintenance. Here, we present the development of an additional diatom vector (pPtPBR1), based on the parent plasmid pBR322, to add a plasmid maintained at medium copy number in Escherichia coli to the diatom genetic toolkit. Using this new vector, we evaluated the contribution of individual yeast DNA elements comprising the 1.4-kb tripartite CEN6-ARSH4-HIS3 sequence that enables episome maintenance in Phaeodactylum tricornutum. While various combinations of these individual elements enable efficient conjugation and high exconjugant yield in P. tricornutum, individual elements alone do not. Conjugation of episomes containing CEN6-ARSH4 and a small sequence from the low GC content 3' end of HIS3 produced the highest number of diatom exconjugant colonies, resulting in a smaller and more efficient vector design. Our findings suggest that the CEN6 and ARSH4 sequences function differently in yeast and diatoms, and that low GC content regions of greater than ~500 bp are a potential indicator of a functional diatom episome maintenance sequence. Additionally, we have developed improvements to the conjugation protocol including a high-throughput option utilizing 12-well plates and plating methods that improve exconjugant yield and reduce time and materials required for the conjugation protocol. The data presented offer additional information regarding the mechanism by which the yeast-derived sequence enables diatom episome maintenance and demonstrate options for flexible vector design. PMID:27551676

  16. Recruitment of Arabidopsis RNA Helicase AtRH9 to the Viral Replication Complex by Viral Replicase to Promote Turnip Mosaic Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinzi; Xiong, Ruyi; Bernards, Mark; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    Positive-sense RNA viruses have a small genome with very limited coding capacity and are highly dependent on host components to fulfill their life cycle. Recent studies have suggested that DEAD-box RNA helicases play vital roles in many aspects of RNA metabolism. To explore the possible role of the RNA helicases in viral infection, we used the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV)-Arabidopsis pathosystem. The Arabidopsis genome encodes more than 100 putative RNA helicases (AtRH). Over 41 Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants carrying genetic lesions in the corresponding 26 AtRH genes were screened for their requirement in TuMV infection. TuMV infection assays revealed that virus accumulation significantly decreased in the Arabidopsis mutants of three genes, AtRH9, AtRH26, and PRH75. In the present work, AtRH9 was further characterized. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays showed that AtRH9 interacted with the TuMV NIb protein, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Moreover, the subcellular distribution of AtRH9 was altered in the virus-infected cells, and AtRH9 was recruited to the viral replication complex. These results suggest that Arabidopsis AtRH9 is an important component of the TuMV replication complex, possibly recruited via its interaction with NIb. PMID:27456972

  17. Recruitment of Arabidopsis RNA Helicase AtRH9 to the Viral Replication Complex by Viral Replicase to Promote Turnip Mosaic Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinzi; Xiong, Ruyi; Bernards, Mark; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    Positive-sense RNA viruses have a small genome with very limited coding capacity and are highly dependent on host components to fulfill their life cycle. Recent studies have suggested that DEAD-box RNA helicases play vital roles in many aspects of RNA metabolism. To explore the possible role of the RNA helicases in viral infection, we used the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV)-Arabidopsis pathosystem. The Arabidopsis genome encodes more than 100 putative RNA helicases (AtRH). Over 41 Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants carrying genetic lesions in the corresponding 26 AtRH genes were screened for their requirement in TuMV infection. TuMV infection assays revealed that virus accumulation significantly decreased in the Arabidopsis mutants of three genes, AtRH9, AtRH26, and PRH75. In the present work, AtRH9 was further characterized. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays showed that AtRH9 interacted with the TuMV NIb protein, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Moreover, the subcellular distribution of AtRH9 was altered in the virus-infected cells, and AtRH9 was recruited to the viral replication complex. These results suggest that Arabidopsis AtRH9 is an important component of the TuMV replication complex, possibly recruited via its interaction with NIb. PMID:27456972

  18. The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Khor, Shy Cian; Razak, Azraul Mumtazah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Makpol, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and α-tocopherol (ATF) in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts.

  19. Influence of the basal core promoter and precore mutation on replication of hepatitis B virus and antiviral susceptibility of different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiu-Ji; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) regions of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) are more common in genotypes B and C than in genotype A, suggesting that these mutations might affect replication competency depending on genotype. The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of these mutations on the capacity of HBV for replication and antiviral drug susceptibility according to genotype. Genotypes A, B, and C of HBV strains with a BCP mutation, PC mutation, or BCP + PC mutation were made by site-directed mutagenesis. Replication competency of each construct and susceptibility to nucleos(t) ide analogues were tested in an Huh7 cell line. In genotype A, the BCP and BCP + PC mutations increased the viral replication around 6.5 times compared with the wild type, and the PC mutation alone similarly increased the viral replication around three times. In genotypes B and C, all three mutant types increased viral replication to a similar extent, regardless of mutation pattern. Interestingly, the BCP mutation appeared to have a greater effect on viral replication in genotype A than in genotypes B and C. This finding was unexpected because the BCP mutation is more common in HBV genotypes B and C. Moreover, the BCP, PC, and BCP + PC mutations decreased the sensitivity of HBV to antiviral agents to various degrees (2- to 10-fold) regardless of genotype. In conclusion, BCP and PC mutations increased viral replication regardless of HBV genotype and decreased in vitro antiviral susceptibility to the nucleos(t) ide analogues.

  20. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. PMID:27624131

  1. Nonadaptive mutations occur on the F' episome during adaptive mutation conditions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P L

    1997-01-01

    One of the most studied examples of adaptive mutation is a strain of Escherichia coli, FC40, that cannot utilize lactose (Lac-) but that readily reverts to lactose utilization (Lac+) when lactose is its sole carbon source. Adaptive reversion to Lac+ occurs at a high rate when the Lac- allele is on an F' episome and conjugal functions are expressed. It was previously shown that nonselected mutations on the chromosome did not appear in the Lac- population while episomal Lac+ mutations accumulated, but it remained possible that nonselected mutations might occur on the episome. To investigate this possibility, a second mutational target was created on the Lac- episome by mutation of a Tn1O element, which encodes tetracycline resistance (Tetr), to tetracycline sensitivity (Tets). Reversion rates to Tetr during normal growth and during lactose selection were measured. The results show that nonselected Tetr mutations do accumulate in Lac- cells when those cells are under selection to become Lac+. Thus, reversion to Lac+ in FC40 does not appear to be adaptive in the narrow sense of the word. In addition, the results suggest that during lactose selection, both Lac+ and Tetr mutations are created or preserved by the same recombination-dependent mechanism. PMID:9045812

  2. Bub1 in Complex with LANA Recruits PCNA To Regulate Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latent Replication and DNA Translesion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiguo; Jha, Hem Chandra

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent DNA replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) initiates at the terminal repeat (TR) element and requires trans-acting elements, both viral and cellular, such as ORCs, MCMs, and latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). However, how cellular proteins are recruited to the viral genome is not very clear. Here, we demonstrated that the host cellular protein, Bub1, is involved in KSHV latent DNA replication. We show that Bub1 constitutively interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) via a highly conserved PIP box motif within the kinase domain. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bub1 can form a complex with LANA and PCNA in KSHV-positive cells. This strongly indicated that Bub1 serves as a scaffold or molecular bridge between LANA and PCNA. LANA recruited PCNA to the KSHV genome via Bub1 to initiate viral replication in S phase and interacted with PCNA to promote its monoubiquitination in response to UV-induced damage for translesion DNA synthesis. This resulted in increased survival of KSHV-infected cells. IMPORTANCE During latency in KSHV-infected cells, the viral episomal DNA replicates once each cell cycle. KSHV does not express DNA replication proteins during latency. Instead, KSHV LANA recruits the host cell DNA replication machinery to the replication origin. However, the mechanism by which LANA mediates replication is uncertain. Here, we show that LANA is able to form a complex with PCNA, a critical protein for viral DNA replication. Furthermore, our findings suggest that Bub1, a spindle checkpoint protein, serves as a scaffold or molecular bridge between LANA and PCNA. Our data further support a role for Bub1 and LANA in PCNA-mediated cellular DNA replication processes as well as monoubiquitination of PCNA in response to UV damage. These data reveal a therapeutic target for inhibition of KSHV persistence in malignant cells. PMID:26223641

  3. Overexpression of pig selenoprotein S blocks OTA-induced promotion of PCV2 replication by inhibiting oxidative stress and p38 phosphorylation in PK15 cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fang; Hu, Zhihua; Huang, Yu; Xue, Hongxia; Huang, Da; Qian, Gang; Hu, Junfa; Chen, Xingxiang; Wang, Tian; Huang, Kehe

    2016-04-12

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary cause of porcine circovirus disease, and ochratoxin A (OTA)-induced oxidative stress promotes PCV2 replication. In humans, selenoprotein S (SelS) has antioxidant ability, but it is unclear whether SelS affects viral infection. Here, we stably transfected PK15 cells with pig pCDNA3.1-SelS to overexpress SelS. Selenium (Se) at 2 or 4 μM and SelS overexpression blocked the OTA-induced increases of PCV2 DNA copy number and infected cell numbers. SelS overexpression also increased glutathione (GSH), NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA, and γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase mRNA levels; decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels; and inhibited p38 phosphorylation in PCV2-infected PK15 cells, regardless of OTA treatment. Buthionine sulfoximine reversed all of the above SelS-induced changes. siRNA-mediated SelS knockdown decreased Nrf2 mRNA and GSH levels, increased ROS levels, and promoted PCV2 replication in OTA-treated PK15 cells. These data indicate that pig SelS blocks OTA-induced promotion of PCV2 replication by inhibiting the oxidative stress and p38 phosphorylation in PK15 cells. PMID:26943035

  4. Overexpression of pig selenoprotein S blocks OTA-induced promotion of PCV2 replication by inhibiting oxidative stress and p38 phosphorylation in PK15 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Fang; Hu, Zhihua; Huang, Yu; Xue, Hongxia; Huang, Da; Qian, Gang; Hu, Junfa; Chen, Xingxiang; Wang, Tian; Huang, Kehe

    2016-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is the primary cause of porcine circovirus disease, and ochratoxin A (OTA)-induced oxidative stress promotes PCV2 replication. In humans, selenoprotein S (SelS) has antioxidant ability, but it is unclear whether SelS affects viral infection. Here, we stably transfected PK15 cells with pig pCDNA3.1-SelS to overexpress SelS. Selenium (Se) at 2 or 4 μM and SelS overexpression blocked the OTA-induced increases of PCV2 DNA copy number and infected cell numbers. SelS overexpression also increased glutathione (GSH), NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA, and γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase mRNA levels; decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels; and inhibited p38 phosphorylation in PCV2-infected PK15 cells, regardless of OTA treatment. Buthionine sulfoximine reversed all of the above SelS-induced changes. siRNA-mediated SelS knockdown decreased Nrf2 mRNA and GSH levels, increased ROS levels, and promoted PCV2 replication in OTA-treated PK15 cells. These data indicate that pig SelS blocks OTA-induced promotion of PCV2 replication by inhibiting the oxidative stress and p38 phosphorylation in PK15 cells. PMID:26943035

  5. Enterovirus 71 induces dsRNA/PKR-dependent cytoplasmic redistribution of GRP78/BiP to promote viral replication.

    PubMed

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Wang, Shin-Chyang; Jheng, Chao-Rih; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    GRP78/BiP is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein with the important function of maintaining ER homeostasis, and the overexpression of GRP78/BiP alleviates ER stress. Our previous studies showed that infection with enterovirus 71 (EV71), a (+)RNA picornavirus, induced GRP78/BiP upregulation; however, ectopic GRP78/BiP overexpression in ER downregulates virus replication and viral particle formation. The fact that a virus infection increases GRP78/BiP expression, which is unfavorable for virus replication, is counterintuitive. In this study, we found that the GRP78/BiP protein level was elevated in the cytoplasm instead of in the ER in EV71-infected cells. Cells transfected with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid, a synthetic analog of replicative double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), but not with viral proteins, also exhibited upregulation and elevation of GRP78/BiP in the cytosol. Our results further demonstrate that EV71 infections induce the dsRNA/protein kinase R-dependent cytosolic accumulation of GRP78/BiP. The overexpression of a GRP78/BiP mutant lacking a KDEL retention signal failed to inhibit both dithiothreitol-induced eIF2α phosphorylation and viral replication in the context of viral protein synthesis and viral titers. These data revealed that EV71 infection might cause upregulation and aberrant redistribution of GRP78/BiP to the cytosol, thereby facilitating virus replication. PMID:27004760

  6. Enterovirus 71 induces dsRNA/PKR-dependent cytoplasmic redistribution of GRP78/BiP to promote viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Wang, Shin-Chyang; Jheng, Chao-Rih; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    GRP78/BiP is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein with the important function of maintaining ER homeostasis, and the overexpression of GRP78/BiP alleviates ER stress. Our previous studies showed that infection with enterovirus 71 (EV71), a (+)RNA picornavirus, induced GRP78/BiP upregulation; however, ectopic GRP78/BiP overexpression in ER downregulates virus replication and viral particle formation. The fact that a virus infection increases GRP78/BiP expression, which is unfavorable for virus replication, is counterintuitive. In this study, we found that the GRP78/BiP protein level was elevated in the cytoplasm instead of in the ER in EV71-infected cells. Cells transfected with polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid, a synthetic analog of replicative double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), but not with viral proteins, also exhibited upregulation and elevation of GRP78/BiP in the cytosol. Our results further demonstrate that EV71 infections induce the dsRNA/protein kinase R-dependent cytosolic accumulation of GRP78/BiP. The overexpression of a GRP78/BiP mutant lacking a KDEL retention signal failed to inhibit both dithiothreitol-induced eIF2α phosphorylation and viral replication in the context of viral protein synthesis and viral titers. These data revealed that EV71 infection might cause upregulation and aberrant redistribution of GRP78/BiP to the cytosol, thereby facilitating virus replication. PMID:27004760

  7. Gastric cancer associated variant of DNA polymerase beta (Leu22Pro) promotes DNA replication associated double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Rozacky, Jenna; Nemec, Antoni A; Sweasy, Joann B; Kidane, Dawit

    2015-09-15

    DNA polymerase beta (Pol β) is a key enzyme for the protection against oxidative DNA lesions via its role in base excision repair (BER). Approximately 1/3 of tumors studied to date express Pol β variant proteins, and several tumors overexpress Pol β. Pol β possesses DNA polymerase and dRP lyase activities, both of which are known to be important for efficient BER. The dRP lyase activity resides within the 8kDa amino terminal domain of Pol β, is responsible for removal of the 5' phosphate group (5'-dRP). The DNA polymerase subsequently fills the gaps. Previously, we demonstrated that the human gastric cancer-associated variant of Pol β (Leu22Pro (L22P)) lacks dRP lyase function in vitro. Here, we report that L22P-expressing cells harbor significantly increased replication associated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and defective maintenance of the nascent DNA strand (NDS) during replication stress. Moreover, L22P-expressing cells are sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors, which suggests trapped PARP1 binds to the 5'-dRP group and blocks replications forks, resulting in fork collapse and DSBs. Our data suggest that the normal function of the dRP lyase is critical to maintain replication fork integrity and prevent replication fork collapse to DSBs and cellular transformation. PMID:26090616

  8. The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Shy Cian; Razak, Azraul Mumtazah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Makpol, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and α-tocopherol (ATF) in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts. PMID:26885980

  9. MiR-22 promotes porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication by targeting the host factor HO-1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuqi; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Xue; Ni, Huaibao; Yan, Yunhuan; Li, Na; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Angke; Gao, Jiming; Liu, Hongliang; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min

    2016-08-30

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most economically important viruses affecting the swine industry worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in virus-host interactions by regulating the expression of viral or host gene at posttranscriptional level. Our previous research showed that PRRSV infection down-regulates the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a pivotal cytoprotective enzyme, and overexpression of HO-1 inhibits PRRSV replication. In this study, we demonstrate that host miRNA miR-22 can downregulate HO-1 expression by directly targeting its 3' untranslated region. Suppression of HO-1 expression by miR-22 facilitates PRRSV replication. This work suggests that PRRSV may utilize cellular miRNA to modify antiviral host factor expression, enabling viral replication, which not only provides new insights into virus-host interactions during PRRSV infection, but also suggests potential therapies for PRRSV infection. PMID:27527787

  10. HMGB1 Promotes Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with Stem-Loop 4 in the Viral 5′ Untranslated Region

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rong; Yang, Darong; Lei, Shaohua; Wang, Xiaohong; Meng, Xianghe; Xue, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a highly conserved nuclear protein involved in multiple human diseases, including infectious diseases, immune disorders, metabolic disorders, and cancer. HMGB1 is comprised of two tandem HMG boxes (the A box and the B box) containing DNA-binding domains and an acidic C-terminal peptide. It has been reported that HMGB1 enhances viral replication by binding to viral proteins. However, its role in hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is unknown. Here, we show that HMGB1 promoted HCV replication but had no effect on HCV translation. RNA immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that the positive strand, not the negative strand, of HCV RNA interacted with HMGB1. HCV infection triggered HMGB1 protein translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, in which it interacted with the HCV genome. Moreover, the A box of HMGB1 is the pivotal domain to interact with stem-loop 4 (SL4) of the HCV 5′ untranslated region. Deletion of the HMGB1 A box abrogated the enhancement of HCV replication by HMGB1. Our data suggested that HMGB1 serves as a proviral factor of HCV to facilitate viral replication in hepatocytes by interaction with the HCV genome. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major global health threat, affecting more than 170 million people infection worldwide. These patients are at high risk of developing severe liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, no vaccine is available. Many host factors may be implicated in the pathogenesis of HCV-related diseases. In this study, we found a novel HCV RNA-binding protein, HMGB1, that promotes HCV RNA replication. Moreover, SL4 in the 5′ untranslated region of the HCV genome is the key region for HMGB1 binding, and the A box of HMGB1 protein is the functional domain to interact with HCV RNA and enhance viral replication. HMGB1 appears to play an important role in HCV-related diseases, and further investigation is

  11. Enhanced Generation of Integration-free iPSCs from Human Adult Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells with an Optimal Combination of Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Xu, Jing; Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Ji, Guang-Zhen; Yuan, Weiping; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-06-14

    We previously reported the generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from adult peripheral blood (PB) with an improved episomal vector (EV) system, which uses the spleen focus-forming virus U3 promoter and an extra factor BCL-XL (B). Here we show an ∼100-fold increase in efficiency by optimizing the vector combination. The two most critical factors are: (1) equimolar expression of OCT4 (O) and SOX2 (S), by using a 2A linker; (2) a higher and gradual increase in the MYC (M) to KLF4 (K) ratio during the course of reprogramming, by using two individual vectors to express M and K instead of one. The combination of EV plasmids (OS + M + K + B) is comparable with Sendai virus in reprogramming efficiency but at a fraction of the cost. The generated iPSCs are indistinguishable from those from our previous approach in pluripotency and phenotype. This improvement lays the foundation for broad applications of episomal vectors in PB reprogramming.

  12. MicroRNA-23b Promotes Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J) Replication by Targeting IRF1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Chen, Biao; Feng, Min; Ouyang, Hongjia; Zheng, Ming; Ye, Qiao; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-05-18

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause several different leukemia-like proliferative diseases in the hemopoietic system of chickens. Here, we investigated the transcriptome profiles and miRNA expression profiles of ALV-J-infected and uninfected chicken spleens to identify the genes and miRNAs related to ALV-J invasion. In total, 252 genes and 167 miRNAs were differentially expressed in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to control uninfected spleens. miR-23b expression was up-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared with the control spleens, and transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) was down-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to uninfected spleens. A dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that IRF1 was a direct target of miR-23b. miR-23b overexpression significantly (P = 0.0022) decreased IRF1 mRNA levels and repressed IRF1-3'-UTR reporter activity. In vitro experiments revealed that miR-23b overexpression strengthened ALV-J replication, whereas miR-23b loss of function inhibited ALV-J replication. IRF1 overexpression inhibited ALV-J replication, and IRF1 knockdown enhanced ALV-J replication. Moreover, IRF1 overexpression significantly (P = 0.0014) increased IFN-β expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that miR-23b may play an important role in ALV-J replication by targeting IRF1.

  13. MicroRNA-23b Promotes Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J) Replication by Targeting IRF1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Chen, Biao; Feng, Min; Ouyang, Hongjia; Zheng, Ming; Ye, Qiao; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause several different leukemia-like proliferative diseases in the hemopoietic system of chickens. Here, we investigated the transcriptome profiles and miRNA expression profiles of ALV-J-infected and uninfected chicken spleens to identify the genes and miRNAs related to ALV-J invasion. In total, 252 genes and 167 miRNAs were differentially expressed in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to control uninfected spleens. miR-23b expression was up-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared with the control spleens, and transcriptome analysis revealed that the expression of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) was down-regulated in ALV-J-infected spleens compared to uninfected spleens. A dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that IRF1 was a direct target of miR-23b. miR-23b overexpression significantly (P = 0.0022) decreased IRF1 mRNA levels and repressed IRF1-3′-UTR reporter activity. In vitro experiments revealed that miR-23b overexpression strengthened ALV-J replication, whereas miR-23b loss of function inhibited ALV-J replication. IRF1 overexpression inhibited ALV-J replication, and IRF1 knockdown enhanced ALV-J replication. Moreover, IRF1 overexpression significantly (P = 0.0014) increased IFN-β expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that miR-23b may play an important role in ALV-J replication by targeting IRF1. PMID:25980475

  14. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  15. Practical Integration-Free Episomal Methods for Generating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kime, Cody; Rand, Tim A; Ivey, Kathryn N; Srivastava, Deepak; Yamanaka, Shinya; Tomoda, Kiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The advent of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology has revolutionized biomedicine and basic research by yielding cells with embryonic stem (ES) cell-like properties. The use of iPS-derived cells for cell-based therapies and modeling of human disease holds great potential. While the initial description of iPS cells involved overexpression of four transcription factors via viral vectors that integrated within genomic DNA, advances in recent years by our group and others have led to safer and higher quality iPS cells with greater efficiency. Here, we describe commonly practiced methods for non-integrating induced pluripotent stem cell generation using nucleofection of episomal reprogramming plasmids. These methods are adapted from recent studies that demonstrate increased hiPS cell reprogramming efficacy with the application of three powerful episomal hiPS cell reprogramming factor vectors and the inclusion of an accessory vector expressing EBNA1.

  16. Generation of Footprint-Free Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Fibroblasts Using Episomal Plasmid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Sun, Jane; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have provided novel insights into the etiology of disease and are set to transform regenerative medicine and drug screening over the next decade. The generation of human iPSCs free of a genetic footprint of the reprogramming process is crucial for the realization of these potential uses. Here we describe in detail the generation of human iPSC from control and disease-carrying individuals' fibroblasts using episomal plasmids.

  17. Improved detection of episomal Banana streak viruses by multiplex immunocapture PCR.

    PubMed

    Le Provost, Grégoire; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Acina, Isabelle; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Banana streak viruses (BSV) are currently the main viral constraint to Musa germplasm movement, genetic improvement and mass propagation. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and implement BSV detection strategies that are both reliable and sensitive, such as PCR-based techniques. Unfortunately, BSV endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (BSV EPRVs) are present in the genome of Musa balbisiana. They interfere with PCR-based detection of episomal BSV in infected banana and plantain, such as immunocapture PCR. Therefore, a multiplex, immunocapture PCR (M-IC-PCR) was developed for the detection of BSV. Musa sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) primers were selected and used in combination with BSV species-specific primers in order to monitor possible contamination by Musa genomic DNA, using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, immunocapture conditions were optimized in order to prevent Musa DNA from interfering with episomal BSV DNA during the PCR step. This improved detection method successfully allowed the accurate, specific and sensitive detection of episomal DNA only from distinct BSV species. Its implementation should benefit PCR-based detection of viruses for which homologous sequences are present in the genome of their hosts, including transgenic plants expressing viral sequences.

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Increases Free Fatty Acids Absorption and Promotes its Replication Via Down-Regulating GADD45α Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Xiao-ming; Li, An-ling; Yang, Gui; Hu, Han-ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as a major cause of chronic hepatic diseases, is always accompanied with an abnormality of lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathogenic role of free fatty acids (FFA) in human HCV infection. Material/Methods Peripheral blood lipid indexes among HCV patients with different viral loads (199 samples) and healthy donors (80 samples) were detected by clinical biochemistry tests. HCV replication and the expression of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible gene 45-α (GADD45α) in Huh7 cells and clinical samples were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Lipid accumulation in Huh7 cells was detected by immunofluorescence. Results In this study, we found that FFA showed a significant positive correlation with viral load in peripheral blood of HCV patients, but not total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). GADD45α expression in HCV patients dramatically decreased with the increase of viral load. In Huh7 cells, FFA treatment significantly enhanced HCV replication. HCV infection inhibited GADD45α expression, and this effect was further enhanced with the presence of FFA treatment. Ectopic expression of GADD45α in HCV-infected Huh7 cells markedly inhibited the absorption of FFA and HCV replication. However, FFA significantly elevated GADD45α expression without HCV infection. Conclusions These results demonstrated that HCV down-regulates GADD45α expression to enhance FFA absorption and thus facilitate its replication. GADD45α is an essential mediator for the pathogenesis of HCV infection. Thus, our study provides potential clues in the search for novel therapeutics and fatty lipid control options for HCV patients. PMID:27381636

  19. Low-copy episomal vector pFY20 and high-saturation coverage genomic libraries for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Wahls, Wayne P; Davidson, Mari K

    2008-09-01

    In fission yeast, as in many organisms, episomally replicating plasmid DNA molecules can be used for a wide variety of applications. However, replicating plasmids described previously are each propagated at a high copy number per cell. Plasmid fission yeast twenty (pFY20) contains the ura4(+) gene for positive and negative selection, an origin of replication (ars1) and a stability element (stb). Although this plasmid does not have a centromere, it is propagated with a copy number of about two plasmids per haploid genome equivalent and it is transmitted with relatively high fidelity in mitosis and meiosis. This low-copy vector is useful for screens and mutational studies where overexpression (e.g. from high copy plasmids) is undesirable. We therefore constructed multiple partial-digest, size-fractionated, fission yeast genomic DNA libraries in pFY20 and in the cloning vector pBluescript KS(+). These libraries have sufficient complexity (average of 2100 genome equivalents each) for saturation screening by complementation, plasmid shuffle or hybridization. PMID:18613214

  20. Low-copy episomal vector pFY20 and high-saturation coverage genomic libraries for the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Wahls, Wayne P.; Davidson, Mari K.

    2011-01-01

    In fission yeast, as in many organisms, episomally replicating plasmid DNA molecules can be used for a wide variety of applications. However, replicating plasmids described previously are each propagated at a high copy number per cell. Plasmid fission yeast twenty (pFY20) contains the ura4+ gene for positive and negative selection, an origin of replication (ars1 ) and a stability element (stb). Although this plasmid does not have a centromere, it is propagated with a copy number of about two plasmids per haploid genome equivalent and it is transmitted with relatively high fidelity in mitosis and meiosis. This low-copy vector is useful for screens and mutational studies where overexpression (e.g. from high copy plasmids) is undesirable. We therefore constructed multiple partial-digest, size-fractionated, fission yeast genomic DNA libraries in pFY20 and in the cloning vector pBluescript KS+. These libraries have sufficient complexity (average of 2100 genome equivalents each) for saturation screening by complementation, plasmid shuffle or hybridization. PMID:18613214

  1. An Autonomous Replicating Element within the KSHV genome

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subhash C.; Lan, Ke; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Cotter, Murray A; Robertson, Erle S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Propagation of episomally maintained KSHV genome into new daughter cells requires replication of its genome once every cell division. This study demonstrates a potential alternative mechanism of KSHV latent DNA replication independent of LANA expression. A cis-acting DNA element within the Long Unique Region is capable of initiating replication shown by DpnI analysis, Meselson-Stahl analysis, BrdU incorporation and single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. This DNA element supports replication of the plasmid which persists in its native form. Human ORC2 and MCM3 also associate with this region of the KSHV genome and depletion of cellular ORC2 by RNAi abolished replication of the plasmids. Thus recruitment of the host cellular replication machinery is important for latent replication. This autonomously replicating DNA element demonstrates that KSHV can initiate replication of its genome independent of any trans-acting viral factors and identifies a secondary replicator element for the initiation of KSHV DNA replication. PMID:18005725

  2. Development and Validation of Non-Integrative, Self-Limited, and Replicating Minicircles for Safe Reporter Gene Imaging of Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ronald, John A.; Cusso, Lorena; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Yan, Xinrui; Dragulescu-Andrasi, Anca; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2013-01-01

    Reporter gene (RG) imaging of cell-based therapies provides a direct readout of therapeutic efficacy by assessing the fate of implanted cells. To permit long-term cellular imaging, RGs are traditionally required to be integrated into the cellular genome. This poses a potential safety risk and regulatory bottleneck for clinical translation as integration can lead to cellular transformation. To address this issue, we have developed non-integrative, replicating minicircles (MCs) as an alternative platform for safer monitoring of cells in living subjects. We developed both plasmids and minicircles containing the scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MAR) of the human interferon-beta gene, driven by the CMV promoter, and expressing the bioluminescence RG firefly luciferase. Constructs were transfected into breast cancer cells, and expanded S/MAR minicircle clones showed luciferase signal for greater than 3 months in culture and minicircles remained as episomes. Importantly, luciferase activity in clonal populations was slowly lost over time and this corresponded to a loss of episome, providing a way to reversibly label cells. To monitor cell proliferation in vivo, 1.5×106 cells carrying the S/MAR minicircle were implanted subcutaneously into mice (n = 5) and as tumors developed significantly more bioluminescence signal was noted at day 35 and 43 compared to day 7 post-implant (p<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first work examining the use of episomal, self-limited, replicating minicircles to track the proliferation of cells using non-invasive imaging in living subjects. Continued development of S/MAR minicircles will provide a broadly applicable vector platform amenable with any of the numerous RG technologies available to allow therapeutic cell fate to be assessed in individual patients, and to achieve this without the need to manipulate the cell's genome so that safety concerns are minimized. This will lead to safe tools to assess treatment response at

  3. Autonomous replication of plasmids bearing monkey DNA origin-enriched sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Frappier, L.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M.

    1987-10-01

    Twelve clones of origin-enriched sequences (ORS) isolated from early replicating monkey (CV-1) DNA were examined for transient episomal replication in transfected CV-1, COS-7, and HeLa cells. Plasmid DNA was isolated at time intervals after transfection and screened by the Dpn I resistance assay or by the bromodeoxyuridine substitution assay to differentiate between input and replicated DNA. The authors have identified four monkey ORS (ORS3, -8, -9, and -12) that can support plasmid replication in mammalian cells. This replication is carried out in a controlled and semiconservative manner characteristic of mammalian replicons. ORS replication was most efficient in HeLa cells. Electron microscopy showed ORS8 and ORS12 plasmids of the correct size with replication bubbles. Using a unique restriction site in ORS12, we have mapped the replication bubble within the monkey DNA sequence.

  4. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood.

  5. Replicating nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic replication disrupts each nucleosome as the fork passes, followed by reassembly of disrupted nucleosomes and incorporation of newly synthesized histones into nucleosomes in the daughter genomes. In this review, we examine this process of replication-coupled nucleosome assembly to understand how characteristic steady-state nucleosome landscapes are attained. Recent studies have begun to elucidate mechanisms involved in histone transfer during replication and maturation of the nucleosome landscape after disruption by replication. A fuller understanding of replication-coupled nucleosome assembly will be needed to explain how epigenetic information is replicated at every cell division. PMID:26269799

  6. MicroRNA-30e* Suppresses Dengue Virus Replication by Promoting NF-κB–Dependent IFN Production

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Weitao; Lin, Cuiji; Yu, Jianchen; Pan, Jing; Li, Ran; Deng, Haijing; Liao, Shaowei; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Jueheng; Li, Jun; Li, Mengfeng

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs have been shown to contribute to a repertoire of host-pathogen interactions during viral infection. Our previous study demonstrated that microRNA-30e* (miR-30e*) directly targeted the IκBα 3′-UTR and disrupted the NF-κB/IκBα negative feedback loop, leading to hyperactivation of NF-κB. This current study investigated the possible role of miR-30e* in the regulation of innate immunity associated with dengue virus (DENV) infection. We found that DENV infection could induce miR-30e* expression in DENV-permissive cells, and such an overexpression of miR-30e* upregulated IFN-β and the downstream IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as OAS1, MxA and IFITM1, and suppressed DENV replication. Furthermore, suppression of IκBα mediates the enhancing effect of miR-30e* on IFN-β-induced antiviral response. Collectively, our findings suggest a modulatory role of miR-30e* in DENV induced IFN-β signaling via the NF-κB-dependent pathway. Further investigation is needed to evaluate whether miR-30e* has an anti-DENV effect in vivo. PMID:25122182

  7. Violent Offending Promotes Appetitive Aggression Rather than Posttraumatic Stress—A Replication Study with Burundian Ex-Combatants

    PubMed Central

    Köbach, Anke; Nandi, Corina; Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé; Westner, Britta; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified appetitive aggression, i.e., the perception of committed, violent acts as appealing, exciting and fascinating, as a common phenomenon within populations living in precarious and violent circumstances. Investigating demobilized soldiers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) demonstrated that violent offending is associated with appetitive aggression and not necessarily with symptoms of posttraumatic stress. In the present study, we sought to replicate these results in an independent and larger sample of demobilized soldiers from Burundi. As with the Congolese ex-combatants, random forest regression revealed that the number of lifetime perpetrated violent acts is the most important predictor of appetitive aggression and the number of lifetime experienced traumatic events is the main predictor for posttraumatic stress. Perpetrated violent acts with salient cues of hunting (pursuing the victim, the sight of blood, etc.) were most predictive for perceiving violent cues appealingly after demobilization. Moreover, the association of violent acts and appetitive aggression as well as traumatic events and posttraumatic stress remains strong even years after demobilization. Patterns of traumatic events and perpetrated acts as predictors for posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression seem to be robust among different samples of ex-combatants who fought in civil wars. Psychotherapeutic interventions that address these complementary facets of combat-related disorders—namely, posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression—are indispensable for a successful reintegration of those who fought in armed conflicts and to achieve a successful transition to peace. PMID:26696913

  8. The Minimal Replicator Element of the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Terminal Repeat Supports Replication in a Semiconservative and Cell-Cycle-Dependent Manner▿

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Subhash C.; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Robertson, Erle S.

    2007-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) persists as episomes in infected cells by circularizing at the terminal repeats (TRs). The KSHV episome carries multiple reiterated copies of the terminal repeat, and each copy is capable of supporting replication. Expression of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is critical for the replication of TR-containing plasmids. A 32-bp sequence upstream of LANA binding site 1 (LBS1), referred to as RE (replication element), along with LANA binding sites 1 and 2 (RE-LBS1/2), is sufficient to support replication (J. Hu and R. Renne, J. Virol. 79:2637-2642, 2005). In this report we demonstrate that the minimal replicator element (RE-LBS1/2) replicates in synchrony with the host cellular DNA, and only once, in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. Overexpression of the mammalian replication inhibitor geminin blocked replication of the plasmid containing the minimal replicator element, confirming the involvement of the host cellular replication control mechanism, and prevented rereplication of the plasmid in the same cell cycle. Overexpression of Cdt1 also rescued the replicative ability of the RE-LBS1/2-containing plasmids. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay performed using anti-origin recognition complex 2 (α-ORC2) and α-LANA antibodies from cells transfected with RE-LBS1/2, RE-LBS1, LBS1, or RE showed the association of ORC2 with the RE region. Expression of LANA increased the number of copies of chromatin-bound DNA of replication elements, suggesting that LANA is important for the recruitment of ORCs and may contribute to the stabilization of the replication protein complexes at the RE site. PMID:17151118

  9. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Frozen Buffy Coats using Non-integrating Episomal Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Zanon, Alessandra; Lavdas, Alexandros A; Schwienbacher, Christine; Silipigni, Rosamaria; Di Segni, Marina; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Rossini, Alessandra

    2015-06-05

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by forcing the expression of four transcription factors (Oct-4, Sox-2, Klf-4, and c-Myc), typically expressed by human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Due to their similarity with hESCs, iPSCs have become an important tool for potential patient-specific regenerative medicine, avoiding ethical issues associated with hESCs. In order to obtain cells suitable for clinical application, transgene-free iPSCs need to be generated to avoid transgene reactivation, altered gene expression and misguided differentiation. Moreover, a highly efficient and inexpensive reprogramming method is necessary to derive sufficient iPSCs for therapeutic purposes. Given this need, an efficient non-integrating episomal plasmid approach is the preferable choice for iPSC derivation. Currently the most common cell type used for reprogramming purposes are fibroblasts, the isolation of which requires tissue biopsy, an invasive surgical procedure for the patient. Therefore, human peripheral blood represents the most accessible and least invasive tissue for iPSC generation. In this study, a cost-effective and viral-free protocol using non-integrating episomal plasmids is reported for the generation of iPSCs from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) obtained from frozen buffy coats after whole blood centrifugation and without density gradient separation.

  10. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  11. Cellular Protein WDR11 Interacts with Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Proteins at the trans-Golgi Network To Promote Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryne E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been proposed that the herpes simplex virus (HSV) protein ICP0 has cytoplasmic roles in blocking antiviral signaling and in promoting viral replication in addition to its well-known proteasome-dependent functions in the nucleus. However, the mechanisms through which it produces these effects remain unclear. While investigating this further, we identified a novel cytoplasmic interaction between ICP0 and the poorly characterized cellular protein WDR11. During an HSV infection, WDR11 undergoes a dramatic change in localization at late times in the viral replication cycle, moving from defined perinuclear structures to a dispersed cytoplasmic distribution. While this relocation was not observed during infection with viruses other than HSV-1 and correlated with efficient HSV-1 replication, the redistribution was found to occur independently of ICP0 expression, instead requiring viral late gene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that WDR11 is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it interacts specifically with some, but not all, HSV virion components, in addition to ICP0. Knockdown of WDR11 in cultured human cells resulted in a modest but consistent decrease in yields of both wild-type and ICP0-null viruses, in the supernatant and cell-associated fractions, without affecting viral gene expression. Although further study is required, we propose that WDR11 participates in viral assembly and/or secondary envelopment. IMPORTANCE While the TGN has been proposed to be the major site of HSV-1 secondary envelopment, this process is incompletely understood, and in particular, the role of cellular TGN components in this pathway is unknown. Additionally, little is known about the cellular functions of WDR11, although the disruption of this protein has been implicated in multiple human diseases. Therefore, our finding that WDR11 is a TGN-resident protein that interacts with specific viral proteins to enhance viral yields improves both

  12. Fidelity of end joining in mammalian episomes and the impact of Metnase on joint processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Double Stranded Breaks (DSBs) are the most serious form of DNA damage and are repaired via homologous recombination repair (HRR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ predominates in mammalian cells at most stages of the cell cycle, and it is viewed as ‘error-prone’, although this notion has not been sufficiently challenged due to shortcomings of many current systems. Multi-copy episomes provide a large pool of genetic material where repair can be studied, as repaired plasmids can be back-cloned into bacteria and characterized for sequence alterations. Here, we used EBV-based episomes carrying 3 resistance marker genes in repair studies where a single DSB is generated with virally-encoded HO endonuclease cleaving rapidly at high efficiency for a brief time post-infection. We employed PCR and Southern blot to follow the kinetics of repair and formation of processing intermediates, and replica plating to screen for plasmids with altered joints resulting in loss of chloramphenicol resistance. Further, we employed this system to study the role of Metnase. Metnase is only found in humans and primates and is a key component of the NHEJ pathway, but its function is not fully characterized in intact cells. Results We found that repair of episomes by end-joining was highly accurate in 293 T cells that lack Metnase. Less than 10% of the rescued plasmids showed deletions. Instead, HEK293 cells (that do express Metnase) or 293 T transfected with Metnase revealed a large number of rescued plasmids with altered repaired joint, typically in the form of large deletions. Moreover, quantitative PCR and Southern blotting revealed less accurately repaired plasmids in Metnase expressing cells. Conclusions Our careful re-examination of fidelity of NHEJ repair in mammalian cells carrying a 3′ cohesive overhang at the ends revealed that the repair is efficient and highly accurate, and predominant over HRR. However, the background of the cells is important in

  13. The Replicative Consequences of Papillomavirus E2 Protein Binding to the Origin Replication Factor ORC2

    PubMed Central

    DeSmet, Marsha; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Rietz, Anne; Wu, Wai-Hong; Roden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) coordinates a series of events that lead to initiation of DNA strand duplication. As a nuclear double stranded DNA plasmid, the papillomavirus (PV) genome resembles a mini-chromosome in infected cells. To initiate its replication, the viral E2 protein binds to and recruits the E1 DNA helicase at the viral origin. PV genome replication program exhibits three stages: initial amplification from a single genome upon infection to a few copies per cell, a cell cycle linked maintenance phase, and a differentiation dependent late stage where the genome is amplified to thousands of copies. Involvement of ORC or other pre-replication complex (pre-RC) factors has not been described. We report that human PV (HPV) and bovine PV (BPV-1) E2 proteins bind to ORC2, however, ORC2 was not detected at the viral origin. Depletion of ORC2 enhanced PV replication in a transient replication model and in keratinocytes stably maintaining viral episomes, while there was no effect on copy number in a cell line with integrated HPV genomes. Consistent with this, occupancy of E1 and E2 at the viral origin increased following ORC2 silencing. These data imply that ORC2 is not necessary for activation of the PV origin by E1 and E2 but instead suppresses E2 replicative function. Furthermore, we observed that over-expression of HPV E2 decreased ORC2 occupation at two known mammalian origins of replication, suggesting that E2 restricts pre-ORC assembly that could otherwise compete for host replication complexes necessary for viral genome amplification. We infer that the ORC2 complex with E2 restricts viral replication in the maintenance phase of the viral replication program and that elevated levels of E2 that occur during the differentiation dependent amplification stage subvert ORC loading and hence DNA synthesis at cellular origins. PMID:27701460

  14. HygR and PurR plasmid vectors for episomal transfection of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Otávio T; Santana, Jaime M; Sturm, Nancy R; Teixeira, Antônio R L; Campbell, David A

    2004-08-01

    This work describes the development and functional testing of two episomes for stable transfection of Trypanosoma cruzi. pHygD contained the 5'- and 3'- flanking regions of the gene encoding the cathepsin B-like protease of T. cruzi as functional trans-splicing and polyadenylation signals for the hygR ORF. Evidence is presented to support extrachromosomal maintenance and organization as tandem repeats in transfected parasites. pPac was derived from pHygD by replacement of the entire hygR ORF with a purR coding region. The ability to modify pHygD and the availability of the complete DNA sequence make these plasmids useful tools for the genetic manipulation of T. cruzi.

  15. Enhanced Viral Replication by Cellular Replicative Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Ae; Seong, Rak-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular replicative senescence is a major contributing factor to aging and to the development and progression of aging-associated diseases. In this study, we sought to determine viral replication efficiency of influenza virus (IFV) and Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) infection in senescent cells. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) or human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were allowed to undergo numbers of passages to induce replicative senescence. Induction of replicative senescence in cells was validated by positive senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Increased susceptibility to both IFV and VZV infection was observed in senescent HBE and HDF cells, respectively, resulting in higher numbers of plaque formation, along with the upregulation of major viral antigen expression than that in the non-senescent cells. Interestingly, mRNA fold induction level of virus-induced type I interferon (IFN) was attenuated by senescence, whereas IFN-mediated antiviral effect remained robust and potent in virus-infected senescent cells. Additionally, we show that a longevity-promoting gene, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), has antiviral role against influenza virus infection. In conclusion, our data indicate that enhanced viral replication by cellular senescence could be due to senescence-mediated reduction of virus-induced type I IFN expression. PMID:27799874

  16. Binding sites for the herpes simplex virus immediate-early protein ICP4 impose an increased dependence on viral DNA replication on simple model promoters located in the viral genome.

    PubMed

    Koop, K E; Duncan, J; Smiley, J R

    1993-12-01

    We examined the ability of binding sites for the herpes simplex virus immediate-early protein ICP4 to alter the regulation of closely linked promoters by placing strong ICP4 binding sites upstream or downstream of simple TATA promoters in the intact viral genome. We found that binding sites strongly reduced the levels of expression at early times postinfection and that this effect was partially overcome after the onset of viral DNA replication. These data confirm that DNA-bound ICP4 can inhibit the activity of a closely linked promoter and raise the possibility that ICP4 binding sites contribute to temporal regulation during infection.

  17. The Caulobacter crescentus ctrA P1 promoter is essential for the coordination of cell cycle events that prevent the overinitiation of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Schredl, Alexander T; Perez Mora, Yannet G; Herrera, Anabel; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2012-10-01

    The master regulator CtrA oscillates during the Caulobacter cell cycle due to temporally regulated proteolysis and transcription. It is proteolysed during the G1-S transition and reaccumulates in predivisional cells as a result of transcription from two sequentially activated promoters, P1 and P2. CtrA reinforces its own synthesis by directly mediating the activation of P2 concurrently with repression of P1. To explore the role of P1 in cell cycle control, we engineered a mutation into the native ctrA locus that prevents transcription from P1 but not P2. As expected, the ctrA P1 mutant exhibits striking growth, morphological and DNA replication defects. Unexpectedly, we found CtrA and its antagonist SciP, but not DnaA, GcrA or CcrM accumulation to be dramatically reduced in the ctrA P1 mutant. SciP levels closely paralleled CtrA accumulation, suggesting that CtrA acts as a rheostat to modulate SciP abundance. Furthermore, the reappearance of CtrA and CcrM in predivisional cells was delayed in the P1 mutant by 0.125 cell cycle unit in synchronized cultures. High levels of ccrM transcription despite low levels of CtrA and increased transcription of ctrA P2 in the ctrA P1 mutant are two examples of robustness in the cell cycle. Thus, Caulobacter can adjust regulatory pathways to partially compensate for reduced and delayed CtrA accumulation in the ctrA P1 mutant.

  18. Plant virus DNA replication processes in Agrobacterium: insight into the origins of geminiviruses?

    PubMed Central

    Rigden, J E; Dry, I B; Krake, L R; Rezaian, M A

    1996-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens, a bacterial plant pathogen, when transformed with plasmid constructs containing greater than unit length DNA of tomato leaf curl geminivirus accumulates viral replicative form DNAs indistinguishable from those produced in infected plants. The accumulation of the viral DNA species depends on the presence of two origins of replication in the DNA constructs and is drastically reduced by introducing mutations into the viral replication-associated protein (Rep or C1) ORF, indicating that an active viral replication process is occurring in the bacterial cell. The accumulation of these viral DNA species is not affected by mutations or deletions in the other viral open reading frames. The observation that geminivirus DNA replication functions are supported by the bacterial cellular machinery provides evidence for the theory that these circular single-stranded DNA viruses have evolved from prokaryotic episomal replicons. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8816791

  19. DNA replication origins.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Alan C; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression.

  20. Hybridizing bacteria, crossing methods, cross-checking arguments: the transition from episomes to plasmids (1961-1969).

    PubMed

    Grote, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    Plasmids are non-chromosomal hereditary determinants, mostly found in prokaryotes. Whereas Joshua Lederberg coined the term "plasmid" as early as 1952, today's concept was not established until the early 1970s. In this eclipse period, the plasmid's place was taken by the episome, following the 1958 publication of Elie Wollman and François Jacob. This paper analyzes the transition from the episome to a renewed plasmid concept both on the experimental and the conceptual level. It will become clear that intergeneric transfer experiments were central to this development. These studies rely on conjugational transfer of extrachromosomal hereditary determinants between different bacterial genera. First, experimental systems employing intergeneric transfer shaped the new plasmid by enabling its representation as a species of circular DNA. Moreover, they had a destabilizing effect on the episome, leading to a crisis in the concepts of microbial genetics towards the end of the 1960s. The new plasmid then became one of the cornerstones of recombinant DNA technologies. In an historic perspective, intergeneric transfer experiments indicate a gradual transition of molecular biology from its early "analytic" to the "synthetic" phase of genetic engineering. Hence, the construction of genetic hybrids in vivo as epitomized in the studies shown here marks an intermediate state that one could designate as "recombinant DNA avant la lettre".

  1. Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Genomes Take the Form of Long-Lived, Transcriptionally Competent Episomes in Human Muscle.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Ye, Guo-Jie; Flotte, Terence R; Trapnell, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Gene augmentation therapy as a strategy to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency has reached phase 2 clinical testing in humans. Sustained serum levels of AAT have been observed beyond one year after intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing the AAT gene. In this study, sequential muscle biopsies obtained at 3 and 12 months after vector injection were examined for the presence of rAAV vector genomes. Each biopsy sample contained readily detectable vector DNA, the majority of which existed as double-stranded supercoiled and open circular episomes. Episomes persisted through 12 months, although at slightly lower levels than observed at 3 months. There was a clear dose response when comparing the low- and mid-vector-dose groups to the high-dose group. The highest absolute copy numbers were found in a high-dose subject, and serum AAT levels at 12 months confirmed that the high-dose group also had the highest sustained serum AAT levels. Sequence analysis revealed that the vast majority of episomes contained double-D inverted terminal repeats ranging from fully intact to severely deleted. Molecular clones of vector genomes derived directly from the biopsies were transcriptionally active, potentially identifying them as the source of serum AAT in the trial subjects.

  2. Bacillus subtilis EdmS (formerly PgsE) participates in the maintenance of episomes.

    PubMed

    Ashiuchi, Makoto; Yamashiro, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kento

    2013-09-01

    Extrachromosomal DNA maintenance (EDM) is an important process in molecular breeding and for various applications in the construction of genetically engineered microbes. Here we describe a novel Bacillus subtilis gene involved in EDM function called edmS (formerly pgsE). Functional gene regions were identified using molecular genetics techniques. We found that EdmS is a membrane-associated protein that is crucial for EDM. We also determined that EdmS can change a plasmid vector with an unstable replicon and worse-than-random segregation into one with better-than-random segregation, suggesting that the protein functions in the declustering and/or partitioning of episomes. EdmS has two distinct domains: an N-terminal membrane-anchoring domain and a C-terminal assembly accelerator-like structure, and mutational analysis of edmS revealed that both domains are essential for EDM. Further studies using cells of Bacillus megaterium and itsedmS (formerly capE) gene implied that EdmS has potential as a molecular probe for exploring novel EDM systems.

  3. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells containing human papillomavirus type 16 episomes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Lei, Yanjun; Srivastava, Ranjana; Qin, Weihua; Chen, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) that infect the anogenital tract are strongly associated with the development of cervical carcinoma, which is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Therapeutic drugs specifically targeting HPV are not available. Polyphenolic compounds have gained considerable attention because of their cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancers and certain viruses. In this study, we examined the effects of several polyphenols on cellular proliferation and death of the human cervical cancer cells and human cervical epithelial cells containing stable HPV type 16 episomes (HPVep). Our results show that three polyphenols inhibited proliferation of HeLa cells dose-dependently. Furthermore, one of the examined polyphenols, gallic acid (GA), also inhibited the proliferation of HPVep cells and exhibited significant specificity towards HPV-positive cells. The anti-proliferative effect of GA on HPVep and HeLa cells was associated with apoptosis and upregulation of p53. These results suggest that GA can be a potential candidate for the development of anti-HPV agents.

  4. Immunodiagnosis of episomal Banana streak MY virus using polyclonal antibodies to an expressed putative coat protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Kumar, P Vignesh; Baranwal, Virendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    A cryptic Badnavirus species complex, known as banana streak viruses (BSV) poses a serious threat to banana production and genetic improvement worldwide. Due to the presence of integrated BSV sequences in the banana genome, routine detection is largely based on serological and nucleo-serological diagnostic methods which require high titre specific polyclonal antiserum. Viral structural proteins like coat protein (CP) are the best target for in vitro expression, to be used as antigen for antiserum production. However, in badnaviruses precise CP sequences are not known. In this study, two putative CP coding regions (p48 and p37) of Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) were identified in silico by comparison with caulimoviruses, retroviruses and Rice tungro bacilliform virus. The putative CP coding region (p37) was in vitro expressed in pMAL system and affinity purified. The purified fusion protein was used as antigen for raising polyclonal antiserum in rabbit. The specificity of antiserum was confirmed in Western blots, immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and antigen coated plate-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA). The antiserum (1:2000) was successfully used in ACP-ELISA for specific detection of BSMYV infection in field and tissue culture raised banana plants. The antiserum was also utilized in immuno-capture PCR (IC-PCR) based indexing of episomal BSMYV infection. This is the first report of in silico identification of putative CP region of BSMYV, production of polyclonal antiserum against recombinant p37 and its successful use in immunodetection.

  5. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research. PMID:26132923

  6. Replicating vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  7. The chromatin assembly factor 1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks by counteracting D-loop disassembly by the RecQ-type helicase Rqh1.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Hardy, Julien; Costes, Audrey; Iraqui, Ismail; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2014-10-01

    At blocked replication forks, homologous recombination mediates the nascent strands to switch template in order to ensure replication restart, but faulty template switches underlie genome rearrangements in cancer cells and genomic disorders. Recombination occurs within DNA packaged into chromatin that must first be relaxed and then restored when recombination is completed. The chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in DNA synthesis-coupled chromatin assembly during DNA replication and DNA repair. We reveal a novel chromatin factor-dependent step during replication-coupled DNA repair: Fission yeast CAF-1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks, independently of the postreplication repair pathway. We used a physical assay that allows the analysis of the individual steps of template switch, from the recruitment of recombination factors to the formation of joint molecules, combined with a quantitative measure of the resulting rearrangements. We reveal functional and physical interplays between CAF-1 and the RecQ-helicase Rqh1, the BLM homologue, mutations in which cause Bloom's syndrome, a human disease associating genome instability with cancer predisposition. We establish that CAF-1 promotes template switch by counteracting D-loop disassembly by Rqh1. Consequently, the likelihood of faulty template switches is controlled by antagonistic activities of CAF-1 and Rqh1 in the stability of the D-loop. D-loop stabilization requires the ability of CAF-1 to interact with PCNA and is thus linked to the DNA synthesis step. We propose that CAF-1 plays a regulatory role during template switch by assembling chromatin on the D-loop and thereby impacting the resolution of the D-loop. PMID:25313826

  8. Plasmid RSF1010 DNA replication in vitro promoted by purified RSF1010 RepA, RepB and RepC proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Scherzinger, E; Haring, V; Lurz, R; Otto, S

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed and analyzed an in vitro system that will efficiently replicate plasmid RSF1010 and its derivatives. The system contains a partially purified extract from E.coli cells and three purified RSF1010-encoded proteins, the products of genes repA, repB (or mobA/repB), and repC. Replication in this system mimics the in vivo mechanism in that it (i) is initiated at oriV, the origin of vegetative DNA replication, (ii) proceeds in a population of plasmid molecules in both directions from this 396-base-pair origin region, and (iii) is absolutely dependent on the presence of each of the three rep gene products. In addition, we find that E.coli DNA gyrase, DnaZ protein (gamma subunit of poIIII holoenzyme) and SSB are required for in vitro plasmid synthesis. The bacterial RNA polymerase, the initiation protein DnaA, and the primosomal proteins DnaB, DnaC, DnaG and DnaT are not required. Furthermore, the replicative intermediates seen in the electron microscope suggest that replication in vitro begins with the simultaneous or non-simultaneous formation of two displacement loops that expand for a short stretch of DNA toward each other, and form a theta-type structure when the two displacing strands pass each other. Images PMID:1851552

  9. Parvovirus B19 Infection of Human Primary Erythroid Progenitor Cells Triggers ATR-Chk1 Signaling, Which Promotes B19 Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yong; Lou, Sai; Deng, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhengwen; Li, Yi; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection is restricted to erythroid progenitor cells of the human bone marrow. Although the mechanism by which the B19V genome replicates in these cells has not been studied in great detail, accumulating evidence has implicated involvement of the cellular DNA damage machinery in this process. Here, we report that, in ex vivo-expanded human erythroid progenitor cells, B19V infection induces a broad range of DNA damage responses by triggering phosphorylation of all the upstream kinases of each of three repair pathways: ATM (ataxia-telangiectasi mutated), ATR (ATM and Rad3 related), and DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit). We found that phosphorylated ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs, and also their downstream substrates and components (Chk2, Chk1, and Ku70/Ku80 complex, respectively), localized within the B19V replication center. Notably, inhibition of kinase phosphorylation (through treatment with either kinase-specific inhibitors or kinase-specific shRNAs) revealed requirements for signaling of ATR and DNA-PKcs, but not ATM, in virus replication. Inhibition of the ATR substrate Chk1 led to similar levels of decreased virus replication, indicating that signaling via the ATR-Chk1 pathway is critical to B19V replication. Notably, the cell cycle arrest characteristic of B19V infection was not rescued by interference with the activity of any of the three repair pathway kinases. PMID:21680529

  10. Interaction of Epstein-Barr Virus BZLF1 C-Terminal Tail Structure and Core Zipper Is Required for DNA Replication but Not for Promoter Transactivation ▿

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Carol M.; Petosa, Carlo; Farrell, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) protein BZLF1 contains a bZIP DNA binding domain in which C-terminal tail residues fold back against a zipper region that forms a coiled coil and mediates dimerization. Point mutagenesis in the zipper region reveals the importance of individual residues within the 208SSENDRLR215 sequence that is conserved in C/EBP for transactivation and EBV DNA replication. The restoration of BZLF1 DNA replication activity by the complementation of two deleterious mutations (S208E and D236K) indicates that the interaction of the C-terminal tail and the core zipper is required for DNA replication, identifying a functional role for this structural feature unique to BZLF1. PMID:19144704

  11. Differential methylation of E2 binding sites in episomal and integrated HPV 16 genomes in preinvasive and invasive cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongkot, Arkom; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan; Chumworathayi, Bandit; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2013-05-01

    Enhanced expression of the HPV 16 E6-E7 oncogenes may trigger neoplastic transformation of the squamous epithelial cells at the uterine cervix. The HPV E2 protein is a key transcriptional regulator of the E6-E7 genes. It binds to four E2 binding sites (E2BSs 1-4) in the viral upstream regulatory region (URR). Modification of E2 functions, for example, by methylation of E2BSs is hypothesized to trigger enhanced expression of the viral E6-E7 oncogenes. In the majority of HPV-transformed premalignant lesions and about half of cervical carcinomas HPV genomes persist in an extra-chromosomal, episomal state, whereas they are integrated into host cells chromosomes in the remaining lesions. Here we compared the methylation profile of E2BSs 1-4 of the HPV 16 URR in a series of 18 HPV16-positive premalignant lesions and 33 invasive cervical cancers. CpGs within the E2BSs 1, 3, and 4 were higher methylated in all lesions with only episomal HPV16 genomes compared with lesions displaying single integrated copies. Samples with multiple HPV16 integrated copies displayed high methylation levels for all CpGs suggesting that the majority of multiple copies were silenced by extensive methylation. These data support the hypothesis that differential methylation of the E2BSs 1, 3 and 4 is related to the activation of viral oncogene expression in cervical lesions as long as the viral genome remains in the episomal state. Once the virus becomes integrated into host cell chromosomes these methylation patterns may be substantially altered due to complex epigenetic changes of integrated HPV genomes.

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA from a vulvar carcinoma in situ is present as head-to-tail dimeric episomes with a deletion in the non-coding region.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, I M; Simpson, S; Macnab, J C; Clements, J B

    1987-02-01

    A number of genital cancer biopsy samples were screened for the presence of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA sequences. One of these samples (a vulvar carcinoma in situ) was found to contain more than 100 copies of HPV-16 DNA sequences per cell. Using this tumour DNA, a genomic library was constructed in bacteriophage lambda and the library was screened for recombinant phage containing HPV-16 sequences. Five recombinant phage clones were isolated and their DNA was analysed by restriction endonuclease digestion and blot hybridization. All five recombinants contained two copies of the HPV-16 genome present in a head-to-tail arrangement. The data are consistent with the presence of HPV-16 sequences in the tumour DNA arranged as genomic dimers in a circular episomal configuration. The HPV-16 genomes contained a deletion within the non-coding region, a region which includes the viral origin of DNA replication and transcriptional control sequences. Possible consequences of this deletion for viral replication and transcription are discussed. PMID:3029284

  13. Assessment of an altered E1B promoter on the specificity and potency of triple-regulated conditionally replicating adenoviruses: implications for the generation of ideal m-CRAs.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Y; Wang, Y; Nagano, S; Kamizono, J; Ikeda, M; Komiya, S; Kosai, K-i

    2011-10-01

    Although previous studies modified two components of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAs), which selectively replicate in and kill cancer cells, the most accurate ways to achieve increased cancer specificity (that is, safety) without reducing the anticancer (that is, therapeutic) effects are unknown. Here, we generated two types of survivin-responsive m-CRAs (Surv.m-CRAs), Surv.m-CRA-CMVp and Surv.m-CRA-OCp, which use two and three different mechanisms to target cancer, that is, early region 1A (E1A) regulated by the survivin promoter and mutated E1BΔ55K regulated by the ubiquitously active cytomegalovirus promoter and cancer/tissue-specific osteocalcin promoter, respectively, and carefully examined their safety and anticancer effects. Endogenous osteocalcin mRNA was expressed and further enhanced by vitamin D(3) in all osteosarcoma and prostate cancer cell lines and human osteoblasts, but not in human fibroblasts. The osteocalcin promoter activity was weak even with vitamin D(3) treatment in these osteocalcin-expressing cancers, leading to low E1BΔ55K expression after Surv.m-CRA-OCp infection. Nevertheless, Surv.m-CRA-OCp had significantly increased cancer specificity without reduced anticancer effects in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. The unexpected but favorable fact that strong activity of an altered E1B promoter is unnecessary indicates that the majority of cancer/tissue-specific promoters may be used to generate ideal m-CRAs and will advance the development of m-CRA-based cancer therapies.

  14. Episomal HPV 16 DNA isolated from a cervical carcinoma presents a partial duplication of the early region.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, D; Caselli, E; Monini, P; Rotola, A; Savioli, A; Cassai, E

    1989-09-01

    An invasive cervical carcinoma was found to harbor an episomal variant of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA, with a size of about 10.1 kb. A genomic library of the tumor was constructed in bacteriophage lambda and a recombinant phage clone was isolated by screening with HPV 16 probe. Analysis by restriction mapping and Southern hybridization showed that the isolate contained a 2.2 kb duplication of the early region, which included part of E6, all E7 and part of E1 open reading frames. Possible consequences of this duplication for oncogenesis are discussed. PMID:2554613

  15. Replication and meta-analysis of the gene-environment interaction between body mass index and the interleukin-6 promoter polymorphism with higher insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Patricia C; Chamarthi, Bindu; Williams, Jonathan S; Sun, Bei; Vaidya, Anand; Raby, Benjamin A; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Hopkins, Paul N; Adler, Gail K; Williams, Gordon H

    2012-05-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a complex disorder caused by an interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies identified a significant interaction between body mass index (BMI) and the rs1800795 polymorphism of the interleukin-6 gene that influences both IR and onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, with obese individuals homozygous for the C allele demonstrating the highest level of IR and greatest risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Replication of a gene-environment interaction is important to confirm the validity of the initial finding and extend the generalizability of the results to other populations. Thus, the objective of this study was to replicate this gene-environment interaction on IR in a hypertensive population and perform a meta-analysis with prior published results. The replication analysis was performed using white individuals with hypertension from the Hypertensive Pathotype cohort (N = 311), genotyped for rs1800795. Phenotype studies were conducted after participants consumed 2 diets--high sodium (200 mmol/d) and low sodium (10 mmol/d)--for 7 days each. Measurements for plasma glucose, insulin, and interleukin-6 were obtained after 8 hours of fasting. Insulin resistance was characterized by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR). In Hypertensive Pathotype, BMI was a significant effect modifier of the relationship between rs1800795 and HOMA-IR; higher BMI was associated with higher HOMA-IR among homozygote CC individuals when compared with major allele G carriers (P = .003). Furthermore, the meta-analysis in 1028 individuals confirmed the result, demonstrating the same significant interaction between rs1800795 and BMI on HOMA-IR (P = 1.05 × 10(-6)). This rare replication of a gene-environment interaction extends the generalizability of the results to hypertension while highlighting this polymorphism as a marker of IR in obese individuals.

  16. Human Heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) promotes influenza A virus replication by assisting nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Batra, Jyoti; Tripathi, Shashank; Kumar, Amrita; Katz, Jacqueline M; Cox, Nancy J; Lal, Renu B; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lal, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    A unique feature of influenza A virus (IAV) life cycle is replication of the viral genome in the host cell nucleus. The nuclear import of IAV genome is an indispensable step in establishing virus infection. IAV nucleoprotein (NP) is known to mediate the nuclear import of viral genome via its nuclear localization signals. Here, we demonstrate that cellular heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) facilitates the nuclear import of incoming IAV viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and is important for efficient IAV replication. Hsp40 was found to interact with NP component of IAV RNPs during early stages of infection. This interaction is mediated by the J domain of Hsp40 and N-terminal region of NP. Drug or RNAi mediated inhibition of Hsp40 resulted in reduced nuclear import of IAV RNPs, diminished viral polymerase function and attenuates overall viral replication. Hsp40 was also found to be required for efficient association between NP and importin alpha, which is crucial for IAV RNP nuclear translocation. These studies demonstrate an important role for cellular chaperone Hsp40/DnaJB1 in influenza A virus life cycle by assisting nuclear trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins. PMID:26750153

  17. Human Heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) promotes influenza A virus replication by assisting nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Jyoti; Tripathi, Shashank; Kumar, Amrita; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Cox, Nancy J.; Lal, Renu B.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lal, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    A unique feature of influenza A virus (IAV) life cycle is replication of the viral genome in the host cell nucleus. The nuclear import of IAV genome is an indispensable step in establishing virus infection. IAV nucleoprotein (NP) is known to mediate the nuclear import of viral genome via its nuclear localization signals. Here, we demonstrate that cellular heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) facilitates the nuclear import of incoming IAV viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and is important for efficient IAV replication. Hsp40 was found to interact with NP component of IAV RNPs during early stages of infection. This interaction is mediated by the J domain of Hsp40 and N-terminal region of NP. Drug or RNAi mediated inhibition of Hsp40 resulted in reduced nuclear import of IAV RNPs, diminished viral polymerase function and attenuates overall viral replication. Hsp40 was also found to be required for efficient association between NP and importin alpha, which is crucial for IAV RNP nuclear translocation. These studies demonstrate an important role for cellular chaperone Hsp40/DnaJB1 in influenza A virus life cycle by assisting nuclear trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins. PMID:26750153

  18. A Sequence-Independent Strategy for Amplification and Characterisation of Episomal Badnavirus Sequences Reveals Three Previously Uncharacterised Yam Badnaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bömer, Moritz; Turaki, Aliyu A.; Silva, Gonçalo; Kumar, P. Lava; Seal, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) plants are potentially hosts to a diverse range of badnavirus species (genus Badnavirus, family Caulimoviridae), but their detection is complicated by the existence of integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. To date, only two badnavirus genomes have been characterised, namely, Dioscorea bacilliform AL virus (DBALV) and Dioscorea bacilliform SN virus (DBSNV). A further 10 tentative species in yam have been described based on their partial reverse transcriptase (RT)-ribonuclease H (RNaseH) sequences, generically referred to here as Dioscorea bacilliform viruses (DBVs). Further characterisation of DBV species is necessary to determine which represent episomal viruses and which are only present as integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. In this study, a sequence-independent multiply-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) method was evaluated for selective amplification of episomal DBV genomes. This resulted in the identification and characterisation of nine complete genomic sequences (7.4–7.7 kbp) of existing and previously undescribed DBV phylogenetic groups from Dioscorea alata and Dioscorea rotundata accessions. These new yam badnavirus genomes expand our understanding of the diversity and genomic organisation of DBVs, and assist the development of improved diagnostic tools. Our findings also suggest that mixed badnavirus infections occur relatively often in West African yam germplasm. PMID:27399761

  19. A Sequence-Independent Strategy for Amplification and Characterisation of Episomal Badnavirus Sequences Reveals Three Previously Uncharacterised Yam Badnaviruses.

    PubMed

    Bömer, Moritz; Turaki, Aliyu A; Silva, Gonçalo; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) plants are potentially hosts to a diverse range of badnavirus species (genus Badnavirus, family Caulimoviridae), but their detection is complicated by the existence of integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. To date, only two badnavirus genomes have been characterised, namely, Dioscorea bacilliform AL virus (DBALV) and Dioscorea bacilliform SN virus (DBSNV). A further 10 tentative species in yam have been described based on their partial reverse transcriptase (RT)-ribonuclease H (RNaseH) sequences, generically referred to here as Dioscorea bacilliform viruses (DBVs). Further characterisation of DBV species is necessary to determine which represent episomal viruses and which are only present as integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. In this study, a sequence-independent multiply-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) method was evaluated for selective amplification of episomal DBV genomes. This resulted in the identification and characterisation of nine complete genomic sequences (7.4-7.7 kbp) of existing and previously undescribed DBV phylogenetic groups from Dioscorea alata and Dioscorea rotundata accessions. These new yam badnavirus genomes expand our understanding of the diversity and genomic organisation of DBVs, and assist the development of improved diagnostic tools. Our findings also suggest that mixed badnavirus infections occur relatively often in West African yam germplasm. PMID:27399761

  20. FANC Pathway Promotes UV-Induced Stalled Replication Forks Recovery by Acting Both Upstream and Downstream Polη and Rev1

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Emilie; Rosselli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    To cope with ultraviolet C (UVC)-stalled replication forks and restart DNA synthesis, cells either undergo DNA translesion synthesis (TLS) by specialised DNA polymerases or tolerate the lesions using homologous recombination (HR)-based mechanisms. To gain insight into how cells manage UVC-induced stalled replication forks, we analysed the molecular crosstalk between the TLS DNA polymerases Polη and Rev1, the double-strand break repair (DSB)-associated protein MDC1 and the FANC pathway. We describe three novel functional interactions that occur in response to UVC-induced DNA lesions. First, Polη and Rev1, whose optimal expression and/or relocalisation depend on the FANC core complex, act upstream of FANCD2 and are required for the proper relocalisation of monoubiquitinylated FANCD2 (Ub-FANCD2) to subnuclear foci. Second, during S-phase, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 relocalise to UVC-damaged nuclear areas or foci simultaneously but independently of each other. Third, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 are independently required for optimal BRCA1 relocalisation. While RPA32 phosphorylation (p-RPA32) and RPA foci formation were reduced in parallel with increasing levels of H2AX phosphorylation and MDC1 foci in UVC-irradiated FANC pathway-depleted cells, MDC1 depletion was associated with increased UVC-induced Ub-FANCD2 and FANCD2 foci as well as p-RPA32 levels and p-RPA32 foci. On the basis of the previous observations, we propose that the FANC pathway participates in the rescue of UVC-stalled replication forks in association with TLS by maintaining the integrity of ssDNA regions and by preserving genome stability and preventing the formation of DSBs, the resolution of which would require the intervention of MDC1. PMID:23365640

  1. FANC pathway promotes UV-induced stalled replication forks recovery by acting both upstream and downstream Polη and Rev1.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Emilie; Rosselli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    To cope with ultraviolet C (UVC)-stalled replication forks and restart DNA synthesis, cells either undergo DNA translesion synthesis (TLS) by specialised DNA polymerases or tolerate the lesions using homologous recombination (HR)-based mechanisms. To gain insight into how cells manage UVC-induced stalled replication forks, we analysed the molecular crosstalk between the TLS DNA polymerases Polη and Rev1, the double-strand break repair (DSB)-associated protein MDC1 and the FANC pathway. We describe three novel functional interactions that occur in response to UVC-induced DNA lesions. First, Polη and Rev1, whose optimal expression and/or relocalisation depend on the FANC core complex, act upstream of FANCD2 and are required for the proper relocalisation of monoubiquitinylated FANCD2 (Ub-FANCD2) to subnuclear foci. Second, during S-phase, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 relocalise to UVC-damaged nuclear areas or foci simultaneously but independently of each other. Third, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 are independently required for optimal BRCA1 relocalisation. While RPA32 phosphorylation (p-RPA32) and RPA foci formation were reduced in parallel with increasing levels of H2AX phosphorylation and MDC1 foci in UVC-irradiated FANC pathway-depleted cells, MDC1 depletion was associated with increased UVC-induced Ub-FANCD2 and FANCD2 foci as well as p-RPA32 levels and p-RPA32 foci. On the basis of the previous observations, we propose that the FANC pathway participates in the rescue of UVC-stalled replication forks in association with TLS by maintaining the integrity of ssDNA regions and by preserving genome stability and preventing the formation of DSBs, the resolution of which would require the intervention of MDC1.

  2. Cdk5 promotes DNA replication stress checkpoint activation through RPA-32 phosphorylation, and impacts on metastasis free survival in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chiker, Sara; Pennaneach, Vincent; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Biard, Denis; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Gemble, Simon; Vacher, Sophie; Bieche, Ivan; Hall, Janet; Fernet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a determinant of PARP inhibitor and ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity. Here we show that Cdk5-depleted (Cdk5-shRNA) HeLa cells show higher sensitivity to S-phase irradiation, chronic hydroxyurea exposure, and 5-fluorouracil and 6-thioguanine treatment, with hydroxyurea and IR sensitivity also seen in Cdk5-depleted U2OS cells. As Cdk5 is not directly implicated in DNA strand break repair we investigated in detail its proposed role in the intra-S checkpoint activation. While Cdk5-shRNA HeLa cells showed altered basal S-phase dynamics with slower replication velocity and fewer active origins per DNA megabase, checkpoint activation was impaired after a hydroxyurea block. Cdk5 depletion was associated with reduced priming phosphorylations of RPA32 serines 29 and 33 and SMC1-Serine 966 phosphorylation, lower levels of RPA serine 4 and 8 phosphorylation and DNA damage measured using the alkaline Comet assay, gamma-H2AX signal intensity, RPA and Rad51 foci, and sister chromatid exchanges resulting in impaired intra-S checkpoint activation and subsequently higher numbers of chromatin bridges. In vitro kinase assays coupled with mass spectrometry demonstrated that Cdk5 can carry out the RPA32 priming phosphorylations on serines 23, 29, and 33 necessary for this checkpoint activation. In addition we found an association between lower Cdk5 levels and longer metastasis free survival in breast cancer patients and survival in Cdk5-depleted breast tumor cells after treatment with IR and a PARP inhibitor. Taken together, these results show that Cdk5 is necessary for basal replication and replication stress checkpoint activation and highlight clinical opportunities to enhance tumor cell killing. PMID:26237679

  3. Cdk5 promotes DNA replication stress checkpoint activation through RPA-32 phosphorylation, and impacts on metastasis free survival in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiker, Sara; Pennaneach, Vincent; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Biard, Denis; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Gemble, Simon; Vacher, Sophie; Bieche, Ivan; Hall, Janet; Fernet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a determinant of PARP inhibitor and ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity. Here we show that Cdk5-depleted (Cdk5-shRNA) HeLa cells show higher sensitivity to S-phase irradiation, chronic hydroxyurea exposure, and 5-fluorouracil and 6-thioguanine treatment, with hydroxyurea and IR sensitivity also seen in Cdk5-depleted U2OS cells. As Cdk5 is not directly implicated in DNA strand break repair we investigated in detail its proposed role in the intra-S checkpoint activation. While Cdk5-shRNA HeLa cells showed altered basal S-phase dynamics with slower replication velocity and fewer active origins per DNA megabase, checkpoint activation was impaired after a hydroxyurea block. Cdk5 depletion was associated with reduced priming phosphorylations of RPA32 serines 29 and 33 and SMC1-Serine 966 phosphorylation, lower levels of RPA serine 4 and 8 phosphorylation and DNA damage measured using the alkaline Comet assay, gamma-H2AX signal intensity, RPA and Rad51 foci, and sister chromatid exchanges resulting in impaired intra-S checkpoint activation and subsequently higher numbers of chromatin bridges. In vitro kinase assays coupled with mass spectrometry demonstrated that Cdk5 can carry out the RPA32 priming phosphorylations on serines 23, 29, and 33 necessary for this checkpoint activation. In addition we found an association between lower Cdk5 levels and longer metastasis free survival in breast cancer patients and survival in Cdk5-depleted breast tumor cells after treatment with IR and a PARP inhibitor. Taken together, these results show that Cdk5 is necessary for basal replication and replication stress checkpoint activation and highlight clinical opportunities to enhance tumor cell killing. PMID:26237679

  4. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D; Copeland, William C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  5. Genomic instability of the host cell induced by the human papillomavirus replication machinery.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Sumerina, Alina; Verst, Tatjana; Ojarand, Mari; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2007-04-18

    Development of invasive cervical cancer upon infection by 'high-risk' human papillomavirus (HPV) in humans is a stepwise process in which some of the initially episomal 'high-risk' type of HPVs (HR-HPVs) integrate randomly into the host cell genome. We show that HPV replication proteins E1 and E2 are capable of inducing overamplification of the genomic locus where HPV origin has been integrated. Clonal analysis of the cells in which the replication from integrated HPV origin was induced showed excision, rearrangement and de novo integration of the HPV containing and flanking cellular sequences. These data suggest that papillomavirus replication machinery is capable of inducing genomic changes of the host cell that may facilitate the formation of the HPV-dependent cancer cell. PMID:17396148

  6. An episomal mammalian replicon: sequence-independent binding of the origin recognition complex

    PubMed Central

    Schaarschmidt, Daniel; Baltin, Jens; Stehle, Isa M; Lipps, Hans J; Knippers, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    An extrachromosomally replicating plasmid was used to investigate the specificity by which the origin recognition complex (ORC) interacts with DNA sequences in mammalian cells in vivo. We first showed that the plasmid pEPI-1 replicates semiconservatively in a once-per-cell-cycle manner and is stably transmitted over many cell generations in culture without selection. Chromatin immunoprecipitations and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that, in G1-phase cells, Orc1 and Orc2, as well as Mcm3, another component of the prereplication complex, are bound to multiple sites on the plasmid. These binding sites are functional because they show the S-phase-dependent dissociation of Orc1 and Mcm3 known to be characteristic for prereplication complexes in mammalian cells. In addition, we identified replicative nascent strands and showed that they correspond to many plasmid DNA regions. This work has implications for current models of replication origins in mammalian systems. It indicates that specific DNA sequences are not required for the chromatin binding of ORC in vivo. The conclusion is that epigenetic mechanisms determine the sites where mammalian DNA replication is initiated. PMID:14685267

  7. Generation of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) from cDNA: BRSV NS2 is not essential for virus replication in tissue culture, and the human RSV leader region acts as a functional BRSV genome promoter.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, U J; Finke, S; Conzelmann, K K

    1999-01-01

    In order to generate recombinant bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), the genome of BRSV strain A51908, variant ATue51908, was cloned as cDNA. We provide here the sequence of the BRSV genome ends and of the entire L gene. This completes the sequence of the BRSV genome, which comprises a total of 15,140 nucleotides. To establish a vaccinia virus-free recovery system, a BHK-derived cell line stably expressing T7 RNA polymerase was generated (BSR T7/5). Recombinant BRSV was reproducibly recovered from cDNA constructs after T7 RNA polymerase-driven expression of antigenome sense RNA and of BRSV N, P, M2, and L proteins from transfected plasmids. Chimeric viruses in which the BRSV leader region was replaced by the human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) leader region replicated in cell culture as efficiently as their nonchimeric counterparts, demonstrating that all cis-acting sequences of the HRSV promoter are faithfully recognized by the BRSV polymerase complex. In addition, we report the successful recovery of a BRSV mutant lacking the complete NS2 gene, which encodes a nonstructural protein of unknown function. The NS2-deficient BRSV replicated autonomously and could be passaged, demonstrating that NS2 is not essential for virus replication in cell culture. However, growth of the mutant was considerably slower than and final infectious titers were reduced by a factor of at least 10 compared to wild-type BRSV, indicating that NS2 provides a supporting factor required for full replication capacity.

  8. Generation of Integration-Free Patient Specific iPS Cells Using Episomal Plasmids Under Feeder Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Caxaria, Sara; Arthold, Susanne; Nathwani, Amit C; Goh, Pollyanna Agnes

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming somatic cells into a pluripotent state involves the overexpression of transcription factors leading to a series of changes that end in the formation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These iPSCs have a wide range of potential uses from drug testing and in vitro disease modelling to personalized cell therapies for patients. While viral methods for reprogramming factor delivery have been traditionally preferred due to their high efficiency, it is now possible to generate iPSCs using nonviral methods at similar efficiencies. We developed a robust reprogramming strategy that combines episomal plasmids and the use of commercially available animal free reagents that can be easily adapted for the GMP manufacture of clinical grade cells. PMID:25701132

  9. Overexpression of the Replicative Helicase in Escherichia coli Inhibits Replication Initiation and Replication Fork Reloading.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Jan-Gert; Myka, Kamila Katarzyna; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-03-27

    Replicative helicases play central roles in chromosome duplication and their assembly onto DNA is regulated via initiators and helicase loader proteins. The Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB and the helicase loader DnaC form a DnaB6-DnaC6 complex that is required for loading DnaB onto single-stranded DNA. Overexpression of dnaC inhibits replication by promoting continual rebinding of DnaC to DnaB and consequent prevention of helicase translocation. Here we show that overexpression of dnaB also inhibits growth and chromosome duplication. This inhibition is countered by co-overexpression of wild-type DnaC but not of a DnaC mutant that cannot interact with DnaB, indicating that a reduction in DnaB6-DnaC6 concentration is responsible for the phenotypes associated with elevated DnaB concentration. Partial defects in the oriC-specific initiator DnaA and in PriA-specific initiation away from oriC during replication repair sensitise cells to dnaB overexpression. Absence of the accessory replicative helicase Rep, resulting in increased replication blockage and thus increased reinitiation away from oriC, also exacerbates DnaB-induced defects. These findings indicate that elevated levels of helicase perturb replication initiation not only at origins of replication but also during fork repair at other sites on the chromosome. Thus, imbalances in levels of the replicative helicase and helicase loader can inhibit replication both via inhibition of DnaB6-DnaC6 complex formation with excess DnaB, as shown here, and promotion of formation of DnaB6-DnaC6 complexes with excess DnaC [Allen GC, Jr., Kornberg A. Fine balance in the regulation of DnaB helicase by DnaC protein in replication in Escherichia coli. J. Biol. Chem. 1991;266:22096-22101; Skarstad K, Wold S. The speed of the Escherichia coli fork in vivo depends on the DnaB:DnaC ratio. Mol. Microbiol. 1995;17:825-831]. Thus, there are two mechanisms by which an imbalance in the replicative helicase and its associated

  10. Overexpression of the Replicative Helicase in Escherichia coli Inhibits Replication Initiation and Replication Fork Reloading

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Jan-Gert; Myka, Kamila Katarzyna; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Replicative helicases play central roles in chromosome duplication and their assembly onto DNA is regulated via initiators and helicase loader proteins. The Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB and the helicase loader DnaC form a DnaB6–DnaC6 complex that is required for loading DnaB onto single-stranded DNA. Overexpression of dnaC inhibits replication by promoting continual rebinding of DnaC to DnaB and consequent prevention of helicase translocation. Here we show that overexpression of dnaB also inhibits growth and chromosome duplication. This inhibition is countered by co-overexpression of wild-type DnaC but not of a DnaC mutant that cannot interact with DnaB, indicating that a reduction in DnaB6–DnaC6 concentration is responsible for the phenotypes associated with elevated DnaB concentration. Partial defects in the oriC-specific initiator DnaA and in PriA-specific initiation away from oriC during replication repair sensitise cells to dnaB overexpression. Absence of the accessory replicative helicase Rep, resulting in increased replication blockage and thus increased reinitiation away from oriC, also exacerbates DnaB-induced defects. These findings indicate that elevated levels of helicase perturb replication initiation not only at origins of replication but also during fork repair at other sites on the chromosome. Thus, imbalances in levels of the replicative helicase and helicase loader can inhibit replication both via inhibition of DnaB6–DnaC6 complex formation with excess DnaB, as shown here, and promotion of formation of DnaB6–DnaC6 complexes with excess DnaC [Allen GC, Jr., Kornberg A. Fine balance in the regulation of DnaB helicase by DnaC protein in replication in Escherichia coli. J. Biol. Chem. 1991;266:22096–22101; Skarstad K, Wold S. The speed of the Escherichia coli fork in vivo depends on the DnaB:DnaC ratio. Mol. Microbiol. 1995;17:825–831]. Thus, there are two mechanisms by which an imbalance in the replicative helicase and its

  11. Inhibition of the FACT Complex Reduces Transcription from the Human Cytomegalovirus Major Immediate Early Promoter in Models of Lytic and Latent Replication.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Christine M; Nukui, Masatoshi; Gurova, Katerina V; Murphy, Eain A

    2016-04-01

    The successful colonization of the majority of the population by human cytomegalovirus is a direct result of the virus's ability to establish and, more specifically, reactivate from latency. The underlying cellular factors involved in viral reactivation remain unknown. Here, we show that the host complexfacilitateschromatintranscription (FACT) binds to the major immediate early promoter (MIEP) and that inhibition of this complex reduces MIEP transactivation, thus inhibiting viral reactivation. PMID:26865717

  12. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling shapes the DNA replication landscape

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jack A.; Kwong, Tracey J.; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic DNA replication machinery must traverse every nucleosome in the genome during S phase. As nucleosomes are generally inhibitory to DNA-dependent processes, chromatin structure must undergo extensive reorganization to facilitate DNA synthesis. However, the identity of chromatin-remodeling factors involved in replication and how they affect DNA synthesis is largely unknown. Here we show that two highly conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Isw2 and Ino80, function in parallel to promote replication fork progression. As a result, Isw2 and Ino80 play especially important roles for replication of late-replicating regions during periods of replication stress. Both Isw2 and Ino80 complexes are enriched at sites of replication, suggesting that these complexes act directly to promote fork progression. These findings identify ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes promoting DNA replication, and define a specific stage of replication that requires remodeling for normal function. PMID:18408730

  13. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and survivin induction by varicella-zoster virus promote replication and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nandini; Che, Xibing; Rajamani, Jaya; Zerboni, Leigh; Sung, Phillip; Ptacek, Jason; Arvin, Ann M

    2012-01-10

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human α-herpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) during primary infection and zoster (shingles) upon reactivation. Like other viruses, VZV must subvert the intrinsic antiviral defenses of differentiated human cells to produce progeny virions. Accordingly, VZV inhibits the activation of the cellular transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1), thereby downregulating antiviral factors, including IFNs. Conversely, in this study, we found that VZV triggers STAT3 phosphorylation in cells infected in vitro and in human skin xenografts in SCID mice in vivo and that STAT3 activation induces the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. Small-molecule inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation and survivin restrict VZV replication in vitro, and VZV infection of skin xenografts in vivo is markedly impaired by the administration of the phospho-STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201. STAT3 and survivin are required for malignant transformation caused by γ-herpesviruses, such as Kaposi's sarcoma virus. We show that STAT3 activation is also critical for VZV, a nononcogenic herpesvirus, via a survivin-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, STAT3 activation is critical for the life cycle of the virus because VZV skin infection is necessary for viral transmission and persistence in the human population. Therefore, we conclude that takeover of this major cell-signaling pathway is necessary, independent of cell transformation, for herpesvirus pathogenesis and that STAT3 activation and up-regulation of survivin is a common mechanism important for the pathogenesis of lytic as well as tumorigenic herpesviruses.

  14. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and survivin induction by varicella-zoster virus promote replication and skin pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sen, Nandini; Che, Xibing; Rajamani, Jaya; Zerboni, Leigh; Sung, Phillip; Ptacek, Jason; Arvin, Ann M

    2012-01-10

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a human α-herpesvirus that causes varicella (chickenpox) during primary infection and zoster (shingles) upon reactivation. Like other viruses, VZV must subvert the intrinsic antiviral defenses of differentiated human cells to produce progeny virions. Accordingly, VZV inhibits the activation of the cellular transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1), thereby downregulating antiviral factors, including IFNs. Conversely, in this study, we found that VZV triggers STAT3 phosphorylation in cells infected in vitro and in human skin xenografts in SCID mice in vivo and that STAT3 activation induces the anti-apoptotic protein survivin. Small-molecule inhibitors of STAT3 phosphorylation and survivin restrict VZV replication in vitro, and VZV infection of skin xenografts in vivo is markedly impaired by the administration of the phospho-STAT3 inhibitor S3I-201. STAT3 and survivin are required for malignant transformation caused by γ-herpesviruses, such as Kaposi's sarcoma virus. We show that STAT3 activation is also critical for VZV, a nononcogenic herpesvirus, via a survivin-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, STAT3 activation is critical for the life cycle of the virus because VZV skin infection is necessary for viral transmission and persistence in the human population. Therefore, we conclude that takeover of this major cell-signaling pathway is necessary, independent of cell transformation, for herpesvirus pathogenesis and that STAT3 activation and up-regulation of survivin is a common mechanism important for the pathogenesis of lytic as well as tumorigenic herpesviruses. PMID:22190485

  15. Replication fork collapse at replication terminator sequences.

    PubMed

    Bidnenko, Vladimir; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Michel, Bénédicte

    2002-07-15

    Replication fork arrest is a source of genome re arrangements, and the recombinogenic properties of blocked forks are likely to depend on the cause of blockage. Here we study the fate of replication forks blocked at natural replication arrest sites. For this purpose, Escherichia coli replication terminator sequences Ter were placed at ectopic positions on the bacterial chromosome. The resulting strain requires recombinational repair for viability, but replication forks blocked at Ter are not broken. Linear DNA molecules are formed upon arrival of a second round of replication forks that copy the DNA strands of the first blocked forks to the end. A model that accounts for the requirement for homologous recombination for viability in spite of the lack of chromosome breakage is proposed. This work shows that natural and accidental replication arrests sites are processed differently.

  16. Cytoplasmic Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Diaz, Arturo; Ahlquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm compartmentalize their genome replication and transcription in organelle-like structures that enhance replication efficiency and protection from host defenses. In particular, recent studies with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses have further elucidated the ultrastructure of membrane-bounded RNA replication complexes and their close coordination with virion assembly and budding. The structure, function and assembly of some positive-strand RNA virus replication complexes have parallels and potential evolutionary links with the replicative cores of double-strand RNA virus and retrovirus virions, and more general similarities with the replication factories of cytoplasmic DNA viruses. PMID:20638644

  17. The Legionella pneumophila F-box protein Lpp2082 (AnkB) modulates ubiquitination of the host protein parvin B and promotes intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Lomma, M; Dervins-Ravault, D; Rolando, M; Nora, T; Newton, H J; Sansom, F M; Sahr, T; Gomez-Valero, L; Jules, M; Hartland, E L; Buchrieser, C

    2010-09-01

    The environmental pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes three proteins containing F-box domains and additional protein-protein interaction domains, reminiscent of eukaryotic SCF ubiquitin-protein ligases. Here we show that the F-box proteins of L. pneumophila strain Paris are Dot/Icm effectors involved in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins associated with the Legionella-containing vacuole. Single, double and triple mutants of the F-box protein encoding genes were impaired in infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, THP-1 macrophages and human lung epithelial cells. Lpp2082/AnkB was essential for infection of the lungs of A/J mice in vivo, and bound Skp1, the interaction partner of the SCF complex in mammalian cells, similar to AnkB from strain AA100/130b. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen and co-immunoprecipitation analysis we identified ParvB a protein present in focal adhesions and in lamellipodia, as a target. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that ectopically expressed Lpp2082/AnkB colocalized with ParvB at the periphery of lamellipodia. Unexpectedly, ubiquitination tests revealed that Lpp2082/AnkB diminishes endogenous ubiquitination of ParvB. Based on these results we propose that L. pneumophila modulates ubiquitination of ParvB by competing with eukaryotic E3 ligases for the specific protein-protein interaction site of ParvB, thereby revealing a new mechanism by which L. pneumophila may employ translocated effector proteins to promote bacterial survival.

  18. Cytotoxic effect of replication-competent adenoviral vectors carrying L-plastin promoter regulated E1A and cytosine deaminase genes in cancers of the breast, ovary and colon.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Hakan; Zhang, Lixin; Tang, Yucheng; Deisseroth, Albert

    2003-05-01

    Prodrug activating transcription unit gene therapy is one of several promising approaches to cancer gene therapy. Combining that approach with conditionally replication-competent viral vectors that are truly tumor specific has been an important objective of recent work. In this study, we report the construction of a new conditionally replication-competent bicistronic adenoviral vector in which the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the E1a gene are driven by the L-plastin tumor-specific promoter (AdLpCDIRESE1a). A similar vector driven by the CMV promoter has also been constructed (AdCMVCDIRESE1a) as a control. We have carried out in vitro cytotoxicity in carcinomas of the breast, ovary and colon, and in vivo efficacy studies with these vectors in an animal model of colon cancer. While the addition of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector to established cancer cell lines showed significant cytotoxicity in tumor cells derived from carcinomas of the breast (MCF-7), colon (HTB-38) and ovary (Ovcar 5), no significant toxicity was seen in explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) exposed to this vector. The addition of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) significantly increased the cytotoxicity in an additive fashion of both the AdLpCDIRESE1a and AdCMVCDIRESE1a vectors as well as that of the AdLpCD replication incompetent vector to established tumor cell lines. However, no significant cytotoxicity was observed with the addition of 5FC to explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells that had been exposed to the L-plastin-driven vectors. Studies with mixtures of infected and uninfected tumor cell lines showed that the established cancer cell lines infected with the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector generated significant toxicity to surrounding uninfected cells (the "bystander effect") even at a ratio of 0.25 of infected cells to infected + uninfected cells in the presence of 5FC. The injection of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector into subcutaneous deposits of human tumor nodules in the

  19. Replication-dependent and independent mechanisms for the chromosome-coupled persistence of a selfish genome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Ting; Chang, Keng-Ming; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2016-01-01

    The yeast 2-micron plasmid epitomizes the evolutionary optimization of selfish extra-chromosomal genomes for stable persistence without jeopardizing their hosts’ fitness. Analyses of fluorescence-tagged single-copy reporter plasmids and/or the plasmid partitioning proteins in native and non-native hosts reveal chromosome-hitchhiking as the likely means for plasmid segregation. The contribution of the partitioning system to equal segregation is bipartite- replication-independent and replication-dependent. The former nearly eliminates ‘mother bias’ (preferential plasmid retention in the mother cell) according to binomial distribution, thus limiting equal segregation of a plasmid pair to 50%. The latter enhances equal segregation of plasmid sisters beyond this level, elevating the plasmid close to chromosome status. Host factors involved in plasmid partitioning can be functionally separated by their participation in the replication-independent and/or replication-dependent steps. In the hitchhiking model, random tethering of a pair of plasmids to chromosomes signifies the replication-independent component of segregation; the symmetric tethering of plasmid sisters to sister chromatids embodies the replication-dependent component. The 2-micron circle broadly resembles the episomes of certain mammalian viruses in its chromosome-associated propagation. This unifying feature among otherwise widely differing selfish genomes suggests their evolutionary convergence to the common logic of exploiting, albeit via distinct molecular mechanisms, host chromosome segregation machineries for self-preservation. PMID:27492289

  20. Alpha interferon-induced antiviral response noncytolytically reduces replication defective adenovirus DNA in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Tianlun; Guo, Haitao; Block, Timothy M

    2007-12-01

    Although alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) is of benefit in the treatment of viral hepatitis B, HBV replication has been refractory to the cytokine in commonly used hepatocyte-derived cell lines. In search for a cell culture system to study the mechanism by which IFN-alpha inhibits HBV replication, we infected a variety of cell lines with an adenoviral vector containing a replication competent 1.3-fold genome length HBV DNA (AdHBV) and followed by incubation with IFN-alpha. We found that IFN-alpha efficiently decreased the level of HBV DNA replicative intermediates in AdHBV infected Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Further analysis revealed, surprisingly, that IFN-alpha did not directly inhibit HBV replication, rather the amount of adenovirus DNA in the nuclei of MDBK cells was reduced. As a consequence, HBV RNA transcription and DNA replication were inhibited. Experiments with adenoviral vector expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) further supported the notion that IFN-alpha treatment noncytolytically eliminated adenovirus DNA, but did not kill the vector infected MDBK cells. Our data suggest that IFN-alpha-induced antiviral program is able to discriminate host cellular DNA from episomal viral DNA and might represent a novel pathway of interferon mediate innate defense against DNA virus infections.

  1. The Homologous Tripartite Viral RNA Polymerase of A/Swine/Korea/CT1204/2009(H1N2) Influenza Virus Synergistically Drives Efficient Replication and Promotes Respiratory Droplet Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q.; Song, Min-Suk; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Kim, Eun-Ha; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Ok-Jun; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J.; Webster, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that influenza A/swine/Korea/1204/2009(H1N2) virus was virulent and transmissible in ferrets in which the respiratory-droplet-transmissible virus (CT-Sw/1204) had acquired simultaneous hemagglutinin (HAD225G) and neuraminidase (NAS315N) mutations. Incorporating these mutations into the nonpathogenic A/swine/Korea/1130/2009(H1N2, Sw/1130) virus consequently altered pathogenicity and growth in animal models but could not establish efficient transmission or noticeable disease. We therefore exploited various reassortants of these two viruses to better understand and identify other viral factors responsible for pathogenicity, transmissibility, or both. We found that possession of the CT-Sw/1204 tripartite viral polymerase enhanced replicative ability and pathogenicity in mice more significantly than did expression of individual polymerase subunit proteins. In ferrets, homologous expression of viral RNA polymerase complex genes in the context of the mutant Sw/1130 carrying the HA225G and NA315N modifications induced optimal replication in the upper nasal and lower respiratory tracts and also promoted efficient aerosol transmission to respiratory droplet contact ferrets. These data show that the synergistic function of the tripartite polymerase gene complex of CT-Sw/1204 is critically important for virulence and transmission independent of the surface glycoproteins. Sequence comparison results reveal putative differences that are likely to be responsible for variation in disease. Our findings may help elucidate previously undefined viral factors that could expand the host range and disease severity induced by triple-reassortant swine viruses, including the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, and therefore further justify the ongoing development of novel antiviral drugs targeting the viral polymerase complex subunits. PMID:23864624

  2. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    PubMed

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  3. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-01-01

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress. PMID:26113155

  4. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65.

    PubMed

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F

    2007-11-01

    We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  5. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S.; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  6. A comparison of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, DNA fragments and AAV-1 for targeted episomal and chromosomal gene repair

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Xavier; Danos, Olivier; Scherman, Daniel; Kichler, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Background Current strategies for gene therapy of inherited diseases consist in adding functional copies of the gene that is defective. An attractive alternative to these approaches would be to correct the endogenous mutated gene in the affected individual. This study presents a quantitative comparison of the repair efficiency using different forms of donor nucleic acids, including synthetic DNA oligonucleotides, double stranded DNA fragments with sizes ranging from 200 to 2200 bp and sequences carried by a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-1). Evaluation of each gene repair strategy was carried out using two different reporter systems, a mutated eGFP gene or a dual construct with a functional eGFP and an inactive luciferase gene, in several different cell systems. Gene targeting events were scored either following transient co-transfection of reporter plasmids and donor DNAs, or in a system where a reporter construct was stably integrated into the chromosome. Results In both episomal and chromosomal assays, DNA fragments were more efficient at gene repair than oligonucleotides or rAAV-1. Furthermore, the gene targeting frequency could be significantly increased by using DNA repair stimulating drugs such as doxorubicin and phleomycin. Conclusion Our results show that it is possible to obtain repair frequencies of 1% of the transfected cell population under optimized transfection protocols when cells were pretreated with phleomycin using rAAV-1 and dsDNA fragments. PMID:19379497

  7. A New Episomic Element Controlling Fermentative Metabolism and Excretion of Amino Acids by Citrobacter intermedium C3

    PubMed Central

    Pares, R.; Guinea, J.; Hernandez, S.; Valoix, Josefina; Jofre, J.

    1974-01-01

    Glutamate excretion by colonies of Citrobacter intermedium C3 was detected by using the auxotrophic strain Leuconostoc mesenteroides P-60. A constant ratio of strain C3 colonies did not excrete glutamate. These colonies were subcultured, and colonial analysis of their descendants established that the change from non-excretor to excretor (Sg− → Sg+) is a spontaneous and random process with occurs at a high rate, and that an equilibrium state results from the back-transition Sg+ → Sg− in large populations. Acridine orange, ethidium bromide, and shaking have a strong influence on Sg+-to-Sg− interconversion, which suggests that a genetic element like an episome is implicated (S factor). Various auxotrophic mutants of bacterial strain C3 have been cured of the S factor. Strains lacking the S factor (S− strains) do not excrete glutamate and lose their fermentative metabolism completely. Consequently, the S factor is different from other extrachromosomal genetic factors whose elimination does not modify central metabolism. The gain of the S factor by infectious transfer has been shown with different C3 auxotrophic mutant strains. Also, the S factor has been transferred to Paracolobactrum intermedium ATCC 11606. These findings suggest that phenotypic changes observed are a consequence of elimination or infectious gain of the S factor, with its autonomous or integrated multiplication. PMID:4600693

  8. Mapping of histone modifications in episomal HBV cccDNA uncovers an unusual chromatin organization amenable to epigenetic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tropberger, Philipp; Mercier, Alexandre; Robinson, Margaret; Zhong, Weidong; Ganem, Don E; Holdorf, Meghan

    2015-10-20

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects 240 million people worldwide and is a major risk factor for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current antiviral therapy inhibits cytoplasmic HBV genomic replication, but is not curative because it does not directly affect nuclear HBV closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the genomic form that templates viral transcription and sustains viral persistence. Novel approaches that directly target cccDNA regulation would therefore be highly desirable. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here, using a new cccDNA ChIP-Seq approach, we report, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide maps of PTMs in cccDNA-containing chromatin from de novo infected HepG2 cells, primary human hepatocytes, and from HBV-infected liver tissue. We find high levels of PTMs associated with active transcription enriched at specific sites within the HBV genome and, surprisingly, very low levels of PTMs linked to transcriptional repression even at silent HBV promoters. We show that transcription and active PTMs in HBV chromatin are reduced by the activation of an innate immunity pathway, and that this effect can be recapitulated with a small molecule epigenetic modifying agent, opening the possibility that chromatin-based regulation of cccDNA transcription could be a new therapeutic approach to chronic HBV infection.

  9. Surveying genome replication

    PubMed Central

    Kearsey, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Two recent studies have added microarrays to the toolkit used to analyze the origins of replication in yeast chromosomes, providing a fuller picture of how genomic DNA replication is organized. PMID:12093380

  10. Replicating repetitive DNA.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Silvia; Speck, Christian

    2016-05-27

    The function and regulation of repetitive DNA, the 'dark matter' of the genome, is still only rudimentarily understood. Now a study investigating DNA replication of repetitive centromeric chromosome segments has started to expose a fascinating replication program that involves suppression of ATR signalling, in particular during replication stress. PMID:27230530

  11. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  12. Phosphorylation of Ku70 subunit by cell cycle kinases modulates the replication related function of Ku heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumita; Chakraborty, Prabal; Saha, Partha

    2016-09-19

    The Ku protein, a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, binds to chromosomal replication origins maximally at G1-phase and plays an essential role in assembly of origin recognition complex. However, the mechanism regulating such a critical periodic activity of Ku remained unknown. Here, we establish human Ku70 as a novel target of cyclin B1-Cdk1, which phosphorylates it in a Cy-motif dependent manner. Interestingly, cyclin E1- and A2-Cdk2 also phosphorylate Ku70, and as a result, the protein remains in a phosphorylated state during S-M phases of cell cycle. Intriguingly, the phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks abolishes the interaction of Ku protein with replication origin due to disruption of the dimer. Furthermore, Ku70 is dephosphorylated in G1-phase, when Ku interacts with replication origin maximally. Strikingly, the over-expression of Ku70 with non-phosphorylable Cdk targets enhances the episomal replication of Ors8 origin and induces rereplication in HeLa cells, substantiating a preventive role of Ku phosphorylation in premature and untimely licensing of replication origin. Therefore, periodic phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks prevents the interaction of Ku with replication origin after initiation events in S-phase and the dephosphorylation at the end of mitosis facilitates its participation in pre-replication complex formation. PMID:27402161

  13. Phosphorylation of Ku70 subunit by cell cycle kinases modulates the replication related function of Ku heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Soumita; Chakraborty, Prabal; Saha, Partha

    2016-01-01

    The Ku protein, a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80, binds to chromosomal replication origins maximally at G1-phase and plays an essential role in assembly of origin recognition complex. However, the mechanism regulating such a critical periodic activity of Ku remained unknown. Here, we establish human Ku70 as a novel target of cyclin B1-Cdk1, which phosphorylates it in a Cy-motif dependent manner. Interestingly, cyclin E1- and A2-Cdk2 also phosphorylate Ku70, and as a result, the protein remains in a phosphorylated state during S-M phases of cell cycle. Intriguingly, the phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks abolishes the interaction of Ku protein with replication origin due to disruption of the dimer. Furthermore, Ku70 is dephosphorylated in G1-phase, when Ku interacts with replication origin maximally. Strikingly, the over-expression of Ku70 with non-phosphorylable Cdk targets enhances the episomal replication of Ors8 origin and induces rereplication in HeLa cells, substantiating a preventive role of Ku phosphorylation in premature and untimely licensing of replication origin. Therefore, periodic phosphorylation of Ku70 by cyclin-Cdks prevents the interaction of Ku with replication origin after initiation events in S-phase and the dephosphorylation at the end of mitosis facilitates its participation in pre-replication complex formation. PMID:27402161

  14. Genetic reprogramming of human amniotic cells with episomal vectors: neural rosettes as sentinels in candidate selection for validation assays

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    The promise of genetic reprogramming has prompted initiatives to develop banks of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from diverse sources. Sentinel assays for pluripotency could maximize available resources for generating iPSCs. Neural rosettes represent a primitive neural tissue that is unique to differentiating PSCs and commonly used to identify derivative neural/stem progenitors. Here, neural rosettes were used as a sentinel assay for pluripotency in selection of candidates to advance to validation assays. Candidate iPSCs were generated from independent populations of amniotic cells with episomal vectors. Phase imaging of living back up cultures showed neural rosettes in 2 of the 5 candidate populations. Rosettes were immunopositive for the Sox1, Sox2, Pax6 and Pax7 transcription factors that govern neural development in the earliest stage of development and for the Isl1/2 and Otx2 transcription factors that are expressed in the dorsal and ventral domains, respectively, of the neural tube in vivo. Dissociation of rosettes produced cultures of differentiation competent neural/stem progenitors that generated immature neurons that were immunopositive for βIII-tubulin and glia that were immunopositive for GFAP. Subsequent validation assays of selected candidates showed induced expression of endogenous pluripotency genes, epigenetic modification of chromatin and formation of teratomas in immunodeficient mice that contained derivatives of the 3 embryonic germ layers. Validated lines were vector-free and maintained a normal karyotype for more than 60 passages. The credibility of rosette assembly as a sentinel assay for PSCs is supported by coordinate loss of nuclear-localized pluripotency factors Oct4 and Nanog in neural rosettes that emerge spontaneously in cultures of self-renewing validated lines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate value in neural rosettes as sentinels for pluripotency and selection of promising candidates for advance to validation

  15. Genetic reprogramming of human amniotic cells with episomal vectors: neural rosettes as sentinels in candidate selection for validation assays.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patricia G; Payne, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    The promise of genetic reprogramming has prompted initiatives to develop banks of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from diverse sources. Sentinel assays for pluripotency could maximize available resources for generating iPSCs. Neural rosettes represent a primitive neural tissue that is unique to differentiating PSCs and commonly used to identify derivative neural/stem progenitors. Here, neural rosettes were used as a sentinel assay for pluripotency in selection of candidates to advance to validation assays. Candidate iPSCs were generated from independent populations of amniotic cells with episomal vectors. Phase imaging of living back up cultures showed neural rosettes in 2 of the 5 candidate populations. Rosettes were immunopositive for the Sox1, Sox2, Pax6 and Pax7 transcription factors that govern neural development in the earliest stage of development and for the Isl1/2 and Otx2 transcription factors that are expressed in the dorsal and ventral domains, respectively, of the neural tube in vivo. Dissociation of rosettes produced cultures of differentiation competent neural/stem progenitors that generated immature neurons that were immunopositive for βIII-tubulin and glia that were immunopositive for GFAP. Subsequent validation assays of selected candidates showed induced expression of endogenous pluripotency genes, epigenetic modification of chromatin and formation of teratomas in immunodeficient mice that contained derivatives of the 3 embryonic germ layers. Validated lines were vector-free and maintained a normal karyotype for more than 60 passages. The credibility of rosette assembly as a sentinel assay for PSCs is supported by coordinate loss of nuclear-localized pluripotency factors Oct4 and Nanog in neural rosettes that emerge spontaneously in cultures of self-renewing validated lines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate value in neural rosettes as sentinels for pluripotency and selection of promising candidates for advance to validation

  16. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. IMPORTANCE The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate

  17. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed Central

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-01-01

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators. PMID:11127914

  18. A new MCM modification cycle regulates DNA replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    The MCM DNA helicase is a central regulatory target during genome replication. MCM is kept inactive during G1 and activated in S phase to initiate replication. During this transition, the only known chemical change on MCM is the gain of multi-site phosphorylation that promotes cofactor recruitment. As replication initiation is intimately linked to multiple biological cues, additional changes on MCM can provide further regulatory points. Here, we describe a yeast MCM sumoylation cycle that negatively regulates replication. MCM subunits undergo sumoylation upon loading at origins in G1 prior to MCM phosphorylation. MCM sumoylation levels then decline as MCM phosphorylation levels rise, suggesting an inhibitory role in replication. Indeed, increasing MCM sumoylation impairs replication initiation through promoting the recruitment of a phosphatase that reduces MCM phosphorylation and activation. MCM sumoylation thus counterbalances kinase-based regulation to ensure accurate control of replication initiation. PMID:26854664

  19. Regulated Eukaryotic DNA Replication Origin Firing with Purified Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yeeles, Joseph T.P.; Deegan, Tom D.; Janska, Agnieszka; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F. X.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells initiate DNA replication from multiple origins, which must be tightly regulated to promote precise genome duplication in every cell cycle. To accomplish this, initiation is partitioned into two temporally discrete steps: a double hexameric MCM complex is first loaded at replication origins during G1 phase, and then converted to the active CMG (Cdc45, MCM, GINS) helicase during S phase. Here we describe the reconstitution of budding yeast DNA replication initiation with 16 purified replication factors, made from 42 polypeptides. Origin-dependent initiation recapitulates regulation seen in vivo. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibits MCM loading by phosphorylating the origin recognition complex (ORC) and promotes CMG formation by phosphorylating Sld2 and Sld3. Dbf4 dependent kinase (DDK) promotes replication by phosphorylating MCM, and can act either before or after CDK. These experiments define the minimum complement of proteins, protein kinase substrates and co-factors required for regulated eukaryotic DNA replication. PMID:25739503

  20. Regulated eukaryotic DNA replication origin firing with purified proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeeles, Joseph T P; Deegan, Tom D; Janska, Agnieszka; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2015-03-26

    Eukaryotic cells initiate DNA replication from multiple origins, which must be tightly regulated to promote precise genome duplication in every cell cycle. To accomplish this, initiation is partitioned into two temporally discrete steps: a double hexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is first loaded at replication origins during G1 phase, and then converted to the active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicase during S phase. Here we describe the reconstitution of budding yeast DNA replication initiation with 16 purified replication factors, made from 42 polypeptides. Origin-dependent initiation recapitulates regulation seen in vivo. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibits MCM loading by phosphorylating the origin recognition complex (ORC) and promotes CMG formation by phosphorylating Sld2 and Sld3. Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) promotes replication by phosphorylating MCM, and can act either before or after CDK. These experiments define the minimum complement of proteins, protein kinase substrates and co-factors required for regulated eukaryotic DNA replication. PMID:25739503

  1. Who Needs Replication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the editor of a recent Cambridge University Press book on research methods discusses replicating previous key studies to throw more light on their reliability and generalizability. Replication research is presented as an accepted method of validating previous research by providing comparability between the original and replicated…

  2. RNA virus replication depends on enrichment of phosphatidylethanolamine at replication sites in subcellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Nagy, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular membranes are critical for replication of positive-strand RNA viruses. To dissect the roles of various lipids, we have developed an artificial phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) vesicle-based Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) replication assay. We demonstrate that the in vitro assembled viral replicase complexes (VRCs) in artificial PE vesicles can support a complete cycle of replication and asymmetrical RNA synthesis, which is a hallmark of (+)-strand RNA viruses. Vesicles containing ∼85% PE and ∼15% additional phospholipids are the most efficient, suggesting that TBSV replicates within membrane microdomains enriched for PE. Accordingly, lipidomics analyses show increased PE levels in yeast surrogate host and plant leaves replicating TBSV. In addition, efficient redistribution of PE leads to enrichment of PE at viral replication sites. Expression of the tombusvirus p33 replication protein in the absence of other viral compounds is sufficient to promote intracellular redistribution of PE. Increased PE level due to deletion of PE methyltransferase in yeast enhances replication of TBSV and other viruses, suggesting that abundant PE in subcellular membranes has a proviral function. In summary, various (+)RNA viruses might subvert PE to build membrane-bound VRCs for robust replication in PE-enriched membrane microdomains. PMID:25810252

  3. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  4. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  5. Transcriptional Regulators Compete with Nucleosomes Post-replication.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-04-21

    Every nucleosome across the genome must be disrupted and reformed when the replication fork passes, but how chromatin organization is re-established following replication is unknown. To address this problem, we have developed Mapping In vivo Nascent Chromatin with EdU and sequencing (MINCE-seq) to characterize the genome-wide location of nucleosomes and other chromatin proteins behind replication forks at high temporal and spatial resolution. We find that the characteristic chromatin landscape at Drosophila promoters and enhancers is lost upon replication. The most conspicuous changes are at promoters that have high levels of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) stalling and DNA accessibility and show specific enrichment for the BRM remodeler. Enhancer chromatin is also disrupted during replication, suggesting a role for transcription factor (TF) competition in nucleosome re-establishment. Thus, the characteristic nucleosome landscape emerges from a uniformly packaged genome by the action of TFs, RNAPII, and remodelers minutes after replication fork passage. PMID:27062929

  6. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  7. Abiotic self-replication.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    The key to the origins of life is the replication of information. Linear polymers such as nucleic acids that both carry information and can be replicated are currently what we consider to be the basis of living systems. However, these two properties are not necessarily coupled. The ability to mutate in a discrete or quantized way, without frequent reversion, may be an additional requirement for Darwinian evolution, in which case the notion that Darwinian evolution defines life may be less of a tautology than previously thought. In this Account, we examine a variety of in vitro systems of increasing complexity, from simple chemical replicators up to complex systems based on in vitro transcription and translation. Comparing and contrasting these systems provides an interesting window onto the molecular origins of life. For nucleic acids, the story likely begins with simple chemical replication, perhaps of the form A + B → T, in which T serves as a template for the joining of A and B. Molecular variants capable of faster replication would come to dominate a population, and the development of cycles in which templates could foster one another's replication would have led to increasingly complex replicators and from thence to the initial genomes. The initial genomes may have been propagated by RNA replicases, ribozymes capable of joining oligonucleotides and eventually polymerizing mononucleotide substrates. As ribozymes were added to the genome to fill gaps in the chemistry necessary for replication, the backbone of a putative RNA world would have emerged. It is likely that such replicators would have been plagued by molecular parasites, which would have been passively replicated by the RNA world machinery without contributing to it. These molecular parasites would have been a major driver for the development of compartmentalization/cellularization, as more robust compartments could have outcompeted parasite-ridden compartments. The eventual outsourcing of metabolic

  8. Abiotic self-replication.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    The key to the origins of life is the replication of information. Linear polymers such as nucleic acids that both carry information and can be replicated are currently what we consider to be the basis of living systems. However, these two properties are not necessarily coupled. The ability to mutate in a discrete or quantized way, without frequent reversion, may be an additional requirement for Darwinian evolution, in which case the notion that Darwinian evolution defines life may be less of a tautology than previously thought. In this Account, we examine a variety of in vitro systems of increasing complexity, from simple chemical replicators up to complex systems based on in vitro transcription and translation. Comparing and contrasting these systems provides an interesting window onto the molecular origins of life. For nucleic acids, the story likely begins with simple chemical replication, perhaps of the form A + B → T, in which T serves as a template for the joining of A and B. Molecular variants capable of faster replication would come to dominate a population, and the development of cycles in which templates could foster one another's replication would have led to increasingly complex replicators and from thence to the initial genomes. The initial genomes may have been propagated by RNA replicases, ribozymes capable of joining oligonucleotides and eventually polymerizing mononucleotide substrates. As ribozymes were added to the genome to fill gaps in the chemistry necessary for replication, the backbone of a putative RNA world would have emerged. It is likely that such replicators would have been plagued by molecular parasites, which would have been passively replicated by the RNA world machinery without contributing to it. These molecular parasites would have been a major driver for the development of compartmentalization/cellularization, as more robust compartments could have outcompeted parasite-ridden compartments. The eventual outsourcing of metabolic

  9. Replication of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming Y.; Matson, Lawrence E.; Lee, Heedong; Chen, Chenggang

    2009-08-01

    The fabrication of lightweight mirror assemblages via a replication technique offers great potential for eliminating the high cost and schedule associated with the grinding and polishing steps needed for conventional glass or SiC mirrors. A replication mandrel is polished to an inverse figure shape and to the desired finish quality. It is then, coated with a release layer, the appropriate reflective layer, and followed by a laminate for coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) tailorability and strength. This optical membrane is adhered to a mirror structural substrate with a low shrinkage, CTE tailored adhesive. Afterwards, the whole assembly is separated from the mandrel. The mandrel is then cleaned and reused for the next replication run. The ultimate goal of replication is to preserve the surface finish and figure of the optical membrane upon its release from the mandrel. Successful replication requires a minimization of the residual stresses within the optical coating stack, the curing stresses from the adhesive and the thermal stress resulting from CTE mismatch between the structural substrate, the adhesive, and the optical membrane. In this paper, the results on replicated trials using both metal/metal and ceramic/ceramic laminates adhered to light weighted structural substrates made from syntactic foams (both inorganic and organic) will be discussed.

  10. Dicer in action at replication-transcription collisions.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Castel, Stephane E; Martienssen, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining genome stability at sites of transcription and replication collision is a major challenge to cells. Recently, we have shown that in Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dicer promotes transcription termination at these sites, facilitating DNA replication and preventing replication fork restart that would otherwise occur via homologous recombination at the expense of genome stability. This novel role of Dicer could further explain its previously described role as a tumor suppressor. PMID:27308471

  11. Mapping of Replication Origins in the X Inactivation Center of Vole Microtus levis Reveals Extended Replication Initiation Zone.

    PubMed

    Sherstyuk, Vladimir V; Shevchenko, Alexander I; Zakian, Suren M

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at specific positions termed replication origins. Genome-wide studies of human replication origins have shown that origins are organized into replication initiation zones. However, only few replication initiation zones have been described so far. Moreover, few origins were mapped in other mammalian species besides human and mouse. Here we analyzed pattern of short nascent strands in the X inactivation center (XIC) of vole Microtus levis in fibroblasts, trophoblast stem cells, and extraembryonic endoderm stem cells and confirmed origins locations by ChIP approach. We found that replication could be initiated in a significant part of XIC. We also analyzed state of XIC chromatin in these cell types. We compared origin localization in the mouse and vole XIC. Interestingly, origins associated with gene promoters are conserved in these species. The data obtained allow us to suggest that the X inactivation center of M. levis is one extended replication initiation zone.

  12. Mapping of Replication Origins in the X Inactivation Center of Vole Microtus levis Reveals Extended Replication Initiation Zone.

    PubMed

    Sherstyuk, Vladimir V; Shevchenko, Alexander I; Zakian, Suren M

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at specific positions termed replication origins. Genome-wide studies of human replication origins have shown that origins are organized into replication initiation zones. However, only few replication initiation zones have been described so far. Moreover, few origins were mapped in other mammalian species besides human and mouse. Here we analyzed pattern of short nascent strands in the X inactivation center (XIC) of vole Microtus levis in fibroblasts, trophoblast stem cells, and extraembryonic endoderm stem cells and confirmed origins locations by ChIP approach. We found that replication could be initiated in a significant part of XIC. We also analyzed state of XIC chromatin in these cell types. We compared origin localization in the mouse and vole XIC. Interestingly, origins associated with gene promoters are conserved in these species. The data obtained allow us to suggest that the X inactivation center of M. levis is one extended replication initiation zone. PMID:26038842

  13. Mapping of Replication Origins in the X Inactivation Center of Vole Microtus levis Reveals Extended Replication Initiation Zone

    PubMed Central

    Sherstyuk, Vladimir V.; Shevchenko, Alexander I.; Zakian, Suren M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at specific positions termed replication origins. Genome-wide studies of human replication origins have shown that origins are organized into replication initiation zones. However, only few replication initiation zones have been described so far. Moreover, few origins were mapped in other mammalian species besides human and mouse. Here we analyzed pattern of short nascent strands in the X inactivation center (XIC) of vole Microtus levis in fibroblasts, trophoblast stem cells, and extraembryonic endoderm stem cells and confirmed origins locations by ChIP approach. We found that replication could be initiated in a significant part of XIC. We also analyzed state of XIC chromatin in these cell types. We compared origin localization in the mouse and vole XIC. Interestingly, origins associated with gene promoters are conserved in these species. The data obtained allow us to suggest that the X inactivation center of M. levis is one extended replication initiation zone. PMID:26038842

  14. Replicational organization of three weakly expressed loci in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Maric, Chrystelle; Swanston, Emma; Bailey, Juliet; Pierron, Gérard

    2002-06-01

    We previously mapped early-activated replication origins in the promoter regions of five abundantly transcribed genes in the slime mold Physarum polycephalum. This physical linkage between origins and genes is congruent with the preferential early replication of the active genes in mammalian cells. To determine how general this replicational organization is in the synchronous plasmodium of Physarum, we analyzed the replication of three weakly expressed genes. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) density-shift and gene dosage experiments indicated that the redB (regulated in development) and redE genes replicate early, whereas redA replicates in mid-S phase. Bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that redA coincides with an origin that appears to be activated within a large temporal window in S phase so that the replication of the gene is not well defined temporally. The early replication of the redB and redE genes is due to the simultaneous activation of flanking origins at the onset of S phase. As a result, these two genes correspond to termination sites of DNA replication. Our data demonstrate that not all the Physarum promoters are preferred sites of initiation but, so far, all the expressed genes analyzed in detail either coincide with a replication origin or are embedded into a cluster of early firing replicons. PMID:12034812

  15. Providing Teachers with Research- and Cognitive Learning Theory-Based Instructional Materials for Promoting Students' Metacognition: A Replication Study of a Community College Mathematics Teacher and Curriculum Reformation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nall, Katherine Ligon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 3-stage community college mathematics teacher and curriculum conceptual change program on student achievement. The study, which was a replication and extension of Lake (2008), was conducted during Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 terms and focused on teachers' instructional practices relative to…

  16. Replication and robustness in developmental research.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Greg J; Engel, Mimi; Claessens, Amy; Dowsett, Chantelle J

    2014-11-01

    Replications and robustness checks are key elements of the scientific method and a staple in many disciplines. However, leading journals in developmental psychology rarely include explicit replications of prior research conducted by different investigators, and few require authors to establish in their articles or online appendices that their key results are robust across estimation methods, data sets, and demographic subgroups. This article makes the case for prioritizing both explicit replications and, especially, within-study robustness checks in developmental psychology. It provides evidence on variation in effect sizes in developmental studies and documents strikingly different replication and robustness-checking practices in a sample of journals in developmental psychology and a sister behavioral science-applied economics. Our goal is not to show that any one behavioral science has a monopoly on best practices, but rather to show how journals from a related discipline address vital concerns of replication and generalizability shared by all social and behavioral sciences. We provide recommendations for promoting graduate training in replication and robustness-checking methods and for editorial policies that encourage these practices. Although some of our recommendations may shift the form and substance of developmental research articles, we argue that they would generate considerable scientific benefits for the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  18. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M.; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81 deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81 deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  19. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81-deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81-deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  20. Avian Retroviral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Justice, James; Beemon, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Avian retroviruses have undergone intense study since the beginning of the 20th century. They were originally identified as cancer-inducing filterable agents in chicken neoplasms. Since their discovery, the study of these simple retroviruses has contributed greatly to our understanding of retroviral replication and cancer. Avian retroviruses are continuing to evolve and have great economic importance in the poultry industry worldwide. The aim of this review is to provide a broad overview of the genome, pathology, and replication of avian retroviruses. Notable gaps in our current knowledge are highlighted, and areas where avian retroviruses differ from other retrovirus are also emphasized. PMID:24011707

  1. Replicated Composite Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell

    1997-01-01

    Advanced optical systems for applications such as grazing incidence Wolter I x-ray mirror assemblies require extraordinary mirror surfaces in ten-ns of fine surface finish and figure. The impeccable mirror surface is on the inside of the rotational mirror form. One practical method of producing devices with these requirements is to first fabricate an exterior surface for the optical device then replicate that surface to have the inverse component with lightweight characteristics. The replicate optic is not better than the master or mandrel from which it is made. This task is a continuance of previous studies to identify methods and materials for forming these extremely low roughness optical components.

  2. Replicated spectrographs in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.

    2014-06-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compare the information gathering power of these replicated instruments with the present state of the art in more traditional spectrographs, and with instruments under development for ELTs. Design principles for replication are explored along with lessons learned, and we look forward to future technologies that could make massively-replicated instruments even more compelling.

  3. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  4. SIMS Replications in Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Howard

    Replication of the Second International Mathematics Study (SIMS) in Ontario, Canada, is described and assessed. The curriculum and testing program covers numerical methods, geometry, and algebra. Whereas classical studies focused on mean scores of a system's students and on percentages of teachers for opportunity to learn (OTL), SIMS aggregates…

  5. Initiation and regulation of paramyxovirus transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Noton, Sarah L; Fearns, Rachel

    2015-05-01

    The paramyxovirus family has a genome consisting of a single strand of negative sense RNA. This genome acts as a template for two distinct processes: transcription to generate subgenomic, capped and polyadenylated mRNAs, and genome replication. These viruses only encode one polymerase. Thus, an intriguing question is, how does the viral polymerase initiate and become committed to either transcription or replication? By answering this we can begin to understand how these two processes are regulated. In this review article, we present recent findings from studies on the paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, which show how its polymerase is able to initiate transcription and replication from a single promoter. We discuss how these findings apply to other paramyxoviruses. Then, we examine how trans-acting proteins and promoter secondary structure might serve to regulate transcription and replication during different phases of the paramyxovirus replication cycle.

  6. PTEN regulates RPA1 and protects DNA replication forks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxi; Li, Yang; Wang, Pan; Liang, Hui; Cui, Ming; Zhu, Minglu; Guo, Limei; Su, Qian; Sun, Yujie; McNutt, Michael A; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-11-01

    Tumor suppressor PTEN regulates cellular activities and controls genome stability through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we report that PTEN is necessary for the protection of DNA replication forks against replication stress. We show that deletion of PTEN leads to replication fork collapse and chromosomal instability upon fork stalling following nucleotide depletion induced by hydroxyurea. PTEN is physically associated with replication protein A 1 (RPA1) via the RPA1 C-terminal domain. STORM and iPOND reveal that PTEN is localized at replication sites and promotes RPA1 accumulation on replication forks. PTEN recruits the deubiquitinase OTUB1 to mediate RPA1 deubiquitination. RPA1 deletion confers a phenotype like that observed in PTEN knockout cells with stalling of replication forks. Expression of PTEN and RPA1 shows strong correlation in colorectal cancer. Heterozygous disruption of RPA1 promotes tumorigenesis in mice. These results demonstrate that PTEN is essential for DNA replication fork protection. We propose that RPA1 is a target of PTEN function in fork protection and that PTEN maintains genome stability through regulation of DNA replication.

  7. Compartmentalization of prokaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alicia; Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Salas, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    It becomes now apparent that prokaryotic DNA replication takes place at specific intracellular locations. Early studies indicated that chromosomal DNA replication, as well as plasmid and viral DNA replication, occurs in close association with the bacterial membrane. Moreover, over the last several years, it has been shown that some replication proteins and specific DNA sequences are localized to particular subcellular regions in bacteria, supporting the existence of replication compartments. Although the mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of prokaryotic DNA replication are largely unknown, the docking of replication factors to large organizing structures may be important for the assembly of active replication complexes. In this article, we review the current state of this subject in two bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, focusing our attention in both chromosomal and extrachromosomal DNA replication. A comparison with eukaryotic systems is also presented.

  8. Replicators, lineages, and interactors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel J; Bryson, Joanna J

    2014-06-01

    The target article argues that whole groups can act as interactors in an evolutionary process. We believe that Smaldino's discussion would be advanced by a more thorough analysis of the appropriate replicators and lineages for this model. We show that cultural evolution is necessarily a separate process from cultural group selection, and we also illustrate that the two processes may influence each other as demonstrated by an agent-based model of communicating food-processing skills. PMID:24970423

  9. A New Replicator: A theoretical framework for analysing replication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Replicators are the crucial entities in evolution. The notion of a replicator, however, is far less exact than the weight of its importance. Without identifying and classifying multiplying entities exactly, their dynamics cannot be determined appropriately. Therefore, it is importance to decide the nature and characteristics of any multiplying entity, in a detailed and formal way. Results Replication is basically an autocatalytic process which enables us to rest on the notions of formal chemistry. This statement has major implications. Simple autocatalytic cycle intermediates are considered as non-informational replicators. A consequence of which is that any autocatalytically multiplying entity is a replicator, be it simple or overly complex (even nests). A stricter definition refers to entities which can inherit acquired changes (informational replicators). Simple autocatalytic molecules (and nests) are excluded from this group. However, in turn, any entity possessing copiable information is to be named a replicator, even multicellular organisms. In order to deal with the situation, an abstract, formal framework is presented, which allows the proper identification of various types of replicators. This sheds light on the old problem of the units and levels of selection and evolution. A hierarchical classification for the partition of the replicator-continuum is provided where specific replicators are nested within more general ones. The classification should be able to be successfully applied to known replicators and also to future candidates. Conclusion This paper redefines the concept of the replicator from a bottom-up theoretical approach. The formal definition and the abstract models presented can distinguish between among all possible replicator types, based on their quantity of variable and heritable information. This allows for the exact identification of various replicator types and their underlying dynamics. The most important claim is that

  10. Complexity transmission during replication

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian K.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of complexity during DNA replication has been investigated to clarify the significance of this molecular property in a deterministic process. Complexity was equated with the amount of randomness within an ordered molecular structure and measured by the entropy of a posteriori probabilities for discrete (monomer sequences, atomic bonds) and continuous (torsion angle sequences) structural parameters in polynucleotides, proteins, and ligand molecules. A theoretical analysis revealed that sequence complexity decreases during transmission from DNA to protein. It was also found that sequence complexity limits the attainable complexity in the folding of a polypeptide chain and that a protein cannot interact with a ligand moiety of higher complexity. The analysis indicated, furthermore, that in any deterministic molecular process a cause possesses more complexity than its effect. This outcome broadly complies with Curie's symmetry principle. Results from an analysis of an extensive set of experimental data are presented; they corroborate these findings. It is suggested, therefore, that complexity governs the direction of order—order molecular transformations. Two biological implications are (i) replication of DNA in a stepwise, repetitive manner by a polymerase appears to be a necessary consequence of structural constraints imposed by complexity, and (ii) during evolution, increases in complexity had to involve a nondeterministic mechanism. This latter requirement apparently applied also to development of the first replicating system on earth. PMID:287070

  11. Replication Research and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  12. Analysis of the DNA replication competence of the xrs-5 mutant cells defective in Ku86.

    PubMed

    Matheos, Diamanto; Novac, Olivia; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2003-01-01

    The radiosensitive mutant xrs-5, a derivative of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) K1 cell line, is defective in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. The defective phenotypes of xrs-5 cells are complemented by the 86 kDa subunit of Ku antigen. OBA is a protein, previously purified from HeLa cells, that binds in a sequence-specific manner to mammalian origins of DNA replication. The DNA-binding subunit of OBA has been identified as Ku86. We tested the xrs-5 cell line for its ability to replicate a mammalian origin-containing plasmid, p186, in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, the p186 episomal DNA replication in transfected xrs-5 cells was reduced by 45% when compared with the CHO K1 cells transfected with p186. In vitro, although total and cytoplasmic cell extracts from xrs-5 cells replicated the p186 with the same efficiency as the parental CHO K1 cell extracts, xrs-5 nuclear extracts did not possess any detectable replication activity. Addition of affinity-purified OBA/Ku restored replication in the xrs-5 nuclear extract reaction. Western blot analyses showed that the levels of other replication proteins (Orc2, PCNA, DNA polymerase epsilon and delta, Primase and Topoisomerase IIalpha) were comparable in both the xrs-5 mutant and CHO K1 wild-type cell lines. In addition, the in vivo association of Ku with the DHFR origin-containing sequence (oribeta) was examined in both the CHO K1 and xrs-5 cell lines by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Anti-Ku antibodies did not immunoprecipitate a detectable amount of Ku from the xrs-5 cells in the origin-containing sequence, in contrast to the CHO K1 cells, wherein Ku was found to be associated with the oribeta origin. The data implicate Ku antigen in in vivo and in vitro DNA replication and suggest the existence of another protein with Ku-like functions in the xrs-5 cells.

  13. Checkpoint Activation of an Unconventional DNA Replication Program in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Pamela Y; Lee, Po-Hsuen; Meng, Xiangzhou; Kapler, Geoffrey M

    2015-07-01

    The intra-S phase checkpoint kinase of metazoa and yeast, ATR/MEC1, protects chromosomes from DNA damage and replication stress by phosphorylating subunits of the replicative helicase, MCM2-7. Here we describe an unprecedented ATR-dependent pathway in Tetrahymena thermophila in which the essential pre-replicative complex proteins, Orc1p, Orc2p and Mcm6p are degraded in hydroxyurea-treated S phase cells. Chromosomes undergo global changes during HU-arrest, including phosphorylation of histone H2A.X, deacetylation of histone H3, and an apparent diminution in DNA content that can be blocked by the deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. Most remarkably, the cell cycle rapidly resumes upon hydroxyurea removal, and the entire genome is replicated prior to replenishment of ORC and MCMs. While stalled replication forks are elongated under these conditions, DNA fiber imaging revealed that most replicating molecules are produced by new initiation events. Furthermore, the sole origin in the ribosomal DNA minichromosome is inactive and replication appears to initiate near the rRNA promoter. The collective data raise the possibility that replication initiation occurs by an ORC-independent mechanism during the recovery from HU-induced replication stress.

  14. Increased expression of the major cysteine proteinases by stable episomal transfection underlines the important role of EhCP5 for the pathogenicity of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Tillack, Manuela; Nowak, Nicolas; Lotter, Hannelore; Bracha, Rivka; Mirelman, David; Tannich, Egbert; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2006-09-01

    The protozoan Entamoeba histolytica causes intestinal inflammation and liver abscess. Cysteine proteinases (CPs) have been proposed as important virulence factors for amoebiasis. To test the role of the various CPs for amoeba induced pathology, the three major enzymes of the parasite, namely EhCP1, EhCP2 and EhCP5 accounting for about 90% of total proteinase activity, were overexpressed by stable episomal transfection. Total CP activity of recombinant amoebae increased by three- to six-fold depending on the gene transfected. Interestingly, overexpression of the genes for EhCP1 or EhCP2 increased the activity of the corresponding enzyme only, whereas overexpression of the gene for EhCP5 increased the activity of all three enzymes, which is consistent with enzyme-converting activity of EhCP5. Cytopathic activity, measured by in vitro monolayer disruption, was dramatically increased in ehcp5-transfectants (five-fold) but showed only a modest increase in ehcp1- or ehcp2-transfectants (1.5-2-fold). In addition, overexpression of ehcp5 but not of ehcp1 or ehcp2 significantly increased amoebic liver abscess formation in laboratory animals. Moreover, transfection and overexpression of ehcp5 was able to compensate the reduction of in vivo pathogenicity in parasites, which have been silenced for the gene encoding the pore-forming protein amoebapore A. In summary, these results further support the important role of EhCP5 in E. histolytica pathogenicity.

  15. Mutant of Escherichia coli with Anomalous Cell Division and Ability to Decrease Episomally and Chromosomally Mediated Resistance to Ampicillin and Several Other Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Normark, Staffan; Boman, Hans G.; Matsson, Eva

    1969-01-01

    In a mutation experiment with a rough, ampicillin-resistant strain, we isolated two smooth mutants which were both sensitive to ampicillin and carried defects in the cell envelope. One of the strains (with the envA gene) is hindered in its completion of septa and forms chains of cells. The envA gene has been mapped to a position between leu and proB, at 2 to 4 min. The envA gene decreased the resistance mediated by both episomal and chromosomal genes for resistance to several antibiotics. During growth the envA mutant was characterized by abnormal ratios between viable count or cell count and optical density. The ratio between viable count and optical density was affected during shift-up and shift-down experiments. When compared to the parent strain, the envA mutant was found to be more resistant to ultraviolet irradiation on plates. Prestarvation for tryptophan had a protective effect against irradiation both on the parent strain and the envA mutant. Images PMID:4887513

  16. Constitutive episomal expression of polypeptide IX (pIX) in a 293-based cell line complements the deficiency of pIX mutant adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    Caravokyri, C; Leppard, K N

    1995-01-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 capsid is composed of a number of distinct polypeptides. It has been shown previously that one of these, polypeptide IX (pIX), is not absolutely required for the production of viable virus. However, viruses lacking this polypeptide have a significantly reduced packaging limit and, in the one case studied, also show a thermolabile virion phenotype. This report describes the use of eukaryotic episomal vectors based on the Epstein-Barr virus replicon to generate cells which stably express pIX. These cells provide pIX that is efficiently incorporated into virions that are genetically pIX-; such enhanced thermostability. These cells have also been used to isolate a genetically pIX- virus having a genome of length some 2.3 kbp in excess of the previously defined packaging limit for pIX- virus; the resulting virions have wild-type thermostability. These cells expand the theoretical capacity of adenovirus vectors for foreign DNA to around 9.2 kbp and may therefore be useful in gene therapy applications in which vector capacity is limiting. PMID:7474071

  17. RECQ1 is required for cellular resistance to replication stress and catalyzes strand exchange on stalled replication fork structures.

    PubMed

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Croteau, Deborah L; Brosh, Robert M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-11-15

    RECQ1 is the most abundant of the five human RecQ helicases, but little is known about its biological significance. Recent studies indicate that RECQ1 is associated with origins of replication, suggesting a possible role in DNA replication. However, the functional role of RECQ1 at damaged or stalled replication forks is still unknown. Here, for the first time, we show that RECQ1 promotes strand exchange on synthetic stalled replication fork-mimicking structures and comparatively analyze RECQ1 with the other human RecQ helicases. RECQ1 actively unwinds the leading strand of the fork, similar to WRN, while RECQ4 and RECQ5β can only unwind the lagging strand of the replication fork. Human replication protein A modulates the strand exchange activity of RECQ1 and shifts the equilibrium more to the unwinding mode, an effect also observed for WRN. Stable depletion of RECQ1 affects cell proliferation and renders human cells sensitive to various DNA damaging agents that directly or indirectly block DNA replication fork progression. Consequently, loss of RECQ1 activates DNA damage response signaling, leads to hyper-phosphorylation of RPA32 and activation of CHK1, indicating replication stress. Furthermore, depletion of RECQ1 leads to chromosomal condensation defects and accumulation of under-condensed chromosomes. Collectively, our observations provide a new insight into the role of RECQ1 in replication fork stabilization and its role in the DNA damage response to maintain genomic stability.

  18. HSV-1 Remodels Host Telomeres To Facilitate Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhong; Kim, Eui Tae; Vladimirova, Olga; Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wang, Zhuo; Newhart, Alyshia; Liu, Dongmei; Myers, Jaclyn L.; Hensley, Scott E.; Moffat, Jennifer; Janicki, Susan M.; Fraser, Nigel W.; Knipe, David M.; Weitzman, Matthew D.; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Telomeres protect the ends of cellular chromosomes. We show here that infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) results in chromosomal structural aberrations at telomeres and the accumulation of telomere dysfunction-induced DNA damage foci (TIFs). At the molecular level, HSV-1 induces transcription of telomere repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), followed by the proteolytic degradation of the telomere protein TPP1, and loss of the telomere repeat DNA signal. The HSV-1 encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0 is required for TERRA transcription and facilitates TPP1 degradation. shRNA depletion of TPP1 increases viral replication, arguing that TPP1inhibits viral replication. Viral replication protein ICP8 forms foci that coincide with telomeric proteins and ICP8 null virus failed to degrade telomere DNA signal. These findings suggest that HSV-1 reorganizes telomeres to form ICP8-associated pre-replication foci and promotes viral genomic replication. PMID:25497088

  19. Quantum Replicator Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban

    2006-09-01

    We propose quantization relationships which would let us describe and solution problems originated by conflicting or cooperative behaviors among the members of a system from the point of view of quantum mechanical interactions. The quantum version of the replicator dynamics is the equation of evolution of mixed states from quantum statistical mechanics. A system and all its members will cooperate and rearrange its states to improve their present condition. They strive to reach the best possible state for each of them which is also the best possible state for the whole system. This led us to propose a quantum equilibrium in which a system is stable only if it maximizes the welfare of the collective above the welfare of the individual. If it is maximized the welfare of the individual above the welfare of the collective the system gets unstable and eventually it collapses.

  20. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2014-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis. PMID:25268162

  1. SUMO and KSHV Replication.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2014-01-01

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV's life cycle and pathogenesis. PMID:25268162

  2. Closing the Circle: Replicating RNA with RNA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Leslie K.L.; Unrau, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    How life emerged on this planet is one of the most important and fundamental questions of science. Although nearly all details concerning our origins have been lost in the depths of time, there is compelling evidence to suggest that the earliest life might have exploited the catalytic and self-recognition properties of RNA to survive. If an RNA based replicating system could be constructed in the laboratory, it would be much easier to understand the challenges associated with the very earliest steps in evolution and provide important insight into the establishment of the complex metabolic systems that now dominate this planet. Recent progress into the selection and characterization of ribozymes that promote nucleotide synthesis and RNA polymerization are discussed and outstanding problems in the field of RNA-mediated RNA replication are summarized. PMID:20554706

  3. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Ishioka, Glenn; Alexander, Jeff; Smith, Jon; Gurwith, Marc; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam) vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam) subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1) HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity) of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  4. Impediments to replication fork movement: stabilisation, reactivation and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sarah; Carr, Antony M

    2013-03-01

    Maintaining genome stability is essential for the accurate transmission of genetic material. Genetic instability is associated with human genome disorders and is a near-universal hallmark of cancer cells. Genetic variation is also the driving force of evolution, and a genome must therefore display adequate plasticity to evolve while remaining sufficiently stable to prevent mutations and chromosome rearrangements leading to a fitness disadvantage. A primary source of genome instability are errors that occur during chromosome replication. More specifically, obstacles to the movement of replication forks are known to underlie many of the gross chromosomal rearrangements seen both in human cells and in model organisms. Obstacles to replication fork progression destabilize the replisome (replication protein complex) and impact on the integrity of forked DNA structures. Therefore, to ensure the successful progression of a replication fork along with its associated replisome, several distinct strategies have evolved. First, there are well-orchestrated mechanisms that promote continued movement of forks through potential obstacles. Second, dedicated replisome and fork DNA stabilization pathways prevent the dysfunction of the replisome if its progress is halted. Third, should stabilisation fail, there are mechanisms to ensure damaged forks are accurately fused with a converging fork or, when necessary, re-associated with the replication proteins to continue replication. Here, we review what is known about potential barriers to replication fork progression, how these are tolerated and their impact on genome instability.

  5. Supercoiling, knotting and replication fork reversal in partially replicated plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Olavarrieta, L.; Martínez-Robles, M. L.; Sogo, J. M.; Stasiak, A.; Hernández, P.; Krimer, D. B.; Schvartzman, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    To study the structure of partially replicated plasmids, we cloned the Escherichia coli polar replication terminator TerE in its active orientation at different locations in the ColE1 vector pBR18. The resulting plasmids, pBR18-TerE@StyI and pBR18-TerE@EcoRI, were analyzed by neutral/neutral two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. Replication forks stop at the Ter–TUS complex, leading to the accumulation of specific replication intermediates with a mass 1.26 times the mass of non-replicating plasmids for pBR18-TerE@StyI and 1.57 times for pBR18-TerE@EcoRI. The number of knotted bubbles detected after digestion with ScaI and the number and electrophoretic mobility of undigested partially replicated topoisomers reflect the changes in plasmid topology that occur in DNA molecules replicated to different extents. Exposure to increasing concentrations of chloroquine or ethidium bromide revealed that partially replicated topoisomers (CCCRIs) do not sustain positive supercoiling as efficiently as their non-replicating counterparts. It was suggested that this occurs because in partially replicated plasmids a positive ΔLk is absorbed by regression of the replication fork. Indeed, we showed by electron microscopy that, at least in the presence of chloroquine, some of the CCCRIs of pBR18-Ter@StyI formed Holliday-like junction structures characteristic of reversed forks. However, not all the positive supercoiling was absorbed by fork reversal in the presence of high concentrations of ethidium bromide. PMID:11809877

  6. The Dyad Symmetry Element of Epstein-Barr Virus Is a Dominant but Dispensable Replication Origin

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Elisabeth; Norio, Paolo; Ritzi, Marion; Schildkraut, Carl; Schepers, Aloys

    2011-01-01

    OriP, the latent origin of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), consists of two essential elements: the dyad symmetry (DS) and the family of repeats (FR). The function of these elements has been predominantly analyzed in plasmids transfected into transformed cells. Here, we examined the molecular functions of DS in its native genomic context and at an ectopic position in the mini-EBV episome. Mini-EBV plasmids contain 41% of the EBV genome including all information required for the proliferation of human B cells. Both FR and DS function independently of their genomic context. We show that DS is the most active origin of replication present in the mini-EBV genome regardless of its location, and it is characterized by the binding of the origin recognition complex (ORC) allowing subsequent replication initiation. Surprisingly, the integrity of oriP is not required for the formation of the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) at or near DS. In addition we show that initiation events occurring at sites other than the DS are also limited to once per cell cycle and that they are ORC-dependent. The deletion of DS increases initiation from alternative origins, which are normally used very infrequently in the mini-EBV genome. The sequence-independent distribution of ORC-binding, pre-RC-assembly, and initiation patterns indicates that a large number of silent origins are present in the mini-EBV genome. We conclude that, in mini-EBV genomes lacking the DS element, the absence of a strong ORC binding site results in an increase of ORC binding at dispersed sites. PMID:21603652

  7. SCFCyclin F-dependent degradation of CDC6 suppresses DNA re-replication

    PubMed Central

    Walter, David; Hoffmann, Saskia; Komseli, Eirini-Stavroula; Rappsilber, Juri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of genome stability requires that DNA is replicated precisely once per cell cycle. This is believed to be achieved by limiting replication origin licensing and thereby restricting the firing of each replication origin to once per cell cycle. CDC6 is essential for eukaryotic replication origin licensing, however, it is poorly understood how CDC6 activity is constrained in higher eukaryotes. Here we report that the SCFCyclin F ubiquitin ligase complex prevents DNA re-replication by targeting CDC6 for proteasomal degradation late in the cell cycle. We show that CDC6 and Cyclin F interact through defined sequence motifs that promote CDC6 ubiquitylation and degradation. Absence of Cyclin F or expression of a stable mutant of CDC6 promotes re-replication and genome instability in cells lacking the CDT1 inhibitor Geminin. Together, our work reveals a novel SCFCyclin F-mediated mechanism required for precise once per cell cycle replication. PMID:26818844

  8. SCF(Cyclin F)-dependent degradation of CDC6 suppresses DNA re-replication.

    PubMed

    Walter, David; Hoffmann, Saskia; Komseli, Eirini-Stavroula; Rappsilber, Juri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-28

    Maintenance of genome stability requires that DNA is replicated precisely once per cell cycle. This is believed to be achieved by limiting replication origin licensing and thereby restricting the firing of each replication origin to once per cell cycle. CDC6 is essential for eukaryotic replication origin licensing, however, it is poorly understood how CDC6 activity is constrained in higher eukaryotes. Here we report that the SCF(Cyclin F) ubiquitin ligase complex prevents DNA re-replication by targeting CDC6 for proteasomal degradation late in the cell cycle. We show that CDC6 and Cyclin F interact through defined sequence motifs that promote CDC6 ubiquitylation and degradation. Absence of Cyclin F or expression of a stable mutant of CDC6 promotes re-replication and genome instability in cells lacking the CDT1 inhibitor Geminin. Together, our work reveals a novel SCF(Cyclin F)-mediated mechanism required for precise once per cell cycle replication.

  9. The asymmetry of telomere replication contributes to replicative senescence heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bourgeron, Thibault; Xu, Zhou; Doumic, Marie; Teixeira, Maria Teresa

    2015-10-15

    In eukaryotes, the absence of telomerase results in telomere shortening, eventually leading to replicative senescence, an arrested state that prevents further cell divisions. While replicative senescence is mainly controlled by telomere length, the heterogeneity of its onset is not well understood. This study proposes a mathematical model based on the molecular mechanisms of telomere replication and shortening to decipher the causes of this heterogeneity. Using simulations fitted on experimental data obtained from individual lineages of senescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, we decompose the sources of senescence heterogeneity into interclonal and intraclonal components, and show that the latter is based on the asymmetry of the telomere replication mechanism. We also evidence telomere rank-switching events with distinct frequencies in short-lived versus long-lived lineages, revealing that telomere shortening dynamics display important variations. Thus, the intrinsic heterogeneity of replicative senescence and its consequences find their roots in the asymmetric structure of telomeres.

  10. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-02-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts.

  11. Non-integrating episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of human amniotic fluid stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells in chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Slamecka, Jaroslav; Salimova, Lilia; McClellan, Steven; van Kelle, Mathieu; Kehl, Debora; Laurini, Javier; Cinelli, Paolo; Owen, Laurie; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Weber, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) represent an attractive potential cell source for fetal and pediatric cell-based therapies. However, upgrading them to pluripotency confers refractoriness toward senescence, higher proliferation rate and unlimited differentiation potential. AFSC were observed to rapidly and efficiently reacquire pluripotency which together with their easy recovery makes them an attractive cell source for reprogramming. The reprogramming process as well as the resulting iPSC epigenome could potentially benefit from the unspecialized nature of AFSC. iPSC derived from AFSC also have potential in disease modeling, such as Down syndrome or β-thalassemia. Previous experiments involving AFSC reprogramming have largely relied on integrative vector transgene delivery and undefined serum-containing, feeder-dependent culture. Here, we describe non-integrative oriP/EBNA-1 episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of AFSC into iPSC and culture in fully chemically defined xeno-free conditions represented by vitronectin coating and E8 medium, a system that we found uniquely suited for this purpose. The derived AF-iPSC lines uniformly expressed a set of pluripotency markers Oct3/4, Nanog, Sox2, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 in a pattern typical for human primed PSC. Additionally, the cells formed teratomas, and were deemed pluripotent by PluriTest, a global expression microarray-based in-silico pluripotency assay. However, we found that the PluriTest scores were borderline, indicating a unique pluripotent signature in the defined condition. In the light of potential future clinical translation of iPSC technology, non-integrating reprogramming and chemically defined culture are more acceptable. PMID:26654216

  12. Non-integrating episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of human amniotic fluid stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells in chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Slamecka, Jaroslav; Salimova, Lilia; McClellan, Steven; van Kelle, Mathieu; Kehl, Debora; Laurini, Javier; Cinelli, Paolo; Owen, Laurie; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Weber, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) represent an attractive potential cell source for fetal and pediatric cell-based therapies. However, upgrading them to pluripotency confers refractoriness toward senescence, higher proliferation rate and unlimited differentiation potential. AFSC were observed to rapidly and efficiently reacquire pluripotency which together with their easy recovery makes them an attractive cell source for reprogramming. The reprogramming process as well as the resulting iPSC epigenome could potentially benefit from the unspecialized nature of AFSC. iPSC derived from AFSC also have potential in disease modeling, such as Down syndrome or β-thalassemia. Previous experiments involving AFSC reprogramming have largely relied on integrative vector transgene delivery and undefined serum-containing, feeder-dependent culture. Here, we describe non-integrative oriP/EBNA-1 episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of AFSC into iPSC and culture in fully chemically defined xeno-free conditions represented by vitronectin coating and E8 medium, a system that we found uniquely suited for this purpose. The derived AF-iPSC lines uniformly expressed a set of pluripotency markers Oct3/4, Nanog, Sox2, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 in a pattern typical for human primed PSC. Additionally, the cells formed teratomas, and were deemed pluripotent by PluriTest, a global expression microarray-based in-silico pluripotency assay. However, we found that the PluriTest scores were borderline, indicating a unique pluripotent signature in the defined condition. In the light of potential future clinical translation of iPSC technology, non-integrating reprogramming and chemically defined culture are more acceptable.

  13. Charter School Replication. Policy Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2009-01-01

    "Replication" is the practice of a single charter school board or management organization opening several more schools that are each based on the same school model. The most rapid strategy to increase the number of new high-quality charter schools available to children is to encourage the replication of existing quality schools. This policy guide…

  14. Regulating DNA Replication in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Maria de la Paz; Costas, Celina; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication in plants has requirements and constraints similar to those in other eukaryotes. However, some aspects are plant-specific. Studies of DNA replication control in plants, which have unique developmental strategies, can offer unparalleled opportunities of comparing regulatory processes with yeast and, particularly, metazoa to identify common trends and basic rules. In addition to the comparative molecular and biochemical studies, genomic studies in plants that started with Arabidopsis thaliana in the year 2000 have now expanded to several dozens of species. This, together with the applicability of genomic approaches and the availability of a large collection of mutants, underscores the enormous potential to study DNA replication control in a whole developing organism. Recent advances in this field with particular focus on the DNA replication proteins, the nature of replication origins and their epigenetic landscape, and the control of endoreplication will be reviewed. PMID:23209151

  15. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Bursomanno, Sara; Aleliunaite, Aiste; Wu, Wei; Mankouri, Hocine W; Shen, Huahao; Liu, Ying; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-12-10

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress has been implicated as a driver of tumorigenesis. Many chromosomal rearrangements characteristic of human cancers originate from specific regions of the genome called common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are difficult-to-replicate loci that manifest as gaps or breaks on metaphase chromosomes (termed CFS 'expression'), particularly when cells have been exposed to replicative stress. The MUS81-EME1 structure-specific endonuclease promotes the appearance of chromosome gaps or breaks at CFSs following replicative stress. Here we show that entry of cells into mitotic prophase triggers the recruitment of MUS81 to CFSs. The nuclease activity of MUS81 then promotes POLD3-dependent DNA synthesis at CFSs, which serves to minimize chromosome mis-segregation and non-disjunction. We propose that the attempted condensation of incompletely duplicated loci in early mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest that targeting this pathway could represent a new therapeutic approach.

  16. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Bursomanno, Sara; Aleliunaite, Aiste; Wu, Wei; Mankouri, Hocine W; Shen, Huahao; Liu, Ying; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-12-10

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress has been implicated as a driver of tumorigenesis. Many chromosomal rearrangements characteristic of human cancers originate from specific regions of the genome called common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are difficult-to-replicate loci that manifest as gaps or breaks on metaphase chromosomes (termed CFS 'expression'), particularly when cells have been exposed to replicative stress. The MUS81-EME1 structure-specific endonuclease promotes the appearance of chromosome gaps or breaks at CFSs following replicative stress. Here we show that entry of cells into mitotic prophase triggers the recruitment of MUS81 to CFSs. The nuclease activity of MUS81 then promotes POLD3-dependent DNA synthesis at CFSs, which serves to minimize chromosome mis-segregation and non-disjunction. We propose that the attempted condensation of incompletely duplicated loci in early mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest that targeting this pathway could represent a new therapeutic approach. PMID:26633632

  17. SMARCAL1 maintains telomere integrity during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Poole, Lisa A; Zhao, Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G; Lovejoy, Courtney A; Eischen, Christine M; Cortez, David

    2015-12-01

    The SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent, regulator of chromatin, subfamily A-like 1) DNA translocase is one of several related enzymes, including ZRANB3 (zinc finger, RAN-binding domain containing 3) and HLTF (helicase-like transcription factor), that are recruited to stalled replication forks to promote repair and restart replication. These enzymes can perform similar biochemical reactions such as fork reversal; however, genetic studies indicate they must have unique cellular activities. Here, we present data showing that SMARCAL1 has an important function at telomeres, which present an endogenous source of replication stress. SMARCAL1-deficient cells accumulate telomere-associated DNA damage and have greatly elevated levels of extrachromosomal telomere DNA (C-circles). Although these telomere phenotypes are often found in tumor cells using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway for telomere elongation, SMARCAL1 deficiency does not yield other ALT phenotypes such as elevated telomere recombination. The activity of SMARCAL1 at telomeres can be separated from its genome-maintenance activity in bulk chromosomal replication because it does not require interaction with replication protein A. Finally, this telomere-maintenance function is not shared by ZRANB3 or HLTF. Our results provide the first identification, to our knowledge, of an endogenous source of replication stress that requires SMARCAL1 for resolution and define differences between members of this class of replication fork-repair enzymes.

  18. SMARCAL1 maintains telomere integrity during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Lisa A.; Zhao, Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G.; Lovejoy, Courtney A.; Eischen, Christine M.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent, regulator of chromatin, subfamily A-like 1) DNA translocase is one of several related enzymes, including ZRANB3 (zinc finger, RAN-binding domain containing 3) and HLTF (helicase-like transcription factor), that are recruited to stalled replication forks to promote repair and restart replication. These enzymes can perform similar biochemical reactions such as fork reversal; however, genetic studies indicate they must have unique cellular activities. Here, we present data showing that SMARCAL1 has an important function at telomeres, which present an endogenous source of replication stress. SMARCAL1-deficient cells accumulate telomere-associated DNA damage and have greatly elevated levels of extrachromosomal telomere DNA (C-circles). Although these telomere phenotypes are often found in tumor cells using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway for telomere elongation, SMARCAL1 deficiency does not yield other ALT phenotypes such as elevated telomere recombination. The activity of SMARCAL1 at telomeres can be separated from its genome-maintenance activity in bulk chromosomal replication because it does not require interaction with replication protein A. Finally, this telomere-maintenance function is not shared by ZRANB3 or HLTF. Our results provide the first identification, to our knowledge, of an endogenous source of replication stress that requires SMARCAL1 for resolution and define differences between members of this class of replication fork-repair enzymes. PMID:26578802

  19. CRISPR-mediated control of the bacterial initiation of replication

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, Jakub; Lesterlin, Christian; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Programmable control of the cell cycle has been shown to be a powerful tool in cell-biology studies. Here, we develop a novel system for controlling the bacterial cell cycle, based on binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to the origin-of-replication locus. Initiation of replication of bacterial chromosomes is accurately regulated by the DnaA protein, which promotes the unwinding of DNA at oriC. We demonstrate that the binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to any position within origin or replication blocks the initiation of replication. Serial-dilution plating, single-cell fluorescence microscopy, and flow-cytometry experiments show that ongoing rounds of chromosome replication are finished upon CRISPR/dCas9 binding, but no new rounds are initiated. Upon arrest, cells stay metabolically active and accumulate cell mass. We find that elevating the temperature from 37 to 42°C releases the CRISR/dCas9 replication inhibition, and we use this feature to recover cells from the arrest. Our simple and robust method of controlling the bacterial cell cycle is a useful asset for synthetic biology and DNA-replication studies in particular. The inactivation of CRISPR/dCas9 binding at elevated temperatures may furthermore be of wide interest for CRISPR/Cas9 applications in genomic engineering. PMID:27036863

  20. DNA damage-induced replication arrest in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Matthew P.; Michael, W. Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Chromosomal replication is sensitive to the presence of DNA-damaging alkylating agents, such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). MMS is known to inhibit replication though activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and through checkpoint-independent slowing of replication fork progression. Using Xenopus egg extracts, we now report an additional pathway that is stimulated by MMS-induced damage. We show that, upon incubation in egg extracts, MMS-treated DNA activates a diffusible inhibitor that blocks, in trans, chromosomal replication. The downstream effect of the inhibitor is a failure to recruit proliferating cell nuclear antigen, but not DNA polymerase α, to the nascent replication fork. Thus, alkylation damage activates an inhibitor that intercepts the replication pathway at a point between the polymerase α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen execution steps. We also show that activation of the inhibitor does not require the DNA damage checkpoint; rather, stimulation of the pathway described here results in checkpoint activation. These data describe a novel replication arrest pathway, and they also provide an example of how subpathways within the DNA damage response network are integrated to promote efficient cell cycle arrest in response to damaged DNA. PMID:14581453

  1. A DNA replication origin and a replication fork barrier used in vivo in the circular plasmid pKD1.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, L; Irene, C; Aragona, M; Newlon, C S

    2001-10-01

    As in other yeasts, ARS-containing plasmids can be maintained extrachromosomally in Kluyveromyces lactis. Although some fragments of K. lactis DNA have ARS activity in both K. lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it appears that the sequences required for ARS activity in the two yeasts are different. As an approach to a better understanding of ARS structure and function in K. lactis, we analyzed the replication of the circular plasmid pKD1. We identified a 159-bp sequence able to promote autonomous replication of pKD1 in both yeasts; this fragments contains both a sequence related to the S. cerevisiae ARS consensus sequence and a region of 53% identity to the 40-bp sequence essential for K. lactis KARS101 function. By the analysis of in vivo replication intermediates we provide the first direct evidence that DNA replication initiates at or near the K. lactis ARS element. Replication terminates at the cisacting stability locus of pKD1, which functions as a replication fork barrier (RFB) and is necessary for proper plasmid segregation. RFB activity requires the pKDI gene products that are important for plasmid segregation, suggesting a link between DNA replication termination and plasmid segregation in a eukaryotic organism.

  2. Loss of Smu1 function de-represses DNA replication and over-activates ATR-dependent replication checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Ren, Laifeng; Liu, Yao; Guo, Liandi; Wang, Haibin; Ma, Lei; Zeng, Ming; Shao, Xin; Yang, Chunlei; Tang, Yaxiong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Cong; Li, Mingyuan

    2013-06-28

    Smu1 is an evolutionarily conserved gene that encodes a member of the WD40-repeat protein family. Disruption of Smu1 function leads to multiple cellular defects including chromosomal instability, aberrant DNA replication and alternative RNA splicing events. In this paper, we show that Smu1 is a chromatin-bound protein that functions as a negative regulator of DNA replication. Knockdown of Smu1 gene expression promotes excessive incorporation of dNTP analogue, implicating the acceleration of DNA synthesis. Smu1-silenced cells show an excessive activation of replication checkpoint in response to ultraviolate (UV) or hydroxyurea treatment, indicating that abnormal stimulation of DNA replication leads to instability of genomic structure. Hence, we propose that Smu1 participates in the protection of genomic integrity by negatively regulating the process of DNA synthesis. PMID:23727573

  3. Inhibition of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication by an E1-Derived p80/UAF1-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G.

    2012-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  4. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target. PMID:22278251

  5. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by an E1-derived p80/UAF1-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Omichinski, James G; Archambault, Jacques

    2012-04-01

    The papillomavirus E1 helicase is recruited by E2 to the viral origin, where it assembles into a double hexamer that orchestrates replication of the viral genome. We previously identified the cellular WD40 repeat-containing protein p80/UAF1 as a novel interaction partner of E1 from anogenital human papillomavirus (HPV) types. p80 was found to interact with the first 40 residues of HPV type 31 (HPV31) E1, and amino acid substitutions within this domain abrogated the maintenance of the viral episome in keratinocytes. In this study, we report that these p80-binding substitutions reduce by 70% the ability of E1 to support transient viral DNA replication without affecting its interaction with E2 and assembly at the origin in vivo. Microscopy studies revealed that p80 is relocalized from the cytoplasm to discrete subnuclear foci by E1 and E2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that p80 is recruited to the viral origin in an E1- and E2-dependent manner. Interestingly, overexpression of a 40-amino-acid-long p80-binding peptide, derived from HPV31 E1, was found to inhibit viral DNA replication by preventing the recruitment of endogenous p80 to the origin. Mutant peptides defective for p80 interaction were not inhibitory, demonstrating the specificity of this effect. Characterization of this E1 peptide by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) showed that it is intrinsically disordered in solution, while mapping studies indicated that the WD repeats of p80 are required for E1 interaction. These results provide additional evidence for the requirement for p80 in anogenital HPV DNA replication and highlight the potential of E1-p80 interaction as a novel antiviral target.

  6. A nuclease-hypersensitive region forms de novo after chromosome replication.

    PubMed

    Solomon, M J; Varshavsky, A

    1987-10-01

    Regular nucleosome arrays in eucaryotic chromosomes are punctuated at specific locations, such as active promoters and replication origins, by apparently nucleosome-free sites, also called nuclease-hypersensitive, or exposed, regions. The -400-base pair-exposed region within simian virus 40 (SV40) chromosomes is present in approximately 20% of the chromosomes in lytically infected cells and encompasses the replication origin, transcriptional enhancer, and both late and early SV40 promoters. We report that nearly all SV40 chromosomes lacked the exposed region during replication and that newly formed chromosomes acquired the exposed region of the same degree as did bulk SV40 chromosomes within 1 h after replication. Furthermore, a much lower but significant level of exposure was detectable in late SV40 replication intermediates, indicating that formation of the exposed region could start within minutes after passage of the replication fork. PMID:2824998

  7. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  8. The Biology of Replicative Senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, J.

    1996-12-04

    Most cells cannot divide indefinitely due to a processtermed cellular or replicative senescence. Replicative senescence appearsto be a fundamental feature of somatic cells, with the exception of mosttumour cells and possibly certain stem cells. How do cells sense thenumber of divisions they have completed? Although it has not yet beencritically tested, the telomere shortening hypothesis is currentlyperhaps the best explanation for a cell division 'counting' mechanism.Why do cells irreversibly cease proliferation after completing a finitenumber of divisions? It is now known that replicative senescence altersthe expression of a few crucial growth-regulatory genes. It is not knownhow these changes in growth-regulatory gene expression are related totelomere shortening in higher eukaryotes. However, lower eukaryotes haveprovided several plausible mechanisms. Finally, what are thephysiological consequences of replicative senescence? Several lines ofevidence suggest that, at least in human cells, replicative senescence isa powerful tumour suppressive mechanism. There is also indirect evidencethat replicative senescence contributes to ageing. Taken together,current findings suggest that, at least in mammals, replicativesenescence may have evolved to curtail tumorigenesis, but may also havethe unselected effect of contributing to age-related pathologies,including cancer.

  9. FANCD2 limits replication stress and genome instability in cells lacking BRCA2.

    PubMed

    Michl, Johanna; Zimmer, Jutta; Buffa, Francesca M; McDermott, Ultan; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2016-08-01

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 plays a key role in genome integrity by promoting replication-fork stability and homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair. Here we report that human cancer cells lacking BRCA2 rely on the Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2 to limit replication-fork progression and genomic instability. Our results identify a new role of FANCD2 in limiting constitutive replication stress in BRCA2-deficient cells, thereby affecting cell survival and treatment responses. PMID:27322732

  10. Independent Control of Replication Initiation of the Two Vibrio cholerae Chromosomes by DnaA and RctB

    PubMed Central

    Duigou, Stéphane; Knudsen, Kristine G.; Skovgaard, Ole; Egan, Elizabeth S.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2006-01-01

    Although the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes initiate replication in a coordinated fashion, we show here that each chromosome appears to have a specific replication initiator. DnaA overproduction promoted overinitiation of chromosome I and not chromosome II. In contrast, overproduction of RctB, a protein that binds to the origin of replication of chromosome II, promoted overinitiation of chromosome II and not chromosome I. PMID:16923911

  11. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulates hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Jung, Gwon-Soo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Byun, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sungwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, In-Kyu; Kang, Yu Na; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    During replication, hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes macromolecules produced by its host cell. This process requires host cellular metabolic reprogramming to favor elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we evaluated whether pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), a mitochondrial enzyme that promotes aerobic glycolysis, can regulate HCV replication. Levels of c-Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), PDK1, PDK3, glucokinase, and serine biosynthetic enzymes were compared between HCV-infected and uninfected human liver and Huh-7.5 cells infected with or without HCV. Protein and mRNA expression of c-Myc, HIF-1α, and glycolytic enzymes were significantly higher in HCV-infected human liver and hepatocytes than in uninfected controls. This increase was accompanied by upregulation of serine biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting cellular metabolism was altered toward facilitated nucleotide synthesis essential for HCV replication. JQ1, a c-Myc inhibitor, and dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDK inhibitor, decreased the expression of glycolytic and serine synthetic enzymes in HCV-infected hepatocytes, resulting in suppressed viral replication. Furthermore, when co-administered with IFN-α or ribavirin, DCA further inhibited viral replication. In summary, HCV reprograms host cell metabolism to favor glycolysis and serine biosynthesis; this is mediated, at least in part, by increased PDK activity, which provides a surplus of nucleotide precursors. Therefore, blocking PDK activity might have therapeutic benefits against HCV replication. PMID:27471054

  12. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase regulates hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Gwon-Soo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Choi, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Sung-Woo; Byun, Jun-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Sungwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Lee, In-Kyu; Kang, Yu Na; Park, Keun-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    During replication, hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes macromolecules produced by its host cell. This process requires host cellular metabolic reprogramming to favor elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis. Therefore, we evaluated whether pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), a mitochondrial enzyme that promotes aerobic glycolysis, can regulate HCV replication. Levels of c-Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), PDK1, PDK3, glucokinase, and serine biosynthetic enzymes were compared between HCV-infected and uninfected human liver and Huh-7.5 cells infected with or without HCV. Protein and mRNA expression of c-Myc, HIF-1α, and glycolytic enzymes were significantly higher in HCV-infected human liver and hepatocytes than in uninfected controls. This increase was accompanied by upregulation of serine biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting cellular metabolism was altered toward facilitated nucleotide synthesis essential for HCV replication. JQ1, a c-Myc inhibitor, and dichloroacetate (DCA), a PDK inhibitor, decreased the expression of glycolytic and serine synthetic enzymes in HCV-infected hepatocytes, resulting in suppressed viral replication. Furthermore, when co-administered with IFN-α or ribavirin, DCA further inhibited viral replication. In summary, HCV reprograms host cell metabolism to favor glycolysis and serine biosynthesis; this is mediated, at least in part, by increased PDK activity, which provides a surplus of nucleotide precursors. Therefore, blocking PDK activity might have therapeutic benefits against HCV replication. PMID:27471054

  13. Mimiviruses: Replication, Purification, and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, Jônatas Santos; Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Ferreira da Silva, Lorena Christine; Dos Santos Silva, Ludmila Karen; Kroon, Erna Geessien; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this protocol is to describe the replication, purification, and titration of mimiviruses. These viruses belong to the Mimiviridae family, the first member of which was isolated in 1992 from a cooling tower water sample collected during an outbreak of pneumonia in a hospital in Bradford, England. In recent years, several new mimiviruses have been isolated from different environmental conditions. These giant viruses are easily replicated in amoeba of the Acanthamoeba genus, its natural host. Mimiviruses present peculiar features that make them unique viruses, such as the particle and genome size and the genome's complexity. The discovery of these viruses rekindled discussions about their origin and evolution, and the genetic and structural complexity opened up a new field of study. Here, we describe some methods utilized for mimiviruses replication, purification, and titration. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153385

  14. Replicating systems concepts: Self-replicating lunar factory and demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Automation of lunar mining and manufacturing facility maintenance and repair is addressed. Designing the factory as an automated, multiproduct, remotely controlled, reprogrammable Lunar Manufacturing Facility capable of constructing duplicates of itself which would themselves be capable of further replication is proposed.

  15. A Replication of Failure, Not a Failure to Replicate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Gary; Barker, Kathleen; Kuppens, Sofie; Rosenberg, Gary; LeBreton, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing role of systematic reviews in knowledge production demands greater rigor in the literature search process. The performance of the Social Work Abstracts (SWA) database has been examined multiple times over the past three decades. The current study is a replication within this line of research. Method: Issue-level coverage…

  16. Personality and Academic Motivation: Replication, Extension, and Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Martin H.; McMichael, Stephanie N.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work examines the relationships between personality traits and intrinsic/extrinsic motivation. We replicate and extend previous work to examine how personality may relate to achievement goals, efficacious beliefs, and mindset about intelligence. Approximately 200 undergraduates responded to the survey with a 150 participants replicating…

  17. Functional Centromeres Determine the Activation Time of Pericentric Origins of DNA Replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Thomas J.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Raghuraman, M. K.

    2012-01-01

    The centromeric regions of all Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes are found in early replicating domains, a property conserved among centromeres in fungi and some higher eukaryotes. Surprisingly, little is known about the biological significance or the mechanism of early centromere replication; however, the extensive conservation suggests that it is important for chromosome maintenance. Do centromeres ensure their early replication by promoting early activation of nearby origins, or have they migrated over evolutionary time to reside in early replicating regions? In Candida albicans, a neocentromere contains an early firing origin, supporting the first hypothesis but not addressing whether the new origin is intrinsically early firing or whether the centromere influences replication time. Because the activation time of individual origins is not an intrinsic property of S. cerevisiae origins, but is influenced by surrounding sequences, we sought to test the hypothesis that centromeres influence replication time by moving a centromere to a late replication domain. We used a modified Meselson-Stahl density transfer assay to measure the kinetics of replication for regions of chromosome XIV in which either the functional centromere or a point-mutated version had been moved near origins that reside in a late replication region. We show that a functional centromere acts in cis over a distance as great as 19 kb to advance the initiation time of origins. Our results constitute a direct link between establishment of the kinetochore and the replication initiation machinery, and suggest that the proposed higher-order structure of the pericentric chromatin influences replication initiation. PMID:22589733

  18. Functional centromeres determine the activation time of pericentric origins of DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Thomas J; Brewer, Bonita J; Raghuraman, M K

    2012-01-01

    The centromeric regions of all Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes are found in early replicating domains, a property conserved among centromeres in fungi and some higher eukaryotes. Surprisingly, little is known about the biological significance or the mechanism of early centromere replication; however, the extensive conservation suggests that it is important for chromosome maintenance. Do centromeres ensure their early replication by promoting early activation of nearby origins, or have they migrated over evolutionary time to reside in early replicating regions? In Candida albicans, a neocentromere contains an early firing origin, supporting the first hypothesis but not addressing whether the new origin is intrinsically early firing or whether the centromere influences replication time. Because the activation time of individual origins is not an intrinsic property of S. cerevisiae origins, but is influenced by surrounding sequences, we sought to test the hypothesis that centromeres influence replication time by moving a centromere to a late replication domain. We used a modified Meselson-Stahl density transfer assay to measure the kinetics of replication for regions of chromosome XIV in which either the functional centromere or a point-mutated version had been moved near origins that reside in a late replication region. We show that a functional centromere acts in cis over a distance as great as 19 kb to advance the initiation time of origins. Our results constitute a direct link between establishment of the kinetochore and the replication initiation machinery, and suggest that the proposed higher-order structure of the pericentric chromatin influences replication initiation.

  19. Exploiting replication in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.; Joseph, T. A.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques are examined for replicating data and execution in directly distributed systems: systems in which multiple processes interact directly with one another while continuously respecting constraints on their joint behavior. Directly distributed systems are often required to solve difficult problems, ranging from management of replicated data to dynamic reconfiguration in response to failures. It is shown that these problems reduce to more primitive, order-based consistency problems, which can be solved using primitives such as the reliable broadcast protocols. Moreover, given a system that implements reliable broadcast primitives, a flexible set of high-level tools can be provided for building a wide variety of directly distributed application programs.

  20. BRCA1 is Required for Post-replication Repair After UV-induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Shailja; Nguyen, Jenna; Hill, Sarah J.; Scully, Ralph; Feunteun, Jean; Livingston, David M.

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 contributes to the response to UV irradiation. Utilizing its BRCT motifs, it is recruited during S/G2 to UV-damaged sites in a DNA replication-dependent, but nucleotide excision repair- independent manner. More specifically, at UV- stalled replication forks, it promotes photoproduct excision, suppression of translesion synthesis, and the localization and activation of replication factor C complex (RFC) subunits. The last function, in turn, triggers post-UV checkpoint activation and post- replicative repair. These BRCA1 functions differ from those required for DSBR. PMID:21963239

  1. Covert Reinforcement: A Partial Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripstra, Constance C.; And Others

    A partial replication of an investigation of the effect of covert reinforcement on a perceptual estimation task is described. The study was extended to include an extinction phase. There were five treatment groups: covert reinforcement, neutral scene reinforcement, noncontingent covert reinforcement, and two control groups. Each subject estimated…

  2. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-11-16

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  3. Cytosolic Replication of Group A Streptococcus in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Alan M.; Thurston, Teresa L. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As key components of innate immune defense, macrophages are essential in controlling bacterial pathogens, including group A Streptococcus (GAS). Despite this, only a limited number of studies have analyzed the recovery of GAS from within human neutrophils and macrophages. Here, we determined the intracellular fate of GAS in human macrophages by using several quantitative approaches. In both U937 and primary human macrophages, the appearance over time of long GAS chains revealed that despite GAS-mediated cytotoxicity, replication occurred in viable, propidium iodide-negative macrophages. Whereas the major virulence factor M1 did not contribute to bacterial growth, a GAS mutant strain deficient in streptolysin O (SLO) was impaired for intracellular replication. SLO promoted bacterial escape from the GAS-containing vacuole (GCV) into the macrophage cytosol. Up to half of the cytosolic GAS colocalized with ubiquitin and p62, suggesting that the bacteria were targeted by the autophagy machinery. Despite this, live imaging of U937 macrophages revealed proficient replication of GAS after GCV rupture, indicating that escape from the GCV is important for growth of GAS in macrophages. Our results reveal that GAS can replicate within viable human macrophages, with SLO promoting GCV escape and cytosolic growth, despite the recruitment of autophagy receptors to bacteria. PMID:27073088

  4. In situ replication techniques: II. Quantitative methodologies for replicate materials.

    PubMed

    Kusy, R P; Whitley, J Q

    1985-01-01

    Because replicate materials have requirements different from those of recording or impression materials, quantitative methodologies were sought using commercial impression materials. Two satisfactory objective techniques resulted, a laser-scattering and a capillary flow test. Using high-resolution gratings to stimulate tooth detail (less than 1 micron), the reproduction quality of 36 two-stage replicas was determined in diffraction, reflection, and in an unblazed state. Using precision bore glass tubes (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mm diameters) to simulate the high-energy surface of enamel, the flow characteristics of nine elastomers (the first stage replicates) and four epoxies (the second stage replicates) were determined at isobaric conditions. Because the laser spot size was relatively large (0.6 mm) and the pressure differential was small (25 mm Hg), both the global resolution and the low shear rate characteristics could be measured. Of the commercial materials tested, Reprosil Light had the best combination of fluidity and resolution, regardless of which positive material was used. Although Permagum Low, Silene Wash, and Xantopren Blue scored high in one of the two tests, none of these materials could compare to Reprosil Light within the context described herein.

  5. Dynamics of plant DNA replication based on PCNA visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ryohei; Hirakawa, Takeshi; Hayashi, Seri; Sakamoto, Takuya; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is an essential process for the copying of genomic information in living organisms. Imaging of DNA replication in tissues and organs is mainly performed using fixed cells after incorporation of thymidine analogs. To establish a useful marker line to measure the duration of DNA replication and analyze the dynamics of DNA replication, we focused on the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), which functions as a DNA sliding clamp for replicative DNA polymerases and is an essential component of replisomes. In this study we produced an Arabidopsis thaliana line expressing PCNA1 fused with the green fluorescent protein under the control of its own promoter (pAtPCNA1::AtPCNA1-EGFP). The duration of the S phase measured using the expression line was consistent with that measured after incorporation of a thymidine analog. Live cell imaging revealed that three distinct nuclear localization patterns (whole, dotted, and speckled) were sequentially observable. These whole, dotted, and speckled patterns of subnuclear AtPCNA1 signals were indicative of the G1 or G2 phase, early S phase and late S phase, respectively. The results indicate that the pAtPCNA1::AtPCNA1-EGFP line is a useful marker line for visualization of S-phase progression in live plant organs. PMID:27417498

  6. Epstein-Barr virus episomes as targets for cigarette smoke- and gamma-irradiation-induced DNA damage: studies on the EBNA-1 region by a new gene-specific technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Q; Hergenhahn, M; Bartsch, H

    1997-07-01

    Following our demonstration of cytochrome P450-independent DNA damage induced by aqueous solutions of cigarette smoke in human mucosal cells in vivo, and in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we have developed a new technique to demonstrate gene-region specific DNA damage, with the EBNA-1 gene present in multiple nuclear matrix-attached episomes in Raji cells serving as an amplified target. DNA was extracted from Raji cells treated by gamma-irradiation or aqueous solutions of cigarette smoke; adducted bases or other damage were removed chemically by depurination/alkali treatment. Single-strand breaks induced directly by cigarette smoke as well as DNA cleaved at the site of former adducts were end-labelled either with alpha-[32P]dCTP or with biotin-16-dUTP. With 32P-labelling, a dose-dependent increase in DNA labelling was seen for different concentrations of cigarette smoke; undiluted smoke produced a similar amount of damage as 22.4 Gy of gamma-irradiation. For isolation of DNA regions that contained biotin label at the sites of former damage, DNA was cut by restriction endonucleases and 3-kb-fragments including the target gene, EBV-EBNA-1, were isolated by agarose-gel electrophoresis. Those containing biotin were selected on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. PCR amplification of the bound DNA revealed EBNA-1 DNA only when cells were pretreated with either cigarette smoke or gamma-irradiation. The presented method thus provides a new approach for detecting gene-specific damage in a readily accessible target, EBV episomes. The method is also potentially applicable for studying single-copy genes such as p53, the types of adducts involved, and quantitative aspects of DNA damage and its repair.

  7. Physics models of centriole replication.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Zou, Changhua

    2006-01-01

    Our previous pre-clinic experimental results have showed that the epithelialization can be enhanced by the externally applied rectangular pulsed electrical current stimulation (RPECS). The results are clinically significant for patients, especially for those difficult patients whose skin wounds need long periods to heal. However, the results also raise questions: How does the RPECS accelerate the epithelium cell proliferation? To answer these questions, we have previously developed several models for animal cells, in a view of physics, to explain mechanisms of mitosis and cytokinesis at a cellular level, and separation of nucleotide sequences and the unwinding of a double helix during DNA replication at a bio-molecular level. In this paper, we further model the mechanism of centriole replication during a natural and normal mitosis and cytokinesis to explore the mechanism of epithelialization enhanced with the externally applied RPECS at a bio-molecular level. Our models suggest: (1) Centriole replication is an information flowing. The direction of the information flowing is from centrioles to centrioles based on a cylindrical template of 9 x 3 protein microtubules (MTs) pattern. (2) A spontaneous and strong electromagnetic field (EMF) force is a pushing force that separates a mother and a daughter centrioles in centrosomes or in cells, while a pulling force of interacting fibers and pericentriolar materials delivers new babies. The newly born babies inherit the pattern information from their mother(s) and grow using microtubule fragments that come through the centrosome pores. A daughter centriole is always born and grows along stronger EMF. The EMF mostly determines centrioles positions and plays key role in centriole replication. We also hypothesize that the normal centriole replication could not been disturbed in centrosome in the epithelium cells by our RPECS, because the centrioles have two non-conducting envelope (cell and centrosome membranes), that protect

  8. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  9. Photomorphogenic Regulation of Chloroplast Replication in Euglena

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Usha; Lyman, Harvard

    1980-01-01

    Chloroplast replication in Euglena gracilis is specifically inhibited by ultraviolet light and the effect is photoreactivable. The ability of irradiated cells to be photoreactivated is lost more rapidly if cells are incubated in red light than in darkness. A mutant, Y9ZNa1L, which lacks the red-blue photomorphogenic system regulating chloroplast synthesis does not show the red-light-enhanced loss of photoreactivability. Another mutant, Y11P27ZD which has the red-blue system, but lacks the blue-light system also regulating chloroplast synthesis, shows the red-light effect. The red-light effect is seen in a mutant of photosynthetic electron transport, P4ZUL, which rules out a product of photosynthesis as a mediator of the effect. Inhibitors of protein synthesis on chloroplast ribosomes do not prevent the red-light-enhanced loss of chloroplast DNA. Chloroplast DNA is lost rapidly when UV-irradiated cells are incubated in red light, showing that the loss of photoreactivability is due to the loss of the substrate for photoreactivation, chloroplast DNA. Therefore, the red-blue photomorphogenic system is activating a chloroplast DNA-specific nuclease(s). A model is proposed for a light-mediated mechanism regulating the amount of chloroplast DNA: blue light would promote chloroplast DNA synthesis; red light would promote its degradation. The photomorphogenic systems regulating chloroplast synthesis might work by activating a chloroplast-specific modification-restriction mechanism. PMID:16661425

  10. Links between genome replication and chromatin landscapes.

    PubMed

    Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2015-07-01

    Post-embryonic organogenesis in plants requires the continuous production of cells in the organ primordia, their expansion and a coordinated exit to differentiation. Genome replication is one of the most important processes that occur during the cell cycle, as the maintenance of genomic integrity is of primary relevance for development. As it is chromatin that must be duplicated, a strict coordination occurs between DNA replication, the deposition of new histones, and the introduction of histone modifications and variants. In turn, the chromatin landscape affects several stages during genome replication. Thus, chromatin accessibility is crucial for the initial stages and to specify the location of DNA replication origins with different chromatin signatures. The chromatin landscape also determines the timing of activation during the S phase. Genome replication must occur fully, but only once during each cell cycle. The re-replication avoidance mechanisms rely primarily on restricting the availability of certain replication factors; however, the presence of specific histone modifications are also revealed as contributing to the mechanisms that avoid re-replication, in particular for heterochromatin replication. We provide here an update of genome replication mostly focused on data from Arabidopsis, and the advances that genomic approaches are likely to provide in the coming years. The data available, both in plants and animals, point to the relevance of the chromatin landscape in genome replication, and require a critical evaluation of the existing views about the nature of replication origins, the mechanisms of origin specification and the relevance of epigenetic modifications for genome replication.

  11. Kinase-independent function of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in the replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Juliana; Federico, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2012-05-01

    The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and ATR are broadly known for their role in the response to the accumulation of damaged DNA. Because Chk1 activation requires its phosphorylation by ATR, it is expected that ATR or Chk1 down-regulation should cause similar alterations in the signals triggered by DNA lesions. Intriguingly, we found that Chk1, but not ATR, promotes the progression of replication forks after UV irradiation. Strikingly, this role of Chk1 is independent of its kinase-domain and of its partnership with Claspin. Instead, we demonstrate that the ability of Chk1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA templates relies on its recently identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting motif, which is required for its release from chromatin after DNA damage. Also supporting the importance of Chk1 release, a histone H2B-Chk1 chimera, which is permanently immobilized in chromatin, is unable to promote the replication of damaged DNA. Moreover, inefficient chromatin dissociation of Chk1 impairs the efficient recruitment of the specialized DNA polymerase η (pol η) to replication-associated foci after UV. Given the critical role of pol η during translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), these findings unveil an unforeseen facet of the regulation by Chk1 of DNA replication. This kinase-independent role of Chk1 is exclusively associated to the maintenance of active replication forks after UV irradiation in a manner in which Chk1 release prompts TLS to avoid replication stalling.

  12. Kinase-independent function of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in the replication of damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Speroni, Juliana; Federico, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2012-01-01

    The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and ATR are broadly known for their role in the response to the accumulation of damaged DNA. Because Chk1 activation requires its phosphorylation by ATR, it is expected that ATR or Chk1 down-regulation should cause similar alterations in the signals triggered by DNA lesions. Intriguingly, we found that Chk1, but not ATR, promotes the progression of replication forks after UV irradiation. Strikingly, this role of Chk1 is independent of its kinase-domain and of its partnership with Claspin. Instead, we demonstrate that the ability of Chk1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA templates relies on its recently identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting motif, which is required for its release from chromatin after DNA damage. Also supporting the importance of Chk1 release, a histone H2B-Chk1 chimera, which is permanently immobilized in chromatin, is unable to promote the replication of damaged DNA. Moreover, inefficient chromatin dissociation of Chk1 impairs the efficient recruitment of the specialized DNA polymerase η (pol η) to replication-associated foci after UV. Given the critical role of pol η during translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), these findings unveil an unforeseen facet of the regulation by Chk1 of DNA replication. This kinase-independent role of Chk1 is exclusively associated to the maintenance of active replication forks after UV irradiation in a manner in which Chk1 release prompts TLS to avoid replication stalling. PMID:22529391

  13. Kinase-independent function of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in the replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Juliana; Federico, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2012-05-01

    The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and ATR are broadly known for their role in the response to the accumulation of damaged DNA. Because Chk1 activation requires its phosphorylation by ATR, it is expected that ATR or Chk1 down-regulation should cause similar alterations in the signals triggered by DNA lesions. Intriguingly, we found that Chk1, but not ATR, promotes the progression of replication forks after UV irradiation. Strikingly, this role of Chk1 is independent of its kinase-domain and of its partnership with Claspin. Instead, we demonstrate that the ability of Chk1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA templates relies on its recently identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting motif, which is required for its release from chromatin after DNA damage. Also supporting the importance of Chk1 release, a histone H2B-Chk1 chimera, which is permanently immobilized in chromatin, is unable to promote the replication of damaged DNA. Moreover, inefficient chromatin dissociation of Chk1 impairs the efficient recruitment of the specialized DNA polymerase η (pol η) to replication-associated foci after UV. Given the critical role of pol η during translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), these findings unveil an unforeseen facet of the regulation by Chk1 of DNA replication. This kinase-independent role of Chk1 is exclusively associated to the maintenance of active replication forks after UV irradiation in a manner in which Chk1 release prompts TLS to avoid replication stalling. PMID:22529391

  14. Tombusviruses upregulate phospholipid biosynthesis via interaction between p33 replication protein and yeast lipid sensor proteins during virus replication in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; Sharma, Monika; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-12-15

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses induce new membranous structures and promote membrane proliferation in infected cells to facilitate viral replication. In this paper, the authors show that a plant-infecting tombusvirus upregulates transcription of phospholipid biosynthesis genes, such as INO1, OPI3 and CHO1, and increases phospholipid levels in yeast model host. This is accomplished by the viral p33 replication protein, which interacts with Opi1p FFAT domain protein and Scs2p VAP protein. Opi1p and Scs2p are phospholipid sensor proteins and they repress the expression of phospholipid genes. Accordingly, deletion of OPI1 transcription repressor in yeast has a stimulatory effect on TBSV RNA accumulation and enhanced tombusvirus replicase activity in an in vitro assay. Altogether, the presented data convincingly demonstrate that de novo lipid biosynthesis is required for optimal TBSV replication. Overall, this work reveals that a (+)RNA virus reprograms the phospholipid biosynthesis pathway in a unique way to facilitate its replication in yeast cells. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with FFAT-domain host protein. • Tombusvirus replication leads to upregulation of phospholipids. • Tombusvirus replication depends on de novo lipid synthesis. • Deletion of FFAT-domain host protein enhances TBSV replication. • TBSV rewires host phospholipid synthesis.

  15. Replication Fork Velocities at Adjacent Replication Origins Are Coordinately Modified during DNA Replication in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Chiara; Saccà, Barbara; Herrick, John; Lalou, Claude; Pommier, Yves

    2007-01-01

    The spatial organization of replicons into clusters is believed to be of critical importance for genome duplication in higher eukaryotes, but its functional organization still remains to be fully clarified. The coordinated activation of origins is insufficient on its own to account for a timely completion of genome duplication when interorigin distances vary significantly and fork velocities are constant. Mechanisms coordinating origin distribution with fork progression are still poorly elucidated, because of technical difficulties of visualizing the process. Taking advantage of a single molecule approach, we delineated and compared the DNA replication kinetics at the genome level in human normal primary and malignant cells. Our results show that replication forks moving from one origin, as well as from neighboring origins, tend to exhibit the same velocity, although the plasticity of the replication program allows for their adaptation to variable interorigin distances. We also found that forks that emanated from closely spaced origins tended to move slower than those associated with long replicons. Taken together, our results indicate a functional role for origin clustering in the dynamic regulation of genome duplication. PMID:17522385

  16. Herpesvirus Replication Compartments Originate with Single Incoming Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kobiler, O.; Brodersen, P.; Taylor, M. P.; Ludmir, E. B.; Enquist, L. W.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously we described a method to estimate the average number of virus genomes expressed in an infected cell. By analyzing the color spectrum of cells infected with a mixture of isogenic pseudorabies virus (PRV) recombinants expressing three fluorophores, we estimated that fewer than seven incoming genomes are expressed, replicated, and packaged into progeny per cell. In this report, we expand this work and describe experiments demonstrating the generality of the method, as well as providing more insight into herpesvirus replication. We used three isogenic PRV recombinants, each expressing a fluorescently tagged VP26 fusion protein (VP26 is a capsid protein) under the viral VP26 late promoter. We calculated a similar finite limit on the number of expressed viral genomes, indicating that this method is independent of the promoter used to transcribe the fluorophore genes, the time of expression of the fluorophore (early versus late), and the insertion site of the fluorophore gene in the PRV genome (UL versus US). Importantly, these VP26 fusion proteins are distributed equally in punctate virion assembly structures in each nucleus, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio when determining the color spectrum of each cell. To understand how the small number of genomes are distributed among the replication compartments, we used a two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization assay. Most viral replication compartments in the nucleus occupy unique nuclear territories, implying that they arose from single genomes. Our experiments suggest a correlation between the small number of expressed viral genomes and the limited number of replication compartments. PMID:22186611

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide Maintains Mitochondrial DNA Replication via Demethylation of TFAM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exerts a wide range of actions in the body, especially in the modulation of mitochondrial functions. The normal replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is critical for cellular energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H2S affects mtDNA replication and the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesize that H2S maintains mtDNA copy number via inhibition of Dnmt3a transcription and TFAM promoter methylation. Results: Here, we demonstrated that deficiency of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE), a major H2S-producing enzyme, reduces mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial contents, and it inhibits the expressions of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial marker genes in both smooth muscle cells and aorta tissues from mice. Supply of exogenous H2S stimulated mtDNA copy number and strengthened the expressions of TFAM and mitochondrial marker genes. TFAM knockdown diminished H2S-enhanced mtDNA copy number. In addition, CSE deficiency induced the expression of DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) and TFAM promoter DNA methylation, and H2S repressed Dnmt3a expression, resulting in TFAM promoter demethylation. We further found that H2S S-sulfhydrates transcription repressor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) and enhances the binding of IRF-1 with Dnmt3a promoter after reduced Dnmt3a transcription. H2S had little effects on the expression of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b as well as on ten-eleven translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3. Innovation: A sufficient level of H2S is able to inhibit TFAM promoter methylation and maintain mtDNA copy number. Conclusion: CSE/H2S system contributes to mtDNA replication and cellular bioenergetics and provides a novel therapeutic avenue for cardiovascular diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 630–642. PMID:25758951

  18. DNA replication: enzymology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Z; O'Donnell, M

    1994-04-01

    Research into the enzymology of DNA replication has seen a multitude of highly significant advances during the past year, in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. The scope of this article is limited to chromosomal replicases and origins of initiation. The multiprotein chromosomal replicases of prokaryotes and eukaryotes appear to be strikingly similar in structure and function, although future work may reveal their differences. Recent developments, elaborating the activation of origins in several systems, have begun to uncover mechanisms of regulation. The enzymology of eukaryotic origins has, until now, been limited to viral systems, but over the past few years, enzymology has caught a grip on the cellular origins of yeast.

  19. Thermal, Autonomous Replicator Made from Transfer RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krammer, Hubert; Möller, Friederike M.; Braun, Dieter

    2012-06-01

    Evolving systems rely on the storage and replication of genetic information. Here we present an autonomous, purely thermally driven replication mechanism. A pool of hairpin molecules, derived from transfer RNA replicates the succession of a two-letter code. Energy is first stored thermally in metastable hairpins. Thereafter, energy is released by a highly specific and exponential replication with a duplication time of 30 s, which is much faster than the tendency to produce false positives in the absence of template. Our experiments propose a physical rather than a chemical scenario for the autonomous replication of protein encoding information in a disequilibrium setting.

  20. Replication of prions in differentiated muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that prions accumulate to high levels in non-proliferative C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 cells replicate as myoblasts but can be differentiated into myotubes. Earlier studies indicated that C2C12 myoblasts are not competent for prion replication. (1) We confirmed that observation and demonstrated, for the first time, that while replicative myoblasts do not accumulate PrP(Sc), differentiated post-mitotic myotube cultures replicate prions robustly. Here we extend our observations and describe the implication and utility of this system for replicating prions.

  1. Strategic Use of Random Subsample Replication and a Coefficient of Factor Replicability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzenmeyer, William G.; Stenner, A. Jackson

    1975-01-01

    The problem of demonstrating replicability of factor structure across random variables is addressed. Procedures are outlined which combine the use of random subsample replication strategies with the correlations between factor score estimates across replicate pairs to generate a coefficient of replicability and confidence intervals associated with…

  2. Mathematical modelling of eukaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Hyrien, Olivier; Goldar, Arach

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is a complex process. Replication starts at thousand origins that are activated at different times in S phase and terminates when converging replication forks meet. Potential origins are much more abundant than actually fire within a given S phase. The choice of replication origins and their time of activation is never exactly the same in any two cells. Individual origins show different efficiencies and different firing time probability distributions, conferring stochasticity to the DNA replication process. High-throughput microarray and sequencing techniques are providing increasingly huge datasets on the population-averaged spatiotemporal patterns of DNA replication in several organisms. On the other hand, single-molecule replication mapping techniques such as DNA combing provide unique information about cell-to-cell variability in DNA replication patterns. Mathematical modelling is required to fully comprehend the complexity of the chromosome replication process and to correctly interpret these data. Mathematical analysis and computer simulations have been recently used to model and interpret genome-wide replication data in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in Xenopus egg extracts and in mammalian cells. These works reveal how stochasticity in origin usage confers robustness and reliability to the DNA replication process. PMID:20205354

  3. The replication origin of a repABC plasmid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background repABC operons are present on large, low copy-number plasmids and on some secondary chromosomes in at least 19 α-proteobacterial genera, and are responsible for the replication and segregation properties of these replicons. These operons consist, with some variations, of three genes: repA, repB, and repC. RepA and RepB are involved in plasmid partitioning and in the negative regulation of their own transcription, and RepC is the limiting factor for replication. An antisense RNA encoded between the repB-repC genes modulates repC expression. Results To identify the minimal region of the Rhizobium etli p42d plasmid that is capable of autonomous replication, we amplified different regions of the repABC operon using PCR and cloned the regions into a suicide vector. The resulting vectors were then introduced into R. etli strains that did or did not contain p42d. The minimal replicon consisted of a repC open reading frame under the control of a constitutive promoter with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence that we designed. A sequence analysis of repC revealed the presence of a large A+T-rich region but no iterons or DnaA boxes. Silent mutations that modified the A+T content of this region eliminated the replication capability of the plasmid. The minimal replicon could not be introduced into R. etli strain containing p42d, but similar constructs that carried repC from Sinorhizobium meliloti pSymA or the linear chromosome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens replicated in the presence or absence of p42d, indicating that RepC is an incompatibility factor. A hybrid gene construct expressing a RepC protein with the first 362 amino acid residues from p42d RepC and the last 39 amino acid residues of RepC from SymA was able to replicate in the presence of p42d. Conclusions RepC is the only element encoded in the repABC operon of the R. etli p42d plasmid that is necessary and sufficient for plasmid replication and is probably the initiator protein. The oriV of this plasmid resides

  4. Cell Cycle Regulation of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, R. A.; Holzen, T. M.

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication is regulated to ensure all chromosomes replicate once and only once per cell cycle. Replication begins at many origins scattered along each chromosome. Except for budding yeast, origins are not defined DNA sequences and probably are inherited by epigenetic mechanisms. Initiation at origins occurs throughout the S phase according to a temporal program that is important in regulating gene expression during development. Most replication proteins are conserved in evolution in eukaryotes and archaea, but not in bacteria. However, the mechanism of initiation is conserved and consists of origin recognition, assembly of pre-replication (pre-RC) initiative complexes, helicase activation, and replisome loading. Cell cycle regulation by protein phosphorylation ensures that pre-RC assembly can only occur in G1 phase, whereas helicase activation and loading can only occur in S phase. Checkpoint regulation maintains high fidelity by stabilizing replication forks and preventing cell cycle progression during replication stress or damage. PMID:17630848

  5. How to securely replicate services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, Michael; Birman, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for constructing replicated services that retain their availability and integrity despite several servers and clients corrupted by an intruder, in addition to others failing benignly. More precisely, a service is replicated by n servers in such a way that a correct client will accept a correct server's response if, for some prespecified parameter k, at least k servers are correct and fewer than k servers are corrupt. The issue of maintaining causality among client requests is also addressed. A security breach resulting from an intruder's ability to effect a violation of causality in the sequence of requests processed by the service is illustrated. An approach to counter this problem is proposed that requires fewer than k servers to be corrupt and that is live if at least k+b servers are correct, where b is the assumed maximum total number of corrupt servers in any system run. An important and novel feature of these schemes is that the client need not be able to identify or authenticate even a single server. Instead, the client is required only to possess at most two public keys for the service. The practicality of these schemes is illustrated through a discussion of several issues pertinent to their implementation and use, and their intended role in a secure version of the Isis system is also described.

  6. Social learning and the replication process: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Derex, Maxime; Feron, Romain; Godelle, Bernard; Raymond, Michel

    2015-06-01

    Human cultural traits typically result from a gradual process that has been described as analogous to biological evolution. This observation has led pioneering scholars to draw inspiration from population genetics to develop a rigorous and successful theoretical framework of cultural evolution. Social learning, the mechanism allowing information to be transmitted between individuals, has thus been described as a simple replication mechanism. Although useful, the extent to which this idealization appropriately describes the actual social learning events has not been carefully assessed. Here, we used a specifically developed computer task to evaluate (i) the extent to which social learning leads to the replication of an observed behaviour and (ii) the consequences it has for fitness landscape exploration. Our results show that social learning does not lead to a dichotomous choice between disregarding and replicating social information. Rather, it appeared that individuals combine and transform information coming from multiple sources to produce new solutions. As a consequence, landscape exploration was promoted by the use of social information. These results invite us to rethink the way social learning is commonly modelled and could question the validity of predictions coming from models considering this process as replicative. PMID:25994679

  7. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  8. Social learning and the replication process: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Derex, Maxime; Feron, Romain; Godelle, Bernard; Raymond, Michel

    2015-06-01

    Human cultural traits typically result from a gradual process that has been described as analogous to biological evolution. This observation has led pioneering scholars to draw inspiration from population genetics to develop a rigorous and successful theoretical framework of cultural evolution. Social learning, the mechanism allowing information to be transmitted between individuals, has thus been described as a simple replication mechanism. Although useful, the extent to which this idealization appropriately describes the actual social learning events has not been carefully assessed. Here, we used a specifically developed computer task to evaluate (i) the extent to which social learning leads to the replication of an observed behaviour and (ii) the consequences it has for fitness landscape exploration. Our results show that social learning does not lead to a dichotomous choice between disregarding and replicating social information. Rather, it appeared that individuals combine and transform information coming from multiple sources to produce new solutions. As a consequence, landscape exploration was promoted by the use of social information. These results invite us to rethink the way social learning is commonly modelled and could question the validity of predictions coming from models considering this process as replicative.

  9. RFWD3-Dependent Ubiquitination of RPA Regulates Repair at Stalled Replication Forks.

    PubMed

    Elia, Andrew E H; Wang, David C; Willis, Nicholas A; Boardman, Alexander P; Hajdu, Ildiko; Adeyemi, Richard O; Lowry, Elizabeth; Gygi, Steven P; Scully, Ralph; Elledge, Stephen J

    2015-10-15

    We have used quantitative proteomics to profile ubiquitination in the DNA damage response (DDR). We demonstrate that RPA, which functions as a protein scaffold in the replication stress response, is multiply ubiquitinated upon replication fork stalling. Ubiquitination of RPA occurs on chromatin, involves sites outside its DNA binding channel, does not cause proteasomal degradation, and increases under conditions of fork collapse, suggesting a role in repair at stalled forks. We demonstrate that the E3 ligase RFWD3 mediates RPA ubiquitination. RFWD3 is necessary for replication fork restart, normal repair kinetics during replication stress, and homologous recombination (HR) at stalled replication forks. Mutational analysis suggests that multisite ubiquitination of the entire RPA complex is responsible for repair at stalled forks. Multisite protein group sumoylation is known to promote HR in yeast. Our findings reveal a similar requirement for multisite protein group ubiquitination during HR at stalled forks in mammalian cells.

  10. FANCJ couples replication past natural fork barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Rebekka A.; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Defective DNA repair causes Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare childhood cancer–predisposing syndrome. At least 15 genes are known to be mutated in FA; however, their role in DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we show that the FANCJ helicase promotes DNA replication in trans by counteracting fork stalling on replication barriers, such as G4 quadruplex structures. Accordingly, stabilization of G4 quadruplexes in ΔFANCJ cells restricts fork movements, uncouples leading- and lagging-strand synthesis and generates small single-stranded DNA gaps behind the fork. Unexpectedly, we also discovered that FANCJ suppresses heterochromatin spreading by coupling fork movement through replication barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure. We propose that FANCJ plays an essential role in counteracting chromatin compaction associated with unscheduled replication fork stalling and restart, and suppresses tumorigenesis, at least partially, in this replication-specific manner. PMID:23530069

  11. Kinetochores coordinate pericentromeric cohesion and early DNA replication by Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase recruitment.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Müller, Carolin A; Katou, Yuki; Retkute, Renata; Gierliński, Marek; Araki, Hiroyuki; Blow, J Julian; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2013-06-01

    Centromeres play several important roles in ensuring proper chromosome segregation. Not only do they promote kinetochore assembly for microtubule attachment, but they also support robust sister chromatid cohesion at pericentromeres and facilitate replication of centromeric DNA early in S phase. However, it is still elusive how centromeres orchestrate all these functions at the same site. Here, we show that the budding yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) accumulates at kinetochores in telophase, facilitated by the Ctf19 kinetochore complex. This promptly recruits Sld3-Sld7 replication initiator proteins to pericentromeric replication origins so that they initiate replication early in S phase. Furthermore, DDK at kinetochores independently recruits the Scc2-Scc4 cohesin loader to centromeres in G1 phase. This enhances cohesin loading and facilitates robust pericentromeric cohesion in S phase. Thus, we have found the central mechanism by which kinetochores orchestrate early S phase DNA replication and robust sister chromatid cohesion at microtubule attachment sites.

  12. A key role for heat shock protein 70 in the localization and insertion of tombusvirus replication proteins to intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Stork, Jozsef; Nagy, Peter D

    2009-04-01

    Plus-stranded RNA viruses coopt host proteins to promote their robust replication in infected hosts. Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) is a model virus that can replicate a small replicon RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in plants. The tombusvirus replicase complex contains heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), an abundant cytosolic chaperone, which is required for TBSV replication. To dissect the function of Hsp70 in TBSV replication, in this paper we use an Hsp70 mutant (ssa1 ssa2) yeast strain that supports a low level of TBSV replication. Using confocal laser microscopy and cellular fractionation experiments, we find that the localization of the viral replication proteins changes to the cytosol in the mutant cells from the peroxisomal membranes in wild-type cells. An in vitro membrane insertion assay shows that Hsp70 promotes the integration of the viral replication proteins into subcellular membranes. This step seems to be critical for the assembly of the viral replicase complex. Using a gene-silencing approach and quercetin as a chemical inhibitor to downregulate Hsp70 levels, we also confirm the significance of cytosolic Hsp70 in the replication of TBSV and other plant viruses in a plant host. Taken together, our results suggest that cytosolic Hsp70 plays multiple roles in TBSV replication, such as affecting the subcellular localization and membrane insertion of the viral replication proteins as well as the assembly of the viral replicase. PMID:19153242

  13. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Molly L; Wang, Xu; Smith, Nathan W; Son, Minkyeong P; Evans, Michael R; Morgan, Iain M

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs) could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1), does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer. PMID:27338449

  14. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Bristol, Molly L.; Wang, Xu; Smith, Nathan W.; Son, Minkyeong P.; Evans, Michael R.; Morgan, Iain M.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs) could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1), does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer. PMID:27338449

  15. Self-replication of DNA rings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghoon; Lee, Junwye; Hamada, Shogo; Murata, Satoshi; Ha Park, Sung

    2015-06-01

    Biology provides numerous examples of self-replicating machines, but artificially engineering such complex systems remains a formidable challenge. In particular, although simple artificial self-replicating systems including wooden blocks, magnetic systems, modular robots and synthetic molecular systems have been devised, such kinematic self-replicators are rare compared with examples of theoretical cellular self-replication. One of the principal reasons for this is the amount of complexity that arises when you try to incorporate self-replication into a physical medium. In this regard, DNA is a prime candidate material for constructing self-replicating systems due to its ability to self-assemble through molecular recognition. Here, we show that DNA T-motifs, which self-assemble into ring structures, can be designed to self-replicate through toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions. The inherent design of these rings allows the population dynamics of the systems to be controlled. We also analyse the replication scheme within a universal framework of self-replication and derive a quantitative metric of the self-replicability of the rings. PMID:25961509

  16. Self-replication of DNA rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghoon; Lee, Junwye; Hamada, Shogo; Murata, Satoshi; Ha Park, Sung

    2015-06-01

    Biology provides numerous examples of self-replicating machines, but artificially engineering such complex systems remains a formidable challenge. In particular, although simple artificial self-replicating systems including wooden blocks, magnetic systems, modular robots and synthetic molecular systems have been devised, such kinematic self-replicators are rare compared with examples of theoretical cellular self-replication. One of the principal reasons for this is the amount of complexity that arises when you try to incorporate self-replication into a physical medium. In this regard, DNA is a prime candidate material for constructing self-replicating systems due to its ability to self-assemble through molecular recognition. Here, we show that DNA T-motifs, which self-assemble into ring structures, can be designed to self-replicate through toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions. The inherent design of these rings allows the population dynamics of the systems to be controlled. We also analyse the replication scheme within a universal framework of self-replication and derive a quantitative metric of the self-replicability of the rings.

  17. Rolling-circle replication of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S A

    1997-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids replicate by a rolling-circle (RC) mechanism. Their replication properties have many similarities to as well as significant differences from those of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) coliphages, which also replicate by an RC mechanism. Studies on a large number of RC plasmids have revealed that they fall into several families based on homology in their initiator proteins and leading-strand origins. The leading-strand origins contain distinct sequences that are required for binding and nicking by the Rep proteins. Leading-strand origins also contain domains that are required for the initiation and termination of replication. RC plasmids generate ssDNA intermediates during replication, since their lagging-strand synthesis does not usually initiate until the leading strand has been almost fully synthesized. The leading- and lagging-strand origins are distinct, and the displaced leading-strand DNA is converted to the double-stranded form by using solely the host proteins. The Rep proteins encoded by RC plasmids contain specific domains that are involved in their origin binding and nicking activities. The replication and copy number of RC plasmids, in general, are regulated at the level of synthesis of their Rep proteins, which are usually rate limiting for replication. Some RC Rep proteins are known to be inactivated after supporting one round of replication. A number of in vitro replication systems have been developed for RC plasmids and have provided insight into the mechanism of plasmid RC replication. PMID:9409148

  18. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Keith, W. Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L.; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S.; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S. Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed “senescence,” can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells’ heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  19. Autophagic machinery activated by dengue virus enhances virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-R.; Lei, H.-Y.; Liu, M.-T.; Wang, J.-R.; Chen, S.-H.; Jiang-Shieh, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-S.; Yeh, T.-M.; Liu, C.-C.; Liu, H.-S.

    2008-05-10

    Autophagy is a cellular response against stresses which include the infection of viruses and bacteria. We unravel that Dengue virus-2 (DV2) can trigger autophagic process in various infected cell lines demonstrated by GFP-LC3 dot formation and increased LC3-II formation. Autophagosome formation was also observed under the transmission electron microscope. DV2-induced autophagy further enhances the titers of extracellular and intracellular viruses indicating that autophagy can promote viral replication in the infected cells. Moreover, our data show that ATG5 protein is required to execute DV2-induced autophagy. All together, we are the first to demonstrate that DV can activate autophagic machinery that is favorable for viral replication.

  20. The Replication System of Bacteriophage T7.

    PubMed

    Kulczyk, A W; Richardson, C C

    2016-01-01

    The replication system of bacteriophage T7 is remarkable in that the 40,000 nucleotide genome is replicated over 100-fold in a matter of minutes. In order to accomplish this feat T7 has evolved an efficient and economical process for the replication of its DNA. The T7 replisome provides a model system to study DNA replication. Four proteins are sufficient for reconstitution of the functional replication complex, yet the assembled replisome recapitulates all the key features of more complex prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. In this review, we describe chemical mechanisms employed by individual proteins at the replication fork. Integration of structural, biochemical, and single-molecule data reveals a compelling view on how a nearly 1-MDa molecular machine acts as a unit to synthetize the two antiparallel DNA strands in a coordinated fashion.

  1. Cell-cycle-specific initiation of replication.

    PubMed

    Nordström, K; Austin, S J

    1993-11-01

    The following characteristics are relevant when replication of chromosomes and plasmids is discussed in relation to the cell cycle: the timing or replication, the selection of molecules for replication, and the coordination of multiple initiation events within a single cell cycle. Several fundamentally different methods have been used to study these processes: Meselson-Stahl density-shift experiments, experiments with the so-called 'baby machine', sorting of cells according to size, and flow cytometry. The evidence for precise timing and co-ordination of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is overwhelming. Similarly, the high-copy-number plasmid ColE1 and the low-copy-number plasmids R1/R100 without any doubt replicate randomly throughout the cell cycle. Data about the low-copy-number plasmids F and P1 are conflicting. This calls for new types of experiments and for a better understanding of how these plasmids control their replication and partitioning.

  2. Polyoma virus early-late switch: regulation of late RNA accumulation by DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Carmichael, G G

    1993-09-15

    Early in infection of permissive mouse cells, messages from the early region of the polyoma virus genome accumulate preferentially over those from the late region. After initiation of DNA replication, the balance between early and late gene expression is reversed in favor of the late products. In previous work from our laboratory, we showed that viral early proteins do not activate the polyoma late promoter in the absence of DNA replication. Here we show that activation of the late genes in replication-incompetent viral genomes can occur if actively replicating genomes are present in the same cell. A low level of DNA replication, however, is insufficient to induce the early-late switch. Furthermore, replication-competent genomes that fail to accumulate late RNA molecules are defective in the transactivation of replication-incompetent genomes. We suggest that titration of an unknown diffusible factor(s) after DNA replication relieves the block to late RNA accumulation seen in the early phase, with most of this titration being attributable to late-strand RNA molecules themselves.

  3. The Non-Canonical Role of Aurora-A in DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Arakaki, Rieko; Yamada, Akiko; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Kudo, Yasusei

    2015-01-01

    Aurora-A is a well-known mitotic kinase that regulates mitotic entry, spindle formation, and chromosome maturation as a canonical role. During mitosis, Aurora-A protein is stabilized by its phosphorylation at Ser51 via blocking anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-mediated proteolysis. Importantly, overexpression and/or hyperactivation of Aurora-A is involved in tumorigenesis via aneuploidy and genomic instability. Recently, the novel function of Aurora-A for DNA replication has been revealed. In mammalian cells, DNA replication is strictly regulated for preventing over-replication. Pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation is required for DNA replication as an initiation step occurring at the origin of replication. The timing of pre-RC formation depends on the protein level of geminin, which is controlled by the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. Aurora-A phosphorylates geminin to prevent its ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis at the mitotic phase to ensure proper pre-RC formation and ensuing DNA replication. In this review, we introduce the novel non-canonical role of Aurora-A in DNA replication. PMID:26380219

  4. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Räschle, Markus; Ibañez de Opakua, Alain; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Feng, Yunpeng; Blanco, Francisco J.; Mann, Matthias; Montoya, Guillermo; Groth, Anja; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication. PMID:26711499

  5. ATR-mediated phosphorylation of FANCI regulates dormant origin firing in response to replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Jones, Mathew J. K.; Yin, Yandong; Crist, Sarah B.; Colnaghi, Luca; Sims, Robert J.; Rothenberg, Eli; Jallepalli, Prasad V.; Huang, Tony T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Excess dormant origins bound by the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) replicative helicase complex play a critical role in preventing replication stress, chromosome instability and tumorigenesis. In response to DNA damage, replicating cells must coordinate DNA repair and dormant origin firing to ensure complete and timely replication of the genome; how cells regulate this process remains elusive. Herein, we identify a member of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, FANCI, as a key effector of dormant origin firing in response to replication stress. Cells lacking FANCI have reduced number of origins, increased inter-origin distances and slowed proliferation rates. Intriguingly, ATR-mediated FANCI phosphorylation inhibits dormant origin firing while promoting replication fork restart/DNA repair. Using super-resolution microscopy, we show that FANCI co-localizes with MCM-bound chromatin in response to replication stress. These data reveal a unique role for FANCI as a modulator of dormant origin firing and links timely genome replication to DNA repair. PMID:25843623

  6. Replication stress induced site-specific phosphorylation targets WRN to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Fengtao; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Abdisalaam, Salim; Mukherjee, Shibani; Yajima, Hirohiko; Yang, Yanyong; Mishra, Ritu; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Ghose, Subroto; Chen, David J; Yannone, Steven M; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2016-01-01

    Faithful and complete genome replication in human cells is essential for preventing the accumulation of cancer-promoting mutations. WRN, the protein defective in Werner syndrome, plays critical roles in preventing replication stress, chromosome instability, and tumorigenesis. Herein, we report that ATR-mediated WRN phosphorylation is needed for DNA replication and repair upon replication stress. A serine residue, S1141, in WRN is phosphorylated in vivo by the ATR kinase in response to replication stress. ATR-mediated WRN S1141 phosphorylation leads to ubiquitination of WRN, facilitating the reversible interaction of WRN with perturbed replication forks and subsequent degradation of WRN. The dynamic interaction between WRN and DNA is required for the suppression of new origin firing and Rad51-dependent double-stranded DNA break repair. Significantly, ATR-mediated WRN phosphorylation is critical for the suppression of chromosome breakage during replication stress. These findings reveal a unique role for WRN as a modulator of DNA repair, replication, and recombination, and link ATR-WRN signaling to the maintenance of genome stability. PMID:26695548

  7. Replication stress induced site-specific phosphorylation targets WRN to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fengtao; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Abdisalaam, Salim; Mukherjee, Shibani; Yajima, Hirohiko; Yang, Yanyong; Mishra, Ritu; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Ghose, Subroto; Chen, David J.; Yannone, Steven M.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2016-01-01

    Faithful and complete genome replication in human cells is essential for preventing the accumulation of cancer-promoting mutations. WRN, the protein defective in Werner syndrome, plays critical roles in preventing replication stress, chromosome instability, and tumorigenesis. Herein, we report that ATR-mediated WRN phosphorylation is needed for DNA replication and repair upon replication stress. A serine residue, S1141, in WRN is phosphorylated in vivo by the ATR kinase in response to replication stress. ATR-mediated WRN S1141 phosphorylation leads to ubiquitination of WRN, facilitating the reversible interaction of WRN with perturbed replication forks and subsequent degradation of WRN. The dynamic interaction between WRN and DNA is required for the suppression of new origin firing and Rad51-dependent double-stranded DNA break repair. Significantly, ATR-mediated WRN phosphorylation is critical for the suppression of chromosome breakage during replication stress. These findings reveal a unique role for WRN as a modulator of DNA repair, replication, and recombination, and link ATR-WRN signaling to the maintenance of genome stability. PMID:26695548

  8. Did DNA replication evolve twice independently?

    PubMed

    Leipe, D D; Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    1999-09-01

    DNA replication is central to all extant cellular organisms. There are substantial functional similarities between the bacterial and the archaeal/eukaryotic replication machineries, including but not limited to defined origins, replication bidirectionality, RNA primers and leading and lagging strand synthesis. However, several core components of the bacterial replication machinery are unrelated or only distantly related to the functionally equivalent components of the archaeal/eukaryotic replication apparatus. This is in sharp contrast to the principal proteins involved in transcription and translation, which are highly conserved in all divisions of life. We performed detailed sequence comparisons of the proteins that fulfill indispensable functions in DNA replication and classified them into four main categories with respect to the conservation in bacteria and archaea/eukaryotes: (i) non-homologous, such as replicative polymerases and primases; (ii) containing homologous domains but apparently non-orthologous and conceivably independently recruited to function in replication, such as the principal replicative helicases or proofreading exonucleases; (iii) apparently orthologous but poorly conserved, such as the sliding clamp proteins or DNA ligases; (iv) orthologous and highly conserved, such as clamp-loader ATPases or 5'-->3' exonucleases (FLAP nucleases). The universal conservation of some components of the DNA replication machinery and enzymes for DNA precursor biosynthesis but not the principal DNA polymerases suggests that the last common ancestor (LCA) of all modern cellular life forms possessed DNA but did not replicate it the way extant cells do. We propose that the LCA had a genetic system that contained both RNA and DNA, with the latter being produced by reverse transcription. Consequently, the modern-type system for double-stranded DNA replication likely evolved independently in the bacterial and archaeal/eukaryotic lineages.

  9. The Transcription Map of Human Papillomavirus Type 18 during Genome Replication in U2OS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toots, Mart; Männik, Andres; Kivi, Gaily; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2014-01-01

    The human osteosarcoma cell line U2OS is useful for studying genome replication of human papillomavirus (HPVs) subtypes that belong to different phylogenetic genera. In this study, we defined the HPV18 transcription map in U2OS cells during transient replication, stable maintenance and vegetative amplification by identifying viral promoter regions, transcription polyadenylation and splicing sites during HPV18 genome replication. Mapping of the HPV18 transcription start sites in U2OS cells revealed five distinct promoter regions (P102, P520, P811, P1193 and P3000). With the exception of P3000, all of these regions have been previously identified during productive HPV18 infection. Collectively, the data suggest that U2OS cells are suitable for studying the replication and transcription properties of HPVs and to serve as a platform for conducting high-throughput drug screens to identify HPV replication inhibitors. In addition, we have identified mRNA species that are initiated from the promoter region P3000, which can encode two E2C regulator proteins that contain only the C-terminal hinge and DNA-binding and dimerization domains of E2. We show that these proteins regulate the initial amplification of HPV18 by modulating viral transcription. Moreover, we show that one of these proteins can act as a transcriptional activator of promoter P102. PMID:25548925

  10. The Dual Nature of Nek9 in Adenovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Richard; Radko, Sandi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To successfully replicate in an infected host cell, a virus must overcome sophisticated host defense mechanisms. Viruses, therefore, have evolved a multitude of devices designed to circumvent cellular defenses that would lead to abortive infection. Previous studies have identified Nek9, a cellular kinase, as a binding partner of adenovirus E1A, but the biology behind this association remains a mystery. Here we show that Nek9 is a transcriptional repressor that functions together with E1A to silence the expression of p53-inducible GADD45A gene in the infected cell. Depletion of Nek9 in infected cells reduces virus growth but unexpectedly enhances viral gene expression from the E2 transcription unit, whereas the opposite occurs when Nek9 is overexpressed. Nek9 localizes with viral replication centers, and its depletion reduces viral genome replication, while overexpression enhances viral genome numbers in infected cells. Additionally, Nek9 was found to colocalize with the viral E4 orf3 protein, a repressor of cellular stress response. Significantly, Nek9 was also shown to associate with viral and cellular promoters and appears to function as a transcriptional repressor, representing the first instance of Nek9 playing a role in gene regulation. Overall, these results highlight the complexity of virus-host interactions and identify a new role for the cellular protein Nek9 during infection, suggesting a role for Nek9 in regulating p53 target gene expression. IMPORTANCE In the arms race that exists between a pathogen and its host, each has continually evolved mechanisms to either promote or prevent infection. In order to successfully replicate and spread, a virus must overcome every mechanism that a cell can assemble to block infection. On the other hand, to counter viral spread, cells must have multiple mechanisms to stifle viral replication. In the present study, we add to our understanding of how the human adenovirus is able to circumvent cellular roadblocks

  11. Comparison of three replication strategies in complex multicellular organisms: Asexual replication, sexual replication with identical gametes, and sexual replication with distinct sperm and egg gametes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the mutation-selection balance in three simplified replication models. The first model considers a population of organisms replicating via the production of asexual spores. The second model considers a sexually replicating population that produces identical gametes. The third model considers a sexually replicating population that produces distinct sperm and egg gametes. All models assume diploid organisms whose genomes consist of two chromosomes, each of which is taken to be functional if equal to some master sequence, and defective otherwise. In the asexual population, the asexual diploid spores develop directly into adult organisms. In the sexual populations, the haploid gametes enter a haploid pool, where they may fuse with other haploids. The resulting immature diploid organisms then proceed to develop into mature organisms. Based on an analysis of all three models, we find that, as organism size increases, a sexually replicating population can only outcompete an asexually replicating population if the adult organisms produce distinct sperm and egg gametes. A sexual replication strategy that is based on the production of large numbers of sperm cells to fertilize a small number of eggs is found to be necessary in order to maintain a sufficiently low cost for sex for the strategy to be selected for over a purely asexual strategy. We discuss the usefulness of this model in understanding the evolution and maintenance of sexual replication as the preferred replication strategy in complex, multicellular organisms.

  12. Regulation of chromosomal replication in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Collier, Justine

    2012-03-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus is characterized by its asymmetric cell division, which gives rise to a replicating stalked cell and a non-replicating swarmer cell. Thus, the initiation of chromosomal replication is tightly regulated, temporally and spatially, to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Waves of DnaA and CtrA activities control when and where the initiation of DNA replication will take place in C. crescentus cells. The conserved DnaA protein initiates chromosomal replication by directly binding to sites within the chromosomal origin (Cori), ensuring that DNA replication starts once and only once per cell cycle. The CtrA response regulator represses the initiation of DNA replication in swarmer cells and in the swarmer compartment of pre-divisional cells, probably by competing with DnaA for binding to Cori. CtrA and DnaA are controlled by multiple redundant regulatory pathways that include DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation, temporally regulated proteolysis and the targeting of regulators to specific locations within the cell. Besides being critical regulators of chromosomal replication, CtrA and DnaA are also master transcriptional regulators that control the expression of many genes, thus connecting DNA replication with other events of the C. crescentus cell cycle.

  13. Precise replication of antireflective nanostructures from biotemplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Zhongfan; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Guoming; Xie, Guoyong

    2007-03-01

    The authors report herein a new type of nanonipple structures on the cicada's eye and the direct structural replication of the complex micro- and nanostructures for potential functional emulation. A two-step direct molding process is developed to replicate these natural micro- and nanostructures using epoxy resin with high fidelity, which demonstrates a general way of fabricating functional nanostructures by direct replication of natural biotemplates via a suitable physicochemical process. Measurements of spectral reflectance showed that this kind of replicated nanostructure has remarkable antireflective property, suggestive of its potential applications to optical devices.

  14. APOBEC4 Enhances the Replication of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Henning; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Mühlebach, Michael D.; Schumann, Gerald G.; König, Renate; Cichutek, Klaus; Häussinger, Dieter; Münk, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC4 (A4) is a member of the AID/APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases. In this study we found a high mRNA expression of A4 in human testis. In contrast, there were only low levels of A4 mRNA detectable in 293T, HeLa, Jurkat or A3.01 cells. Ectopic expression of A4 in HeLa cells resulted in mostly cytoplasmic localization of the protein. To test whether A4 has antiviral activity similar to that of proteins of the APOBEC3 (A3) subfamily, A4 was co-expressed in 293T cells with wild type HIV-1 and HIV-1 luciferase reporter viruses. We found that A4 did not inhibit the replication of HIV-1 but instead enhanced the production of HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner and seemed to act on the viral LTR. A4 did not show detectable cytidine deamination activity in vitro and weakly interacted with single-stranded DNA. The presence of A4 in virus producer cells enhanced HIV-1 replication by transiently transfected A4 or stably expressed A4 in HIV-susceptible cells. APOBEC4 was capable of similarly enhancing transcription from a broad spectrum of promoters, regardless of whether they were viral or mammalian. We hypothesize that A4 may have a natural role in modulating host promoters or endogenous LTR promoters. PMID:27249646

  15. Mechanism of Gene Amplification via Yeast Autonomously Replicating Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation was aimed at understanding the molecular mechanism of gene amplification. Interplay of fragile sites in promoting gene amplification was also elucidated. The amplification promoting sequences were chosen from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARS, 5S rRNA regions of Plantago ovata and P. lagopus, proposed sites of replication pausing at Ste20 gene locus of S. cerevisiae, and the bend DNA sequences within fragile site FRA11A in humans. The gene amplification assays showed that plasmid bearing APS from yeast and human beings led to enhanced protein concentration as compared to the wild type. Both the in silico and in vitro analyses were pointed out at the strong bending potential of these APS. In addition, high mitotic stability and presence of TTTT repeats and SAR amongst these sequences encourage gene amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of S. cerevisiae ARS was also conducted. The combinatorial power of different aspects of APS analyzed in the present investigation was harnessed to reach a consensus about the factors which stimulate gene expression, in presence of these sequences. It was concluded that the mechanism of gene amplification was that AT rich tracts present in fragile sites of yeast serve as binding sites for MAR/SAR and DNA unwinding elements. The DNA protein interactions necessary for ORC activation are facilitated by DNA bending. These specific bindings at ORC promote repeated rounds of DNA replication leading to gene amplification. PMID:25685838

  16. Maintaining replication fork integrity in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Christian J; Upton, Amy L; Lloyd, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    In dividing cells, the stalling of replication fork complexes by impediments to DNA unwinding or by template imperfections that block synthesis by the polymerase subunits is a serious threat to genomic integrity and cell viability. What happens to stalled forks depends on the nature of the offending obstacle. In UV-irradiated Escherichia coli cells DNA synthesis is delayed for a considerable period, during which forks undergo extensive processing before replication can resume. Thus, restart depends on factors needed to load the replicative helicase, indicating that the replisome may have dissociated. It also requires the RecFOR proteins, which are known to load RecA recombinase on single-stranded DNA, implying that template strands are exposed. To gain a further understanding of how UV irradiation affects replication and how replication resumes after a block, we used fluorescence microscopy and BrdU or radioisotope labelling to examine chromosome replication and cell cycle progression. Our studies confirm that RecFOR promote efficient reactivation of stalled forks and demonstrate that they are also needed for productive replication initiated at the origin, or triggered elsewhere by damage to the DNA. Although delayed, all modes of replication do recover in the absence of these proteins, but nascent DNA strands are degraded more extensively by RecJ exonuclease. However, these strands are also degraded in the presence of RecFOR when restart is blocked by other means, indicating that RecA loading is not sufficient to stabilise and protect the fork. This is consistent with the idea that RecA actively promotes restart. Thus, in contrast to eukaryotic cells, there may be no factor in bacterial cells acting specifically to stabilise stalled forks. Instead, nascent strands may be protected by the simple expedient of promoting restart. We also report that the efficiency of fork reactivation is not affected in polB mutants. PMID:18644471

  17. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  18. Replication and Control of Circular Bacterial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    del Solar, Gloria; Giraldo, Rafael; Ruiz-Echevarría, María Jesús; Espinosa, Manuel; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón

    1998-01-01

    An essential feature of bacterial plasmids is their ability to replicate as autonomous genetic elements in a controlled way within the host. Therefore, they can be used to explore the mechanisms involved in DNA replication and to analyze the different strategies that couple DNA replication to other critical events in the cell cycle. In this review, we focus on replication and its control in circular plasmids. Plasmid replication can be conveniently divided into three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The inability of DNA polymerases to initiate de novo replication makes necessary the independent generation of a primer. This is solved, in circular plasmids, by two main strategies: (i) opening of the strands followed by RNA priming (theta and strand displacement replication) or (ii) cleavage of one of the DNA strands to generate a 3′-OH end (rolling-circle replication). Initiation is catalyzed most frequently by one or a few plasmid-encoded initiation proteins that recognize plasmid-specific DNA sequences and determine the point from which replication starts (the origin of replication). In some cases, these proteins also participate directly in the generation of the primer. These initiators can also play the role of pilot proteins that guide the assembly of the host replisome at the plasmid origin. Elongation of plasmid replication is carried out basically by DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (and, in some cases, by DNA polymerase I at an early stage), with the participation of other host proteins that form the replisome. Termination of replication has specific requirements and implications for reinitiation, studies of which have started. The initiation stage plays an additional role: it is the stage at which mechanisms controlling replication operate. The objective of this control is to maintain a fixed concentration of plasmid molecules in a growing bacterial population (duplication of the plasmid pool paced with duplication of the bacterial population

  19. Double-strand-break repair recombination in Escherichia coli: physical evidence for a DNA replication mechanism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Mohammad R.; Szigety, Susan K.; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    DNA double-strand-break repair (DSBR) is, in many organisms, accomplished by homologous recombination. In Escherichia coli DSBR was thought to result from breakage and reunion of parental DNA molecules, assisted by known endonucleases, the Holliday junction resolvases. Under special circumstances, for example, SOS induction, recombination forks were proposed to initiate replication. We provide physical evidence that this is a major alternative mechanism in which replication copies information from one chromosome to another generating recombinant chromosomes in normal cells in vivo. This alternative mechanism can occur independently of known Holliday junction cleaving proteins, requires DNA polymerase III, and produces recombined DNA molecules that carry newly replicated DNA. The replicational mechanism underlies about half the recombination of linear DNA in E. coli; the other half occurs by breakage and reunion, which we show requires resolvases, and is replication-independent. The data also indicate that accumulation of recombination intermediates promotes replication dramatically. PMID:10557215

  20. Cis-acting elements in the lytic origin of DNA replication of Marek's disease virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, A; Iwata, A; Ueda, S

    1998-12-01

    The replication origin of Marek's disease virus (MDV) type 1 was analysed by using a transient replication assay with plasmids containing various fragments of MDV strain Md5 genomic DNA. Plasmid pMBH, containing the BamHI-H fragment, showed replication activity in MDV-infected chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF). By deletion analysis of pMBH, two regions, the promoter-enhancer region of the MDV pp38 gene and the 132 bp tandem direct repeat, were shown to be required for replication activity. Replication of pMBH was not observed in uninfected CEF, suggesting that a trans-acting factor(s) encoded by the MDV genome was necessary for replication.

  1. Replicative senescence: the human fibroblast comes of age.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S

    1990-09-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts undergo replicative senescence predominantly because of arrest at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle. Senescent arrest resembles a process of terminal differentiation that appears to involve repression of proliferation-promoting genes with reciprocal new expression of antiproliferative genes, although post-transcriptional factors may also be involved. Identification of participating genes and clarification of their mechanisms of action will help to elucidate the universal cellular decline of biological aging and an important obverse manifestation, the rare escape of cells from senescence leading to immortalization and oncogenesis.

  2. Replicating Milgram Would People Still Obey Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Jerry M.

    2009-01-01

    The author conducted a partial replication of Stanley Milgram's (1963, 1965, 1974) obedience studies that allowed for useful comparisons with the original investigations while protecting the well-being of participants. Seventy adults participated in a replication of Milgram's Experiment 5 up to the point at which they first heard the learner's…

  3. Replication and Robustness in Developmental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J.; Engel, Mimi; Claessens, Amy; Dowsett, Chantelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Replications and robustness checks are key elements of the scientific method and a staple in many disciplines. However, leading journals in developmental psychology rarely include explicit replications of prior research conducted by different investigators, and few require authors to establish in their articles or online appendices that their key…

  4. A Replication by Any Other Name: A Systematic Review of Replicative Intervention Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Collins, Lauren W.; Cook, Sara C.; Cook, Lysandra

    2016-01-01

    Replication research is essential to scientific knowledge. Reviews of replication studies often electronically search for "replicat*" as a textword, which does not identify studies that replicate previous research but do not self-identify as such. We examined whether the 83 intervention studies published in six non-categorical research…

  5. Recommendations for Replication Research in Special Education: A Framework of Systematic, Conceptual Replications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Michael D.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Special education researchers conduct studies that can be considered replications. However, they do not often refer to them as replication studies. The purpose of this article is to consider the potential benefits of conceptualizing special education intervention research within a framework of systematic, conceptual replication. Specifically, we…

  6. Accessory replicative helicases and the replication of protein-bound DNA.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Jan-Gert; Howard, Jamieson L; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-12-12

    Complete, accurate duplication of the genetic material is a prerequisite for successful cell division. Achieving this accuracy is challenging since there are many barriers to replication forks that may cause failure to complete genome duplication or result in possibly catastrophic corruption of the genetic code. One of the most important types of replicative barriers are proteins bound to the template DNA, especially transcription complexes. Removal of these barriers demands energy input not only to separate the DNA strands but also to disrupt multiple bonds between the protein and DNA. Replicative helicases that unwind the template DNA for polymerases at the fork can displace proteins bound to the template. However, even occasional failures in protein displacement by the replicative helicase could spell disaster. In such circumstances, failure to restart replication could result in incomplete genome duplication. Avoiding incomplete genome duplication via the repair and restart of blocked replication forks also challenges viability since the involvement of recombination enzymes is associated with the risk of genome rearrangements. Organisms have therefore evolved accessory replicative helicases that aid replication fork movement along protein-bound DNA. These helicases reduce the dangers associated with replication blockage by protein-DNA complexes, aiding clearance of blocks and resumption of replication by the same replisome thus circumventing the need for replication repair and restart. This review summarises recent work in bacteria and eukaryotes that has begun to delineate features of accessory replicative helicases and their importance in genome stability.

  7. Strategies for Replication Research Exemplified by Replications of the Istomina Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Hayne W.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses motivations for research replications and makes recommendations for appropriate research strategies. Illustrates research strategies in a review of studies replicating a 1948 study by Soviet psychologist Z.M. Istomina on preschoolers' memory. Concludes that none of the studies closely replicated Istomina's methods, but some replicated…

  8. The Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is present as an intact latent genome in KS tissue but replicates in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of KS patients

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Short DNA sequences have been identified, originally in association with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) biopsies, that are highly homologous to oncogenic, lymphotropic herpesviruses. Recently a virus, Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8), bearing these sequences has been identified in a cell line derived from a body cavity-based lymphoma. In this report, we show that the same sequences are present in KS biopsies as DNA molecules of a form and size characteristic of latent herpesviruses-large, covalently closed, circular episomes. The genomes migrate with an apparent size larger than the herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (172 kb). This form of the viral genome was found in four of four biopsies and three of five peripheral blood samples from KS patients. Linear forms of the viral genome, characteristic of viral replication, were not detected in the biopsies, but were present in the peripheral blood of three out of five patients. The sequences for KSHV/HHV-8 were also detected in the blood of four of five allograft patients and three of five healthy donors without KS suggesting that the virus is widespread throughout the human population. PMID:8691144

  9. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  10. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran-yi; Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Yan-ling; Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min; Li, Li-xia; Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  11. Transcriptional control of DNA replication licensing by Myc.

    PubMed

    Valovka, Taras; Schönfeld, Manuela; Raffeiner, Philipp; Breuker, Kathrin; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Hartl, Markus; Bister, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The c-myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor, a global regulator of fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of c-myc leads to tumorigenesis, and c-myc is an important driver in human cancer. Myc and its dimerization partner Max are bHLH-Zip DNA binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation of target genes. Non-transcriptional functions have also been attributed to the Myc protein, notably direct interaction with the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) controlling the initiation of DNA replication. A key component of the pre-RC is the Cdt1 protein, an essential factor in origin licensing. Here we present data suggesting that the CDT1 gene is a transcriptional target of the Myc-Max complex. Expression of the CDT1 gene in v-myc-transformed cells directly correlates with myc expression. Also, human tumor cells with elevated c-myc expression display increased CDT1 expression. Occupation of the CDT1 promoter by Myc-Max is demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transactivation by Myc-Max is shown in reporter assays. Ectopic expression of CDT1 leads to cell transformation. Our results provide a possible direct mechanistic link of Myc's canonical function as a transcription factor to DNA replication. Furthermore, we suggest that aberrant transcriptional activation of CDT1 by deregulated myc alleles contributes to the genomic instabilities observed in tumor cells.

  12. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  13. ATM and KAT5 safeguard replicating chromatin against formaldehyde damage.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Wong, Victor C; DeLoughery, Zachary; Luczak, Michal W; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Many carcinogens damage both DNA and protein constituents of chromatin, and it is unclear how cells respond to this compound injury. We examined activation of the main DNA damage-responsive kinase ATM and formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) by formaldehyde (FA) that forms histone adducts and replication-blocking DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC). We found that low FA doses caused a strong and rapid activation of ATM signaling in human cells, which was ATR-independent and restricted to S-phase. High FA doses inactivated ATM via its covalent dimerization and formation of larger crosslinks. FA-induced ATM signaling showed higher CHK2 phosphorylation but much lower phospho-KAP1 relative to DSB inducers. Replication blockage by DPC did not produce damaged forks or detectable amounts of DSB during the main wave of ATM activation, which did not require MRE11. Chromatin-monitoring KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase was responsible for acetylation and activation of ATM by FA. KAT5 and ATM were equally important for triggering of intra-S-phase checkpoint and ATM signaling promoted recovery of normal human cells after low-dose FA. Our results revealed a major role of the KAT5-ATM axis in protection of replicating chromatin against damage by the endogenous carcinogen FA.

  14. ATM and KAT5 safeguard replicating chromatin against formaldehyde damage

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Wong, Victor C.; DeLoughery, Zachary; Luczak, Michal W.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Many carcinogens damage both DNA and protein constituents of chromatin, and it is unclear how cells respond to this compound injury. We examined activation of the main DNA damage-responsive kinase ATM and formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) by formaldehyde (FA) that forms histone adducts and replication-blocking DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC). We found that low FA doses caused a strong and rapid activation of ATM signaling in human cells, which was ATR-independent and restricted to S-phase. High FA doses inactivated ATM via its covalent dimerization and formation of larger crosslinks. FA-induced ATM signaling showed higher CHK2 phosphorylation but much lower phospho-KAP1 relative to DSB inducers. Replication blockage by DPC did not produce damaged forks or detectable amounts of DSB during the main wave of ATM activation, which did not require MRE11. Chromatin-monitoring KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase was responsible for acetylation and activation of ATM by FA. KAT5 and ATM were equally important for triggering of intra-S-phase checkpoint and ATM signaling promoted recovery of normal human cells after low-dose FA. Our results revealed a major role of the KAT5-ATM axis in protection of replicating chromatin against damage by the endogenous carcinogen FA. PMID:26420831

  15. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Thomas R; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R G; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M; Wilkinson, Robert J; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G

    2016-03-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes.

  16. Transcriptional control of DNA replication licensing by Myc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovka, Taras; Schönfeld, Manuela; Raffeiner, Philipp; Breuker, Kathrin; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Hartl, Markus; Bister, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    The c-myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor, a global regulator of fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of c-myc leads to tumorigenesis, and c-myc is an important driver in human cancer. Myc and its dimerization partner Max are bHLH-Zip DNA binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation of target genes. Non-transcriptional functions have also been attributed to the Myc protein, notably direct interaction with the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) controlling the initiation of DNA replication. A key component of the pre-RC is the Cdt1 protein, an essential factor in origin licensing. Here we present data suggesting that the CDT1 gene is a transcriptional target of the Myc-Max complex. Expression of the CDT1 gene in v-myc-transformed cells directly correlates with myc expression. Also, human tumor cells with elevated c-myc expression display increased CDT1 expression. Occupation of the CDT1 promoter by Myc-Max is demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transactivation by Myc-Max is shown in reporter assays. Ectopic expression of CDT1 leads to cell transformation. Our results provide a possible direct mechanistic link of Myc's canonical function as a transcription factor to DNA replication. Furthermore, we suggest that aberrant transcriptional activation of CDT1 by deregulated myc alleles contributes to the genomic instabilities observed in tumor cells.

  17. A novel role of SIRT1 in gammaherpesvirus latency and replication.

    PubMed

    He, Meilan; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Viruses often hijack cellular functions to facilitate their infection and replication. SIRT1, one of the most widely studied sirtuins, functions as both metabolic sensor and transcriptional regulator. SIRT1 has broad cellular functions including metabolic homeostasis, stress response, tumorigenesis and autophagy. The role of SIRT1 in the life cycle of viruses remains unclear. Like all herpesviruses, oncogenic gammaherpesvirus KSHV has both latent and lytic phases. In a recent study, we have shown that SIRT1 binds to the promoter and silence the expression of KSHV replication and transcription activator (RTA), a key activator of viral lytic replication. Chemical inhibition or knock down of SIRT1 is sufficient to initiate the lytic replication program by increasing active histone H3 trimethyl Lys4 (H3K4me3) mark and decreasing repressive histone H3 trimethyl Lys27 (H3K27me3) mark in the RTA promoter. SIRT1 also interacts with RTA and inhibits RTA transactivation of its own promoter and those of downstream target genes. Our findings reveal that SIRT1 regulates KSHV latency by inhibiting different stages of viral lytic replication, and link a metabolic sensor and transcriptional regulator SIRT1 to KSHV life cycle. PMID:25485577

  18. Inferring Where and When Replication Initiates from Genome-Wide Replication Timing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A.; Audit, B.; Yang, S. C.-H.; Bechhoefer, J.; Arneodo, A.

    2012-06-01

    Based on an analogy between DNA replication and one dimensional nucleation-and-growth processes, various attempts to infer the local initiation rate I(x,t) of DNA replication origins from replication timing data have been developed in the framework of phase transition kinetics theories. These works have all used curve-fit strategies to estimate I(x,t) from genome-wide replication timing data. Here, we show how to invert analytically the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model and extract I(x,t) directly. Tests on both simulated and experimental budding-yeast data confirm the location and firing-time distribution of replication origins.

  19. DNA2 drives processing and restart of reversed replication forks in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Berti, Matteo; Levikova, Maryna; Pinto, Cosimo; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Vujanovic, Marko; Zellweger, Ralph; Moore, Hayley; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Cejka, Petr; Stewart, Sheila; Lopes, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Accurate processing of stalled or damaged DNA replication forks is paramount to genomic integrity and recent work points to replication fork reversal and restart as a central mechanism to ensuring high-fidelity DNA replication. Here, we identify a novel DNA2- and WRN-dependent mechanism of reversed replication fork processing and restart after prolonged genotoxic stress. The human DNA2 nuclease and WRN ATPase activities functionally interact to degrade reversed replication forks with a 5′-to-3′ polarity and promote replication restart, thus preventing aberrant processing of unresolved replication intermediates. Unexpectedly, EXO1, MRE11, and CtIP are not involved in the same mechanism of reversed fork processing, whereas human RECQ1 limits DNA2 activity by preventing extensive nascent strand degradation. RAD51 depletion antagonizes this mechanism, presumably by preventing reversed fork formation. These studies define a new mechanism for maintaining genome integrity tightly controlled by specific nucleolytic activities and central homologous recombination factors. PMID:25733713

  20. Stabilization and targeting of INO80 to replication forks by BAP1 during normal DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Sae; Lee, Shin-Ai; Hur, Shin-Kyoung; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Kwon, Jongbum

    2014-10-06

    The INO80 chromatin-remodelling complex has been implicated in DNA replication during stress in yeast. However, its role in normal DNA replication and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that INO80 binds to replication forks and promotes fork progression in human cells under unperturbed, normal conditions. We find that Ino80, which encodes the catalytic ATPase of INO80, is essential for mouse embryonic DNA replication and development. Ino80 is recruited to replication forks through interaction with ubiquitinated H2A--aided by BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1), a tumour suppressor and nuclear de-ubiquitinating enzyme that also functions to stabilize Ino80. Importantly, Ino80 is downregulated in BAP1-defective cancer cells due to the lack of an Ino80 stabilization mechanism via BAP1. Our results establish a role for INO80 in normal DNA replication and uncover a mechanism by which this remodeler is targeted to replication forks, suggesting a molecular basis for the tumour-suppressing function of BAP1.

  1. Xenopus Mcm10 is a CDK-substrate required for replication fork stability

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Gaganmeet Singh; Gambus, Agnieszka; Gillespie, Peter J.; Blow, J. Julian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During S phase, following activation of the S phase CDKs and the DBF4-dependent kinases (DDK), double hexamers of Mcm2-7 at licensed replication origins are activated to form the core replicative helicase. Mcm10 is one of several proteins that have been implicated from work in yeasts to play a role in forming a mature replisome during the initiation process. Mcm10 has also been proposed to play a role in promoting replisome stability after initiation has taken place. The role of Mcm10 is particularly unclear in metazoans, where conflicting data has been presented. Here, we investigate the role and regulation of Mcm10 in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that Xenopus Mcm10 is recruited to chromatin late in the process of replication initiation and this requires prior action of DDKs and CDKs. We also provide evidence that Mcm10 is a CDK substrate but does not need to be phosphorylated in order to associate with chromatin. We show that in extracts depleted of more than 99% of Mcm10, the bulk of DNA replication still occurs, suggesting that Mcm10 is not required for the process of replication initiation. However, in extracts depleted of Mcm10, the replication fork elongation rate is reduced. Furthermore, the absence of Mcm10 or its phosphorylation by CDK results in instability of replisome proteins on DNA, which is particularly important under conditions of replication stress. PMID:27327991

  2. Telomere-bound TRF1 and TRF2 stall the replication fork at telomeric repeats

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Rieko; Ishikawa, Fuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Vertebrate telomeres consist of tandem repeats of T2AG3 and associated proteins including the telomeric DNA-binding proteins, TRF1 and TRF2. It has been proposed that telomeres assume two interswitchable states, the open state that is accessible to various trans-acting factors and the closed state that excludes those factors. TRF1 and TRF2 are believed to promote the formation of the closed state. However, little is known about how those two states influence DNA replication. We analyzed the effects of TRF1 and TRF2 on telomeric replication both in vitro and in vivo. By exploiting the in vitro replication system of linear SV40 DNA, we found that telomeric repeats are a poor replication template. Moreover, the addition of recombinant TRF1 and TRF2 significantly stalled the replication fork progression at telomeric repeats. When TRF1 was overexpressed in HeLa cells, cells with 4N DNA content were accumulated. Furthermore, cytological analyses revealed that the replication focus overlapped with telomere signals at a significantly higher frequency in TRF1-overexpressing cells than in control cells. The results suggest that TRF1 and TRF2 exert inhibitory effects on replication fork progression. PMID:15007108

  3. Enzymes of the central carbon metabolism: are they linkers between transcription, DNA replication, and carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Konieczna, Aleksandra; Szczepańska, Aneta; Sawiuk, Karolina; Łyżeń, Robert; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Dependence of carcinogenesis on disruption of DNA replication regulation is a well-known fact. There are also many reports demonstrating the interplay between transcription and DNA replication processes, particularly underlying the importance of promoter activities in the control of replication initiation. Recent findings have shown direct links between central carbon metabolism and DNA replication regulation. Here, we summarize previously published reports which indicated that enzymes of the central carbon metabolism, particularly those involved in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, may contribute to regulation of transcription and DNA transactions (replication and repair). In this light, we propose a hypothesis that some of these enzymes might be linkers between transcription, DNA replication, and carcinogenesis. If true, it may have a consequence in our understanding of causes and mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Particularly, certain metabolic perturbations might directly (through central carbon metabolism enzymes) influence regulation of DNA transactions (replication control and fidelity), and thus facilitate carcinogenesis. To test this hypothesis, further studies will be necessary, which is discussed in the final part of this article.

  4. Replication forks reverse at high frequency upon replication stress in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Maric, Chrystelle; Bénard, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    The addition of hydroxyurea after the onset of S phase allows replication to start and permits the successive detecting of replication-dependent joint DNA molecules and chicken foot structures in the synchronous nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. We find evidence for a very high frequency of reversed replication forks upon replication stress. The formation of these reversed forks is dependent on the presence of joint DNA molecules, the impediment of the replication fork progression by hydroxyurea, and likely on the propensity of some replication origins to reinitiate replication to counteract the action of this compound. As hydroxyurea treatment enables us to successively detect the appearance of joint DNA molecules and then of reversed replication forks, we propose that chicken foot structures are formed both from the regression of hydroxyurea-frozen joint DNA molecules and from hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks. These experiments underscore the transient nature of replication fork regression, which becomes detectable due to the hydroxyurea-induced slowing down of replication fork progression.

  5. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit "replication stress" -a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress. PMID:27548226

  6. GC skew and mitochondrial origins of replication.

    PubMed

    Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Bernt, Matthias; Stadler, Peter F; Tout, Kifah

    2014-07-01

    The comprehensive understanding of mitochondrial genome evolution requires a detailed mechanistic picture of mitogenomic replication. Despite many previous efforts it has remained a non-trivial problem to determine the origins of replication and trace their fate across rearrangements of the gene order even in the small genomes of animal mitochondria. We elaborate here on the observation that the GC skew is correlated with the distance from the replication origins. This effect has been explained as a consequence of the standard model of mitochondrial DNA replication, i.e. the strand displacement model. According to this model chemical damage accumulates proportional to the duration that DNA is exposed in single-stranded form during replication (Dssh) which depends on the relative position with respect to the replication origins. Based on this model we developed a computational method to infer the positions of both the heavy strand and the light strand origin from nucleotide skew data. In a comprehensive survey of deuterostome mitochondria we infer conserved replication origins for the vast majority of vertebrates and cephalochordates. Deviations from the consensus picture are presumably associated with genome rearrangements.

  7. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-01-01

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress. PMID:27548226

  8. Replication landscape of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Petryk, Nataliya; Kahli, Malik; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Jaszczyszyn, Yan; Shen, Yimin; Silvain, Maud; Thermes, Claude; Chen, Chun-Long; Hyrien, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense investigation, human replication origins and termini remain elusive. Existing data have shown strong discrepancies. Here we sequenced highly purified Okazaki fragments from two cell types and, for the first time, quantitated replication fork directionality and delineated initiation and termination zones genome-wide. Replication initiates stochastically, primarily within non-transcribed, broad (up to 150 kb) zones that often abut transcribed genes, and terminates dispersively between them. Replication fork progression is significantly co-oriented with the transcription. Initiation and termination zones are frequently contiguous, sometimes separated by regions of unidirectional replication. Initiation zones are enriched in open chromatin and enhancer marks, even when not flanked by genes, and often border ‘topologically associating domains' (TADs). Initiation zones are enriched in origin recognition complex (ORC)-binding sites and better align to origins previously mapped using bubble-trap than λ-exonuclease. This novel panorama of replication reveals how chromatin and transcription modulate the initiation process to create cell-type-specific replication programs. PMID:26751768

  9. Replication landscape of the human genome.

    PubMed

    Petryk, Nataliya; Kahli, Malik; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Jaszczyszyn, Yan; Shen, Yimin; Silvain, Maud; Thermes, Claude; Chen, Chun-Long; Hyrien, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense investigation, human replication origins and termini remain elusive. Existing data have shown strong discrepancies. Here we sequenced highly purified Okazaki fragments from two cell types and, for the first time, quantitated replication fork directionality and delineated initiation and termination zones genome-wide. Replication initiates stochastically, primarily within non-transcribed, broad (up to 150 kb) zones that often abut transcribed genes, and terminates dispersively between them. Replication fork progression is significantly co-oriented with the transcription. Initiation and termination zones are frequently contiguous, sometimes separated by regions of unidirectional replication. Initiation zones are enriched in open chromatin and enhancer marks, even when not flanked by genes, and often border 'topologically associating domains' (TADs). Initiation zones are enriched in origin recognition complex (ORC)-binding sites and better align to origins previously mapped using bubble-trap than λ-exonuclease. This novel panorama of replication reveals how chromatin and transcription modulate the initiation process to create cell-type-specific replication programs. PMID:26751768

  10. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dai, Qun; Park, Dongkyoo; Deng, Xingming

    2016-08-19

    The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR) mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit "replication stress" -a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  11. Replication of centromere II of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J G; Caddle, M S; Bulboaca, G H; Wohlgemuth, J G; Baum, M; Clarke, L; Calos, M P

    1995-01-01

    The centromeric DNAs of Schizosaccharomyces pombe chromosomes resemble those of higher eukaryotes in being large and composed predominantly of repeated sequences. To begin a detailed analysis of the mode of replication of a complex centromere, we examined whether any sequences within S. pombe centromere II (cen2) have the ability to mediate autonomous replication. We found a high density of segments with such activity, including at least eight different regions comprising most of the repeated and unique centromeric DNA elements. A physical mapping analysis using two-dimensional gels showed that autonomous replication initiated within the S. pombe sequences in each plasmid. A two-dimensional gel analysis of replication on the chromosomes revealed that the K and L repeat elements, which occur in multiple copies at all three centromeres and comprise approximately 70% of total centromeric DNA mass in S. pombe, are both sites of replication initiation. In contrast, the unique cen2 central core, which contains multiple segments that can support autonomous replication, appears to be repressed for initiation on the chromosome. We discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of DNA replication and centromere function. PMID:7651433

  12. Brc1-dependent recovery from replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Kirstin L.; Murray, Johanne M.; O'Connell, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    BRCT-containing protein 1 (Brc1) is a multi-BRCT (BRCA1 carboxyl terminus) domain protein in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that is required for resistance to chronic replicative stress, but whether this reflects a repair or replication defect is unknown and the subject of this study. We show that brc1Δ cells are significantly delayed in recovery from replication pausing, though this does not activate a DNA damage checkpoint. DNA repair and recombination protein Rad52 is a homologous recombination protein that loads the Rad51 recombinase at resected double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks and is also recruited to stalled replication forks, where it may stabilize structures through its strand annealing activity. Rad52 is required for the viability of brc1Δ cells, and brc1Δ cells accumulate Rad52 foci late in S phase that are potentiated by replication stress. However, these foci contain the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein RPA, but not Rad51 or γH2A. Further, these foci are not associated with increased recombination between repeated sequences, or increased post-replication repair. Thus, these Rad52 foci do not represent sites of recombination. Following the initiation of DNA replication, the induction of these foci by replication stress is suppressed by defects in origin recognition complex (ORC) function, which is accompanied by loss of viability and severe mitotic defects. This suggests that cells lacking Brc1 undergo an ORC-dependent rescue of replication stress, presumably through the firing of dormant origins, and this generates RPA-coated ssDNA and recruits Rad52. However, as Rad51 is not recruited, and the checkpoint effector kinase Chk1 is not activated, these structures must not contain the unprotected primer ends found at sites of DNA damage that are required for recombination and checkpoint activation. PMID:22366461

  13. An archaeal chromosomal autonomously replicating sequence element from an extreme halophile, Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1.

    PubMed

    Berquist, Brian R; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2003-10-01

    We report on the identification and first cloning of an autonomously replicating sequence element from the chromosome of an archaeon, the extreme halophile Halobacterium strain NRC-1. The putative replication origin was identified by association with the orc7 gene and replication ability in the host strain, demonstrated by cloning into a nonreplicating plasmid. Deletion analysis showed that sequences located up to 750 bp upstream of the orc7 gene translational start, plus the orc7 gene and 50 bp downstream, are sufficient to endow the plasmid with replication ability, as judged by expression of a plasmid-encoded mevinolin resistance selectable marker and plasmid recovery after transformation. Sequences located proximal to the two other chromosomally carried haloarchaeal orc genes (orc6 and orc8) are not able to promote efficient autonomous replication. Located within the 750-bp region upstream of orc7 is a nearly perfect inverted repeat of 31 bp, which flanks an extremely AT-rich (44%) stretch of 189 bp. The replication ability of the plasmid was lost when one copy of the inverted repeat was deleted. Additionally, the inverted repeat structure near orc7 homologs in the genomic sequences of two other halophiles, Haloarcula marismortui and Haloferax volcanii, is highly conserved. Our results indicate that, in halophilic archaea, a chromosomal origin of replication is physically linked to orc7 homologs and that this element is sufficient to promote autonomous replication. We discuss the finding of a functional haloarchaeal origin in relation to the large number of orc1-cdc6 homologs identified in the genomes of all haloarchaea to date.

  14. Systematic identification of novel, essential host genes affecting bromovirus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Gancarz, Brandi L; Hao, Linhui; He, Qiuling; Newton, Michael A; Ahlquist, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA virus replication involves viral proteins and cellular proteins at nearly every replication step. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a well-established model for dissecting virus-host interactions and is one of very few viruses whose RNA replication, gene expression and encapsidation have been reproduced in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previously, our laboratory identified ∼100 non-essential host genes whose loss inhibited or enhanced BMV replication at least 3-fold. However, our isolation of additional BMV-modulating host genes by classical genetics and other results underscore that genes essential for cell growth also contribute to BMV RNA replication at a frequency that may be greater than that of non-essential genes. To systematically identify novel, essential host genes affecting BMV RNA replication, we tested a collection of ∼900 yeast strains, each with a single essential gene promoter replaced by a doxycycline-repressible promoter, allowing repression of gene expression by adding doxycycline to the growth medium. Using this strain array of ∼81% of essential yeast genes, we identified 24 essential host genes whose depleted expression reproducibly inhibited or enhanced BMV RNA replication. Relevant host genes are involved in ribosome biosynthesis, cell cycle regulation and protein homeostasis, among other cellular processes. BMV 2a(Pol) levels were significantly increased in strains depleted for a heat shock protein (HSF1) or proteasome components (PRE1 and RPT6), suggesting these genes may affect BMV RNA replication by directly or indirectly modulating 2a(Pol) localization, post-translational modification or interacting partners. Investigating the diverse functions of these newly identified essential host genes should advance our understanding of BMV-host interactions and normal cellular pathways, and suggest new modes of virus control.

  15. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for rapid generation of HBV-replicating stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Fang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Zi-Xuan; Song, Liu-Wei; Cao, Jia-Li; Yang, Lin; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-08-01

    The stable HBV-replicating cell lines, which carry replication-competent HBV genome stably integrated into the genome of host cell, are widely used to evaluate the effects of antiviral agents. However, current methods to generate HBV-replicating cell lines, which are mostly dependent on random integration of foreign DNA via plasmid transfection, are less-efficient and time-consuming. To address this issue, we constructed an all-in-one Sleeping Beauty transposon system (denoted pTSMP-HBV vector) for robust generation of stable cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of different genotype. This vector contains a Sleeping Beauty transposon containing HBV 1.3-copy genome with an expression cassette of the SV40 promoter driving red fluorescent protein (mCherry) and self-cleaving P2A peptide linked puromycin resistance gene (PuroR). In addition, a PGK promoter-driven SB100X hyperactive transposase cassette is placed in the outside of the transposon in the same plasmid.The HBV-replicating stable cells could be obtained from pTSMP-HBV transfected HepG2 cells by red fluorescence-activated cell sorting and puromycin resistant cell selection within 4-week. Using this system, we successfully constructed four cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of genotypes A-D. The replication and viral protein expression profiles of these cells were systematically characterized. In conclusion, our study provides a high-efficiency strategy to generate HBV-replicating stable cell lines, which may facilitate HBV-related virological study.

  16. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for rapid generation of HBV-replicating stable cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Fang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Zi-Xuan; Song, Liu-Wei; Cao, Jia-Li; Yang, Lin; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-08-01

    The stable HBV-replicating cell lines, which carry replication-competent HBV genome stably integrated into the genome of host cell, are widely used to evaluate the effects of antiviral agents. However, current methods to generate HBV-replicating cell lines, which are mostly dependent on random integration of foreign DNA via plasmid transfection, are less-efficient and time-consuming. To address this issue, we constructed an all-in-one Sleeping Beauty transposon system (denoted pTSMP-HBV vector) for robust generation of stable cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of different genotype. This vector contains a Sleeping Beauty transposon containing HBV 1.3-copy genome with an expression cassette of the SV40 promoter driving red fluorescent protein (mCherry) and self-cleaving P2A peptide linked puromycin resistance gene (PuroR). In addition, a PGK promoter-driven SB100X hyperactive transposase cassette is placed in the outside of the transposon in the same plasmid.The HBV-replicating stable cells could be obtained from pTSMP-HBV transfected HepG2 cells by red fluorescence-activated cell sorting and puromycin resistant cell selection within 4-week. Using this system, we successfully constructed four cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of genotypes A-D. The replication and viral protein expression profiles of these cells were systematically characterized. In conclusion, our study provides a high-efficiency strategy to generate HBV-replicating stable cell lines, which may facilitate HBV-related virological study. PMID:27091097

  17. Topological locking restrains replication fork reversal

    PubMed Central

    Fierro-Fernández, Marta; Hernández, Pablo; Krimer, Dora B.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Schvartzman, Jorge B.

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, psoralen cross-linking, and electron microscopy were used to study the effects of positive supercoiling on fork reversal in isolated replication intermediates of bacterial DNA plasmids. The results obtained demonstrate that the formation of Holliday-like junctions at both forks of a replication bubble creates a topological constraint that prevents further regression of the forks. We propose that this topological locking of replication intermediates provides a biological safety mechanism that protects DNA molecules against extensive fork reversals. PMID:17242356

  18. Prebiotic chemistry and nucleic acid replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.; Lohrmann, R.

    1974-01-01

    Recent work is reviewed on some reactions that could have occurred on the primitive earth and that could have played a part in the evolution of a self-replicating system. The transition from the primitive atmosphere to the simplest replicating molecules is considered in four stages: (1) the formation of a 'prebiotic soup' of organic precursors, including the purine and pyrimidine bases and the pentose sugars; (2) the condensation of these precursors and inorganic phosphate to form monomeric nucleotides and activated nucleotide derivatives; (3) the polymerization of nucleotide derivatives to oligonucleotides; and (4) the complementary replication of oligonucleotides in a template-directed process that depends on Watson-Crick base pairing.

  19. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve

    PubMed Central

    Murre, Jaap M. J.; Dros, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus’ classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point. PMID:26148023

  20. LANA Binds to Multiple Active Viral and Cellular Promoters and Associates with the H3K4Methyltransferase hSET1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Turner, Peter C.; Jain, Vaibhav; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Renne, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a γ-herpesvirus associated with KS and two lymphoproliferative diseases. Recent studies characterized epigenetic modification of KSHV episomes during latency and determined that latency-associated genes are associated with H3K4me3 while most lytic genes are associated with the silencing mark H3K27me3. Since the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) (i) is expressed very early after de novo infection, (ii) interacts with transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelers, and (iii) regulates the LANA and RTA promoters, we hypothesized that LANA may contribute to the establishment of latency through epigenetic control. We performed a detailed ChIP-seq analysis in cells of lymphoid and endothelial origin and compared H3K4me3, H3K27me3, polII, and LANA occupancy. On viral episomes LANA binding was detected at numerous lytic and latent promoters, which were transactivated by LANA using reporter assays. LANA binding was highly enriched at H3K4me3 peaks and this co-occupancy was also detected on many host gene promoters. Bioinformatic analysis of enriched LANA binding sites in combination with biochemical binding studies revealed three distinct binding patterns. A small subset of LANA binding sites showed sequence homology to the characterized LBS1/2 sequence in the viral terminal repeat. A large number of sites contained a novel LANA binding motif (TCCAT)3 which was confirmed by gel shift analysis. Third, some viral and cellular promoters did not contain LANA binding sites and are likely enriched through protein/protein interaction. LANA was associated with H3K4me3 marks and in PEL cells 86% of all LANA bound promoters were transcriptionally active, leading to the hypothesis that LANA interacts with the machinery that methylates H3K4. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated LANA association with endogenous hSET1 complexes in both lymphoid and endothelial cells suggesting that LANA may contribute to the epigenetic

  1. LANA binds to multiple active viral and cellular promoters and associates with the H3K4methyltransferase hSET1 complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Turner, Peter C; Jain, Vaibhav; McIntyre, Lauren M; Renne, Rolf

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a γ-herpesvirus associated with KS and two lymphoproliferative diseases. Recent studies characterized epigenetic modification of KSHV episomes during latency and determined that latency-associated genes are associated with H3K4me3 while most lytic genes are associated with the silencing mark H3K27me3. Since the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) (i) is expressed very early after de novo infection, (ii) interacts with transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelers, and (iii) regulates the LANA and RTA promoters, we hypothesized that LANA may contribute to the establishment of latency through epigenetic control. We performed a detailed ChIP-seq analysis in cells of lymphoid and endothelial origin and compared H3K4me3, H3K27me3, polII, and LANA occupancy. On viral episomes LANA binding was detected at numerous lytic and latent promoters, which were transactivated by LANA using reporter assays. LANA binding was highly enriched at H3K4me3 peaks and this co-occupancy was also detected on many host gene promoters. Bioinformatic analysis of enriched LANA binding sites in combination with biochemical binding studies revealed three distinct binding patterns. A small subset of LANA binding sites showed sequence homology to the characterized LBS1/2 sequence in the viral terminal repeat. A large number of sites contained a novel LANA binding motif (TCCAT)3 which was confirmed by gel shift analysis. Third, some viral and cellular promoters did not contain LANA binding sites and are likely enriched through protein/protein interaction. LANA was associated with H3K4me3 marks and in PEL cells 86% of all LANA bound promoters were transcriptionally active, leading to the hypothesis that LANA interacts with the machinery that methylates H3K4. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated LANA association with endogenous hSET1 complexes in both lymphoid and endothelial cells suggesting that LANA may contribute to the epigenetic

  2. Transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 couples the histone chaperone Asf1b to HSV-1 DNA replication components.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hua; Nogueira, Mauricio L; Vogel, Jodi L; Kristie, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    The cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 interacts with numerous transcription factors as well as other coactivators and is a component of multiple chromatin modulation complexes. The protein is essential for the expression of the immediate early genes of both herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella zoster virus and functions, in part, by coupling chromatin modification components including the Set1 or MLL1 histone methyltransferases and the histone demethylase LSD1 to promote the installation of positive chromatin marks and the activation of viral immediately early gene transcription. Although studies have investigated the role of HCF-1 in both cellular and viral transcription, little is known about other processes that the protein may be involved in. Here we demonstrate that HCF-1 localizes to sites of HSV replication late in infection. HCF-1 interacts directly and simultaneously with both HSV DNA replication proteins and the cellular histone chaperone Asf1b, a protein that regulates the progression of cellular DNA replication forks via chromatin reorganization. Asf1b localizes with HCF-1 in viral replication foci and depletion of Asf1b results in significantly reduced viral DNA accumulation. The results support a model in which the transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 is a component of the HSV DNA replication assembly and promotes viral DNA replication by coupling Asf1b to DNA replication components. This coupling provides a novel function for HCF-1 and insights into the mechanisms of modulating chromatin during DNA replication.

  3. What Should Researchers Expect When They Replicate Studies? A Statistical View of Replicability in Psychological Science.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prasad; Peng, Roger D; Leek, Jeffrey T

    2016-07-01

    A recent study of the replicability of key psychological findings is a major contribution toward understanding the human side of the scientific process. Despite the careful and nuanced analysis reported, the simple narrative disseminated by the mass, social, and scientific media was that in only 36% of the studies were the original results replicated. In the current study, however, we showed that 77% of the replication effect sizes reported were within a 95% prediction interval calculated using the original effect size. Our analysis suggests two critical issues in understanding replication of psychological studies. First, researchers' intuitive expectations for what a replication should show do not always match with statistical estimates of replication. Second, when the results of original studies are very imprecise, they create wide prediction intervals-and a broad range of replication effects that are consistent with the original estimates. This may lead to effects that replicate successfully, in that replication results are consistent with statistical expectations, but do not provide much information about the size (or existence) of the true effect. In this light, the results of the Reproducibility Project: Psychology can be viewed as statistically consistent with what one might expect when performing a large-scale replication experiment. PMID:27474140

  4. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    SciTech Connect

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  5. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  6. Density matters: The semiconservative replication of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The semiconservative mode of DNA replication was originally documented through the classic density labeling experiments of Matthew Meselson and Franklin W. Stahl, as communicated to PNAS by Max Delbrück in May 1958. The ultimate value of their novel approach has extended far beyond the initial implications from that elegant study, through more than four decades of research on DNA replication, recombination, and repair. I provide here a short historical commentary and then an account of some developments in the field of DNA replication, which closely followed the Meselson–Stahl experiment. These developments include the application of density labeling to discover the repair replication of damaged DNA, a “nonconservative” mode of synthesis in which faulty sections of DNA are replaced. PMID:15608066

  7. Density matters: the semiconservative replication of DNA.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2004-12-28

    The semiconservative mode of DNA replication was originally documented through the classic density labeling experiments of Matthew Meselson and Franklin W. Stahl, as communicated to PNAS by Max Delbruck in May 1958. The ultimate value of their novel approach has extended far beyond the initial implications from that elegant study, through more than four decades of research on DNA replication, recombination, and repair. I provide here a short historical commentary and then an account of some developments in the field of DNA replication, which closely followed the Meselson-Stahl experiment. These developments include the application of density labeling to discover the repair replication of damaged DNA, a "nonconservative" mode of synthesis in which faulty sections of DNA are replaced.

  8. A global profile of replicative polymerase usage

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Carolin A.; Miyabe, Izumi; Brooks, Tony; Retkute, Renata; Hubank, Mike; Nieduszyski, Conrad A.; Carr, Antony M.

    2014-01-01

    Three eukaryotic DNA polymerases are essential for genome replication. Polα-primase initiates each synthesis event and is rapidly replaced by processive DNA polymerases: Polε replicates the leading strand while Polδ performs lagging strand synthesis. However, it is not known whether this division of labour is maintained across the whole genome or how uniform it is within single replicons. Using S. pombe, we have developed a polymerase usage sequencing (Pu-seq) strategy to map polymerase usage genome–wide. Pu–seq provides direct replication origin location and efficiency data and indirect estimates of replication timing. We confirm that the division of labour is broadly maintained across an entire genome. However, our data suggest a subtle variability in the usage of the two polymerases within individual replicons. We propose this results from occasional leading strand initiation by Polδ followed by exchange for Polε. PMID:25664722

  9. Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-09-16

    This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners’ replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization’s building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

  10. The E. coli DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J S; Jergic, S; Dixon, N E

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli initiates at oriC, the origin of replication and proceeds bidirectionally, resulting in two replication forks that travel in opposite directions from the origin. Here, we focus on events at the replication fork. The replication machinery (or replisome), first assembled on both forks at oriC, contains the DnaB helicase for strand separation, and the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE) for DNA synthesis. DnaB interacts transiently with the DnaG primase for RNA priming on both strands. The Pol III HE is made up of three subassemblies: (i) the αɛθ core polymerase complex that is present in two (or three) copies to simultaneously copy both DNA strands, (ii) the β2 sliding clamp that interacts with the core polymerase to ensure its processivity, and (iii) the seven-subunit clamp loader complex that loads β2 onto primer-template junctions and interacts with the α polymerase subunit of the core and the DnaB helicase to organize the two (or three) core polymerases. Here, we review the structures of the enzymatic components of replisomes, and the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that ensure they remain intact while undergoing substantial dynamic changes as they function to copy both the leading and lagging strands simultaneously during coordinated replication.

  11. Design and Implementation of Replicated Object Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koka, Sudhir

    1996-01-01

    One of the widely used techniques for construction of fault tolerant applications is the replication of resources so that if one copy fails sufficient copies may still remain operational to allow the application to continue to function. This thesis involves the design and implementation of an object oriented framework for replicating data on multiple sites and across different platforms. Our approach, called the Replicated Object Layer (ROL) provides a mechanism for consistent replication of data over dynamic networks. ROL uses the Reliable Multicast Protocol (RMP) as a communication protocol that provides for reliable delivery, serialization and fault tolerance. Besides providing type registration, this layer facilitates distributed atomic transactions on replicated data. A novel algorithm called the RMP Commit Protocol, which commits transactions efficiently in reliable multicast environment is presented. ROL provides recovery procedures to ensure that site and communication failures do not corrupt persistent data, and male the system fault tolerant to network partitions. ROL will facilitate building distributed fault tolerant applications by performing the burdensome details of replica consistency operations, and making it completely transparent to the application.Replicated databases are a major class of applications which could be built on top of ROL.

  12. Identification of the minimal replicon and the origin of replication of the crenarchaeal plasmid pRN1

    PubMed Central

    Berkner, Silvia; Hinojosa, Mery Pina; Prangishvili, David; Lipps, Georg

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the minimal replicon of the crenarchaeal plasmid pRN1. It consists of 3097 base pairs amounting to 58% of the genome of pRN1. The minimal replicon comprises replication operon orf56/orf904 coding for a transcriptional repressor and the replication protein of pRN1. An upstream region of 64 bp that contains the promoter of the replication operon is essential as well as 166 bp of sequence downstream of the orf904 gene. This region contains a putative transcriptional terminator and a 100 nucleotides long stem–loop structure. Only the latter structure was shown to be required for replication. In addition replication was sustained when the stem–loop was displaced to another part of the pRN1 sequence. By mutational analysis we also find that the integrity of the stem–loop structure is required to maintain the replication of pRN1-derived constructs. As similar stem–loop structures are also present in other members of the pRN family, we suggest that this conserved structural element could be the origin of replication for the pRN plasmids. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the domain structure of the replication protein and the presence of a similar stem–loop structure as the putative replication origin are also found in several bacteriophages. PMID:25060695

  13. Replication origins and timing of temporal replication in budding yeast: how to solve the conundrum?

    PubMed

    Barberis, Matteo; Spiesser, Thomas W; Klipp, Edda

    2010-05-01

    Similarly to metazoans, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cereviasiae replicates its genome with a defined timing. In this organism, well-defined, site-specific origins, are efficient and fire in almost every round of DNA replication. However, this strategy is neither conserved in the fission yeast Saccharomyces pombe, nor in Xenopus or Drosophila embryos, nor in higher eukaryotes, in which DNA replication initiates asynchronously throughout S phase at random sites. Temporal and spatial controls can contribute to the timing of replication such as Cdk activity, origin localization, epigenetic status or gene expression. However, a debate is going on to answer the question how individual origins are selected to fire in budding yeast. Two opposing theories were proposed: the "replicon paradigm" or "temporal program" vs. the "stochastic firing". Recent data support the temporal regulation of origin activation, clustering origins into temporal blocks of early and late replication. Contrarily, strong evidences suggest that stochastic processes acting on origins can generate the observed kinetics of replication without requiring a temporal order. In mammalian cells, a spatiotemporal model that accounts for a partially deterministic and partially stochastic order of DNA replication has been proposed. Is this strategy the solution to reconcile the conundrum of having both organized replication timing and stochastic origin firing also for budding yeast? In this review we discuss this possibility in the light of our recent study on the origin activation, suggesting that there might be a stochastic component in the temporal activation of the replication origins, especially under perturbed conditions. PMID:21037857

  14. Bridging from Replication to Translation with a Thermal, Autonomous Replicator Made from Transfer RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Möller, Friederike M.; Krammer, Hubert

    2013-03-01

    Central to the understanding of living systems is the interplay between DNA/RNA and proteins. Known as Eigen paradox, proteins require genetic information while proteins are needed for the replication of genes. RNA world scenarios focus on a base by base replication disconnected from translation. Here we used strategies from DNA machines to demonstrate a tight connection between a basic replication mechanism and translation. A pool of hairpin molecules replicate a two-letter code. The replication is thermally driven: the energy and negative entropy to drive replication is initially stored in metastable hairpins by kinetic cooling. Both are released by a highly specific and exponential replication reaction that is solely implemented by base hybridization. The duplication time is 30s. The reaction is monitored by fluorescence and described by a detailed kinetic model. The RNA hairpins usetransfer RNA sequences and the replication is driven by the simple disequilibrium setting of a thermal gradient The experiments propose a physical rather than a chemical scenario for the autonomous replication of protein encoding information. Supported by the NanoSystems Initiative Munich and ERC.

  15. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    SciTech Connect

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, Česlovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteins retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.

  16. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, Česlovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteins retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. In more general terms, we suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal. PMID:26350214

  17. THE FORK AND THE KINASE: A DNA REPLICATION TALE FROM A CHK1 PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    González Besteiro, Marina A.; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. The checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged-DNA. Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Such findings unveil a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA-lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, the multifaceted and versatile functions of Chk1 at ongoing forks and replication origins determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress. PMID:25795119

  18. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    DOE PAGES

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, Česlovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteinsmore » retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.« less

  19. Pf Filamentous Phage Requires UvrD for Replication in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Eriel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pf is a lysogenic filamentous phage that promotes biofilm development in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pf replicates by a rolling circle replication system which depends on a phage-encoded initiator protein and host factors usually involved in chromosome replication. Rep, an accessory replicative DNA helicase, is crucial for replication of filamentous phages in Escherichia coli. In contrast, here we show that, instead of depending on Rep, Pf replication depends on UvrD, an accessory helicase implicated in DNA repair. In this study, we also identified the initiator protein of Pf and found that it shares similarities with that of Vibrio phages CTXφ and VGJφ, which also depend on UvrD for replication. A structural comparative analysis of the initiator proteins of most known filamentous phages described thus far suggested that UvrD, known as a nonreplicative helicase, is involved in rolling circle replication of filamentous phages in diverse bacteria genera. This report consolidates knowledge on the new role of UvrD in filamentous phage replication, a function previously thought to be exclusive of Rep helicase. IMPORTANCE Biofilm development is a key component of the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to evade host immune defenses and resist multiple drugs. Induction of the filamentous phage Pf, which usually is lysogenized in clinical and environmental isolates of P. aeruginosa, plays an important role in biofilm assembly, maturation, and dispersal. Despite the clinical relevance of Pf, the molecular biology of this phage is largely unknown. In this study, we found that rolling circle replication of Pf depends on UvrD, a DNA helicase normally involved in DNA repair. We also identified the initiator protein of Pf and found that it shares structural similarity with that of Vibrio cholerae phages CTXφ and VGJφ, which also use UvrD for replication. Our results reveal that, in addition to DNA repair, UvrD plays an essential role in rolling circle replication of

  20. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs.

  1. Replication and transcription on a collision course: eukaryotic regulation mechanisms and implications for DNA stability.

    PubMed

    Brambati, Alessandra; Colosio, Arianna; Zardoni, Luca; Galanti, Lorenzo; Liberi, Giordano

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and transcription are vital cellular processes during which the genetic information is copied into complementary DNA and RNA molecules. Highly complex machineries required for DNA and RNA synthesis compete for the same DNA template, therefore being on a collision course. Unscheduled replication-transcription clashes alter the gene transcription program and generate replication stress, reducing fork speed. Molecular pathways and mechanisms that minimize the conflict between replication and transcription have been extensively characterized in prokaryotic cells and recently identified also in eukaryotes. A pathological outcome of replication-transcription collisions is the formation of stable RNA:DNA hybrids in molecular structures called R-loops. Growing evidence suggests that R-loop accumulation promotes both genetic and epigenetic instability, thus severely affecting genome functionality. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge related to replication and transcription conflicts in eukaryotes, their consequences on genome stability and the pathways involved in their resolution. These findings are relevant to clarify the molecular basis of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Increased global transcription activity as a mechanism of replication stress in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Silva, Lara Marques; Irmscher, Sarah; Jones, Rebecca M.; Folkes, Lisa; Gromak, Natalia; Petermann, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease associated with genomic instability that often results from oncogene activation. This in turn leads to hyperproliferation and replication stress. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie oncogene-induced replication stress are still poorly understood. Oncogenes such as HRASV12 promote proliferation by upregulating general transcription factors to stimulate RNA synthesis. Here we investigate whether this increase in transcription underlies oncogene-induced replication stress. We show that in cells overexpressing HRASV12, elevated expression of the general transcription factor TATA-box binding protein (TBP) leads to increased RNA synthesis, which together with R-loop accumulation results in replication fork slowing and DNA damage. Furthermore, overexpression of TBP alone causes the hallmarks of oncogene-induced replication stress, including replication fork slowing, DNA damage and senescence. Consequently, we reveal that increased transcription can be a mechanism of oncogene-induced DNA damage, providing a molecular link between upregulation of the transcription machinery and genomic instability in cancer. PMID:27725641

  3. Inhibition of DNA replication and repair by anthralin or danthron in cultured human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.M.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1982-07-01

    The comparative effects of the tumor promoter anthralin and its analog, danthron, on semiconservative DNA replication and DNA repair synthesis were studied in cultured human cells. Bromodeoxyuridine was used as density label together with /sup 3/H-thymidine to distinguish replication from repair synthesis in isopycnic CsCl gradients. Anthralin at 1.1 microgram inhibited replication in T98G cells by 50%. In cells treated with 0.4 or 1.3 microM anthralin and additive effect was observed on the inhibition of replication by ultraviolet light (254 nm). In cells irradiated with 20 J/m2, 2.3 microM anthralin was required to inhibit repair synthesis by 50%. Thus there was no selective inhibitory effect of anthralin on repair synthesis. Danthron exhibited no detectable effect on either semiconservative replication or repair synthesis at concentrations below about 5.0 microM. Neither compound stimulated repair synthesis in the absence of ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, anthralin and danthron do not appear to react with DNA to form adducts that are subject to excision repair. Although both compounds appear to intercalate into supercoiled DNA in vitro to a limited extent, the degree of unwinding introduced by the respective drugs does not correlate with their relative effects on DNA synthesis in vivo. Therefore the inhibitory effect of anthralin on DNA replication and repair synthesis in T98G cells does not appear to result from the direct interaction of the drug with DNA.

  4. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  5. Recombination-restarted replication makes inverted chromosome fusions at inverted repeats.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ken'Ichi; Miyabe, Izumi; Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Carr, Antony M; Murray, Johanne M

    2013-01-10

    Impediments to DNA replication are known to induce gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) and copy-number variations (CNVs). GCRs and CNVs underlie human genomic disorders and are a feature of cancer. During cancer development, environmental factors and oncogene-driven proliferation promote replication stress. Resulting GCRs and CNVs are proposed to contribute to cancer development and therapy resistance. When stress arrests replication, the replisome remains associated with the fork DNA (stalled fork) and is protected by the inter-S-phase checkpoint. Stalled forks efficiently resume when the stress is relieved. However, if the polymerases dissociate from the fork (fork collapse) or the fork structure breaks (broken fork), replication restart can proceed either by homologous recombination or microhomology-primed re-initiation. Here we ascertain the consequences of replication with a fork restarted by homologous recombination in fission yeast. We identify a new mechanism of chromosomal rearrangement through the observation that recombination-restarted forks have a considerably high propensity to execute a U-turn at small inverted repeats (up to 1 in 40 replication events). We propose that the error-prone nature of restarted forks contributes to the generation of GCRs and gene amplification in cancer, and to non-recurrent CNVs in genomic disorders.

  6. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway Maintains Genome Stability by Coordinating Replication and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Rebekka A.; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Shah, Fenil; Langton, Jamie; Lopez Martinez, David; Liang, Chih-Chao; Cohn, Martin A.; Gibbons, Richard J.; Deans, Andrew J.; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Summary DNA replication stress can cause chromosomal instability and tumor progression. One key pathway that counteracts replication stress and promotes faithful DNA replication consists of the Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins. However, how these proteins limit replication stress remains largely elusive. Here we show that conflicts between replication and transcription activate the FA pathway. Inhibition of transcription or enzymatic degradation of transcription-associated R-loops (DNA:RNA hybrids) suppresses replication fork arrest and DNA damage occurring in the absence of a functional FA pathway. Furthermore, we show that simple aldehydes, known to cause leukemia in FA-deficient mice, induce DNA:RNA hybrids in FA-depleted cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the molecular mechanism by which the FA pathway limits R-loop accumulation requires FANCM translocase activity. Failure to activate a response to physiologically occurring DNA:RNA hybrids may critically contribute to the heightened cancer predisposition and bone marrow failure of individuals with mutated FA proteins. PMID:26593718

  7. Opposing Regulation of the EGF Receptor: A Molecular Switch Controlling Cytomegalovirus Latency and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zeltzer, Sebastian; Reitsma, Justin; Petrucelli, Alex; Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Rak, Mike; Zagallo, Patricia; Schroeder, Joyce; Terhune, Scott; Goodrum, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses persist indefinitely in their host through complex and poorly defined interactions that mediate latent, chronic or productive states of infection. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV or HCMV), a ubiquitous β-herpesvirus, coordinates the expression of two viral genes, UL135 and UL138, which have opposing roles in regulating viral replication. UL135 promotes reactivation from latency and virus replication, in part, by overcoming replication-suppressive effects of UL138. The mechanism by which UL135 and UL138 oppose one another is not known. We identified viral and host proteins interacting with UL138 protein (pUL138) to begin to define the mechanisms by which pUL135 and pUL138 function. We show that pUL135 and pUL138 regulate the viral cycle by targeting that same receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is a major homeostatic regulator involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival, making it an ideal target for viral manipulation during infection. pUL135 promotes internalization and turnover of EGFR from the cell surface, whereas pUL138 preserves surface expression and activation of EGFR. We show that activated EGFR is sequestered within the infection-induced, juxtanuclear viral assembly compartment and is unresponsive to stress. Intriguingly, these findings suggest that CMV insulates active EGFR in the cell and that pUL135 and pUL138 function to fine-tune EGFR levels at the cell surface to allow the infected cell to respond to extracellular cues. Consistent with the role of pUL135 in promoting replication, inhibition of EGFR or the downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) favors reactivation from latency and replication. We propose a model whereby pUL135 and pUL138 together with EGFR comprise a molecular switch that regulates states of latency and replication in HCMV infection by regulating EGFR trafficking to fine tune EGFR signaling. PMID:27218650

  8. Opposing Regulation of the EGF Receptor: A Molecular Switch Controlling Cytomegalovirus Latency and Replication.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Jason; Zeltzer, Sebastian; Reitsma, Justin; Petrucelli, Alex; Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Rak, Mike; Zagallo, Patricia; Schroeder, Joyce; Terhune, Scott; Goodrum, Felicia

    2016-05-01

    Herpesviruses persist indefinitely in their host through complex and poorly defined interactions that mediate latent, chronic or productive states of infection. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV or HCMV), a ubiquitous β-herpesvirus, coordinates the expression of two viral genes, UL135 and UL138, which have opposing roles in regulating viral replication. UL135 promotes reactivation from latency and virus replication, in part, by overcoming replication-suppressive effects of UL138. The mechanism by which UL135 and UL138 oppose one another is not known. We identified viral and host proteins interacting with UL138 protein (pUL138) to begin to define the mechanisms by which pUL135 and pUL138 function. We show that pUL135 and pUL138 regulate the viral cycle by targeting that same receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is a major homeostatic regulator involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival, making it an ideal target for viral manipulation during infection. pUL135 promotes internalization and turnover of EGFR from the cell surface, whereas pUL138 preserves surface expression and activation of EGFR. We show that activated EGFR is sequestered within the infection-induced, juxtanuclear viral assembly compartment and is unresponsive to stress. Intriguingly, these findings suggest that CMV insulates active EGFR in the cell and that pUL135 and pUL138 function to fine-tune EGFR levels at the cell surface to allow the infected cell to respond to extracellular cues. Consistent with the role of pUL135 in promoting replication, inhibition of EGFR or the downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) favors reactivation from latency and replication. We propose a model whereby pUL135 and pUL138 together with EGFR comprise a molecular switch that regulates states of latency and replication in HCMV infection by regulating EGFR trafficking to fine tune EGFR signaling. PMID:27218650

  9. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  10. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  11. Targeting Mesothelioma Using an Infectivity Enhanced Survivin-Conditionally Replicative Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zeng B.; Makhija, Sharmila K.; Lu, Baogen; Wang, Minghui; Wang, Shuyi; Takayama, Koichi; Siegal, Gene P.; Reynolds, Paul N.; Curiel, David T.

    2007-01-01

    Mesothelioma is a highly malignant neoplasm with no effective treatment. Conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds) represent a promising new modality for the treatment of cancer in general. A key contribution in this regard is the introduction of tumor-selective viral replication for amplification of the initial inoculum in the neoplastic cell population. Under ideal conditions following cellular infection, the viruses replicate selectively in the infected tumor cells and kill the cells by cytolysis, leaving normal cells unaffected. However, to date there have been two limitations to clinical application of these CRAd agents; viral infectivity and tumor specificity have been poor. Herein we report on two CRAd agents, CRAd-S.RGD and CRAd-S.F5/3, in which the tumor specificity is regulated by a tumor-specific promoter, the survivin promoter, and the viral infectivity is enhanced by incorporating a capsid modification (RGD or F5/3) in the adenovirus fiber region. These CRAd agents effectively target human mesothelioma cell lines, induce strong cytoxicity in these cells in vitro, and viral replication in a H226 murine xenograft model in vivo. In addition, the survivin promoter has extremely low activity both in the non-transformed cell line, HMEC, and in human liver tissue. Our results suggest that the survivin-based CRAds are promising agents for targeting mesothelioma with low host toxicity. These agents should provide important insights into the identification of novel therapeutic strategies for mesothelioma. PMID:17409940

  12. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  13. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, Joshua M.; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  14. Replication of cultured lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.; Bienkowski, R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have investigated the conditions necessary to support replication of lung type 2 epithelial cells in culture. Cells were isolated from mature fetal rabbit lungs (29d gestation) and cultured on feeder layers of mitotically inactivated 3T3 fibroblasts. The epithelial nature of the cells was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent staining for keratin and by polyacid dichrome stain. Ultrastructural examination during the first week showed that the cells contained myofilaments, microvilli and lamellar bodies (markers for type 2 cells). The following changes were observed after the first week: increase in cell size; loss of lamellar bodies and appearance of multivesicular bodies; increase in rough endoplasmic reticulum and golgi; increase in tonafilaments and well-defined junctions. General cell morphology was good for up to 10 wk. Cells cultured on plastic surface degenerated after 1 wk. Cell replication was assayed by autoradiography of cultures exposed to (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and by direct cell counts. The cells did not replicate during the first week; however, between 2-10 wk the cells incorporated the label and went through approximately 6 population doublings. They have demonstrated that lung alveolar epithelial cells can replicate in culture if they are maintained on an appropriate substrate. The coincidence of ability to replicate and loss of markers for differentiation may reflect the dichotomy between growth and differentiation commonly observed in developing systems.

  15. COPI Is Required for Enterovirus 71 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is found in Asian countries where it causes a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Picornaviruses undergo RNA replication in association with membranes of infected cells. COPI and COPII have been shown to be involved in the formation of picornavirus-induced vesicles. Replication of several picornaviruses, including poliovirus and Echovirus 11 (EV11), is dependent on COPI or COPII. Here, we report that COPI, but not COPII, is required for EV71 replication. Replication of EV71 was inhibited by brefeldin A and golgicide A, inhibitors of COPI activity. Furthermore, we found EV71 2C protein interacted with COPI subunits by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay, indicating that COPI coatomer might be directed to the viral replication complex through viral 2C protein. Additionally, because the pathway is conserved among different species of enteroviruses, it may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies. PMID:22662263

  16. Eukaryotic replication origins: Strength in flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Charanya; Remus, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The eukaryotic replicative DNA helicase, Mcm2-7, is loaded in inactive form as a double hexameric complex around double-stranded DNA. To ensure that replication origins fire no more than once per S phase, activation of the Mcm2-7 helicase is temporally separated from Mcm2-7 loading in the cell cycle. This 2-step mechanism requires that inactive Mcm2-7 complexes be maintained for variable periods of time in a topologically bound state on chromatin, which may create a steric obstacle to other DNA transactions. We have recently found in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that Mcm2-7 double hexamers can respond to collisions with transcription complexes by sliding along the DNA template. Importantly, Mcm2-7 double hexamers remain functional after displacement along DNA and support replication initiation from sites distal to the origin. These results reveal a novel mechanism to specify eukaryotic replication origin sites and to maintain replication origin competence without the need for Mcm2-7 reloading. PMID:27416360

  17. Spacetime replication of continuous variable quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Patrick; Nezami, Sepehr; Salton, Grant; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-08-01

    The theory of relativity requires that no information travel faster than light, whereas the unitarity of quantum mechanics ensures that quantum information cannot be cloned. These conditions provide the basic constraints that appear in information replication tasks, which formalize aspects of the behavior of information in relativistic quantum mechanics. In this article, we provide continuous variable (CV) strategies for spacetime quantum information replication that are directly amenable to optical or mechanical implementation. We use a new class of homologically constructed CV quantum error correcting codes to provide efficient solutions for the general case of information replication. As compared to schemes encoding qubits, our CV solution requires half as many shares per encoded system. We also provide an optimized five-mode strategy for replicating quantum information in a particular configuration of four spacetime regions designed not to be reducible to previously performed experiments. For this optimized strategy, we provide detailed encoding and decoding procedures using standard optical apparatus and calculate the recovery fidelity when finite squeezing is used. As such we provide a scheme for experimentally realizing quantum information replication using quantum optics.

  18. Human CST Facilitates Genome-wide RAD51 Recruitment to GC-Rich Repetitive Sequences in Response to Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Megan; Zhou, Qing; Shiva, Olga; Whitmore, Leanne; Jia, Pingping; Dai, Xueyu; Huang, Chenhui; Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Ye, Ping; Chai, Weihang

    2016-08-01

    The telomeric CTC1/STN1/TEN1 (CST) complex has been implicated in promoting replication recovery under replication stress at genomic regions, yet its precise role is unclear. Here, we report that STN1 is enriched at GC-rich repetitive sequences genome-wide in response to hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress. STN1 deficiency exacerbates the fragility of these sequences under replication stress, resulting in chromosome fragmentation. We find that upon fork stalling, CST proteins form distinct nuclear foci that colocalize with RAD51. Furthermore, replication stress induces physical association of CST with RAD51 in an ATR-dependent manner. Strikingly, CST deficiency diminishes HU-induced RAD51 foci formation and reduces RAD51 recruitment to telomeres and non-telomeric GC-rich fragile sequences. Collectively, our findings establish that CST promotes RAD51 recruitment to GC-rich repetitive sequences in response to replication stress to facilitate replication restart, thereby providing insights into the mechanism underlying genome stability maintenance.

  19. [The effects of TorR protein on initiation of DNA replication in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yao; Jiaxin, Qiao; Jing, Li; Hui, Li; Morigen, Morigen

    2015-03-01

    The two-component systems, which could sense and respond to environmental changes, widely exist in bacteria as a signal transduction pathway. The bacterial CckA/CtrA, ArcA/ArcB and PhoP/PhoQ two-component systems are associated with initiation of DNA replication and cell division, however, the effects of the TorS/TorR system on cell cycle and DNA replication remains unknown. The TorS/TorR system in Escherichia coli can sense changes in trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) concentration around the cells. However, it is unknown if it also affects initiation of DNA replication. We detected DNA replication patterns in ΔtorS and ΔtorR mutant strains by flow cytometry. We found that the average number of replication origins (oriCs) per cell and doubling time in ΔtorS mutants were the same while the average number of oriCs in ΔtorR mutants was increased compared with that in wild-type cells. These results indicated that absence of TorR led to an earlier initiation of DNA replication than that in wild-type cells. Strangely, neither overexpression of TorR nor co-expression of TorR and TorS could restore ΔtorR mutant phenotype to the wild type. However, overexpression of SufD in both wild type and ΔtorR mutants promoted initiation of DNA replication, while mutation of SufD delayed it in ΔtorR mutants. Thus, TorR may affect initiation of DNA replication indirectly through regulating gene expression of sufD.

  20. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    PubMed

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  1. Developmental regulation of DNA replication: replication fork barriers and programmed gene amplification in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Macalpine, D M; Kapler, G M

    1997-10-01

    The palindromic Tetrahymena ribosomal DNA (rDNA) minichromosome is amplified 10,000-fold during development. Subsequent vegetative replication is cell cycle regulated. rDNA replication differs fundamentally in cycling vegetative and nondividing amplifying cells. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we show for the first time that replication origins that direct gene amplification also function in normal dividing cells. Two classes of amplification intermediates were identified. The first class is indistinguishable from vegetative rDNA, initiating in just one of the two 5' nontranscribed spacer (NTS) copies in the rDNA palindrome at either of two closely spaced origins. Thus, these origins are active throughout the life cycle and their regulation changes at different developmental stages. The second, novel class of amplification intermediates is generated by multiple initiation events. Intermediates with mass greater than fully replicated DNA were observed, suggesting that onionskin replication occurs at this stage. Unlike amplified rDNA in Xenopus laevis, the novel Tetrahymena species are not produced by random initiation; replication also initiates in the 5' NTS. Surprisingly, a replication fork barrier which is activated only in these amplifying molecules blocks the progression of forks near the center of the palindrome. Whereas barriers have been previously described, this is the first instance in which programmed regulation of replication fork progression has been demonstrated in a eukaryote.

  2. Plasmid-like replicative intermediates of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic origin of DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pfüller, R; Hammerschmidt, W

    1996-01-01

    During the lytic phase of herpesviruses, intermediates of viral DNA replication are found as large concatemeric molecules in the infected cells. It is not known, however, what the early events in viral DNA replication that yield these concatemers are. In an attempt to identify these early steps of DNA replication, replicative intermediates derived from the lytic origin of Epstein-Barr virus, oriLyt, were analyzed. As shown by density shift experiments with bromodeoxyuridine, oriLyt replicated semiconservatively soon after induction of the lytic cycle and oriLyt-containing DNA is amplified to yield monomeric plasmid progeny DNA (besides multimeric forms and high-molecular-weight DNA). A new class of plasmid progeny DNA which have far fewer negative supercoils than do plasmids extracted from uninduced cells is present only in cells undergoing the lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus. This finding is consistent with plasmid DNAs having fewer nucleosomes before extraction. The newly replicated plasmid DNAs are dependent on a functional oriLyt in cis and support an efficient marker transfer into Escherichia coli as monomeric plasmids. Multimeric forms of presumably circular progeny DNA of oriLyt, as well as detected recombination events, indicate that oriLyt-mediated DNA replication is biphasic: an early theta-like mode is followed by a complex pattern which could result from rolling-circle DNA replication. PMID:8648674

  3. The Temporal Program of Chromosome Replication: Genomewide Replication in clb5Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Heather J.; Danielson, Laura S.; Alvino, Gina M.; Collingwood, David; Delrow, Jeffrey J.; Fangman, Walton L.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Raghuraman, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal regulation of origin activation is widely thought to explain the pattern of early- and late-replicating domains in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Recently, single-molecule analysis of replication suggested that stochastic processes acting on origins with different probabilities of activation could generate the observed kinetics of replication without requiring an underlying temporal order. To distinguish between these possibilities, we examined a clb5Δ strain, where origin firing is largely limited to the first half of S phase, to ask whether all origins nonspecifically show decreased firing (as expected for disordered firing) or if only some origins (“late” origins) are affected. Approximately half the origins in the mutant genome show delayed replication while the remainder replicate largely on time. The delayed regions can encompass hundreds of kilobases and generally correspond to regions that replicate late in wild-type cells. Kinetic analysis of replication in wild-type cells reveals broad windows of origin firing for both early and late origins. Our results are consistent with a temporal model in which origins can show some heterogeneity in both time and probability of origin firing, but clustering of temporally like origins nevertheless yields a genome that is organized into blocks showing different replication times. PMID:18832352

  4. Synchronization of DNA array replication kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manturov, Alexey O.; Grigoryev, Anton V.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work we discuss the features of the DNA replication kinetics at the case of multiplicity of simultaneously elongated DNA fragments. The interaction between replicated DNA fragments is carried out by free protons that appears at the every nucleotide attachment at the free end of elongated DNA fragment. So there is feedback between free protons concentration and DNA-polymerase activity that appears as elongation rate dependence. We develop the numerical model based on a cellular automaton, which can simulate the elongation stage (growth of DNA strands) for DNA elongation process with conditions pointed above and we study the possibility of the DNA polymerases movement synchronization. The results obtained numerically can be useful for DNA polymerase movement detection and visualization of the elongation process in the case of massive DNA replication, eg, under PCR condition or for DNA "sequencing by synthesis" sequencing devices evaluation.

  5. Role of bacterial chaperones in DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, I; Zylicz, M

    1999-01-01

    Studies on the involvement of chaperone proteins in DNA replication have been limited to a few replication systems, belonging primarily to the prokaryotic world. The insights gained from these studies have substantially contributed to our understanding of the eukaryotic DNA replication process as well. The finding that molecular chaperones can activate some initiation proteins before DNA synthesis has led to the more general suggestion that molecular chaperones can influence the DNA-binding activity of many proteins, including transcriptional factors involved in cell regulatory systems. The DnaK/DnaJ/GrpE molecular chaperone system became a paradigm of our understanding of fundamental processes, such as protein folding, translocation, selective proteolysis and autoregulation of the heat-shock response. Studies on the Clp ATPase family of molecular chaperones will help to define the nature of signals involved in chaperone-dependent proteins' refolding and the degradation of misfolded proteins.

  6. DNA replication and transcription in mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2007-01-01

    The mitochondrion was originally a free-living prokaryotic organism, which explains the presence of a compact mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in contemporary mammalian cells. The genome encodes for key subunits of the electron transport chain and RNA components needed for mitochondrial translation. Nuclear genes encode the enzyme systems responsible for mtDNA replication and transcription. Several of the key components of these systems are related to proteins replicating and transcribing DNA in bacteriophages. This observation has led to the proposition that some genes required for DNA replication and transcription were acquired together from a phage early in the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, already at the time of the mitochondrial endosymbiosis. Recent years have seen a rapid development in our molecular understanding of these machineries, but many aspects still remain unknown.

  7. Replicating Milgram: Would people still obey today?

    PubMed

    Burger, Jerry M

    2009-01-01

    The author conducted a partial replication of Stanley Milgram's (1963, 1965, 1974) obedience studies that allowed for useful comparisons with the original investigations while protecting the well-being of participants. Seventy adults participated in a replication of Milgram's Experiment 5 up to the point at which they first heard the learner's verbal protest (150 volts). Because 79% of Milgram's participants who went past this point continued to the end of the shock generator's range, reasonable estimates could be made about what the present participants would have done if allowed to continue. Obedience rates in the 2006 replication were only slightly lower than those Milgram found 45 years earlier. Contrary to expectation, participants who saw a confederate refuse the experimenter's instructions obeyed as often as those who saw no model. Men and women did not differ in their rates of obedience, but there was some evidence that individual differences in empathic concern and desire for control affected participants' responses. PMID:19209958

  8. Evolution of Database Replication Technologies for WLCG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Zbigniew; Lobato Pardavila, Lorena; Blaszczyk, Marcin; Dimitrov, Gancho; Canali, Luca

    2015-12-01

    In this article we summarize several years of experience on database replication technologies used at WLCG and we provide a short review of the available Oracle technologies and their key characteristics. One of the notable changes and improvement in this area in recent past has been the introduction of Oracle GoldenGate as a replacement of Oracle Streams. We report in this article on the preparation and later upgrades for remote replication done in collaboration with ATLAS and Tier 1 database administrators, including the experience from running Oracle GoldenGate in production. Moreover, we report on another key technology in this area: Oracle Active Data Guard which has been adopted in several of the mission critical use cases for database replication between online and offline databases for the LHC experiments.

  9. Replicating Cardiovascular Condition-Birth Month Associations.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Boland, Mary Regina; Miotto, Riccardo; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    Independent replication is vital for study findings drawn from Electronic Health Records (EHR). This replication study evaluates the relationship between seasonal effects at birth and lifetime cardiovascular condition risk. We performed a Season-wide Association Study on 1,169,599 patients from Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) to compute phenome-wide associations between birth month and CVD. We then evaluated if seasonal patterns found at MSH matched those reported at Columbia University Medical Center. Coronary arteriosclerosis, essential hypertension, angina, and pre-infarction syndrome passed phenome-wide significance and their seasonal patterns matched those previously reported. Atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathy, and chronic myocardial ischemia had consistent patterns but were not phenome-wide significant. We confirm that CVD risk peaks for those born in the late winter/early spring among the evaluated patient populations. The replication findings bolster evidence for a seasonal birth month effect in CVD. Further study is required to identify the environmental and developmental mechanisms. PMID:27624541

  10. Replicating Cardiovascular Condition-Birth Month Associations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Boland, Mary Regina; Miotto, Riccardo; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Independent replication is vital for study findings drawn from Electronic Health Records (EHR). This replication study evaluates the relationship between seasonal effects at birth and lifetime cardiovascular condition risk. We performed a Season-wide Association Study on 1,169,599 patients from Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) to compute phenome-wide associations between birth month and CVD. We then evaluated if seasonal patterns found at MSH matched those reported at Columbia University Medical Center. Coronary arteriosclerosis, essential hypertension, angina, and pre-infarction syndrome passed phenome-wide significance and their seasonal patterns matched those previously reported. Atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathy, and chronic myocardial ischemia had consistent patterns but were not phenome-wide significant. We confirm that CVD risk peaks for those born in the late winter/early spring among the evaluated patient populations. The replication findings bolster evidence for a seasonal birth month effect in CVD. Further study is required to identify the environmental and developmental mechanisms. PMID:27624541

  11. Extremal dynamics in random replicator ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärenlampi, Petri P.

    2015-10-01

    The seminal numerical experiment by Bak and Sneppen (BS) is repeated, along with computations with replicator models, including a greater amount of features. Both types of models do self-organize, and do obey power-law scaling for the size distribution of activity cycles. However species extinction within the replicator models interferes with the BS self-organized critical (SOC) activity. Speciation-extinction dynamics ruins any stationary state which might contain a steady size distribution of activity cycles. The BS-type activity appears as a dissimilar phenomenon in comparison to speciation-extinction dynamics in the replicator system. No criticality is found from the speciation-extinction dynamics. Neither are speciations and extinctions in real biological macroevolution known to contain any diverging distributions, or self-organization towards any critical state. Consequently, biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical phenomenon.

  12. Transitions: The Evolution of Linguistic Replicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Simon

    Maynard Smith and Szathmáry (1995) propose a series of major transitions in the evolutionary history of life. Their work provides a rich framework for thinking about replication. They identified the importance of language in this light, but language is a new system of replication in more than one sense: it is both an enabler of cultural replicators with unlimited heredity, and also a new kind of evolutionary system itself. Iterated learning is the process of linguistic transmission, and it drives both language change and the transitions to qualitatively new kinds of linguistic system. By seeing language as an evolutionary system, the biggest payoff we get may be the ability to take biologists' insights into the evolution of life and apply them to the evolution of language.

  13. Replicating Cardiovascular Condition-Birth Month Associations.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Boland, Mary Regina; Miotto, Riccardo; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    Independent replication is vital for study findings drawn from Electronic Health Records (EHR). This replication study evaluates the relationship between seasonal effects at birth and lifetime cardiovascular condition risk. We performed a Season-wide Association Study on 1,169,599 patients from Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) to compute phenome-wide associations between birth month and CVD. We then evaluated if seasonal patterns found at MSH matched those reported at Columbia University Medical Center. Coronary arteriosclerosis, essential hypertension, angina, and pre-infarction syndrome passed phenome-wide significance and their seasonal patterns matched those previously reported. Atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathy, and chronic myocardial ischemia had consistent patterns but were not phenome-wide significant. We confirm that CVD risk peaks for those born in the late winter/early spring among the evaluated patient populations. The replication findings bolster evidence for a seasonal birth month effect in CVD. Further study is required to identify the environmental and developmental mechanisms.

  14. Patentability of self-replicating technologies.

    PubMed

    Shear, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Patents provide an incentive to inventors, investors, and entrepreneurs to conduct research and development, especially in risky (i.e., unpredictable) fields of technology. This review discusses whether self-replicating technologies are patentable within the United States and the issues surrounding them. Self-replicating technologies discussed include plants, bacteria, and genetic technology and the historical legal precedents that have led to the current status of the patent law. To clearly understand these issues, the review also discusses various U.S. Supreme Court cases that, although not related to self-replicating technologies, have an impact on these patentability issues. Finally, some thoughts regarding patent strategy are presented so as to maximize patent protection for these technologies. PMID:25256175

  15. Role of DNA gyrase in phiX replicative-form replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Marians, K J; Ikeda, J E; Schlagman, S; Hurwitz, J

    1977-01-01

    Preparations containing DNA gyrase activity Gellert, M., Mizuchi, K., O'Dea, M.H. & Nash, H.A. (1976) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 73, 3872-3876] have been extensively purified from Escherichia coli. Such fractions, in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, catalyze supertwisting of relaxed circular double-stranded DNA replicative forms of a number of DNAs that results in the formation of superhelical replicative forms. Relaxed phiX174 replicative form (phiX RFIV) is not attacked by the A protein endonuclease coded for by the phiX DNA genome. After exposure to preparations of DNA gyrase, the relaxed phiX174 replicative form is converted to phiX RFI which can then be attacked by the phiX gene A protein and participate in replication of duplex phiX DNA. PMID:266716

  16. Hepatitis C virus replication in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Niu, J; Kumar, U; Monjardino, J; Goldin, R; Rosin, D; Thomas, H C

    1995-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is reported in both tumour and non-tumour tissue in a case of hepatocellular carcinoma. Viral replication was established by showing the presence of minus strand HCV RNA by PCR amplification, after excluding residual reverse transcriptase activity of Taq polymerase. No minus strand was found in serum derived virion RNA. PCR amplified products from both tumour and non-tumour parenchyma were sequenced in the 5' non-coding region and shown to be identical. The genotype of this Indonesian patient was found to be 1b (or II), the most prevalent type in the Far East. Images PMID:7490330

  17. Natural selection among replicators, interactors and transactors.

    PubMed

    Bergandi, Donato

    2013-01-01

    In evolutionary biology and ecology, ontological and epistemological perspectives based on the replicator and the interactor have become the background that makes it possible to transcend traditional biological levels of organization and to achieve a unified view of evolution in which replication and interaction are fundamental operating processes. Using the transactional perspective proposed originally by John Dewey and Arthur Fisher Bentley, a new ontological and methodological category is proposed here: the transactor. The transactional perspective, based on the concept of the transactor, bridges the dichotomy between organisms and environment that characterizes the interactional perspective on evolution and provides epistemological support for the emergentist, systemic view of evolutionary and developmental processes.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA replication includes the sequential recruitment of pre-replication and replication machineries close to nuclear periphery

    PubMed Central

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; de Melo Godoy, Patrícia Diogo; Motta, Maria Cristina M; Mortara, Renato A; Schenkman, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, many nuclear processes are spatially compartmentalized. Previously, we have shown that in Trypanosoma cruzi, an early-divergent eukaryote, DNA replication occurs at the nuclear periphery where chromosomes remain constrained during the S phase of the cell cycle. We followed Orc1/Cdc6, a pre-replication machinery component and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a component of replication machinery, during the cell cycle of this protozoon. We found that, at the G1 stage, TcOrc1/Cdc6 and TcPCNA are dispersed throughout the nuclear space. During the G1/S transition, TcOrc1/Cdc6 migrates to a region close to nuclear periphery. At the onset of S phase, TcPCNA is loaded onto the DNA and remains constrained close to nuclear periphery. Finally, in G2, mitosis and cytokinesis, TcOrc1/Cdc6 and TcPCNA are dispersed throughout the nuclear space. Based on these findings, we propose that DNA replication in T. cruzi is accomplished by the organization of functional machineries in a spatial-temporal manner. PMID:21738836

  19. Replication, recombination, and repair: going for the gold.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hannah L; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2002-03-01

    DNA recombination is now appreciated to be integral to DNA replication and cell survival. Recombination allows replication to successfully maneuver through the roadblocks of damaged or collapsed replication forks. The signals and controls that permit cells to transition between replication and recombination modes are now being identified.

  20. CDK1 phosphorylates WRN at collapsed replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Valentina; Rinalducci, Sara; Sanchez, Massimo; Grillini, Francesca; Sommers, Joshua A.; Brosh, Robert M.; Zolla, Lello; Franchitto, Annapaola; Pichierri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of end-processing is critical for accurate repair and to switch between homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). End resection is a two-stage process but very little is known about regulation of the long-range resection, especially in humans. WRN participates in one of the two alternative long-range resection pathways mediated by DNA2 or EXO1. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of WRN by CDK1 is essential to perform DNA2-dependent end resection at replication-related DSBs, promoting HR, replication recovery and chromosome stability. Mechanistically, S1133 phosphorylation of WRN is dispensable for relocalization in foci but is involved in the interaction with the MRE11 complex. Loss of WRN phosphorylation negatively affects MRE11 foci formation and acts in a dominant negative manner to prevent long-range resection altogether, thereby licensing NHEJ at collapsed forks. Collectively, we unveil a CDK1-dependent regulation of the WRN-DNA2-mediated resection and identify an undescribed function of WRN as a DSB repair pathway switch. PMID:27634057

  1. DNA transformations of Candida tropicalis with replicating and integrative vectors.

    PubMed

    Sanglard, D; Fiechter, A

    1992-12-01

    The alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis was used as a host for DNA transformations. A stable ade2 mutant (Ha900) obtained by UV-mutagenesis was used as a recipient for different vectors carrying selectable markers. A first vector, pMK16, that was developed for the transformation of C. albicans and carries an ADE2 gene marker and a Candida autonomously replicating sequence (CARS) element promoting autonomous replication, was compatible for transforming Ha900. Two transformant types were observed: (i) pink transformants which easily lose pMK16 under non-selective growth conditions; (ii) white transformants, in which the same plasmid exhibited a higher mitotic stability. In both cases pMK16 could be rescued from these cells in Escherichia coli. A second vector, pADE2, containing the isolated C. tropicalis ADE2, gene, was used to transform Ha900. This vector integrated in the yeast genome at homologous sites of the ade2 locus. Different integration types were observed at one or both ade2 alleles in single or in tandem repeats.

  2. CDK1 phosphorylates WRN at collapsed replication forks.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Valentina; Rinalducci, Sara; Sanchez, Massimo; Grillini, Francesca; Sommers, Joshua A; Brosh, Robert M; Zolla, Lello; Franchitto, Annapaola; Pichierri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of end-processing is critical for accurate repair and to switch between homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). End resection is a two-stage process but very little is known about regulation of the long-range resection, especially in humans. WRN participates in one of the two alternative long-range resection pathways mediated by DNA2 or EXO1. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of WRN by CDK1 is essential to perform DNA2-dependent end resection at replication-related DSBs, promoting HR, replication recovery and chromosome stability. Mechanistically, S1133 phosphorylation of WRN is dispensable for relocalization in foci but is involved in the interaction with the MRE11 complex. Loss of WRN phosphorylation negatively affects MRE11 foci formation and acts in a dominant negative manner to prevent long-range resection altogether, thereby licensing NHEJ at collapsed forks. Collectively, we unveil a CDK1-dependent regulation of the WRN-DNA2-mediated resection and identify an undescribed function of WRN as a DSB repair pathway switch. PMID:27634057

  3. DNA transformations of Candida tropicalis with replicating and integrative vectors.

    PubMed

    Sanglard, D; Fiechter, A

    1992-12-01

    The alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis was used as a host for DNA transformations. A stable ade2 mutant (Ha900) obtained by UV-mutagenesis was used as a recipient for different vectors carrying selectable markers. A first vector, pMK16, that was developed for the transformation of C. albicans and carries an ADE2 gene marker and a Candida autonomously replicating sequence (CARS) element promoting autonomous replication, was compatible for transforming Ha900. Two transformant types were observed: (i) pink transformants which easily lose pMK16 under non-selective growth conditions; (ii) white transformants, in which the same plasmid exhibited a higher mitotic stability. In both cases pMK16 could be rescued from these cells in Escherichia coli. A second vector, pADE2, containing the isolated C. tropicalis ADE2, gene, was used to transform Ha900. This vector integrated in the yeast genome at homologous sites of the ade2 locus. Different integration types were observed at one or both ade2 alleles in single or in tandem repeats. PMID:1293885

  4. The CRL4Cdt2 ubiquitin ligase targets the degradation of p21Cip1 to control replication licensing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngjo; Starostina, Natalia G; Kipreos, Edward T

    2008-09-15

    The faithful replication of genomic DNA is crucial for maintaining genome stability. In eukaryotes, DNA rereplication is prevented by the temporal regulation of replication licensing. Replication-licensing factors are required to form prereplicative complexes during G1 phase, but are inactivated in S phase to prevent rereplication. A vertebrate CUL4 CRL ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) complex containing Cdt2 as the substrate recognition subunit promotes proper DNA replication, in part, by degrading the replication-licensing factor Cdt1 during S phase. We show that the Caenorhabditis elegans CRL4(Cdt2) complex has a conserved role in degrading Cdt1. Furthermore, we show that CRL4(Cdt2) restrains replication licensing in both C. elegans and humans by targeting the degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors CKI-1 and p21(Cip1), respectively. Human CRL4(Cdt2) targets the degradation of p21 in S phase, with the in vivo ubiquitylation of p21 by CRL4(Cdt2) dependent on p21 binding to PCNA. Inactivation of Cdt2 induces rereplication, which requires the presence of the CDK inhibitor p21. Strikingly, coinactivation of CRL4(Cdt2) and SCF(Skp2) (which redundantly targets p21 degradation) prevents the nuclear export of the replication-licensing factor Cdc6 during S phase, and the block on nuclear export is dependent on p21. Our work defines the degradation of p21 as a critical aspect of replication licensing in human cells. PMID:18794348

  5. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleus and how this spatial organization is linked to temporal regulation. We focus on DNA replication in budding yeast and fission yeast and, where applicable, compare yeast DNA replication with that in bacteria and metazoans.

  6. Replication Restart after Replication-Transcription Conflicts Requires RecA in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Samadpour, Ariana Nakta

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Efficient duplication of genomes depends on reactivation of replication forks outside the origin. Replication restart can be facilitated by recombination proteins, especially if single- or double-strand breaks form in the DNA. Each type of DNA break is processed by a distinct pathway, though both depend on the RecA protein. One common obstacle that can stall forks, potentially leading to breaks in the DNA, is transcription. Though replication stalling by transcription is prevalent, the nature of DNA breaks and the prerequisites for replication restart in response to these encounters remain unknown. Here, we used an engineered site-specific replication-transcription conflict to identify and dissect the pathways required for the resolution and restart of replication forks stalled by transcription in Bacillus subtilis. We found that RecA, its loader proteins RecO and AddAB, and the Holliday junction resolvase RecU are required for efficient survival and replication restart after conflicts with transcription. Genetic analyses showed that RecO and AddAB act in parallel to facilitate RecA loading at the site of the conflict but that they can each partially compensate for the other's absence. Finally, we found that RecA and either RecO or AddAB are required for the replication restart and helicase loader protein, DnaD, to associate with the engineered conflict region. These results suggest that conflicts can lead to both single-strand gaps and double-strand breaks in the DNA and that RecA loading and Holliday junction resolution are required for replication restart at regions of replication-transcription conflicts. IMPORTANCE Head-on conflicts between replication and transcription occur when a gene is expressed from the lagging strand. These encounters stall the replisome and potentially break the DNA. We investigated the necessary mechanisms for Bacillus subtilis cells to overcome a site-specific engineered conflict with transcription of a protein-coding gene

  7. The DNA replication and damage checkpoint pathways induce transcription by inhibition of the Crt1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Zhou, Z; Elledge, S J

    1998-09-01

    We have identified the yeast CRT1 gene as an effector of the DNA damage and replication checkpoint pathway. CRT1 encodes a DNA-binding protein that recruits the general repressors Ssn6 and Tup1 to the promoters of damage-inducible genes. Derepression of the Crt1 regulon suppresses the lethality of mec1 and rad53 null alleles and is essential for cell viability during replicative stress. In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, Crt1 becomes hyperphosphorylated and no longer binds DNA, resulting in transcriptional induction. CRT1 is autoregulated and is itself induced by DNA damage, indicating the existence of a negative feedback pathway that facilitates return to the repressed state after elimination of damage. The inhibition of an autoregulatory repressor in response to DNA damage is a strategy conserved throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

  8. P1 plasmid replication: measurement of initiator protein concentration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Swack, J A; Pal, S K; Mason, R J; Abeles, A L; Chattoraj, D K

    1987-01-01

    To study the functions of the mini-P1 replication initiation protein RepA quantitatively, we have developed a method to measure RepA concentration by using immunoblotting. In vivo, there are about 20 RepA dimers per unit-copy plasmid DNA. RepA was deduced to be a dimer from gel filtration of the purified protein. Since there are 14 binding sites of the protein per replicon, the physiological concentration of the protein appears to be sufficiently low to be a rate-limiting factor for replication. Autoregulation is apparently responsible for the low protein level; at the physiological concentration of the protein, the repA promoter retains only 0.1% of its full activity as determined by gene fusions to lacZ. When the concentration is further decreased by a factor of 3 or increased by a factor of 40, replication is no longer detectable. Images PMID:3611028

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum: The Favorite Intracellular Niche for Viral Replication and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular organelle. It forms a complex network of continuous sheets and tubules, extending from the nuclear envelope (NE) to the plasma membrane. This network is frequently perturbed by positive-strand RNA viruses utilizing the ER to create membranous replication factories (RFs), where amplification of their genomes occurs. In addition, many enveloped viruses assemble progeny virions in association with ER membranes, and viruses replicating in the nucleus need to overcome the NE barrier, requiring transient changes of the NE morphology. This review first summarizes some key aspects of ER morphology and then focuses on the exploitation of the ER by viruses for the sake of promoting the different steps of their replication cycles. PMID:27338443

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum: The Favorite Intracellular Niche for Viral Replication and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular organelle. It forms a complex network of continuous sheets and tubules, extending from the nuclear envelope (NE) to the plasma membrane. This network is frequently perturbed by positive-strand RNA viruses utilizing the ER to create membranous replication factories (RFs), where amplification of their genomes occurs. In addition, many enveloped viruses assemble progeny virions in association with ER membranes, and viruses replicating in the nucleus need to overcome the NE barrier, requiring transient changes of the NE morphology. This review first summarizes some key aspects of ER morphology and then focuses on the exploitation of the ER by viruses for the sake of promoting the different steps of their replication cycles. PMID:27338443

  11. Reflections on "Replicating Milgram" (Burger, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur G.

    2009-01-01

    In "Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey Today?" Jerry M. Burger (see record 2008-19206-001) reported a high base rate of obedience, comparable to that observed by Stanley Milgram (1974). Another condition, involving a defiant confederate, failed to significantly reduce obedience. This commentary discusses the primary contributions of…

  12. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  13. Chemistry: Small molecular replicators go organic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Annette F.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of complex, dynamic molecular behaviour might have had a role in the origin of life. Such behaviour has now been seen in a reaction network involving small, organic, self-replicating molecules of biological relevance. See Letter p.656

  14. Reducing the agreement cost of BFT replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbierski, Maciej

    2015-09-01

    Byzantine fault-tolerant (BFT) replication is a powerful technique for guaranteeing correctness of distributed services despite arbitrary faults. BFT replication protocols are typically composed of two phases: agreement and execution. Although some monolithic solutions exist that incorporate both phases, providing a clear separation between agreement and execution is often desired, due to for instance higher level of abstraction or better resource utilization. At the same time, however, separation can increase latency and reduce throughput, as an additional communication round is typically required to relay the requests between the phases. In this article we address this issue by proposing an approach that reduces the cost of agreement in BFT replication protocols without sacrificing phase separation. The article presents Otonaru, a dedicated sequencer that achieves around 30% higher performance than solutions usually deployed in the agreement phase of modern BFT replication protocols. As a result, the solutions built using the proposed approach can inherit all benefits of separation, at the same time providing a performance competitive to monolithic BFT protocols.

  15. DNA replication: archaeal oriGINS.

    PubMed

    Bell, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    GINS is an essential eukaryotic DNA replication factor that is found in a simplified form in Archaea. A new study in this issue of BMC Biology reveals the first structure of the archaeal GINS complex. The structure reveals the anticipated similarity to the previously determined eukaryotic complex but also has some intriguing differences in the relative disposition of subunit domains. PMID:21627856

  16. 36 CFR 910.64 - Replication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Replication. 910.64 Section 910.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA...

  17. 36 CFR 910.64 - Replication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Replication. 910.64 Section 910.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA...

  18. 36 CFR 910.64 - Replication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Replication. 910.64 Section 910.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA...

  19. Projector Center: Replication, Transcription, and Translation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Edward B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the use of a chart that systematically summarizes three basic steps that involve DNA and its decoding in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells: replication; transcription, and translation. Indicates that the chart (mounted on a tranparency) does an adequate job of conveying basic information about nucleic acids to students. (DH)

  20. Measuring DNA Replication in Hypoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Foskolou, Iosifina P; Biasoli, Deborah; Olcina, Monica M; Hammond, Ester M

    2016-01-01

    It is imperative that dividing cells maintain replication fork integrity in order to prevent DNA damage and cell death. The investigation of DNA replication is of high importance as alterations in this process can lead to genomic instability, a known causative factor of tumor development. A simple, sensitive, and informative technique which enables the study of DNA replication, is the DNA fiber assay, an adaptation of which is described in this chapter. The DNA fiber method is a powerful tool, which allows the quantitative and qualitative analysis of DNA replication at the single molecule level. The sequential pulse labeling of live cells with two thymidine analogues and the subsequent detection with specific antibodies and fluorescence imaging allows direct examination of sites of DNA synthesis. In this chapter, we describe how this assay can be performed in conditions of low oxygen levels (hypoxia)-a physiologically relevant stress that occurs in most solid tumors. Moreover, we suggest ways on how to overcome the technical problems that arise while using the hypoxic chambers.

  1. Frameworks for Comprehending Discourse: A Replication Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Douglas; Timpson, William

    1979-01-01

    This study replicates findings of a study reported by Anderson et al. (EJ 184 138). Interpretation of ambiguously worded paragraphs was related to sex and college major. Titles on the paragraphs reduced ambiguity, although some students still gave an interpretation that was not consistent with the title. (Author/CP)

  2. Replication and Inhibitors of Enteroviruses and Parechoviruses.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Wolthers, Katja C; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-08-01

    The Enterovirus (EV) and Parechovirus genera of the picornavirus family include many important human pathogens, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, EV-A71, EV-D68, and human parechoviruses (HPeV). They cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from a simple common cold to life-threatening diseases such as encephalitis and myocarditis. At the moment, no antiviral therapy is available against these viruses and it is not feasible to develop vaccines against all EVs and HPeVs due to the great number of serotypes. Therefore, a lot of effort is being invested in the development of antiviral drugs. Both viral proteins and host proteins essential for virus replication can be used as targets for virus inhibitors. As such, a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication is pivotal in the design of antiviral strategies goes hand in hand with a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication. In this review, we will give an overview of the current state of knowledge of EV and HPeV replication and how this can be inhibited by small-molecule inhibitors.

  3. 36 CFR 910.64 - Replication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Replication. 910.64 Section 910.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA...

  4. The Intergenerational Caregiving Program: A Replication Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marlene Cresci; And Others

    The Intergenerational Caregiving Program (ICP), a year long educational experience in human development and child care for older adults, is described in this replication manual. In its first year of operation, the ICP recruited older, usually retired adults from agencies and organizations in San Francisco that serve older people. The 22 older…

  5. Flow Liner Slot Edge Replication Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Willard, Scott A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detection of cracks as small as 0.005 inch, and surface flaws as small as 0.001 inch, for the flowliner material.

  6. Replicating Direction Service: A Hand Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake Univ., Des Moines, IA. Midwest Regional Resource Center.

    The handbook details planning and development of a direction service center (DSC), an agency which matches the needs of handicapped persons with appropriate services. A replication sequence, based upon practices of the Jackson County, Missouri, Direction Service Center, is discussed for the following six areas: development of a resource…

  7. 36 CFR 910.64 - Replication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Replication. 910.64 Section 910.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION GENERAL GUIDELINES AND UNIFORM STANDARDS FOR URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN OF DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE PENNSYLVANIA...

  8. Multiseason occupancy models for correlated replicate surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, James; Nichols, James; Collazo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Occupancy surveys collecting data from adjacent (sometimes correlated) spatial replicates have become relatively popular for logistical reasons. Hines et al. (2010) presented one approach to modelling such data for single-season occupancy surveys. Here, we present a multiseason analogue of this model (with corresponding software) for inferences about occupancy dynamics. We include a new parameter to deal with the uncertainty associated with the first spatial replicate for both single-season and multiseason models. We use a case study, based on the brown-headed nuthatch, to assess the need for these models when analysing data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), and we test various hypotheses about occupancy dynamics for this species in the south-eastern United States. The new model permits inference about local probabilities of extinction, colonization and occupancy for sampling conducted over multiple seasons. The model performs adequately, based on a small simulation study and on results of the case study analysis. The new model incorporating correlated replicates was strongly favoured by model selection for the BBS data for brown-headed nuthatch (Sitta pusilla). Latitude was found to be an important source of variation in local colonization and occupancy probabilities for brown-headed nuthatch, with both probabilities being higher near the centre of the species range, as opposed to more northern and southern areas. We recommend this new occupancy model for detection–nondetection studies that use potentially correlated replicates.

  9. Campus Values in Mate Selection: A Replication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, John W.; Henze, lura F.

    1969-01-01

    Replicates research by Hill (1939) and McGinnis (1956) through use of questionnaire with random sample on four campuses. Concludes that values expressed currently and a generation ago show remarkable consistency. Revised version of paper presented at Rocky Muntain Social Science Association, Denver, Colorado, 1968. (CJ)

  10. Replication and Inhibitors of Enteroviruses and Parechoviruses

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Lonneke; Wolthers, Katja C.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Enterovirus (EV) and Parechovirus genera of the picornavirus family include many important human pathogens, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, EV-A71, EV-D68, and human parechoviruses (HPeV). They cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from a simple common cold to life-threatening diseases such as encephalitis and myocarditis. At the moment, no antiviral therapy is available against these viruses and it is not feasible to develop vaccines against all EVs and HPeVs due to the great number of serotypes. Therefore, a lot of effort is being invested in the development of antiviral drugs. Both viral proteins and host proteins essential for virus replication can be used as targets for virus inhibitors. As such, a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication is pivotal in the design of antiviral strategies goes hand in hand with a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication. In this review, we will give an overview of the current state of knowledge of EV and HPeV replication and how this can be inhibited by small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:26266417

  11. Formation of a DNA loop at the replication fork generated by bacteriophage T7 replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, K; Debyser, Z; Tabor, S; Richardson, C C; Griffith, J D

    1998-02-27

    Intermediates in the replication of circular and linear M13 double-stranded DNA by bacteriophage T7 proteins have been examined by electron microscopy. Synthesis generated double-stranded DNA molecules containing a single replication fork with a linear duplex tail. A complex presumably consisting of T7 DNA polymerase and gene 4 helicase/primase molecules was present at the fork together with a variable amount of single-stranded DNA sequestered by gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA binding protein. Analysis of the length distribution of Okazaki fragments formed at different helicase/primase concentrations was consistent with coupling of leading and lagging strand replication. Fifteen to forty percent of the templates engaged in replication have a DNA loop at the replication fork. The loops are fully double-stranded with an average length of approximately 1 kilobase. Labeling with biotinylated dCTP showed that the loops consist of newly synthesized DNA, and synchronization experiments using a linear template with a G-less cassette demonstrated that the loops are formed by active displacement of the lagging strand. A long standing feature of models for coupled leading/lagging strand replication has been the presence of a DNA loop at the replication fork. This study provides the first direct demonstration of such loops.

  12. ATR-like kinase Mec1 facilitates both chromatin accessibility at DNA replication forks and replication fork progression during replication stress.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for normal cell division and differentiation. In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication takes place on chromatin. This poses the critical question as to how DNA replication can progress through chromatin, which is inhibitory to all DNA-dependent processes. Here, we developed a novel genome-wide method to measure chromatin accessibility to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) that is normalized for nucleosome density, the NCAM (normalized chromatin accessibility to MNase) assay. This method enabled us to discover that chromatin accessibility increases specifically at and ahead of DNA replication forks in normal S phase and during replication stress. We further found that Mec1, a key regulatory ATR-like kinase in the S-phase checkpoint, is required for both normal chromatin accessibility around replication forks and replication fork rate during replication stress, revealing novel functions for the kinase in replicati