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Sample records for promotes episomal replication

  1. Identification of a 450-bp region of human papillomavirus type 1 that promotes episomal replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; Schmidt, Martin C.; Khan, Saleem A. . E-mail: khan@pitt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) replicate as nuclear plasmids in infected cells. Since the DNA replication machinery is generally conserved between humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we studied whether HPV-1 DNA can replicate in yeast. Plasmids containing a selectable marker (with or without a yeast centromere) and either the full-length HPV-1 genome or various regions of the viral long control region (LCR) and the 3' end of the L1 gene were introduced into S. cerevisiae and their ability to replicate episomally was investigated. Our results show that HPV-1 sequences promote episomal replication of plasmids although the yeast centromere is required for plasmid retention. We have mapped the autonomously replicating sequence activity of HPV-1 DNA to a 450 base-pair sequence (HPV-1 nt 6783-7232) that includes 293 nucleotides from the 5' region of the viral LCR and 157 nucleotides from the 3' end of the L1 gene. The HPV-1 ARS does not include the binding sites for the viral E1 and E2 proteins, and these proteins are dispensable for replication in S. cerevisiae.

  2. G-quadruplex-interacting compounds alter latent DNA replication and episomal persistence of KSHV

    PubMed Central

    Madireddy, Advaitha; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Loosbroock, Christopher P.; Robertson, Erle S.; Schildkraut, Carl L.; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long latent infection by persisting as an extra-chromosomal episome in the infected cells and by maintaining its genome in dividing cells. KSHV achieves this by tethering its epigenome to the host chromosome by latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which binds in the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Sequence analysis of the TR, a GC-rich DNA element, identified several potential Quadruplex G-Rich Sequences (QGRS). Since quadruplexes have the tendency to obstruct DNA replication, we used G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds to examine their effect on latent DNA replication and the persistence of viral episomes. Our results showed that these G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds led to the activation of dormant origins of DNA replication, with preferential bi-directional pausing of replications forks moving out of the TR region, implicating the role of the G-rich TR in the perturbation of episomal DNA replication. Over time, treatment with PhenDC3 showed a loss of viral episomes in the infected cells. Overall, these data show that G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds retard the progression of replication forks leading to a reduction in DNA replication and episomal maintenance. These results suggest a potential role for G-quadruplex stabilizers in the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:26837574

  3. Epstein-Barr virus episome-based promoter function in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, C A; Getty, R R; Tykocinski, M L

    1989-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) episomal replicons offer an expeditious means for amplifying transfected genes in human cells. A panel of EBV episomes was constructed to assess the relative utility of five distinct eukaryotic promoter elements for high level and inducible gene expression in stably transfected human myeloid leukemia cells. The Rous sarcoma virus 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) was most highly suited for EBV episome-based gene expression, whereas the lymphopapilloma virus and the SV40 early regulatory elements exhibited substantially lower activities. Chemically responsive promoter elements, such as the SV40 early, human metallothionein IIA and rat GRP78 gene promoters, retained their inducibility when EBV episome-based. Differences in gene expression obtained with the episomes reflected differential promoter activity rather than significant variations in episome copy numbers per cell. These observations provide guidelines for the optimal design of EBV episomal expression vectors for human expression work. Images PMID:2538801

  4. Physiological levels of HBB transgene expression from S/MAR element-based replicating episomal vectors.

    PubMed

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Spathas, Dionysios; Athanassiadou, Aglaia; Antoniou, Michael N

    2009-08-20

    Replicating episomal vectors (REV) are in principle able to provide long-term transgene expression in the absence of integration into the target cell genome. The scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) located 5' of the human beta-interferon gene (IFNB1) has been shown to confer a stable episomal replication and retention function within plasmid vectors when stably transfected and selected in mammalian cells. The minimal requirement for the IFNB1 S/MAR to function in DNA replication and episomal retention is transcription through this element. We used the erythroid beta-globin locus control region-beta-globin gene (betaLCR-HBB) microlocus cassette as a model to assess tissue-specific expression from within an IFNB1 S/MAR-based plasmid REV. The betaLCR-HBB plus S/MAR combination constructs provided either high or low levels of transcription through the S/MAR element. Our results show that the betaLCR-HBB microlocus is able to reproducibly and stably express at full physiological levels on an episome copy number basis. In addition, our data show that even low levels of transcription from betaLCR-HBB through the S/MAR element are sufficient to allow efficient episomal replication and retention. These data provide the principles upon which generic and flexible expression cassette-S/MAR-based REVs can be designed for a wide range of applications.

  5. Glucocorticoid regulation of transcription at an amplified, episomal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, M C; Richard-Foy, H; Wolford, R G; Berard, D S; Hager, G L

    1983-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) has been introduced into cultured murine cells, using the 69% transforming fragment of bovine papilloma virus type 1 (BPV). Transformed cells contain up to 200 copies of the chimeric molecules per diploid genome. The restriction endonuclease map of the acquired recombinants, as well as the physical structure of the DNA, indicates that the LTR-BPV molecules present in these cells occur exclusively as unintegrated, extrachromosomal episome. When a 72-base pair direct repeat "enhancer" element (derived from the Harvey sarcoma retrovirus) was included in the MMTV LTR-BPV chimeric plasmids, DNA acquired through transfection, with a single exception, was integrated or rearranged or both. The transcriptional potential of the episomal MMTV promoter present in these cells was tested in two ways. First, steady-state levels of MMTV-initiated RNA were measured by quantitative S1 mapping. Second, the relative number of transcription complexes initiated in vivo was determined by using a subnuclear fraction highly enriched for MMTV-BPV minichromosomes in an in vitro transcription extension assay. Both approaches showed that the MMTV LTR present in the episomal state was capable of supporting glucocorticoid hormone-regulated transcription. We have therefore demonstrated the hormone response for the first time in a totally defined primary sequence environment. Significant differences both in the basal level of MMTV-initiated transcription and in the extent of glucocorticoid induction were observed in individual cell lines with similar episomal copy numbers. These phenotypic variations suggest that epigenetic structure is an important component of the mechanism of regulation. Images PMID:6318079

  6. A Vector Based on the Chicken Hypersensitive Site 4 Insulator Element Replicates Episomally in Mammalian Cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Wang, Xiao-Yin; Jia, Yan-Long; Guo, Xiao; Wang, Yan-Fang; Wang, Tian-Yun

    2017-02-02

    Gene therapy in mammalian cells requires vectors exhibiting long-term stability and high expression. Episomal gene expression vectors offer a safe and attractive alternative to those that integrate into the host cell genome. In the present study, we developed a new episomal vector based on the insulator, chicken hypersensitive site 4 (cHS4). The cHS4 element was artificially synthesized, cloned into the pEGFP-C1 vector, and used to transfect Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human Chang liver cells. The stably transfected cell colonies were further cultured in either the presence or absence of G418 selection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and vector rescue experiments demonstrated that the vector replicated episomally in both CHO and human Chang liver cells. Compared with episomal vectors mediated by matrix attachment region sequences, the cHS4 element-containing vector yielded increased transgene expression levels, transfection efficiency, and stability during long-term culture. The vector was present at a very low copy number in the cells and was stably maintained over more than 100 generations without selection pressure. In conclusion, apart from a few free vector forms, the cHS4-containing vector mainly replicates episomally in mammalian cells and out-performs comparable systems in terms of yielding both higher expression levels and stability levels.

  7. Epstein-Barr-based episomal chromosomes shuttle 100 kb of self-replicating circular human DNA in mouse cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Z.T.; Fu, H.; Livanos, E.; Wendelburg, B.; Gulino, S.; Vos, J.M.

    1998-08-01

    The authors describe the microcell fusion transfer of 100--200 kb self-replicating circular human minichromosomes from human into mouse cells. This experimental approach is illustrated through the shuttling of the latent 170 kb double-stranded DNA genome from the human herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus, into nonpermissive rodent cells. Using this interspecies transfer strategy, circular episomes carrying 95--105 kb of human DNA were successfully established at low copy number in mouse A9 cells. Selected episomes were stably maintained for 6 months, and unselected episomes were characterized by a 95% episomal retention per cell division. The establishment of a mouse artificial episomal chromosome system should facilitate evolutionary and therapeutic studies of large human DNA in rodent genetic backgrounds.

  8. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  9. Replication of chromosomal and episomal DNA in X-ray-damaged human cells: A cis- or trans-acting mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.; Rose, R.; Mitchell, D.L. )

    1990-12-01

    Episomal plasmids and viruses in mammalian cells present small targets for X-ray-induced DNA damage. At doses up to 100 Gy, DNA strand breaks or endonuclease III-sensitive sites were not discernible in 10.3-kb Epstein-Barr virus-based plasmid DNA or in 4.9-kb defective simian virus 40 DNA. DNA replication in these small molecules, however, was inhibited strongly by X-ray doses of greater than or equal to 20 Gy, decreasing to only 20 to 40% of control values. Inhibition was relieved slightly by growth in caffeine but was increased by growth in 3-aminobenzamide. Inhibition of DNA replication in episomal DNA molecules that are too small to sustain significant damage directly to their DNA may be due to either (a) a trans-acting diffusible factor that transfers the consequences of DNA breakage to episomes and to other replicating molecules, (b) a cis-acting mechanism in which episomes are structurally linked to genomic chromatin, and replication of both episomal and chromosomal replicons is under common control, or (c) radiation damage on other cellular structures unrelated to DNA. The resolution of these cellular mechanisms may shed light on the X-ray-resistant replication in ataxia-telangiectasia and may suggest strategies for molecular characterization of potential trans- or cis-acting factors.

  10. Glucocorticoid regulation of transcription at an amplified, episomal promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrowski, M.C.; Richard-Foy, H.; Wolford, R.G.; Berard, D.S.; Hager, G.L.

    1983-11-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) has been introduced into cultured murine cells, using the 69% transforming fragment of bovine papiloma virus type 1 (BVP). Transformed cells contain up to 200 copies of the chimeric molecules per diploid genome. The restriction endonuclease map of the acquired recombinants, as well as the physical structure of the DNA, indicates that the LTR-BVP molecules present in these cells occur exclusively as unintegrated, extrachromosomal episome. When a 72-base pair direct repeat ''enhancer'' element (derived from the Harvey sarcoma retrovirus) was included in the MMTV LTR-BPV chimeric plasmids, DNA acquired through transfection, with a single exception, was integrated or rearranged or both. Two approaches showed that the MMTV LTR present in the episomal state was capable of supporting glucocorticoid hormone-regulated transcription. The authors have therefore demonstrated the hormone response for the first time in a totally defined primary sequence environment. Significant differences both in the basal level of MMTV-initiated transcription and in the extend of glucocorticoid induction were observed in individual cell lines with similar episomal copy numbers. These phenotypic variations suggest that epigenetic structure is an important component of the mechanism of regulation.

  11. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  12. Episomal High Copy Number Maintenance of Hairpin-capped DNA Bearing a Replication Initiation Region in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Seiyu; Uchida, Masafumi; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that a plasmid bearing a replication initiation region efficiently initiates gene amplification in mammalian cells and that it generates extrachromosomal double minutes and/or chromosomal homogeneously staining regions. During analysis of the underlying mechanism, we serendipitously found that hairpin-capped linear DNA was stably maintained as numerous extrachromosomal tiny episomes for more than a few months in a human cancer cell line. Generation of such episomes depended on the presence of the replication initiation region in the original plasmid. Despite extrachromosomal maintenance, episomal gene expression was epigenetically suppressed. The Southern blot analysis of the DNA of cloned cells revealed that the region around the hairpin end was diversified between the clones. Furthermore, the bisulfite-modified PCR and the sequencing analyses revealed that the palindrome sequence that derived from the original hairpin end or its end-resected structure were well preserved during clonal long term growth. From these data, we propose a model that explains the formation and maintenance of these episomes, in which replication of the hairpin-capped DNA and cruciform formation and its resolution play central roles. Our findings may be relevant for the dissection of mammalian replicator sequences. PMID:19617622

  13. The β-globin Replicator greatly enhances the potential of S/MAR based episomal vectors for gene transfer into human haematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, Eleana F.; Lazaris, Vassileios M.; Giannakopoulos, Aristeidis; Papapetrou, Eirini; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Zoumbos, Nikolas C.; Gkountis, Antonis; Athanassiadou, Aglaia

    2017-01-01

    Specific human chromosomal elements enhance the performance of episomal gene-transfer vectors. S/MAR-based episomal vector pEPI-eGFP transfects CD34+ haematopoietic cells, but only transiently. To address this issue we reinforced (1) transgene transcription by replacing the CMV promoter driving eGFP with the EF1/HTLV or SFFV promoters to produce vectors pEPI-EF1/HTLV and pEPI-SFFV, respectively; and (2) plasmid replication by inserting the replication-Initiation Region (IR) from the β-globin locus into vector pEPI-SFFV to produce vector pEP-IR. All vectors supported stable transfections in K562 cells. Transfections of CD34+ cells from peripheral blood of healthy donors reached 30% efficiency. Upon evaluation of CD34+/eGFP+ cells in colony-forming cell (CFC) assays, vector pEP-IR showed superior performance after 14 days, by fluorescent microscopy: 100% eGFP+-colonies against 0% for pEPI-eGFP, 56.9% for pEPI-SFFV and 49.8% for pEPI-EF1/HTLV; 50% more plasmid copies per cell and 3-fold eGFP expression compared to the latter two constructs, by quantitative (q)PCR and RT-qPCR, respectively. Importantly, the establishment rate in CFC assays was 15% for pEP-IR against 5.5% for pEPI-SFFV and 5% for pEPI-EF1/HTLV. Vector pEP-IR shows extremely low delivery rate but supports eGFP expression in thalassaemic mouse haematopoietic progenitor cells. The IR is a novel human control element for improved episomal gene transfer into progenitor cells. PMID:28106085

  14. Episomal Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Promote Functional Recovery of Transected Murine Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Cardona, Esteban; Chuang, Sheng-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic peripheral nerve neurotmesis occurs frequently and functional recovery is often slow and impaired. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have shown much promise in recent years due to its regenerative properties similar to that of embryonic stem cells. However, the potential of iPSCs in promoting the functional recovery of a transected peripheral nerve is largely unknown. This study is the first to investigate in vivo effects of episomal iPSCs (EiPSCs) on peripheral nerve regeneration in a murine sciatic nerve transection model. Episomal iPSCs refer to iPSCs that are generated via Oct3/4-Klf4-Sox2 plasmid reprogramming instead of the conventional viral insertion techniques. It represents a relatively safer form of iPSC production without permanent transgene integration which may raise questions regarding risks of genomic mutation. A minimal number of EiPSCs were added directly to the transected nerve. Functional recovery of the EiPSC group was significantly improved compared to the negative control group when assessed via serial five-toe spread measurement and gait analysis of ankle angles. EiPSC promotion of nerve regeneration was also evident on stereographic analysis of axon density, myelin thickness, and axonal cross-sectional surface area. Most importantly, the results observed in EiPSCs are similar to that of the embryonic stem cell group. A roughly ten-fold increase in neurotrophin-3 levels was seen in EiPSCs which could have contributed to peripheral nerve regeneration and recovery. No abnormal masses or adverse effects were noted with EiPSC administration after one year of follow-up. We have hence shown that functional recovery of the transected peripheral nerve can be improved with the use of EiPSC therapy, which holds promise for the future of nerve regeneration. PMID:27736950

  15. Non-viral S/MAR vectors replicate episomally in vivo when provided with a selective advantage.

    PubMed

    Wong, S P; Argyros, O; Coutelle, C; Harbottle, R P

    2011-01-01

    The ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent expression without the limitations of safety and reproducibility. We previously reported that a prototype plasmid vector, containing a scaffold matrix attachment region (S/MAR) domain and the luciferase reporter gene, showed transgene expression for at least 6 months following a single administration to MF1 mice. Following partial hepatectomy of the animals, however, we found no detectable vector replication and subsequent propagation in vivo. To overcome this drawback, we have now developed an in vivo liver selection strategy by which liver cells transfected with an S/MAR plasmid are provided with a survival advantage over non-transfected cells. This allows an enrichment of vectors that are capable of replicating and establishing themselves as extra-chromosomal entities in the liver. Accordingly, a novel S/MAR plasmid encoding the Bcl-2 gene was constructed; Bcl-2 expression confers resistance against apoptosis-mediated challenges by the Fas-activating antibody Jo2. Following hydrodynamic delivery to the livers of mice and frequent Jo2 administrations, we demonstrate that this Bcl-luciferase S/MAR plasmid is indeed capable of providing sustained luciferase reporter gene expression for over 3 months and that this plasmid replicates as an episomal entity in vivo. These results provide proof-of-principle that S/MAR vectors are capable of preventing transgene silencing, are resistant to integration and are able to confer mitotic stability in vivo when provided with a selective advantage.

  16. Epstein-barr virus shuttle vector for stable episomal replication of cDNA expression libraries in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Margolskee, R.F.; Kavathas, P.; Berg, P.

    1988-07-01

    Efficient transfection and expression of cDNA libraries in human cells has been achieved with an Epstein-Barr virus-based subcloning vector (EBO-pcD). The plasmid vector contains a resistance marker for hygromcying B to permit selection for transformed cells. The Epstein-Barr virus origin for plasmid replication (oriP) and the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen gene have also been incorporated into the vector to ensure that the plasmids are maintained stably and extrachromosomally. Human lymphoblastodi cells can be stably transformed at high efficiency (10 to 15%) by such plasmids, thereby permitting the ready isolation of 10/sup 6/ to 10/sup 7/ independent transformants. Consequently, entire high-complexity EBO-pcD expression libraries can be introduced into these cells. Furthermore, since EBP-pcD plasmids are maintained as episomes at two to eight copies per cell, intact cDNA clones can be readily isolated from transformants and recovered by propagation in Escherichia coli. By using such vectors, human cells have been stably transformed with EBO-pcD-hprt to express hypoxanthing-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and with EBO-pcD-Leu-2 to express the human T-cell surface marker Leu-2. Reconstruction experiments with mixtures of EBO-pcD plasmids demonstrated that one clone of EBO-pcD-hprt per 10/sup 6/ total clones or one clone of EBO-pcD-Leu-2 per 2 x 10/sup 4/ total clones can be recovered intact from the transformed cells. The ability to directly select for expression of very rare EBO-pcD clones and to then recover these episomes should make it possible to clone certain genes where hybridization and immunological screening methods are not applicable but where a phenotype can be scored or selected in human cell lines.

  17. Cloned origin of DNA replication in c-myc gene can function and be transmitted in transgenic mice in an episomal state.

    PubMed Central

    Sudo, K; Ogata, M; Sato, Y; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1990-01-01

    The c-myc protein has recently been shown to interact with a region possessing putative origin of DNA replication and enhancer activities located 2 kb upstream of the c-myc gene itself. Transgenic mice were obtained by injecting constructs containing this region, termed pmyc(H-P), into fertilized mouse eggs. The transgenic elements were capable of efficient replication in all mouse tissues examined and were maintained in an episomal state even in highly differentiated cells. Moreover, pmyc(H-P) was transmittable to the progeny throughout several generations, which suggests that the fragment derived from the region upstream of the c-myc gene possesses sequences necessary for partition, stability and DNA replication of the plasmid in the cells. In addition, we have shown that the plasmid might be captured only by eggs, not by sperm. Images PMID:2216716

  18. The ubiquitin-specific protease USP7 modulates the replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent episomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Wiebke; Santag, Susann; Weidner-Glunde, Magdalena; Gellermann, Eva; Kati, Semra; Pietrek, Marcel; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Schulz, Thomas F

    2012-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma-2 Herpesviridae and is associated with three neoplastic disorders: Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). The viral latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA) is expressed in all latently KSHV-infected cells and is involved in viral latent replication and maintenance of the viral genome. We show that LANA interacts with the ubiquitin-specific protease USP7 through its N-terminal TRAF (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] receptor-associated factor) domain. This interaction involves a short sequence (amino acids [aa] 971 to 986) within the C-terminal domain of LANA with strong similarities to the USP7 binding site of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA-1 protein. A LANA mutant with a deletion of the identified USP7 binding site showed an enhanced ability to replicate a plasmid containing the KSHV latent origin of replication but was comparable to the wild-type LANA (LANA WT) with regard to the regulation of viral and cellular promoters. Furthermore, the LANA homologues of two other gamma-2 herpesviruses, MHV68 and RRV, also recruit USP7. Our findings suggest that recruitment of USP7 to LANA could play a role in the regulation of viral latent replication. The recruitment of USP7, and its role in herpesvirus latent replication, previously described for the latent EBNA-1 protein of the gamma-1 herpesvirus (lymphocryptovirus) EBV (M. N. Holowaty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 278:29987-29994, 2003), may thereby be a conserved feature among gammaherpesvirus latent origin binding proteins.

  19. The Ubiquitin-Specific Protease USP7 Modulates the Replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latent Episomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Wiebke; Santag, Susann; Weidner-Glunde, Magdalena; Gellermann, Eva; Kati, Semra; Pietrek, Marcel; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) belongs to the gamma-2 Herpesviridae and is associated with three neoplastic disorders: Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). The viral latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA) is expressed in all latently KSHV-infected cells and is involved in viral latent replication and maintenance of the viral genome. We show that LANA interacts with the ubiquitin-specific protease USP7 through its N-terminal TRAF (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] receptor-associated factor) domain. This interaction involves a short sequence (amino acids [aa] 971 to 986) within the C-terminal domain of LANA with strong similarities to the USP7 binding site of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) EBNA-1 protein. A LANA mutant with a deletion of the identified USP7 binding site showed an enhanced ability to replicate a plasmid containing the KSHV latent origin of replication but was comparable to the wild-type LANA (LANA WT) with regard to the regulation of viral and cellular promoters. Furthermore, the LANA homologues of two other gamma-2 herpesviruses, MHV68 and RRV, also recruit USP7. Our findings suggest that recruitment of USP7 to LANA could play a role in the regulation of viral latent replication. The recruitment of USP7, and its role in herpesvirus latent replication, previously described for the latent EBNA-1 protein of the gamma-1 herpesvirus (lymphocryptovirus) EBV (M. N. Holowaty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 278:29987–29994, 2003), may thereby be a conserved feature among gammaherpesvirus latent origin binding proteins. PMID:22514345

  20. An interaction between human papillomavirus 16 E2 and TopBP1 is required for optimum viral DNA replication and episomal genome establishment.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mary M; Mackintosh, Lorna J; Bodily, Jason M; Dornan, Edward S; Laimins, Laimonis A; Morgan, Iain M

    2012-12-01

    In human papillomavirus DNA replication, the viral protein E2 forms homodimers and binds to 12-bp palindromic DNA sequences surrounding the origin of DNA replication. Via a protein-protein interaction, it then recruits the viral helicase E1 to an A/T-rich origin of replication, whereupon a dihexamer forms, resulting in DNA replication initiation. In order to carry out DNA replication, the viral proteins must interact with host factors that are currently not all known. An attractive cellular candidate for regulating viral replication is TopBP1, a known interactor of the E2 protein. In mammalian DNA replication, TopBP1 loads DNA polymerases onto the replicative helicase after the G(1)-to-S transition, and this process is tightly cell cycle controlled. The direct interaction between E2 and TopBP1 would allow E2 to bypass this cell cycle control, resulting in DNA replication more than once per cell cycle, which is a requirement for the viral life cycle. We report here the generation of an HPV16 E2 mutant compromised in TopBP1 interaction in vivo and demonstrate that this mutant retains transcriptional activation and repression functions but has suboptimal DNA replication potential. Introduction of this mutant into a viral life cycle model results in the failure to establish viral episomes. The results present a potential new antiviral target, the E2-TopBP1 interaction, and increase our understanding of the viral life cycle, suggesting that the E2-TopBP1 interaction is essential.

  1. LCR-mediated, long-term tissue-specific gene expression within replicating episomal plasmid and cosmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Chow, C-M; Athanassiadou, A; Raguz, S; Psiouri, L; Harland, L; Malik, M; Aitken, M A; Grosveld, F; Antoniou, M

    2002-03-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are transcriptional regulatory elements, which possess a dominant chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activating capability conferring full physiological levels of expression on a gene linked in cis, when integrated into the host cell genome. Using the human beta-globin LCR (betaLCR) as a model, we show that this class of control element can drive high levels of tissue-specific gene expression in stably transfected cultured cells from within an Epstein-Barr virus-based plasmid REV. Furthermore, a 38-kb betaLCR minilocus-REV cosmid vector was efficiently retained and maintained therapeutic levels of beta-globin transgene expression in the absence of drug selective pressure over a 2-month period of continuous culture equivalent to at least 60 generations. This demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using REVs for gene therapy of the haemoglobinopathies. Importantly, our results demonstrate that as in the case of integrated transgenes, expression from within REVs is prone to silencing but that the inclusion of the betaLCR prevented this repression of gene function. Therefore, appropriate control elements to provide and maintain tissue-specific gene expression, as well as the episomal status of REVs is a crucial feature in vector design. Our data suggest that LCRs can contribute to this vital function.

  2. A novel DNA replication origin identified in the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Taira, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1994-01-01

    A general and sensitive method for the mapping of initiation sites of DNA replication in vivo, developed by Vassilev and Johnson, has revealed replication origins in the region of simian virus 40 ori, in the regions upstream from the human c-myc gene and downstream from the Chinese hamster dihydrofolate reductase gene, and in the enhancer region of the mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene. Here we report that the region containing the promoter of the human heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene was identified as a DNA replication origin in HeLa cells by this method. Several segments of the region were cloned into pUC19 and examined for autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) activity. The plasmids carrying the segments replicated episomally and semiconservatively when transfected into HeLa cells. The segments of ARS activity contained the sequences previously identified as binding sequences for a c-myc protein complex (T. Taira, Y. Negishi, F. Kihara, S. M. M. Iguchi-Ariga, and H. Ariga, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1130:166-174, 1992). Mutations introduced within the c-myc protein complex binding sequences abolished the ARS activity. Moreover, the ARS plasmids stably replicated at episomal state for a long time in established cell lines. The results suggest that the promoter region of the human hsp70 gene plays a role in DNA replication as well as in transcription. Images PMID:8065368

  3. Chk1 promotes replication fork progression by controlling replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Woodcock, Mick; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-09-14

    DNA replication starts at initiation sites termed replication origins. Metazoan cells contain many more potential origins than are activated (fired) during each S phase. Origin activation is controlled by the ATR checkpoint kinase and its downstream effector kinase Chk1, which suppresses origin firing in response to replication blocks and during normal S phase by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk2. In addition to increased origin activation, cells deficient in Chk1 activity display reduced rates of replication fork progression. Here we investigate the causal relationship between increased origin firing and reduced replication fork progression. We use the Cdk inhibitor roscovitine or RNAi depletion of Cdc7 to inhibit origin firing in Chk1-inhibited or RNAi-depleted cells. We report that Cdk inhibition and depletion of Cdc7 can alleviate the slow replication fork speeds in Chk1-deficient cells. Our data suggest that increased replication initiation leads to slow replication fork progression and that Chk1 promotes replication fork progression during normal S phase by controlling replication origin activity.

  4. Designer diatom episomes delivered by bacterial conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Bogumil J.; Diner, Rachel E.; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; McQuaid, Jeff; Phillips, Alex P.R.; Noddings, Chari M.; Brunson, John K.; Valas, Ruben E.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Jablanovic, Jelena; Gillard, Jeroen T.F.; Beeri, Karen; Ellisman, Mark H.; Glass, John I.; Hutchison III, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Venter, J. Craig; Allen, Andrew E.; Dupont, Christopher L.; Weyman, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic microalgae hold great promise for the bioproduction of fuels and higher value chemicals. However, compared with model genetic organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, characterization of the complex biology and biochemistry of algae and strain improvement has been hampered by the inefficient genetic tools. To date, many algal species are transformable only via particle bombardment, and the introduced DNA is integrated randomly into the nuclear genome. Here we describe the first nuclear episomal vector for diatoms and a plasmid delivery method via conjugation from Escherichia coli to the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We identify a yeast-derived sequence that enables stable episome replication in these diatoms even in the absence of antibiotic selection and show that episomes are maintained as closed circles at copy number equivalent to native chromosomes. This highly efficient genetic system facilitates high-throughput functional characterization of algal genes and accelerates molecular phytoplankton research. PMID:25897682

  5. Designer diatom episomes delivered by bacterial conjugation.

    PubMed

    Karas, Bogumil J; Diner, Rachel E; Lefebvre, Stephane C; McQuaid, Jeff; Phillips, Alex P R; Noddings, Chari M; Brunson, John K; Valas, Ruben E; Deerinck, Thomas J; Jablanovic, Jelena; Gillard, Jeroen T F; Beeri, Karen; Ellisman, Mark H; Glass, John I; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Venter, J Craig; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-04-21

    Eukaryotic microalgae hold great promise for the bioproduction of fuels and higher value chemicals. However, compared with model genetic organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, characterization of the complex biology and biochemistry of algae and strain improvement has been hampered by the inefficient genetic tools. To date, many algal species are transformable only via particle bombardment, and the introduced DNA is integrated randomly into the nuclear genome. Here we describe the first nuclear episomal vector for diatoms and a plasmid delivery method via conjugation from Escherichia coli to the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We identify a yeast-derived sequence that enables stable episome replication in these diatoms even in the absence of antibiotic selection and show that episomes are maintained as closed circles at copy number equivalent to native chromosomes. This highly efficient genetic system facilitates high-throughput functional characterization of algal genes and accelerates molecular phytoplankton research.

  6. How dormant origins promote complete genome replication

    PubMed Central

    Blow, J. Julian; Ge, Xin Quan; Jackson, Dean A.

    2012-01-01

    Many replication origins that are licensed by loading MCM2-7 complexes in G1 are not normally used. Activation of these dormant origins during S phase provides a first line of defence for the genome if replication is inhibited. When replication forks fail, dormant origins are activated within regions of the genome currently engaged in replication. At the same time, DNA damage response kinases activated by the stalled forks preferentially suppress the assembly of new replication factories, thereby ensuring that chromosomal regions experiencing replicative stress complete synthesis before new regions of the genome are replicated. Mice expressing reduced levels of MCM2-7 have fewer dormant origins, are cancer prone and are genetically unstable, thus demonstrating the importance of dormant origins for preserving genome integrity. Here we review the function of dormant origins, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and their physiological implications. PMID:21641805

  7. RMI1 Promotes DNA Replication Fork Progression and Recovery from Replication Fork Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jay; O'Donnell, Lara; Durocher, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    RMI1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved complex composed of BLM and topoisomerase IIIα (TopoIIIα). This complex exhibits strand passage activity in vitro, which is likely important for DNA repair and DNA replication in vivo. The inactivation of RMI1 causes genome instability, including elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange and accelerated tumorigenesis. Using molecular combing to analyze DNA replication at the single-molecule level, we show that RMI1 is required to promote normal replication fork progression. The fork progression defect in RMI1-depleted cells is alleviated in cells lacking BLM, indicating that RMI1 functions downstream of BLM in promoting replication elongation. RMI1 localizes to subnuclear foci with BLM and TopoIIIα in response to replication stress. The proper localization of the complex requires a BLM-TopoIIIα-RMI1 interaction and is essential for RMI1 to promote recovery from replication stress. These findings reveal direct roles of RMI1 in DNA replication and the replication stress response, which could explain the molecular basis for its involvement in suppressing sister chromatid exchange and tumorigenesis. PMID:22645306

  8. A dual promoter system regulating λ DNA replication initiation

    PubMed Central

    Olszewski, Paweł; Szambowska, Anna; Barańska, Sylwia; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Glinkowska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Transcription and DNA replication are tightly regulated to ensure coordination of gene expression with growth conditions and faithful transmission of genetic material to progeny. A large body of evidence has accumulated, indicating that encounters between protein machineries carrying out DNA and RNA synthesis occur in vivo and may have important regulatory consequences. This feature may be exacerbated in the case of compact genomes, like the one of bacteriophage λ, used in our study. Transcription that starts at the rightward pR promoter and proceeds through the λ origin of replication and downstream of it was proven to stimulate the initiation of λ DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that the activity of a convergently oriented pO promoter decreases the efficiency of transcription starting from pR. Our results show, however, that a lack of the functional pO promoter negatively influences λ phage and λ-derived plasmid replication. We present data, suggesting that this effect is evoked by the enhanced level of the pR-driven transcription, occurring in the presence of the defective pO, which may result in the impeded formation of the replication initiation complex. Our data suggest that the cross talk between the two promoters regulates λ DNA replication and coordinates transcription and replication processes. PMID:24500197

  9. Impaired DNA replication within progenitor cell pools promotes leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Ganna; Marusyk, Andriy; Porter, Christopher C; Cardiff, Robert D; DeGregori, James

    2005-12-01

    Impaired cell cycle progression can be paradoxically associated with increased rates of malignancies. Using retroviral transduction of bone marrow progenitors followed by transplantation into mice, we demonstrate that inhibition of hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation impairs competition, promoting the expansion of progenitors that acquire oncogenic mutations which restore cell cycle progression. Conditions that impair DNA replication dramatically enhance the proliferative advantage provided by the expression of Bcr-Abl or mutant p53, which provide no apparent competitive advantage under conditions of healthy replication. Furthermore, for the Bcr-Abl oncogene the competitive advantage in contexts of impaired DNA replication dramatically increases leukemogenesis. Impaired replication within hematopoietic progenitor cell pools can select for oncogenic events and thereby promote leukemia, demonstrating the importance of replicative competence in the prevention of tumorigenesis. The demonstration that replication-impaired, poorly competitive progenitor cell pools can promote tumorigenesis provides a new rationale for links between tumorigenesis and common human conditions of impaired DNA replication such as dietary folate deficiency, chemotherapeutics targeting dNTP synthesis, and polymorphisms in genes important for DNA metabolism.

  10. Tetracycline-inducible promoter-based conditionally replicative adenoviruses for the control of viral replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Takayama, K; Zhang, L; Uchino, J; Harada, A; Harada, T; Hisasue, J; Nakagaki, N; Zhou, C; Nakanishi, Y

    2009-05-01

    The use of conditionally replicative adenoviruses (CRAds) as a promising strategy for cancer gene therapy has been developed to overcome inefficient transduction of solid tumor masses by replication-deficient adenoviruses. Many modifications have been made to CRAds to enlarge tropism, increase selectivity and lytic ability, and improve safety. However, safety is still a concern in the context of future clinical application of CRAds. Particularly, after injection into the body, viral replication cannot be controlled externally. Therefore, we constructed a novel CRAd using a tetracycline-inducible promoter system to realize external pharmacological control of its replication. The effect of this CRAd in vitro was measured at the levels of viral DNA replication, cell death and progeny production. We showed that CRAd replication was tightly controlled by the presence or absence of doxycycline (Dox). Moreover, this system showed a significant gene expression in vivo, in which the viral replication was controlled by the oral administration of Dox. This strategy may help improve the safety of cancer gene therapy.

  11. Identification of a differentiation-inducible promoter in the E7 open reading frame of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) in raft cultures of a new cell line containing high copy numbers of episomal HPV-16 DNA.

    PubMed

    Grassmann, K; Rapp, B; Maschek, H; Petry, K U; Iftner, T

    1996-04-01

    Gene expression of human papillomaviruses (HPV) is tightly linked to differentiation processes within the pluristratified epithelium. To analyze changes in the transcription pattern of HPV-16 during epithelial cell differentiation, we established a permanently growing HPV-16 positive cell line, designated KG, from a vulvar intraepithelial neoplasm. KG cells of early passages harbored multiple copies of the HPV-16 DNA as episomes and were able to form a stratified epithelium in an organotypic raft culture system. Analysis of viral gene expression revealed the known transcription pattern of the early region of HPV-16 with the exception of a so far undefined mRNA class with start sites in the E7 open reading frame. Quantitative analysis of primer extension experiments with RNA from KG cells grown in monolayer and raft culture showed a strong induction of this transcript in differentiated KG cells, whereas the level of the mRNAs initiated at the early promoter P97 remained almost constant. Primer extension analyses with four different primers and direct sequencing of the extension product revealed that the differentiation-inducible transcript initiated at a novel promoter with a major start site around nucleotide position 670 (P670) in the E7 open reading frame of HPV-16. Sequence analysis of cDNAs derived from RNA of KG cells grown in raft culture suggested that the transcripts initiated at P670 have a coding potential for an E1E4 fusion protein and for the E5 protein.

  12. Episomal vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Anja; Haase, Rudolf; Schepers, Aloys; Deutsch, Manuel J; Lipps, Hans Joachim; Baiker, Armin

    2008-06-01

    The increasing knowledge of the molecular and genetic background of many different human diseases has led to the vision that genetic engineering might be used one day for their phenotypic correction. The main goal of gene therapy is to treat loss-of-function genetic disorders by delivering correcting therapeutic DNA sequences into the nucleus of a cell, allowing its long-term expression at physiologically relevant levels. Manifold different vector systems for the therapeutic gene delivery have been described over the recent years. They all have their individual advantages but also their individual limitations and must be judged on a careful risk/benefit analysis. Integrating vector systems can deliver genetic material to a target cell with high efficiency enabling long-term expression of an encoded transgene. The main disadvantage of integrating vector systems, however, is their potential risk of causing insertional mutagenesis. Episomal vector systems have the potential to avoid these undesired side effects, since they behave as separate extrachromosomal elements in the nucleus of a target cell. Within this article we present a comprehensive survey of currently available episomal vector systems for the genetic modification of mammalian cells. We will discuss their advantages and disadvantages and their applications in the context of basic research, biotechnology and gene therapy.

  13. Transpositionally active episomal hAT elements

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background hAT elements and V(D)J recombination may have evolved from a common ancestral transposable element system. Extrachromosomal, circular forms of transposable elements (referred to here as episomal forms) have been reported yet their biological significance remains unknown. V(D)J signal joints, which resemble episomal transposable elements, have been considered non-recombinogenic products of V(D)J recombination and a safe way to dispose of excised chromosomal sequences. V(D)J signal joints can, however, participate in recombination reactions and the purpose of this study was to determine if hobo and Hermes episomal elements are also recombinogenic. Results Up to 50% of hobo/Hermes episomes contained two intact, inverted-terminal repeats and 86% of these contained from 1-1000 bp of intercalary DNA. Episomal hobo/Hermes elements were recovered from Musca domestica (a natural host of Hermes), Drosophila melanogaster (a natural host of hobo) and transgenic Drosophila melanogaster and Aedes aegypti (with autonomous Hermes elements). Episomal Hermes elements were recovered from unfertilized eggs of M. domestica and D. melanogaster demonstrating their potential for extrachromosomal, maternal transmission. Reintegration of episomal Hermes elements was observed in vitro and in vivo and the presence of Hermes episomes resulted in lower rates of canonical Hermes transposition in vivo. Conclusion Episomal hobo/Hermes elements are common products of element excision and can be maternally transmitted. Episomal forms of Hermes are capable of integration and also of influencing the transposition of canonical elements suggesting biological roles for these extrachromosomal elements in element transmission and regulation. PMID:20003420

  14. An episomal expression vector for screening mutant gene libraries in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles C; Williams, Tina G; Wong, Dominic W S; Robertson, George H

    2005-07-01

    Screening mutant gene libraries for isolating improved enzyme variants is a powerful technique that benefits from effective and reliable biological expression systems. Pichia pastoris is a very useful organism to express proteins that are inactive in other hosts such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, most P. pastoris expression plasmids are designed to integrate into the host chromosome and hence are not as amenable to high-throughput screening projects. We have designed a P. pastoris expression vector, pBGP1, incorporating an autonomous replication sequence that allows the plasmid to exist as an episomal element. This vector contains the alpha-factor signal sequence to direct secretion of the mutant enzymes. Expression of the genes is driven by the constitutive GAP promoter, thus eliminating the need for timed or cell density-specific inductions. The pBGP1 plasmid was used to screen a xylanase gene library to isolate higher activity mutants.

  15. DDX59 promotes DNA replication in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    You, Jin; Wang, Xingshun; Wang, Jiuling; Yuan, Baolei; Zhang, Yandong

    2017-01-01

    DEAD box proteins are multifunctional proteins involved in every aspect in RNA metabolism and have essential roles in many cellular activities. Despite their importance, many DEAD box proteins remain uncharacterized. In this report, we found DDX59 overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. DDX59 knockdown reduced cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell growth, and caused reduction of tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. In multiple lung cancer cells, we found that DDX59 knockdown inhibits DNA synthesis; wild-type DDX59 but not helicase-defective mutant of DDX59 enhances DNA synthesis. DDX59 knockdown caused reduction of MCM protein levels, decreased the loading of MCM ring protein onto chromatin, and therefore inhibited DNA replication. Our study reveals for the first time that DDX59 has an important role in lung cancer development through promoting DNA replication. PMID:28090355

  16. HCF1 and OCT2 Cooperate with EBNA1 To Enhance OriP-Dependent Transcription and Episome Maintenance of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Sentana-Lledo, Daniel; Cassel, Joel; Messick, Troy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes latent infections as multicopy episomes with complex patterns of viral gene transcription and chromatin structure. The EBV origin of plasmid replication (OriP) has been implicated as a critical control element for viral transcription, as well as viral DNA replication and episome maintenance. Here, we examine cellular factors that bind OriP and regulate histone modification, transcription regulation, and episome maintenance. We found that OriP is enriched for histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation in multiple cell types and latency types. Host cell factor 1 (HCF1), a component of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methyltransferase complex, and transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding transcription factor 2) bound cooperatively with EBNA1 (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1) at OriP. Depletion of OCT2 or HCF1 deregulated latency transcription and histone modifications at OriP, as well as the OriP-regulated latency type-dependent C promoter (Cp) and Q promoter (Qp). HCF1 depletion led to a loss of histone H3K4me3 (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4) and H3 acetylation at Cp in type III latency and Qp in type I latency, as well as an increase in heterochromatic H3K9me3 at these sites. HCF1 depletion resulted in the loss of EBV episomes from Burkitt's lymphoma cells with type I latency and reactivation from lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) with type III latency. These findings indicate that HCF1 and OCT2 function at OriP to regulate viral transcription, histone modifications, and episome maintenance. As HCF1 is best known for its function in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene transcription, our findings suggest that EBV latency transcription shares unexpected features with HSV gene regulation. IMPORTANCE EBV latency is associated with several human cancers. Viral latent cycle gene expression is regulated by the epigenetic control of the OriP enhancer region. Here, we show that cellular factors

  17. HCF1 and OCT2 Cooperate with EBNA1 To Enhance OriP-Dependent Transcription and Episome Maintenance of Latent Epstein-Barr Virus.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Sentana-Lledo, Daniel; Cassel, Joel; Messick, Troy; Lieberman, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes latent infections as multicopy episomes with complex patterns of viral gene transcription and chromatin structure. The EBV origin of plasmid replication (OriP) has been implicated as a critical control element for viral transcription, as well as viral DNA replication and episome maintenance. Here, we examine cellular factors that bind OriP and regulate histone modification, transcription regulation, and episome maintenance. We found that OriP is enriched for histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation in multiple cell types and latency types. Host cell factor 1 (HCF1), a component of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methyltransferase complex, and transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding transcription factor 2) bound cooperatively with EBNA1 (Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1) at OriP. Depletion of OCT2 or HCF1 deregulated latency transcription and histone modifications at OriP, as well as the OriP-regulated latency type-dependent C promoter (Cp) and Q promoter (Qp). HCF1 depletion led to a loss of histone H3K4me3 (trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4) and H3 acetylation at Cp in type III latency and Qp in type I latency, as well as an increase in heterochromatic H3K9me3 at these sites. HCF1 depletion resulted in the loss of EBV episomes from Burkitt's lymphoma cells with type I latency and reactivation from lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) with type III latency. These findings indicate that HCF1 and OCT2 function at OriP to regulate viral transcription, histone modifications, and episome maintenance. As HCF1 is best known for its function in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene transcription, our findings suggest that EBV latency transcription shares unexpected features with HSV gene regulation. EBV latency is associated with several human cancers. Viral latent cycle gene expression is regulated by the epigenetic control of the OriP enhancer region. Here, we show that cellular factors OCT2 and HCF1 bind Ori

  18. AKT1 loss correlates with episomal HPV16 in vulval intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ekeowa-Anderson, Arucha L; Purdie, Karin J; Gibbon, Karen; Byrne, Carolyn R; Arbeit, Jeffrey M; Harwood, Catherine A; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L

    2012-01-01

    Anogenital malignancy has a significant association with high-risk mucosal alpha-human papillomaviruses (alpha-PV), particularly HPV 16 and 18 whereas extragenital SCC has been linked to the presence of cutaneous beta and gamma-HPV types. Vulval skin may be colonised by both mucosal and cutaneous (beta-, mu-, nu- and gamma-) PV types, but there are few systematic studies investigating their presence and their relative contributions to vulval malignancy. Dysregulation of AKT, a serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in several cancers. Mucosal HPV types can increase AKT phosphorylation and activity whereas cutaneous HPV types down-regulate AKT1 expression, probably to weaken the cornified envelope to promote viral release. We assessed the presence of mucosal and cutaneous HPV in vulval malignancy and its relationship to AKT1 expression in order to establish the corresponding HPV and AKT1 profile of normal vulval skin, vulval intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) and vulval squamous cell carcinoma (vSCC). We show that HPV16 is the principle HPV type present in VIN, there were few detectable beta types present and AKT1 loss was not associated with the presence of these cutaneous HPV. We show that HPV16 early gene expression reduced AKT1 expression in transgenic mouse epidermis. AKT1 loss in our VIN cohort correlated with presence of high copy number, episomal HPV16. Maintained AKT1 expression correlated with low copy number, an increased frequency of integration and increased HPV16E7 expression, a finding we replicated in another untyped cohort of vSCC. Since expression of E7 reflects tumour progression, these findings suggest that AKT1 loss associated with episomal HPV16 may have positive prognostic implications in vulval malignancy.

  19. The Nuclear DNA Sensor IFI16 Acts as a Restriction Factor for Human Papillomavirus Replication through Epigenetic Modifications of the Viral Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Lo Cigno, Irene; De Andrea, Marco; Borgogna, Cinzia; Albertini, Silvia; Landini, Manuela M.; Peretti, Alberto; Johnson, Karen E.; Chandran, Bala; Landolfo, Santo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human interferon-inducible IFI16 protein, an innate immune sensor of intracellular DNA, was recently demonstrated to act as a restriction factor for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection by inhibiting both viral-DNA replication and transcription. Through the use of two distinct cellular models, this study provides strong evidence in support of the notion that IFI16 can also restrict human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) replication. In the first model, an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (NIKS) was used, in which the IFI16 protein was knocked down through the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology and overexpressed following transduction with the adenovirus IFI16 (AdVIFI16) vector. The second model consisted of U2OS cells transfected by electroporation with HPV18 minicircles. In differentiated IFI16-silenced NIKS-HPV18 cells, viral-load values were significantly increased compared with differentiated control cells. Consistent with this, IFI16 overexpression severely impaired HPV18 replication in both NIKS and U2OS cells, thus confirming its antiviral restriction activity. In addition to the inhibition of viral replication, IFI16 was also able to reduce viral transcription, as demonstrated by viral-gene expression analysis in U2OS cells carrying episomal HPV18 minicircles and HeLa cells. We also provide evidence that IFI16 promotes the addition of heterochromatin marks and the reduction of euchromatin marks on viral chromatin at both early and late promoters, thus reducing both viral replication and transcription. Altogether, these results argue that IFI16 restricts chromatinized HPV DNA through epigenetic modifications and plays a broad surveillance role against viral DNA in the nucleus that is not restricted to herpesviruses. IMPORTANCE Intrinsic immunity is mediated by cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The host nuclear factor IFI

  20. New BK virus episomal vector for complementary DNA expression in human cells.

    PubMed

    Grossi, M P; Caputo, A; Rimessi, P; Chiccoli, L; Balboni, P G; Barbanti-Brodano, G

    1988-01-01

    The properties of pRP-c, a new vector for complementary DNA (cDNA) expression, are described. The vector contains the early region and replication origin of BK virus (BKV), a human papovavirus. Due to the presence of these BKV sequences, pRP-c replicates in human cells allowing amplification of inserted cDNAs. The promoter, intron and polyadenylation region for cDNA expression are separated by unique restriction sites and can therefore be individually excised and substituted with different transcription signals. Coding sequences of the bacterial genes for chloramphenicol-acetyl transferase (CAT) or neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) were inserted into the cDNA cloning site of pRP-c and expressed in human cells in transient assays or stable clones. In both cases expression of the inserted sequences was significantly more efficient than by using the integration vectors pSV2CAT and pSV2neo, demonstrating the advantages of episomal expression vectors in human cells. Possible uses of pRP-c to express viral and cellular cDNAs in human cells are discussed.

  1. Insulated hsp70B' promoter: stringent heat-inducible activity in replication-deficient, but not replication-competent adenoviruses.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, Stanimira; Mainka, Astrid; Knippertz, Ilka; Hesse, Andrea; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2008-04-01

    Key to the realization of gene therapy is the development of efficient and targeted gene transfer vectors. Therapeutic gene transfer by replication-deficient or more recently by conditionally replication-competent/oncolytic adenoviruses has shown much promise. For specific applications, however, it will be advantageous to provide vectors that allow for external control of gene expression. The efficient cellular heat shock system in combination with available technology for focused and controlled hyperthermia suggests heat-regulated transcription control as a promising tool for this purpose. We investigated the feasibility of a short fragment of the human hsp70B' promoter, with and without upstream insulator elements, for the regulation of transgene expression by replication-deficient or oncolytic adenoviruses. Two novel adenoviral vectors with an insulated hsp70B' promoter were developed and showed stringent heat-inducible gene expression with induction ratios up to 8000-fold. In contrast, regulation of gene expression from the hsp70B' promoter without insulation was suboptimal. In replication-competent/oncolytic adenoviruses regulation of the hsp70B' promoter was lost specifically during late replication in permissive cells and could not be restored by the insulators. We developed novel adenovirus gene transfer vectors that feature improved and stringent regulation of transgene expression from the hsp70B' promoter using promoter insulation. These vectors have potential for gene therapy applications that benefit from external modulation of therapeutic gene expression or for combination therapy with hyperthermia. Furthermore, our study reveals that vector replication can deregulate inserted cellular promoters, an observation which is of relevance for the development of replication-competent/oncolytic gene transfer vectors. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Roscovitine Inhibits EBNA1 Serine 393 Phosphorylation, Nuclear Localization, Transcription, and Episome Maintenance▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Soni, Vishal; Lewis, Timothy A.; Koehler, Angela N.; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes human lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV usually persists as an episome in malignant cells. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBNA1 binding to multiple cognate sites in oriP. To search for inhibitors of EBNA1- and oriP-dependent episome maintenance or transcription, a library of 40,550 small molecules was screened for compounds that inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and do not inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-independent transcription. This screening identified roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), CDK2, CDK5, and CDK7. Based on motif predictions of EBNA1 serine 393 as a CDK phosphorylation site and 486RALL489 and 580KDLVM584 as potential cyclin binding domains, we hypothesized that cyclin binding to EBNA1 may enable CDK1, -2, -5, or -7 to phosphorylate serine 393. We found that Escherichia coli-expressed EBNA1 amino acids 387 to 641 were phosphorylated in vitro by CDK1-, -2-, -5-, and -7/cyclin complexes and serine 393 phosphorylation was roscovitine inhibited. Further, S393A mutation abrogated phosphorylation. S393A mutant EBNA1 was deficient in supporting EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and episome persistence, and roscovitine had little further effect on the diminished S393A mutant EBNA1-mediated transcription or episome persistence. Immunoprecipitated FLAG-EBNA1 was phosphorylated in vitro, and roscovitine inhibited this phosphorylation. Moreover, roscovitine decreased nuclear EBNA1 and often increased cytoplasmic EBNA1, whereas S393A mutant EBNA1 was localized equally in the nucleus and cytoplasm and was unaffected by roscovitine treatment. These data indicate that roscovitine effects are serine 393 specific and that serine 393 is important in EBNA1- and oriPCp-dependent transcription and episome persistence. PMID:21209116

  3. Roscovitine inhibits EBNA1 serine 393 phosphorylation, nuclear localization, transcription, and episome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Soni, Vishal; Lewis, Timothy A; Koehler, Angela N; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-03-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes human lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV usually persists as an episome in malignant cells. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBNA1 binding to multiple cognate sites in oriP. To search for inhibitors of EBNA1- and oriP-dependent episome maintenance or transcription, a library of 40,550 small molecules was screened for compounds that inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and do not inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-independent transcription. This screening identified roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), CDK2, CDK5, and CDK7. Based on motif predictions of EBNA1 serine 393 as a CDK phosphorylation site and (486)RALL(489) and (580)KDLVM(584) as potential cyclin binding domains, we hypothesized that cyclin binding to EBNA1 may enable CDK1, -2, -5, or -7 to phosphorylate serine 393. We found that Escherichia coli-expressed EBNA1 amino acids 387 to 641 were phosphorylated in vitro by CDK1-, -2-, -5-, and -7/cyclin complexes and serine 393 phosphorylation was roscovitine inhibited. Further, S393A mutation abrogated phosphorylation. S393A mutant EBNA1 was deficient in supporting EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and episome persistence, and roscovitine had little further effect on the diminished S393A mutant EBNA1-mediated transcription or episome persistence. Immunoprecipitated FLAG-EBNA1 was phosphorylated in vitro, and roscovitine inhibited this phosphorylation. Moreover, roscovitine decreased nuclear EBNA1 and often increased cytoplasmic EBNA1, whereas S393A mutant EBNA1 was localized equally in the nucleus and cytoplasm and was unaffected by roscovitine treatment. These data indicate that roscovitine effects are serine 393 specific and that serine 393 is important in EBNA1- and oriPCp-dependent transcription and episome persistence.

  4. Specific replication origins promote DNA amplification in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Lee; Heichinger, Christian; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Nurse, Paul

    2010-09-15

    To ensure equal replication of the genome in every eukaryotic cell cycle, replication origins fire only once each S phase and do not fire after passive replication. Failure in these controls can lead to local amplification, contributing to genome instability and the development of cancer. To identify features of replication origins important for such amplification, we have investigated origin firing and local genome amplification in the presence of excess helicase loaders Cdc18 and Cdt1 in fission yeast. We find that S phase controls are attenuated and coordination of origin firing is lost, resulting in local amplification. Specific origins are necessary for amplification but act only within a permissive chromosomal context. Origins associated with amplification are highly AT-rich, fire efficiently and early during mitotic S phase, and are located in large intergenic regions. We propose that these features predispose replication origins to re-fire within a single S phase, or to remain active after passive replication.

  5. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  6. Prospects for the Use of Artificial Chromosomes and Minichromosome-Like Episomes in Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Luz, Sara; Díaz-Nido, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Artificial chromosomes and minichromosome-like episomes are large DNA molecules capable of containing whole genomic loci, and be maintained as nonintegrating, replicating molecules in proliferating human somatic cells. Authentic human artificial chromosomes are very difficult to engineer because of the difficulties associated with centromere structure, so they are not widely used for gene-therapy applications. However, OriP/EBNA1-based episomes, which they lack true centromeres, can be maintained stably in dividing cells as they bind to mitotic chromosomes and segregate into daughter cells. These episomes are more easily engineered than true human artificial chromosomes and can carry entire genes along with all their regulatory sequences. Thus, these constructs may facilitate the long-term persistence and physiological regulation of the expression of therapeutic genes, which is crucial for some gene therapy applications. In particular, they are promising vectors for gene therapy in inherited diseases that are caused by recessive mutations, for example haemophilia A and Friedreich's ataxia. Interestingly, the episome carrying the frataxin gene (deficient in Friedreich's ataxia) has been demonstrated to rescue the susceptibility to oxidative stress which is typical of fibroblasts from Friedreich's ataxia patients. This provides evidence of their potential to treat genetic diseases linked to recessive mutations through gene therapy. PMID:20862363

  7. Prospects for the use of artificial chromosomes and minichromosome-like episomes in gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Luz, Sara; Díaz-Nido, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Artificial chromosomes and minichromosome-like episomes are large DNA molecules capable of containing whole genomic loci, and be maintained as nonintegrating, replicating molecules in proliferating human somatic cells. Authentic human artificial chromosomes are very difficult to engineer because of the difficulties associated with centromere structure, so they are not widely used for gene-therapy applications. However, OriP/EBNA1-based episomes, which they lack true centromeres, can be maintained stably in dividing cells as they bind to mitotic chromosomes and segregate into daughter cells. These episomes are more easily engineered than true human artificial chromosomes and can carry entire genes along with all their regulatory sequences. Thus, these constructs may facilitate the long-term persistence and physiological regulation of the expression of therapeutic genes, which is crucial for some gene therapy applications. In particular, they are promising vectors for gene therapy in inherited diseases that are caused by recessive mutations, for example haemophilia A and Friedreich's ataxia. Interestingly, the episome carrying the frataxin gene (deficient in Friedreich's ataxia) has been demonstrated to rescue the susceptibility to oxidative stress which is typical of fibroblasts from Friedreich's ataxia patients. This provides evidence of their potential to treat genetic diseases linked to recessive mutations through gene therapy.

  8. S/MAR sequence confers long-term mitotic stability on non-integrating lentiviral vector episomes without selection.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Santhosh Chakkaramakkil; Goloviznina, Natalya A; Skinner, Amy M; Lipps, Hans J; Kurre, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Insertional oncogene activation and aberrant splicing have proved to be major setbacks for retroviral stem cell gene therapy. Integrase-deficient human immunodeficiency virus-1-derived vectors provide a potentially safer approach, but their circular genomes are rapidly lost during cell division. Here we describe a novel lentiviral vector (LV) that incorporates human ß-interferon scaffold/matrix-associated region sequences to provide an origin of replication for long-term mitotic maintenance of the episomal LTR circles. The resulting 'anchoring' non-integrating lentiviral vector (aniLV) achieved initial transduction rates comparable with integrating vector followed by progressive establishment of long-term episomal expression in a subset of cells. Analysis of aniLV-transduced single cell-derived clones maintained without selective pressure for >100 rounds of cell division showed sustained transgene expression from episomes and provided molecular evidence for long-term episome maintenance. To evaluate aniLV performance in primary cells, we transduced lineage-depleted murine hematopoietic progenitor cells, observing GFP expression in clonogenic progenitor colonies and peripheral blood leukocyte chimerism following transplantation into conditioned hosts. In aggregate, our studies suggest that scaffold/matrix-associated region elements can serve as molecular anchors for non-integrating lentivector episomes, providing sustained gene expression through successive rounds of cell division and progenitor differentiation in vitro and in vivo.

  9. The Ebola virus genomic replication promoter is bipartite and follows the rule of six.

    PubMed

    Weik, Michael; Enterlein, Sven; Schlenz, Kathrin; Mühlberger, Elke

    2005-08-01

    In this work we investigated the cis-acting signals involved in replication of Ebola virus (EBOV) genomic RNA. A set of mingenomes with mutant 3' ends were generated and used in a reconstituted replication and transcription system. Our results suggest that the EBOV genomic replication promoter is bipartite, consisting of a first element located within the leader region of the genome and a second, downstream element separated by a spacer region. While proper spacing of the two promoter elements is a prerequisite for replication, the nucleotide sequence of the spacer is not important. Replication activity was only observed when six or a multiple of six nucleotides were deleted or inserted, while all other changes in length abolished replication completely. These data indicate that the EBOV replication promoter obeys the rule of six, although the genome length is not divisible by six. The second promoter element is located in the 3' nontranslated region of the first gene and consists of eight UN5 hexamer repeats, where N is any nucleotide. However, three consecutive hexamers, which could be located anywhere within the promoter element, were sufficient to support replication as long as the hexameric phase was preserved. By using chemical modification assays, we could demonstrate that nucleotides 5 to 44 of the EBOV leader are involved in the formation of a stable secondary structure. Formation of the RNA stem-loop occurred independently of the presence of the trailer, indicating that a panhandle structure is not formed between the 3' and 5' ends.

  10. Human CDK18 promotes replication stress signaling and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Giancarlo; Staples, Christopher J.; Ganesh, Anil; Patterson, Karl W.; Bryne, Dominic P.; Myers, Katie N.; Patil, Abhijit A.; Eyers, Claire E.; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J. Mark; Eyers, Patrick A.; Collis, Spencer J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) coordinate cell cycle checkpoints with DNA repair mechanisms that together maintain genome stability. However, the myriad mechanisms that can give rise to genome instability are still to be fully elucidated. Here, we identify CDK18 (PCTAIRE 3) as a novel regulator of genome stability, and show that depletion of CDK18 causes an increase in endogenous DNA damage and chromosomal abnormalities. CDK18-depleted cells accumulate in early S-phase, exhibiting retarded replication fork kinetics and reduced ATR kinase signaling in response to replication stress. Mechanistically, CDK18 interacts with RAD9, RAD17 and TOPBP1, and CDK18-deficiency results in a decrease in both RAD17 and RAD9 chromatin retention in response to replication stress. Importantly, we demonstrate that these phenotypes are rescued by exogenous CDK18 in a kinase-dependent manner. Collectively, these data reveal a rate-limiting role for CDK18 in replication stress signalling and establish it as a novel regulator of genome integrity. PMID:27382066

  11. Human CDK18 promotes replication stress signaling and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Barone, Giancarlo; Staples, Christopher J; Ganesh, Anil; Patterson, Karl W; Bryne, Dominic P; Myers, Katie N; Patil, Abhijit A; Eyers, Claire E; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Eyers, Patrick A; Collis, Spencer J

    2016-10-14

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) coordinate cell cycle checkpoints with DNA repair mechanisms that together maintain genome stability. However, the myriad mechanisms that can give rise to genome instability are still to be fully elucidated. Here, we identify CDK18 (PCTAIRE 3) as a novel regulator of genome stability, and show that depletion of CDK18 causes an increase in endogenous DNA damage and chromosomal abnormalities. CDK18-depleted cells accumulate in early S-phase, exhibiting retarded replication fork kinetics and reduced ATR kinase signaling in response to replication stress. Mechanistically, CDK18 interacts with RAD9, RAD17 and TOPBP1, and CDK18-deficiency results in a decrease in both RAD17 and RAD9 chromatin retention in response to replication stress. Importantly, we demonstrate that these phenotypes are rescued by exogenous CDK18 in a kinase-dependent manner. Collectively, these data reveal a rate-limiting role for CDK18 in replication stress signalling and establish it as a novel regulator of genome integrity.

  12. Cdc6 ATPase activity disengages Cdc6 from the pre-replicative complex to promote DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Chang, FuJung; Riera, Alberto; Evrin, Cecile; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Speck, Christian; Weinreich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To initiate DNA replication, cells first load an MCM helicase double hexamer at origins in a reaction requiring ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1, also called pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) assembly. The essential mechanistic role of Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis in this reaction is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that although Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is essential to initiate DNA replication, it is not essential for MCM loading. Using purified proteins, an ATPase-defective Cdc6 mutant ‘Cdc6-E224Q’ promoted MCM loading on DNA. Cdc6-E224Q also promoted MCM binding at origins in vivo but cells remained blocked in G1-phase. If after loading MCM, Cdc6-E224Q was degraded, cells entered an apparently normal S-phase and replicated DNA, a phenotype seen with two additional Cdc6 ATPase-defective mutants. Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is therefore required for Cdc6 disengagement from the pre-RC after helicase loading to advance subsequent steps in helicase activation in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05795.001 PMID:26305410

  13. The large episomes of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316T have arisen through intragenomic gene shuttling from the chromosome to smaller Butyrivibrio-specific plasmids.

    PubMed

    Yeoman, Carl J; Kelly, William J; Rakonjac, Jasna; Leahy, Sinead C; Altermann, Eric; Attwood, Graeme T

    2011-07-01

    The genome of Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus B316(T) contains three large episomes including a 302 kb chromid (BPc2) and two large plasmids of 361 (pCY360) and 186 kb (pCY186). The two plasmids are largely cryptic and it is therefore difficult to gauge their contributions or importance to the biology of B. proteoclasticus. Here, we provide evidence that at least BPc2 and pCY360 are essential as neither could be cured using several previously described curing techniques. We show that BPc2 exists at a copy number of 1, while pCY360 and pCY186 exist at copy numbers of 4 and 0.9, respectively. Yet the transcriptional activities of each episome are much less than that of the 3.5 Mb chromosome. Codon usage analyses did not support the hypothesis that the genes of all three episomes were acquired horizontally. Instead our analyses suggest that the vast majority of genes on each episome were transferred from the 3.5 Mb B. proteoclasticus chromosome. Analysis of their replication origins, however, suggests the plasmid backbones share an evolutionary lineage with the smaller Butyrivibrio specific plasmids, pRJF1 and pRJF2. A survey of 13 species of the Butyrivibrio/Pseudobutyrivibrio assemblage identified similar large episomes in nine strains. DNA hybridization experiments revealed none contained an rRNA operon and only a 145 kb episome from Pseudobutyrivibrioruminis possessed an ortholog of the pCY360 plasmid replication initiation protein. The size and distribution of episomes within the nine strains of Butyrivibrio/Pseudobutyrivibrio showed no correlation with 16S rRNA based phylogeny, leading to a hypothesis that the large episomes of Butyrivibrio spp., have arisen through intragenomic gene transfer events from the chromosome to small horizontally acquired elements.

  14. FANCM interacts with PCNA to promote replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Rohleder, Florian; Huang, Jing; Xue, Yutong; Kuper, Jochen; Round, Adam; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    FANCM is a highly conserved DNA remodeling enzyme that promotes the activation of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway and facilitates replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks. However, how FANCM interacts with the replication machinery to promote traverse remains unclear. Here, we show that FANCM and its archaeal homolog Hef from Thermoplasma acidophilum interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential co-factor for DNA polymerases in both replication and repair. The interaction is mediated through a conserved PIP-box; and in human FANCM, it is strongly stimulated by replication stress. A FANCM variant carrying a mutation in the PIP-box is defective in promoting replication traverse of interstrand crosslinks and is also inefficient in promoting FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a key step of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Our data reveal a conserved interaction mode between FANCM and PCNA during replication stress, and suggest that this interaction is essential for FANCM to aid replication machines to traverse DNA interstrand crosslinks prior to post-replication repair. PMID:26825464

  15. Controlled removal of a nonviral episomal vector from transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Sina; Hagedorn, Claudia; Seruggia, Davide; Magnusson, Terese; Wagner, Ernst; Ogris, Manfred; Lipps, Hans J

    2010-10-15

    An ideal vector to be used in gene therapy should allow long-term and regulated expression of the therapeutic sequence, but in many cases, it would be most desirable to remove all ectopic vector sequences from the cell once expression is no longer required. The vector pEPI is the first nonviral autonomous replicon that was constructed for mammalian cells. It represents a minimal model system to study the epigenetic regulation of replication and transcription but is also regarded as a promising alternative to currently used viral vector systems in gene therapy. Its function relies on a transcription unit linked to an S/MAR sequence. We constructed an inducible pEPI vector system based on the Tet ON system in which transcription is switched on in the presence of doxycycline. We show that for vector replication and long-term maintenance an ongoing transcription running into the S/MAR element is required. Once established, the vector is lost from the cell upon switching off transcription from the gene linked to the S/MAR. This feature provides not only controlled transgene expression but also the possibility to remove all vector molecules from the cells upon demand. This inducible episomal nonviral vector system will find broad application in gene therapy but also in reprogramming of somatic cells or modification of stem cells.

  16. Chromatin architectures at fission yeast transcriptional promoters and replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Robert M.; Lai, William K. M.; Rizzo, Jason M.; Bard, Jonathan E.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Leatherwood, Janet; Huberman, Joel A.; Buck, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We have used micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion followed by deep sequencing in order to obtain a higher resolution map than previously available of nucleosome positions in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our data confirm an unusually short average nucleosome repeat length, ∼152 bp, in fission yeast and that transcriptional start sites (TSSs) are associated with nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs), ordered nucleosome arrays downstream and less regularly spaced upstream nucleosomes. In addition, we found enrichments for associated function in four of eight groups of genes clustered according to chromatin configurations near TSSs. At replication origins, our data revealed asymmetric localization of pre-replication complex (pre-RC) proteins within large NDRs—a feature that is conserved in fission and budding yeast and is therefore likely to be conserved in other eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22573177

  17. FANCD2 regulates BLM complex functions independently of FANCI to promote replication fork recovery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Sareen, Archana; Raghunandan, Maya; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2013-07-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Bloom Syndrome share overlapping phenotypes including spontaneous chromosomal abnormalities and increased cancer predisposition. The FA protein pathway comprises an upstream core complex that mediates recruitment of two central players, FANCD2 and FANCI, to sites of stalled replication forks. Successful fork recovery depends on the Bloom's helicase BLM that participates in a larger protein complex ('BLMcx') containing topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1, RMI2 and replication protein A. We show that FANCD2 is an essential regulator of BLMcx functions: it maintains BLM protein stability and is crucial for complete BLMcx assembly; moreover, it recruits BLMcx to replicating chromatin during normal S-phase and mediates phosphorylation of BLMcx members in response to DNA damage. During replication stress, FANCD2 and BLM cooperate to promote restart of stalled replication forks while suppressing firing of new replication origins. In contrast, FANCI is dispensable for FANCD2-dependent BLMcx regulation, demonstrating functional separation of FANCD2 from FANCI.

  18. S/MAR Element Facilitates Episomal Long-Term Persistence of Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Genomes in Proliferating Cells.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Schnödt-Fuchs, Maria; Boehme, Philip; Abdelrazik, Heba; Lipps, Hans J; Büning, Hildegard

    2017-06-29

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most frequently applied gene transfer systems in research and human clinical trials. Since AAV vectors do not possess an integrase activity, application is restricted to terminally differentiated tissues if transgene expression is required long term. To overcome this limitation and to generate AAV vectors that persist episomally in dividing cells, AAV vector genomes were equipped with a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR). After a mild antibiotic selection, cells transduced with AAV-S/MAR established colonies that maintained long-term transgene expression (>50 population doublings) from replicating AAV vector episomes in the absence of further selection. Unexpectedly, with a lesser but still significant efficiency, the control vector (AAV-ΔS/MAR), a standard single-stranded AAV vector, also established stable transgene-expressing colonies, most of which were maintained as replicating episomes rather than integrated vector genomes. Thus, based on the result in HeLa cells, it is concluded that AAV vector genomes per se possess the ability to establish episomal maintenance in proliferating cells, a feature that can be enhanced by incorporation of a foreign genomic element such as an S/MAR element.

  19. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  20. Forks on the Run: Can the Stalling of DNA Replication Promote Epigenetic Changes?

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Hollie; Dhavarasa, Piriththiv; Cheng, Ashley; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    Built of DNA polymerases and multiple associated factors, the replication fork steadily progresses along the DNA template and faithfully replicates DNA. This model can be found in practically every textbook of genetics, with the more complex situation of chromatinized DNA in eukaryotes often viewed as a variation. However, the replication-coupled disassembly/reassembly of chromatin adds significant complexity to the whole replication process. During the course of eukaryotic DNA replication the forks encounter various conditions and numerous impediments. These include nucleosomes with a variety of post-translational modifications, euchromatin and heterochromatin, differentially methylated DNA, tightly bound proteins, active gene promoters and DNA loops. At such positions the forks slow down or even stall. Dedicated factors stabilize the fork and prevent its rotation or collapse, while other factors resolve the replication block and facilitate the resumption of elongation. The fate of histones during replication stalling and resumption is not well understood. In this review we briefly describe recent advances in our understanding of histone turnover during DNA replication and focus on the possible mechanisms of nucleosome disassembly/reassembly at paused replication forks. We propose that replication pausing provides opportunities for an epigenetic change of the associated locus.

  1. Forks on the Run: Can the Stalling of DNA Replication Promote Epigenetic Changes?

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, Hollie; Dhavarasa, Piriththiv; Cheng, Ashley; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    Built of DNA polymerases and multiple associated factors, the replication fork steadily progresses along the DNA template and faithfully replicates DNA. This model can be found in practically every textbook of genetics, with the more complex situation of chromatinized DNA in eukaryotes often viewed as a variation. However, the replication-coupled disassembly/reassembly of chromatin adds significant complexity to the whole replication process. During the course of eukaryotic DNA replication the forks encounter various conditions and numerous impediments. These include nucleosomes with a variety of post-translational modifications, euchromatin and heterochromatin, differentially methylated DNA, tightly bound proteins, active gene promoters and DNA loops. At such positions the forks slow down or even stall. Dedicated factors stabilize the fork and prevent its rotation or collapse, while other factors resolve the replication block and facilitate the resumption of elongation. The fate of histones during replication stalling and resumption is not well understood. In this review we briefly describe recent advances in our understanding of histone turnover during DNA replication and focus on the possible mechanisms of nucleosome disassembly/reassembly at paused replication forks. We propose that replication pausing provides opportunities for an epigenetic change of the associated locus. PMID:28690636

  2. Human Choline Kinase-α Promotes Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication through Modulation of Membranous Viral Replication Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mun-Teng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reorganizes cellular membranes to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). The role that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) plays in HCV replication remains elusive. Here, we first showed that hCKα activity, not the CDP-choline pathway, promoted viral RNA replication. Confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation of HCV-infected cells revealed that a small fraction of hCKα colocalized with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that HCV infection increased hCKα localization to the ER. In the pTM-NS3-NS5B model, NS3-NS5B expression increased the localization of the wild-type, not the inactive D288A mutant, hCKα on the ER, and hCKα activity was required for effective trafficking of hCKα and NS5A to the ER. Coimmunoprecipitation showed that hCKα was recruited onto the viral RC presumably through its binding to NS5A domain 1 (D1). hCKα silencing or treatment with CK37, an hCKα activity inhibitor, abolished HCV-induced MW formation. In addition, hCKα depletion hindered NS5A localization on the ER, interfered with NS5A and NS5B colocalization, and mitigated NS5A-NS5B interactions but had no apparent effect on NS5A-NS4B and NS4B-NS5B interactions. Nevertheless, hCKα activity was not essential for the binding of NS5A to hCKα or NS5B. These findings demonstrate that hCKα forms a complex with NS5A and that hCKα activity enhances the targeting of the complex to the ER, where hCKα protein, not activity, mediates NS5A binding to NS5B, thereby promoting functional membranous viral RC assembly and viral RNA replication. IMPORTANCE HCV infection reorganizes the cellular membrane to create an active viral replication site named the membranous web (MW). Here, we report that human choline kinase-α (hCKα) acts as an essential host factor for HCV RNA replication. A fraction of hCKα colocalizes with the viral replication complex (RC) on the endoplasmic reticulum

  3. RECQ5 helicase promotes resolution of conflicts between replication and transcription in human cells.

    PubMed

    Urban, Vaclav; Dobrovolna, Jana; Hühn, Daniela; Fryzelkova, Jana; Bartek, Jiri; Janscak, Pavel

    2016-08-15

    Collisions between replication and transcription machineries represent a significant source of genomic instability. RECQ5 DNA helicase binds to RNA-polymerase (RNAP) II during transcription elongation and suppresses transcription-associated genomic instability. Here, we show that RECQ5 also associates with RNAPI and enforces the stability of ribosomal DNA arrays. We demonstrate that RECQ5 associates with transcription complexes in DNA replication foci and counteracts replication fork stalling in RNAPI- and RNAPII-transcribed genes, suggesting that RECQ5 exerts its genome-stabilizing effect by acting at sites of replication-transcription collisions. Moreover, RECQ5-deficient cells accumulate RAD18 foci and BRCA1-dependent RAD51 foci that are both formed at sites of interference between replication and transcription and likely represent unresolved replication intermediates. Finally, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of resolution of replication-transcription collisions wherein the interaction between RECQ5 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promotes RAD18-dependent PCNA ubiquitination and the helicase activity of RECQ5 promotes the processing of replication intermediates. © 2016 Urban et al.

  4. RECQ5 helicase promotes resolution of conflicts between replication and transcription in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Vaclav; Dobrovolna, Jana; Hühn, Daniela; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Collisions between replication and transcription machineries represent a significant source of genomic instability. RECQ5 DNA helicase binds to RNA-polymerase (RNAP) II during transcription elongation and suppresses transcription-associated genomic instability. Here, we show that RECQ5 also associates with RNAPI and enforces the stability of ribosomal DNA arrays. We demonstrate that RECQ5 associates with transcription complexes in DNA replication foci and counteracts replication fork stalling in RNAPI- and RNAPII-transcribed genes, suggesting that RECQ5 exerts its genome-stabilizing effect by acting at sites of replication-transcription collisions. Moreover, RECQ5-deficient cells accumulate RAD18 foci and BRCA1-dependent RAD51 foci that are both formed at sites of interference between replication and transcription and likely represent unresolved replication intermediates. Finally, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of resolution of replication-transcription collisions wherein the interaction between RECQ5 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promotes RAD18-dependent PCNA ubiquitination and the helicase activity of RECQ5 promotes the processing of replication intermediates. PMID:27502483

  5. Episomal maintenance of S/MAR-containing non-viral vectors for RPE-based diseases.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Adarsha; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of non-viral genetic therapies has historically been limited by transient gene expression and vector loss. Scaffold matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) have been shown to augment transcription, promote episomal maintenance, and provide insulator-like function to DNA in in vitro and in vivo systems. Here we explore the ability of S/MAR elements to mediate these effects in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells with the eventual goal of improving the persistence of expression of our non-viral gene delivery tools. We engineered an RPE-specific reporter vector with or without an S/MAR immediately downstream of the eGFP expression cassette. We show that the S/MAR vector is maintained as an episome for up to 1 year. Experiments in which rhodamine-labeled DNA was delivered to the subretinal space of mice show better persistence of the S/MAR-containing vector in the RPE than the non-S/MAR vector. These results suggest that inclusion of the S/MAR region promotes episomal maintenance of plasmid DNA in the RPE after subretinal delivery and that inclusion of this DNA element may be beneficial for non-viral ocular gene transfer.

  6. Characterization of sequence elements from Malvastrum yellow vein betasatellite regulating promoter activity and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many monopartite begomoviruses are associated with betasatellites, but only several promoters from which were isolated and studied. In this study, the βC1 promoter from Malvastrum yellow vein betasatellite (MYVB) was characterized and important sequence elements were identified to modulate promoter activity and replication of MYVB. Results A 991 nucleotide (nt) fragment upstream of the translation start site of the βC1 open reading frame of MYVB and a series of deletions within this fragment were constructed and fused to the β-glucuronidase (GUS) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter genes, respectively. Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression assays showed that the 991 nt fragment was functional and that a 28 nt region (between −390 nt and −418 nt), which includes a 5′UTR Py-rich stretch motif, was important for promoter activity. Replication assays using Nicotiana benthamiana leaf discs and whole plants showed that deletion of the 5′UTR Py-rich stretch impaired viral satellite replication in the presence of the helper virus. Transgenic assays demonstrated that the 991 nt fragment conferred a constitutive expression pattern in transgenic tobacco plants and that a 214 nt fragment at the 3'-end of this sequence was sufficient to drive this expression pattern. Conclusion Our results showed that the βC1 promoter of MYVB displayed a constitutive expression pattern and a 5′UTR Py-rich stretch motif regulated both βC1 promoter activity and MYVB replication. PMID:23057573

  7. Promotion of Hendra Virus Replication by MicroRNA 146a

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Glenn A.; Jenkins, Kristie A.; Gantier, Michael P.; Tizard, Mark L.; Middleton, Deborah; Lowenthal, John W.; Haining, Jessica; Izzard, Leonard; Gough, Tamara J.; Deffrasnes, Celine; Stambas, John; Robinson, Rachel; Heine, Hans G.; Pallister, Jackie A.; Foord, Adam J.; Bean, Andrew G.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus. Thirty-nine outbreaks of Hendra virus have been reported since its initial identification in Queensland, Australia, resulting in seven human infections and four fatalities. Little is known about cellular host factors impacting Hendra virus replication. In this work, we demonstrate that Hendra virus makes use of a microRNA (miRNA) designated miR-146a, an NF-κB-responsive miRNA upregulated by several innate immune ligands, to favor its replication. miR-146a is elevated in the blood of ferrets and horses infected with Hendra virus and is upregulated by Hendra virus in human cells in vitro. Blocking miR-146a reduces Hendra virus replication in vitro, suggesting a role for this miRNA in Hendra virus replication. In silico analysis of miR-146a targets identified ring finger protein (RNF)11, a member of the A20 ubiquitin editing complex that negatively regulates NF-κB activity, as a novel component of Hendra virus replication. RNA interference-mediated silencing of RNF11 promotes Hendra virus replication in vitro, suggesting that increased NF-κB activity aids Hendra virus replication. Furthermore, overexpression of the IκB superrepressor inhibits Hendra virus replication. These studies are the first to demonstrate a host miRNA response to Hendra virus infection and suggest an important role for host miRNAs in Hendra virus disease. PMID:23345523

  8. Detection of episomal banana streak badnavirus by IC-PCR.

    PubMed

    Harper, G; Dahal, G; Thottappilly, G; Hull, R

    1999-04-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based strategy to detect episomal banana streak badnavirus (BSV) in banana and plantain plants that carry integrated BSV sequences was developed. Antisera used in immuno-capture polymerase chain reaction (IC-PCR) are capable of binding a large number of BSV serotypes. The primers used for PCR are capable of annealing to and amplifying across the aspartic protease-reverse transcriptase domain boundaries of both episomal and integrated BSV sequences and result in similar or identical sequence size fragments from either template. However, we show that under the conditions selected for IC-PCR, nuclear, mitochondrial or chloroplast genomic sequences are not amplified and thus only captured episomal BSV is amplified. IC-PCR is suitable for the large-scale screening of Musa for episomal BSV which is necessary for germplasm movement.

  9. Possible function of the c-myc product: promotion of cellular DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Itani, T; Kiji, Y; Ariga, H

    1987-01-01

    We have recently cloned a plasmid, pARS65, containing the sequences derived from mouse liver DNA which can autonomously replicate in mouse and human cells (Ariga et al., 1987). In this report, we show that replication of pARS65 in HL-60 cells can be inhibited by co-transfection with anti-c-myc antibody. In an in-vitro replication system using HL-60 nuclear extract, pARS65 functioned as a template. This in-vitro replication was also blocked by addition of anti-c-myc antibody. Specific binding activity of the c-myc product to pARS65 was detected by an immunobinding assay, suggesting that the c-myc protein promotes DNA replication through binding to the initiation site of replication. This has been substantiated using the antibody to help isolate a human DNA segment that can autonomously replicate in the cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3665880

  10. Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 promotes DNA replication and cell proliferation in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Xue; Xi, Bi-Xin; Wan, Dong-Yi; Li, Li; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Wei; Ma, Ding; Wang, Hui; Gao, Qing-Lei

    2014-09-01

    Malignant proliferation is the fundamental trait of tumor cells. The initiation of DNA replication represents a key process for cell proliferation, and has a marked impact on tumorigenesis and progression. Here we report that Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 (SIX1) functions as a master regulator in DNA replication of cervical cancer cells. The expression of SIX1 was induced by the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomaviruses in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. The increase of SIX1 expression resulted in the upregulation of multiple genes related to the initiation of DNA replication, including the genes coding for the proteins in minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM2, MCM3, MCM6), DNA polymerase α-primase complex (POLA1, PRIM1, PRIM2), clamp loader (RFC3, RFC4, RFC5), DNA polymerase δ complex (POLD3) and DNA polymerase ε complex (POLE2). In line with this, the increase of SIX1 expression enhanced DNA synthesis, accelerated G1 to S phase progression, and promoted the proliferation of cervical cancer cells and the growth of cervical cancer. Consistently, knockdown of SIX1 could hamper DNA synthesis, slow down G1 to S phase progression, and suppress tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth. Importantly, SIX1 could more efficiently promote anchorage-independent cell growth. These results suggest that the increase of SIX1 expression could promote tumorigenesis, progression and invasive growth of cervical cancer by promoting DNA replication, and that targeting SIX1 may have significant therapeutic value in cervical cancer treatment.

  11. Mapping of an Origin of DNA Replication in the Promoter of Fragile X Gene FMR1

    PubMed Central

    Brylawski, Bruna P.; Chastain, Paul D.; Cohen, Stephanie M.; Cordeiro-Stone, Marila; Kaufman, David G.

    2007-01-01

    An origin of bidirectional DNA replication was mapped to the promoter of the FMR1 gene in human chromosome Xq27.3, which has been linked to the fragile X syndrome. This origin is adjacent to a CpG island and overlaps the site of expansion of the triplet repeat (CGG) at the fragile X instability site, FRAXA. The promoter region of FMR2 in the FRAXE site (approximately 600 kb away, in chromosome band Xq28) also includes an origin of replication, as previously described. FMR1 transcripts were detected in foreskin and male fetal lung fibroblasts, while FMR2 transcripts were not. However, both FMR1 and FMR2 were found to replicate late in S phase (approximately six hours into the S phase of normal human fibroblasts). The position of the origin of replication relative to the CGG repeat, and perhaps the late replication of these genes, might be important factors in the susceptibility to triplet repeat amplification at the FRAXA and FRAXE sites. PMID:17196195

  12. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. FANCD2 regulates BLM complex functions independently of FANCI to promote replication fork recovery

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Sareen, Archana; Raghunandan, Maya; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Bloom Syndrome share overlapping phenotypes including spontaneous chromosomal abnormalities and increased cancer predisposition. The FA protein pathway comprises an upstream core complex that mediates recruitment of two central players, FANCD2 and FANCI, to sites of stalled replication forks. Successful fork recovery depends on the Bloom’s helicase BLM that participates in a larger protein complex (‘BLMcx’) containing topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1, RMI2 and replication protein A. We show that FANCD2 is an essential regulator of BLMcx functions: it maintains BLM protein stability and is crucial for complete BLMcx assembly; moreover, it recruits BLMcx to replicating chromatin during normal S-phase and mediates phosphorylation of BLMcx members in response to DNA damage. During replication stress, FANCD2 and BLM cooperate to promote restart of stalled replication forks while suppressing firing of new replication origins. In contrast, FANCI is dispensable for FANCD2-dependent BLMcx regulation, demonstrating functional separation of FANCD2 from FANCI. PMID:23658231

  14. Structural homologies and functional similarities between mammalian origins of replication and amplification promoting sequences.

    PubMed

    Stolzenburg, F; Gerwig, R; Dinkl, E; Grummt, F

    1994-06-01

    MuNTS2, a 423 bp sequence isolated from the non-transcribed spacer of murine rDNA stimulates the amplification of cis-linked plasmid DNA in mouse cells under selective conditions. Here we demonstrate that a 180 bp subdomain of muNTS2 is highly homologous (approximately 70%) to three domains of the first well-characterized origin of replication of mammalian chromosomes, i.e. the origin of bidirectional replication (OBR) of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) locus in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When subcloned, the 180 bp homology region of muNTS2 was revealed to be essential for the amplification promoting activity of muNTS2. Fragments of the initiation zone of DNA replication from the DHFR locus of hamster cells containing the domains of homology to the mouse muNTS2 element proved also to promote DNA amplification. Thus, the screening system for amplification promoting elements turned out to detect an origin of bidirectional replication.

  15. A neo-Darwinian algorithm: asymmetrical mutations due to semiconservative DNA-type replication promote evolution.

    PubMed

    Wada, K N; Doi, H; Tanaka, S; Wada, Y; Furusawa, M

    1993-12-15

    Evolution is, in a sense, to resolve optimization problems. Our neo-Darwinian algorithm based on the mechanics of inheritance and natural selection uses double-stranded DNA-type genetic information to resolve the "knap-sack problem." The algorithm with asymmetrical mutations due to semiconservative DNA-type replication most effectively resolved the problem. Our results strongly suggest that disparity in mutations caused by the asymmetric machinery of DNA replication promotes evolution, in particular of diploid organisms with a high mutation rate, in a small population, and under strong selection pressure.

  16. MAR characteristic motifs mediate episomal vector in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Li, Zhaoxi; Wang, Tianyun; Wang, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li; Dong, Weihua; Jing, Changqin; Yang, Xianjun

    2015-04-01

    An ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent transgene expression without limitations in safety and reproducibility. Recent researches' insight into the ability of chromosomal matrix attachment regions (MARs) to mediate episomal maintenance of genetic elements allowed the development of a circular episomal vector. Although a MAR-mediated engineered vector has been developed, little is known on which motifs of MAR confer this function during interaction with the host genome. Here, we report an artificially synthesized DNA fragment containing only characteristic motif sequences that served as an alternative to human beta-interferon matrix attachment region sequence. The potential of the vector to mediate gene transfer in CHO cells was investigated. The short synthetic MAR motifs were found to mediate episomal vector at a low copy number for many generations without integration into the host genome. Higher transgene expression was maintained for at least 4 months. In addition, MAR was maintained episomally and conferred sustained EGFP expression even in nonselective CHO cells. All the results demonstrated that MAR characteristic sequence-based vector can function as stable episomes in CHO cells, supporting long-term and effective transgene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes cytosolic metabolism promotes replication, survival, and evasion of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Grischa Y; Pensinger, Daniel A; Sauer, John-Demian

    2017-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, the causative agent of listeriosis, is an intracellular pathogen that is exquisitely evolved to survive and replicate in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells typically restrict bacteria from colonising the cytosol, likely through a combination of cell autonomous defences, nutritional immunity, and innate immune responses including induction of programmed cell death. This suggests that L. monocytogenes and other professional cytosolic pathogens possess unique metabolic adaptations, not only to support replication but also to facilitate resistance to host-derived stresses/defences and avoidance of innate immune activation. In this review, we outline our current understanding of L. monocytogenes metabolism in the host cytosol and highlight major metabolic processes which promote intracellular replication and survival. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Replication licensing promotes cyclin D1 expression and G1 progression in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijun; Slater, Damien M.; Lenburg, Marc; Nevis, Kathleen; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication are implicated as early and causal events in malignancy. However, the immediate effects of impaired DNA replication licensing on cell cycle progression of non-malignant human cells are unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the acute effects of Mcm7 ablation using synchronized cultures of untransformed Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF). Mcm7 ablation elicited a G1 delay associated with impaired activation of CDK4 and CDK2 and reduced Rb phosphorylation. The cell cycle delay of Mcm7-ablated cells was not associated with a DNA damage response. However, levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were specifically reduced and binding of RNA Polymerase II to the CYCD1 promoter was decreased in Mcm7-depleted cells. Similar to Mcm7-deficiency, Mcm2- or Cdc6-depletion led to impaired cyclin D expression. Ectopic overexpression of Cdc6 in quiescent cells promoted cyclin D1 expression, CDK4 activation and G1 progression. Therefore timely and efficient expression of cyclin D1 during G1 phase requires replication licensing. Reconstitution of cyclin D1 expression was insufficient to correct the G1 delay of Mcm7-depleted cells, indicating that additional cell cycle events during G1 are dependent on replication licensing. However, ectopic expression of the HPV-E7 oncoprotein, and the resulting bypass of the requirement for cyclin D1-Rb signaling enabled Mcm7-depleted cells to enter S-phase. HPV-E7-induced S-phase entry of Mcm7-depleted cells led to a DNA damage response, a hallmark of pre-malignancy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of a ‘replication licensing restriction point’ that couples pre-RC assembly with G1 progression in normal cells to minimize replication stress, DNA damage and tumorigenesis. PMID:19106611

  19. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Anna Lena; Stoiber, Cornelia; Herkt, Christina E.; Schulz, Christine; Bertrams, Wilhelm; Schmeck, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila), a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a’s targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host. PMID:27105429

  20. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-11-18

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce (1)O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial (1)O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by (1)O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro.

  1. Carcinoma-risk variant of EBNA1 deregulates Epstein-Barr Virus episomal latency

    PubMed Central

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Malecka, Kimberly; Wiedmer, Andreas; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Chiang, Alan K.S.; Altieri, Dario C.; Messick, Troy E.; Lieberman, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) latent infection is a causative co-factor for endemic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC). NPC-associated variants have been identified in EBV-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA1. Here, we solve the X-ray crystal structure of an NPC-derived EBNA1 DNA binding domain (DBD) and show that variant amino acids are found on the surface away from the DNA binding interface. We show that NPC-derived EBNA1 is compromised for DNA replication and episome maintenance functions. Recombinant virus containing the NPC EBNA1 DBD are impaired in their ability to immortalize primary B-lymphocytes and suppress lytic transcription during early stages of B-cell infection. We identify Survivin as a host protein deficiently bound by the NPC variant of EBNA1 and show that Survivin depletion compromises EBV episome maintenance in multiple cell types. We propose that endemic variants of EBNA1 play a significant role in EBV-driven carcinogenesis by altering key regulatory interactions that destabilize latent infection. PMID:28077791

  2. Carcinoma-risk variant of EBNA1 deregulates Epstein-Barr Virus episomal latency.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Malecka, Kimberly; Wiedmer, Andreas; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Chiang, Alan K S; Altieri, Dario C; Messick, Troy E; Lieberman, Paul M

    2017-01-31

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) latent infection is a causative co-factor for endemic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC). NPC-associated variants have been identified in EBV-encoded nuclear antigen EBNA1. Here, we solve the X-ray crystal structure of an NPC-derived EBNA1 DNA binding domain (DBD) and show that variant amino acids are found on the surface away from the DNA binding interface. We show that NPC-derived EBNA1 is compromised for DNA replication and episome maintenance functions. Recombinant virus containing the NPC EBNA1 DBD are impaired in their ability to immortalize primary B-lymphocytes and suppress lytic transcription during early stages of B-cell infection. We identify Survivin as a host protein deficiently bound by the NPC variant of EBNA1 and show that Survivin depletion compromises EBV episome maintenance in multiple cell types. We propose that endemic variants of EBNA1 play a significant role in EBV-driven carcinogenesis by altering key regulatory interactions that destabilize latent infection.

  3. MicroRNA-649 promotes HSV-1 replication by directly targeting MALT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Tang, Jinfeng; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mengzhou

    2016-11-03

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the Herpes viridae, is associated with a wide variety of nervous system diseases including meningitis and encephalitis. The data presented here demonstrate that miR-649 promotes the replication of HSV-1 without affecting cell viability. Further mechanistic studies revealed that MALT1 (mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1) is directly targeted by miR-649. We then found that MALT1 and the downstream NF-κB signaling pathway, are involved in miR-649-induced HSV-1 replication. Interestingly, miR-649 levels were downregulated after HSV-1 infection, and miR-649 expression was negatively associated with MALT1 expression in HSV-1-infected HeLa cells. Taken together, this present study indicates that miR-649 promotes HSV-1 replication through regulation of the MALT1-mediated antiviral signaling pathway and suggests a promising target for antiviral therapies. J. Med. Virol. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ochratoxin A promotes porcine circovirus type 2 replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gan, Fang; Zhang, Zheqian; Hu, Zhihua; Hesketh, John; Xue, Hongxia; Chen, Xingxiang; Hao, Shu; Huang, Yu; Cole Ezea, Patience; Parveen, Fahmida; Huang, Kehe

    2015-03-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a worldwide mycotoxin found in food and feeds, is a potent nephrotoxin in animals and humans. Porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD), including porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome, is a worldwide swine disease. To date, little is known concerning the relationship between OTA and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), the primary causative agent of PCVAD. The effects of OTA on PCV2 replication and their mechanisms were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The results in vitro showed that low doses of OTA significantly increased PCV2 DNA copies and the number of infected cells. Maximum effects were observed at 0.05 μg/ml OTA. The results in vivo showed that PCV2 replication was significantly increased in serum and tissues of pigs fed 75 μg/kg OTA compared with the control group and pigs fed 150 μg/kg OTA. In addition, low doses of OTA significantly depleted reduced glutathione and mRNA expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase; increased reactive oxygen species, oxidants, and malondialdehyde; and induced p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in PK15 cells. Adding N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the changes induced by OTA. Knockdown of p38 and ERK1/2 by their respective specific siRNAs or inhibition of p38 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation by their respective inhibitors (SB203580 and U0126) eliminated the increase in PCV2 replication induced by OTA. These data indicate that low doses of OTA promoted PCV2 replication in vitro and in vivo via the oxidative stress-mediated p38/ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathway. This suggests that low doses of OTA are potentially harmful to animals, as they enhance virus replication, and partly explains why the morbidity and severity of PCVAD vary significantly in different pig farms.

  5. RASSF4 promotes EV71 replication to accelerate the inhibition of the phosphorylation of AKT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengfeng; Liu, Yongjuan; Chen, Xiong; Dong, Lanlan; Zhou, Bingfei; Cheng, Qingqing; Han, Song; Liu, Zhongchun; Peng, Biwen; He, Xiaohua; Liu, Wanhong

    2015-03-20

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a neurotropic virus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), occasionally leading to death. As a member of the RAS association domain family (RASSFs), RASSF4 plays important roles in cell death, tumor development and signal transduction. However, little is known about the relationship between RASSF4 and EV71. Our study reveals for the first time that RASSF4 promotes EV71 replication and then accelerates AKT phosphorylation inhibition in EV71-infected 293T cells, suggesting that RASSF4 may be a potential new target for designing therapeutic measures to prevent and control EV71 infection.

  6. Promotion of human adipocyte precursor replication by 17beta-estradiol in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Roncari, D A; Van, R L

    1978-01-01

    The influence of 17beta-estradiol and 17alpha-estradiol on adult human omental adipocyte precursors grown in a propagating culture system was studied. Cells were grown in subculture in the presence or absence of hormone. 17beta-estradiol resulted in significant promotion of adipocyte precursor replication, as determined by cell counting and incorporation of radioactive thymidine into DNA. The hormone stimulated cell multiplication in the concentration range 0.5--500 ng/ml growth medium. The highest level tested was 500 ng/ml. The maximal effects were obtained at 50 ng/ml (P less than 0.001 by paired t test, 48 h after hormone addition). All 10 cell strains (five were derived from men and five from women) that were tested responded similarly to the hormone. 17beta-estradiol did not affect cell size. 17alpha-estradiol did not promote the replication of adipocyte precursors, nor did it influence cell size. Thus, 17beta-estradiol, which is the active isomer in known target tissues, stimulates the multiplication of human adipocyte precursors in culture. Images PMID:690182

  7. TRAF2 Facilitates Vaccinia Virus Replication by Promoting Rapid Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Haas, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) is a pivotal intracellular mediator of signaling pathways downstream of TNFR1 and -2 with known pro- and antiviral effects. We investigated its role in the replication of the prototype poxvirus vaccinia virus (VACV). Loss of TRAF2 expression, either through small interfering RNA treatment of HeLa cells or through genetic knockout in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), led to significant reductions in VACV growth following low-multiplicity infection. In single-cycle infections, there was delayed production of both early and late VACV proteins as well as accelerated virus-induced alterations to cell morphology, indicating that TRAF2 influences early stages of virus replication. Consistent with an early role, uncoating assays showed normal virus attachment but delayed virus entry in the absence of TRAF2. Although alterations to c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling were apparent in VACV-infected TRAF2−/− MEFs, treatment of wild-type cells with a JNK inhibitor did not affect virus entry. Instead, treatment with an inhibitor of endosomal acidification greatly reduced virus entry into TRAF2−/− MEFs, suggesting that VACV is reliant on the endosomal route of entry in the absence of TRAF2. Thus, TRAF2 is a proviral factor for VACV that plays a role in promoting efficient viral entry, most likely via the plasma membrane. IMPORTANCE Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) are key facilitators of intracellular signaling with roles in innate and adaptive immunity and stress responses. We have discovered that TRAF2 is a proviral factor in vaccinia virus replication in both HeLa cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts and that its influence is exercised through promotion of efficient virus entry. PMID:24429366

  8. Accurate Quantification of Episomal HIV-1 Two-Long Terminal Repeat Circles by Use of Optimized DNA Isolation and Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Trypsteen, Wim; Messiaen, Peter; Vermeire, Jolien; Verhasselt, Bruno; Vervisch, Karen; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2014-01-01

    Episomal HIV-1 two-long terminal repeat (2-LTR) circles are considered markers for ongoing viral replication. Two sample processing procedures were compared to accurately quantify 2-LTR in patients by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Here, we show that plasmid isolation with a spiked non-HIV plasmid for normalization enables more accurate 2-LTR quantification than genomic DNA isolation. PMID:25502524

  9. Structure and functional basis for an EBNA1 hexameric ring in Epstein-Barr Virus episome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Deakyne, Julianna S; Malecka, Kimberly; Messick, Troy E; Lieberman, Paul M

    2017-07-12

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes a stable latent infection that can persist for the life of the host. EBNA1 is required for the replication, maintenance, and segregation of the latent episome but the structural features of EBNA1 that confer each of these functions are not completely understood. Here, we have solved the x-ray crystal structure of an EBNA1 DNA binding domain (DBD) and discovered a novel hexameric ring oligomeric form. The oligomeric interface pivoted around residue T585 as a joint that links and stabilizes higher order EBNA1 complexes. Substitution mutations around the interface destabilized higher order complex formation and altered the cooperative DNA-binding properties of EBNA1. Mutations had both positive and negative effects on EBNA1-dependent DNA replication and episome maintenance with OriP. We found that one naturally occurring polymorphism in the oligomer interface (T585P) had greater cooperative DNA binding in vitro, minor defects in DNA replication, and pronounced defects in episome maintenance. T585P was compromised for binding to OriP in vivo, as well as for assembling ORC2 and histone H3K4me3 at OriP. T585P was also compromised for forming stable subnuclear foci in living cells. These findings reveal a novel oligomeric structure of EBNA1 with an interface subject to naturally occurring polymoprhisms that modulate EBNA1 functional properties. We propose that EBNA1 dimers can assemble into higher-order oligomeric structures important for diverse functions of EBNA1.IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus is a human gamma herpesvirus that is causally associated with various cancers. Carcinogenic properties are linked to the ability of the virus to persist in the latent form for the life time of the host. EBNA1 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is consistently expressed in EBV tumors and is the only viral protein required to maintain the viral episome during latency. The structural and biochemical mechanisms by which EBNA1 allows for

  10. Induction of interferon-stimulated genes by IRF3 promotes replication of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Dhar, Jayeeta; Goswami, Ramansu; Sen, Ganes C; Barik, Sailen

    2015-03-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against microbial insult. The transcription factor, IRF3, is needed by mammalian cells to mount innate immune responses against many microbes, especially viruses. IRF3 remains inactive in the cytoplasm of uninfected cells; upon virus infection, it gets phosphorylated and then translocates to the nucleus, where it binds to the promoters of antiviral genes and induces their expression. Such genes include type I interferons (IFNs) as well as Interferon Stimulated Genes (ISGs). IRF3-/- cells support enhanced replication of many viruses and therefore, the corresponding mice are highly susceptible to viral pathogenesis. Here, we provide evidence for an unexpected pro-microbial role of IRF3: the replication of the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, was significantly impaired in IRF3-/- cells. In exploring whether the transcriptional activity of IRF3 was important for its pro-parasitic function, we found that ISGs induced by parasite-activated IRF3 were indeed essential, whereas type I interferons were not important. To delineate the signaling pathway that activates IRF3 in response to parasite infection, we used genetically modified human and mouse cells. The pro-parasitic signaling pathway, which we termed PISA (Parasite-IRF3 Signaling Activation), activated IRF3 without any involvement of the Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor pathways, thereby ruling out a role of parasite-derived RNA species in activating PISA. Instead, PISA needed the presence of cGAS, STING, TBK1 and IRF3, indicating the necessity of DNA-triggered signaling. To evaluate the physiological significance of our in vitro findings, IRF3-/- mice were challenged with parasite infection and their morbidity and mortality were measured. Unlike WT mice, the IRF3-/- mice did not support replication of the parasite and were resistant to pathogenesis caused by it. Our results revealed a new paradigm in which the antiviral host factor, IRF3, plays a cell

  11. Induction of Interferon-Stimulated Genes by IRF3 Promotes Replication of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Dhar, Jayeeta; Goswami, Ramansu; Sen, Ganes C.; Barik, Sailen

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against microbial insult. The transcription factor, IRF3, is needed by mammalian cells to mount innate immune responses against many microbes, especially viruses. IRF3 remains inactive in the cytoplasm of uninfected cells; upon virus infection, it gets phosphorylated and then translocates to the nucleus, where it binds to the promoters of antiviral genes and induces their expression. Such genes include type I interferons (IFNs) as well as Interferon Stimulated Genes (ISGs). IRF3-/- cells support enhanced replication of many viruses and therefore, the corresponding mice are highly susceptible to viral pathogenesis. Here, we provide evidence for an unexpected pro-microbial role of IRF3: the replication of the protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, was significantly impaired in IRF3-/- cells. In exploring whether the transcriptional activity of IRF3 was important for its pro-parasitic function, we found that ISGs induced by parasite-activated IRF3 were indeed essential, whereas type I interferons were not important. To delineate the signaling pathway that activates IRF3 in response to parasite infection, we used genetically modified human and mouse cells. The pro-parasitic signaling pathway, which we termed PISA (Parasite-IRF3 Signaling Activation), activated IRF3 without any involvement of the Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor pathways, thereby ruling out a role of parasite-derived RNA species in activating PISA. Instead, PISA needed the presence of cGAS, STING, TBK1 and IRF3, indicating the necessity of DNA-triggered signaling. To evaluate the physiological significance of our in vitro findings, IRF3-/- mice were challenged with parasite infection and their morbidity and mortality were measured. Unlike WT mice, the IRF3-/- mice did not support replication of the parasite and were resistant to pathogenesis caused by it. Our results revealed a new paradigm in which the antiviral host factor, IRF3, plays a cell

  12. Molecular chaperone Jiv promotes the RNA replication of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kangkang; Li, Haimin; Tan, Xuechao; Wu, Mengmeng; Lv, Qizhuang; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yanming

    2017-06-01

    The nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a self-splicing ribozyme wherein the precursor protein NS2-3 is cleaved, and the cleavage efficiency of NS2-3 is crucial to the replication of viral RNA. However, the proteolytic activity of NS2 autoprotease may be achieved through a cellular chaperone called J-domain protein interacting with viral protein (Jiv) or its fragment Jiv90, as evidence suggests that Jiv is required for the proper functioning of the NS2 protein of bovine viral diarrhea virus. Hence, the expression of Jiv may be correlated with the replication efficiency of CSFV RNA. We investigated the expression levels of Jiv and viral RNA in CSFV-infected cells and tissues using Real-time RT-PCR or Western blot analysis. The obtained results show that Jiv90 possibly plays an important role in the lifecycle of CSFV because the distribution of Jiv90 protein shows a positive correlation with the viral load of CSFV. Furthermore, the overexpression or knockdown of Jiv90 in swine cells can also significantly promote or decrease the viral load, respectively. The detection of Flow cytometry shows that the overexpression of Jiv90 prolongs the G1 phase of cell cycles but has no effect on apoptosis. These findings are likely to be of benefit in clarifying the pathogenesis of the CSFV.

  13. Establishment of a promoter-based chromatin architecture on recently replicated DNA can accommodate variable inter-nucleosome spacing

    PubMed Central

    Fennessy, Ross T.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes, the fundamental subunits of eukaryotic chromatin, are organized with respect to transcriptional start sites. A major challenge to the persistence of this organization is the disassembly of nucleosomes during DNA replication. Here, we use complimentary approaches to map the locations of nucleosomes on recently replicated DNA. We find that nucleosomes are substantially realigned with promoters during the minutes following DNA replication. As a result, the nucleosomal landscape is largely re-established before newly replicated chromosomes are partitioned into daughter cells and can serve as a platform for the re-establishment of gene expression programmes. When the supply of histones is disrupted through mutation of the chaperone Caf1, a promoter-based architecture is generated, but with increased inter-nucleosomal spacing. This indicates that the chromatin remodelling enzymes responsible for spacing nucleosomes are capable of organizing nucleosomes with a range of different linker DNA lengths. PMID:27106059

  14. RAD18, WRNIP1 and ATMIN promote ATM signalling in response to replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Nnennaya; Zhang, Tianyi; Burrell, Rebecca A.; Chakraborty, Atanu; Cronshaw, Janet; Da Costa, Clive; Grönroos, Eva; Pemberton, Helen N.; Anderton, Emma; Gonzalez, Laure; Sabbioneda, Simone; Ulrich, Helle D.; Swanton, Charles; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery invariably encounters obstacles that slow replication fork progression, and threaten to prevent complete replication and faithful segregation of sister chromatids. The resulting replication stress activates ATR, the major kinase involved in resolving impaired DNA replication. In addition, replication stress also activates the related kinase ATM, which is required to prevent mitotic segregation errors. However, the molecular mechanism of ATM activation by replication stress is not defined. Here we show that monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), a marker of stalled replication forks, interacts with the ATM cofactor ATMIN via WRN interacting protein 1 (WRNIP1). ATMIN, WRNIP1 and RAD18, the E3 ligase responsible for PCNA monoubiquitination, are specifically required for ATM signalling and 53BP1 focus formation induced by replication stress, not ionising radiation. Thus, WRNIP1 connects PCNA monoubiquitination with ATMIN/ATM to activate ATM signalling in response to replication stress and contribute to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:26549024

  15. RAD18, WRNIP1 and ATMIN promote ATM signalling in response to replication stress.

    PubMed

    Kanu, N; Zhang, T; Burrell, R A; Chakraborty, A; Cronshaw, J; DaCosta, C; Grönroos, E; Pemberton, H N; Anderton, E; Gonzalez, L; Sabbioneda, S; Ulrich, H D; Swanton, C; Behrens, A

    2016-07-28

    The DNA replication machinery invariably encounters obstacles that slow replication fork progression, and threaten to prevent complete replication and faithful segregation of sister chromatids. The resulting replication stress activates ATR, the major kinase involved in resolving impaired DNA replication. In addition, replication stress also activates the related kinase ATM, which is required to prevent mitotic segregation errors. However, the molecular mechanism of ATM activation by replication stress is not defined. Here, we show that monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), a marker of stalled replication forks, interacts with the ATM cofactor ATMIN via WRN-interacting protein 1 (WRNIP1). ATMIN, WRNIP1 and RAD18, the E3 ligase responsible for PCNA monoubiquitination, are specifically required for ATM signalling and 53BP1 focus formation induced by replication stress, not ionising radiation. Thus, WRNIP1 connects PCNA monoubiquitination with ATMIN/ATM to activate ATM signalling in response to replication stress and contribute to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  16. MicroRNA-33 promotes the replicative senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts by suppressing CDK6

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shun; Huang, Haijiao; Li, Nanhong; Zhang, Bing; Jia, Yubin; Yang, Yukun; Yuan, Yuan; Xiong, Xing-dong; Wang, Dengchuan; Zheng, Hui-ling; Liu, Xinguang

    2016-05-13

    MicroRNAs are a large class of tiny noncoding RNAs, which have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, and thus are involved in multiple cellular processes, including cellular senescence. MicroRNA-33 has previously been established to exert crucial effect on cell proliferation, lipid metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. Nonetheless, the association between microRNA-33 and cellular senescence and its underlying molecular mechanism are far to be elucidated. The present study has attempted to probe into the effect of microRNA-33 on MEFs senescence. Our data unveiled that microRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEFs compared to the young MEFs, and ectopic expression of microRNA-33 promoted MEFs senescence, while knock-down of microRNA-33 exhibited a protective effect against senescence phenotype. Moreover, we verified CDK6 as a direct target of microRNA-33 in mouse. Silencing of CDK6 induced the premature senescence phenotype of MEFs similarly as microRNA-33, while enforced expression of CDK6 significantly reverse the senescence-induction effect of microRNA-33. Taken together, our results suggested that microRNA-33 enhanced the replicative senescence of MEFs potentially by suppressing CDK6 expression. -- Highlights: •MicroRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEF cells. •Altered expression of microRNA-33 exerted a critical role in MEFs senescence. •MicroRNA-33 promoted the replicative senescence of MEFs via targeting of CDK6.

  17. Tobacco exposure results in increased E6 and E7 oncogene expression, DNA damage and mutation rates in cells maintaining episomal human papillomavirus 16 genomes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lanlan; Griego, Anastacia M; Chu, Ming; Ozbun, Michelle A

    2014-10-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infections are necessary but insufficient agents of cervical and other epithelial cancers. Epidemiological studies support a causal, but ill-defined, relationship between tobacco smoking and cervical malignancies. In this study, we used mainstream tobacco smoke condensate (MSTS-C) treatments of cervical cell lines that maintain either episomal or integrated HPV16 or HPV31 genomes to model tobacco smoke exposure to the cervical epithelium of the smoker. MSTS-C exposure caused a dose-dependent increase in viral genome replication and correspondingly higher early gene transcription in cells with episomal HPV genomes. However, MSTS-C exposure in cells with integrated HR-HPV genomes had no effect on genome copy number or early gene transcription. In cells with episomal HPV genomes, the MSTS-C-induced increases in E6 oncogene transcription led to decreased p53 protein levels and activity. As expected from loss of p53 activity in tobacco-exposed cells, DNA strand breaks were significantly higher but apoptosis was minimal compared with cells containing integrated viral genomes. Furthermore, DNA mutation frequencies were higher in surviving cells with HPV episomes. These findings provide increased understanding of tobacco smoke exposure risk in HPV infection and indicate tobacco smoking acts more directly to alter HR-HPV oncogene expression in cells that maintain episomal viral genomes. This suggests a more prominent role for tobacco smoke in earlier stages of HPV-related cancer progression. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Episome Stability Is Reduced by Aphidicolin and Controlled by DNA Damage Response Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Terri G.; Helmus, Michael J.; Koeller, Kevin; Bashkin, James K.

    2013-01-01

    A highly reproducible quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) assay was used to study the stability of human papillomavirus (HPV) in undifferentiated keratinocytes that maintain viral episomes. The term “stability” refers to the ability of episomes to persist with little copy number variation in cells. In investigating the mechanism of action of PA25, a previously published compound that destabilizes HPV episomes, aphidicolin was also found to markedly decrease episome levels, but via a different pathway from that of PA25. Since aphidicolin is known to activate DNA damage response (DDR) pathways, effects of inhibitors and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) acting within DDR pathways were investigated. Inhibitors of Chk1 and siRNA directed against ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ataxia-telangiectasia Rad3-related (ATR) pathways significantly reduced viral episomes, suggesting that these pathways play a role in maintaining HPV episome stability. Inhibitors of Chk2 and DNA-PK had no effect on episome levels. Pharmacological inhibition of ATM proteins had no effect on episome levels, but ATM knockdown by siRNA significantly reduced episome levels, suggesting that ATM proteins are playing an important role in HPV episome stability that does not require kinase activity. These results outline two pathways that trigger episome loss from cells and suggest the existence of a little-understood mechanism that mediates viral DNA elimination. Together, our results also indicate that HPV episomes have a stability profile that is remarkably similar to that of fragile sites; these similarities are outlined and discussed. This close correspondence may influence the preference of HPV for integration into fragile sites. PMID:23365423

  19. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2–FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM–BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. PMID:28058110

  20. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2-FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM-BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs.

  1. miR-29a promotes hepatitis B virus replication and expression by targeting SMARCE1 in hepatoma carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong-Jie; Zhuo, Ya; Zhou, Yan-Cai; Wang, Xin-Wei; Wang, Yan-Ping; Si, Chang-Yun; Wang, Xin-Hong

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the functional role and underlying molecular mechanism of miR-29a in hepatitis B virus (HBV) expression and replication. METHODS The levels of miR-29a and SMARCE1 in HBV-infected HepG2.2.15 cells were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. HBV DNA replication was measured by quantitative PCR and Southern blot analysis. The relative levels of hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B e antigen were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) was used to detect the viability of HepG2.2.15 cells. The relationship between miR-29a and SMARCE1 were identified by target prediction and luciferase reporter analysis. RESULTS miR-29a promoted HBV replication and expression, while SMARCE1 repressed HBV replication and expression. Cell viability detection indicated that miR-29a transfection had no adverse effect on the host cells. Moreover, SMARCE1 was identified and validated to be a functional target of miR-29a. Furthermore, restored expression of SMARCE1 could relieve the increased HBV replication and expression caused by miR-29a overexpression. CONCLUSION miR-29a promotes HBV replication and expression through regulating SMARCE1. As a potential regulator of HBV replication and expression, miR-29a could be a promising therapeutic target for patients with HBV infection. PMID:28740345

  2. Nucleolin is important for Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 1-mediated episome binding, maintenance, and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Zhao, Bo; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Shen, Chih-Long; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-wen

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for EBV episome maintenance, replication, and transcription. These effects are mediated by EBNA1 binding to cognate oriP DNA, which comprise 20 imperfect copies of a 30-bp dyad symmetry enhancer and an origin for DNA replication. To identify cell proteins essential for these EBNA1 functions, EBNA1 associated cell proteins were immune precipitated and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nucleolin (NCL) was identified to be EBNA1 associated. EBNA1's N-terminal 100 aa and NCL's RNA-binding domains were critical for EBNA1/NCL interaction. Lentivirus shRNA-mediated NCL depletion substantially reduced EBNA1 recruitment to oriP DNA, EBNA1-dependent transcription of an EBV oriP luciferase reporter, and EBV genome maintenance in lymphoblastoid cell lines. NCL RNA-binding domain K429 was critical for ATP and EBNA1 binding. NCL overexpression increased EBNA1 binding to oriP and transcription, whereas NCL K429A was deficient. Moreover, NCL silencing impaired lymphoblastoid cell line growth. These experiments reveal a surprisingly critical role for NCL K429 in EBNA1 episome maintenance and transcription, which may be a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24344309

  3. New host cell system for regulated simian virus 40 DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, R D; Gluzman, Y

    1985-01-01

    Transformed monkey cell lines (CMT and BMT) that inducible express simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen from the metallothionein promoter have been isolated and characterized. Immunoprecipitation of pulse-labeled T antigen demonstrates a 5- to 12-fold increase in the rate of synthesis on addition of heavy-metal inducers to the culture medium. Radioimmunoassay of cell extracts indicates the accumulation of three- to fourfold more total T antigen after 2 days of induction by comparison with uninduced controls. A direct correlation was found between the level of T-antigen synthesis and the extent of SV40 DNA replication in inducible cells. Inducible BMT cells expressing a low basal level of T antigen were efficiently transformed by a vector carrying the neomycin resistance marker and an SV40 origin of replication. These vector sequences were maintained in an episomal form in most G418-resistant cell lines examined and persisted even in the absence of biochemical selection. Extensive rearrangements were observed only if the vector contained bacterial plasmid sequences. Expression of a protein product under the control of the SV40 late promoter in such vectors was increased after heavy-metal-dependent amplification of the template. These results demonstrate the ability of BMT cells to maintain a cloned eucaryotic gene in an amplifiable episomal state. Images PMID:3018509

  4. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Jha, Jyoti K; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid-the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae Chr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that promotes initiation by reducing

  5. LUC7L3/CROP inhibits replication of hepatitis B virus via suppressing enhancer II/basal core promoter activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Ito, Masahiko; Sun, Suofeng; Chida, Takeshi; Nakashima, Kenji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    The core promoter of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome is a critical region for transcriptional initiation of 3.5 kb, pregenome and precore RNAs and for the viral replication. Although a number of host-cell factors that potentially regulate the viral promoter activities have been identified, the molecular mechanisms of the viral gene expression, in particular, regulatory mechanisms of the transcriptional repression remain elusive. In this study, we identified LUC7 like 3 pre-mRNA splicing factor (LUC7L3, also known as hLuc7A or CROP) as a novel interacting partner of HBV enhancer II and basal core promoter (ENII/BCP), key elements within the core promoter, through the proteomic screening and found that LUC7L3 functions as a negative regulator of ENII/BCP. Gene silencing of LUC7L3 significantly increased expression of the viral genes and antigens as well as the activities of ENII/BCP and core promoter. In contrast, overexpression of LUC7L3 inhibited their activities and HBV replication. In addition, LUC7L3 possibly contributes to promotion of the splicing of 3.5 kb RNA, which may also be involved in negative regulation of the pregenome RNA level. This is the first to demonstrate the involvement of LUC7L3 in regulation of gene transcription and in viral replication. PMID:27857158

  6. Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics of Episomes among Ecologically Cohesive Bacterial Populations

    DOE PAGES

    Xue, Hong; Cordero, Otto X.; Camas, Francisco M.; ...

    2015-05-05

    Although plasmids and other episomes are recognized as key players in horizontal gene transfer among microbes, their diversity and dynamics among ecologically structured host populations in the wild remain poorly understood. Here, we show that natural populations of marine Vibrionaceae bacteria host large numbers of families of episomes, consisting of plasmids and a surprisingly high fraction of plasmid-like temperate phages. Episomes are unevenly distributed among host populations, and contrary to the notion that high-density communities in biofilms act as hot spots of gene transfer, we identified a strong bias for episomes to occur in free-living as opposed to particle-attached cells.more » Mapping of episomal families onto host phylogeny shows that, with the exception of all phage and a few plasmid families, most are of recent evolutionary origin and appear to have spread rapidly by horizontal transfer. Such high eco-evolutionary turnover is particularly surprising for plasmids that are, based on previously suggested categorization, putatively nontransmissible, indicating that this type of plasmid is indeed frequently transferred by currently unknown mechanisms. Finally, analysis of recent gene transfer among plasmids reveals a network of extensive exchange connecting nearly all episomes. Genes functioning in plasmid transfer and maintenance are frequently exchanged, suggesting that plasmids can be rapidly transformed from one category to another. The broad distribution of episomes among distantly related hosts and the observed promiscuous recombination patterns show how episomes can offer their hosts rapid assembly and dissemination of novel functions.« less

  7. Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics of Episomes among Ecologically Cohesive Bacterial Populations

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Hong; Cordero, Otto X.; Camas, Francisco M.; Trimble, William; Meyer, Folker; Guglielmini, Julien; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Polz, Martin F.

    2015-05-05

    Although plasmids and other episomes are recognized as key players in horizontal gene transfer among microbes, their diversity and dynamics among ecologically structured host populations in the wild remain poorly understood. Here, we show that natural populations of marine Vibrionaceae bacteria host large numbers of families of episomes, consisting of plasmids and a surprisingly high fraction of plasmid-like temperate phages. Episomes are unevenly distributed among host populations, and contrary to the notion that high-density communities in biofilms act as hot spots of gene transfer, we identified a strong bias for episomes to occur in free-living as opposed to particle-attached cells. Mapping of episomal families onto host phylogeny shows that, with the exception of all phage and a few plasmid families, most are of recent evolutionary origin and appear to have spread rapidly by horizontal transfer. Such high eco-evolutionary turnover is particularly surprising for plasmids that are, based on previously suggested categorization, putatively nontransmissible, indicating that this type of plasmid is indeed frequently transferred by currently unknown mechanisms. Finally, analysis of recent gene transfer among plasmids reveals a network of extensive exchange connecting nearly all episomes. Genes functioning in plasmid transfer and maintenance are frequently exchanged, suggesting that plasmids can be rapidly transformed from one category to another. The broad distribution of episomes among distantly related hosts and the observed promiscuous recombination patterns show how episomes can offer their hosts rapid assembly and dissemination of novel functions.

  8. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T H

    1981-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) was also accelerated in infected cultures exposed to TPA, whereas phorbol, 4 alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate and 4-OmeTPA, which are inactive as tumor promoters, were ineffective in inducing this morphological change. The acceleration of the CPE seen in TPA-treated Ad5-infected cells was not caused by TPA induction of the protease plasminogen activator, since the protease inhibitors leupeptin and antipain do not inhibit the earlier onset of this CPE and, in contrast, epidermal growth factor, which induces plasminogen activator in HeLa cells, does not induce an earlier CPE. Evidence for a direct effect of TPA on viral gene expression was obtained by analyzing viral messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) synthesis. TPA accelerated the appearance of mRNA from all major early regions of Ad5, transiently stimulated the accumulation of region III mRNA, and accelerated the appearance of late Ad5 mRNA. Thus, TPA altered the temporal program of Ad5 mRNA production and accelerated the appearance of at least some Ad5-specific polypeptides during lytic infection of human cells. These effects presumably explain the earlier onset of the Ad5-specific CPE in TPA-treated cells and may have relevance to the effects of TPA on viral gene expression in nonpermissive cells carrying integrated viral deoxyribonucleic acid sequences. Images PMID:6965103

  9. Tumor promoters alter the temporal program of adenovirus replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, P B; Young, C S; Weinstein, I B; Carter, T H

    1981-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the kinetics of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) replication in human cells. When added at the time of infection, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) accelerated the appearance of an early virus antigen (72,000-molecular-weight [72K] deoxyribonucleic acid-binding protein), the onset of viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, and the production of infectious virus. The appearance of an Ad5-specific cytopathic effect (CPE) was also accelerated in infected cultures exposed to TPA, whereas phorbol, 4 alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate and 4-OmeTPA, which are inactive as tumor promoters, were ineffective in inducing this morphological change. The acceleration of the CPE seen in TPA-treated Ad5-infected cells was not caused by TPA induction of the protease plasminogen activator, since the protease inhibitors leupeptin and antipain do not inhibit the earlier onset of this CPE and, in contrast, epidermal growth factor, which induces plasminogen activator in HeLa cells, does not induce an earlier CPE. Evidence for a direct effect of TPA on viral gene expression was obtained by analyzing viral messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) synthesis. TPA accelerated the appearance of mRNA from all major early regions of Ad5, transiently stimulated the accumulation of region III mRNA, and accelerated the appearance of late Ad5 mRNA. Thus, TPA altered the temporal program of Ad5 mRNA production and accelerated the appearance of at least some Ad5-specific polypeptides during lytic infection of human cells. These effects presumably explain the earlier onset of the Ad5-specific CPE in TPA-treated cells and may have relevance to the effects of TPA on viral gene expression in nonpermissive cells carrying integrated viral deoxyribonucleic acid sequences.

  10. Tousled-like kinases phosphorylate Asf1 to promote histone supply during DNA replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimovskaia, Ilnaz M.; Young, Clifford; Strømme, Caroline B.; Menard, Patrice; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Mejlvang, Jakob; Ask, Katrine; Ploug, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L.; Jensen, Ole N.; Groth, Anja

    2014-03-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes are rapidly assembled on newly synthesized DNA to restore chromatin organization. Asf1, a key histone H3-H4 chaperone required for this process, is phosphorylated by Tousled-like kinases (TLKs). Here, we identify TLK phosphorylation sites by mass spectrometry and dissect how phosphorylation has an impact on human Asf1 function. The divergent C-terminal tail of Asf1a is phosphorylated at several sites, and this is required for timely progression through S phase. Consistent with this, biochemical analysis of wild-type and phospho-mimetic Asf1a shows that phosphorylation enhances binding to histones and the downstream chaperones CAF-1 and HIRA. Moreover, we find that TLK phosphorylation of Asf1a is induced in cells experiencing deficiency of new histones and that TLK interaction with Asf1a involves its histone-binding pocket. We thus propose that TLK signalling promotes histone supply in S phase by targeting histone-free Asf1 and stimulating its ability to shuttle histones to sites of chromatin assembly.

  11. BRCA1-regulated RRM2 expression protects glioblastoma cells from endogenous replication stress and promotes tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Rikke D.; Gajjar, Madhavsai K.; Tuckova, Lucie; Jensen, Kamilla E.; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgaard, Kjeld; Rasmussen, Jane S.; Brennum, Jannick; Bartek, Jiri; Syrucek, Martin; Sedlakova, Eva; Andersen, Klaus K.; Frederiksen, Marie H.; Bartek, Jiri; Hamerlik, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-evoked replication stress (RS) fuels genomic instability in diverse cancer types. Here we report that BRCA1, traditionally regarded a tumour suppressor, plays an unexpected tumour-promoting role in glioblastoma (GBM), safeguarding a protective response to supraphysiological RS levels. Higher BRCA1 positivity is associated with shorter survival of glioma patients and the abrogation of BRCA1 function in GBM enhances RS, DNA damage (DD) accumulation and impairs tumour growth. Mechanistically, we identify a novel role of BRCA1 as a transcriptional co-activator of RRM2 (catalytic subunit of ribonucleotide reductase), whereby BRCA1-mediated RRM2 expression protects GBM cells from endogenous RS, DD and apoptosis. Notably, we show that treatment with a RRM2 inhibitor triapine reproduces the BRCA1-depletion GBM-repressive phenotypes and sensitizes GBM cells to PARP inhibition. We propose that GBM cells are addicted to the RS-protective role of the BRCA1-RRM2 axis, targeting of which may represent a novel paradigm for therapeutic intervention in GBM. PMID:27845331

  12. Quinacrine promotes replication and conformational mutation of chronic wasting disease prions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jifeng; Kang, Hae-Eun; Telling, Glenn C

    2014-04-22

    Quinacrine's ability to reduce levels of pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in mouse cells infected with experimentally adapted prions led to several unsuccessful clinical studies in patients with prion diseases, a 10-y investment to understand its mechanism of action, and the production of related compounds with expectations of greater efficacy. We show here, in stark contrast to this reported inhibitory effect, that quinacrine enhances deer and elk PrP(Sc) accumulation and promotes propagation of prions causing chronic wasting disease (CWD), a fatal, transmissible, neurodegenerative disorder of cervids of uncertain zoonotic potential. Surprisingly, despite increased prion titers in quinacrine-treated cells, transmission of the resulting prions produced prolonged incubation times and altered PrP(Sc) deposition patterns in the brains of diseased transgenic mice. This unexpected outcome is consistent with quinacrine affecting the intrinsic properties of the CWD prion. Accordingly, quinacrine-treated CWD prions were comprised of an altered PrP(Sc) conformation. Our findings provide convincing evidence for drug-induced conformational mutation of prions without the prerequisite of generating drug-resistant variants of the original strain. More specifically, they show that a drug capable of restraining prions in one species/strain setting, and consequently used to treat human prion diseases, improves replicative ability in another and therefore force reconsideration of current strategies to screen antiprion compounds.

  13. MicroRNA-33 promotes the replicative senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts by suppressing CDK6.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shun; Huang, Haijiao; Li, Nanhong; Zhang, Bing; Jia, Yubin; Yang, Yukun; Yuan, Yuan; Xiong, Xing-Dong; Wang, Dengchuan; Zheng, Hui-Ling; Liu, Xinguang

    2016-05-13

    MicroRNAs are a large class of tiny noncoding RNAs, which have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, and thus are involved in multiple cellular processes, including cellular senescence. MicroRNA-33 has previously been established to exert crucial effect on cell proliferation, lipid metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. Nonetheless, the association between microRNA-33 and cellular senescence and its underlying molecular mechanism are far to be elucidated. The present study has attempted to probe into the effect of microRNA-33 on MEFs senescence. Our data unveiled that microRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEFs compared to the young MEFs, and ectopic expression of microRNA-33 promoted MEFs senescence, while knock-down of microRNA-33 exhibited a protective effect against senescence phenotype. Moreover, we verified CDK6 as a direct target of microRNA-33 in mouse. Silencing of CDK6 induced the premature senescence phenotype of MEFs similarly as microRNA-33, while enforced expression of CDK6 significantly reverse the senescence-induction effect of microRNA-33. Taken together, our results suggested that microRNA-33 enhanced the replicative senescence of MEFs potentially by suppressing CDK6 expression. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The One-Kilobase DNA Fragment Upstream of the ardC Actin Gene of Physarum polycephalum Is Both a Replicator and a Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Gérard; Pallotta, Dominick; Bénard, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    The 1-kb DNA fragment upstream of the ardC actin gene of Physarum polycephalum promotes the transcription of a reporter gene either in a transient-plasmid assay or as an integrated copy in an ectopic position, defining this region as the transcriptional promoter of the ardC gene (PardC). Since we mapped an origin of replication activated at the onset of S phase within this same fragment, we examined the pattern of replication of a cassette containing the PardC promoter and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene, hph, integrated into two different chromosomal sites. In both cases, we show by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis that an efficient, early activated origin coincides with the ectopic PardC fragment. One of the integration sites was a normally late-replicating region. The presence of the ectopic origin converted this late-replicating domain into an early-replicating domain in which replication forks propagate with kinetics indistinguishable from those of the native PardC replicon. This is the first demonstration that initiation sites for DNA replication in Physarum correspond to cis-acting replicator sequences. This work also confirms the close proximity of a replication origin and a promoter, with both functions being located within the 1-kb proximal region of the ardC actin gene. A more precise location of the replication origin with respect to the transcriptional promoter must await the development of a functional autonomously replicating sequence assay in Physarum. PMID:10207074

  15. Viral DNA Replication Orientation and hnRNPs Regulate Transcription of the Human Papillomavirus 18 Late Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Haibin; Ge, Hui; Ajiro, Masahiko; Sharma, Nishi R.; Meyers, Craig; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas; Klar, Amar; Court, Donald

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is tightly linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Although expression of viral early genes is initiated immediately upon virus infection of undifferentiated basal cells, viral DNA amplification and late gene expression occur only in the mid to upper strata of the keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In this report, we show that the relative activity of HPV18 TATA-less late promoter P811 depends on its orientation relative to that of the origin (Ori) of viral DNA replication and is sensitive to the eukaryotic DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. Additionally, transfected 70-nucleotide (nt)-long single-strand DNA oligonucleotides that are homologous to the region near Ori induce late promoter activity. We also found that promoter activation in raft cultures leads to production of the late promoter-associated, sense-strand transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs) and splice-site small RNAs (spliRNAs). Finally, a cis-acting AAGTATGCA core element that functions as a repressor to the promoter was identified. This element interacts with hnRNP D0B and hnRNP A/B factors. Point mutations in the core prevented binding of hnRNPs and increased the promoter activity. Confirming this result, knocking down the expression of both hnRNPs in keratinocytes led to increased promoter activity. Taking the data together, our study revealed the mechanism of how the HPV18 late promoter is regulated by DNA replication and host factors. PMID:28559488

  16. FANCD2, FANCJ and BRCA2 cooperate to promote replication fork recovery independently of the Fanconi Anemia core complex.

    PubMed

    Raghunandan, Maya; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Kelich, Stephanie L; Hanenberg, Helmut; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an inherited multi-gene cancer predisposition syndrome that is characterized on the cellular level by a hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). To repair these lesions, the FA pathway proteins are thought to act in a linear hierarchy: Following ICL detection, an upstream FA core complex monoubiquitinates the central FA pathway members FANCD2 and FANCI, followed by their recruitment to chromatin. Chromatin-bound monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI subsequently coordinate DNA repair factors including the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 to repair the DNA ICL. Importantly, we recently showed that FANCD2 has additional independent roles: it binds chromatin and acts in concert with the BLM helicase complex to promote the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks, while suppressing the firing of new replication origins. Here, we show that FANCD2 fulfills these roles independently of the FA core complex-mediated monoubiquitination step. Following APH treatment, nonubiquitinated FANCD2 accumulates on chromatin, recruits the BLM complex, and promotes robust replication fork recovery regardless of the absence or presence of a functional FA core complex. In contrast, the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and BRCA2 share FANCD2's role in replication fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Our results support a non-linear FA pathway model at stalled replication forks, where the nonubiquitinated FANCD2 isoform - in concert with FANCJ and BRCA2 - fulfills a specific function in promoting efficient replication fork recovery independently of the FA core complex.

  17. FANCD2, FANCJ and BRCA2 cooperate to promote replication fork recovery independently of the Fanconi Anemia core complex

    PubMed Central

    Raghunandan, Maya; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Kelich, Stephanie L.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an inherited multi-gene cancer predisposition syndrome that is characterized on the cellular level by a hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). To repair these lesions, the FA pathway proteins are thought to act in a linear hierarchy: Following ICL detection, an upstream FA core complex monoubiquitinates the central FA pathway members FANCD2 and FANCI, followed by their recruitment to chromatin. Chromatin-bound monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI subsequently coordinate DNA repair factors including the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 to repair the DNA ICL. Importantly, we recently showed that FANCD2 has additional independent roles: it binds chromatin and acts in concert with the BLM helicase complex to promote the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks, while suppressing the firing of new replication origins. Here, we show that FANCD2 fulfills these roles independently of the FA core complex-mediated monoubiquitination step. Following APH treatment, nonubiquitinated FANCD2 accumulates on chromatin, recruits the BLM complex, and promotes robust replication fork recovery regardless of the absence or presence of a functional FA core complex. In contrast, the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and BRCA2 share FANCD2's role in replication fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Our results support a non-linear FA pathway model at stalled replication forks, where the nonubiquitinated FANCD2 isoform – in concert with FANCJ and BRCA2 – fulfills a specific function in promoting efficient replication fork recovery independently of the FA core complex. PMID:25659033

  18. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

  19. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture.

  20. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Debra L.; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4Cdt2) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. PMID:26771714

  1. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  2. Delivery of episomal vectors into primary cells by means of commercial transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Han, Na Rae; Lee, Hyun; Baek, Song; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Seung Tae

    2015-05-29

    Although episomal vectors are commonly transported into cells by electroporation, a number of electroporation-derived problems have led to the search for alternative transfection protocols, such as the use of transfection reagents, which are inexpensive and easy to handle. Polyplex-mediated transport of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm has been conducted successfully in immortalized cell lines, but no report exists of successful transfection of primary cells using this method. Accordingly, we sought to optimize the conditions for polyplex-mediated transfection for effective delivery of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Episomal vectors were complexed with the commercially available transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000, FuGEND HD and jetPEI. The ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vectors was varied, and the subsequent transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of the complexes were analyzed using flow cytometry and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. No cytotoxicity and the highest transfection yield were observed when the ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vector was 4 (v/wt) in the cases of Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGENE HD, and 2 in the case of jetPEI. Of the three transfection reagents tested, jetPEI showed the highest transfection efficiency without any cytotoxicity. Thus, we confirmed that the transfection reagent jetPEI could be used to effectively deliver episomal vectors into primary cells without electroporation.

  3. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Utilizes and Manipulates RNA N(6)-Adenosine Methylation To Promote Lytic Replication.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fengchun; Chen, E Ricky; Nilsen, Timothy W

    2017-08-15

    N(6)-adenosine methylation (m(6)A) is the most common posttranscriptional RNA modification in mammalian cells. We found that most transcripts encoded by the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genome undergo m(6)A modification. The levels of m(6)A-modified mRNAs increased substantially upon stimulation for lytic replication. The blockage of m(6)A inhibited splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding the replication transcription activator (RTA), a key KSHV lytic switch protein, and halted viral lytic replication. We identified several m(6)A sites in RTA pre-mRNA crucial for splicing through interactions with YTH domain containing 1 (YTHDC1), an m(6)A nuclear reader protein, in conjunction with serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3) and SRSF10. Interestingly, RTA induced m(6)A and enhanced its own pre-mRNA splicing. Our results not only demonstrate an essential role of m(6)A in regulating RTA pre-mRNA splicing but also suggest that KSHV has evolved a mechanism to manipulate the host m(6)A machinery to its advantage in promoting lytic replication.IMPORTANCE KSHV productive lytic replication plays a pivotal role in the initiation and progression of Kaposi's sarcoma tumors. Previous studies suggested that the KSHV switch from latency to lytic replication is primarily controlled at the chromatin level through histone and DNA modifications. The present work reports for the first time that KSHV genome-encoded mRNAs undergo m(6)A modification, which represents a new mechanism at the posttranscriptional level in the control of viral replication. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5’ end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3’ single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5’ end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5’ DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5’ overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  5. Nuclear geometry and rapid mitosis ensure asymmetric episome segregation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gehlen, Lutz R; Nagai, Shigeki; Shimada, Kenji; Meister, Peter; Taddei, Angela; Gasser, Susan M

    2011-01-11

    Asymmetric cell division drives the generation of differentiated cells and maintenance of stem cells. In budding yeast, autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids lacking centromere elements are asymmetrically segregated into the mother cell, where they are thought to contribute to cellular senescence. This phenomenon has been proposed to result from the active retention of plasmids through an interaction with nuclear pores. To investigate the mother-daughter segregation bias of plasmids, we used live-cell imaging to follow the behavior of extrachromosomal DNA. We show that both an excised DNA ring and a centromere-deficient ARS plasmid move freely in the nucleoplasm yet show a strong segregation bias for the mother cell. Computational modeling shows that the geometrical shape of the dividing yeast nucleus and length of mitosis severely restrict the passive diffusion of episomes into daughter nuclei. Predictions based on simulated nuclear division were tested with mutants that extend the length of mitosis. Finally, explaining how various anchors can improve mitotic segregation, we show that plasmid partitioning is improved by tethering the plasmid to segregating structures, such as the nuclear envelope and telomeres. The morphology and brevity of mitotic division in budding yeast impose physical constraints on the diffusion of material into the daughter, obviating the need for a retention mechanism to generate rejuvenated offspring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. AP1 enhances polyomavirus DNA replication by promoting T-antigen-mediated unwinding of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, W; Tang, W J; Bu, X; Bermudez, V; Martin, M; Folk, W R

    1996-01-01

    An early step in the initiation of polyomavirus DNA replication is viral large-T-antigen-mediated unwinding of the origin. We report that components of the AP1 transcription factor, Fos and Jun, interact with T antigen in vitro to enhance unwinding of the viral origin. This provides a biochemical basis for the capacity of AP1 to activate viral DNA replication in vivo. PMID:8763994

  7. UGGT1 enhances enterovirus 71 pathogenicity by promoting viral RNA synthesis and viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng-Nien; Cameron, Craig E.

    2017-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA virus infections can induce the stress-related unfolded protein response (UPR) in host cells. This study found that enterovirus A71 (EVA71) utilizes host UDP-glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGGT1), a key endoplasmic reticulum protein (ER) involved in UPR, to enhance viral replication and virulence. EVA71 forms replication complexes (RCs) on cellular membranes that contain a mix of host and viral proteins to facilitate viral replication, but the components and processes involved in the assembly and function of RCs are not fully understood. Using EVA71 as a model, this study found that host UGGT1 and viral 3D polymerase co-precipitate along with other factors on membranous replication complexes to enhance viral replication. Increased UGGT1 levels elevated viral growth rates, while viral pathogenicity was observed to be lower in heterozygous knockout mice (Uggt1 +/- mice). These findings provide important insight on the role of UPR and host UGGT1 in regulating RNA virus replication and pathogenicity. PMID:28545059

  8. Mouse Norovirus infection promotes autophagy induction to facilitate replication but prevents final autophagosome maturation

    SciTech Connect

    O’Donnell, Tanya B.; Hyde, Jennifer L.; Mintern, Justine D.; Mackenzie, Jason M.

    2016-05-15

    Autophagy is a cellular process used to eliminate intracellular pathogens. Many viruses however are able to manipulate this cellular process for their own advantage. Here we demonstrate that Mouse Norovirus (MNV) infection induces autophagy but does not appear to utilise the autophagosomal membrane for establishment and formation of the viral replication complex. We have observed that MNV infection results in lipidation and recruitment of LC3 to the autophagosome membrane but prevents subsequent fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, as SQSTM1 (an autophagy receptor) accumulates and Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein1 is sequestered to the MNV replication complex (RC) rather than to autophagosomes. We have additionally observed that chemical modulation of autophagy differentially affects MNV replication. From this study we can conclude that MNV infection induces autophagy, however suppresses the final maturation step of this response, indicating that autophagy induction contributes to MNV replication independently of RC biogenesis. - Highlights: • MNV induces autophagy in infected murine macrophages. • MNV does not utilise autophagosomal membranes for replication. • The MNV-induced autophagosomes do not fuse with lysosomes. • MNV sequesters SQSTM1 to prevent autophagy degradation and turnover. • Chemical modulation of autophagy enhances MNV replication.

  9. Targeting the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 promotes adult human β cell replication.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, Dana; Li, Changhong; Yu, Ming; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Jia; Naji, Ali; Ziaie, Seyed; Glaser, Benjamin; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2014-02-01

    Children with focal hyperinsulinism of infancy display a dramatic, non-neoplastic clonal expansion of β cells that have undergone mitotic recombination, resulting in paternal disomy of part of chromosome 11. This disomic region contains imprinted genes, including the gene encoding the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 (CDKN1C), which is silenced as a consequence of the recombination event. We hypothesized that targeting p57Kip2 could stimulate adult human β cell replication. Indeed, when we suppressed CDKN1C expression in human islets obtained from deceased adult organ donors and transplanted them into hyperglycemic, immunodeficient mice, β cell replication increased more than 3-fold. The newly replicated cells retained properties of mature β cells, including the expression of β cell markers such as insulin, PDX1, and NKX6.1. Importantly, these newly replicated cells demonstrated normal glucose-induced calcium influx, further indicating β cell functionality. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the massive β cell replication that occurs in children with focal hyperinsulinism. These data also provided evidence that β cells from older humans, in which baseline replication is negligible, can be coaxed to re-enter and complete the cell cycle while maintaining mature β cell properties. Thus, controlled manipulation of this pathway holds promise for the expansion of β cells in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  10. Targeting the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 promotes adult human β cell replication

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Dana; Li, Changhong; Yu, Ming; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Jia; Naji, Ali; Ziaie, Seyed; Glaser, Benjamin; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2014-01-01

    Children with focal hyperinsulinism of infancy display a dramatic, non-neoplastic clonal expansion of β cells that have undergone mitotic recombination, resulting in paternal disomy of part of chromosome 11. This disomic region contains imprinted genes, including the gene encoding the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 (CDKN1C), which is silenced as a consequence of the recombination event. We hypothesized that targeting p57Kip2 could stimulate adult human β cell replication. Indeed, when we suppressed CDKN1C expression in human islets obtained from deceased adult organ donors and transplanted them into hyperglycemic, immunodeficient mice, β cell replication increased more than 3-fold. The newly replicated cells retained properties of mature β cells, including the expression of β cell markers such as insulin, PDX1, and NKX6.1. Importantly, these newly replicated cells demonstrated normal glucose-induced calcium influx, further indicating β cell functionality. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the massive β cell replication that occurs in children with focal hyperinsulinism. These data also provided evidence that β cells from older humans, in which baseline replication is negligible, can be coaxed to re-enter and complete the cell cycle while maintaining mature β cell properties. Thus, controlled manipulation of this pathway holds promise for the expansion of β cells in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24430183

  11. The Werner's Syndrome protein collaborates with REV1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara G.; Sale, Julian E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance pathways facilitate the bypass of DNA lesions encountered during replication. These pathways can be mechanistically divided into recombinational damage avoidance and translesion synthesis, in which the lesion is directly bypassed by specialised DNA polymerases. We have recently shown distinct genetic dependencies for lesion bypass at and behind the replication fork in the avian cell line DT40, bypass at the fork requiring REV1 and bypass at post-replicative gaps requiring PCNA ubiquitination by RAD18. The WRN helicase/exonuclease, which is mutated in the progeroid and cancer predisposition disorder Werner's Syndrome, has previously been implicated in a RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathway. However, WRN has also been shown to be required to maintain normal replication fork progression on a damaged DNA template, a defect reminiscent of REV1-deficient cells. Here we use the avian cell line DT40 to demonstrate that WRN assists REV1-dependent translesion synthesis at the replication fork and that PCNA ubiquitination-dependent post-replicative lesion bypass provides an important backup mechanism for damage tolerance in the absence of WRN protein. PMID:20691646

  12. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-08-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3' end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3' end protection and 5'-3' decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes.

  13. Inhibition of adenovirus replication by the E1A antisense transcript initiated from hsp70 and VA-1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, O I; Borisenko, A S; Ponomareva, T I; Tikhonenko, T I

    1990-03-01

    The E1A region of the adenoviral genome, important for initiation of virus infection and activation of other viral genes, was chosen as a target for engineering antisense RNA (asRNA) to inhibit adenovirus 5 (Ad5) replication in COS-1 cell culture in vitro. The hsp70 promoter, taken from the appropriate heat-shock-protein gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and the VA-1 RNA promoter, derived from the Ad5 gene coding for low-molecular-mass VA-1 RNA and recognized by RNA polymerase III were used as regulatory elements of transcription. The two types of recombinant constructs contained E1A fragments of 710 bp (hsp70 constructs) or 380 or 740 bp (VA-1 RNA constructs) in reverse orientation relative to the promoter position, as well as a transcription termination signal, the SV40 ori, and the gene controlling Geneticin (antibiotic G418) resistance (G418R). After selection of transfected COS-1 cells in the presence of G418, a number of stable G418R cell lines were raised which expressed engineered asRNAs. Plating of Ad5 suspensions of known titre on monolayers of transfected COS-1 cells clearly showed strong inhibition of adenovirus replication by asRNAs: 75% with the hsp70 promoter and 90% with the VA-1 RNA promoter.

  14. Timeless preserves telomere length by promoting efficient DNA replication through human telomeres.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Deng, Zhong; Lee, Seung Woo; Das, Mukund M; Lieberman, Paul M; Noguchi, Eishi

    2012-06-15

    A variety of telomere protection programs are utilized to preserve telomere structure. However, the complex nature of telomere maintenance remains elusive. The Timeless protein associates with the replication fork and is thought to support efficient progression of the replication fork through natural impediments, including replication fork block sites. However, the mechanism by which Timeless regulates such genomic regions is not understood. Here, we report the role of Timeless in telomere length maintenance. We demonstrate that Timeless depletion leads to telomere shortening in human cells. This length maintenance is independent of telomerase, and Timeless depletion causes increased levels of DNA damage, leading to telomere aberrations. We also show that Timeless is associated with Shelterin components TRF1 and TRF2. Timeless depletion slows telomere replication in vitro, and Timeless-depleted cells fail to maintain TRF1-mediated accumulation of replisome components at telomeric regions. Furthermore, telomere replication undergoes a dramatic delay in Timeless-depleted cells. These results suggest that Timeless functions together with TRF1 to prevent fork collapse at telomere repeat DNA and ensure stable maintenance of telomere length and integrity.

  15. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    PubMed Central

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K.; James, John; Prescott, Alan; Haga, Ismar R.; Beard, Philippa M.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. PMID:25462347

  16. CRL2Lrr1 promotes unloading of the vertebrate replisome from chromatin during replication termination

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, James M.; Low, Emily; Mann, Matthias; Räschle, Markus; Walter, Johannes C.

    2017-01-01

    A key event during eukaryotic replication termination is the removal of the CMG helicase from chromatin. CMG unloading involves ubiquitylation of its Mcm7 subunit and the action of the p97 ATPase. Using a proteomic screen in Xenopus egg extracts, we identified factors that are enriched on chromatin when CMG unloading is blocked. This approach identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL2Lrr1, a specific p97 complex, other potential regulators of termination, and many replisome components. We show that Mcm7 ubiquitylation and CRL2Lrr1 binding to chromatin are temporally linked and occur only during replication termination. In the absence of CRL2Lrr1, Mcm7 is not ubiquitylated, CMG unloading is inhibited, and a large subcomplex of the vertebrate replisome that includes DNA Pol ε is retained on DNA. Our data identify CRL2Lrr1 as a master regulator of replisome disassembly during vertebrate DNA replication termination. PMID:28235849

  17. Stable transformation of an episomal protein-tagging shuttle vector in the piscine diplomonad Spironucleus vortens

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Scott C; Pham, Jonathan K; House, Susan A; Slawson, Elizabeth E; Cronembold, Daniela; Cande, W Zacheus

    2008-01-01

    Background Diplomonads are common free-living inhabitants of anoxic aquatic environments and are also found as intestinal commensals or parasites of a wide variety of animals. Spironucleus vortens is a putatively commensal diplomonad of angelfish that grows to high cell densities in axenic culture. Genomic sequencing of S. vortens is in progress, yet little information is available regarding molecular and cellular aspects of S. vortens biology beyond descriptive ultrastructural studies. To facilitate the development of S. vortens as an additional diplomonad experimental model, we have constructed and stably transformed an episomal plasmid containing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag, an AU1 epitope tag, and a tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag. This construct also contains selectable antibiotic resistance markers for both S. vortens and E. coli. Results Stable transformants of S. vortens grew relatively rapidly (within 7 days) after electroporation and were maintained under puromycin selection for over 6 months. We expressed the enhanced GFP variant, eGFP, under transcriptional control of the S. vortens histone H3 promoter, and visually confirmed diffuse GFP expression in over 50% of transformants. Next, we generated a histone H3::GFP fusion using the S. vortens conventional histone H3 gene and its native promoter. This construct was also highly expressed in the majority of S. vortens transformants, in which the H3::GFP fusion localized to the chromatin in both nuclei. Finally, we used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of the episomal plasmid to show that the transformed plasmid localized to only one nucleus/cell and was present at roughly 10–20 copies per nucleus. Because S. vortens grows to high densities in laboratory culture, it is a feasible diplomonad from which to purify native protein complexes. Thus, we also included a TAP tag in the plasmid constructs to permit future tagging and subsequent purification of protein complexes by

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor promoter-based conditionally replicative adenoviruses effectively suppress growth of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akiko; Uchino, Junji; Harada, Taishi; Nakagaki, Noriaki; Hisasue, Junko; Fujita, Masaki; Takayama, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) incidence is increasing drastically worldwide as an occupational disease resulting from asbestos exposure. However, no curative treatment for MM of advanced stage is available. Thus, new therapeutic approaches for MM are required. Because malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells spread along the pleural surface in most patients, MPM can be targeted using intrapleural therapeutic approaches. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of the intrapleural instillation of a replication-competent adenovirus as an oncolytic agent against MPM. We constructed a vascular endothelial growth factor promoter-based conditionally replicative adenovirus (VEGF-CRAd) that replicates exclusively in VEGF-expressing cells. All of the MM cell lines that we tested expressed VEGF mRNA, and VEGF-CRAd selectively replicated in these MM cells and exerted a direct concentration-dependent oncolytic effect in vitro. Furthermore, our in vivo studies showed that pre-infection of MM cells with VEGF-CRAd potently suppressed MPM tumor formation in nude mice, and that intrapleural instillation of VEGF-CRAd prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicate that VEGF-CRAd exerts an oncolytic effect on MM cells and that intrapleural instillation of VEGF-CRAd is safe and might represent a promising therapeutic strategy for MPM. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Expression of Raf kinase inhibitor protein is downregulated in response to Newcastle disease virus infection to promote viral replication.

    PubMed

    Yin, Renfu; Liu, Xinxin; Bi, Yuhai; Xie, Guangyao; Zhang, Pingze; Meng, Xin; Ai, Lili; Xu, Rongyi; Sun, Yuzhang; Stoeger, Tobias; Ding, Zhuang

    2015-09-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes a severe and economically significant disease affecting almost the entire poultry industry worldwide. However, factors that affect NDV replication in host cells are poorly understood. Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is a physiological inhibitor of c-RAF kinase and NF-κB signalling, known for their functions in the control of immune response as well as tumour invasion and metastasis. In the present study, we investigated the consequences of overexpression of host RKIP during viral infection. We demonstrate that NDV infection represses RKIP expression thereby promoting virus replication. Experimental upregulation of RKIP in turn acts as a potential antiviral defence mechanism in host cells that restricts NDV replication by repressing the activation of Raf/MEK/ERK and IκBα/NF-κB signalling pathways. Our results not only extend the concept of linking NDV-host interactions, but also reveal RKIP as a new class of protein-kinase-inhibitor protein that affects NDV replication with therapeutic potential.

  20. Herpesvirus Saimiri Open Reading Frame 50 (Rta) Protein Reactivates the Lytic Replication Cycle in a Persistently Infected A549 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Delyth J.; Walters, Matthew S.; Smith, Peter G.; Thurau, Mathias; Fickenscher, Helmut; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2001-01-01

    Herpesviruses occur in two distinct forms of infection, lytic replication and latent persistence. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms that govern the latent-lytic switch in the prototype gamma-2 herpesvirus, herpesvirus saimiri (HVS). We utilized a persistently HVS-infected A549 cell line, in which HVS DNA is stably maintained as nonintegrated circular episomes, to assess the role of the open reading frame 50 (ORF 50) (Rta) proteins in the latent-lytic switch. Northern blot analysis and virus recovery assays determined that the ORF 50a gene product, when expressed under the control of a constitutively active promoter, was sufficient to reactivate the entire lytic replication cycle, producing infectious virus particles. Furthermore, although the ORF 50 proteins of HVS strains A11 and C488 are structurally divergent, they were both capable of inducing the lytic replication cycle in this model of HVS latency. PMID:11264393

  1. Herpesvirus saimiri open reading frame 50 (Rta) protein reactivates the lytic replication cycle in a persistently infected A549 cell line.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, D J; Walters, M S; Smith, P G; Thurau, M; Fickenscher, H; Whitehouse, A

    2001-04-01

    Herpesviruses occur in two distinct forms of infection, lytic replication and latent persistence. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms that govern the latent-lytic switch in the prototype gamma-2 herpesvirus, herpesvirus saimiri (HVS). We utilized a persistently HVS-infected A549 cell line, in which HVS DNA is stably maintained as nonintegrated circular episomes, to assess the role of the open reading frame 50 (ORF 50) (Rta) proteins in the latent-lytic switch. Northern blot analysis and virus recovery assays determined that the ORF 50a gene product, when expressed under the control of a constitutively active promoter, was sufficient to reactivate the entire lytic replication cycle, producing infectious virus particles. Furthermore, although the ORF 50 proteins of HVS strains A11 and C488 are structurally divergent, they were both capable of inducing the lytic replication cycle in this model of HVS latency.

  2. A critical Sp1 element in the rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) Rta promoter confers high-level activity that correlates with cellular permissivity for viral replication

    PubMed Central

    DeMaster, Laura K.; Rose, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    KSHV establishes characteristic latent infections in vitro, while RRV, a related macaque rhadinovirus, establishes characteristic permissive infections with virus replication. We identified cells that are not permissive for RRV replication and recapitulate the latent KSHV infection and reactivation processes. The RRV replication and transactivator (Rta) promoter was characterized in permissive and non-permissive cells and compared to the KSHV Rta promoter. Both promoters contained a critical Sp1 element, had equivalent activities in different cell types, and were inhibited by LANA. RRV and KSHV infections were non-permissive in cells with low Rta promoter activity. While RRV infections were permissive in cells with high basal promoter activity, KSHV infections remained non-permissive. Our studies suggest that RRV lacks the Rta-inducible LANA promoter that is responsible for LANA inhibition of the KSHV Rta promoter and induction of latency during KSHV infection. Instead, the outcome of RRV infection is determined by host factors, such as Spl. PMID:24314650

  3. A critical Sp1 element in the rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) Rta promoter confers high-level activity that correlates with cellular permissivity for viral replication.

    PubMed

    DeMaster, Laura K; Rose, Timothy M

    2014-01-05

    KSHV establishes characteristic latent infections in vitro, while RRV, a related macaque rhadinovirus, establishes characteristic permissive infections with virus replication. We identified cells that are not permissive for RRV replication and recapitulate the latent KSHV infection and reactivation processes. The RRV replication and transactivator (Rta) promoter was characterized in permissive and non-permissive cells and compared to the KSHV Rta promoter. Both promoters contained a critical Sp1 element, had equivalent activities in different cell types, and were inhibited by LANA. RRV and KSHV infections were non-permissive in cells with low Rta promoter activity. While RRV infections were permissive in cells with high basal promoter activity, KSHV infections remained non-permissive. Our studies suggest that RRV lacks the Rta-inducible LANA promoter that is responsible for LANA inhibition of the KSHV Rta promoter and induction of latency during KSHV infection. Instead, the outcome of RRV infection is determined by host factors, such as Sp1.

  4. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    -strand regions may be created during DNA replication or by single-strand exonuclease digestion of linear duplex DNA. Previously, in vitro studies reported that these recombinases promote the single-strand annealing of two complementary DNAs and also strand invasion of a single DNA strand into duplex DNA to create a three-stranded region. Here, in vivo experiments show that recombinase-mediated annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA is the predominant recombination pathway in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Thomason et al.

  5. Replication of an association of a promoter polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Christopher; Brookes, Keeley; Simpson, Jennifer; Park, Joanne; Scott, Sarah; Coghill, David R; Hawi, Ziarah; Kirley, Aiveen; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey

    2009-09-22

    Genetic associations for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a common highly heritable childhood behavioural disorder, require replication in order to establish whether they are true positive findings. The current study aims to replicate recent association findings from the International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) project in one of the most studied genes related to ADHD, the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene. In a family-based sample of 450 ADHD probands, three Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers have been genotyped using TaqMan assays. Transmission Disequilibrium Test analysis demonstrates that one of three SNP markers (rs11564750) in the 5' promoter region of the gene is significantly associated with ADHD (P=0.02). This provides further evidence that in addition to the well-known and investigated 3'UTR polymorphism associated with ADHD, there is potentially a further association signal emanating from the 5' promoter region of the gene. Further replication and functional studies are now required to fully understand the consequence of polymorphisms present at both the 5' and 3' ends of the DAT1 gene and their role in ADHD pathophysiology.

  6. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

    SciTech Connect

    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K.; James, John; Prescott, Alan; Haga, Ismar R.; Beard, Philippa M.

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  7. Alterations in DNA replication and histone levels promote histone gene amplification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Libuda, Diana E; Winston, Fred

    2010-04-01

    Gene amplification, a process that increases the copy number of a gene or a genomic region to two or more, is utilized by many organisms in response to environmental stress or decreased levels of a gene product. Our previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified the amplification of a histone H2A-H2B gene pair, HTA2-HTB2, in response to the deletion of the other H2A-H2B gene pair, HTA1-HTB1. This amplification arises from a recombination event between two flanking Ty1 elements to form a new, stable circular chromosome and occurs at a frequency higher than has been observed for other Ty1-Ty1 recombination events. To understand the regulation of this amplification event, we screened the S. cerevisiae nonessential deletion set for mutations that alter the amplification frequency. Among the deletions that increase HTA2-HTB2 amplification frequency, we identified those that either decrease DNA replication fork progression (rrm3Delta, dpb3Delta, dpb4Delta, and clb5Delta) or that reduce histone H3-H4 levels (hht2-hhf2Delta). These two classes are related because reduced histone H3-H4 levels increase replication fork pauses, and impaired replication forks cause a reduction in histone levels. Consistent with our mutant screen, we found that the introduction of DNA replication stress by hydroxyurea induces the HTA2-HTB2 amplification event. Taken together, our results suggest that either reduced histone levels or slowed replication forks stimulate the HTA2-HTB2 amplification event, contributing to the restoration of normal chromatin structure.

  8. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    PubMed

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hst3p, a histone deacetylase, promotes maintenance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III lacking efficient replication origins.

    PubMed

    Irene, Carmela; Theis, James F; Gresham, David; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Newlon, Carol S

    2016-02-01

    Long gaps between active replication origins probably occur frequently during chromosome replication, but little is known about how cells cope with them. To address this issue, we deleted replication origins from S. cerevisiae chromosome III to create chromosomes with long interorigin gaps and identified mutations that destabilize them [originless fragment maintenance (Ofm) mutations]. ofm6-1 is an allele of HST3, a sirtuin that deacetylates histone H3K56Ac. Hst3p and Hst4p are closely related, but hst4Δ does not cause an Ofm phenotype. Expressing HST4 under the control of the HST3 promoter suppressed the Ofm phenotype of hst3Δ, indicating Hst4p, when expressed at the appropriate levels and/or at the correct time, can fully substitute for Hst3p in maintenance of ORIΔ chromosomes. H3K56Ac is the Hst3p substrate critical for chromosome maintenance. H3K56Ac-containing nucleosomes are preferentially assembled into chromatin behind replication forks. Deletion of the H3K56 acetylase and downstream chromatin assembly factors suppressed the Ofm phenotype of hst3, indicating that persistence of H3K56Ac-containing chromatin is deleterious for the maintenance of ORIΔ chromosomes, and experiments with synchronous cultures showed that it is replication of H3K56Ac-containing chromatin that causes chromosome loss. This work shows that while normal chromosomes can tolerate hyperacetylation of H3K56Ac, deacetylation of histone H3K56Ac by Hst3p is required for stable maintenance of a chromosome with a long interorigin gap. The Ofm phenotype is the first report of a chromosome instability phenotype of an hst3 single mutant.

  10. EPISOME-MEDIATED TRANSFER OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN ENTEROBACTERIACEAE VIII.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ogata, Chizuko; Sato, Sachiko

    1964-01-01

    Watanabe, Tsutomu (Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan), Chizuko Ogata, and Sachiko Sato. Episome-mediated transfer of drug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. VIII. Six-drug-resistance R factor. J. Bacteriol. 88:922–928. 1964.—The multiple-drug-resistant Escherichia coli strain isolated by Lebek in 1963 was found to transfer resistance to sulfonamide, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, kanamycin, and neomycin together by conjugation, as well as by transduction with phage P1kc, suggesting that these drug-resistance markers are carried by a single R factor (R6). The results of transductional and spontaneous segregations of the drug-resistance markers of R6 have shown that R6 has independent genetic determinants for sulfonamide, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and kanamycin-neomycin resistance. Resistance to kanamycin and neomycin is probably controlled by a single gene, because no segregation was observed between these two. The resistance transfer factor of R6 was found to be of the fi+ type. PMID:14219055

  11. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  12. Adenovirus E4ORF1-induced MYC activation promotes host cell anabolic glucose metabolism and virus replication.

    PubMed

    Thai, Minh; Graham, Nicholas A; Braas, Daniel; Nehil, Michael; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Kurdistani, Siavash K; McCormick, Frank; Graeber, Thomas G; Christofk, Heather R

    2014-04-01

    Virus infections trigger metabolic changes in host cells that support the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of viral replication. Although recent studies have characterized virus-induced changes in host cell metabolism (Munger et al., 2008; Terry et al., 2012), the molecular mechanisms by which viruses reprogram cellular metabolism have remained elusive. Here, we show that the gene product of adenovirus E4ORF1 is necessary for adenovirus-induced upregulation of host cell glucose metabolism and sufficient to promote enhanced glycolysis in cultured epithelial cells by activation of MYC. E4ORF1 localizes to the nucleus, binds to MYC, and enhances MYC binding to glycolytic target genes, resulting in elevated expression of specific glycolytic enzymes. E4ORF1 activation of MYC promotes increased nucleotide biosynthesis from glucose intermediates and enables optimal adenovirus replication in primary lung epithelial cells. Our findings show how a viral protein exploits host cell machinery to reprogram cellular metabolism and promote optimal progeny virion generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dual gene expression in embryoid bodies derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells using episomal vectors.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Sueishi, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    Transcription factors are essential for the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) into specialized cell types. Embryoid body (EB) formation promotes the differentiation of iPS cells. We sought to establish an efficient method of transfection and rotary culture to generate EBs that stably express two genes. The pMetLuc2-Reporter vector was transfected using FuGENE HD (FuGENE), Lipofectamine LTX (LTX), X-tremeGENE, or TransIT-2020 transfection reagents. The media was analyzed using a Metridia luciferase (MetLuc) assay. Transfections were performed on cells adherent to plates/dishes (adherent method) or suspended in the media (suspension method). The 201B7 cells transfected with episomal vectors were selected using G418 (200 μg/mL) or hygromycin B (300 μg/mL). Rotary culture was performed at 2.5 or 9.9 rpm. Efficiency of EB formation was compared among plates and dishes. Cell density was compared at 1.6×10(3),×10(4), and×10(5) cells/mL. The suspended method of transfection using the FuGENE HD reagent was the most efficient. The expression of pEBMulti/Met-Hyg was detected 11 days posttransfection. Double transformants were selected 6 days posttransfection with pEBNK/EGFP-Neo and pEBNK/Cherry-Hyg. Both EGFP and CherryPicker were expressed in all of the surviving cells. EBs were formed most efficiently from cells cultured at a density of 1.6×10(5) cells/mL in six-well plates or 6 cm dishes. The selected cells formed EBs. FuGENE-mediated transfection of plasmids using the suspension method was effective in transforming iPS cells. Furthermore, the episomal vectors enabled us to perform a stable double transfection of EB-forming iPS cells.

  14. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Harley, Margaret E; Murina, Olga; Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R; Bicknell, Louise S; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A M; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P; Hurles, Matthew E; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage, where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions.

  15. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R.; Bicknell, Louise S.; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N.; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J.; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A. M.; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B.; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S.; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism/Seckel syndrome. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to UV irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a novel component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions. PMID:26595769

  16. Activation of COX-2/PGE2 Promotes Sapovirus Replication via the Inhibition of Nitric Oxide Production.

    PubMed

    Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Deok-Song; Seo, Ja-Young; Kim, Ji-Yun; Park, Jun-Gyu; Soliman, Mahmoud; Baek, Yeong-Bin; Cho, Eun-Hyo; Kwon, Joseph; Kwon, Hyung-Jun; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Woo Song; Kang, Mun-Il; Hosmillo, Myra; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2017-02-01

    Enteric caliciviruses in the genera Norovirus and Sapovirus are important pathogens that cause severe acute gastroenteritis in both humans and animals. Cyclooxygenases (COXs) and their final product, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are known to play important roles in the modulation of both the host response to infection and the replicative cycles of several viruses. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which the COX/PGE2 pathway regulates sapovirus replication remains largely unknown. In this study, infection with porcine sapovirus (PSaV) strain Cowden, the only cultivable virus within the genus Sapovirus, markedly increased COX-2 mRNA and protein levels at 24 and 36 h postinfection (hpi), with only a transient increase in COX-1 levels seen at 24 hpi. The treatment of cells with pharmacological inhibitors, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against COX-1 and COX-2, significantly reduced PGE2 production, as well as PSaV replication. Expression of the viral proteins VPg and ProPol was associated with activation of the COX/PGE2 pathway. We observed that pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 dramatically increased NO production, causing a reduction in PSaV replication that could be restored by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase via the inhibitor N-nitro-l-methyl-arginine ester. This study identified a pivotal role for the COX/PGE2 pathway in the regulation of NO production during the sapovirus life cycle, providing new insights into the life cycle of this poorly characterized family of viruses. Our findings also reveal potential new targets for treatment of sapovirus infection.

  17. Replication of the TNFSF4 (OX40L) Promoter Region Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Witte, Torsten; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Galeazzi, Mauro; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 4 gene (TNFSF4) encodes the OX40 ligand (OX40L), a co-stimulatory molecule involved in T-cell activation. A recent study demonstrated the association ofTNFSF4 haplotypes located in the upstream region with risk for- or protection from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) (Graham et al, 2008). In order to replicate this association, five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the previously associated haplotypes and passing the proper quality control filters were tested in 1312 cases and 1801 controls from Germany, Italy, Spain, and Argentina. The association of TNFSF4 with SLE was replicated in all the sets except Spain. There was a unique risk haplotype tagged by the minor alleles of the SNPs rs1234317 (pooled OR=1.39, p=0.0009) and rs12039904 (pooled OR=1.38, p=0.0012). We did not observe association to a single protective marker (rs844644) or haplotype as the first study reported; instead, we observed different protective haplotypes, all carrying the major alleles of both SNPs rs1234317 and rs12039904. Association analysis conditioning on the haplotypic background confirmed that these two SNPs explain the entire haplotype effect. This is the first replication study that confirms the association of genetic variation in the upstream region of TNFSF4 with susceptibility to SLE. PMID:19092840

  18. Slx5/Slx8 promotes replication stress tolerance by facilitating mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Yee Mon; Van Riper, Susan Kaye; Higgins, LeeAnn; Zhang, Tianji; Becker, Jordan Robert; Markowski, Todd William; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Griffin, Timothy Jon; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) causes replication stress. We uncovered that S. cerevisiae mcm10-1 mutants rely on the E3 SUMO ligase Mms21 and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase complex Slx5/8 for survival. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified changes in the SUMO proteome of mcm10-1 mutants and revealed candidates regulated by Slx5/8. Such candidates included subunits of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC), Bir1 and Sli15, known to facilitate spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation. We show here that Slx5 counteracts SAC activation in mcm10-1 mutants under conditions of moderate replication stress. This coincides with the proteasomal degradation of sumoylated Bir1. Importantly, Slx5-dependent mitotic relief was not only triggered by Mcm10 deficiency but also by treatment with low doses of the alkylating drug methyl methanesulfonate. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which Slx5/8 allows for passage through mitosis when replication stress is tolerable. PMID:27134171

  19. Slx5/Slx8 Promotes Replication Stress Tolerance by Facilitating Mitotic Progression.

    PubMed

    Thu, Yee Mon; Van Riper, Susan Kaye; Higgins, LeeAnn; Zhang, Tianji; Becker, Jordan Robert; Markowski, Todd William; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Griffin, Timothy Jon; Bielinsky, Anja Katrin

    2016-05-10

    Loss of minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) causes replication stress. We uncovered that S. cerevisiae mcm10-1 mutants rely on the E3 SUMO ligase Mms21 and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase complex Slx5/8 for survival. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified changes in the SUMO proteome of mcm10-1 mutants and revealed candidates regulated by Slx5/8. Such candidates included subunits of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC), Bir1 and Sli15, known to facilitate spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation. We show here that Slx5 counteracts SAC activation in mcm10-1 mutants under conditions of moderate replication stress. This coincides with the proteasomal degradation of sumoylated Bir1. Importantly, Slx5-dependent mitotic relief was triggered not only by Mcm10 deficiency but also by treatment with low doses of the alkylating drug methyl methanesulfonate. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which Slx5/8 allows for passage through mitosis when replication stress is tolerable.

  20. Structural Insights into Bunyavirus Replication and Its Regulation by the vRNA Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Piotr; Malet, Hélène; Cusack, Stephen; Reguera, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Segmented negative-strand RNA virus (sNSV) polymerases transcribe and replicate the viral RNA (vRNA) within a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). We present cryo-EM and X-ray structures of, respectively, apo- and vRNA bound La Crosse orthobunyavirus (LACV) polymerase that give atomic-resolution insight into how such RNPs perform RNA synthesis. The complementary 3′ and 5′ vRNA extremities are sequence specifically bound in separate sites on the polymerase. The 5′ end binds as a stem-loop, allosterically structuring functionally important polymerase active site loops. Identification of distinct template and product exit tunnels allows proposal of a detailed model for template-directed replication with minimal disruption to the circularised RNP. The similar overall architecture and vRNA binding of monomeric LACV to heterotrimeric influenza polymerase, despite high sequence divergence, suggests that all sNSV polymerases have a common evolutionary origin and mechanism of RNA synthesis. These results will aid development of replication inhibitors of diverse, serious human pathogenic viruses. PMID:26004069

  1. Cell Type-Specific Replication of Simian Virus 40 Conferred by Hormone Response Elements in the Late Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Michael L.; Mertz, Janet E.

    2002-01-01

    The late genes of SV40 are not expressed at significant levels until after the onset of viral DNA replication. We previously identified two hormone response elements (HREs) in the late promoter that contribute to this delay. Mutants defective in these HREs overexpress late RNA at early, but not late, times after transfection of CV-1PD cells. Overexpression of nuclear receptors (NRs) that recognize these HREs leads to repression of the late promoter in a sequence-specific and titratable manner, resulting in a delay in late gene expression. These observations led to a model in which the late promoter is repressed at early times after infection by NRs, with this repression being relieved by titration of these repressors through simian virus 40 (SV40) genome replication to high copy number. Here, we tested this model in the context of the viral life cycle. SV40 genomes containing mutations in either or both HREs that significantly reduce NR binding without altering the coding of any proteins were constructed. Competition for replication between mutant and wild-type viruses in low-multiplicity coinfections indicated that the +1 HRE offered a significant selective advantage to the virus within a few cycles of infection in African green monkey kidney cell lines CV-1, CV-1P, TC-7, MA-134, and Vero but not in CV-1PD′ cells. Interestingly, the +55 HRE offered a selective disadvantage in MA-134 cells but had no effect in CV-1, CV-1P, TC-7, Vero, and CV-1PD′ cells. Thus, we conclude that these HREs are biologically important to the virus, but in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:12050389

  2. Community-academic partnerships: lessons learned from replicating a salon-based health education and promotion program.

    PubMed

    Browne, Ruth; Vaughn, Nicole A; Siddiqui, Nadia; Brown, Necole; Delmoor, Ernestine; Randleman, Paul; Randleman, Shirley; Gonzalez, Laura; Lewis, Jack; Lourie, Rita; Foster, Gwen; Brown, Humberto; Fraser-White, Marilyn; Banks, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of a community-academic partnership formed to replicate a unique salon-based health education and promotion program among African-American and Latino communities in Philadelphia. The purpose of this article is to describe the partnership principles established and lessons learned in replicating the salon-based program that sought to develop a cadre of community-academic partners and build community-based organizations' (CBOs) capacity to implement and evaluate the program. As the lead organization, the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health (AAIUH), formed a partnership with two CBOs, three universities, and 17 salons. Guiding principles were established to manage the large collaborative and ensure success. By embracing a common mission and principles of understanding, co-learning, building capacity and sharing responsibility and recognition, this partnership was able to achieve positive outcomes. Challenges faced were related to replication, CBO infrastructure, data management capacity, and other process issues. Despite challenges, we created and sustained an enduring partnership and brought positive change to the community. Lessons learned highlight issues to examine before furthering this work such as fostering trust and building meaningful relationships.

  3. Midkine promoter-driven suicide gene expression and -mediated adenovirus replication produced cytotoxic effects to immortalised and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Hamada, K; Namba, M; Kadomatsu, K; Muramatsu, T; Matsubara, S; Tagawa, M

    2004-07-01

    We examined possible application of a regulatory region of midkine (MK) gene, which is frequently upregulated in a number of human tumours but not in normal cells, to cancer gene therapy. We examined transcriptional activity of the MK genomic fragments in paired cell lines, immortalized cells and their parental normal fibroblasts, and found that the MK fragments activated a fused reporter or a suicide gene preferentially in the immortalized cells. Recombinant adenoviruses (Ad), in which the MK fragment was inserted upstream to the E1A gene (AdMK), replicated preferentially in the immortalized cells and were cytotoxie to them. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells were significantly susceptible to AdMK compared with human normal fibroblasts in vitro and the replication of AdMK was less than that of wild-type Ad in the infected fibroblasts. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells infected with AdMK did not form tumours in immunocompromised mice and intratumoural injection of AdMK into the hepatocellular carcinoma developed in mice retarded the subsequent tumour growth. Expression of E1A and necrosis of tumours were detected in AdMK-injected but not control Ad-injected cases. The MK promoter-driven suicide gene therapy and -mediated replicative Ad can thereby produce cytotoxic effects to immortalized and tumour cells with minimal damage to normal cells.

  4. Characterization of a protein tyrosine phosphatase as a host factor promoting baculovirus replication in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Xue, Renju; Li, Xianyang; Hu, Cuimei; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-04-01

    The relevance of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) to host-pathogen interaction is highlighted in mammalian studies, whereas less is known in insects. Here we presented the categorization of the PTP complement of silkworm and characterized their homologous relationship with human and fruit fly PTPs. Among the 36 PTP genes, ptp-h, which was proposed to be the origin of baculovirus ptp belongs to atypical VH1-like dual-specific PTP subset and encodes a catalytic active protein. The maximum expression level of Bmptp-h was at 5th instar and in fat body. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) infection potently induced its expression in silkworm larvae and in BmE cells. Knock-down of Bmptp-h by RNA interference significantly inhibited viral replication, and over-expression enhanced viral replication as determined by viral DNA abundance and BmNPV-GFP positive cells. These results suggest that BmPTP-h might be one of the host factors that is beneficial to baculovirus infection by promoting viral replication. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Dichloroacetate blocks aerobic glycolytic adaptation to attenuated measles virus and promotes viral replication leading to enhanced oncolysis in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lei; Chen, Aiping; Xia, Mao; Xu, Chun; Yu, Decai; Jiang, Aiqin; Wei, Jiwu

    2015-01-01

    Targeting reprogrammed energy metabolism such as aerobic glycolysis is a potential strategy for cancer treatment. However, tumors exhibiting low-rate glycolysis or metabolic heterogeneity might be resistant to such treatment. We hypothesized that a therapeutic modality that drove cancer cells to high-rate glycolysis might sensitize cancer cells to interference directed against metabolic flux. In this study, we found that attenuated oncolytic measles virus Edmonston strain (MV-Edm) caused glioblastoma cells to shift to high-rate aerobic glycolysis; this adaptation was blocked by dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of glycolysis, leading to profound cell death of cancer cells but not of normal cells. DCA enhanced viral replication by mitigating mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-mediated innate immune responses. In a subcutaneous glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft mouse model, low-dose MV-Edm and DCA significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. We found that DCA impaired glycolysis (blocking bioenergetic generation) and enhanced viral replication (increasing bioenergetic consumption), which, in combination, accelerated bioenergetic exhaustion leading to necrotic cell death. Taken together, oncolytic MV-Edm sensitized cancer cells to DCA, and in parallel, DCA promoted viral replication, thus, improving oncolysis. This novel therapeutic approach should be readily incorporated into clinical trials. PMID:25575816

  6. SH3 domain-mediated recruitment of host cell amphiphysins by alphavirus nsP3 promotes viral RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Kazlauskas, Arunas; Martikainen, Miika; Hinkkanen, Ari; Ahola, Tero; Saksela, Kalle

    2011-11-01

    Among the four non-structural proteins of alphaviruses the function of nsP3 is the least well understood. NsP3 is a component of the viral replication complex, and composed of a conserved aminoterminal macro domain implicated in viral RNA synthesis, and a poorly conserved carboxyterminal region. Despite the lack of overall homology we noted a carboxyterminal proline-rich sequence motif shared by many alphaviral nsP3 proteins, and found it to serve as a preferred target site for the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains of amphiphysin-1 and -2. Nsp3 proteins of Semliki Forest (SFV), Sindbis (SINV), and Chikungunya viruses all showed avid and SH3-dependent binding to amphiphysins. Upon alphavirus infection the intracellular distribution of amphiphysin was dramatically altered and colocalized with nsP3. Mutations in nsP3 disrupting the amphiphysin SH3 binding motif as well as RNAi-mediated silencing of amphiphysin-2 expression resulted in impaired viral RNA replication in HeLa cells infected with SINV or SFV. Infection of Balb/c mice with SFV carrying an SH3 binding-defective nsP3 was associated with significantly decreased mortality. These data establish SH3 domain-mediated binding of nsP3 with amphiphysin as an important host cell interaction promoting alphavirus replication.

  7. Matriptase proteolytically activates influenza virus and promotes multicycle replication in the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Alexandre; Gravel, Émilie; Cloutier, Alexandre; Marois, Isabelle; Colombo, Éloïc; Désilets, Antoine; Verreault, Catherine; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Éric; Richter, Martin V

    2013-04-01

    Influenza viruses do not encode any proteases and must rely on host proteases for the proteolytic activation of their surface hemagglutinin proteins in order to fuse with the infected host cells. Recent progress in the understanding of human proteases responsible for influenza virus hemagglutinin activation has led to the identification of members of the type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 and human airway trypsin-like protease; however, none has proved to be the sole enzyme responsible for hemagglutinin cleavage. In this study, we identify and characterize matriptase as an influenza virus-activating protease capable of supporting multicycle viral replication in the human respiratory epithelium. Using confocal microscopy, we found matriptase to colocalize with hemagglutinin at the apical surface of human epithelial cells and within endosomes, and we showed that the soluble form of the protease was able to specifically cleave hemagglutinins from H1 virus, but not from H2 and H3 viruses, in a broad pH range. We showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of matriptase in human bronchial epithelial cells significantly blocked influenza virus replication in these cells. Lastly, we provide a selective, slow, tight-binding inhibitor of matriptase that significantly reduces viral replication (by 1.5 log) of H1N1 influenza virus, including the 2009 pandemic virus. Our study establishes a three-pronged model for the action of matriptase: activation of incoming viruses in the extracellular space in its shed form, upon viral attachment or exit in its membrane-bound and/or shed forms at the apical surface of epithelial cells, and within endosomes by its membrane-bound form where viral fusion takes place.

  8. Matriptase Proteolytically Activates Influenza Virus and Promotes Multicycle Replication in the Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Alexandre; Gravel, Émilie; Cloutier, Alexandre; Marois, Isabelle; Colombo, Éloïc; Désilets, Antoine; Verreault, Catherine; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses do not encode any proteases and must rely on host proteases for the proteolytic activation of their surface hemagglutinin proteins in order to fuse with the infected host cells. Recent progress in the understanding of human proteases responsible for influenza virus hemagglutinin activation has led to the identification of members of the type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and TMPRSS4 and human airway trypsin-like protease; however, none has proved to be the sole enzyme responsible for hemagglutinin cleavage. In this study, we identify and characterize matriptase as an influenza virus-activating protease capable of supporting multicycle viral replication in the human respiratory epithelium. Using confocal microscopy, we found matriptase to colocalize with hemagglutinin at the apical surface of human epithelial cells and within endosomes, and we showed that the soluble form of the protease was able to specifically cleave hemagglutinins from H1 virus, but not from H2 and H3 viruses, in a broad pH range. We showed that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of matriptase in human bronchial epithelial cells significantly blocked influenza virus replication in these cells. Lastly, we provide a selective, slow, tight-binding inhibitor of matriptase that significantly reduces viral replication (by 1.5 log) of H1N1 influenza virus, including the 2009 pandemic virus. Our study establishes a three-pronged model for the action of matriptase: activation of incoming viruses in the extracellular space in its shed form, upon viral attachment or exit in its membrane-bound and/or shed forms at the apical surface of epithelial cells, and within endosomes by its membrane-bound form where viral fusion takes place. PMID:23365447

  9. Identification of Fic-1 as an enzyme that inhibits bacterial DNA replication by AMPylating GyrB, promoting filament formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canhua; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Zhang, Li-Qun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-26

    The morphology of bacterial cells is important for virulence, evasion of the host immune system, and coping with environmental stresses. The widely distributed Fic proteins (filamentation induced by cAMP) are annotated as proteins involved in cell division because of the presence of the HPFx[D/E]GN[G/K]R motif. We showed that the presence of Fic-1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens significantly reduced the yield of plasmid DNA when expressed in Escherichia coli or P. fluorescens. Fic-1 interacted with GyrB, a subunit of DNA gyrase, which is essential for bacterial DNA replication. Fic-1 catalyzed the AMPylation of GyrB at Tyr(109), a residue critical for binding ATP, and exhibited auto-AMPylation activity. Mutation of the Fic-1 auto-AMPylated site greatly reduced AMPylation activity toward itself and toward GyrB. Fic-1-dependent AMPylation of GyrB triggered the SOS response, indicative of DNA replication stress or DNA damage. Fic-1 also promoted the formation of elongated cells when the SOS response was blocked. We identified an α-inhibitor protein that we named anti-Fic-1 (AntF), encoded by a gene immediately upstream of Fic-1. AntF interacted with Fic-1, inhibited the AMPylation activity of Fic-1 for GyrB in vitro, and blocked Fic-1-mediated inhibition of DNA replication in bacteria, suggesting that Fic-1 and AntF comprise a toxin-antitoxin module. Our work establishes Fic-1 as an AMPylating enzyme that targets GyrB to inhibit DNA replication and may target other proteins to regulate bacterial morphology.

  10. Ad-mTERT-delta19, a conditional replication-competent adenovirus driven by the human telomerase promoter, selectively replicates in and elicits cytopathic effect in a cancer cell-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunhee; Kim, Joo-Hang; Shin, Ha-Youn; Lee, Hansaem; Yang, Jai Myung; Kim, Jungho; Sohn, Joo-Hyuk; Kim, Hoguen; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2003-10-10

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, functions to stabilize telomere length during chromosomal replication. Previous studies have shown that hTERT promoter is highly active in most tumor and immortal cell lines but inactive in normal somatic cell types. The use of wild-type hTERT promoter, however, may be limited by its inability to direct high level and cancer cell-specific expression necessary for effective targeted gene therapy. To improve cancer cell specificity and the strength of the hTERT promoter, a modified hTERT, m-hTERT promoter was generated in which additional copies of c-Myc and Sp1 binding sites were incorporated adjacent to the promoter. As assessed using relative lacZ expression, hTERT and m-hTERT promoter activity was significantly upregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells, and within these upregulated cancer cells, m-hTERT promoter strength was substantially higher than that of the wild-type hTERT. Next, to restrict viral replication to tumor cells, a conditional replication-competent adenoviruses, Ad-TERT-Delta19 and Ad-mTERT-delta19 were generated in which the E1A gene, which is essential for viral replication, was placed under the control of the hTERT and m-hTERT promoter, respectively. While the wild-type Ad-TERT-delta19 replicated in and induced cytopathic effect in cancer and in some normal cell lines, Ad-mTERT-delta19 enhanced viral replication and cytopathic effect only in cancer cells. Furthermore, the growth of established human cervical carcinoma in nude mice was significantly suppressed by intratumoral injection of Ad-mTERT-delta19. Taken together, present results strongly suggest that the use of the m-hTERT promoter is not only useful in the regulation of therapeutic gene expression but also that replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus under the control of the m-hTERT promoter may be a new promising tool for the treatment of human malignancies.

  11. A Brucella Type IV Effector Targets the COG Tethering Complex to Remodel Host Secretory Traffic and Promote Intracellular Replication.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cheryl N; Smith, Erin P; Cundiff, Jennifer A; Knodler, Leigh A; Bailey Blackburn, Jessica; Lupashin, Vladimir; Celli, Jean

    2017-09-13

    Many intracellular pathogens exploit host secretory trafficking to support their intracellular cycle, but knowledge of these pathogenic processes is limited. The bacterium Brucella abortus uses a type IV secretion system (VirB T4SS) to generate a replication-permissive Brucella-containing vacuole (rBCV) derived from the host ER, a process that requires host early secretory trafficking. Here we show that the VirB T4SS effector BspB contributes to rBCV biogenesis and Brucella replication by interacting with the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) tethering complex, a major coordinator of Golgi vesicular trafficking, thus remodeling Golgi membrane traffic and redirecting Golgi-derived vesicles to the BCV. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that Brucella modulates COG-dependent trafficking via delivery of a T4SS effector to promote rBCV biogenesis and intracellular proliferation, providing mechanistic insight into how bacterial exploitation of host secretory functions promotes pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Activation of COX-2/PGE2 Promotes Sapovirus Replication via the Inhibition of Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Alfajaro, Mia Madel; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Deok-Song; Seo, Ja-Young; Kim, Ji-Yun; Park, Jun-Gyu; Soliman, Mahmoud; Baek, Yeong-Bin; Cho, Eun-Hyo; Kwon, Joseph; Kwon, Hyung-Jun; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Woo Song; Kang, Mun-Il; Hosmillo, Myra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enteric caliciviruses in the genera Norovirus and Sapovirus are important pathogens that cause severe acute gastroenteritis in both humans and animals. Cyclooxygenases (COXs) and their final product, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are known to play important roles in the modulation of both the host response to infection and the replicative cycles of several viruses. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which the COX/PGE2 pathway regulates sapovirus replication remains largely unknown. In this study, infection with porcine sapovirus (PSaV) strain Cowden, the only cultivable virus within the genus Sapovirus, markedly increased COX-2 mRNA and protein levels at 24 and 36 h postinfection (hpi), with only a transient increase in COX-1 levels seen at 24 hpi. The treatment of cells with pharmacological inhibitors, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against COX-1 and COX-2, significantly reduced PGE2 production, as well as PSaV replication. Expression of the viral proteins VPg and ProPol was associated with activation of the COX/PGE2 pathway. We observed that pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 dramatically increased NO production, causing a reduction in PSaV replication that could be restored by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase via the inhibitor N-nitro-l-methyl-arginine ester. This study identified a pivotal role for the COX/PGE2 pathway in the regulation of NO production during the sapovirus life cycle, providing new insights into the life cycle of this poorly characterized family of viruses. Our findings also reveal potential new targets for treatment of sapovirus infection. IMPORTANCE Sapoviruses are among the major etiological agents of acute gastroenteritis in both humans and animals, but little is known about sapovirus host factor requirements. Here, using only cultivable porcine sapovirus (PSaV) strain Cowden, we demonstrate that PSaV induced the vitalization of the cyclooxygenase (COX) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2

  13. Deregulated telomere transcription causes replication-dependent telomere shortening and promotes cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Maicher, André; Kastner, Lisa; Dees, Martina; Luke, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are transcribed into non-coding TElomeric Repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). We have employed a transcriptionally inducible telomere to investigate how telomere transcription affects telomere function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report that telomere shortening resulting from high levels of telomere transcription stems from a DNA replication-dependent loss of telomere tracts, which can occur independent of both telomerase inhibition and homologous recombination. We show that in order for telomere loss to occur, transcription must pass through the telomere tract itself producing a TERRA molecule. We demonstrate that increased telomere transcription of a single telomere leads to a premature cellular senescence in the absence of a telomere maintenance mechanism (telomerase and homology directed repair). Similar rapid senescence and telomere shortening are also seen in sir2Δ cells with compromised telomere maintenance, where TERRA levels are increased at natural telomeres. These data suggest that telomere transcription must be tightly controlled to prevent telomere loss and early onset senescence. PMID:22553368

  14. The Fanconi anemia pathway promotes replication-dependent DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Knipscheer, Puck; Räschle, Markus; Smogorzewska, Agata; Enoiu, Milica; Ho, The Vinh; Schärer, Orlando D; Elledge, Stephen J; Walter, Johannes C

    2009-12-18

    Fanconi anemia is a human cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in 13 Fanc genes. The disorder is characterized by genomic instability and cellular hypersensitivity to chemicals that generate DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). A central event in the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway is the mono-ubiquitylation of the FANCI-FANCD2 complex, but how this complex confers ICL resistance remains enigmatic. Using a cell-free system, we showed that FANCI-FANCD2 is required for replication-coupled ICL repair in S phase. Removal of FANCD2 from extracts inhibits both nucleolytic incisions near the ICL and translesion DNA synthesis past the lesion. Reversal of these defects requires ubiquitylated FANCI-FANCD2. Our results show that multiple steps of the essential S-phase ICL repair mechanism fail when the Fanconi anemia pathway is compromised.

  15. Pragmatic Replication Trial of Health Promotion Coaching for Obesity in Serious Mental Illness and Maintenance of Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Barre, Laura K.; Naslund, John A.; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Xie, Haiyi; McHugo, Gregory J.; Jimenez, Daniel E.; Jue, Ken; Feldman, James; Bird, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few studies targeting obesity in serious mental illness report clinically significant risk reduction, and none have been replicated within community settings or have demonstrated sustained outcomes after intervention withdrawal. This pragmatic clinical trial aims to replicate positive health outcomes demonstrated in a prior randomized effectiveness study of the In SHAPE program across urban community mental health organizations serving an ethnically diverse population. Methods Persons with serious mental illness and BMI>25 receiving services in three community mental health organizations were randomized to the 12-month In SHAPE program (health promotion coach and membership to a public fitness club) or to fitness club membership alone. Primary outcomes were weight and cardiorespiratory fitness (measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test) collected at baseline, 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, and 18-months. Results Participants (N=210) were ethnically diverse (46% non-White) with mean baseline BMI=36.8±8.2. At 12-months In SHAPE (n=104) compared to a fitness club membership alone (n=106) contributed to greater reduction in weight and improved fitness. Primary outcomes were maintained at 18-months follow-up. Approximately half of In SHAPE participants (51% at 12-month program completion and 46% at 18-month follow-up) achieved clinically significant cardiovascular risk reduction (≥5% weight loss or >50 meter increase on the 6-Minute Walk Test). Conclusions Sustained weight loss and improved fitness can be achieved by community mental health organizations providing health promotion coaching and access to fitness facilities. Health promotion should be integrated into mental health services for persons with serious mental illness at risk for cardiovascular disease and early mortality. PMID:25827032

  16. Homeostatic chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 promote inflammation in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with ongoing viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Damås, J K; Landrø, L; Fevang, B; Heggelund, L; Tjønnfjord, G E; Fløisand, Y; Halvorsen, B; Frøland, S S; Aukrust, P

    2009-01-01

    CCL19 and CCL21 and their receptor CCR7 are expressed constitutively within lymphoid organs, regulating lymphocyte homing. Recent studies suggest that these chemokines may have inflammatory properties. We hypothesized a role of CCL19/CCL21 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by promoting inflammation. We examined the expression of CCL19 and CCL21 in mononuclear cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) in HIV-infected patients before and during highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). We also examined the ability of CCL19/CCL21 to promote inflammatory responses in these patients. PBMC from untreated HIV-infected patients (n = 29) released enhanced levels of CCL19 spontaneously compared with cells from controls (n = 20), particularly in those with symptomatic disease (n = 15, P < 0·01 versus controls). During HAART (n = 9), there was a decrease in the spontaneous CCL19 release and an increase in the phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated CCL19 release in both PBMC (P < 0·01) and BMMC (P < 0·05). In patients with enhanced HIV replication there was an increased proportion of inflammatory CD8+CCR7-CD45RA- T cells in peripheral blood [P < 0·01 and P < 0·05 versus controls, untreated (n = 9) and treatment failure (n = 8), respectively]. In vitro, CCL19/CCL21 promoted an inflammatory response in PBMC when accompanied by high viral load, irrespective of HAART. The HIV-tat protein significantly boosted the inflammatory effect of CCL19/CCL21 in PBMC. These findings link a dysregulated CCL19/CCL21/CCR7 system in HIV-infected patients to persistent inflammation and HIV replication, not only in untreated HIV infection, but also in treatment failure during HAART. PMID:19664149

  17. RNA Replication from the Simian Virus 5 Antigenomic Promoter Requires Three Sequence-Dependent Elements Separated by Sequence-Independent Spacer Regions

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael A.; Murphy, Susan K.; Parks, Griffith D.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown for the paramyxovirus simian virus 5 (SV5) that a functional promoter for RNA replication requires proper spacing between two discontinuous elements: a 19-base segment at the 3′ terminus (conserved region I [CRI]) and an 18-base internal region (CRII) that is contained within the coding region of the L protein gene. In the work described here, we have used a reverse-genetics system to determine if the 53-base segment between CRI and CRII contains additional sequence-specific signals required for optimal replication or if this segment functions solely as a sequence-independent spacer region. A series of copyback defective interfering minigenome analogs were constructed to contain substitutions of nonviral sequences in place of bases 21 to 72 of the antigenomic promoter, and the relative level of RNA replication was measured by Northern blot analysis. The results from our mutational analysis indicate that in addition to CRI and CRII, optimal replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires a third sequence-dependent element located 51 to 66 bases from the 3′ end of the RNA. Minigenome RNA replication was not affected by changes in the either the position of this element in relation to CRI and CRII or the predicted hexamer phase of NP encapsidation. Thus, optimal RNA replication from the SV5 antigenomic promoter requires three sequence-dependent elements, CRI, CRII and bases 51 to 66. PMID:11264390

  18. The hemagglutinin protein of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses overcomes an early block in the replication cycle to promote productive replication in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cline, Troy D; Karlsson, Erik A; Seufzer, Bradley J; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2013-02-01

    Macrophages are known to be one of the first lines of defense against influenza virus infection. However, they may also contribute to severe disease caused by the highly pathogenic avian (HPAI) H5N1 influenza viruses. One reason for this may be the ability of certain influenza virus strains to productively replicate in macrophages. However, studies investigating the productive replication of influenza viruses in macrophages have been contradictory, and the results may depend on both the type of macrophages used and the specific viral strain. In this work, we investigated the ability of H1 to H16 viruses to productively replicate in primary murine alveolar macrophages and RAW264.7 macrophages. We show that only a subset of HPAI H5N1 viruses, those that cause high morbidity and mortality in mammals, can productively replicate in macrophages, as measured by the release of newly synthesized virus particles into the cell supernatant. Mechanistically, we found that these H5 strains can overcome a block early in the viral life cycle leading to efficient nuclear entry, viral transcription, translation, and ultimately replication. Studies with reassortant viruses demonstrated that expression of the hemagglutinin gene from an H5N1 virus rescued replication of H1N1 influenza virus in macrophages. This study is the first to characterize H5N1 influenza viruses as the only subtype of influenza virus capable of productive replication in macrophages and establishes the viral gene that is required for this characteristic. The ability to productively replicate in macrophages is unique to H5N1 influenza viruses and may contribute to their increased pathogenesis.

  19. Nuclear Envelope Protein SUN2 Promotes Cyclophilin-A-Dependent Steps of HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Xavier; Satoh, Takeshi; Gentili, Matteo; Cerboni, Silvia; Silvin, Aymeric; Conrad, Cécile; Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Rodriguez, Elisa C.; Guichou, Jean-François; Bosquet, Nathalie; Piel, Matthieu; Le Grand, Roger; King, Megan C.; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Manel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the early phase of replication, HIV reverse transcribes its RNA and crosses the nuclear envelope while escaping host antiviral defenses. The host factor Cyclophilin A (CypA) is essential for these steps and binds the HIV capsid; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. Here, we identify related capsid mutants in HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVmac that are restricted by CypA. This antiviral restriction of mutated viruses is conserved across species and prevents nuclear import of the viral cDNA. Importantly, the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN2 is required for the antiviral activity of CypA. We show that wild-type HIV exploits SUN2 in primary CD4+ T cells as an essential host factor that is required for the positive effects of CypA on reverse transcription and infection. Altogether, these results establish essential CypA-dependent functions of SUN2 in HIV infection at the nuclear envelope. PMID:27149839

  20. Refinement of the Diatom Episome Maintenance Sequence and Improvement of Conjugation-Based DNA Delivery Methods

    PubMed Central

    Diner, Rachel E.; Bielinski, Vincent A.; Dupont, Christopher L.; Allen, Andrew E.; Weyman, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    Conjugation of episomal plasmids from bacteria to diatoms advances diatom genetic manipulation by simplifying transgene delivery and providing a stable and consistent gene expression platform. To reach its full potential, this nascent technology requires new optimized expression vectors and a deeper understanding of episome maintenance. Here, we present the development of an additional diatom vector (pPtPBR1), based on the parent plasmid pBR322, to add a plasmid maintained at medium copy number in Escherichia coli to the diatom genetic toolkit. Using this new vector, we evaluated the contribution of individual yeast DNA elements comprising the 1.4-kb tripartite CEN6-ARSH4-HIS3 sequence that enables episome maintenance in Phaeodactylum tricornutum. While various combinations of these individual elements enable efficient conjugation and high exconjugant yield in P. tricornutum, individual elements alone do not. Conjugation of episomes containing CEN6-ARSH4 and a small sequence from the low GC content 3′ end of HIS3 produced the highest number of diatom exconjugant colonies, resulting in a smaller and more efficient vector design. Our findings suggest that the CEN6 and ARSH4 sequences function differently in yeast and diatoms, and that low GC content regions of greater than ~500 bp are a potential indicator of a functional diatom episome maintenance sequence. Additionally, we have developed improvements to the conjugation protocol including a high-throughput option utilizing 12-well plates and plating methods that improve exconjugant yield and reduce time and materials required for the conjugation protocol. The data presented offer additional information regarding the mechanism by which the yeast-derived sequence enables diatom episome maintenance and demonstrate options for flexible vector design. PMID:27551676

  1. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by helper dependent adenoviral vectors expressing artificial anti-HBV pri-miRs from a liver-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Mowa, Mohube Betty; Crowther, Carol; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Research on applying RNA interference (RNAi) to counter HBV replication has led to identification of potential therapeutic sequences. However, before clinical application liver-specific expression and efficient delivery of these sequences remain an important objective. We recently reported short-term inhibition of HBV replication in vivo by using helper dependent adenoviral vectors (HD Ads) expressing anti-HBV sequences from a constitutively active cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. To develop the use of liver-specific transcription regulatory elements we investigated the utility of the murine transthyretin (MTTR) promoter for expression of anti-HBV primary microRNAs (pri-miRs). HD Ads containing MTTR promoter effected superior expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs in mice compared to HD Ads containing the CMV promoter. MTTR-containing HD Ads resulted in HBV replication knockdown of up to 94% in mice. HD Ads expressing trimeric anti-HBV pri-miRs silenced HBV replication for 5 weeks. We previously showed that the product of the codelivered lacZ gene induces an immune response, and the duration of HBV silencing in vivo is likely to be attenuated by this effect. Nevertheless, expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs from MTTR promoter is well suited to countering HBV replication and development of HD Ads through attenuation of their immunostimulatory effects should advance their clinical utility.

  2. Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Helper Dependent Adenoviral Vectors Expressing Artificial Anti-HBV Pri-miRs from a Liver-Specific Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Mowa, Mohube Betty; Crowther, Carol; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Research on applying RNA interference (RNAi) to counter HBV replication has led to identification of potential therapeutic sequences. However, before clinical application liver-specific expression and efficient delivery of these sequences remain an important objective. We recently reported short-term inhibition of HBV replication in vivo by using helper dependent adenoviral vectors (HD Ads) expressing anti-HBV sequences from a constitutively active cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. To develop the use of liver-specific transcription regulatory elements we investigated the utility of the murine transthyretin (MTTR) promoter for expression of anti-HBV primary microRNAs (pri-miRs). HD Ads containing MTTR promoter effected superior expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs in mice compared to HD Ads containing the CMV promoter. MTTR-containing HD Ads resulted in HBV replication knockdown of up to 94% in mice. HD Ads expressing trimeric anti-HBV pri-miRs silenced HBV replication for 5 weeks. We previously showed that the product of the codelivered lacZ gene induces an immune response, and the duration of HBV silencing in vivo is likely to be attenuated by this effect. Nevertheless, expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs from MTTR promoter is well suited to countering HBV replication and development of HD Ads through attenuation of their immunostimulatory effects should advance their clinical utility. PMID:25003129

  3. Histatin 5-Derived Peptide with Improved Fungicidal Properties Enhances Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by Promoting Viral Entry

    PubMed Central

    Groot, Fedde; Sanders, Rogier W.; ter Brake, Olivier; Nazmi, Kamran; Veerman, Enno C. I.; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are found in a number of body compartments and are secreted at mucosal surfaces, where they form part of the innate immune system. Many of these small peptides have a broad spectrum of inhibitory activity against bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. Generally, the peptide's mode of action is binding and disruption of membranes due to its amphipathic properties. Histatin 5 is a salivary peptide that inhibits Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungus that causes oropharyngeal candidiasis in a majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients progressing towards AIDS. Previously, we increased the fungicidal properties of histatin 5 by replacing amino acids in the active domain of histatin 5 (Dh-5) (A. L. Ruissen, J. Groenink, E. J. Helmerhorst, E. Walgreen-Weterings, W. van’t Hof, E. C. Veerman, and A. V. Nieuw Amerongen, Biochem. J. 356:361-368, 2001). In the current study, we tested the anti-HIV-1 activity of Dh-5 and its derivatives. Although Dh-5 inhibited HIV-1 replication, none of the peptide variants were more effective in this respect. In contrast, one of the derivatives, Dhvar2, significantly increased HIV-1 replication by promoting the envelope-mediated cell entry process. Most likely, Dhvar2 affects membranes, thereby facilitating fusion of viral and cellular membranes. This study shows that modification of antimicrobial peptides in order to improve their activity against a pathogen may have unpredictable and unwanted side effects on other pathogens. PMID:16940535

  4. Uncoupling of pathways that promote postmitotic life span and apoptosis from replicative immortality of Caenorhabditis elegans germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shawn

    2006-12-01

    A dichotomy exists between germ and somatic cells in most organisms, such that somatic cell lineages proliferate for a single generation, whereas the germ cell lineage has the capacity to proliferate from one generation to the next, indefinitely. Several theories have been proposed to explain the unlimited replicative life span of germ cells, including the elimination of damaged germ cells by apoptosis or expression of high levels of gene products that prevent aging in somatic cells. These theories were tested in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by examining the consequences of eliminating either apoptosis or the daf-16, daf-18 or sir-2.1 genes that promote longevity of postmitotic somatic cells. However, germ cells of strains deficient for these activities displayed an unlimited proliferative capacity. Thus, C. elegans germ cells retain their youthful character via alternative pathways that prevent or eliminate damage that accumulates as a consequence of cell proliferation.

  5. Different Modes of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication during Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Ralf; Hirt, Bernhard; Bechtold, Viviane; Beard, Peter; Raj, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) begins its life cycle by infecting the basal cells of the epithelium. Within these proliferating cells, the viral genomes are replicated, maintained, and passed on to the daughter cells. Using HPV episome-containing cell lines that were derived from naturally infected cervical tissues, we investigated the mode by which the viral DNAs replicate in these cells. We observed that, whereas HPV16 DNA replicated in an ordered once-per-S-phase manner in W12 cells, HPV31 DNA replicated via a random-choice mechanism in CIN612 cells. However, when HPV16 and HPV31 DNAs were separately introduced into an alternate keratinocyte cell line NIKS, they both replicated randomly. This indicates that HPV DNA is inherently capable of replicating by either random-choice or once-per-S-phase mechanisms and that the mode of HPV DNA replication is dependent on the cells that harbor the viral episome. High expression of the viral replication protein E1 in W12 cells converted HPV16 DNA replication to random-choice replication and, as such, it appears that the mode of HPV DNA replication in proliferating cells is dependent on the presence or the increased level of this protein in the host cell. The implications of these observations on maintenance, latency, and persistence are discussed. PMID:16611903

  6. The promoter regions of the Myb-regulated Adora2B and Mcm4 genes co-localize with origins of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Gundelach, Holger; Braas, Daniel; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Background The retroviral oncogene v-myb encodes a transcription factor (v-Myb) which is responsible for the transformation of myelomonocytic cells by avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV). v-Myb is thought to exert its biological effects by deregulating the expression of specific target genes. We have recently demonstrated that the chicken Gas41 gene, whose promoter co-localizes with an origin of DNA replication, is a bona fide Myb target gene. Because of this finding we have asked whether other Myb-regulated genes are also associated with DNA replication origins. Results We show that the promoter region of the chicken adenosine receptor 2B gene (Adora2B), a known Myb-target gene, acts as a DNA replication origin. Furthermore, we have examined known replication origins for the presence of Myb binding sites. We found that the intergenic region between the genes for the minichromosome maintenance 4 protein (Mcm4) and the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (Prkdc), whose human counterpart has been identified as a replication origin, contains a number of Myb binding sites. Our data show that this region also acts as an origin of replication in chicken cells. Interestingly, we found that the chicken Mcm4 gene is also Myb-regulated. Conclusion Our work identifies the chicken Mcm4 gene as a novel Myb target gene and presents evidence for the co-localization of two novel origins of DNA replication with Myb-regulated genes. Our work raises the possibility that a fraction of Myb target gene promoters is associated with DNA replication origins. PMID:17822556

  7. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Promotes Flaviviridae Entry and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Le Sommer, Caroline; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Pearson, James L.; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.

    2012-01-01

    Flaviviruses cause a wide range of severe diseases ranging from encephalitis to hemorrhagic fever. Discovery of host factors that regulate the fate of flaviviruses in infected cells could provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of infection and therefore facilitate the development of anti-flaviviral drugs. We performed genome-scale siRNA screens to discover human host factors required for yellow fever virus (YFV) propagation. Using a 2×2 siRNA pool screening format and a duplicate of the screen, we identified a high confidence list of YFV host factors. To find commonalities between flaviviruses, these candidates were compared to host factors previously identified for West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue virus (DENV). This comparison highlighted a potential requirement for the G protein-coupled receptor kinase family, GRKs, for flaviviral infection. The YFV host candidate GRK2 (also known as ADRBK1) was validated both in siRNA-mediated knockdown HuH-7 cells and in GRK−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Additionally, we showed that GRK2 was required for efficient propagation of DENV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) indicating that GRK2 requirement is conserved throughout the Flaviviridae. Finally, we found that GRK2 participates in multiple distinct steps of the flavivirus life cycle by promoting both entry and RNA synthesis. Together, our findings identified GRK2 as a novel regulator of flavivirus infection and suggest that inhibition of GRK2 function may constitute a new approach for treatment of flavivirus associated diseases. PMID:23029581

  8. Hepatitis B virus genotype C isolates with wild-type core promoter sequence replicate less efficiently than genotype B isolates but possess higher virion secretion capacity.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanli; Tang, Xiaoli; Garcia, Tamako; Hussain, Munira; Zhang, Jiming; Lok, Anna; Wands, Jack; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping

    2011-10-01

    Infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C is associated with a prolonged viremic phase, delayed hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, and an increased incidence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma compared with genotype B infection. Genotype C is also associated with the more frequent emergence of core promoter mutations, which increase genome replication and are independently associated with poor clinical outcomes. We amplified full-length HBV genomes from serum samples from Chinese and U. S. patients with chronic HBV infection and transfected circularized genome pools or dimeric constructs of individual clones into Huh7 cells. The two genotypes could be differentiated by Western blot analysis due to the reactivities of M and L proteins toward a monoclonal pre-S2 antibody and slightly different S-protein mobilities. Great variability in replication capacity was observed for both genotypes. The A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations were prevalent in genotype C isolates and correlated with increased replication capacity, while the A1752G/T mutation frequently found in genotype B isolates correlated with a low replication capacity. Importantly, most genotype C isolates with wild-type core promoter sequence replicated less efficiently than the corresponding genotype B isolates due to less efficient transcription of the 3.5-kb RNA. However, genotype C isolates often displayed more efficient virion secretion. We propose that the low intracellular levels of viral DNA and core protein of wild-type genotype C delay immune clearance and trigger the subsequent emergence of A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations to upregulate replication; efficient virion secretion compensates for the low replication capacity to ensure the establishment of persistent infection by genotype C.

  9. Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C Isolates with Wild-Type Core Promoter Sequence Replicate Less Efficiently than Genotype B Isolates but Possess Higher Virion Secretion Capacity ▿

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yanli; Tang, Xiaoli; Garcia, Tamako; Hussain, Munira; Zhang, Jiming; Lok, Anna; Wands, Jack; Li, Jisu; Tong, Shuping

    2011-01-01

    Infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C is associated with a prolonged viremic phase, delayed hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion, and an increased incidence of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma compared with genotype B infection. Genotype C is also associated with the more frequent emergence of core promoter mutations, which increase genome replication and are independently associated with poor clinical outcomes. We amplified full-length HBV genomes from serum samples from Chinese and U. S. patients with chronic HBV infection and transfected circularized genome pools or dimeric constructs of individual clones into Huh7 cells. The two genotypes could be differentiated by Western blot analysis due to the reactivities of M and L proteins toward a monoclonal pre-S2 antibody and slightly different S-protein mobilities. Great variability in replication capacity was observed for both genotypes. The A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations were prevalent in genotype C isolates and correlated with increased replication capacity, while the A1752G/T mutation frequently found in genotype B isolates correlated with a low replication capacity. Importantly, most genotype C isolates with wild-type core promoter sequence replicated less efficiently than the corresponding genotype B isolates due to less efficient transcription of the 3.5-kb RNA. However, genotype C isolates often displayed more efficient virion secretion. We propose that the low intracellular levels of viral DNA and core protein of wild-type genotype C delay immune clearance and trigger the subsequent emergence of A1762T/G1764A core promoter mutations to upregulate replication; efficient virion secretion compensates for the low replication capacity to ensure the establishment of persistent infection by genotype C. PMID:21775451

  10. Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Genomes Persist as Episomal Chromatin in Primate Muscle▿

    PubMed Central

    Penaud-Budloo, Magalie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Nowrouzi, Ali; Toromanoff, Alice; Chérel, Yan; Chenuaud, Pierre; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Rolling, Fabienne; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors are capable of mediating long-term gene expression following administration to skeletal muscle. In rodent muscle, the vector genomes persist in the nucleus in concatemeric episomal forms. Here, we demonstrate with nonhuman primates that rAAV vectors integrate inefficiently into the chromosomes of myocytes and reside predominantly as episomal monomeric and concatemeric circles. The episomal rAAV genomes assimilate into chromatin with a typical nucleosomal pattern. The persistence of the vector genomes and gene expression for years in quiescent tissues suggests that a bona fide chromatin structure is important for episomal maintenance and transgene expression. These findings were obtained from primate muscles transduced with rAAV1 and rAAV8 vectors for up to 22 months after intramuscular delivery of 5 × 1012 viral genomes/kg. Because of this unique context, our data, which provide important insight into in situ vector biology, are highly relevant from a clinical standpoint. PMID:18524821

  11. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ke; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yingyu; Dai, Yue; Fan, Yimei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang; Li, Erguang

    2016-10-01

    The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection.

  12. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Ma, Yingyu; Dai, Yue; Fan, Yimei; Hou, Yayi; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection. PMID:27764245

  13. Rad6-Bre1-mediated H2B ubiquitination regulates telomere replication by promoting telomere-end resection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Qiong-Di; Lv, De-Kang; Wu, Nian-Feng; Zhou, Jin-Qiu

    2017-04-07

    Rad6 and Bre1, ubiquitin-conjugating E2 and E3 enzymes respectively, are responsible for histone H2B lysine 123 mono-ubiquitination (H2Bub1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous studies have shown that Rad6 and Bre1 regulate telomere length and recombination. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we report that H2BK123 mutation results in telomere shortening, while inactivation of Ubp8 and/or Ubp10, deubiquitinases of H2Bub1, leads to telomere lengthening in Rad6-Bre1-dependent manner. In telomerase-deficient cells, inactivation of Rad6-Bre1 pathway retards telomere shortening rate and the onset of senescence, while deletion of UBP8 and/or UBP10 accelerates senescence. Thus, Rad6-Bre1 pathway regulates both telomere length and recombination through its role in H2Bub1. Additionally, inactivation of both Rad6-Bre1-H2Bub1 and Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) pathways causes synthetic growth defects and telomere shortening in telomerase-proficient cells, and significantly accelerates senescence and eliminates type II telomere recombination in telomerase-deficient cells. Furthermore, RAD6 or BRE1 deletion, or H2BK123R mutation decreases the accumulation of ssDNA at telomere ends. These results support the model that Rad6-Bre1-H2Bub1 cooperates with MRX to promote telomere-end resection and thus positively regulates both telomerase- and recombination-dependent telomere replication. This study provides a mechanistic link between histone H2B ubiquitination and telomere replication. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Atasheva, Svetlana; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; White, James P.; Diamond, Michael S.; Weaver, Scott C.; Frolova, Elena I.; Frolov, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5’UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5’UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5’end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5’UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates. PMID:25927359

  15. IFIT1 Differentially Interferes with Translation and Replication of Alphavirus Genomes and Promotes Induction of Type I Interferon.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Josephine M; Kim, Dal Young; Atasheva, Svetlana; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; White, James P; Diamond, Michael S; Weaver, Scott C; Frolova, Elena I; Frolov, Ilya

    2015-04-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of widely distributed human and animal pathogens. It is well established that their replication is sensitive to type I IFN treatment, but the mechanism of IFN inhibitory function remains poorly understood. Using a new experimental system, we demonstrate that in the presence of IFN-β, activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) does not interfere with either attachment of alphavirus virions to the cells, or their entry and nucleocapsid disassembly. However, it strongly affects translation of the virion-delivered virus-specific RNAs. One of the ISG products, IFIT1 protein, plays a major role in this translation block, although an IFIT1-independent mechanism is also involved. The 5'UTRs of the alphavirus genomes were found to differ significantly in their ability to drive translation in the presence of increased concentration of IFIT1. Prior studies have shown that adaptation of naturally circulating alphaviruses to replication in tissue culture results in accumulation of mutations in the 5'UTR, which increase the efficiency of the promoter located in the 5'end of the genome. Here, we show that these mutations also decrease resistance of viral RNA to IFIT1-induced translation inhibition. In the presence of higher levels of IFIT1, alphaviruses with wt 5'UTRs became potent inducers of type I IFN, suggesting a new mechanism of type I IFN induction. We applied this knowledge of IFIT1 interaction with alphaviruses to develop new attenuated variants of Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses that are more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFIT1, and thus could serve as novel vaccine candidates.

  16. DDX5 regulates DNA replication and is required for cell proliferation in a subset of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Anthony; Luo, Weijun; Krasnitz, Alexander; Hicks, James; Powers, R Scott; Stillman, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    Understanding factors required for DNA replication will enrich our knowledge of this important process and potentially identify vulnerabilities that can be exploited in cancer therapy. We applied an assay that measures the stability of maintenance of an episomal plasmid in human tissue culture cells to screen for new DNA replication factors. We identify an important role for DDX5 in G(1)-S-phase progression where it directly regulates DNA replication factor expression by promoting the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to E2F-regulated gene promoters. We find that the DDX5 locus is frequently amplified in breast cancer and that breast cancer-derived cells with amplification of DDX5 are much more sensitive to its depletion than breast cancer cells and a breast epithelial cell line that lacks DDX5 amplification. Our results show a novel role for DDX5 in cancer cell proliferation and suggest DDX5 as a therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment. DDX5 is required for cell proliferation by controlling the transcription of genes expressing DNA replication proteins in cancer cells in which the DDX5 locus is amplified, and this has uncovered a dependence on DDX5 for cell proliferation. Given the high frequency of DDX5 amplification in breast cancer, our results highlight DDX5 as a promising candidate for targeted therapy of breast tumors with DDX5 amplification, and indeed we show that DDX5 inhibition sensitizes a subset of breast cancer cells to trastuzumab.

  17. Nucleobase-mediated, photocatalytic production of amphiphiles to promote the self-assembly of a simple self-replicating protocell.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain; Maurer, Sarah, E.; Albertsen, Anders, N.; Boncella, James, M.; Cape, Jonathan, L.

    Living cells are in many respects the ultimate nanoscale chemical system. Within a very small volume they can produce highly specific useful products by extracting resources and free energy from the environment. They are also self-organized, self-controlled, and capable of self-repair and self-replication. Designing artificial chemical systems (artificial cells or protocells) that would be endowed with these powerful capabilities has been investigated extensively in the recent years. Chemical systems usually studied were based on the encapsulation of a set of genes along with catalytic protein machinery within the self-assembled boundaries of liposome/vesicles. The generated systems have many of the characteristics of a living system, but lack the regulation by genetic information of all protocell functions. Departing from these encapsulated models, we have been attempting to implement a simple, chemical system in which the regulation of the metabolism is truly mediated by information molecules. Our proposed system is composed of a chemical mixture composed of fatty acids that form bilayers (compartment), amphiphilic information molecules (nucleic acids -NA), and metabolic complexes (photosensitizers). Due to the intrinsic properties of all its components, a chemical system will self-assemble into aqueous, colloid mixtures that will be conducive to the metabolic steps, the non-enzymatic polymerization of the information, and the photochemical fatty acid production from its oil-like precursor. The reaction products (e.g., the container molecules) will in turn promote system growth and replication. In this scheme, the NA acts as an information molecule mediating the metabolic catalysis (electron donor/relay system) with a ruthenium metal complex as a cofactor and sensitizer, which is used to convert the hydrophobic precursor container molecules into amphiphiles, thus directly linking protocell metabolism with information. In a first experimental design, NA has been

  18. Connecting Replication and Repair: YoaA, a Helicase-Related Protein, Promotes Azidothymidine Tolerance through Association with Chi, an Accessory Clamp Loader Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Laura T.; Sutera, Vincent A.; Zhou, Shen; Weitzel, Christopher S.; Cheng, Yisha; Lovett, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Elongating DNA polymerases frequently encounter lesions or structures that impede progress and require repair before DNA replication can be completed. Therefore, directing repair factors to a blocked fork, without interfering with normal replication, is important for proper cell function, and it is a process that is not well understood. To study this process, we have employed the chain-terminating nucleoside analog, 3’ azidothymidine (AZT) and the E. coli genetic system, for which replication and repair factors have been well-defined. By using high-expression suppressor screens, we identified yoaA, encoding a putative helicase, and holC, encoding the Chi component of the replication clamp loader, as genes that promoted tolerance to AZT. YoaA is a putative Fe-S helicase in the XPD/RAD3 family for which orthologs can be found in most bacterial genomes; E. coli has a paralog to YoaA, DinG, which possesses 5’ to 3’ helicase activity and an Fe-S cluster essential to its activity. Mutants in yoaA are sensitive to AZT exposure; dinG mutations cause mild sensitivity to AZT and exacerbate the sensitivity of yoaA mutant strains. Suppression of AZT sensitivity by holC or yoaA was mutually codependent and we provide evidence here that YoaA and Chi physically interact. Interactions of Chi with single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB) and with Psi were required to aid AZT tolerance, as was the proofreading 3’ exonuclease, DnaQ. Our studies suggest that repair is coupled to blocked replication through these interactions. We hypothesize that SSB, through Chi, recruits the YoaA helicase to replication gaps and that unwinding of the nascent strand promotes repair and AZT excision. This recruitment prevents the toxicity of helicase activity and aids the handoff of repair with replication factors, ensuring timely repair and resumption of replication. PMID:26544712

  19. Connecting Replication and Repair: YoaA, a Helicase-Related Protein, Promotes Azidothymidine Tolerance through Association with Chi, an Accessory Clamp Loader Protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura T; Sutera, Vincent A; Zhou, Shen; Weitzel, Christopher S; Cheng, Yisha; Lovett, Susan T

    2015-11-01

    Elongating DNA polymerases frequently encounter lesions or structures that impede progress and require repair before DNA replication can be completed. Therefore, directing repair factors to a blocked fork, without interfering with normal replication, is important for proper cell function, and it is a process that is not well understood. To study this process, we have employed the chain-terminating nucleoside analog, 3' azidothymidine (AZT) and the E. coli genetic system, for which replication and repair factors have been well-defined. By using high-expression suppressor screens, we identified yoaA, encoding a putative helicase, and holC, encoding the Chi component of the replication clamp loader, as genes that promoted tolerance to AZT. YoaA is a putative Fe-S helicase in the XPD/RAD3 family for which orthologs can be found in most bacterial genomes; E. coli has a paralog to YoaA, DinG, which possesses 5' to 3' helicase activity and an Fe-S cluster essential to its activity. Mutants in yoaA are sensitive to AZT exposure; dinG mutations cause mild sensitivity to AZT and exacerbate the sensitivity of yoaA mutant strains. Suppression of AZT sensitivity by holC or yoaA was mutually codependent and we provide evidence here that YoaA and Chi physically interact. Interactions of Chi with single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB) and with Psi were required to aid AZT tolerance, as was the proofreading 3' exonuclease, DnaQ. Our studies suggest that repair is coupled to blocked replication through these interactions. We hypothesize that SSB, through Chi, recruits the YoaA helicase to replication gaps and that unwinding of the nascent strand promotes repair and AZT excision. This recruitment prevents the toxicity of helicase activity and aids the handoff of repair with replication factors, ensuring timely repair and resumption of replication.

  20. Dynamic regulation of histone H3K9 is linked to the switch between replication and transcription at the Dbf4 origin-promoter locus

    PubMed Central

    Kylie, Kathleen; Romero, Julia; Lindamulage, Indeewari K.S.; Knockleby, James; Lee, Hoyun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The co-regulation of DNA replication and gene transcription is still poorly understood. To gain a better understanding of this important control mechanism, we examined the DNA replication and transcription using the Dbf4 origin-promoter and Dbf4 pseudogene models. We found that origin firing and Dbf4 transcription activity were inversely regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We also found that proteins critical for the regulation of replication (ORC, MCM), transcription (SP1, TFIIB), and cohesin (Smc1, Smc3) and Mediator functions (Med1, Med12) interact with specific sites within and the surrounding regions of the Dbf4 locus in a cell cycle-dependent manner. As expected, replication initiation occurred within a nucleosome-depleted region, and nucleosomes flanked the 2 replication initiation zones. Further, the histone H3 in this region was distinctly acetylated or trimethylated on lysine 9 in a cell cycle-dependent fluctuation pattern: H3K9ac was most prevalent when the Dbf4 transcription level was highest whereas the H3K9me3 level was greatest during and just after replication. The KDM4A histone demethylase, which is responsible for the H3K9me3 modification, was enriched at the Dbf4 origin in a manner coinciding with H3K9me3. Finally, HP1γ, a protein known to interact with H3K9me3 in the heterochromatin was also found enriched at the origin during DNA replication, indicating that H3K9me3 may be required for the regulation of replication at both heterochromatin and euchromatin regions. Taken together, our data show that mammalian cells employ an extremely sophisticated and multilayered co-regulation mechanism for replication and transcription in a highly coordinated manner. PMID:27341472

  1. Recruitment of Arabidopsis RNA Helicase AtRH9 to the Viral Replication Complex by Viral Replicase to Promote Turnip Mosaic Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinzi; Xiong, Ruyi; Bernards, Mark; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    Positive-sense RNA viruses have a small genome with very limited coding capacity and are highly dependent on host components to fulfill their life cycle. Recent studies have suggested that DEAD-box RNA helicases play vital roles in many aspects of RNA metabolism. To explore the possible role of the RNA helicases in viral infection, we used the Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV)-Arabidopsis pathosystem. The Arabidopsis genome encodes more than 100 putative RNA helicases (AtRH). Over 41 Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants carrying genetic lesions in the corresponding 26 AtRH genes were screened for their requirement in TuMV infection. TuMV infection assays revealed that virus accumulation significantly decreased in the Arabidopsis mutants of three genes, AtRH9, AtRH26, and PRH75. In the present work, AtRH9 was further characterized. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays showed that AtRH9 interacted with the TuMV NIb protein, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Moreover, the subcellular distribution of AtRH9 was altered in the virus-infected cells, and AtRH9 was recruited to the viral replication complex. These results suggest that Arabidopsis AtRH9 is an important component of the TuMV replication complex, possibly recruited via its interaction with NIb. PMID:27456972

  2. The first two nucleotides of the respiratory syncytial virus antigenome RNA replication product can be selected independently of the promoter terminus.

    PubMed

    Noton, Sarah L; Fearns, Rachel

    2011-10-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding how the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses initiate genome replication. In a previous study of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) RNA replication, we found evidence that the polymerase could select the 5'-ATP residue of the genome RNA independently of the 3' nucleotide of the template. To investigate if a similar mechanism is used during antigenome synthesis, a study of initiation from the RSV leader (Le) promoter was performed using an intracellular minigenome assay in which RNA replication was restricted to a single step, so that the products examined were derived only from input mutant templates. Templates in which Le nucleotides 1U, or 1U and 2G, were deleted directed efficient replication, and in both cases, the replication products were initiated at the wild-type position, at position -1 or -2 relative to the template, respectively. Sequence analysis of the RNA products showed that they contained ATP and CTP at the -1 and -2 positions, respectively, thus restoring the mini-antigenome RNA to wild-type sequence. These data indicate that the RSV polymerase is able to select the first two nucleotides of the antigenome and initiate at the correct position, even if the 3'-terminal two nucleotides of the template are missing. Substitution of positions +1 and +2 of the template reduced RNA replication and resulted in increased initiation at positions +3 and +5. Together these data suggest a model for how the RSV polymerase initiates antigenome synthesis.

  3. Influence of the basal core promoter and precore mutation on replication of hepatitis B virus and antiviral susceptibility of different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiu-Ji; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) regions of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) are more common in genotypes B and C than in genotype A, suggesting that these mutations might affect replication competency depending on genotype. The purpose of the study was to investigate the influence of these mutations on the capacity of HBV for replication and antiviral drug susceptibility according to genotype. Genotypes A, B, and C of HBV strains with a BCP mutation, PC mutation, or BCP + PC mutation were made by site-directed mutagenesis. Replication competency of each construct and susceptibility to nucleos(t) ide analogues were tested in an Huh7 cell line. In genotype A, the BCP and BCP + PC mutations increased the viral replication around 6.5 times compared with the wild type, and the PC mutation alone similarly increased the viral replication around three times. In genotypes B and C, all three mutant types increased viral replication to a similar extent, regardless of mutation pattern. Interestingly, the BCP mutation appeared to have a greater effect on viral replication in genotype A than in genotypes B and C. This finding was unexpected because the BCP mutation is more common in HBV genotypes B and C. Moreover, the BCP, PC, and BCP + PC mutations decreased the sensitivity of HBV to antiviral agents to various degrees (2- to 10-fold) regardless of genotype. In conclusion, BCP and PC mutations increased viral replication regardless of HBV genotype and decreased in vitro antiviral susceptibility to the nucleos(t) ide analogues.

  4. Modulation of the Host Lipid Landscape to Promote RNA Virus Replication: The Picornavirus Encephalomyocarditis Virus Converges on the Pathway Used by Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Dorobantu, Cristina M; Albulescu, Lucian; Harak, Christian; Feng, Qian; van Kampen, Mirjam; Strating, Jeroen R P M; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Lohmann, Volker; van der Schaar, Hilde M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2015-09-01

    Cardioviruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and the human Saffold virus, are small non-enveloped viruses belonging to the Picornaviridae, a large family of positive-sense RNA [(+)RNA] viruses. All (+)RNA viruses remodel intracellular membranes into unique structures for viral genome replication. Accumulating evidence suggests that picornaviruses from different genera use different strategies to generate viral replication organelles (ROs). For instance, enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus) rely on the Golgi-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta (PI4KB), while cardioviruses replicate independently of the kinase. By which mechanisms cardioviruses develop their ROs is currently unknown. Here we show that cardioviruses manipulate another PI4K, namely the ER-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III alpha (PI4KA), to generate PI4P-enriched ROs. By siRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacological inhibition, we demonstrate that PI4KA is an essential host factor for EMCV genome replication. We reveal that the EMCV nonstructural protein 3A interacts with and is responsible for PI4KA recruitment to viral ROs. The ensuing phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) proved important for the recruitment of oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), which delivers cholesterol to EMCV ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. PI4P lipids and cholesterol are shown to be required for the global organization of the ROs and for viral genome replication. Consistently, inhibition of OSBP expression or function efficiently blocked EMCV RNA replication. In conclusion, we describe for the first time a cellular pathway involved in the biogenesis of cardiovirus ROs. Remarkably, the same pathway was reported to promote formation of the replication sites of hepatitis C virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, but not other picornaviruses or flaviviruses. Thus, our results highlight the convergent recruitment by distantly related (+)RNA viruses of a host lipid

  5. Modulation of the Host Lipid Landscape to Promote RNA Virus Replication: The Picornavirus Encephalomyocarditis Virus Converges on the Pathway Used by Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dorobantu, Cristina M.; Albulescu, Lucian; Harak, Christian; Feng, Qian; van Kampen, Mirjam; Strating, Jeroen R. P. M.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Lohmann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Cardioviruses, including encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) and the human Saffold virus, are small non-enveloped viruses belonging to the Picornaviridae, a large family of positive-sense RNA [(+)RNA] viruses. All (+)RNA viruses remodel intracellular membranes into unique structures for viral genome replication. Accumulating evidence suggests that picornaviruses from different genera use different strategies to generate viral replication organelles (ROs). For instance, enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus) rely on the Golgi-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III beta (PI4KB), while cardioviruses replicate independently of the kinase. By which mechanisms cardioviruses develop their ROs is currently unknown. Here we show that cardioviruses manipulate another PI4K, namely the ER-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III alpha (PI4KA), to generate PI4P-enriched ROs. By siRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacological inhibition, we demonstrate that PI4KA is an essential host factor for EMCV genome replication. We reveal that the EMCV nonstructural protein 3A interacts with and is responsible for PI4KA recruitment to viral ROs. The ensuing phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) proved important for the recruitment of oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), which delivers cholesterol to EMCV ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. PI4P lipids and cholesterol are shown to be required for the global organization of the ROs and for viral genome replication. Consistently, inhibition of OSBP expression or function efficiently blocked EMCV RNA replication. In conclusion, we describe for the first time a cellular pathway involved in the biogenesis of cardiovirus ROs. Remarkably, the same pathway was reported to promote formation of the replication sites of hepatitis C virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, but not other picornaviruses or flaviviruses. Thus, our results highlight the convergent recruitment by distantly related (+)RNA viruses of a host lipid

  6. Enhanced Generation of Integration-free iPSCs from Human Adult Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells with an Optimal Combination of Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wei; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Xu, Jing; Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Ji, Guang-Zhen; Yuan, Weiping; Cheng, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-06-14

    We previously reported the generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from adult peripheral blood (PB) with an improved episomal vector (EV) system, which uses the spleen focus-forming virus U3 promoter and an extra factor BCL-XL (B). Here we show an ∼100-fold increase in efficiency by optimizing the vector combination. The two most critical factors are: (1) equimolar expression of OCT4 (O) and SOX2 (S), by using a 2A linker; (2) a higher and gradual increase in the MYC (M) to KLF4 (K) ratio during the course of reprogramming, by using two individual vectors to express M and K instead of one. The combination of EV plasmids (OS + M + K + B) is comparable with Sendai virus in reprogramming efficiency but at a fraction of the cost. The generated iPSCs are indistinguishable from those from our previous approach in pluripotency and phenotype. This improvement lays the foundation for broad applications of episomal vectors in PB reprogramming. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo episomal maintenance of a herpesvirus saimiri-based gene delivery vector.

    PubMed

    Smith, P G; Coletta, P L; Markham, A F; Whitehouse, A

    2001-12-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) has several properties that make it amenable to development as a gene delivery vector. HVS offers the potential to incorporate large amounts of heterologous DNA and infect a broad range of human cell lines. Upon infection the viral genome can persist by virtue of episomal maintenance and stably maintains heterologous gene expression. Here we report an evaluation of the in vivo properties of HVS, with a view to its development as a gene delivery system. We demonstrate for the first time, the long-term persistence of the HVS genome in tumour xenografts generated from HVS-infected human carcinoma cell lines. The HVS-based vector remained latent in the xenograft without spreading to other organs. Moreover, the long-term in vivo maintenance of the HVS genome, as a nonintegrated circular episome, provided efficient sustained expression of a heterologous transgene. These in vivo results suggest that HVS-based vectors have potential for gene therapy applications.

  8. Cohesin promotes the repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in replicated chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Bauerschmidt, Christina; Arrichiello, Cecilia; Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne; Woodcock, Michael; Hill, Mark A.; Stevens, David L.; Rothkamm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin protein complex holds sister chromatids together after synthesis until mitosis. It also contributes to post-replicative DNA repair in yeast and higher eukaryotes and accumulates at sites of laser-induced damage in human cells. Our goal was to determine whether the cohesin subunits SMC1 and Rad21 contribute to DNA double-strand break repair in X-irradiated human cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. RNA interference-mediated depletion of SMC1 sensitized HeLa cells to X-rays. Repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, measured by γH2AX/53BP1 foci analysis, was slower in SMC1- or Rad21-depleted cells than in controls in G2 but not in G1. Inhibition of the DNA damage kinase DNA-PK, but not ATM, further inhibited foci loss in cohesin-depleted cells in G2. SMC1 depletion had no effect on DNA single-strand break repair in either G1 or late S/G2. Rad21 and SMC1 were recruited to sites of X-ray-induced DNA damage in G2-phase cells, but not in G1, and only when DNA damage was concentrated in subnuclear stripes, generated by partially shielded ultrasoft X-rays. Our results suggest that the cohesin complex contributes to cell survival by promoting the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks in G2-phase cells in an ATM-dependent pathway. PMID:19906707

  9. Episomal-based generation of an iPS cell line from human fetal foreskin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Matz, Peggy; Adjaye, James

    2016-01-01

    Human fetal foreskin fibroblasts (HFF1) were used to generate the iPSC line epiHFF1-B1 employing a combination of three episomal-based plasmids expressing OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28, c-MYC, and KLF4. Pluripotency was confirmed both in vivo and in vitro. The transcriptome profile of epiHFF1-B1 and the human embryonic stem cell line-H1 have a pearson correlation of 0.936.

  10. p53 is preferentially recruited to the promoters of growth arrest genes p21 and GADD45 during replicative senescence of normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Jackson, James G; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M

    2006-09-01

    Replicative senescence is the terminal growth arrest that most normal human cells enter into after a fixed number of divisions in vitro, limiting the proliferative potential of a cell and preventing genomic instability caused by critically short telomeres. Thus, senescence presents a tumor-suppressive mechanism and a barrier to tumor formation. However, senescent cells are inherently resistant to apoptosis and, as they accumulate in aging tissues, may contribute to organ dysfunction and promote tumor progression as part of the stromal environment. Replicative life span in normal human cells can be extended by inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 or its direct target, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, suggesting a direct role for this pathway in senescence. However, p53 recruitment to promoters of target genes during replicative senescence has not been shown in live cells. In this study, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine that p53 preferentially occupied the promoters of growth arrest genes p21 and GADD45 in senescent normal human diploid fibroblasts but not the promoters of other target genes that recruited p53 following doxorubicin-induced DNA damage, such as apoptosis regulators TNFRSF10b, TNFRSF6, and PUMA. This differential recruitment of p53 in senescent versus doxorubicin-treated fibroblasts was accompanied by differences in post-translational modification of p53. These data provide mechanisms for both the growth arrest mediated by p53 and the resistant nature of senescent cells to apoptosis despite p53 activity.

  11. Improved detection of episomal Banana streak viruses by multiplex immunocapture PCR.

    PubMed

    Le Provost, Grégoire; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Acina, Isabelle; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Banana streak viruses (BSV) are currently the main viral constraint to Musa germplasm movement, genetic improvement and mass propagation. Therefore, it is necessary to develop and implement BSV detection strategies that are both reliable and sensitive, such as PCR-based techniques. Unfortunately, BSV endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (BSV EPRVs) are present in the genome of Musa balbisiana. They interfere with PCR-based detection of episomal BSV in infected banana and plantain, such as immunocapture PCR. Therefore, a multiplex, immunocapture PCR (M-IC-PCR) was developed for the detection of BSV. Musa sequence tagged microsatellite site (STMS) primers were selected and used in combination with BSV species-specific primers in order to monitor possible contamination by Musa genomic DNA, using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, immunocapture conditions were optimized in order to prevent Musa DNA from interfering with episomal BSV DNA during the PCR step. This improved detection method successfully allowed the accurate, specific and sensitive detection of episomal DNA only from distinct BSV species. Its implementation should benefit PCR-based detection of viruses for which homologous sequences are present in the genome of their hosts, including transgenic plants expressing viral sequences.

  12. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. PMID:27624131

  13. The Barley stripe mosaic virus γb protein promotes chloroplast-targeted replication by enhancing unwinding of RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yongliang; Yang, Meng; Liu, Songyu; Li, Zhenggang; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2017-04-07

    RNA viruses encode various RNA binding proteins that function in many steps of viral infection cycles. These proteins function as RNA helicases, methyltransferases, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, RNA silencing suppressors, RNA chaperones, movement proteins, and so on. Although many of the proteins bind the viral RNA genome during different stages of infection, our knowledge about the coordination of their functions is limited. In this study, we describe a novel role for the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) γb as an enhancer of αa RNA helicase activity, and we show that the γb protein is recruited by the αa viral replication protein to chloroplast membrane sites of BSMV replication. Mutagenesis or deletion of γb from BSMV resulted in reduced positive strand (+) RNAα accumulation, but γb mutations abolishing viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity did not completely eliminate genomic RNA replication. In addition, cis- or trans-expression of the Tomato bushy stunt virus p19 VSR protein failed to complement the γb replication functions, indicating that the direct involvement of γb in BSMV RNA replication is independent of VSR functions. These data support a model whereby two BSMV-encoded RNA-binding proteins act coordinately to regulate viral genome replication and provide new insights into strategies whereby double-stranded viral RNA unwinding is regulated, as well as formation of viral replication complexes.

  14. The Barley stripe mosaic virus γb protein promotes chloroplast-targeted replication by enhancing unwinding of RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Liu, Songyu; Li, Zhenggang; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin

    2017-01-01

    RNA viruses encode various RNA binding proteins that function in many steps of viral infection cycles. These proteins function as RNA helicases, methyltransferases, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, RNA silencing suppressors, RNA chaperones, movement proteins, and so on. Although many of the proteins bind the viral RNA genome during different stages of infection, our knowledge about the coordination of their functions is limited. In this study, we describe a novel role for the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) γb as an enhancer of αa RNA helicase activity, and we show that the γb protein is recruited by the αa viral replication protein to chloroplast membrane sites of BSMV replication. Mutagenesis or deletion of γb from BSMV resulted in reduced positive strand (+) RNAα accumulation, but γb mutations abolishing viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity did not completely eliminate genomic RNA replication. In addition, cis- or trans-expression of the Tomato bushy stunt virus p19 VSR protein failed to complement the γb replication functions, indicating that the direct involvement of γb in BSMV RNA replication is independent of VSR functions. These data support a model whereby two BSMV-encoded RNA-binding proteins act coordinately to regulate viral genome replication and provide new insights into strategies whereby double-stranded viral RNA unwinding is regulated, as well as formation of viral replication complexes. PMID:28388677

  15. In Vivo Replication of Recombinant Murine Cytomegalovirus Driven by the Paralogous Major Immediate-Early Promoter-Enhancer of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Grzimek, Natascha K. A.; Podlech, Jürgen; Steffens, Hans-Peter; Holtappels, Rafaela; Schmalz, Susanne; Reddehase, Matthias J.

    1999-01-01

    Transcription of the major immediate-early (MIE) genes of cytomegaloviruses (CMV) is driven by a strong promoter-enhancer (MIEPE) complex. Transactivator proteins encoded by these MIE genes are essential for productive infection. Accordingly, the MIEPE is a crucial control point, and its regulation by activators and repressors is pertinent to virus replication. Since the MIEPE contains multiple regulatory elements, it was reasonable to assume that specific sequence motifs are irreplaceable for specifying the cell-type tropism and replication pattern. Recent work on murine CMV infectivity (A. Angulo, M. Messerle, U. H. Koszinowski, and P. Ghazal, J. Virol. 72:8502–8509, 1998) has documented the proposed enhancing function of the enhancer in that its resection or its replacement by a nonregulatory stuffer sequence resulted in a significant reduction of infectivity, even though replication competence was maintained by a basal activity of the spared authentic MIE promoter. Notably, full capacity for productive in vitro infection of fibroblasts was restored in recombinant viruses by the human CMV enhancer. Using two-color in situ hybridization with MIEPE-specific polynucleotide probes, we demonstrated that a murine CMV recombinant in which the complete murine CMV MIEPE is replaced by the paralogous human CMV core promoter and enhancer (recombinant virus mCMVhMIEPE) retained the potential to replicate in vivo in all tissues relevant to CMV disease. Notably, mCMVhMIEPE was also found to replicate in the liver, a site at which transgenic hCMV MIEPE is silenced. We conclude that productive in vivo infection with murine CMV does not strictly depend on a MIEPE type-specific regulation. PMID:10233967

  16. Cis-acting DNA sequence at a replication origin promotes repeat expansion to fragile X full mutation.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Zaninovic, Nikica; Zhan, Qiansheng; Madireddy, Advaitha; Nolin, Sarah L; Ersalesi, Nicole; Yan, Zi; Rosenwaks, Zev; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2014-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by CGG repeat expansion that leads to FMR1 silencing. Women with a premutation allele are at risk of having a full mutation child with FXS. To investigate the mechanism of repeat expansion, we examined the relationship between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant that is linked to repeat expansion in haplogroup D and a replication origin located ∼53 kb upstream of the repeats. This origin is absent in FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have the SNP variant C, but present in the nonaffected hESCs, which have a T variant. The SNP maps directly within the replication origin. Interestingly, premutation hESCs have a replication origin and the T variant similar to nonaffected hESCs. These results suggest that a T/C SNP located at a replication origin could contribute to the inactivation of this replication origin in FXS hESCs, leading to altered replication fork progression through the repeats, which could result in repeat expansion to the FXS full mutation. © 2014 Gerhardt et al.

  17. Cis-acting DNA sequence at a replication origin promotes repeat expansion to fragile X full mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zaninovic, Nikica; Zhan, Qiansheng; Madireddy, Advaitha; Nolin, Sarah L.; Ersalesi, Nicole; Yan, Zi; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by CGG repeat expansion that leads to FMR1 silencing. Women with a premutation allele are at risk of having a full mutation child with FXS. To investigate the mechanism of repeat expansion, we examined the relationship between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant that is linked to repeat expansion in haplogroup D and a replication origin located ∼53 kb upstream of the repeats. This origin is absent in FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have the SNP variant C, but present in the nonaffected hESCs, which have a T variant. The SNP maps directly within the replication origin. Interestingly, premutation hESCs have a replication origin and the T variant similar to nonaffected hESCs. These results suggest that a T/C SNP located at a replication origin could contribute to the inactivation of this replication origin in FXS hESCs, leading to altered replication fork progression through the repeats, which could result in repeat expansion to the FXS full mutation. PMID:25179629

  18. Cellular Transcriptional Coactivator RanBP10 and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Interact and Synergistically Promote Viral Gene Expression and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuka; Kato, Akihisa; Maruzuru, Yuhei; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Arii, Jun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the molecular mechanism(s) by which herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) regulatory protein ICP0 promotes viral gene expression and replication, we screened cells overexpressing ICP0 for ICP0-binding host cell proteins. Tandem affinity purification of transiently expressed ICP0 coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics technology and subsequent analyses showed that ICP0 interacted with cell protein RanBP10, a known transcriptional coactivator, in HSV-1-infected cells. Knockdown of RanBP10 in infected HEp-2 cells resulted in a phenotype similar to that observed with the ICP0-null mutation, including reduction in viral replication and in the accumulation of viral immediate early (ICP27), early (ICP8), and late (VP16) mRNAs and proteins. In addition, RanBP10 knockdown or the ICP0-null mutation increased the level of histone H3 association with the promoters of these viral genes, which is known to repress transcription. These effects observed in wild-type HSV-1-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells or those observed in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected control HEp-2 cells were remarkably increased in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells. Our results suggested that ICP0 and RanBP10 redundantly and synergistically promoted viral gene expression by regulating chromatin remodeling of the HSV-1 genome for efficient viral replication. IMPORTANCE Upon entry of herpesviruses into a cell, viral gene expression is restricted by heterochromatinization of the viral genome. Therefore, HSV-1 has evolved multiple mechanisms to counteract this epigenetic silencing for efficient viral gene expression and replication. HSV-1 ICP0 is one of the viral proteins involved in counteracting epigenetic silencing. Here, we identified RanBP10 as a novel cellular ICP0-binding protein and showed that RanBP10 and ICP0 appeared to act synergistically to promote viral gene expression and replication by modulating viral chromatin remodeling. Our results

  19. Cellular Transcriptional Coactivator RanBP10 and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 Interact and Synergistically Promote Viral Gene Expression and Replication.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuka; Kato, Akihisa; Maruzuru, Yuhei; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Arii, Jun; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2016-01-06

    To investigate the molecular mechanism(s) by which herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) regulatory protein ICP0 promotes viral gene expression and replication, we screened cells overexpressing ICP0 for ICP0-binding host cell proteins. Tandem affinity purification of transiently expressed ICP0 coupled with mass spectrometry-based proteomics technology and subsequent analyses showed that ICP0 interacted with cell protein RanBP10, a known transcriptional coactivator, in HSV-1-infected cells. Knockdown of RanBP10 in infected HEp-2 cells resulted in a phenotype similar to that observed with the ICP0-null mutation, including reduction in viral replication and in the accumulation of viral immediate early (ICP27), early (ICP8), and late (VP16) mRNAs and proteins. In addition, RanBP10 knockdown or the ICP0-null mutation increased the level of histone H3 association with the promoters of these viral genes, which is known to repress transcription. These effects observed in wild-type HSV-1-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells or those observed in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected control HEp-2 cells were remarkably increased in ICP0-null mutant virus-infected HEp-2 RanBP10 knockdown cells. Our results suggested that ICP0 and RanBP10 redundantly and synergistically promoted viral gene expression by regulating chromatin remodeling of the HSV-1 genome for efficient viral replication. Upon entry of herpesviruses into a cell, viral gene expression is restricted by heterochromatinization of the viral genome. Therefore, HSV-1 has evolved multiple mechanisms to counteract this epigenetic silencing for efficient viral gene expression and replication. HSV-1 ICP0 is one of the viral proteins involved in counteracting epigenetic silencing. Here, we identified RanBP10 as a novel cellular ICP0-binding protein and showed that RanBP10 and ICP0 appeared to act synergistically to promote viral gene expression and replication by modulating viral chromatin remodeling. Our results provide insight into

  20. The Cellular TAR RNA Binding Protein, TRBP, Promotes HIV-1 Replication Primarily by Inhibiting the Activation of Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Kinase PKR▿

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Viraj R.; Steel, Laura F.

    2011-01-01

    The TAR RNA binding protein, TRBP, is a cellular double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein that can promote the replication of HIV-1 through interactions with the viral TAR element as well as with cellular proteins that affect the efficiency of translation of viral transcripts. The structured TAR element, present on all viral transcripts, can impede efficient translation either by sterically blocking access of translation initiation factors to the 5′-cap or by activating the dsRNA-dependent kinase, PKR. Several mechanisms by which TRBP can facilitate translation of viral transcripts have been proposed, including the binding and unwinding of TAR and the suppression of PKR activation. Further, TRBP has been identified as a cofactor of Dicer in the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs), and sequestration of TRBP by TAR in infected cells has been proposed as a viral countermeasure to potential host cell RNA interference-based antiviral activities. Here, we have addressed the relative importance of these various roles for TRBP in HIV-1 replication. Using Jurkat T cells, primary human CD4+ T cells, and additional cultured cell lines, we show that depletion of TRBP has no effect on viral replication when PKR activation is otherwise blocked. Moreover, the presence of TAR-containing mRNAs does not affect the efficacy of cellular miRNA silencing pathways. These results establish that TRBP, when expressed at physiological levels, promotes HIV-1 replication mainly by suppressing the PKR-mediated antiviral response, while its contribution to HIV-1 replication through PKR-independent pathways is minimal. PMID:21937648

  1. The UL8 subunit of the helicase-primase complex of herpes simplex virus promotes DNA annealing and has a high affinity for replication forks.

    PubMed

    Bermek, Oya; Weller, Sandra K; Griffith, Jack D

    2017-09-22

    During lytic infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA is replicated by a mechanism involving DNA recombination. For instance, replication of the HSV-1 genome produces X- and Y-branched structures, reminiscent of recombination intermediates. HSV-1's replication machinery includes a trimeric helicase-primase composed of helicase (UL5) and primase (UL52) subunits and a third subunit, UL8. UL8 has been reported to stimulate the helicase and primase activities of the complex in the presence of ICP8, an HSV-1 protein that functions as an annealase, a protein that binds complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and facilitates its annealing to duplex DNA. UL8 also influences the intracellular localization of the UL5/UL52 subunits, but UL8's catalytic activities are not known. In this study we used a combination of biochemical techniques and transmission electron microscopy. First, we report that UL8 alone forms protein filaments in solution. Moreover, we also found that UL8 binds to ssDNAs >50-nucletides long and promotes the annealing of complementary ssDNA to generate highly branched duplex DNA structures. Finally, UL8 has a very high affinity for replication fork structures containing a gap in the lagging strand as short as 15 nucleotides, suggesting that UL8 may aid in directing or loading the trimeric complex onto a replication fork. The properties of UL8 uncovered here suggest that UL8 may be involved in the generation of the X- and Y-branched structures that are the hallmarks of HSV replication. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Enterovirus 71 induces dsRNA/PKR-dependent cytoplasmic redistribution of GRP78/BiP to promote viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Jheng, Jia-Rong; Wang, Shin-Chyang; Jheng, Chao-Rih; Horng, Jim-Tong

    2016-01-01

    GRP78/BiP is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein with the important function of maintaining ER homeostasis, and the overexpression of GRP78/BiP alleviates ER stress. Our previous studies showed that infection with enterovirus 71 (EV71), a (+)RNA picornavirus, induced GRP78/BiP upregulation; however, ectopic GRP78/BiP overexpression in ER downregulates virus replication and viral particle formation. The fact that a virus infection increases GRP78/BiP expression, which is unfavorable for virus replication, is counterintuitive. In this study, we found that the GRP78/BiP protein level was elevated in the cytoplasm instead of in the ER in EV71-infected cells. Cells transfected with polyinosinic–polycytidylic acid, a synthetic analog of replicative double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), but not with viral proteins, also exhibited upregulation and elevation of GRP78/BiP in the cytosol. Our results further demonstrate that EV71 infections induce the dsRNA/protein kinase R-dependent cytosolic accumulation of GRP78/BiP. The overexpression of a GRP78/BiP mutant lacking a KDEL retention signal failed to inhibit both dithiothreitol-induced eIF2α phosphorylation and viral replication in the context of viral protein synthesis and viral titers. These data revealed that EV71 infection might cause upregulation and aberrant redistribution of GRP78/BiP to the cytosol, thereby facilitating virus replication. PMID:27004760

  3. Gastric cancer associated variant of DNA polymerase beta (Leu22Pro) promotes DNA replication associated double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rozacky, Jenna; Nemec, Antoni A.; Sweasy, Joann B.; Kidane, Dawit

    2015-01-01

    DNA polymerase beta (Pol β) is a key enzymefor the protection against oxidative DNA lesions via itsrole in base excision repair (BER). Approximately 1/3 of tumors studied to date express Pol β variant proteins, and several tumors overexpress Pol β. Pol β possesses DNA polymerase and dRP lyase activities, both of which are known to be important for efficient BER. The dRP lyase activity resides within the 8kDa amino terminal domain of Pol β, is responsible for removal of the 5′ phosphate group (5′-dRP). The DNA polymerase subsequently fills the gaps. Previously, we demonstrated that the human gastric cancer-associated variant of Pol β (Leu22Pro (L22P)) lacks dRP lyase function in vitro. Here, we report that L22P-expressing cells harbor significantly increased replication associated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and defective maintenance of the nascent DNA strand (NDS) during replication stress. Moreover, L22P-expressing cells are sensitive to PARP1 inhibitors, which suggests trapped PARP1 binds to the 5′-dRP group and blocks replications forks, resulting in fork collapse and DSBs. Our data suggest that the normal function of the dRP lyase is critical to maintain replication fork integrity and prevent replication fork collapse to DSBs and cellular transformation. PMID:26090616

  4. The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Shy Cian; Razak, Azraul Mumtazah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Makpol, Suzana

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) and α-tocopherol (ATF) in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts. PMID:26885980

  5. E1-Mediated Recruitment of a UAF1-USP Deubiquitinase Complex Facilitates Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Michaël; Gagnon, David

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) E1 helicase promotes viral DNA replication through its DNA unwinding activity and association with host factors. The E1 proteins from anogenital HPV types interact with the cellular WD repeat-containing factor UAF1 (formerly known as p80). Specific amino acid substitutions in E1 that impair this interaction inhibit maintenance of the viral episome in immortalized keratinocytes and reduce viral DNA replication by up to 70% in transient assays. In this study, we determined by affinity purification of UAF1 that it interacts with three deubiquitinating enzymes in C33A cervical carcinoma cells: USP1, a nuclear protein, and the two cytoplasmic enzymes USP12 and USP46. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that E1 assembles into a ternary complex with UAF1 and any one of these three USPs. Moreover, expression of E1 leads to a redistribution of USP12 and USP46 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies further revealed that E1 recruits these threes USPs to the viral origin in association with UAF1. The function of USP1, USP12, and USP46 in viral DNA replication was investigated by overproduction of catalytically inactive versions of these enzymes in transient assays. All three dominant negative USPs reduced HPV31 DNA replication by up to 60%, an effect that was specific, as it was not observed in assays performed with a truncated E1 lacking the UAF1-binding domain or with bovine papillomavirus 1 E1, which does not bind UAF1. These results highlight the importance of the USP1, USP12, and USP46 deubiquitinating enzymes in anogenital HPV DNA replication. IMPORTANCE Human papillomaviruses are small DNA tumor viruses that induce benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosa. HPV types that infect the anogenital tract are the etiological agents of cervical cancer, the majority of anal cancers, and a growing proportion of head-and-neck cancers. Replication of the HPV genome requires the viral

  6. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4 Promotes Japanese Encephalitis Virus Replication by Suppressing Autophagy in Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingqiang; Zhu, Naiwei; Chen, Shenglin; Zhao, Ping; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shiying; Tang, Hailin; Zhu, Yongzhe; Qi, Zhongtian

    2017-03-28

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes the most prevalent viral encephalitis in Asia. Since JEV is a neurotropic virus, it is important to identify key molecules that mediate JEV infection in neuronal cells and to investigate their underlying mechanisms. In this study, the critical role of Nedd4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is highly expressed in the central nervous system, was examined in JEV propagation. In SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells, Nedd4 was up-regulated in response to JEV infection. Moreover, down-regulation of Nedd4 resulted in a significant decrease in JEV replication without alterations in virus attachment and internalization or in JEV pseudotyped virus infection, suggesting that Nedd4 participates in the replication but not in the entry stage of JEV infection. Further functional analysis showed that Nedd4 attenuated JEV-induced autophagy, which negatively regulates virus replication during infection. These results suggest that Nedd4 facilitates the replication of JEV by suppressing virus-induced autophagy. Taken together, our results indicate that Nedd4 plays a crucial role in JEV infection of neuronal cells, which provides a potential target for the development of novel treatment to combat JEV infection.

  7. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4 Promotes Japanese Encephalitis Virus Replication by Suppressing Autophagy in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingqiang; Zhu, Naiwei; Chen, Shenglin; Zhao, Ping; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shiying; Tang, Hailin; Zhu, Yongzhe; Qi, Zhongtian

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes the most prevalent viral encephalitis in Asia. Since JEV is a neurotropic virus, it is important to identify key molecules that mediate JEV infection in neuronal cells and to investigate their underlying mechanisms. In this study, the critical role of Nedd4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is highly expressed in the central nervous system, was examined in JEV propagation. In SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells, Nedd4 was up-regulated in response to JEV infection. Moreover, down-regulation of Nedd4 resulted in a significant decrease in JEV replication without alterations in virus attachment and internalization or in JEV pseudotyped virus infection, suggesting that Nedd4 participates in the replication but not in the entry stage of JEV infection. Further functional analysis showed that Nedd4 attenuated JEV-induced autophagy, which negatively regulates virus replication during infection. These results suggest that Nedd4 facilitates the replication of JEV by suppressing virus-induced autophagy. Taken together, our results indicate that Nedd4 plays a crucial role in JEV infection of neuronal cells, which provides a potential target for the development of novel treatment to combat JEV infection. PMID:28349961

  8. Mu-like prophage strong gyrase site sequences: analysis of properties required for promoting efficient mu DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Oram, Mark; Pato, Martin L

    2004-07-01

    The bacteriophage Mu genome contains a centrally located strong gyrase site (SGS) that is required for efficient prophage replication. To aid in studying the unusual properties of the SGS, we sought other gyrase sites that might be able to substitute for the SGS in Mu replication. Five candidate sites were obtained by PCR from Mu-like prophage sequences present in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18, and two strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Each of the sites was used to replace the natural Mu SGS to form recombinant prophages, and the effects on Mu replication and host lysis were determined. The site from the E. coli prophage supported markedly enhanced replication and host lysis over that observed with a Mu derivative lacking the SGS, those from the N. meningitidis prophages allowed a small enhancement, and the sites from the Haemophilus and Salmonella prophages gave none. Each of the candidate sites was cleaved specifically by E. coli DNA gyrase both in vitro and in vivo. Supercoiling assays performed in vitro, with the five sites or the Mu SGS individually cloned into a pUC19 reporter plasmid, showed that the Mu SGS and the E. coli or N. meningitidis sequences allowed an enhancement of processive, gyrase-dependent supercoiling, whereas the H. influenzae or Salmonella serovar Typhi sequences did not. While consistent with a requirement for enhanced processivity of supercoiling for a site to function in Mu replication, these data suggest that other factors are also important. The relevance of these observations to an understanding of the function of the SGS is discussed. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  9. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  10. Myxoma Virus Protein M029 Is a Dual Function Immunomodulator that Inhibits PKR and Also Conscripts RHA/DHX9 to Promote Expanded Host Tropism and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Masmudur M.; Liu, Jia; Chan, Winnie M.; Rothenburg, Stefan; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV)-encoded protein M029 is a member of the poxvirus E3 family of dsRNA-binding proteins that antagonize the cellular interferon signaling pathways. In order to investigate additional functions of M029, we have constructed a series of targeted M029-minus (vMyx-M029KO and vMyx-M029ID) and V5-tagged M029 MYXV. We found that M029 plays a pivotal role in determining the cellular tropism of MYXV in all mammalian cells tested. The M029-minus viruses were able to replicate only in engineered cell lines that stably express a complementing protein, such as vaccinia E3, but underwent abortive or abated infection in all other tested mammalian cell lines. The M029-minus viruses were dramatically attenuated in susceptible host European rabbits and caused no observable signs of myxomatosis. Using V5-tagged M029 virus, we observed that M029 expressed as an early viral protein is localized in both the nuclear and cytosolic compartments in virus-infected cells, and is also incorporated into virions. Using proteomic approaches, we have identified Protein Kinase R (PKR) and RNA helicase A (RHA)/DHX9 as two cellular binding partners of M029 protein. In virus-infected cells, M029 interacts with PKR in a dsRNA-dependent manner, while binding with DHX9 was not dependent on dsRNA. Significantly, PKR knockdown in human cells rescued the replication defect of the M029-knockout viruses. Unexpectedly, this rescue of M029-minus virus replication by PKR depletion could then be reversed by RHA/DHX9 knockdown in human monocytic THP1 cells. This indicates that M029 not only inhibits generic PKR anti-viral pathways, but also binds and conscripts RHA/DHX9 as a pro-viral effector to promote virus replication in THP1 cells. Thus, M029 is a critical host range and virulence factor for MYXV that is required for replication in all mammalian cells by antagonizing PKR-mediated anti-viral functions, and also conscripts pro-viral RHA/DHX9 to promote viral replication specifically in myeloid

  11. A modified hTERT Promoter-directed Oncolytic Adenovirus Replication with Concurrent Inhibition of TGFβ Signaling for Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zebin; Robbins, John S.; Pister, Amanda; Zafar, M. Behzad; Zhang, Zhen-Wei; Gupta, Janhavi; Lee, K. Jessica; Neuman, Kam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Guise, Theresa; Seth, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Our laboratory is interested to develop oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we have constructed mhTERTAd.sTβRFc, a 01/07 based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of TGFβ receptor II fused with human Fc IgG1 (sTGFβRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc-mediated sTGFβRIIFc production would target growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20-times) in breast cancer cells compared to normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 hrs with mhTERTAd.sTβRFc produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc (greater than 1 μg/ml) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly 6,000-fold increase in the viral titers during 48 hrs infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTβRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication deficient virus Ad(E1-).sTβRFc also produced high levels of sTGFβRIIFc, but under these conditions no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFβRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFβ-1, and abolished the effects of TGFβ-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTβRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft bearing mice resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth, and production of sTGFβRIIFc in the blood. On the other hand, intravenous injection of Ad(E1-).sTβRFc did not exhibit significant inhibition of the tumor growth, but resulted in the sTGFβRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with sTGFβRIIFc protein production play a critical role in inducing

  12. A modified hTERT promoter-directed oncolytic adenovirus replication with concurrent inhibition of TGFbeta signaling for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Robbins, J S; Pister, A; Zafar, M B; Zhang, Z-W; Gupta, J; Lee, K J; Newman, K; Neuman, K; Yun, C-O; Guise, T; Seth, P

    2010-04-01

    We were interested in developing oncolytic adenoviral vectors that can be administered systemically for the treatment of breast cancer. To restrict viral replication in breast tumor cells, we constructed mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc, a 01/07-based adenoviral vector expressing the soluble form of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II fused with the human Fc IgG1 (sTGFbetaRIIFc) gene, in which viral replication is under the control of a modified human telomerase reverse transcriptase (mhTERT) promoter. In addition, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc-mediated sTGFbetaRIIFc production targets the TGFbeta pathway known to contribute to the tumor progression of breast cancer metastasis. We chose to use the mhTERT promoter because it was found to be relatively more active (approximately 20 times) in breast cancer cells compared with normal human cells. We showed that infection of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells for 48 h with mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc (greater than 1 microg ml(-1)) in the medium. Breast cancer cells produced nearly a 6000-fold increase in viral titers during the 48 h infection period. However, mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc replication was attenuated in normal cells. Infection of breast cancer cells with a replication-deficient virus Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc also produced high levels of sTGFbetaRIIFc, but under these conditions, no detectable viral replication was observed. Adenoviral-mediated production of sTGFbetaRIIFc was shown to bind with TGFbeta-1, and to abolish the effects of TGFbeta-1 on downstream SMAD-3 phosphorylation. The administration of mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc intravenously into MDA-MB-231 human xenograft-bearing mice resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth and production of sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood. Conversely, intravenous injection of Ad(E1(-)).sTbetaRFc did not show a significant inhibition of tumor growth, but resulted in sTGFbetaRIIFc in the blood, suggesting that viral replication along with s

  13. Myxoma virus protein M029 is a dual function immunomodulator that inhibits PKR and also conscripts RHA/DHX9 to promote expanded host tropism and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Liu, Jia; Chan, Winnie M; Rothenburg, Stefan; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV)-encoded protein M029 is a member of the poxvirus E3 family of dsRNA-binding proteins that antagonize the cellular interferon signaling pathways. In order to investigate additional functions of M029, we have constructed a series of targeted M029-minus (vMyx-M029KO and vMyx-M029ID) and V5-tagged M029 MYXV. We found that M029 plays a pivotal role in determining the cellular tropism of MYXV in all mammalian cells tested. The M029-minus viruses were able to replicate only in engineered cell lines that stably express a complementing protein, such as vaccinia E3, but underwent abortive or abated infection in all other tested mammalian cell lines. The M029-minus viruses were dramatically attenuated in susceptible host European rabbits and caused no observable signs of myxomatosis. Using V5-tagged M029 virus, we observed that M029 expressed as an early viral protein is localized in both the nuclear and cytosolic compartments in virus-infected cells, and is also incorporated into virions. Using proteomic approaches, we have identified Protein Kinase R (PKR) and RNA helicase A (RHA)/DHX9 as two cellular binding partners of M029 protein. In virus-infected cells, M029 interacts with PKR in a dsRNA-dependent manner, while binding with DHX9 was not dependent on dsRNA. Significantly, PKR knockdown in human cells rescued the replication defect of the M029-knockout viruses. Unexpectedly, this rescue of M029-minus virus replication by PKR depletion could then be reversed by RHA/DHX9 knockdown in human monocytic THP1 cells. This indicates that M029 not only inhibits generic PKR anti-viral pathways, but also binds and conscripts RHA/DHX9 as a pro-viral effector to promote virus replication in THP1 cells. Thus, M029 is a critical host range and virulence factor for MYXV that is required for replication in all mammalian cells by antagonizing PKR-mediated anti-viral functions, and also conscripts pro-viral RHA/DHX9 to promote viral replication specifically in myeloid

  14. Hepatitis C Virus Increases Free Fatty Acids Absorption and Promotes its Replication Via Down-Regulating GADD45α Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Xiao-ming; Li, An-ling; Yang, Gui; Hu, Han-ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as a major cause of chronic hepatic diseases, is always accompanied with an abnormality of lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathogenic role of free fatty acids (FFA) in human HCV infection. Material/Methods Peripheral blood lipid indexes among HCV patients with different viral loads (199 samples) and healthy donors (80 samples) were detected by clinical biochemistry tests. HCV replication and the expression of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible gene 45-α (GADD45α) in Huh7 cells and clinical samples were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Lipid accumulation in Huh7 cells was detected by immunofluorescence. Results In this study, we found that FFA showed a significant positive correlation with viral load in peripheral blood of HCV patients, but not total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). GADD45α expression in HCV patients dramatically decreased with the increase of viral load. In Huh7 cells, FFA treatment significantly enhanced HCV replication. HCV infection inhibited GADD45α expression, and this effect was further enhanced with the presence of FFA treatment. Ectopic expression of GADD45α in HCV-infected Huh7 cells markedly inhibited the absorption of FFA and HCV replication. However, FFA significantly elevated GADD45α expression without HCV infection. Conclusions These results demonstrated that HCV down-regulates GADD45α expression to enhance FFA absorption and thus facilitate its replication. GADD45α is an essential mediator for the pathogenesis of HCV infection. Thus, our study provides potential clues in the search for novel therapeutics and fatty lipid control options for HCV patients. PMID:27381636

  15. Mck2-dependent infection of alveolar macrophages promotes replication of MCMV in nodular inflammatory foci of the neonatal lung.

    PubMed

    Stahl, F R; Keyser, K A; Heller, K; Bischoff, Y; Halle, S; Wagner, K; Messerle, M; Förster, R

    2015-01-01

    Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) shows a worldwide high prevalence with only immunocompromised individuals or newborns to become symptomatic. The host's constitution and the pathogen's virulence determine whether disease occurs after infection. Mouse CMV (MCMV) is an appreciated pathogen for in vivo investigation of host-pathogen interactions. It has recently been reported that a single base pair deletion can spontaneously occur in the open reading frame of MCMV-encoded chemokine 2 (MCK2), preventing the expression of the full-length gene product. To study the consequences of this mutation, we compared the Mck2-defective reporter virus MCMV-3D with the newly generated repaired Mck2(+) mutant MCMV-3DR. Compared with MCMV-3D, neonatal mice infected with MCMV-3DR showed severe viral disease after lung infection. Viral disease coincided with high viral activity in multiple organs and increased virus replication in previously described nodular inflammatory foci (NIF) in the lung. Notably, MCMV-3DR showed tropism for alveolar macrophages in vitro and in vivo, whereas MCMV-3D did not infect this cell type. Moreover, in vivo depletion of alveolar macrophages reduced MCMV-3DR replication in the lung. We proposed an Mck2-mediated mechanism by which MCMV exploits alveolar macrophages to increase replication upon first encounter with the host's lung mucosa.

  16. Episome-carried Surface Antigen K88 of Escherichia coli II. Isolation and Chemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stirm, Stephan; Ørskov, Frits; Ørskov, Ida; Mansa, Bendt

    1967-01-01

    The K88 antigen was carried by episomal transfer to D282, a nonmotile Escherichia coli strain without K antigen. D520, obtained by this episomal transfer, was used for the extraction of K88 antigen. It was shown by the agar gel precipitation technique that some K88 antigen was released from D520 into suspending aqueous medium. The amount of liberated material was increased by gentle heating (60 C) or treatment in a Waring Blendor. The antigen was obtained from the extracts in a purified form by making use of its insolubility between pH 3.5 and 5.5 and of its high sedimentation rate (S020,w = 36.7S). The homogeneity of the material was demonstrated by agar gel precipitation with D520 antiserum, by analytical ultracentrifugation, and by moving-boundary electrophoresis. Chemical analysis revealed that K88 is a pure protein containing all the common amino acids with the exception of cysteine-cystine. Purified K88 selectively precipitated the K88 antibodies from D520 antiserum and was shown to be immunogenic in rabbits. Images PMID:4960185

  17. Derivation, Expansion, and Motor Neuron Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Non-Integrating Episomal Vectors and a Defined Xenogeneic-free Culture System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; He, Yongpei; Xiong, Yongjie; Lu, Hong; Chen, Hong; Hou, Limin; Qiu, Zhandong; Fang, Yu; Zhang, Suming

    2016-04-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from patient-derived somatic cells provides the opportunity for model development in order to study patient-specific disease states with the potential for drug discovery. However, use of lentivirus and exposure of iPSCs to animal-derived products limit their therapeutic utility and affect lineage differentiation and subsequent downstream functionality of iPSC derivatives. Within the context of this study, we describe a simple and practical protocol enabling the efficient reprogramming of terminally differentiated adult fibroblasts into integration-free human iPSCs (hiPSCs) using a combination of episomal plasmids with small molecules (SMs). Using this approach, there was a 10-fold increase in reprogramming efficiency over single plasmid vector-based methods. We obtained approximately 100 iPSCs colonies from 1 × 10(5) human adult dermal fibroblasts (HADFs) and achieved approximately 0.1% reprogramming efficiencies. Concurrently, we developed a highly conducive culture system using xeno-free media and human vitronectin. The resulting hiPSCs were free of DNA integration and had completely lost episomal vectors, maintained long-term self-renewal, featured a normal karyotype, expressed pluripotent stem cell markers, and possessed the capability of differentiating into components of all three germ layers in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that the integration-free hiPSCs could be differentiated into motor neurons under xeno-free culture conditions. This induction method will promote the derivation of patient-specific integration-free and xeno-free iPSCs and improve the strategy for motor neuron derivation. Our approach provides a useful tool for human disease models, drug screen, and clinical applications.

  18. Development and Validation of Non-Integrative, Self-Limited, and Replicating Minicircles for Safe Reporter Gene Imaging of Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ronald, John A.; Cusso, Lorena; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Yan, Xinrui; Dragulescu-Andrasi, Anca; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2013-01-01

    Reporter gene (RG) imaging of cell-based therapies provides a direct readout of therapeutic efficacy by assessing the fate of implanted cells. To permit long-term cellular imaging, RGs are traditionally required to be integrated into the cellular genome. This poses a potential safety risk and regulatory bottleneck for clinical translation as integration can lead to cellular transformation. To address this issue, we have developed non-integrative, replicating minicircles (MCs) as an alternative platform for safer monitoring of cells in living subjects. We developed both plasmids and minicircles containing the scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MAR) of the human interferon-beta gene, driven by the CMV promoter, and expressing the bioluminescence RG firefly luciferase. Constructs were transfected into breast cancer cells, and expanded S/MAR minicircle clones showed luciferase signal for greater than 3 months in culture and minicircles remained as episomes. Importantly, luciferase activity in clonal populations was slowly lost over time and this corresponded to a loss of episome, providing a way to reversibly label cells. To monitor cell proliferation in vivo, 1.5×106 cells carrying the S/MAR minicircle were implanted subcutaneously into mice (n = 5) and as tumors developed significantly more bioluminescence signal was noted at day 35 and 43 compared to day 7 post-implant (p<0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first work examining the use of episomal, self-limited, replicating minicircles to track the proliferation of cells using non-invasive imaging in living subjects. Continued development of S/MAR minicircles will provide a broadly applicable vector platform amenable with any of the numerous RG technologies available to allow therapeutic cell fate to be assessed in individual patients, and to achieve this without the need to manipulate the cell's genome so that safety concerns are minimized. This will lead to safe tools to assess treatment response at

  19. Identification of the transcriptional regulatory sequences of human calponin promoter and their use in targeting a conditionally replicating herpes vector to malignant human soft tissue and bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, H; Hashio, M; Noguchi, M; Sugenoya, Y; Osakada, M; Hirano, N; Sasaki, Y; Yoden, T; Awata, N; Araki, N; Tatsuta, M; Miyatake, S I; Takahashi, K

    2001-05-15

    The calponin (basic or h1) gene, normally expressed in maturated smooth muscle cells, is aberrantly expressed in a variety of human soft tissue and bone tumors. In this study, we show that expression of the calponin gene in human soft tissue and bone tumor cells is regulated at the transcriptional level by the sequence between positions -260 and -219 upstream of the translation initiation site. A novel conditionally replicating herpes simplex virus-1 vector (d12.CALP) in which the calponin promoter drives expression of ICP4, a major trans-activating factor for viral genes was constructed and tested as an experimental treatment for malignant human soft tissue and bone tumors. In cell culture, d12.CALP at low multiplicity of infection (0.001 plaque-forming unit/cell) selectively killed calponin-positive human synovial sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, and osteosarcoma cells. For in vivo studies, 10 animals harboring SK-LMS-1 human leiomyosarcoma cells were randomly divided and treated twice on days 0 and 9 intraneoplastically with either 1 x 10(7) plaque-forming units of d12.CALP/100 mm(3) of tumor volume or with medium alone. The viral treatment group showed stable and significant inhibition of tumorigenicity with apparent cure in four of five mice by day 35. Replication of viral DNA demonstrated by PCR amplification and expression of the inserted LacZ gene visualized by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside histochemistry was associated with oncolysis of d12.CALP-treated tumors, while sparing normal vascular smooth muscle cells. In mice harboring two SK-LMS-1 tumors, replication of d12.CALP was detected in a nontreated tumor distant from the site of virus inoculation. These results indicate that replication-competent virus vectors controlled by the calponin transcriptional regulatory sequence may be a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of malignant human soft tissue and bone tumors.

  20. Autonomous replication of plasmids bearing monkey DNA origin-enriched sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Frappier, L.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M.

    1987-10-01

    Twelve clones of origin-enriched sequences (ORS) isolated from early replicating monkey (CV-1) DNA were examined for transient episomal replication in transfected CV-1, COS-7, and HeLa cells. Plasmid DNA was isolated at time intervals after transfection and screened by the Dpn I resistance assay or by the bromodeoxyuridine substitution assay to differentiate between input and replicated DNA. The authors have identified four monkey ORS (ORS3, -8, -9, and -12) that can support plasmid replication in mammalian cells. This replication is carried out in a controlled and semiconservative manner characteristic of mammalian replicons. ORS replication was most efficient in HeLa cells. Electron microscopy showed ORS8 and ORS12 plasmids of the correct size with replication bubbles. Using a unique restriction site in ORS12, we have mapped the replication bubble within the monkey DNA sequence.

  1. Human Herpesvirus 8 Viral Interleukin-6 Signaling through gp130 Promotes Virus Replication in Primary Effusion Lymphoma and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Emily; Gao, Yang; Sandford, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    The contributions of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6) to virus biology remain unclear. Here we examined the role of vIL-6/gp130 signaling in HHV-8 productive replication in primary effusion lymphoma and endothelial cells. Depletion and depletion-complementation experiments revealed that endoplasmic reticulum-localized vIL-6 activity via gp130 and gp130-activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, was critical for vIL-6 proreplication activity. Our data significantly extend current understanding of vIL-6 function and associated mechanisms in HHV-8 biology. PMID:25078695

  2. The Tanapoxvirus 15L Protein Is a Virus-Encoded Neuregulin That Promotes Viral Replication in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, David; Ma, Zhenzhong; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant; Loeb, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Studies on large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses such as poxviruses have been helpful in identifying a number of viral and cellular growth factors that contribute to our broad understanding of virus-host interaction. Orthopoxviruses and leporipoxviruses are among the most studied viruses in this aspect. However, tanapoxvirus (TPV), a member of the genus Yatapoxvirus, still remains largely unexplored, as the only known hosts for this virus are humans and monkeys. Here, we describe the initial characterization of an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor mimicking human neuregulin from TPV, expressed by the TPV-15L gene. Assays using a baculovirus-expressed and tagged TPV-15L protein demonstrated the ability to phosphorylate neuregulin receptors. Neuregulins represent a large family of EGF-like growth factors that play important roles in embryonic endocardium development, Schwann and oligodendrocyte survival and differentiation, localized acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction, and epithelial morphogenesis. Interestingly, certain neuregulin molecules are able to target specific tissues through interactions with heparin sulfate proteoglycans via an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain. Analyses of TPV-15L revealed no Ig-like domain, but it retains the ability to bind heparin and phosphorylate neuregulin receptors, providing compelling evidence that TPV-15L is a functional mimetic of neuregulin. TPV-15L knockout virus experiments demonstrate that the virus replicates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells less efficiently than wild-type TPV-Kenya, indicating that this is a nonessential protein for virus viability but can serve a stimulatory role for replication in some cultured cells. However, the precise role of this protein in host-virus interaction still remains to be deduced. PMID:23269801

  3. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  4. Comprehensive genetic assessment of a functional TLR9 promoter polymorphism: no replicable association with asthma or asthma-related phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prior studies suggest a role for a variant (rs5743836) in the promoter of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in asthma and other inflammatory diseases. We performed detailed genetic association studies of the functional variant rs5743836 with asthma susceptibility and asthma-related phenotypes in three independent cohorts. Methods rs5743836 was genotyped in two family-based cohorts of children with asthma and a case-control study of adult asthmatics. Association analyses were performed using chi square, family-based and population-based testing. A luciferase assay was performed to investigate whether rs5743836 genotype influences TLR9 promoter activity. Results Contrary to prior reports, rs5743836 was not associated with asthma in any of the three cohorts. Marginally significant associations were found with FEV1 and FVC (p = 0.003 and p = 0.008, respectively) in one of the family-based cohorts, but these associations were not significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. Higher promoter activity of the CC genotype was demonstrated by luciferase assay, confirming the functional importance of this variant. Conclusion Although rs5743836 confers regulatory effects on TLR9 transcription, this variant does not appear to be an important asthma-susceptibility locus. PMID:21324137

  5. Foot-and-mouth disease virus infection inhibits LGP2 protein expression to exaggerate inflammatory response and promote viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zixiang; Li, Chuntian; Du, Xiaoli; Wang, Guoqing; Cao, Weijun; Yang, Fan; Feng, Huanhuan; Zhang, Xiangle; Shi, Zhengwang; Liu, Huanan; Tian, Hong; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2017-01-01

    The role of the innate immune protein LGP2 (laboratory of genetics and physiology 2) in FMDV-infected cells remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate the antiviral role of LGP2 during FMDV infection. FMDV infection triggered LGP2 mRNA expression but reduced protein expression. Overexpression of LGP2 suppressed FMDV replication, and the inflammatory response was significantly inhibited by LGP2 in virus-infected cells. The N-terminal DExDc and the C-terminal regulatory domain regions of LGP2 were essential for LGP2-mediated antiviral activity against FMDV. Disruption of RNA recognition by LGP2 is suggested to abolish completely LGP2-mediated antiviral activity against FMDV. FMDV leader protein (Lpro), as well as the 3Cpro and 2B proteins were determined to possess the ability to induce reduction of LGP2 protein expression. 2B-induced reduction of LGP2 was independent of cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4 gamma; and the proteasomes, lysosomes or caspase-dependent pathways were not involved in this process. The C-terminal amino acids of 101–154 were essential for 2B-induced reduction of LGP2 and upregulation of inflammatory response. Direct interaction was demonstrated between LGP2 and 2B. Our results describe the antiviral role of LGP2 against FMDV and a novel antagonistic mechanism of FMDV that is mediated by 2B protein. PMID:28406479

  6. β-lactam antibiotics promote bacterial mutagenesis via an RpoS-mediated reduction in replication fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, A.; Laureti, L.; Crussard, S.; Abida, H.; Rodríguez-Rojas, A.; Blázquez, J.; Baharoglu, Z.; Mazel, D.; Darfeuille, F.; Vogel, J.; Matic, I.

    2013-01-01

    Regardless of their targets and modes of action, subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics can have an impact on cell physiology and trigger a large variety of cellular responses in different bacterial species. Subinhibitory concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics cause reactive oxygen species production and induce PolIV-dependent mutagenesis in Escherichia coli. Here we show that subinhibitory concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics induce the RpoS regulon. RpoS-regulon induction is required for PolIV-dependent mutagenesis because it diminishes the control of DNA-replication fidelity by depleting MutS in E. coli, Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that in E. coli, the reduction in mismatch-repair activity is mediated by SdsR, the RpoS-controlled small RNA. In summary, we show that mutagenesis induced by subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics is a genetically controlled process. Because this mutagenesis can generate mutations conferring antibiotic resistance, it should be taken into consideration for the development of more efficient antimicrobial therapeutic strategies. PMID:23511474

  7. Violent Offending Promotes Appetitive Aggression Rather than Posttraumatic Stress—A Replication Study with Burundian Ex-Combatants

    PubMed Central

    Köbach, Anke; Nandi, Corina; Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé; Westner, Britta; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified appetitive aggression, i.e., the perception of committed, violent acts as appealing, exciting and fascinating, as a common phenomenon within populations living in precarious and violent circumstances. Investigating demobilized soldiers in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) demonstrated that violent offending is associated with appetitive aggression and not necessarily with symptoms of posttraumatic stress. In the present study, we sought to replicate these results in an independent and larger sample of demobilized soldiers from Burundi. As with the Congolese ex-combatants, random forest regression revealed that the number of lifetime perpetrated violent acts is the most important predictor of appetitive aggression and the number of lifetime experienced traumatic events is the main predictor for posttraumatic stress. Perpetrated violent acts with salient cues of hunting (pursuing the victim, the sight of blood, etc.) were most predictive for perceiving violent cues appealingly after demobilization. Moreover, the association of violent acts and appetitive aggression as well as traumatic events and posttraumatic stress remains strong even years after demobilization. Patterns of traumatic events and perpetrated acts as predictors for posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression seem to be robust among different samples of ex-combatants who fought in civil wars. Psychotherapeutic interventions that address these complementary facets of combat-related disorders—namely, posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression—are indispensable for a successful reintegration of those who fought in armed conflicts and to achieve a successful transition to peace. PMID:26696913

  8. H3K9/36me3 Demethylase KDM4A Promotes Site-Specific Copy Gain and Re-replication of Regions Amplified in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Black, Joshua C.; Manning, Amity; Van Rechem, Capucine; Kim, Jaegil; Ladd, Brendon; Cho, Juok; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Murphy, Nancy; Daniels, Danette L.; Montagna, Cristina; Lewis, Peter W.; Glass, Kimberly; Allis, C. David; Dyson, Nicholas J.; Getz, Gad; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acquired chromosomal instability and copy number alterations are hallmarks of cancer. Enzymes capable of promoting site-specific copy number changes have yet to be identified. Here, we demonstrate that H3K9/36me3 lysine demethylase KDM4A/JMJD2A overexpression leads to localized copy gain of 1q12, 1q21, and Xq13.1 without global chromosome instability. KDM4A amplified tumors have increased copy gains for these same regions. 1q12h copy gain occurs within a single cell cycle, requires S phase and is not stable but regenerated each cell division. Sites with increased copy number are re-replicated and have increased KDM4A, MCM and DNA polymerase occupancy. Suv39h1/KMT1A or HP1γ overexpression suppresses the copy gain, while H3K9/K36 methylation interference promotes gain. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of a chromatin modifier results in site-specific copy gains. This begins to establish how copy number changes could originate during tumorigenesis and demonstrates that transient overexpression of specific chromatin modulators could promote these events. PMID:23871696

  9. Repression of the HIV-1 5′ LTR promoter and inhibition of HIV-1 replication by using engineered zinc-finger transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lindsey; Ullman, Christopher; Moore, Michael; Isalan, Mark; West, Michelle J.; Clapham, Paul; Klug, Aaron; Choo, Yen

    2003-01-01

    Zinc finger domains are small DNA-binding modules that can be engineered to bind desired target sequences. Functional transcription factors can be made from these DNA-binding modules, by fusion with an appropriate effector domain. In this study, eight three-zinc-finger proteins (ZFPs) that bound HIV-1 sequences in vitro were engineered into transcription repressors by linking them to the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) repressor domain (KOX1). One protein, ZFP HIVB-KOX, which bound to a 9-bp region overlapping two Sp1 sites, was found to repress a Tat-activated 5′ LTR cellular HIV-reporter assay to almost basal levels. A related six-finger protein, HIVBA′-KOX, was made to target all three Sp1 sites in the 5′ LTR promoter and efficiently inhibited both basal and Tat-activated transcription in unstimulated and mitogen-stimulated T cells. In contrast, a combination of two unlinked three-finger ZFPs, HIVA′-KOX and HIVB-KOX, which bind over the same region of DNA, resulted in less effective repression. Finally, HIVBA′-KOX was tested for its capacity to block viral replication in a cellular infection assay using the HIV-1 HXB2 strain. This ZFP was found to inhibit HIV-1 replication by 75% compared with control constructs, thus demonstrating the potential of this approach for antiviral therapy. PMID:12574502

  10. The Redox-sensitive Induction of the Local Angiotensin System Promotes Both Premature and Replicative Endothelial Senescence: Preventive Effect of a Standardized Crataegus Extract.

    PubMed

    Khemais-Benkhiat, Sonia; Idris-Khodja, Noureddine; Ribeiro, Thais Porto; Silva, Grazielle Caroline; Abbas, Malak; Kheloufi, Marouane; Lee, Jung-Ok; Toti, Florence; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2016-12-01

    Endothelial senescence, characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress, and downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), has been shown to promote endothelial dysfunction leading to the development of age-related vascular disorders. This study has assessed the possibility that the local angiotensin system promotes endothelial senescence in coronary artery endothelial cells and also the protective effect of the Crataegus extract WS1442, a quantified hawthorn extract. Serial passaging from P1 to P4 (replicative senescence) and treatment of P1 endothelial cells with the eNOS inhibitor L-NAME (premature senescence) promoted acquisition of markers of senescence, enhanced ROS formation, decreased eNOS expression, and upregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and AT1 receptors. Increased SA-β-gal activity and the upregulation of ACE and AT1R in senescent cells were prevented by antioxidants, an ACE inhibitor, and by an AT1 receptor blocker. WS1442 prevented SA-β-gal activity, the downregulation of eNOS, and oxidative stress in P3 cells. These findings indicate that the impairment of eNOS-derived nitric oxide formation favors a pro-oxidant response triggering the local angiotensin system, which, in turn, promotes endothelial senescence. Such a sequence of events can be effectively inhibited by a standardized polyphenol-rich extract mainly by targeting the oxidative stress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Rev1 promotes replication through UV lesions in conjunction with DNA polymerases η, ι, and κ but not DNA polymerase ζ

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Jeseong; Conde, Juan; Wakamiya, Maki; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases (Pols) promote replication through DNA lesions; however, little is known about the protein factors that affect their function in human cells. In yeast, Rev1 plays a noncatalytic role as an indispensable component of Polζ, and Polζ together with Rev1 mediates a highly mutagenic mode of TLS. However, how Rev1 functions in TLS and mutagenesis in human cells has remained unclear. Here we determined the role of Rev1 in TLS opposite UV lesions in human and mouse fibroblasts and showed that Rev1 is indispensable for TLS mediated by Polη, Polι, and Polκ but is not required for TLS by Polζ. In contrast to its role in mutagenic TLS in yeast, Rev1 promotes predominantly error-free TLS opposite UV lesions in humans. The identification of Rev1 as an indispensable scaffolding component for Polη, Polι, and Polκ, which function in TLS in highly specialized ways opposite a diverse array of DNA lesions and act in a predominantly error-free manner, implicates a crucial role for Rev1 in the maintenance of genome stability in humans. PMID:26680302

  12. AcMNPV-mediated expression of BmK IT promotes the apoptosis of Sf9 cells and replication of AcMNPV.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yue-Jun; Zhao, Jie; Liang, Ai-Hua; Hu, Feng-Yun

    2015-06-25

    Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmK) venom is a rich source of neurotoxins which bind to various ion channels with high affinity and specificity and thus widely used as compounds to modulate channel gating or channel currents. To promote the insecticidal effects of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), the gene encoding an excitatory insect toxin, BmK IT, was inserted into the genome of AcMNPV to construct a recombinant baculovirus, AcMNPV-BmK IT. Spodopter frugiperda 9 (Sf9) cells were infected with AcMNPV and AcMNPV-BmK IT respectively for 24 h. Results from the MTT assay, TUNEL assay, analysis of the expression level of apoptosis-related proteins (c-Myc, cleaved-Caspase3, Bcl-2 and Bax) of Sf9 cells, the transcription level of key genes (38K, C42, P78, F) of AcMNPV, and viral propagation assay demonstrated that AcMNPV-mediated expression of BmK IT promoted the apoptosis of Sf9 cells and replication of AcMNPV. The results laid a foundation for further structural and functional analysis of BmK IT.

  13. A sequence in the Drosophila H3-H4 promoter triggers 1 Histone Locus Body assembly and biosynthesis of replication-coupled histone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Salzler, Harmony R.; Tatomer, Deirdre C.; Malek, Pamela Y.; McDaniel, Stephen L.; Orlando, Anna N.; Marzluff, William F.; Duronio, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Compartmentalization of RNA biosynthetic factors into nuclear bodies (NBs) is a ubiquitous feature of eukaryotic cells. How NBs initially assemble and ultimately affect gene expression remains unresolved. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors necessary for replication-coupled histone mRNA transcription and processing and associates with histone gene clusters. Using a transgenic assay for ectopic Drosophila HLB assembly, we show that a sequence located between, and transcription from, the divergently transcribed H3-H4 genes nucleates HLB formation and activates other histone genes in the histone gene cluster. In the absence of transcription from the H3-H4 promoter, “proto-HLBs”, containing only a subset of HLB components, form and the adjacent histone H2a-H2b genes are not expressed. Proto-HLBs also transiently form in mutant embryos with the histone locus deleted. We conclude that HLB assembly occurs through a stepwise process involving stochastic interactions of individual components that localize to a specific sequence in the H3-H4 promoter. PMID:23537633

  14. Some Characteristics of the Resistance Transfer Factor (RTF) Episome as Determined by Inactivation with Tritium, P32, and Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Robert B.; Ginoza, Herbert S.

    1966-01-01

    The resistance transfer factor (RTF) episome was studied by measuring its inactivation by Co60 gamma radiation, by incorporated P32, and by tritium incorporated as tritium-labeled thymine. The D37 for Co60 irradiation was 7 to 9 × 104 rad. Growth of the bacteria harboring the RTF in BUdR (bromouracil deoxyriboside) increased the sensitivity of the RTF to the gamma radiation. The RTF was markedly inactivated by tritium after growth of the host (thymine requiring) bacteria in tritium-labeled thymine, thus further establishing the presence of thymine in the genome of the RTF. Assuming the efficiency of inactivation by P32 to be 10%, the phosphorus content of the RTF was estimated to be about 2 × 105 P atoms/episome. The data suggest the RTF contains double stranded DNA with a molecular weight of the order of 3 to 8 × 107. PMID:5335449

  15. The Replicative Consequences of Papillomavirus E2 Protein Binding to the Origin Replication Factor ORC2.

    PubMed

    DeSmet, Marsha; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Rietz, Anne; Wu, Wai-Hong; Roden, Richard; Androphy, Elliot J

    2016-10-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) coordinates a series of events that lead to initiation of DNA strand duplication. As a nuclear double stranded DNA plasmid, the papillomavirus (PV) genome resembles a mini-chromosome in infected cells. To initiate its replication, the viral E2 protein binds to and recruits the E1 DNA helicase at the viral origin. PV genome replication program exhibits three stages: initial amplification from a single genome upon infection to a few copies per cell, a cell cycle linked maintenance phase, and a differentiation dependent late stage where the genome is amplified to thousands of copies. Involvement of ORC or other pre-replication complex (pre-RC) factors has not been described. We report that human PV (HPV) and bovine PV (BPV-1) E2 proteins bind to ORC2, however, ORC2 was not detected at the viral origin. Depletion of ORC2 enhanced PV replication in a transient replication model and in keratinocytes stably maintaining viral episomes, while there was no effect on copy number in a cell line with integrated HPV genomes. Consistent with this, occupancy of E1 and E2 at the viral origin increased following ORC2 silencing. These data imply that ORC2 is not necessary for activation of the PV origin by E1 and E2 but instead suppresses E2 replicative function. Furthermore, we observed that over-expression of HPV E2 decreased ORC2 occupation at two known mammalian origins of replication, suggesting that E2 restricts pre-ORC assembly that could otherwise compete for host replication complexes necessary for viral genome amplification. We infer that the ORC2 complex with E2 restricts viral replication in the maintenance phase of the viral replication program and that elevated levels of E2 that occur during the differentiation dependent amplification stage subvert ORC loading and hence DNA synthesis at cellular origins.

  16. Pathways of mammalian replication fork restart.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Single-molecule analyses of DNA replication have greatly advanced our understanding of mammalian replication restart. Several proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery promote the efficient restart of replication forks that have been stalled by replication inhibitors, suggesting that bona fide fork restart pathways exist in mammalian cells. Different models of replication fork restart can be envisaged, based on the involvement of DNA helicases, nucleases, homologous recombination factors and the importance of DNA double-strand break formation.

  17. Cellular Protein WDR11 Interacts with Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Proteins at the trans-Golgi Network To Promote Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryne E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been proposed that the herpes simplex virus (HSV) protein ICP0 has cytoplasmic roles in blocking antiviral signaling and in promoting viral replication in addition to its well-known proteasome-dependent functions in the nucleus. However, the mechanisms through which it produces these effects remain unclear. While investigating this further, we identified a novel cytoplasmic interaction between ICP0 and the poorly characterized cellular protein WDR11. During an HSV infection, WDR11 undergoes a dramatic change in localization at late times in the viral replication cycle, moving from defined perinuclear structures to a dispersed cytoplasmic distribution. While this relocation was not observed during infection with viruses other than HSV-1 and correlated with efficient HSV-1 replication, the redistribution was found to occur independently of ICP0 expression, instead requiring viral late gene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that WDR11 is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it interacts specifically with some, but not all, HSV virion components, in addition to ICP0. Knockdown of WDR11 in cultured human cells resulted in a modest but consistent decrease in yields of both wild-type and ICP0-null viruses, in the supernatant and cell-associated fractions, without affecting viral gene expression. Although further study is required, we propose that WDR11 participates in viral assembly and/or secondary envelopment. IMPORTANCE While the TGN has been proposed to be the major site of HSV-1 secondary envelopment, this process is incompletely understood, and in particular, the role of cellular TGN components in this pathway is unknown. Additionally, little is known about the cellular functions of WDR11, although the disruption of this protein has been implicated in multiple human diseases. Therefore, our finding that WDR11 is a TGN-resident protein that interacts with specific viral proteins to enhance viral yields improves both

  18. Cross-species conservation of episome maintenance provides a basis for in vivo investigation of Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus LANA.

    PubMed

    Habison, Aline C; de Miranda, Marta Pires; Beauchemin, Chantal; Tan, Min; Cerqueira, Sofia A; Correia, Bruno; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Usherwood, Edward J; McVey, Colin E; Simas, J Pedro; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2017-09-01

    Many pathogens, including Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), lack tractable small animal models. KSHV persists as a multi-copy, nuclear episome in latently infected cells. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (kLANA) binds viral terminal repeat (kTR) DNA to mediate episome persistence. Model pathogen murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) mLANA acts analogously on mTR DNA. kLANA and mLANA differ substantially in size and kTR and mTR show little sequence conservation. Here, we find kLANA and mLANA act reciprocally to mediate episome persistence of TR DNA. Further, kLANA rescued mLANA deficient MHV68, enabling a chimeric virus to establish latent infection in vivo in germinal center B cells. The level of chimeric virus in vivo latency was moderately reduced compared to WT infection, but WT or chimeric MHV68 infected cells had similar viral genome copy numbers as assessed by immunofluorescence of LANA intranuclear dots or qPCR. Thus, despite more than 60 Ma of evolutionary divergence, mLANA and kLANA act reciprocally on TR DNA, and kLANA functionally substitutes for mLANA, allowing kLANA investigation in vivo. Analogous chimeras may allow in vivo investigation of genes of other human pathogens.

  19. Immunodiagnosis of episomal Banana streak MY virus using polyclonal antibodies to an expressed putative coat protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Kumar, P Vignesh; Baranwal, Virendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    A cryptic Badnavirus species complex, known as banana streak viruses (BSV) poses a serious threat to banana production and genetic improvement worldwide. Due to the presence of integrated BSV sequences in the banana genome, routine detection is largely based on serological and nucleo-serological diagnostic methods which require high titre specific polyclonal antiserum. Viral structural proteins like coat protein (CP) are the best target for in vitro expression, to be used as antigen for antiserum production. However, in badnaviruses precise CP sequences are not known. In this study, two putative CP coding regions (p48 and p37) of Banana streak MY virus (BSMYV) were identified in silico by comparison with caulimoviruses, retroviruses and Rice tungro bacilliform virus. The putative CP coding region (p37) was in vitro expressed in pMAL system and affinity purified. The purified fusion protein was used as antigen for raising polyclonal antiserum in rabbit. The specificity of antiserum was confirmed in Western blots, immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and antigen coated plate-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ACP-ELISA). The antiserum (1:2000) was successfully used in ACP-ELISA for specific detection of BSMYV infection in field and tissue culture raised banana plants. The antiserum was also utilized in immuno-capture PCR (IC-PCR) based indexing of episomal BSMYV infection. This is the first report of in silico identification of putative CP region of BSMYV, production of polyclonal antiserum against recombinant p37 and its successful use in immunodetection.

  20. A Versatile Transreplication-Based System To Identify Cellular Proteins Involved in Geminivirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Morilla, Gabriel; Castillo, Araceli G.; Preiss, Werner; Jeske, Holger; Bejarano, Eduardo R.

    2006-01-01

    A versatile green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression cassette containing the replication origins of the monopartite begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) is described. Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants containing one copy of the cassette stably integrated into their genome were superinfected with TYLCSV, which mobilized and replicated the cassette as an episomal replicon. The expression of the reporter gene (the GFP gene) was thereby modified. Whereas GFP fluorescence was dimmed in the intercostal areas, an increase of green fluorescence in veins of all leaves placed above the inoculation site, as well as in transport tissues of roots and stems, was observed. The release of episomal trans replicons from the transgene and the increase in GFP expression were dependent on the cognate geminiviral replication-associated protein (Rep) and required interaction between Rep and the intergenic region of TYLCSV. This expression system is able to monitor the replication status of TYLCSV in plants, as induction of GFP expression is only produced in those tissues where Rep is present. To further confirm this notion, the expression of a host factor required for geminivirus replication, the proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) was transiently silenced. Inhibition of PCNA prevented GFP induction in veins and reduced viral DNA. We propose that these plants could be widely used to easily identify host factors required for geminivirus replication by virus-induced gene silencing. PMID:16537630

  1. Effects of Friedreich's ataxia GAA repeats on DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandok, Gurangad S.; Patel, Mayank P.; Mirkin, Sergei M.

    2012-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a common hereditary degenerative neuro-muscular disorder caused by expansions of the (GAA)n repeat in the first intron of the frataxin gene. The expanded repeats from parents frequently undergo further significant length changes as they are passed on to progeny. Expanded repeats also show an age-dependent instability in somatic cells, albeit on a smaller scale than during intergenerational transmissions. Here we studied the effects of (GAA)n repeats of varying lengths and orientations on the episomal DNA replication in mammalian cells. We have recently shown that the very first round of the transfected DNA replication occurs in the lack of the mature chromatin, does not depend on the episomal replication origin and initiates at multiple single-stranded regions of plasmid DNA. We now found that expanded GAA repeats severely block this first replication round post plasmid transfection, while the subsequent replication cycles are only mildly affected. The fact that GAA repeats affect various replication modes in a different way might shed light on their differential expansions characteristic for FRDA. PMID:22262734

  2. Enhanced Viral Replication by Cellular Replicative Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Ae; Seong, Rak-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular replicative senescence is a major contributing factor to aging and to the development and progression of aging-associated diseases. In this study, we sought to determine viral replication efficiency of influenza virus (IFV) and Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) infection in senescent cells. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) or human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were allowed to undergo numbers of passages to induce replicative senescence. Induction of replicative senescence in cells was validated by positive senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Increased susceptibility to both IFV and VZV infection was observed in senescent HBE and HDF cells, respectively, resulting in higher numbers of plaque formation, along with the upregulation of major viral antigen expression than that in the non-senescent cells. Interestingly, mRNA fold induction level of virus-induced type I interferon (IFN) was attenuated by senescence, whereas IFN-mediated antiviral effect remained robust and potent in virus-infected senescent cells. Additionally, we show that a longevity-promoting gene, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), has antiviral role against influenza virus infection. In conclusion, our data indicate that enhanced viral replication by cellular senescence could be due to senescence-mediated reduction of virus-induced type I IFN expression. PMID:27799874

  3. EAT-UP™ Family-Centered Feeding Intervention to Promote Food Acceptance and Decrease Challenging Behaviors: A Single-Case Experimental Design Replicated across Three Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosbey, Joanna; Muldoon, Deirdre

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a family-centered feeding intervention, Easing Anxiety Together with Understanding and Perseverance (EAT-UP™), for promoting food acceptance of children with autism spectrum disorder at home. A concurrent multiple-baseline design was used with systematic replication across three families. Baseline was…

  4. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway of a vector insect is activated by virus capsid protein and promotes viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Wan; Li, Jing; Luo, Lan; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2017-01-01

    No evidence has shown whether insect-borne viruses manipulate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway of vector insects. Using a system comprising the plant virus Rice stripe virus (RSV) and its vector insect, the small brown planthopper, we have studied the response of the vector insect’s JNK pathway to plant virus infection. We found that RSV increased the level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and decreased the level of G protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) in the insect vector. The virus capsid protein competitively bound GPS2 to release it from inhibiting the JNK activation machinery. We confirmed that JNK activation promoted RSV replication in the vector, whereas JNK inhibition caused a significant reduction in virus production and thus delayed the disease incidence of plants. These findings suggest that inhibition of insect vector JNK may be a useful strategy for controling the transmission of plant viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26591.001 PMID:28716183

  5. Binding sites for the herpes simplex virus immediate-early protein ICP4 impose an increased dependence on viral DNA replication on simple model promoters located in the viral genome.

    PubMed Central

    Koop, K E; Duncan, J; Smiley, J R

    1993-01-01

    We examined the ability of binding sites for the herpes simplex virus immediate-early protein ICP4 to alter the regulation of closely linked promoters by placing strong ICP4 binding sites upstream or downstream of simple TATA promoters in the intact viral genome. We found that binding sites strongly reduced the levels of expression at early times postinfection and that this effect was partially overcome after the onset of viral DNA replication. These data confirm that DNA-bound ICP4 can inhibit the activity of a closely linked promoter and raise the possibility that ICP4 binding sites contribute to temporal regulation during infection. Images PMID:8230448

  6. Genetic modification of dividing cells using episomally maintained S/MAR DNA vectors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suet-Ping; Harbottle, Richard Paul

    2013-08-13

    The development of episomally maintained DNA vectors to genetically modify dividing cells efficiently and stably, without the risk of integration-mediated genotoxicity, should prove to be a valuable tool in genetic research. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Region (S/MAR) DNA vectors to model the restoration of a functional wild-type copy of the gene folliculin (FLCN) implicated in the renal cancer Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD). Inactivation of FLCN has been shown to be involved in the development of sporadic renal neoplasia in BHD. S/MAR-modified BHD tumor cells (named UOK257-FS) show restored stable FLCN expression and have normalized downstream TGFβ signals. We demonstrate that UOK257-FS cells show a reduced growth rate in vitro and suppression of xenograft tumor development in vivo, compared with the original FLCN-null UOK257 cell line. In addition, we demonstrate that mTOR signaling in serum-starved FLCN-restored cells is differentially regulated compared with the FLCN-deficient cell. The novel UOK257-FS cell line will be useful for studying the signaling pathways affected in BHD pathogenesis. Significantly, this study demonstrates the suitability of S/MAR vectors to successfully model the functional expression of a therapeutic gene in a cancer cell line and will aid the identification of novel cancer markers for diagnosis and therapy.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e115; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.40; published online 13 August 2013.

  7. A Regulatory Element Near the 3′ End of the Adeno-Associated Virus rep Gene Inhibits Adenovirus Replication in cis by Means of p40 Promoter-Associated Short Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Eva; Gonsior, Melanie; Stutika, Catrin; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has long been known to inhibit helper adenovirus (Ad) replication independently of AAV Rep protein expression. More recently, replication of Ad serotype 5 (Ad5)/AAV serotype 2 (AAV-2) hybrid vectors was shown to be inhibited in cis by a sequence near the 3′ end of AAV rep, termed the Rep inhibition sequence for adenoviral replication (RIS-Ad). RIS-Ad functions independently of Rep protein expression. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of adenoviral replication by RIS-Ad requires an active AAV p40 promoter and the 5′ half of the intron. In addition, Ad inhibition is critically dependent on the integrity of the p40 transcription start site (TSS) leading to short p40-associated transcripts. These do not give rise to effector molecules capable of inhibiting adenoviral replication in trans, like small polypeptides or microRNAs. Our data point to an inhibitory mechanism in which RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pauses directly downstream of the p40 promoter, leading to interference of the stalled Pol II transcription complex with the adenoviral replication machinery. Whereas inhibition by RIS-Ad is mediated exclusively in cis, it can be overcome by providing a replication-competent adenoviral genome in trans. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of RIS-Ad is not limited to AAV-2 but could also be shown for the corresponding regions of other AAV serotypes, including AAV-5. These findings have important implications for the future generation of Ad5/AAV hybrid vectors. IMPORTANCE Insertion of sequences from the 3′ part of the rep gene of adeno-associated virus (AAV) into the genome of its helper adenovirus strongly reduces adenoviral genome replication. We could show that this inhibition is mediated exclusively in cis without the involvement of trans-acting regulatory RNAs or polypeptides but nevertheless requires an active AAV-2 p40 promoter and p40-associated short transcripts. Our results suggest a novel inhibitory mechanism that has so

  8. Differential regulation of the overlapping Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus vGCR (orf74) and LANA (orf73) promoters.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J; Papin, J; Dittmer, D

    2001-02-01

    Similar to that of other herpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) lytic replication destroys the host cell, while the virus can persist in a latent state in synchrony with the host. During latency only a few genes are transcribed, and the question becomes one of what determines latent versus lytic gene expression. Here we undertake a detailed analysis of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA [orf73]) promoter (LANAp). We characterized a minimal region that is necessary and sufficient to maintain high-level transcription in all tissues tested, including primary endothelial cells and B cells, which are the suspected natural host for KSHV. We show that in transient-transfection assays LANAp mimics the expression pattern observed for the authentic promoter in the context of the KSHV episome. Unlike other KSHV promoters tested thus far, LANAp is not affected by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate or viral lytic cycle functions. It is, however, subject to control by LANA itself and cellular regulatory factors, such as p53. This is in contrast to the K14/vGCR (orf74) promoter, which overlaps LANAp and directs transcription on the opposite strand. We isolated a minimal cis-regulatory region sufficient for K14/vGCR promoter activity and show that it, too, mimics the regulation observed for the authentic viral promoter. In particular, we demonstrate that its activity is absolutely dependent on the immediate-early transactivator orf50, the KSHV homolog of the Epstein-Barr virus Rta transactivator.

  9. Autonomous replicating sequences from mouse cells which can replicate in mouse cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, H; Itani, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M

    1987-01-01

    We have already reported that the cloned mouse DNA fragment (pMU65) could replicate in a simian virus 40 T antigen-dependent system in vivo and in vitro (H. Ariga, Z. Tsuchihashi, M. Naruto, and M. Yamada, Mol. Cell. Biol. 5:563-568, 1985). The plasmid p65-tk, containing the thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus and the BglII-EcoRI region of pMU65 homologous to the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication, was constructed. The p65-tk persisted episomally in tk+ transformants after the transfection of p65-tk into mouse FM3Atk- cells. The copy numbers of p65-tk in FM3Atk+ cells were 100 to 200 copies per cell. Furthermore, the p65-tk replicated semiconservatively, and the initiation of DNA replication started from the mouse DNA sequences when the replicating activity of p65-tk was tested in the in vitro DNA replication system developed from the FM3A cells. These results show that a 2.5-kilobase fragment of mouse DNA contains the autonomously replicating sequences. Images PMID:3031448

  10. DNA Replication Origins

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Alan C.; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression. PMID:23838439

  11. The Stealth Episome: Suppression of Gene Expression on the Excised Genomic Island PPHGI-1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Scott A. C.; Lovell, Helen C.; Mansfield, John W.; Corry, David S.; Jackson, Robert W.; Arnold, Dawn L.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is the causative agent of halo blight in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. P. syringae pv. phaseolicola race 4 strain 1302A contains the avirulence gene avrPphB (syn. hopAR1), which resides on PPHGI-1, a 106 kb genomic island. Loss of PPHGI-1 from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A following exposure to the hypersensitive resistance response (HR) leads to the evolution of strains with altered virulence. Here we have used fluorescent protein reporter systems to gain insight into the mobility of PPHGI-1. Confocal imaging of dual-labelled P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A strain, F532 (dsRFP in chromosome and eGFP in PPHGI-1), revealed loss of PPHGI-1::eGFP encoded fluorescence during plant infection and when grown in vitro on extracted leaf apoplastic fluids. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of fluorescent and non-fluorescent PPHGI-1::eGFP F532 populations showed that cells lost fluorescence not only when the GI was deleted, but also when it had excised and was present as a circular episome. In addition to reduced expression of eGFP, quantitative PCR on sub-populations separated by FACS showed that transcription of other genes on PPHGI-1 (avrPphB and xerC) was also greatly reduced in F532 cells harbouring the excised PPHGI-1::eGFP episome. Our results show how virulence determinants located on mobile pathogenicity islands may be hidden from detection by host surveillance systems through the suppression of gene expression in the episomal state. PMID:21483484

  12. Cytotoxic effect of a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector with cytosine deaminase gene driven by L-plastin promoter in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kihwa; Kim, Sunja; Lee, Kyumhyang; Kim, Changmin; Chung, Injae

    2007-06-01

    Great expectations are set on gene therapy for the treatment of malignant hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) in East Asia. Recombinant adenoviral vectors (AV) have been developed in which the L-plastin promoter (LP) regulates the expression of transgenes, in a tumor cell specific manner, resulting in an increase in the therapeutic index. The development of the AdLPCD vector, a replication-incompetent AV, containing a transcription unit of LP and E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD), was reported in our previous work. In the present study, the AdLPCD vector combined with 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) administration was tested to see if it might have significant utility in the chemosensitization of L-plastin positive HCC. Four HCC cell lines (HepG2, Chang Liver, Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells) were investigated for the expression of LacZ after infecting the cells with the AdLPLacZ vector containing a 2.4 kb fragment of LP and the LacZ gene. Relatively high levels of LP activity were detected in HepG2, followed by Chang Liver cells; whereas, no promoter activity was found in Huh-7 and SK-Hep-1 cells, as determined by AdLPLacZ infection followed by the beta-galactosidase assay. In addition, the results of RT-PCR assays for the detection of endogenous L-plastin mRNA in these cells lines correlated well with those of the beta-galactosidase activity after infection with AdLPLacZ. Based on these data, the cytotoxic effect of AdLPCD/5-FC was evaluated in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that the CD gene delivered by AV could sensitize HepG2 cells to the prodrug, 5-FC. However, the observed effects were insufficient to cause the death of most of cells. This suggests that the screening of patients for an AdLP/5-FC strategy based on AdLPLacZ data might not always guarantee a good therapeutic outcome.

  13. Episomal plasmid-based generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from fetal femur-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Megges, Matthias; Oreffo, Richard O C; Adjaye, James

    2016-01-01

    Human bone mesenchymal stromal cells derived from fetal femur 55 days post-conception were reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells using episomal plasmid-based expression of OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28, SV40LT, KLF4 and c-MYC and supplemented with the following pathway inhibitors - TGFβ receptor inhibitor (A-83-01), MEK inhibitor (PD325901), GSK3β inhibitor (CHIR99021) and ROCK inhibitor (HA-100). Successful induction of pluripotency in two iPS-cell lines was demonstrated in vitro and by the Pluritest.

  14. H3K4me3 demethylation by the histone demethylase KDM5C/JARID1C promotes DNA replication origin firing.

    PubMed

    Rondinelli, Beatrice; Schwerer, Hélène; Antonini, Elena; Gaviraghi, Marco; Lupi, Alessio; Frenquelli, Michela; Cittaro, Davide; Segalla, Simona; Lemaitre, Jean-Marc; Tonon, Giovanni

    2015-03-11

    DNA replication is a tightly regulated process that initiates from multiple replication origins and leads to the faithful transmission of the genetic material. For proper DNA replication, the chromatin surrounding origins needs to be remodeled. However, remarkably little is known on which epigenetic changes are required to allow the firing of replication origins. Here, we show that the histone demethylase KDM5C/JARID1C is required for proper DNA replication at early origins. JARID1C dictates the assembly of the pre-initiation complex, driving the binding to chromatin of the pre-initiation proteins CDC45 and PCNA, through the demethylation of the histone mark H3K4me3. Fork activation and histone H4 acetylation, additional early events involved in DNA replication, are not affected by JARID1C downregulation. All together, these data point to a prominent role for JARID1C in a specific phase of DNA replication in mammalian cells, through its demethylase activity on H3K4me3.

  15. Virus-specific antibodies allow viral replication in the marginal zone, thereby promoting CD8+ T-cell priming and viral control

    PubMed Central

    Duhan, Vikas; Khairnar, Vishal; Friedrich, Sarah-Kim; Zhou, Fan; Gassa, Asmae; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Gailus, Nicole; Botezatu, Lacramioara; Khandanpour, Cyrus; Dittmer, Ulf; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically used human vaccination aims to induce specific antibodies that can guarantee long-term protection against a pathogen. The reasons that other immune components often fail to induce protective immunity are still debated. Recently we found that enforced viral replication in secondary lymphoid organs is essential for immune activation. In this study we used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to determine whether enforced virus replication occurs in the presence of virus-specific antibodies or virus-specific CD8+ T cells. We found that after systemic recall infection with LCMV-WE the presence of virus-specific antibodies allowed intracellular replication of virus in the marginal zone of spleen. In contrast, specific antibodies limited viral replication in liver, lung, and kidney. Upon recall infection with the persistent virus strain LCMV-Docile, viral replication in spleen was essential for the priming of CD8+ T cells and for viral control. In contrast to specific antibodies, memory CD8+ T cells inhibited viral replication in marginal zone but failed to protect mice from persistent viral infection. We conclude that virus-specific antibodies limit viral infection in peripheral organs but still allow replication of LCMV in the marginal zone, a mechanism that allows immune boosting during recall infection and thereby guarantees control of persistent virus. PMID:26805453

  16. Differential Chromatin Structure Encompassing Replication Origins in Transformed and Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Chan, Man Kid

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the chromatin structure encompassing replication origins in transformed and normal cells. Analysis of the global levels of histone H3 acetylated at K9&14 (open chromatin) and histone H3 trimethylated at K9 (closed chromatin) revealed a higher ratio of open to closed chromatin in the transformed cells. Also, the trithorax and polycomb group proteins, Brg-1 and Bmi-1, respectively, were overexpressed and more abundantly bound to chromatin in the transformed cells. Quantitative comparative analyses of episomal and in situ chromosomal replication origin activity as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, using specific antibodies targeting members of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) as well as open/closed chromatin markers encompassing both episomal and chromosomal origins, revealed that episomal origins had similar levels of in vivo activity, nascent DNA abundance, pre-RC protein association, and elevated open chromatin structure at the origin in both cell types. In contrast, the chromosomal origins corresponding to 20mer1, 20mer2, and c-myc displayed a 2- to 3-fold higher activity and pre-RC protein abundance as well as higher ratios of open to closed chromatin and of Brg-1 to Bmi-1 in the transformed cells, whereas the origin associated with the housekeeping lamin B2 gene exhibited similar levels of activity, pre-RC protein abundance, and higher ratios of open to closed chromatin and of Brg-1 to Bmi-1 in both cell types. Nucleosomal positioning analysis, using an MNase-Southern blot assay, showed that all the origin regions examined were situated within regions of inconsistently positioned nucleosomes, with the nucleosomes being spaced farther apart from each other prior to the onset of S phase in both cell types. Overall, the results indicate that cellular transformation is associated with differential epigenetic regulation, whereby chromatin structure is more open, rendering replication origins more accessible to initiator

  17. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  18. Break-Induced DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith P.; Lovett, Susan T.; Haber, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Recombination-dependent DNA replication, often called break-induced replication (BIR), was initially invoked to explain recombination events in bacteriophage but it has recently been recognized as a fundamentally important mechanism to repair double-strand chromosome breaks in eukaryotes. This mechanism appears to be critically important in the restarting of stalled and broken replication forks and in maintaining the integrity of eroded telomeres. Although BIR helps preserve genome integrity during replication, it also promotes genome instability by the production of loss of heterozygosity and the formation of nonreciprocal translocations, as well as in the generation of complex chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:23881940

  19. Replicating vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  20. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  1. A Sequence-Independent Strategy for Amplification and Characterisation of Episomal Badnavirus Sequences Reveals Three Previously Uncharacterised Yam Badnaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bömer, Moritz; Turaki, Aliyu A.; Silva, Gonçalo; Kumar, P. Lava; Seal, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) plants are potentially hosts to a diverse range of badnavirus species (genus Badnavirus, family Caulimoviridae), but their detection is complicated by the existence of integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. To date, only two badnavirus genomes have been characterised, namely, Dioscorea bacilliform AL virus (DBALV) and Dioscorea bacilliform SN virus (DBSNV). A further 10 tentative species in yam have been described based on their partial reverse transcriptase (RT)-ribonuclease H (RNaseH) sequences, generically referred to here as Dioscorea bacilliform viruses (DBVs). Further characterisation of DBV species is necessary to determine which represent episomal viruses and which are only present as integrated badnavirus sequences in some yam genomes. In this study, a sequence-independent multiply-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) method was evaluated for selective amplification of episomal DBV genomes. This resulted in the identification and characterisation of nine complete genomic sequences (7.4–7.7 kbp) of existing and previously undescribed DBV phylogenetic groups from Dioscorea alata and Dioscorea rotundata accessions. These new yam badnavirus genomes expand our understanding of the diversity and genomic organisation of DBVs, and assist the development of improved diagnostic tools. Our findings also suggest that mixed badnavirus infections occur relatively often in West African yam germplasm. PMID:27399761

  2. The Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 Promotes Rad51-Dependent Template Switches at Replication Forks by Counteracting D-Loop Disassembly by the RecQ-Type Helicase Rqh1

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Julien; Costes, Audrey; Iraqui, Ismail; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Lambert, Sarah A.E.

    2014-01-01

    At blocked replication forks, homologous recombination mediates the nascent strands to switch template in order to ensure replication restart, but faulty template switches underlie genome rearrangements in cancer cells and genomic disorders. Recombination occurs within DNA packaged into chromatin that must first be relaxed and then restored when recombination is completed. The chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in DNA synthesis-coupled chromatin assembly during DNA replication and DNA repair. We reveal a novel chromatin factor-dependent step during replication-coupled DNA repair: Fission yeast CAF-1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks, independently of the postreplication repair pathway. We used a physical assay that allows the analysis of the individual steps of template switch, from the recruitment of recombination factors to the formation of joint molecules, combined with a quantitative measure of the resulting rearrangements. We reveal functional and physical interplays between CAF-1 and the RecQ-helicase Rqh1, the BLM homologue, mutations in which cause Bloom's syndrome, a human disease associating genome instability with cancer predisposition. We establish that CAF-1 promotes template switch by counteracting D-loop disassembly by Rqh1. Consequently, the likelihood of faulty template switches is controlled by antagonistic activities of CAF-1 and Rqh1 in the stability of the D-loop. D-loop stabilization requires the ability of CAF-1 to interact with PCNA and is thus linked to the DNA synthesis step. We propose that CAF-1 plays a regulatory role during template switch by assembling chromatin on the D-loop and thereby impacting the resolution of the D-loop. PMID:25313826

  3. The chromatin assembly factor 1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks by counteracting D-loop disassembly by the RecQ-type helicase Rqh1.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Hardy, Julien; Costes, Audrey; Iraqui, Ismail; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2014-10-01

    At blocked replication forks, homologous recombination mediates the nascent strands to switch template in order to ensure replication restart, but faulty template switches underlie genome rearrangements in cancer cells and genomic disorders. Recombination occurs within DNA packaged into chromatin that must first be relaxed and then restored when recombination is completed. The chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in DNA synthesis-coupled chromatin assembly during DNA replication and DNA repair. We reveal a novel chromatin factor-dependent step during replication-coupled DNA repair: Fission yeast CAF-1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks, independently of the postreplication repair pathway. We used a physical assay that allows the analysis of the individual steps of template switch, from the recruitment of recombination factors to the formation of joint molecules, combined with a quantitative measure of the resulting rearrangements. We reveal functional and physical interplays between CAF-1 and the RecQ-helicase Rqh1, the BLM homologue, mutations in which cause Bloom's syndrome, a human disease associating genome instability with cancer predisposition. We establish that CAF-1 promotes template switch by counteracting D-loop disassembly by Rqh1. Consequently, the likelihood of faulty template switches is controlled by antagonistic activities of CAF-1 and Rqh1 in the stability of the D-loop. D-loop stabilization requires the ability of CAF-1 to interact with PCNA and is thus linked to the DNA synthesis step. We propose that CAF-1 plays a regulatory role during template switch by assembling chromatin on the D-loop and thereby impacting the resolution of the D-loop.

  4. Transient Reversal of Episome Silencing Precedes VP16-Dependent Transcription during Reactivation of Latent HSV-1 in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Youn; Mandarino, Angelo; Chao, Moses V.; Mohr, Ian; Wilson, Angus C.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) establishes latency in peripheral neurons, creating a permanent source of recurrent infections. The latent genome is assembled into chromatin and lytic cycle genes are silenced. Processes that orchestrate reentry into productive replication (reactivation) remain poorly understood. We have used latently infected cultures of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) sympathetic neurons to profile viral gene expression following a defined reactivation stimulus. Lytic genes are transcribed in two distinct phases, differing in their reliance on protein synthesis, viral DNA replication and the essential initiator protein VP16. The first phase does not require viral proteins and has the appearance of a transient, widespread de-repression of the previously silent lytic genes. This allows synthesis of viral regulatory proteins including VP16, which accumulate in the cytoplasm of the host neuron. During the second phase, VP16 and its cellular cofactor HCF-1, which is also predominantly cytoplasmic, concentrate in the nucleus where they assemble an activator complex on viral promoters. The transactivation function supplied by VP16 promotes increased viral lytic gene transcription leading to the onset of genome amplification and the production of infectious viral particles. Thus regulated localization of de novo synthesized VP16 is likely to be a critical determinant of HSV-1 reactivation in sympathetic neurons. PMID:22383875

  5. The Proteasomal Rpn11 Metalloprotease Suppresses Tombusvirus RNA Recombination and Promotes Viral Replication via Facilitating Assembly of the Viral Replicase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Prasanth, K. Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a “matchmaker” that brings the viral p92pol replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. IMPORTANCE RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA

  6. Plasmid RSF1010 DNA replication in vitro promoted by purified RSF1010 RepA, RepB and RepC proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Scherzinger, E; Haring, V; Lurz, R; Otto, S

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed and analyzed an in vitro system that will efficiently replicate plasmid RSF1010 and its derivatives. The system contains a partially purified extract from E.coli cells and three purified RSF1010-encoded proteins, the products of genes repA, repB (or mobA/repB), and repC. Replication in this system mimics the in vivo mechanism in that it (i) is initiated at oriV, the origin of vegetative DNA replication, (ii) proceeds in a population of plasmid molecules in both directions from this 396-base-pair origin region, and (iii) is absolutely dependent on the presence of each of the three rep gene products. In addition, we find that E.coli DNA gyrase, DnaZ protein (gamma subunit of poIIII holoenzyme) and SSB are required for in vitro plasmid synthesis. The bacterial RNA polymerase, the initiation protein DnaA, and the primosomal proteins DnaB, DnaC, DnaG and DnaT are not required. Furthermore, the replicative intermediates seen in the electron microscope suggest that replication in vitro begins with the simultaneous or non-simultaneous formation of two displacement loops that expand for a short stretch of DNA toward each other, and form a theta-type structure when the two displacing strands pass each other. Images PMID:1851552

  7. Heparan Sulfate and Heparin Promote Faithful Prion Replication in Vitro by Binding to Normal and Abnormal Prion Proteins in Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Morikazu; Tabeta, Naoko; Kato, Nobuko; Matsuura, Yuichi; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Yokoyama, Takashi; Murayama, Yuichi

    2016-12-16

    The precise mechanism underlying the conversion of normal prion protein (PrP(C)) into abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) remains unclear. Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), an in vitro technique used for amplifying PrP(Sc), results in PrP(Sc) replication that preserves the strain-specific characteristics of the input PrP(Sc); thus, PMCA mimics the process of in vivo PrP(Sc) replication. Previous work has demonstrated that in PMCA, nucleic acids are critical for PrP(Sc) amplification, but little information has been reported on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) participation in PrP(Sc) replication in vitro Here, we investigated whether GAGs play a role in the faithful replication of PrP(Sc) by using a modified PMCA performed with baculovirus-derived recombinant PrP (Bac-PrP) as a substrate. The addition of heparan sulfate (HS) or its analog heparin (HP) restored the conversion efficiency in PMCA that was inhibited through nucleic acid depletion. Moreover, the PMCA products obtained under these conditions were infectious and preserved the properties of the input PrP(Sc) These data suggest that HS and HP play the same role as nucleic acids in facilitating faithful replication of prions in PMCA. Furthermore, we showed that HP binds to both Bac-PrP and Bac-PrP(Sc) through the sulfated groups present on HP and that the N-terminal domain of Bac-PrP(Sc) might potentially not be involved in the binding to HP. These results suggest that the interaction of GAGs such as HS and HP with PrP(C) and/or PrP(Sc) through their sulfate groups is critical for the faithful replication of prions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. ERCC1 and MUS81-EME1 promote sister chromatid separation by processing late replication intermediates at common fragile sites during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Naim, Valeria; Wilhelm, Therese; Debatisse, Michelle; Rosselli, Filippo

    2013-08-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is a hallmark of tumour initiation and progression. Some genomic regions are particularly unstable under replication stress, notably common fragile sites (CFSs) whose rearrangements in tumour cells contribute to cancer development. Recent work has shown that the Fanconi anaemia (FANC) pathway plays a role in preventing defective chromosome segregation and CIN under conditions of replication stress. Strikingly, FANCD2 is recruited to regions hosting CFSs on metaphase chromosomes. To decipher the mechanisms protecting CFSs in G2/M, we searched for proteins that co-localize with FANCD2 on mitotic chromosomes, and identified XPF-ERCC1 and MUS81-EME1, two structure-specific endonucleases. We show that depletion of either ERCC1 or MUS81-EME1 affects accurate processing of replication intermediates or under-replicated DNA that persist at CFSs until mitosis. Depletion of these endonucleases also leads to an increase in the frequency of chromosome bridges during anaphase that, in turn, favours accumulation of DNA damage in the following G1 phase.

  9. The E1 Protein of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Is Dispensable for Maintenance Replication of the Viral Genome

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Nakahara, Tomomi; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Narisawa-Saito, Mako; Yugawa, Takashi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Yamato, Kenji; Natori, Yukikazu

    2012-01-01

    Papillomavirus genomes are thought to be amplified to about 100 copies per cell soon after infection, maintained constant at this level in basal cells, and amplified for viral production upon keratinocyte differentiation. To determine the requirement for E1 in viral DNA replication at different stages, an E1-defective mutant of the human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) genome featuring a translation termination mutation in the E1 gene was used. The ability of the mutant HPV16 genome to replicate as nuclear episomes was monitored with or without exogenous expression of E1. Unlike the wild-type genome, the E1-defective HPV16 genome became established in human keratinocytes only as episomes in the presence of exogenous E1 expression. Once established, it could replicate with the same efficiency as the wild-type genome, even after the exogenous E1 was removed. However, upon calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation, once again amplification was dependent on exogenous E1. These results demonstrate that the E1 protein is dispensable for maintenance replication but not for initial and productive replication of HPV16. PMID:22238312

  10. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  11. The Expanding Functions of Cellular Helicases: The Tombusvirus RNA Replication Enhancer Co-opts the Plant eIF4AIII-Like AtRH2 and the DDX5-Like AtRH5 DEAD-Box RNA Helicases to Promote Viral Asymmetric RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. Several of the co-opted host factors bind to the viral RNA, which plays multiple roles, including mRNA function, as an assembly platform for the viral replicase (VRC), template for RNA synthesis, and encapsidation during infection. It is likely that remodeling of the viral RNAs and RNA-protein complexes during the switch from one step to another requires RNA helicases. In this paper, we have discovered a second group of cellular RNA helicases, including the eIF4AIII-like yeast Fal1p and the DDX5-like Dbp3p and the orthologous plant AtRH2 and AtRH5 DEAD box helicases, which are co-opted by tombusviruses. Unlike the previously characterized DDX3-like AtRH20/Ded1p helicases that bind to the 3′ terminal promoter region in the viral minus-strand (−)RNA, the other class of eIF4AIII-like RNA helicases bind to a different cis-acting element, namely the 5′ proximal RIII(−) replication enhancer (REN) element in the TBSV (−)RNA. We show that the binding of AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases to the TBSV (−)RNA could unwind the dsRNA structure within the RIII(−) REN. This unique characteristic allows the eIF4AIII-like helicases to perform novel pro-viral functions involving the RIII(−) REN in stimulation of plus-strand (+)RNA synthesis. We also show that AtRH2 and AtRH5 helicases are components of the tombusvirus VRCs based on co-purification experiments. We propose that eIF4AIII-like helicases destabilize dsRNA replication intermediate within the RIII(−) REN that promotes bringing the 5′ and 3′ terminal (−)RNA sequences in close vicinity via long-range RNA-RNA base pairing. This newly formed RNA structure promoted by eIF4AIII helicase together with AtRH20 helicase might facilitate the recycling of the viral replicases for multiple rounds of (+)-strand synthesis, thus resulting in asymmetrical viral replication. PMID:24743583

  12. Replication and Meta-analysis of the Gene-Environment Interaction between Body Mass Index and the Interleukin-6 Promoter Polymorphism with Higher Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Patricia C.; Chamarthi, Bindu; Williams, Jonathan S.; Sun, Bei; Vaidya, Anand; Raby, Benjamin A.; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Hopkins, Paul N.; Adler, Gail K.; Williams, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance (IR) is a complex disorder caused by an interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies identified a significant interaction between body mass index (BMI) and the rs1800795 polymorphism of the Interleukin-6 (IL-6) gene that influences both IR and onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with obese individuals homozygous for the C allele demonstrating the highest level of IR and greatest risk for T2DM. Replication of a gene-environment interaction is important to confirm the validity of the initial finding and extends the generalizability of the results to other populations. Thus, the objective of this study was to replicate this gene-environment interaction on IR in a hypertensive population and perform a meta-analysis with prior published results. Material and Methods The replication analysis was performed using Caucasian individuals with hypertension (HTN) from the HyperPATH cohort (N=311), genotyped for rs1800795. Phenotype studies were conducted after participants consumed two diets: high sodium (HS) (200mmol/day) and low sodium (LS) (10mmol/day) for 7 days each. Measurements for plasma glucose, insulin, and IL-6 were obtained after 8 hours of fasting. IR was characterized by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR). Results In HyperPATH, BMI was a significant effect modifier of the relationship between rs1800795 and HOMA-IR; higher BMI was associated with higher HOMA-IR among homozygote CC individuals when compared to major allele G carriers (p=0.003). Further, the meta-analysis in 1028 individuals confirmed the result demonstrating the same significant interaction between rs1800795 and BMI on HOMA-IR (p=1.05×10−6). Conclusion This rare replication of a gene-environment interaction extends the generalizability of the results to HTN while highlighting this polymorphism as a marker of IR in obese individuals. PMID:22075267

  13. CENTRIOLE REPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Joseph G.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes the replication of centrioles during spermatogenesis in the Prosobranch snail, Viviparus malleatus Reeve. Sections for electron microscopy were cut from pieces of testis fixed in OsO4 and embedded in the polyester resin Vestopal W. Two kinds of spermatocytes are present. These give rise to typical uniflagellate sperm carrying the haploid number of 9 chromosomes, and atypical multiflagellate sperm with only one chromosome. Two centrioles are present in the youngest typical spermatocyte. Each is a hollow cylinder about 160 mµ in diameter and 330 mµ long. The wall consists of 9 sets of triplet fibers arranged in a characteristic pattern. Sometime before pachytene an immature centriole, or procentriole as it will be called, appears next to each of the mature centrioles. The procentriole resembles a mature centriole in most respects except length: it is more annular than tubular. The daughter procentriole lies with its axis perpendicular to that of its parent. It presumably grows to full size during the late prophase, although the maturation stages have not been observed with the electron microscope. It is suggested that centrioles possess a constant polarization. The distal end forms the flagellum or other centriole products, while the proximal end represents the procentriole and is concerned with replication. The four centrioles of prophase (two parents and two daughters) are distributed by the two meiotic divisions to the four typical spermatids, in which they function as the basal bodies of the flagella. Atypical spermatocytes at first contain two normal centrioles. Each of these becomes surrounded by a cluster of procentrioles, which progressively elongate during the late prophase. After two aberrant meiotic divisions the centriole clusters give rise to the basal bodies of the multiflagellate sperm. These facts are discussed in the light of the theory, first proposed by Pollister, that the supernumerary centrioles in the atypical cells are

  14. Mutation of the f-protein cleavage site of avian paramyxovirus type 7 results in furin cleavage, fusion promotion, and increased replication in vitro but not increased replication, tissue tropism, or virulence in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Sa; Khattar, Sunil K; Subbiah, Madhuri; Collins, Peter L; Samal, Siba K

    2012-04-01

    We constructed a reverse genetics system for avian paramyxovirus serotype 7 (APMV-7) to investigate the role of the fusion F glycoprotein in tissue tropism and virulence. The AMPV-7 F protein has a single basic residue arginine (R) at position -1 in the F cleavage site sequence and also is unusual in having alanine at position +2 (LPSSR↓FA) (underlining indicates the basic amino acids at the F protein cleavage site, and the arrow indicates the site of cleavage.). APMV-7 does not form syncytia or plaques in cell culture, but its replication in vitro does not depend on, and is not increased by, added protease. Two mutants were successfully recovered in which the cleavage site was modified to mimic sites that are found in virulent Newcastle disease virus isolates and to contain 4 or 5 basic residues as well as isoleucine in the +2 position: (RRQKR↓FI) or (RRKKR↓FI), named Fcs-4B or Fcs-5B, respectively. In cell culture, one of the mutants, Fcs-5B, formed protease-independent syncytia and grew to 10-fold-higher titers compared to the parent and Fcs-4B viruses. This indicated the importance of the single additional basic residue (K) at position -3. Syncytium formation and virus yield of the Fcs-5B virus was impaired by the furin inhibitor decanoyl-RVKR-CMK, whereas parental APMV-7 was not affected. APMV-7 is avirulent in chickens and is limited in tropism to the upper respiratory tract of 1-day-old and 2-week-old chickens, and these characteristics were unchanged for the two mutant viruses. Thus, the acquisition of furin cleavability by APMV-7 resulted in syncytium formation and increased virus yield in vitro but did not alter virus yield, tropism, or virulence in chickens.

  15. Varying Efficiency of Long-term Replication of Papillomaviruses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Adam J.; Loggen, Malte; Lee, Karen; Angeletti, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) replicate in mitotically active basal keratinocytes. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and maintenance of HPV episomes. We previously showed that HPV16 could replicate stably in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002)] and we identified cis-elements that mediate replication and maintenance [J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-3358.; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005)]. Here, we demonstrate that although multiple HPV genomes replicate stably in yeast, they do so with differing long-term efficiency; HPV6-Ura3 is replicated at the highest copy number, followed by HPV31-Ura3 and HPV16-Ura3 respectively, HPV11-Ura3 and HPV18-Ura3 were unable replicate without the presence of E2 expression and BPV-1-Ura3 was unable to replicate, with or without the presence of E2. These studies suggest genotype-specific differences in HPV replication and maintenance. PMID:18829061

  16. FANC Pathway Promotes UV-Induced Stalled Replication Forks Recovery by Acting Both Upstream and Downstream Polη and Rev1

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Emilie; Rosselli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    To cope with ultraviolet C (UVC)-stalled replication forks and restart DNA synthesis, cells either undergo DNA translesion synthesis (TLS) by specialised DNA polymerases or tolerate the lesions using homologous recombination (HR)-based mechanisms. To gain insight into how cells manage UVC-induced stalled replication forks, we analysed the molecular crosstalk between the TLS DNA polymerases Polη and Rev1, the double-strand break repair (DSB)-associated protein MDC1 and the FANC pathway. We describe three novel functional interactions that occur in response to UVC-induced DNA lesions. First, Polη and Rev1, whose optimal expression and/or relocalisation depend on the FANC core complex, act upstream of FANCD2 and are required for the proper relocalisation of monoubiquitinylated FANCD2 (Ub-FANCD2) to subnuclear foci. Second, during S-phase, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 relocalise to UVC-damaged nuclear areas or foci simultaneously but independently of each other. Third, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 are independently required for optimal BRCA1 relocalisation. While RPA32 phosphorylation (p-RPA32) and RPA foci formation were reduced in parallel with increasing levels of H2AX phosphorylation and MDC1 foci in UVC-irradiated FANC pathway-depleted cells, MDC1 depletion was associated with increased UVC-induced Ub-FANCD2 and FANCD2 foci as well as p-RPA32 levels and p-RPA32 foci. On the basis of the previous observations, we propose that the FANC pathway participates in the rescue of UVC-stalled replication forks in association with TLS by maintaining the integrity of ssDNA regions and by preserving genome stability and preventing the formation of DSBs, the resolution of which would require the intervention of MDC1. PMID:23365640

  17. Cdk5 promotes DNA replication stress checkpoint activation through RPA-32 phosphorylation, and impacts on metastasis free survival in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiker, Sara; Pennaneach, Vincent; Loew, Damarys; Dingli, Florent; Biard, Denis; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Gemble, Simon; Vacher, Sophie; Bieche, Ivan; Hall, Janet; Fernet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a determinant of PARP inhibitor and ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity. Here we show that Cdk5-depleted (Cdk5-shRNA) HeLa cells show higher sensitivity to S-phase irradiation, chronic hydroxyurea exposure, and 5-fluorouracil and 6-thioguanine treatment, with hydroxyurea and IR sensitivity also seen in Cdk5-depleted U2OS cells. As Cdk5 is not directly implicated in DNA strand break repair we investigated in detail its proposed role in the intra-S checkpoint activation. While Cdk5-shRNA HeLa cells showed altered basal S-phase dynamics with slower replication velocity and fewer active origins per DNA megabase, checkpoint activation was impaired after a hydroxyurea block. Cdk5 depletion was associated with reduced priming phosphorylations of RPA32 serines 29 and 33 and SMC1-Serine 966 phosphorylation, lower levels of RPA serine 4 and 8 phosphorylation and DNA damage measured using the alkaline Comet assay, gamma-H2AX signal intensity, RPA and Rad51 foci, and sister chromatid exchanges resulting in impaired intra-S checkpoint activation and subsequently higher numbers of chromatin bridges. In vitro kinase assays coupled with mass spectrometry demonstrated that Cdk5 can carry out the RPA32 priming phosphorylations on serines 23, 29, and 33 necessary for this checkpoint activation. In addition we found an association between lower Cdk5 levels and longer metastasis free survival in breast cancer patients and survival in Cdk5-depleted breast tumor cells after treatment with IR and a PARP inhibitor. Taken together, these results show that Cdk5 is necessary for basal replication and replication stress checkpoint activation and highlight clinical opportunities to enhance tumor cell killing. PMID:26237679

  18. MMS Exposure Promotes Increased MtDNA Mutagenesis in the Presence of Replication-Defective Disease-Associated DNA Polymerase γ Variants

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D.; Copeland, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  19. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D; Copeland, William C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mtDNA replication but

  20. Molecular replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of our research program is to understand how polynucleotide replication originated on the primitive Earth. This is a central issue in studies of the origins of life, since a process similar to modern DNA and RNA synthesis is likely to have formed the basis for the most primitive system of genetic information transfer. The major conclusion of studies so far is that a preformed polynucleotide template under many different experimental conditions will facilitate the synthesis of a new oligonucleotide with a sequence complementary to that of the template. It has been shown, for example, that poly(C) facilitates the synthesis of long oligo(G)s and that the short template CCGCC facilities the synthesis of its complement GGCGG. Very recently we have shown that template-directed synthesis is not limited to the standard oligonucleotide substrates. Nucleic acid-like molecules with a pyrophosphate group replacing the phosphate of the standard nucleic acid backbone are readily synthesized from deoxynucleotide 3'-5'-diphosphates on appropriate templates.

  1. Molecular replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of our research program is to understand how polynucleotide replication originated on the primitive Earth. This is a central issue in studies of the origins of life, since a process similar to modern DNA and RNA synthesis is likely to have formed the basis for the most primitive system of genetic information transfer. The major conclusion of studies so far is that a preformed polynucleotide template under many different experimental conditions will facilitate the synthesis of a new oligonucleotide with a sequence complementary to that of the template. It has been shown, for example, that poly(C) facilitates the synthesis of long oligo(G)s and that the short template CCGCC facilities the synthesis of its complement GGCGG. Very recently we have shown that template-directed synthesis is not limited to the standard oligonucleotide substrates. Nucleic acid-like molecules with a pyrophosphate group replacing the phosphate of the standard nucleic acid backbone are readily synthesized from deoxynucleotide 3'-5'-diphosphates on appropriate templates.

  2. A promoter of Epstein-Barr virus that can function during latent infection can be transactivated by EBNA-1, a viral protein required for viral DNA replication during latent infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, B; Warren, N

    1989-01-01

    A viral promoter that functions on recombinant plasmids in cells immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus was identified and characterized. It is identical to that mapped on the viral genome by Bodescot et al. (M. Bodescot, M. Perricaudet, and P.J. Farrell, J. Virol. 61:3424-3430, 1987) which functions during the latent phase of the viral life cycle in some but not all cells to encode several latent viral gene products. Experiments with these plasmids indicated that this promoter requires the enhancer within oriP of Epstein-Barr virus in cis to function efficiently. They also indicated that it requires the EBNA-1 gene in trans to function efficiently. The EBNA-1 gene therefore positively affects both viral DNA replication (J.L. Yates, N. Warren, and B. Sugden, Nature [London] 313:812-815, 1985) and viral transcription. Images PMID:2542577

  3. Small Molecule Inhibition of Epstein - Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen-1 DNA Binding Activity Interferes with Replication and Persistence of the Viral Genome

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ka-Won; Joo, Eun Hye; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The replication and persistence of extra chromosomal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) episome in latently infected cells are primarily dependent on the binding of EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) to the cognate EBV oriP element. In continuation of the previous study, herein we characterized EBNA1 small molecule inhibitors (H20, H31) and their underlying inhibitory mechanisms. In silico docking analyses predicted that H20 fits into a pocket in the EBNA1 DNA binding domain (DBD). However, H20 did not significantly affect EBNA1 binding to its cognate sequence. A limited structure-relationship study of H20 identified a hydrophobic compound H31, as an EBNA1 inhibitor. An in vitro EBNA1 EMSA and in vivo EGFP-EBNA1 confocal microscopy analysis showed that H31 inhibited EBNA1-dependent oriP sequence-specific DNA binding activity, but not sequence-nonspecific chromosomal association. Consistent with this, H31 repressed the EBNA1-dependent transcription, replication, and persistence of an EBV oriP plasmid. Furthermore, H31 induced progressive loss of EBV episome. In addition, H31 selectively retarded the growth of EBV-infected LCL or Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. These data indicate that H31 inhibition of EBNA1-dependent DNA binding decreases transcription from and persistence of EBV episome in EBV-infected cells. These new compounds might be useful probes for dissecting EBNA1 functions in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24486954

  4. The CDK regulators Cdh1 and Sic1 promote efficient usage of DNA replication origins to prevent chromosomal instability at a chromosome arm

    PubMed Central

    Ayuda-Durán, Pilar; Devesa, Fernando; Gomes, Fábia; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Ávila-Zarza, Carmelo; Gómez, María; Calzada, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Robustness and completion of DNA replication rely on redundant DNA replication origins. Reduced efficiency of origin licensing is proposed to contribute to chromosome instability in CDK-deregulated cell cycles, a frequent alteration in oncogenesis. However, the mechanism by which this instability occurs is largely unknown. Current models suggest that limited origin numbers would reduce fork density favouring chromosome rearrangements, but experimental support in CDK-deregulated cells is lacking. We have investigated the pattern of origin firing efficiency in budding yeast cells lacking the CDK regulators Cdh1 and Sic1. We show that each regulator is required for efficient origin activity, and that both cooperate non-redundantly. Notably, origins are differentially sensitive to CDK deregulation. Origin sensitivity is independent on normal origin efficiency, firing timing or chromosomal location. Interestingly, at a chromosome arm, there is a shortage of origin firing involving active and dormant origins, and the extent of shortage correlates with the severity of CDK deregulation and chromosome instability. We therefore propose that CDK deregulation in G1 phase compromises origin redundancy by decreasing the number of active and dormant origins, leading to origin shortage and increased chromosome instability. PMID:24753426

  5. Analysis of the functions of glycoproteins E and I and their promoters during VZV replication in vitro and in skin and T-cell xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan; Reichelt, Mike; Moffat, Jennifer F; Sommer, Marvin; Zerboni, Leigh; Berarducci, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The two VZV glycoproteins, gE and gI, are encoded by genes that are designated open reading frames, ORF67 and ORF68, located in the short unique region of the VZV genome. These proteins have homologs in the other alphaherpesviruses. Like their homologues, VZV gE and gI exhibit prominent co-localization in infected cells and form heterodimers. However, VZV gE is much larger than its homologues because it has a unique N-terminal domain, consisting of 188 amino acids that are not present in these other gene products. VZV gE also differs from the related gE proteins, in that it is essential for viral replication. Targeted mutations of gE that are compatible with VZV replication in cultured cells have varying phenotypes in skin and T-cell xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis in vivo. While gI is dispensable for growth in cultured cells in vitro, this glycoprotein is essential for VZV infection of differentiated human skin and T cells in vivo. The promoter regions of gE and gI are regulated by the cellular transactivator, specificity protein factor 1 (Sp1) in combination with the major VZV transactivator in reporter construct experiments and some Sp1 promoter elements are important for VZV virulence in vivo. Further analysis of VZV gE and gI functions and their interactions with other viral and host cell proteins are important areas for studies of VZV replication and pathogenesis.

  6. Evidence Supporting a Role for TopBP1 and Brd4 in the Initiation but Not Continuation of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1/E2-Mediated DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gauson, Elaine J.; Donaldson, Mary M.; Dornan, Edward S.; Wang, Xu; Bristol, Molly; Bodily, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To replicate the double-stranded human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) DNA genome, viral proteins E1 and E2 associate with the viral origin of replication, and E2 can also regulate transcription from adjacent promoters. E2 interacts with host proteins in order to regulate both transcription and replication; TopBP1 and Brd4 are cellular proteins that interact with HPV16 E2. Previous work with E2 mutants demonstrated the Brd4 requirement for the transactivation properties of E2, while TopBP1 is required for DNA replication induced by E2 from the viral origin of replication in association with E1. More-recent studies have also implicated Brd4 in the regulation of DNA replication by E2 and E1. Here, we demonstrate that both TopBP1 and Brd4 are present at the viral origin of replication and that interaction with E2 is required for optimal initiation of DNA replication. Both cellular proteins are present in E1-E2-containing nuclear foci, and the viral origin of replication is required for the efficient formation of these foci. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against either TopBP1 or Brd4 destroys the E1-E2 nuclear bodies but has no effect on E1-E2-mediated levels of DNA replication. An E2 mutation in the context of the complete HPV16 genome that compromises Brd4 interaction fails to efficiently establish episomes in primary human keratinocytes. Overall, the results suggest that interactions between TopBP1 and E2 and between Brd4 and E2 are required to correctly initiate DNA replication but are not required for continuing DNA replication, which may be mediated by alternative processes such as rolling circle amplification and/or homologous recombination. IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in many human cancers, including cervical and head and neck cancers, and is responsible for the annual deaths of hundreds of thousands of people worldwide. The current vaccine will save lives in future generations, but antivirals targeting HPV16 are required for the

  7. Regulating DNA Replication in Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Khalid; On, Kin Fan; Diffley, John F.X.

    2013-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly controlled in eukaryotic cells to ensure that an exact copy of the genetic material is inherited by both daughter cells. Oscillating waves of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) activities provide a binary switch that permits the replication of each chromosome exactly once per cell cycle. Work from several organisms has revealed a conserved strategy whereby inactive replication complexes are assembled onto DNA during periods of low CDK and high APC activity but are competent to execute genome duplication only when these activities are reversed. Periods of high CDK and low APC/C serve an essential function by blocking reassembly of replication complexes, thereby preventing rereplication. Higher eukaryotes have evolved additional CDK-independent mechanisms for preventing rereplication. PMID:23838438

  8. STAT-5 Regulates Transcription of the Topoisomerase IIβ-Binding Protein 1 (TopBP1) Gene To Activate the ATR Pathway and Promote Human Papillomavirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shiyuan; Cheng, Shouqiang; Iovane, Andre

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The life cycle of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is dependent upon epithelial differentiation. Following infection of basal cells, HPV genomes are stably maintained at low copy numbers, and productive replication or amplification is restricted to highly differentiated suprabasal cells. In high-risk HPV infections, the ATM pathway is constitutively activated in the absence of external DNA-damaging agents and is required for productive viral replication. The ataxia telangiectasia (ATM) pathway repairs double-strand breaks in DNA, while the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) pathway targets single-strand breaks. Our studies show that the ATR pathway, like the ATM pathway, is activated in HPV-positive cells and that inhibitors of ATR or CHK1 phosphorylation block both amplification and late viral gene expression in differentiated cells while moderately reducing stable copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. TopBP1 is a critical upstream activator of the ATR pathway and is expressed at elevated levels in HPV-positive cells. This increased expression of TopBP1 is necessary for ATR/CHK1 activation in HPV-positive cells, and knockdown blocks amplification. Furthermore, TopBP1 activation is shown to be regulated at the level of transcription initiation by the innate immune regulator STAT-5, which is activated by HPV proteins. STAT-5 has also been shown to be a regulator of the ATM response, demonstrating that these two pathways are coordinately regulated in HPV-positive cells. These findings identify a novel link between the innate immune response and activation of the ATR DNA damage response in regulating the life cycle of high-risk HPVs. PMID:26695634

  9. Virus Hunting: Discovery of New Episomal Circular Viruses by Rolling Circle Techniques.

    PubMed

    Vanmechelen, Bert; Rector, Annabel; Maes, Piet

    2017-02-06

    Many methods for the discovery of novel viruses are based on amplification of the virus using consensus or degenerate PCR primers. A downside of this approach is that it requires prior knowledge of the viral nucleotide sequence to be applicable. Presented in this unit is a method for the sequence-independent amplification of circular viral genomes that is based on the rolling-circle mechanism used by certain viruses in their natural replication cycle. The amplification of the virus of interest is coupled to the isolation of the viral genome by gel extraction following a restriction digestion. Once isolated, the sequence of the viral genome can be determined by nanopore sequencing, a rapid and inexpensive next-generation sequencing technology that generates long reads in real time. The method described in this unit was originally developed for the discovery of papillomaviruses, but can be used for the identification of all types of circular DNA viruses. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. PERK Signal-Modulated Protein Translation Promotes the Survivability of Dengue 2 Virus-Infected Mosquito Cells and Extends Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jiun-Nan; Chen, Tien-Huang; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Peng, Jing-Yun; Yang, Tsong-Han; Cheng, Chih-Chieh; Sofiyatun, Eny; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Wei-June

    2017-09-20

    Survival of mosquitoes from dengue virus (DENV) infection is a prerequisite of viral transmission to the host. This study aimed to see how mosquito cells can survive the infection during prosperous replication of the virus. In C6/36 cells, global protein translation was shut down after infection by DENV type 2 (DENV2). However, it returned to a normal level when infected cells were treated with an inhibitor of the protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) signaling pathway. Based on a 7-Methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m7GTP) pull-down assay, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex was also identified in DENV2-infected cells. This suggests that most mosquito proteins are synthesized via canonical cap-dependent translation. When the PERK signal pathway was inhibited, both accumulation of reactive oxygen species and changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential increased. This suggested that ER stress response was alleviated through the PERK-mediated shutdown of global proteins in DENV2-infected C6/36 cells. In the meantime, the activities of caspases-9 and -3 and the apoptosis-related cell death rate increased in C6/36 cells with PERK inhibition. This reflected that the PERK-signaling pathway is involved in determining cell survival, presumably by reducing DENV2-induced ER stress. Looking at the PERK downstream target, α-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), an increased phosphorylation status was only shown in infected C6/36 cells. This indicated that recruitment of ribosome binding to the mRNA 5'-cap structure could have been impaired in cap-dependent translation. It turned out that shutdown of cellular protein translation resulted in a pro-survival effect on mosquito cells in response to DENV2 infection. As synthesis of viral proteins was not affected by the PERK signal pathway, an alternate mode other than cap-dependent translation may be utilized. This finding provides insights into elucidating how the PERK signal

  11. A New Episomic Element Controlling Fermentative Metabolism and Excretion of Amino Acids by Citrobacter intermedium C3

    PubMed Central

    Pares, R.; Guinea, J.; Hernandez, S.; Valoix, Josefina; Jofre, J.

    1974-01-01

    Glutamate excretion by colonies of Citrobacter intermedium C3 was detected by using the auxotrophic strain Leuconostoc mesenteroides P-60. A constant ratio of strain C3 colonies did not excrete glutamate. These colonies were subcultured, and colonial analysis of their descendants established that the change from non-excretor to excretor (Sg− → Sg+) is a spontaneous and random process with occurs at a high rate, and that an equilibrium state results from the back-transition Sg+ → Sg− in large populations. Acridine orange, ethidium bromide, and shaking have a strong influence on Sg+-to-Sg− interconversion, which suggests that a genetic element like an episome is implicated (S factor). Various auxotrophic mutants of bacterial strain C3 have been cured of the S factor. Strains lacking the S factor (S− strains) do not excrete glutamate and lose their fermentative metabolism completely. Consequently, the S factor is different from other extrachromosomal genetic factors whose elimination does not modify central metabolism. The gain of the S factor by infectious transfer has been shown with different C3 auxotrophic mutant strains. Also, the S factor has been transferred to Paracolobactrum intermedium ATCC 11606. These findings suggest that phenotypic changes observed are a consequence of elimination or infectious gain of the S factor, with its autonomous or integrated multiplication. PMID:4600693

  12. The proteins secreted by Trichomonas vaginalis and vaginal epithelial cell response to secreted and episomally expressed AP65

    PubMed Central

    Kucknoor, Ashwini S.; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Alderete, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We showed recently that contact of human vaginal epithelial cells (VECs) by Trichomonas vaginalis and incubation with trichomonad proteins in conditioned medium induced expression of VEC genes. We performed 2-D SDS-PAGE followed by MALDI-TOF to identify the major secreted proteins. Based on protein abundance and separation of spots in 2-D gels, 32 major secreted proteins were examined, which gave 19 proteins with accession numbers. These proteins included known secreted cysteine proteinases. In addition, other secreted proteins were enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, adhesin protein AP65, heat shock proteins, thioredoxin reductase and coronins. We confirmed that the secreted trichomonad proteins induced expression of VEC genes, including interleukin 8 (IL-8), COX-2 and fibronectin. Purified AP65 added to VECs had a pronounced effect only on IL-8 gene expression, which was inhibited in the presence of 12G4 monoclonal antibody to AP65. Moreover, AP65 expressed episomally within epithelial cells was found to enhance the expression of IL-8 and COX-2. This may be the first report of analysis of the secreted proteins of T. vaginalis and of the host epithelial cell response to these proteins and to the prominent adhesin AP65. PMID:17590165

  13. MiR-34b-5p Suppresses Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 (MDA5) Signaling Pathway to Promote Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J)-Infected Cells Proliferaction and ALV-J Replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhui; Luo, Qingbin; Xu, Haiping; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Feng, Min; Cai, Bolin; Zhang, Xiaocui; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that has a similar replication cycle to multiple viruses and therefore can be used as a model system for viral entry into host cells. However, there are few reports on the genes or microRNAs (miRNAs) that are responsible for the replication of ALV-J. Our previous miRNA and RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of miR-34b-5p was significantly upregulated in ALV-J-infected chicken spleens compared to non-infected chicken spleens, but melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) had the opposite expression pattern. In this study, a dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that MDA5 is a direct target of miR-34b-5p. In vitro, overexpression of miR-34b-5p accelerated the proliferation of ALV-J-infected cells by inducing the progression from G2 to S phase and it promoted cell migration. Ectopic expression of MDA5 inhibited ALV-J-infected cell proliferation, the cell cycle and cell migration, and knockdown of MDA5 promoted proliferation, the cell cycle and migration. In addition, during ALV-J infections, MDA5 can detect virus invasion and it triggers the MDA5 signaling pathway. MDA5 overexpression can activate the MDA5 signaling pathway, and thus it can inhibit the mRNA and protein expression of the ALV-J env gene and it can suppress virion secretion. In contrast, in response to the knockdown of MDA5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an miR-34b-5p mimic, genes in the MDA5 signaling pathway were significantly downregulated (P < 0.05), but the mRNA and protein expression of ALV-J env and the sample-to-positive ratio of virion in the supernatants were increased. This indicates that miR-34b-5p is able to trigger the MDA5 signaling pathway and affect ALV-J infections. Together, these results suggest that miR-34b-5p targets MDA5 to accelerate the proliferation and migration of ALV-J-infected cells, and it promotes ALV-J replication, via the MDA5 signaling pathway.

  14. MiR-34b-5p Suppresses Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 (MDA5) Signaling Pathway to Promote Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J (ALV-J)-Infected Cells Proliferaction and ALV-J Replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhui; Luo, Qingbin; Xu, Haiping; Zheng, Ming; Abdalla, Bahareldin Ali; Feng, Min; Cai, Bolin; Zhang, Xiaocui; Nie, Qinghua; Zhang, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) is an oncogenic retrovirus that has a similar replication cycle to multiple viruses and therefore can be used as a model system for viral entry into host cells. However, there are few reports on the genes or microRNAs (miRNAs) that are responsible for the replication of ALV-J. Our previous miRNA and RNA sequencing data showed that the expression of miR-34b-5p was significantly upregulated in ALV-J-infected chicken spleens compared to non-infected chicken spleens, but melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) had the opposite expression pattern. In this study, a dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that MDA5 is a direct target of miR-34b-5p. In vitro, overexpression of miR-34b-5p accelerated the proliferation of ALV-J-infected cells by inducing the progression from G2 to S phase and it promoted cell migration. Ectopic expression of MDA5 inhibited ALV-J-infected cell proliferation, the cell cycle and cell migration, and knockdown of MDA5 promoted proliferation, the cell cycle and migration. In addition, during ALV-J infections, MDA5 can detect virus invasion and it triggers the MDA5 signaling pathway. MDA5 overexpression can activate the MDA5 signaling pathway, and thus it can inhibit the mRNA and protein expression of the ALV-J env gene and it can suppress virion secretion. In contrast, in response to the knockdown of MDA5 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) or an miR-34b-5p mimic, genes in the MDA5 signaling pathway were significantly downregulated (P < 0.05), but the mRNA and protein expression of ALV-J env and the sample-to-positive ratio of virion in the supernatants were increased. This indicates that miR-34b-5p is able to trigger the MDA5 signaling pathway and affect ALV-J infections. Together, these results suggest that miR-34b-5p targets MDA5 to accelerate the proliferation and migration of ALV-J-infected cells, and it promotes ALV-J replication, via the MDA5 signaling pathway. PMID:28194372

  15. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Seho; Lim, Chunghun; Lee, Jae Young; Song, Yoon-Jae; Park, Junsoo; Choe, Joonho; Seo, Taegun

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  16. Chikungunya virus nsP3 & nsP4 interacts with HSP-90 to promote virus replication: HSP-90 inhibitors reduce CHIKV infection and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Abhay P S; Haystead, Timothy; Das, Pratyush K; Merits, Andres; Ng, Mah-Lee; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2014-03-01

    The global emergence of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection is alarming and currently there is no licensed vaccine or antiviral treatment available to mitigate this disease. CHIKV infection typically results in high viral load with an outcome of high fever, skin rashes, muscle pain, and sequelae of prolonged arthritis, which occurs in >90% of the infected cases. In this study, using biochemical pull-downs, mass-spectrometry, and microscopic imaging techniques, we have identified novel interactions between CHIKV nsP3 or nsP4 proteins with the host stress-pathway chaperone HSP-90 protein. Indeed, silencing of HSP-90 transcripts using siRNA disrupts CHIKV replication in cultured cells. Furthermore, drugs targeting HSP-90, such as commercially available geldanamycin, as well as other specific HSP-90 inhibitor drugs that had been obtained from a purinome mining approach (HS-10 and SNX-2112) showed dramatic reduction in viral titers and reduced inflammation in a CHIKV mouse model of severe infection and musculopathy. The detailed study of the underlying molecular mechanism of these viral and host protein interactions may provide a platform to develop novel therapeutics against CHIKV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Diversification of DnaA dependency for DNA replication in cyanobacterial evolution.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Watanabe, Satoru; Ehira, Shigeki; Kanesaki, Yu; Chibazakura, Taku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Regulating DNA replication is essential for all living cells. The DNA replication initiation factor DnaA is highly conserved in prokaryotes and is required for accurate initiation of chromosomal replication at oriC. DnaA-independent free-living bacteria have not been identified. The dnaA gene is absent in plastids and some symbiotic bacteria, although it is not known when or how DnaA-independent mechanisms were acquired. Here, we show that the degree of dependency of DNA replication on DnaA varies among cyanobacterial species. Deletion of the dnaA gene in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 shifted DNA replication from oriC to a different site as a result of the integration of an episomal plasmid. Moreover, viability during the stationary phase was higher in dnaA disruptants than in wild-type cells. Deletion of dnaA did not affect DNA replication or cell growth in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, indicating that functional dependency on DnaA was already lost in some nonsymbiotic cyanobacterial lineages during diversification. Therefore, we proposed that cyanobacteria acquired DnaA-independent replication mechanisms before symbiosis and such an ancestral cyanobacterium was the sole primary endosymbiont to form a plastid precursor.

  18. Differentially active origins of DNA replication in tumor versus normal cells.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Domenic; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2006-05-15

    Previously, a degenerate 36 bp human consensus sequence was identified as a determinant of autonomous replication in eukaryotic cells. Random mutagenesis analyses further identified an internal 20 bp of the 36 bp consensus sequence as sufficient for acting as a core origin element. Here, we have located six versions of the 20 bp consensus sequence (20mer) on human chromosome 19q13 over a region spanning approximately 211 kb and tested them for ectopic and in situ replication activity by transient episomal replication assays and nascent DNA strand abundance analyses, respectively. The six versions of the 20mer alone were capable of supporting autonomous replication of their respective plasmids, unlike random genomic sequence of the same length. Furthermore, comparative analyses of the endogenous replication activity of these 20mers at their respective chromosomal sites, in five tumor/transformed and two normal cell lines, done by in situ chromosomal DNA replication assays, involving preparation of nascent DNA by the lambda exonuclease method and quantification by real-time PCR, showed that these sites coincided with chromosomal origins of DNA replication in all cell lines. Moreover, a 2- to 3-fold higher origin activity in the tumor/transformed cells by comparison to the normal cells was observed, suggesting a higher activation of these origins in tumor/transformed cell lines.

  19. Rapid and quantitative assessment of KSHV LANA-mediated DNA replication.

    PubMed

    De León Vázquez, Erika; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2011-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates DNA replication of terminal repeat (TR) DNA to enable viral episome persistence in latently infected cells. Southern blotting is routinely used to detect LANA-replicated DNA. We developed and validated a real-time PCR assay for TR-associated DNA and compared it with Southern blot analysis. Both PCR and Southern blot detected LANA-replicated DNA, but the PCR assay was more rapid and did not require radioisotope. PCR detection at 24 and 72 hours post-transfection demonstrated rapid loss of transfected TR DNA. LANA, and to a lesser extent a moderately deficient LANA mutant, reduced the rate of DNA loss through addition of replicated TR DNA and reduction in the loss of non-replicated DNA, the latter of which is consistent with LANA's nuclear segregation function. Therefore, this work develops a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay to detect KSHV LANA-replicated DNA and demonstrates that LANA reduces TR DNA loss after transfection through replication and nuclear partitioning of TR DNA.

  20. Archaeal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  1. Mapping of histone modifications in episomal HBV cccDNA uncovers an unusual chromatin organization amenable to epigenetic manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Tropberger, Philipp; Mercier, Alexandre; Robinson, Margaret; Zhong, Weidong; Ganem, Don E.; Holdorf, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects 240 million people worldwide and is a major risk factor for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Current antiviral therapy inhibits cytoplasmic HBV genomic replication, but is not curative because it does not directly affect nuclear HBV closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the genomic form that templates viral transcription and sustains viral persistence. Novel approaches that directly target cccDNA regulation would therefore be highly desirable. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here, using a new cccDNA ChIP-Seq approach, we report, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide maps of PTMs in cccDNA-containing chromatin from de novo infected HepG2 cells, primary human hepatocytes, and from HBV-infected liver tissue. We find high levels of PTMs associated with active transcription enriched at specific sites within the HBV genome and, surprisingly, very low levels of PTMs linked to transcriptional repression even at silent HBV promoters. We show that transcription and active PTMs in HBV chromatin are reduced by the activation of an innate immunity pathway, and that this effect can be recapitulated with a small molecule epigenetic modifying agent, opening the possibility that chromatin-based regulation of cccDNA transcription could be a new therapeutic approach to chronic HBV infection. PMID:26438841

  2. FANCD2 Binds Human Papillomavirus Genomes and Associates with a Distinct Set of DNA Repair Proteins to Regulate Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Spriggs, Chelsey C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The life cycle of human papillomavirus (HPV) is dependent on the differentiation state of its host cell. HPV genomes are maintained as low-copy episomes in basal epithelial cells and amplified to thousands of copies per cell in differentiated layers. Replication of high-risk HPVs requires the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) DNA repair pathways. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway is a part of the DNA damage response and mediates cross talk between the ATM and ATR pathways. Our studies show that HPV activates the FA pathway, leading to the accumulation of a key regulatory protein, FANCD2, in large nuclear foci. These HPV-dependent foci colocalize with a distinct population of DNA repair proteins, including ATM components γH2AX and BRCA1, but infrequently with p-SMC1, which is required for viral genome amplification in differentiated cells. Furthermore, FANCD2 is found at viral replication foci, where it is preferentially recruited to viral genomes compared to cellular chromosomes and is required for maintenance of HPV episomes in undifferentiated cells. These findings identify FANCD2 as an important regulator of HPV replication and provide insight into the role of the DNA damage response in the differentiation-dependent life cycle of HPV. PMID:28196964

  3. EAT-UP™ Family-Centered Feeding Intervention to Promote Food Acceptance and Decrease Challenging Behaviors: A Single-Case Experimental Design Replicated Across Three Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cosbey, Joanna; Muldoon, Deirdre

    2017-03-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a family-centered feeding intervention, Easing Anxiety Together with Understanding and Perseverance (EAT-UP™), for promoting food acceptance of children with autism spectrum disorder at home. A concurrent multiple-baseline design was used with systematic replication across three families. Baseline was followed by an 'Intervention-Coaching' phase and then an 'Intervention-Independent' phase. Using direct observation and pre- and post-intervention questionnaires, data on acceptance of less preferred foods and challenging mealtime behaviors were collected. Procedural fidelity was monitored throughout all study phases. Data were analyzed using visual analysis and measures of effect size. All children demonstrated increases in food acceptance (effect size >0.90) and dietary diversity and decreased challenging behaviors. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  4. Association between the APOA2 promoter polymorphism and body weight in Mediterranean and Asian populations: replication of a gene-saturated fat interaction.

    PubMed

    Corella, D; Tai, E S; Sorlí, J V; Chew, S K; Coltell, O; Sotos-Prieto, M; García-Rios, A; Estruch, R; Ordovas, J M

    2011-05-01

    The APOA2 gene has been associated with obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in animal and human studies with controversial results. We have reported an APOA2-saturated fat interaction determining body mass index (BMI) and obesity in American populations. This work aims to extend our findings to European and Asian populations. Cross-sectional study in 4602 subjects from two independent populations: a high-cardiovascular risk Mediterranean population (n = 907 men and women; aged 67 ± 6 years) and a multiethnic Asian population (n = 2506 Chinese, n = 605 Malays and n = 494 Asian Indians; aged 39 ± 12 years) participating in a Singapore National Health Survey. Anthropometric, clinical, biochemical, lifestyle and dietary variables were determined. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was used in Asians. We analyzed gene-diet interactions between the APOA2 -265T>C polymorphism and saturated fat intake (replicated the APOA2-saturated fat interaction on body weight. In Mediterranean individuals, the CC genotype was associated with a 6.8% greater BMI in those consuming a high (P = 0.018), but not a low (P = 0.316) saturated fat diet. Likewise, the CC genotype was significantly associated with higher obesity prevalence in Chinese and Asian Indians only, with a high-saturated fat intake (P = 0.036). We also found a significant APOA2-saturated fat interaction in determining IR in Chinese and Asian Indians (P = 0.026). The influence of the APOA2 -265T>C polymorphism on body-weight-related measures was modulated by saturated fat in Mediterranean and Asian populations.

  5. Association between the APOA2 promoter polymorphism and body-weight in Mediterranean and Asian populations. Replication of a gene-saturated fat interaction

    PubMed Central

    Corella, Dolores; Tai, E Shyong; Sorlí, Jose V; Kai Chew, Suok; Coltell, Oscar; Sotos-Prieto, Mercedes; García-Rios, Antonio; Estruch, Ramón; Ordovas, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The APOA2 gene has been associated with obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in animal and human studies with controversial results. We have reported an APOA2-saturated fat interaction determining body mass index (BMI) and obesity in American populations. This work aims to extend our findings to European and Asian populations. Methods Cross-sectional study in 4602 subjects from 2 independent populations: A high cardiovascular risk Mediterranean population (n=907 men and women; aged 67+/−6 years) and a multiethnic Asian population (n=2506 Chinese, n=605 Malays and n=494 Asian Indians; aged 39+/−12 years), participating in a Singapore National Health Survey. Anthropometric, clinical, biochemical, lifestyle and dietary variables were determined. Homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) was used in Asians. We analyzed gene-diet interactions between the APOA2 −265T>C polymorphism and saturated fat intake (=22 g/d) on anthropometric measures and IR. Results Frequency of CC subjects differed among populations (1%–15%). We confirmed a recessive effect of the APOA2 polymorphism, and replicated the APOA2–saturated fat interaction on body-weight. In Mediterranean individuals, the CC genotype was associated with a 6.8% greater BMI in those consuming a high (P=0.018), but not a low (P=0.316) saturated fat diet. Likewise, the CC genotype was significantly associated with higher obesity prevalence in Chinese and Asian Indians only with a high-saturated fat intake (P=0.036). We also found a significant APOA2-saturated fat interaction in determining IR in Chinese and Asian Indians (P=0.026). Conclusion The influence of the APOA2 −265T>C polymorphism on body-weight-related measures was modulated by saturated fat in Mediterranean and Asian populations. PMID:20975728

  6. Cytoplasmic Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Diaz, Arturo; Ahlquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm compartmentalize their genome replication and transcription in organelle-like structures that enhance replication efficiency and protection from host defenses. In particular, recent studies with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses have further elucidated the ultrastructure of membrane-bounded RNA replication complexes and their close coordination with virion assembly and budding. The structure, function and assembly of some positive-strand RNA virus replication complexes have parallels and potential evolutionary links with the replicative cores of double-strand RNA virus and retrovirus virions, and more general similarities with the replication factories of cytoplasmic DNA viruses. PMID:20638644

  7. Differential Regulation of the Overlapping Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus vGCR (orf74) and LANA (orf73) Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joseph; Papin, James; Dittmer, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    Similar to that of other herpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) lytic replication destroys the host cell, while the virus can persist in a latent state in synchrony with the host. During latency only a few genes are transcribed, and the question becomes one of what determines latent versus lytic gene expression. Here we undertake a detailed analysis of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA [orf73]) promoter (LANAp). We characterized a minimal region that is necessary and sufficient to maintain high-level transcription in all tissues tested, including primary endothelial cells and B cells, which are the suspected natural host for KSHV. We show that in transient-transfection assays LANAp mimics the expression pattern observed for the authentic promoter in the context of the KSHV episome. Unlike other KSHV promoters tested thus far, LANAp is not affected by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate or viral lytic cycle functions. It is, however, subject to control by LANA itself and cellular regulatory factors, such as p53. This is in contrast to the K14/vGCR (orf74) promoter, which overlaps LANAp and directs transcription on the opposite strand. We isolated a minimal cis-regulatory region sufficient for K14/vGCR promoter activity and show that it, too, mimics the regulation observed for the authentic viral promoter. In particular, we demonstrate that its activity is absolutely dependent on the immediate-early transactivator orf50, the KSHV homolog of the Epstein-Barr virus Rta transactivator. PMID:11160678

  8. Genetic reprogramming of human amniotic cells with episomal vectors: neural rosettes as sentinels in candidate selection for validation assays

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    The promise of genetic reprogramming has prompted initiatives to develop banks of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from diverse sources. Sentinel assays for pluripotency could maximize available resources for generating iPSCs. Neural rosettes represent a primitive neural tissue that is unique to differentiating PSCs and commonly used to identify derivative neural/stem progenitors. Here, neural rosettes were used as a sentinel assay for pluripotency in selection of candidates to advance to validation assays. Candidate iPSCs were generated from independent populations of amniotic cells with episomal vectors. Phase imaging of living back up cultures showed neural rosettes in 2 of the 5 candidate populations. Rosettes were immunopositive for the Sox1, Sox2, Pax6 and Pax7 transcription factors that govern neural development in the earliest stage of development and for the Isl1/2 and Otx2 transcription factors that are expressed in the dorsal and ventral domains, respectively, of the neural tube in vivo. Dissociation of rosettes produced cultures of differentiation competent neural/stem progenitors that generated immature neurons that were immunopositive for βIII-tubulin and glia that were immunopositive for GFAP. Subsequent validation assays of selected candidates showed induced expression of endogenous pluripotency genes, epigenetic modification of chromatin and formation of teratomas in immunodeficient mice that contained derivatives of the 3 embryonic germ layers. Validated lines were vector-free and maintained a normal karyotype for more than 60 passages. The credibility of rosette assembly as a sentinel assay for PSCs is supported by coordinate loss of nuclear-localized pluripotency factors Oct4 and Nanog in neural rosettes that emerge spontaneously in cultures of self-renewing validated lines. Taken together, these findings demonstrate value in neural rosettes as sentinels for pluripotency and selection of promising candidates for advance to validation

  9. TORC1 kinase and the S-phase cyclin Clb5 collaborate to promote mitotic spindle assembly and DNA replication in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lieu T.; Wang’ondu, Ruth W.; Weng, Jessica B.; Wanjiku, Grace W.; Fong, Chi M.; Kile, Andrew C.; Koepp, Deanna M.; Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    The Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell growth that is inhibited by the drug rapamycin. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, translational defects associated with TORC1 inactivation inhibit cell cycle progression at an early stage in G1, but little is known about the possible roles for TORC1 later in the cell cycle. We investigated the rapamycin-hypersensitivity phenotype of cells lacking the S phase cyclin Clb5 (clb5Δ) as a basis for uncovering novel connections between TORC1 and the cell cycle regulatory machinery. Dosage suppression experiments suggested that the clb5Δ rapamycin hypersensitivity reflects a unique Clb5-associated cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) function that cannot be performed by mitotic cyclins and that also involves motor proteins, particularly the kinesin-like protein Kip3. Synchronized cell experiments revealed rapamycin-induced defects in pre-anaphase spindle assembly and S phase progression that were more severe in clb5Δ than in wild type cells but no apparent activation of Rad53-dependent checkpoint pathways. Some rapamycin-treated cells had aberrant spindle morphologies, but rapamycin did not cause gross defects in the microtubule cytoskeleton. We propose a model in which TORC1 and Clb5/CDK act coordinately to promote both spindle assembly via a pathway involving Kip3 and S phase progression. PMID:20697716

  10. Replication of Tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-08-04

    Tobacco mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses have served as models for studying the mechanisms of viral RNA replication. In tobamoviruses, genomic RNA replication occurs via several steps: (a) synthesis of viral replication proteins by translation of the genomic RNA; (b) translation-coupled binding of the replication proteins to a 5'-terminal region of the genomic RNA; (c) recruitment of the genomic RNA by replication proteins onto membranes and formation of a complex with host proteins TOM1 and ARL8; (d) synthesis of complementary (negative-strand) RNA in the complex; and (e) synthesis of progeny genomic RNA. This article reviews current knowledge on tobamovirus RNA replication, particularly regarding how the genomic RNA is specifically selected as a replication template and how the replication proteins are activated. We also focus on the roles of the replication proteins in evading or suppressing host defense systems.

  11. Cytotoxic effect of replication-competent adenoviral vectors carrying L-plastin promoter regulated E1A and cytosine deaminase genes in cancers of the breast, ovary and colon.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Hakan; Zhang, Lixin; Tang, Yucheng; Deisseroth, Albert

    2003-05-01

    Prodrug activating transcription unit gene therapy is one of several promising approaches to cancer gene therapy. Combining that approach with conditionally replication-competent viral vectors that are truly tumor specific has been an important objective of recent work. In this study, we report the construction of a new conditionally replication-competent bicistronic adenoviral vector in which the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene and the E1a gene are driven by the L-plastin tumor-specific promoter (AdLpCDIRESE1a). A similar vector driven by the CMV promoter has also been constructed (AdCMVCDIRESE1a) as a control. We have carried out in vitro cytotoxicity in carcinomas of the breast, ovary and colon, and in vivo efficacy studies with these vectors in an animal model of colon cancer. While the addition of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector to established cancer cell lines showed significant cytotoxicity in tumor cells derived from carcinomas of the breast (MCF-7), colon (HTB-38) and ovary (Ovcar 5), no significant toxicity was seen in explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) exposed to this vector. The addition of 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) significantly increased the cytotoxicity in an additive fashion of both the AdLpCDIRESE1a and AdCMVCDIRESE1a vectors as well as that of the AdLpCD replication incompetent vector to established tumor cell lines. However, no significant cytotoxicity was observed with the addition of 5FC to explant cultures of normal human mammary epithelial cells that had been exposed to the L-plastin-driven vectors. Studies with mixtures of infected and uninfected tumor cell lines showed that the established cancer cell lines infected with the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector generated significant toxicity to surrounding uninfected cells (the "bystander effect") even at a ratio of 0.25 of infected cells to infected + uninfected cells in the presence of 5FC. The injection of the AdLpCDIRESE1a vector into subcutaneous deposits of human tumor nodules in the

  12. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    PubMed

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  13. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-01-01

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress. PMID:26113155

  14. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  16. Hyperthermia Stimulates HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42–45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38–40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity. PMID:22807676

  17. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Fragkos, Michalis; Naim, Valeria

    2017-04-03

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease.

  18. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease. PMID:28166452

  19. Amino Acids in the Basic Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus ZEBRA Protein Play Distinct Roles in DNA Binding, Activation of Early Lytic Gene Expression, and Promotion of Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Heston, Lee; El-Guindy, Ayman; Countryman, Jill; Dela Cruz, Charles; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2006-01-01

    to DNA, in activating Rta, in stimulating early lytic gene expression, and in promoting viral DNA replication and viral late gene expression. These results are discussed in relationship to the recently solved crystal structure of ZEBRA bound to an AP-1 site. PMID:16940523

  20. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus.

    PubMed

    Bloom, David C; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria; Voellmy, Richard

    2015-10-01

    We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate, stringent regulation of

  1. Mechanisms for Initiating Cellular DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Alessandro; Hood, Iris V.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication represents a committing step to cell proliferation. Appropriate replication onset depends on multiprotein complexes that help properly distinguish origin regions, generate nascent replication bubbles, and promote replisome formation. This review describes initiation systems employed by bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes, with a focus on comparing and contrasting molecular mechanisms among organisms. Although commonalities can be found in the functional domains and strategies used to carry out and regulate initiation, many key participants have markedly different activities and appear to have evolved convergently. Despite significant advances in the field, major questions still persist in understanding how initiation programs are executed at the molecular level. PMID:23746253

  2. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. IMPORTANCE The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate

  3. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-11-29

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators.

  4. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed Central

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-01-01

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators. PMID:11127914

  5. Alimentary fibropapilloma in cattle: a spontaneous tumor, nonpermissive for papillomavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, W F; Campo, M S; Blaxter, M L; O'Neil, B W; Laird, H M; Moar, M H; Sartirana, M L

    1984-08-01

    Fibropapillomatosis of the upper alimentary canal of cattle is described. The tumors, found in the esophagus, esophageal groove, and rumen, showed involvement of the subepithelial fibroblasts as well as of the squamous epithelial layer. Although the fibropapilloma cells harbored multiple episomal copies of the genome of bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) easily detected by hybridization techniques, no mature virus could be isolated from these lesions or seen by electron microscopy, and no viral antigen could be detected by immunohistochemical methods. It would appear, therefore, that within the limitations of the techniques employed the alimentary canal epithelium and the underlying fibroblasts, while allowing BPV-2 DNA replication, are nonpermissive for the expression of the viral vegetative functions and that transformation of the epithelial cells, like transformation of fibroblasts, can take place in the absence of infectious viral progeny.

  6. Prelife catalysts and replicators

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Life is based on replication and evolution. But replication cannot be taken for granted. We must ask what there was prior to replication and evolution. How does evolution begin? We have proposed prelife as a generative system that produces information and diversity in the absence of replication. We model prelife as a binary soup of active monomers that form random polymers. ‘Prevolutionary’ dynamics can have mutation and selection prior to replication. Some sequences might have catalytic activity, thereby enhancing the rates of certain prelife reactions. We study the selection criteria for these prelife catalysts. Their catalytic efficiency must be above certain critical values. We find a maintenance threshold and an initiation threshold. The former is a linear function of sequence length, and the latter is an exponential function of sequence length. Therefore, it is extremely hard to select for prelife catalysts that have long sequences. We compare prelife catalysis with a simple model for replication. Assuming fast template-based elongation reactions, we can show that replicators have selection thresholds that are independent of their sequence length. Our calculation demonstrates the efficiency of replication and provides an explanation of why replication was selected over other forms of prelife catalysis. PMID:19692408

  7. Recruitment of ORC or CDC6 to DNA is sufficient to create an artificial origin of replication in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, David Y; Shibata, Yoshiyuki; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Dutta, Anindya

    2005-12-01

    Origins of replication are expected to recruit initiation proteins like origin recognition complex (ORC) and Cdc6 in eukaryotes and provide a platform for unwinding DNA. Here we test whether localization of initiation proteins onto DNA is sufficient for origin function. Different components of the ORC complex and Cdc6 stimulated prereplicative complex (pre-RC) formation and replication initiation when fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain and recruited to plasmid DNA containing a tandem array of GAL4-binding sites. Replication occurred once per cell cycle and was inhibited by Geminin, indicating that the plasmid was properly licensed during the cell cycle. The GAL4 fusion protein recruits other polypeptides of the ORC-Cdc6 complex, and nascent strand abundance was highest near the GAL4-binding sites. Therefore, the artificial origin recapitulates many of the regulatory features of physiological origins and is valuable for studies on replication initiation in mammalian cells. We demonstrated the utility of this system by showing the functional importance of the ATPase domains of human Cdc6 and Orc1 and the dispensability of the N-terminal segments of Orc1 and Orc2 in this assay. Artificial recruitment of a eukaryotic cellular replication initiation factor to a DNA sequence can create a functional origin of replication, providing a robust genetic assay for these factors and a novel approach to generating episomal vectors for gene therapy.

  8. Who Needs Replication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the editor of a recent Cambridge University Press book on research methods discusses replicating previous key studies to throw more light on their reliability and generalizability. Replication research is presented as an accepted method of validating previous research by providing comparability between the original and replicated…

  9. Project New Pride: Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, is establishing a new discretionary grant program entitled Replication of Project New Pride: A Serious Offender Youth Treatment Program. Project New Pride was chosen for replication because of its demonstrated effectiveness in Denver, Colorado,…

  10. Thermal Replication Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The hallmark of living matter is the replication of genetic molecules and their active storage against diffusion. We have argued in the past that thermal convection can host the million-fold accumulation even of single nucleotides and at the same time trigger exponential replication. Accumulation is driven by thermophoresis and convection in elongated chambers, replication by the inherent temperature cycling in convection. Optothermal pumping [2,3] allows to implement the thermal trap efficiently in a toroidal or linear geometry. Based on this method, we were in a position to combine accumulation and replication of DNA in the same chamber. As we are missing a solid chemistry of prebiotic replication, we used as a proxy reaction for to replication the polymerase chain reaction. Convective flow both drives the DNA replicating polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while concurrent thermophoresis accumulates the replicated 143 base pair DNA in bulk solution. The time constant for accumulation is 92 s while DNA is doubled every 50 s. The length of the amplified DNA is checked with thermophoresis. Finite element simulations confirm the findings. The experiments explore conditions in pores of hydrothermal rock which can serve as a model environment for the origin of life and has prospects towards the first autonomous evolution, hosting the Darwin process by molecular selection using the thermophoretic trap. On the other side, the implemented continuous evolution will be able to breed well specified DNA or RNA molecules in the future.

  11. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  12. siRNAs against the Epstein Barr virus latency replication factor, EBNA1, inhibit its function and growth of EBV-dependent tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qinyan; Flemington, Erik K

    2006-03-15

    The Epstein Barr virus (EBV) plays a role in maintenance of the tumor phenotype in a number of human cancers. The EBV latency replication factor, EBNA1, is required for persistence of the EBV episome, is anti-apoptotic, and is universally expressed in all EBV-associated tumors. Here, we show that EBNA1-specific siRNAs can inhibit EBNA1 expression and function. siRNAs were generated against three target sites in the EBNA1 messenger RNA, and two of these were found to inhibit EBNA1 expression from an ectopic EBNA1 expression cassette. EBNA1 siRNAs also inhibit endogenously expressed EBNA1 in EBV-positive epithelial and B-cell lines. Using a mini-EBV replication model, siRNA-mediated inhibition of EBNA1 expression suppressed the episomal maintenance function of EBNA1. Lastly, introduction of an EBNA1 siRNA into an EBV-positive tumor cell line inhibited tumor cell growth/survival. These data suggest that siRNAs against EBNA1 may have therapeutic value in EBV-associated diseases.

  13. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  14. FANCD2 Binds Human Papillomavirus Genomes and Associates with a Distinct Set of DNA Repair Proteins to Regulate Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Chelsey C; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2017-02-14

    The life cycle of human papillomavirus (HPV) is dependent on the differentiation state of its host cell. HPV genomes are maintained as low-copy episomes in basal epithelial cells and amplified to thousands of copies per cell in differentiated layers. Replication of high-risk HPVs requires the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) DNA repair pathways. The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway is a part of the DNA damage response and mediates cross talk between the ATM and ATR pathways. Our studies show that HPV activates the FA pathway, leading to the accumulation of a key regulatory protein, FANCD2, in large nuclear foci. These HPV-dependent foci colocalize with a distinct population of DNA repair proteins, including ATM components γH2AX and BRCA1, but infrequently with p-SMC1, which is required for viral genome amplification in differentiated cells. Furthermore, FANCD2 is found at viral replication foci, where it is preferentially recruited to viral genomes compared to cellular chromosomes and is required for maintenance of HPV episomes in undifferentiated cells. These findings identify FANCD2 as an important regulator of HPV replication and provide insight into the role of the DNA damage response in the differentiation-dependent life cycle of HPV.IMPORTANCE High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer and are linked to the development of many other anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Identification of host cellular pathways involved in regulating the viral life cycle may be helpful in identifying treatments for HPV lesions. Mutations in genes of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway lead to genomic instability in patients and a predisposition to HPV-associated malignancies. Our studies demonstrate that FA pathway component FANCD2 is recruited to HPV DNA, associates with members of the ATM DNA repair pathway, and is essential for the maintenance of viral episomes in basal

  15. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  16. Poxvirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are large, enveloped viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm and encode proteins for DNA replication and gene expression. Hairpin ends link the two strands of the linear, double-stranded DNA genome. Viral proteins involved in DNA synthesis include a 117-kDa polymerase, a helicase–primase, a uracil DNA glycosylase, a processivity factor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a protein kinase, and a DNA ligase. A viral FEN1 family protein participates in double-strand break repair. The DNA is replicated as long concatemers that are resolved by a viral Holliday junction endonuclease. PMID:23838441

  17. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  18. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  19. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  20. Host DNA Damage Response Factors Localize to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus DNA Replication Sites To Support Efficient Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Sabrina H.; Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Buck, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making MCPyV the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. With the high prevalence of MCPyV infection and the increasing amount of MCC diagnosis, there is a need to better understand the virus and its oncogenic potential. In this study, we examined the relationship between the host DNA damage response (DDR) and MCPyV replication. We found that components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways accumulate in MCPyV large T antigen (LT)-positive nuclear foci in cells infected with native MCPyV virions. To further study MCPyV replication, we employed our previously established system, in which recombinant MCPyV episomal DNA is autonomously replicated in cultured cells. Similar to native MCPyV infection, where both MCPyV origin and LT are present, the host DDR machinery colocalized with LT in distinct nuclear foci. Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation analysis showed that these DDR proteins and MCPyV LT in fact colocalized at the actively replicating MCPyV replication complexes, which were absent when a replication-defective LT mutant or an MCPyV-origin mutant was introduced in place of wild-type LT or wild-type viral origin. Inhibition of DDR kinases using chemical inhibitors and ATR/ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown reduced MCPyV DNA replication without significantly affecting LT expression or the host cell cycle. This study demonstrates that these host DDR factors are important for MCPyV DNA replication, providing new insight into the host machinery involved in the MCPyV life cycle. IMPORTANCE MCPyV is the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. However, the MCPyV life cycle and its oncogenic mechanism remain poorly understood. In this report, we show that, in cells infected with native MCPyV virions, components of the ATM- and ATR

  1. Replication of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming Y.; Matson, Lawrence E.; Lee, Heedong; Chen, Chenggang

    2009-08-01

    The fabrication of lightweight mirror assemblages via a replication technique offers great potential for eliminating the high cost and schedule associated with the grinding and polishing steps needed for conventional glass or SiC mirrors. A replication mandrel is polished to an inverse figure shape and to the desired finish quality. It is then, coated with a release layer, the appropriate reflective layer, and followed by a laminate for coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) tailorability and strength. This optical membrane is adhered to a mirror structural substrate with a low shrinkage, CTE tailored adhesive. Afterwards, the whole assembly is separated from the mandrel. The mandrel is then cleaned and reused for the next replication run. The ultimate goal of replication is to preserve the surface finish and figure of the optical membrane upon its release from the mandrel. Successful replication requires a minimization of the residual stresses within the optical coating stack, the curing stresses from the adhesive and the thermal stress resulting from CTE mismatch between the structural substrate, the adhesive, and the optical membrane. In this paper, the results on replicated trials using both metal/metal and ceramic/ceramic laminates adhered to light weighted structural substrates made from syntactic foams (both inorganic and organic) will be discussed.

  2. Impact of the MRN Complex on Adeno-Associated Virus Integration and Replication during Coinfection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Rachel; Jolinon, Nelly; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Berger, Gregory; Cimarelli, Andrea; Greco, Anna; Bertrand, Pascale; Odenthal, Margarete; Büning, Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a helper-dependent parvovirus that requires coinfection with adenovirus (AdV) or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to replicate. In the absence of the helper virus, AAV can persist in an episomal or integrated form. Previous studies have analyzed the DNA damage response (DDR) induced upon AAV replication to understand how it controls AAV replication. In particular, it was shown that the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, a major player of the DDR induced by double-stranded DNA breaks and stalled replication forks, could negatively regulate AdV and AAV replication during coinfection. In contrast, MRN favors HSV-1 replication and is recruited to AAV replication compartments that are induced in the presence of HSV-1. In this study, we examined the role of MRN during AAV replication induced by HSV-1. Our results indicated that knockdown of MRN significantly reduced AAV DNA replication after coinfection with wild-type (wt) HSV-1 or HSV-1 with the polymerase deleted. This effect was specific to wt AAV, since it did not occur with recombinant AAV vectors. Positive regulation of AAV replication by MRN was dependent on its DNA tethering activity but did not require its nuclease activities. Importantly, knockdown of MRN also negatively regulated AAV integration within the human AAVS1 site, both in the presence and in the absence of HSV-1. Altogether, this work identifies a new function of MRN during integration of the AAV genome and demonstrates that this DNA repair complex positively regulates AAV replication in the presence of HSV-1. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA genomes trigger a DNA damage response (DDR), which can be either detrimental or beneficial for virus replication. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a defective parvovirus that requires the help of an unrelated virus such as adenovirus (AdV) or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for productive replication. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cellular Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, a

  3. Influence of retinoblastoma-related gene silencing on the initiation of DNA replication by African cassava mosaic virus Rep in cells of mature leaves in Nicotiana benthamiana plants.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Gareth; Gu, Mei; Shi, Nongnong; Liu, Yule; Hong, Yiguo

    2011-12-28

    Geminiviruses mainly infect terminally differentiated tissues and cells in plants. They need to reprogramme host cellular machinery for DNA replication. This process is thought to be mediated by inactivation of cell-cycle repressor proteins and by induction of host DNA synthesis protein expression through actions of the geminviral replication initiator protein (Rep). Exploiting a Nicotiana benthamiana pOri2 line, which is transformed with a transgene consisting of a direct repeat of the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV)-replication origin (Ori) flanking a non-viral DNA region, and virus-induced RNA silencing (VIGS), the impact of host gene expression on replication of the ACMV-derived replicon was investigated. The ACMV Rep trans-replicated the viral episomal replicon in leaves of young but not older pOri2 plants. Upon VIGS-mediated down-regulation of N. benthamiana NbRBR1, the retinoblastoma-related protein gene coding for a negative cell-cycle suppressor, recovered the ability of ACMV Rep for trans DNA replication, whereas the silencing of NbPCNA coding for the sliding clamp of DNA polymerase had no effect. These results suggest that the cellular machinery for DNA replication in differentiated tissues of older leaves cannot be reprogrammed by Rep alone but may need other uncharacterised viral and plant factors. © 2011 Bruce et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. Success of the PCR-based replication assay depends on the number of methylation sensitive restriction sites in the PCR amplifying region.

    PubMed

    Metta, M K; Tantravahi, S; Kunaparaju, R

    2015-06-02

    The PCR—based replication assay is one of the most simple, quick and economical methods for the analysis of episomal replication. However, in spite of its advantages the method has not been able to replace the southern—based replication assay, the latter of which is a tedious and time—consuming process. This is due to the generation of spurious amplification products in the PCR—based replication assay. The replication assay is based on the use of methylation—sensitive restriction endonucleases (eg. DpnI, MboI) to distinguish bacterial replicated (adenosine methylated) and mammalian replicated plasmids (adenosine non—methylated). In this work we addressed the problem by evaluating (a) restriction enzyme digestion and (b) the minimum number of restriction sites that are required in the amplifying region. The efficiency of restriction digestion was tested by subjecting the plasmid to one and two rounds of digestion. Multiple rounds of digestions were found to be inefficient in preventing false positives when the number of DpnI sites in the amplifying region is less than 8. However, use of a minimum of 15 DpnI sites in the amplifying region was found to overcome the false positives.

  5. The Nature of Mutations Induced by Replication-Transcription Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, T. Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D.; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A.; Wang, Jue D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on1,2. Replication-transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity1–10. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors of genetic disease and evolution5,7,11. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequence of replication-transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the well-characterized base substitutions in coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are likely caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide conserved in promoters recognized by the major sigma factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication-transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements. PMID:27362223

  6. Replication and robustness in developmental research.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Greg J; Engel, Mimi; Claessens, Amy; Dowsett, Chantelle J

    2014-11-01

    Replications and robustness checks are key elements of the scientific method and a staple in many disciplines. However, leading journals in developmental psychology rarely include explicit replications of prior research conducted by different investigators, and few require authors to establish in their articles or online appendices that their key results are robust across estimation methods, data sets, and demographic subgroups. This article makes the case for prioritizing both explicit replications and, especially, within-study robustness checks in developmental psychology. It provides evidence on variation in effect sizes in developmental studies and documents strikingly different replication and robustness-checking practices in a sample of journals in developmental psychology and a sister behavioral science-applied economics. Our goal is not to show that any one behavioral science has a monopoly on best practices, but rather to show how journals from a related discipline address vital concerns of replication and generalizability shared by all social and behavioral sciences. We provide recommendations for promoting graduate training in replication and robustness-checking methods and for editorial policies that encourage these practices. Although some of our recommendations may shift the form and substance of developmental research articles, we argue that they would generate considerable scientific benefits for the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  8. DNA Replication Timing

    PubMed Central

    Rhind, Nicholas; Gilbert, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of replication within eukaryotic genomes correlate with gene expression, chromatin structure, and genome evolution. Recent advances in genome-scale mapping of replication kinetics have allowed these correlations to be explored in many species, cell types, and growth conditions, and these large data sets have allowed quantitative and computational analyses. One striking new correlation to emerge from these analyses is between replication timing and the three-dimensional structure of chromosomes. This correlation, which is significantly stronger than with any single histone modification or chromosome-binding protein, suggests that replication timing is controlled at the level of chromosomal domains. This conclusion dovetails with parallel work on the heterogeneity of origin firing and the competition between origins for limiting activators to suggest a model in which the stochastic probability of individual origin firing is modulated by chromosomal domain structure to produce patterns of replication. Whether these patterns have inherent biological functions or simply reflect higher-order genome structure is an open question. PMID:23838440

  9. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M.; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81 deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81 deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  10. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    PubMed

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  11. Replicated Composite Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell

    1997-01-01

    Advanced optical systems for applications such as grazing incidence Wolter I x-ray mirror assemblies require extraordinary mirror surfaces in ten-ns of fine surface finish and figure. The impeccable mirror surface is on the inside of the rotational mirror form. One practical method of producing devices with these requirements is to first fabricate an exterior surface for the optical device then replicate that surface to have the inverse component with lightweight characteristics. The replicate optic is not better than the master or mandrel from which it is made. This task is a continuance of previous studies to identify methods and materials for forming these extremely low roughness optical components.

  12. Activation of new replication foci under conditions of replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, P; Waligórska, A; Bujnowicz, Ł; Hoang, A; Dobrucki, JW

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage, binding of drugs to DNA or a shortage of nucleotides can decrease the rate or completely halt the progress of replication forks. Although the global rate of replication decreases, mammalian cells can respond to replication stress by activating new replication origins. We demonstrate that a moderate level of stress induced by inhibitors of topoisomerase I, commencing in early, mid or late S-phase, induces activation of new sites of replication located within or in the immediate vicinity of the original replication factories; only in early S some of these new sites are also activated at a distance greater than 300 nm. Under high stress levels very few new replication sites are activated; such sites are located within the original replication regions. There is a large variation in cellular response to stress – while in some cells the number of replication sites increases even threefold, it decreases almost twofold in other cells. Replication stress results in a loss of PCNA from replication factories and a twofold increase in nuclear volume. These observations suggest that activation of new replication origins from the pool of dormant origins within replication cluster under conditions of mild stress is generally restricted to the original replication clusters (factories) active at a time of stress initiation, while activation of distant origins and new replication factories is suppressed. PMID:26212617

  13. Chromatin Controls DNA Replication Origin Selection, Lagging-Strand Synthesis, and Replication Fork Rates.

    PubMed

    Kurat, Christoph F; Yeeles, Joseph T P; Patel, Harshil; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2017-01-05

    The integrity of eukaryotic genomes requires rapid and regulated chromatin replication. How this is accomplished is still poorly understood. Using purified yeast replication proteins and fully chromatinized templates, we have reconstituted this process in vitro. We show that chromatin enforces DNA replication origin specificity by preventing non-specific MCM helicase loading. Helicase activation occurs efficiently in the context of chromatin, but subsequent replisome progression requires the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription). The FACT-associated Nhp6 protein, the nucleosome remodelers INO80 or ISW1A, and the lysine acetyltransferases Gcn5 and Esa1 each contribute separately to maximum DNA synthesis rates. Chromatin promotes the regular priming of lagging-strand DNA synthesis by facilitating DNA polymerase α function at replication forks. Finally, nucleosomes disrupted during replication are efficiently re-assembled into regular arrays on nascent DNA. Our work defines the minimum requirements for chromatin replication in vitro and shows how multiple chromatin factors might modulate replication fork rates in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Safe engineering of CAR T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer using long-term episomal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chuan; Fotaki, Grammatiki; Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Nilsson, Berith; Essand, Magnus; Yu, Di

    2016-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a new successful treatment for refractory B-cell leukemia. Successful therapeutic outcome depends on long-term expression of CAR transgene in T cells, which is achieved by delivering transgene using integrating gamma retrovirus (RV) or lentivirus (LV). However, uncontrolled RV/LV integration in host cell genomes has the potential risk of causing insertional mutagenesis. Herein, we describe a novel episomal long-term cell engineering method using non-integrating lentiviral (NILV) vector containing a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) element, for either expression of transgenes or silencing of target genes. The insertional events of this vector into the genome of host cells are below detection level. CD19 CAR T cells engineered with a NILV-S/MAR vector have similar levels of CAR expression as T cells engineered with an integrating LV vector, even after numerous rounds of cell division. NILV-S/MAR-engineered CD19 CAR T cells exhibited similar cytotoxic capacity upon CD19(+) target cell recognition as LV-engineered T cells and are as effective in controlling tumor growth in vivo We propose that NILV-S/MAR vectors are superior to current options as they enable long-term transgene expression without the risk of insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. Constitutive episomal expression of polypeptide IX (pIX) in a 293-based cell line complements the deficiency of pIX mutant adenovirus type 5.

    PubMed Central

    Caravokyri, C; Leppard, K N

    1995-01-01

    The human adenovirus type 5 capsid is composed of a number of distinct polypeptides. It has been shown previously that one of these, polypeptide IX (pIX), is not absolutely required for the production of viable virus. However, viruses lacking this polypeptide have a significantly reduced packaging limit and, in the one case studied, also show a thermolabile virion phenotype. This report describes the use of eukaryotic episomal vectors based on the Epstein-Barr virus replicon to generate cells which stably express pIX. These cells provide pIX that is efficiently incorporated into virions that are genetically pIX-; such enhanced thermostability. These cells have also been used to isolate a genetically pIX- virus having a genome of length some 2.3 kbp in excess of the previously defined packaging limit for pIX- virus; the resulting virions have wild-type thermostability. These cells expand the theoretical capacity of adenovirus vectors for foreign DNA to around 9.2 kbp and may therefore be useful in gene therapy applications in which vector capacity is limiting. PMID:7474071

  16. Exponential self-replication enabled through a fibre elongation/breakage mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomb-Delsuc, Mathieu; Mattia, Elio; Sadownik, Jan W.; Otto, Sijbren

    2015-06-01

    Self-replicating molecules are likely to have played a central role in the origin of life. Most scenarios of Darwinian evolution at the molecular level require self-replicators capable of exponential growth, yet only very few exponential replicators have been reported to date and general design criteria for exponential replication are lacking. Here we show that a peptide-functionalized macrocyclic self-replicator exhibits exponential growth when subjected to mild agitation. The replicator self-assembles into elongated fibres of which the ends promote replication and fibre growth. Agitation results in breakage of the growing fibres, generating more fibre ends. Our data suggest a mechanism in which mechanical energy promotes the liberation of the replicator from the inactive self-assembled state, thereby overcoming self-inhibition that prevents the majority of self-replicating molecules developed to date from attaining exponential growth.

  17. Exponential self-replication enabled through a fibre elongation/breakage mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Colomb-Delsuc, Mathieu; Mattia, Elio; Sadownik, Jan W.; Otto, Sijbren

    2015-01-01

    Self-replicating molecules are likely to have played a central role in the origin of life. Most scenarios of Darwinian evolution at the molecular level require self-replicators capable of exponential growth, yet only very few exponential replicators have been reported to date and general design criteria for exponential replication are lacking. Here we show that a peptide-functionalized macrocyclic self-replicator exhibits exponential growth when subjected to mild agitation. The replicator self-assembles into elongated fibres of which the ends promote replication and fibre growth. Agitation results in breakage of the growing fibres, generating more fibre ends. Our data suggest a mechanism in which mechanical energy promotes the liberation of the replicator from the inactive self-assembled state, thereby overcoming self-inhibition that prevents the majority of self-replicating molecules developed to date from attaining exponential growth. PMID:26081104

  18. Coronavirus Attachment and Replication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-28

    synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 49:303-309. Pedersen, N.C. 1976a. Feline infectious peritonitis: Something old...receptors on intestinal brush border membranes from normal host species were developed for canine (CCV), feline (FIPV), porcine (TGEV), human (HCV...gastroenteritis receptor on pig BBMs ...... ................. ... 114 Feline infectious peritonitis virus receptor on cat BBMs ... .............. 117 Human

  19. Evolution of Replication Machines

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nina Y.; O'Donnell, Mike E.

    2016-01-01

    The machines that decode and regulate genetic information require the translation, transcription and replication pathways essential to all living cells. Thus, it might be expected that all cells share the same basic machinery for these pathways that were inherited from the primordial ancestor cell from which they evolved. A clear example of this is found in the translation machinery that converts RNA sequence to protein. The translation process requires numerous structural and catalytic RNAs and proteins, the central factors of which are homologous in all three domains of life, bacteria, archaea and eukarya. Likewise, the central actor in transcription, RNA polymerase, shows homology among the catalytic subunits in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In contrast, while some “gears” of the genome replication machinery are homologous in all domains of life, most components of the replication machine appear to be unrelated between bacteria and those of archaea and eukarya. This review will compare and contrast the central proteins of the “replisome” machines that duplicate DNA in bacteria, archaea and eukarya, with an eye to understanding the issues surrounding the evolution of the DNA replication apparatus. PMID:27160337

  20. Replicated spectrographs in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.

    2014-06-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compare the information gathering power of these replicated instruments with the present state of the art in more traditional spectrographs, and with instruments under development for ELTs. Design principles for replication are explored along with lessons learned, and we look forward to future technologies that could make massively-replicated instruments even more compelling.

  1. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  2. INITIATION AND REGULATION OF PARAMYXOVIRUS TRANSCRIPTION AND REPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Fearns, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The paramyxovirus family has a genome consisting of a single strand of negative sense RNA. This genome acts as a template for two distinct processes: transcription to generate subgenomic, capped and polyadenylated mRNAs, and genome replication. These viruses only encode one polymerase. Thus, an intriguing question is, how does the viral polymerase initiate and become committed to either transcription or replication? By answering this we can begin to understand how these two processes are regulated. In this review article, we present recent findings from studies on the paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, which show how its polymerase is able to initiate transcription and replication from a single promoter. We discuss how these findings apply to other paramyxoviruses. Then, we examine how trans-acting proteins and promoter secondary structure might serve to regulate transcription and replication during different phases of the paramyxovirus replication cycle. PMID:25683441

  3. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  4. Replication inhibition by nucleoside analogues of a recombinant Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus harboring the herpes thymidine kinase gene driven by the IE-1(0) promoter: a new way to select recombinant baculoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Godeau, F; Saucier, C; Kourilsky, P

    1992-01-01

    The expression of the thymidine-thymidylate kinase (HSV1-TK), (ATP: thymidine 5'-phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.21) of herpes simplex virus type 1 endows the host cell with a conditional lethal phenotype which depends on the presence of nucleoside analogues metabolized by this enzyme into toxic inhibitors of DNA replication. To generate a recombinant baculovirus that could be selected against by nucleoside analogs, the HSV1-tk coding sequence was placed under the control of the Autographa californica multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) immediate early promoterm IE-1(0), and this construction was introduced via homologous recombination into the polyhedrin locus of AcMNPV. Two recombinant baculoviruses harboring this gene construct at the polyhedrin locus were isolated and tested for their ability to replicate in the presence of various concentrations of the nucleoside analog 9-(1,3-Dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)guanine (Ganciclovir). Neither Sf9 lepidopteran cell viability nor replication of wild type or beta-Galactosidase-expressing recombinant AcMNPVs were affected by concentrations of Ganciclovir up to 100 microM. In contrast, replication of the recombinant AcMNPV virus harboring the HSV1-tk gene was inhibited by Ganciclovir in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was detectable at 2 microM and complete at 100 microM. This property was exploited in model isolations aimed at purifying new recombinant viruses having lost this counter-selectable gene marker as a result of homologous recombination at the polyhedrin locus after cotransfection of the viral DNA with a replacement vector. After being propagated in the presence of Ganciclovir, the progeny of such co-transfections contained over 85% recombinant viruses, demonstrating that counter-selection of parental HSV1-tk-containing viruses by Ganciclovir constitutes a novel approach for recombinant baculovirus isolation. Images PMID:1335569

  5. The replication timing program in the hands of two HDACs

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kazumasa; Lengronne, Armelle; Pasero, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, duplication of genomic information depends on the sequential activation of multiple replication origins distributed along the chromosomes. Replication origins differ in initiation time, chromatin structure and three-dimensional position in the nucleus. Recently, we have performed a systematic analysis of the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the regulation of origin activity in budding yeast. We have found that the epigenetic regulation of repetitive sequences is a key determinant of the DNA replication program. Indeed, our study revealed that two histone deacetylases, Rpd3 and Sir2, have opposite effects on the replication timing program. Rpd3 delays initiation at late origins, whereas Sir2 promotes efficient activation of early origins. Remarkably, we also found that Rpd3 and Sir2 regulate initiation at ~200 replication origins located within the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) array. We propose that this epigenetic regulation of repetitive origins controls the replication timing program by modulating the availability of limiting initiation factors. PMID:28357253

  6. Replication and preferential inheritance of hypersuppressive petite mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    MacAlpine, David M.; Kolesar, Jill; Okamoto, Koji; Butow, Ronald A.; Perlman, Philip S.

    2001-01-01

    Wild-type yeast mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is inherited biparentally, whereas mtDNA of hypersuppressive petite mutants is inherited uniparentally in crosses to strains with wild-type mtDNA. Genomes of hypersuppressive petites contain a conserved ori sequence that includes a promoter, but it is unclear whether the ori confers a segregation or replication advantage. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis of wild-type and petite mtDNAs in crosses reveals no preferential segregation of hypersuppressive petite mtDNA to first zygotic buds. We identify single-stranded DNA circles and RNA-primed DNA replication intermediates in hypersuppressive petite mtDNA that are absent from non-hypersuppressive petites. Mutating the promoter blocks hypersuppressiveness in crosses to wild-type strains and eliminates the distinctive replication intermediates. We propose that promoter-dependent RNA-primed replication accounts for the uniparental inheritance of hypersuppressive petite mtDNA. PMID:11285243

  7. Reversible Switching of Cooperating Replicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urtel, Georg C.; Rind, Thomas; Braun, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    How can molecules with short lifetimes preserve their information over millions of years? For evolution to occur, information-carrying molecules have to replicate before they degrade. Our experiments reveal a robust, reversible cooperation mechanism in oligonucleotide replication. Two inherently slow replicating hairpin molecules can transfer their information to fast crossbreed replicators that outgrow the hairpins. The reverse is also possible. When one replication initiation site is missing, single hairpins reemerge from the crossbreed. With this mechanism, interacting replicators can switch between the hairpin and crossbreed mode, revealing a flexible adaptation to different boundary conditions.

  8. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    In general terms, the replication cycle of lentiviruses, including HIV-1, closely resembles that of other retroviruses. There are, however, a number of unique aspects of HIV replication; for example, the HIVs and SIVs target receptors and coreceptors distinct from those used by other retroviruses. Lentiviruses encode a number of regulatory and accessory proteins not encoded by the genomes of the prototypical "simple" retroviruses. Of particular interest from the gene therapy perspective, lentiviruses possess the ability to productively infect some types of non-dividing cells. This chapter, while reiterating certain points discussed in Chapter 1, will attempt to focus on issues unique to HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 genome encodes the major structural and non-structural proteins common to all replication-competent retroviruses (Fig. 1, and Chapter 1). From the 5'- to 3'-ends of the genome are found the gag (for group-specific antigen), pol (for polymerase), and env (for envelope glycoprotein) genes. The gag gene encodes a polyprotein precursor whose name, Pr55Gag, is based on its molecular weight. Pr55Gag is cleaved by the viral protease (PR) to the mature Gag proteins matrix (also known as MA or p17), capsid (CA or p24), nucleocapsid (NC or p7), and p6. Two spacer peptides, p2 and p1, are also generated upon Pr55Gag processing. The pol-encoded enzymes are initially synthesized as part of a large polyprotein precursor, Pr160GagPol, whose synthesis results from a rare frameshifting event during Pr55Gag translation. The individual pol-encoded enzymes, PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), are cleaved from Pr160GagPol by the viral PR. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins are also synthesized as a polyprotein precursor (Fig. 1). Unlike the Gag and Pol precursors, which are cleaved by the viral PR, the Env precursor, known as gp160, is processed by a cellular protease during Env trafficking to the cell surface, gp160 processing results in the generation of the

  9. DNA replication in thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Majerník, A I; Jenkinson, E R; Chong, J P J

    2004-04-01

    DNA replication enzymes in the thermophilic Archaea have previously attracted attention due to their obvious use in methods such as PCR. The proofreading ability of the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase has resulted in a commercially successful product (Pfu polymerase). One of the many notable features of the Archaea is the fact that their DNA processing enzymes appear on the whole to be more like those found in eukaryotes than bacteria. These proteins also appear to be simpler versions of those found in eukaryotes. For these reasons, archaeal organisms make potentially interesting model systems to explore the molecular mechanisms of processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination. Why archaeal DNA-manipulation systems were adopted over bacterial systems by eukaryotic cells remains a most interesting question that we suggest may be linked to thermophily.

  10. Analysis of Pupil Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaan, F. H. P.; Greenaway, A. H.

    2007-04-01

    Pupil replication and hypertelescope systems for imaging telluric exoplanets in scattered light are treated. Analytic expressions for the spread functions in one and two dimensions and in the presence of various forms of error are given. Error effects considered include aperture misalignment, tilts, piston, pointing errors, and unequal beam amplitude. The performance of the two approaches is contrasted, and the analytic results are compared with simulation results.

  11. A New Replicator: A theoretical framework for analysing replication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Replicators are the crucial entities in evolution. The notion of a replicator, however, is far less exact than the weight of its importance. Without identifying and classifying multiplying entities exactly, their dynamics cannot be determined appropriately. Therefore, it is importance to decide the nature and characteristics of any multiplying entity, in a detailed and formal way. Results Replication is basically an autocatalytic process which enables us to rest on the notions of formal chemistry. This statement has major implications. Simple autocatalytic cycle intermediates are considered as non-informational replicators. A consequence of which is that any autocatalytically multiplying entity is a replicator, be it simple or overly complex (even nests). A stricter definition refers to entities which can inherit acquired changes (informational replicators). Simple autocatalytic molecules (and nests) are excluded from this group. However, in turn, any entity possessing copiable information is to be named a replicator, even multicellular organisms. In order to deal with the situation, an abstract, formal framework is presented, which allows the proper identification of various types of replicators. This sheds light on the old problem of the units and levels of selection and evolution. A hierarchical classification for the partition of the replicator-continuum is provided where specific replicators are nested within more general ones. The classification should be able to be successfully applied to known replicators and also to future candidates. Conclusion This paper redefines the concept of the replicator from a bottom-up theoretical approach. The formal definition and the abstract models presented can distinguish between among all possible replicator types, based on their quantity of variable and heritable information. This allows for the exact identification of various replicator types and their underlying dynamics. The most important claim is that

  12. Mechanisms of DNA replication termination.

    PubMed

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2017-08-01

    Genome duplication is carried out by pairs of replication forks that assemble at origins of replication and then move in opposite directions. DNA replication ends when converging replication forks meet. During this process, which is known as replication termination, DNA synthesis is completed, the replication machinery is disassembled and daughter molecules are resolved. In this Review, we outline the steps that are likely to be common to replication termination in most organisms, namely, fork convergence, synthesis completion, replisome disassembly and decatenation. We briefly review the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in simian virus 40 (SV40) and also focus on recent advances in eukaryotic replication termination. In particular, we discuss the recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases that control replisome disassembly in yeast and higher eukaryotes, and how their activity is regulated to avoid genome instability.

  13. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-02-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts.

  14. Human glioblastoma cells persistently infected with simian virus 40 carry nondefective episomal viral DNA and acquire the transformed phenotype and numerous chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Norkin, L C; Steinberg, V I; Kosz-Vnenchak, M

    1985-01-01

    A stable, persistent infection of A172 human glioblastoma cells with simian virus 40 (SV40) was readily established after infection at an input of 450 PFU per cell. Only 11% of the cells were initially susceptible to SV40, as shown by indirect immunofluorescent staining for the SV40 T antigen at 48 h. However, all cells produced T antigen by week 11. In contrast, viral capsid proteins were made in only about 1% of the cells in the established carrier system. Weekly viral yields ranged between 10(4) and 10(6) PFU/ml. Most of the capsid protein-producing cells contained enormous aberrant (lobulated or multiple) nuclei. Persistent viral DNA appeared in an episomal or "free" state exclusively in Southern blots and was indistinguishable from standard SV40 DNA by restriction analysis. Viral autointerference activity was not detected, and yield reduction assays did not indicate defective interfering particle activity, further implying that variant viruses were not a factor in this carrier system. Interferon was also not a factor in the system, as shown by direct challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Persistent infection resulted in cellular growth changes (enhanced saturation density and plating efficiency) characteristic of SV40 transformation. Persistent infection also led to an increased frequency of cytogenetic effects. These included sister chromatid exchanges, a variety of chromosomal abnormalities (ring chromosomes, acentric fragments, breaks, and gaps), and an increase in the chromosome number. Nevertheless, the persistently infected cells continued to display a bipolar glial cell-like morphology with extensive process extension and intercellular contacts. Images PMID:2578579

  15. Replication of grazing incidence optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.

    1986-01-01

    The replication of grazing incidence optics is reviewed. Electroform and epoxy replication are described and compared. It is concluded that for light weight and deep nesting, replication has a distinct advantage over direct production. The resolution of optics produced in this manner is however, limited to about 10 arc seconds; a typical value is 40 arc seconds. Epoxy replicated pieces tend to have better optical figures than electroformed optics, but the latter can be made thinner to make more deeply nested systems.

  16. Replication of grazing incidence optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.

    1986-01-01

    The replication of grazing incidence optics is reviewed. Electroform and epoxy replication are described and compared. It is concluded that for light weight and deep nesting, replication has a distinct advantage over direct production. The resolution of optics produced in this manner is however, limited to about 10 arc seconds; a typical value is 40 arc seconds. Epoxy replicated pieces tend to have better optical figures than electroformed optics, but the latter can be made thinner to make more deeply nested systems.

  17. Replication Research and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  18. Replication Research and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  19. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    PubMed Central

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  20. Inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus replication by small interfering RNA targeting the Epstein-Barr virus protease gene.

    PubMed

    Larrat, Sylvie; Morand, Patrice; Bas, Ariane; Vigne, Solenne; Crance, Jean-Marc; Boyer, Véronique; Nicod, Sandrine; Grossi, Laurence; Buisson, Marlyse; Burmeister, Wim P; Seigneurin, Jean-Marie; Germi, Raphaële

    2009-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) protease (PR), coded by the BVRF2 gene, is essential for the maturation of the viral capsid and viral DNA packaging during the late stage of the EBV lytic cycle. Like the other herpesvirus serine PRs, EBV PR could be a target for the inhibition of EBV replication. To date, no data have been reported on the inhibition of EBV PR messenger RNA (mRNA) by small interfering RNA (siRNA). In this study, siRNAs targeting EBV PR were delivered to the epithelial 293 cell line stably transfected with the complete B95-8 EBV episome. EBV DNA and PR mRNA were quantified by real-time PCR in cells and supernatant, protein expression was assessed by immunoblotting, and production of EBV infectious particles in the culture medium was measured by Raji cell superinfection. The EBV PR mRNA within the cells was reduced by 73%, the PR protein by 35% and the amount of virus in the cell supernatant was drastically decreased by 86% or 95%, depending on the method. The strong effect of the siRNA targeting EBV PR on EBV replication attests to the crucial role played by EBV PR in the production of infectious particles and suggests that targeting this enzyme can be a new strategy against EBV-associated diseases where virus replication occurs.

  1. Inactivation of hepatitis B virus replication in cultured cells and in vivo with engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Kristie; Ely, Abdullah; Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an important global health problem. Stability of the episomal covalently closed circular HBV DNA (cccDNA) is largely responsible for the modest curative efficacy of available therapy. Since licensed anti-HBV drugs have a post-transcriptional mechanism of action, disabling cccDNA is potentially of therapeutic benefit. To develop this approach, we engineered mutagenic transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that target four HBV-specific sites within the viral genome. TALENs with cognate sequences in the S or C open-reading frames (ORFs) efficiently disrupted sequences at the intended sites and suppressed markers of viral replication. Following triple transfection of cultured HepG2.2.15 cells under mildly hypothermic conditions, the S TALEN caused targeted mutation in ~35% of cccDNA molecules. Markers of viral replication were also inhibited in vivo in a murine hydrodynamic injection model of HBV replication. HBV target sites within S and C ORFs of the injected HBV DNA were mutated without evidence of toxicity. These findings are the first to demonstrate a targeted nuclease-mediated disruption of HBV cccDNA. Efficacy in vivo also indicates that these engineered nucleases have potential for use in treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  2. Self-Replicating RNA.

    PubMed

    Tews, Birke Andrea; Meyers, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Self-replicating RNA derived from the genomes of positive strand RNA viruses represents a powerful tool for both molecular studies on virus biology and approaches to novel safe and effective vaccines. The following chapter summarizes the principles how such RNAs can be established and used for design of vaccines. Due to the large variety of strategies needed to circumvent specific pitfalls in the design of such constructs the technical details of the experiments are not described here but can be found in the cited literature.

  3. Checkpoint Activation of an Unconventional DNA Replication Program in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Pamela Y.; Lee, Po-Hsuen; Meng, Xiangzhou; Kapler, Geoffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The intra-S phase checkpoint kinase of metazoa and yeast, ATR/MEC1, protects chromosomes from DNA damage and replication stress by phosphorylating subunits of the replicative helicase, MCM2-7. Here we describe an unprecedented ATR-dependent pathway in Tetrahymena thermophila in which the essential pre-replicative complex proteins, Orc1p, Orc2p and Mcm6p are degraded in hydroxyurea-treated S phase cells. Chromosomes undergo global changes during HU-arrest, including phosphorylation of histone H2A.X, deacetylation of histone H3, and an apparent diminution in DNA content that can be blocked by the deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. Most remarkably, the cell cycle rapidly resumes upon hydroxyurea removal, and the entire genome is replicated prior to replenishment of ORC and MCMs. While stalled replication forks are elongated under these conditions, DNA fiber imaging revealed that most replicating molecules are produced by new initiation events. Furthermore, the sole origin in the ribosomal DNA minichromosome is inactive and replication appears to initiate near the rRNA promoter. The collective data raise the possibility that replication initiation occurs by an ORC-independent mechanism during the recovery from HU-induced replication stress. PMID:26218270

  4. Anatomy of Mammalian Replication Domains

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic information is faithfully copied by DNA replication through many rounds of cell division. In mammals, DNA is replicated in Mb-sized chromosomal units called “replication domains.” While genome-wide maps in multiple cell types and disease states have uncovered both dynamic and static properties of replication domains, we are still in the process of understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these properties. A better understanding of the molecular basis of replication domain regulation will bring new insights into chromosome structure and function. PMID:28350365

  5. Transmissible Gastroenteritis Coronavirus Genome Packaging Signal Is Located at the 5′ End of the Genome and Promotes Viral RNA Incorporation into Virions in a Replication-Independent Process

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Lucia; Mateos-Gomez, Pedro A.; Capiscol, Carmen; del Palacio, Lorena; Sola, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Preferential RNA packaging in coronaviruses involves the recognition of viral genomic RNA, a crucial process for viral particle morphogenesis mediated by RNA-specific sequences, known as packaging signals. An essential packaging signal component of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus (TGEV) has been further delimited to the first 598 nucleotides (nt) from the 5′ end of its RNA genome, by using recombinant viruses transcribing subgenomic mRNA that included potential packaging signals. The integrity of the entire sequence domain was necessary because deletion of any of the five structural motifs defined within this region abrogated specific packaging of this viral RNA. One of these RNA motifs was the stem-loop SL5, a highly conserved motif in coronaviruses located at nucleotide positions 106 to 136. Partial deletion or point mutations within this motif also abrogated packaging. Using TGEV-derived defective minigenomes replicated in trans by a helper virus, we have shown that TGEV RNA packaging is a replication-independent process. Furthermore, the last 494 nt of the genomic 3′ end were not essential for packaging, although this region increased packaging efficiency. TGEV RNA sequences identified as necessary for viral genome packaging were not sufficient to direct packaging of a heterologous sequence derived from the green fluorescent protein gene. These results indicated that TGEV genome packaging is a complex process involving many factors in addition to the identified RNA packaging signal. The identification of well-defined RNA motifs within the TGEV RNA genome that are essential for packaging will be useful for designing packaging-deficient biosafe coronavirus-derived vectors and providing new targets for antiviral therapies. PMID:23966403

  6. DNA replication origins in archaea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jingfang; Yang, Haibo; Xiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator-initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea.

  7. Regulatory parameters of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M; Price, G B

    1998-01-01

    One of the fundamental characteristics that help define life is the ability to propagate. At the basest level in the act of propagation is replication of the genetic information as the databank and architectural plans for each particular life form. Thus propagation of life requires the replication of the genome--for the purposes of our review, eukaryotic DNA replication. In this critical review, we have chosen to present the issues and supporting experimental evidence in question-and-answer format. Over the past 3 to 4 years, the research domain of eukaryotic DNA replication has developed a new dynamism. This new force in discovery of the fundamental elements and mechanisms for DNA replication in higher eukaryotes has been propelled by accepted methodologies for mapping (identification) of origins of DNA replication, applicable to mammalian DNA replication, and by the discovery of the origin recognition complex (ORC) in yeast, which has served as a model in the search for the mammalian equivalent.

  8. Chromatin and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    MacAlpine, David M.; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program. PMID:23751185

  9. Chromatin and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    MacAlpine, David M; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program.

  10. Universal Temporal Profile of Replication Origin Activation in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Goldar, Arach; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Hyrien, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Although replication proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, the sequence requirements for replication initiation differ between species. In all species, however, replication origins fire asynchronously throughout S phase. The temporal program of origin firing is reproducible in cell populations but largely probabilistic at the single-cell level. The mechanisms and the significance of this program are unclear. Replication timing has been correlated with gene activity in metazoans but not in yeast. One potential role for a temporal regulation of origin firing is to minimize fluctuations in replication end time and avoid persistence of unreplicated DNA in mitosis. Here, we have extracted the population-averaged temporal profiles of replication initiation rates for S. cerevisiae, S. pombe, D. melanogaster, X. laevis and H. sapiens from genome-wide replication timing and DNA combing data. All the profiles have a strikingly similar shape, increasing during the first half of S phase then decreasing before its end. A previously proposed minimal model of stochastic initiation modulated by accumulation of a recyclable, limiting replication-fork factor and fork-promoted initiation of new origins, quantitatively described the observed profiles without requiring new implementations. The selective pressure for timely completion of genome replication and optimal usage of replication proteins that must be imported into the cell nucleus can explain the generic shape of the profiles. We have identified a universal behavior of eukaryotic replication initiation that transcends the mechanisms of origin specification. The population-averaged efficiency of replication origin usage changes during S phase in a strikingly similar manner in a highly diverse set of eukaryotes. The quantitative model previously proposed for origin activation in X. laevis can be generalized to explain this evolutionary conservation. PMID:19521533

  11. RECQ1 is required for cellular resistance to replication stress and catalyzes strand exchange on stalled replication fork structures

    PubMed Central

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Croteau, Deborah L.; Brosh, Jr., Robert M.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    RECQ1 is the most abundant of the five human RecQ helicases, but little is known about its biological significance. Recent studies indicate that RECQ1 is associated with origins of replication, suggesting a possible role in DNA replication. However, the functional role of RECQ1 at damaged or stalled replication forks is still unknown. Here, for the first time, we show that RECQ1 promotes strand exchange on synthetic stalled replication fork-mimicking structures and comparatively analyze RECQ1 with the other human RecQ helicases. RECQ1 actively unwinds the leading strand of the fork, similar to WRN, while RECQ4 and RECQ5β can only unwind the lagging strand of the replication fork. Human replication protein A modulates the strand exchange activity of RECQ1 and shifts the equilibrium more to the unwinding mode, an effect also observed for WRN. Stable depletion of RECQ1 affects cell proliferation and renders human cells sensitive to various DNA damaging agents that directly or indirectly block DNA replication fork progression. Consequently, loss of RECQ1 activates DNA damage response signaling, leads to hyper-phosphorylation of RPA32 and activation of CHK1, indicating replication stress. Furthermore, depletion of RECQ1 leads to chromosomal condensation defects and accumulation of under-condensed chromosomes. Collectively, our observations provide a new insight into the role of RECQ1 in replication fork stabilization and its role in the DNA damage response to maintain genomic stability. PMID:23095637

  12. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Michel G; Norio, Paolo; Bechhoefer, John

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  13. Agrobacterium tumefaciens supports DNA replication of diverse geminivirus types.

    PubMed

    Selth, Luke A; Randles, John W; Rezaian, M Ali

    2002-04-10

    We have previously shown that the soil-borne plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens supports the replication of tomato leaf curl geminivirus (Australian isolate) (TLCV) DNA. However, the reproducibility of this observation with other geminiviruses has been questioned. Here, we show that replicative DNA forms of three other geminiviruses also accumulate at varying levels in Agrobacterium. Geminiviral DNA constructs that lacked the ability to replicate in Agrobacterium were rendered replication-competent by changing their configuration so that two copies of the viral ori were present. Furthermore, we report that low-level replication of TLCV DNA can occur in Escherichia coli containing a dimeric TLCV construct in a high copy number plasmid. These findings were reinforced by expression studies using beta-glucuronidase which revealed that all six TLCV promoters are active in Agrobacterium, and two are functional in E. coli.

  14. Break-induced replication: functions and molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Malkova, Anna; Ira, Grzegorz

    2013-06-01

    Break-induced replication (BIR) is the pathway of homologous recombination (HR) conserved from phages to eukaryotes that serves to repair DNA breaks that have only one end. BIR contributes to the repair of broken replication forks and allows telomere lengthening in the absence of telomerase. Nonallelic BIR may lead to translocations and other chromosomal rearrangements. In addition, BIR initiated at sites of microhomology can generate copy number variations (CNVs) and complex chromosomal changes. The level of mutagenesis associated with DNA synthesis in BIR is significantly higher than during normal replication. These features make BIR a likely pathway to promote bursts of genetic changes that fuel cancer progression and evolution.

  15. DNA replication origins in archaea

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jingfang; Yang, Haibo; Xiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator–initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea. PMID:24808892

  16. Gene organization inside replication domains in mammalian genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Lamia; Baker, Antoine; Audit, Benjamin; Arneodo, Alain

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the large-scale organization of human genes with respect to "master" replication origins that were previously identified as bordering nucleotide compositional skew domains. We separate genes in two categories depending on their CpG enrichment at the promoter which can be considered as a marker of germline DNA methylation. Using expression data in mouse, we confirm that CpG-rich genes are highly expressed in germline whereas CpG-poor genes are in a silent state. We further show that, whether tissue-specific or broadly expressed (housekeeping genes), the CpG-rich genes are over-represented close to the replication skew domain borders suggesting some coordination of replication and transcription. We also reveal that the transcription of the longest CpG-rich genes is co-oriented with replication fork progression so that the promoter of these transcriptionally active genes be located into the accessible open chromatin environment surrounding the master replication origins that border the replication skew domains. The observation of a similar gene organization in the mouse genome confirms the interplay of replication, transcription and chromatin structure as the cornerstone of mammalian genome architecture.

  17. Replicative Aging in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Steinkraus, K.A.; Kaeberlein, M.; Kennedy, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Progress in aging research is now rapid, and surprisingly, studies in a single-celled eukaryote are a driving force. The genetic modulators of replicative life span in yeast are being identified, the molecular events that accompany aging are being discovered, and the extent to which longevity pathways are conserved between yeast and multicellular eukaryotes is being tested. In this review, we provide a brief retrospective view on the development of yeast as a model for aging and then turn to recent discoveries that have pushed aging research into novel directions and also linked aging in yeast to well-developed hypotheses in mammals. Although the question of what causes aging still cannot be answered definitively, that day may be rapidly approaching. PMID:18616424

  18. Regulation of DNA replication licensing.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2012-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication is tightly regulated to occur only once per cell cycle. DNA licensing is a mechanism to guarantee this aim; that is, licensing of replication initiation is permitted during late M phase to G1 phase. The license is canceled by the start of DNA replication. Once DNA replication begins, the license is never given until the next late M phase. The licensing corresponds to the process of assembling components of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) on the replication origin DNA. This pre-RC is the target of several different regulation systems to prevent rereplication of DNA during a single cell cycle. In this review, the regulation mechanisms mainly in mammals to control assembling components of the pre-RC will be discussed.

  19. Latent infection of human bocavirus accompanied by flare of chronic cough, fatigue and episodes of viral replication in an immunocompetent adult patient, Cologne, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Wolfram; Pieper, Monika; Ziemele, Inga; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Brockmann, Michael; Schildgen, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The human bocavirus (HBoV) is a parvovirus and is associated with mild to life-threatening acute or persisting respiratory infections, frequently accompanied by further pathogens. So far, there is limited knowledge on the mechanisms of persistence, and no reports on chronic infections or latency have been published so far. Case presentation: An immunocompetent male patient suffers from a chronic HBoV1 infection, i.e. viral DNA was detected in both serum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for >5 months without co-infections and with respiratory symptoms resolved spontaneously while receiving symptomatic treatment with montelukast and corticosteroids. Following the symptomatic medication of a chronic infection with HBoV1 viraemia indicating active viral replication lasting over 5 months, the patient cleared the viraemia and no further viral DNA was detectable in the BAL. However, by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of mucosal biopsies, it was shown that the virus genome still persisted in the absence of viral shedding but in a more compact manner possibly representing a supercoiled episomal form of this otherwise linear single-stranded DNA genome. This indicated the entry into a latency phase. Moreover, the cytokine profile and the IP-10/TARC ratio, a marker for fibrotization, seem to have been altered by HBoV1 replication. Although specific IgG antibodies were detectable during the whole observation period, they showed an apparently insufficient neutralising activity. Conclusion: On the one hand, these findings suggest that the symptomatic medication may have led to clearance of the virus from blood and airways and, moreover, that the viral DNA persists in the tissue as an altered episomal form favoured by lacking neutralising antibodies. This appears to be important in order to reduce possible long-term effects such as lung fibrosis. PMID:28348774

  20. Plant virus replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-05-01

    Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation, transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes, virus-encoded products and cellular factors. To enhance these processes, viruses assemble and replicate in membrane-associated complexes that may develop into "virus factories" or "viroplasms" in which viral components and host factors required for replication are concentrated. Many plant viruses replicate in association with the cortical ER-actin network that is continuous between cells through plasmodesmata. The replication complexes can be highly organized and supported by network interactions between the viral genome and the virus-encoded proteins. Intracellular PD targeting of replication complexes links the process of movement to replication and provides specificity for transport of the viral genome by the virus-encoded movement proteins. The formation and trafficking of replication complexes and also the development and anchorage of replication factories involves important roles of the cortical cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mechanisms of Theta Plasmid Replication.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Joshua; Camps, Manel

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are autonomously replicating pieces of DNA. This article discusses theta plasmid replication, which is a class of circular plasmid replication that includes ColE1-like origins of replication popular with expression vectors. All modalities of theta plasmid replication initiate synthesis with the leading strand at a predetermined site and complete replication through recruitment of the host's replisome, which extends the leading strand continuously while synthesizing the lagging strand discontinuously. There are clear differences between different modalities of theta plasmid replication in mechanisms of DNA duplex melting and in priming of leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. In some replicons duplex melting depends on transcription, while other replicons rely on plasmid-encoded trans-acting proteins (Reps); primers for leading-strand synthesis can be generated through processing of a transcript or in other replicons by the action of host- or plasmid-encoded primases. None of these processes require DNA breaks. The frequency of replication initiation is tightly regulated to facilitate establishment in permissive hosts and to achieve a steady state. The last section of the article reviews how plasmid copy number is sensed and how this feedback modulates the frequency of replication.

  2. Solving the Telomere Replication Problem

    PubMed Central

    Maestroni, Laetitia; Matmati, Samah; Coulon, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem. In this article, different and new aspects of telomere replication, that can threaten the integrity of telomeres, will be reviewed. In particular, we will focus on the functions of shelterin and the replisome for the preservation of telomere integrity. PMID:28146113

  3. Chromatin dynamics during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, Raz; Voichek, Yoav; Barkai, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin is composed of DNA and histones, which provide a unified platform for regulating DNA-related processes, mostly through their post-translational modification. During DNA replication, histone arrangement is perturbed, first to allow progression of DNA polymerase and then during repackaging of the replicated DNA. To study how DNA replication influences the pattern of histone modification, we followed the cell-cycle dynamics of 10 histone marks in budding yeast. We find that histones deposited on newly replicated DNA are modified at different rates: While some marks appear immediately upon replication (e.g., H4K16ac, H3K4me1), others increase with transcription-dependent delays (e.g., H3K4me3, H3K36me3). Notably, H3K9ac was deposited as a wave preceding the replication fork by ∼5–6 kb. This replication-guided H3K9ac was fully dependent on the acetyltransferase Rtt109, while expression-guided H3K9ac was deposited by Gcn5. Further, topoisomerase depletion intensified H3K9ac in front of the replication fork and in sites where RNA polymerase II was trapped, suggesting supercoiling stresses trigger H3K9 acetylation. Our results assign complementary roles for DNA replication and gene expression in defining the pattern of histone modification. PMID:27225843

  4. Oral priming with replicating adenovirus serotype 4 followed by subunit H5N1 vaccine boost promotes antibody affinity maturation and expands H5N1 cross-clade neutralization.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Coyle, Elizabeth M; Manischewitz, Jody; King, Lisa R; Ishioka, Glenn; Alexander, Jeff; Smith, Jon; Gurwith, Marc; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    A Phase I trial conducted in 2009-2010 demonstrated that oral vaccination with a replication competent Ad4-H5 (A/Vietnam) vector with dosages ranging from 107-1011 viral particles was well tolerated. HA-specific T-cell responses were efficiently induced, but very limited hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) humoral responses were measured. However, a single boost of Ad4-H5-Vtn vaccinated individuals with a unadjuvanted licensed H5N1 (A/Vietnam) subunit vaccine resulted in superior HI titers compared with unprimed subjects. In the current study, the impact of Ad4-H5 priming on the quality of the polyclonal humoral immune response was evaluated using a real-time kinetics assay by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Total binding of serum polyclonal antibodies from the Ad4-H5-Vtn primed groups against both homologous H5N1-A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (clade 1) and heterologous A/Indonesia-5/2005 (clade 2.1) HA1 head domain was significantly higher compared with sera from individuals that received subunit H5N1 vaccination alone. SPR measurements also demonstrated that the antigen-antibody complex dissociation rates (a surrogate for antibody affinity) of serum antibodies against the HA1 of H5N1-A/Vietnam were significantly higher in the Ad4-H5 primed groups compared with those from the unprimed group. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between the antibody affinities for HA1 (but not HA2) and the virus neutralization titers against the homologous strain and a panel of heterologous clade 2 H5N1 strains. These findings support the concept of oral prime-boost vaccine approaches against pandemic influenza to elicit long-term memory B cells with high affinity capable of rapid response to variant pandemic viruses likely to emerge and adapt to human transmissions.

  5. Replication patterns and organization of replication forks in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Stokke, Caroline; Waldminghaus, Torsten; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the replication patterns of the two chromosomes of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae grown in four different media. By combining flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR with computer simulations, we show that in rich media, V. cholerae cells grow with overlapping replication cycles of both the large chromosome (ChrI) and the small chromosome (ChrII). In Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, initiation occurs at four copies of the ChrI origin and two copies of the ChrII origin. Replication of ChrII was found to occur at the end of the ChrI replication period in all four growth conditions. Novel cell-sorting experiments with marker frequency analysis support these conclusions. Incubation with protein synthesis inhibitors indicated that the potential for initiation of replication of ChrII was present at the same time as that of ChrI, but was actively delayed until much of ChrI was replicated. Investigations of the localization of SeqA bound to new DNA at replication forks indicated that the forks were co-localized in pairs when cells grew without overlapping replication cycles and in higher-order structures during more rapid growth. The increased degree of fork organization during rapid growth may be a means by which correct segregation of daughter molecules is facilitated.

  6. The asymmetry of telomere replication contributes to replicative senescence heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeron, Thibault; Xu, Zhou; Doumic, Marie; Teresa Teixeira, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the absence of telomerase results in telomere shortening, eventually leading to replicative senescence, an arrested state that prevents further cell divisions. While replicative senescence is mainly controlled by telomere length, the heterogeneity of its onset is not well understood. This study proposes a mathematical model based on the molecular mechanisms of telomere replication and shortening to decipher the causes of this heterogeneity. Using simulations fitted on experimental data obtained from individual lineages of senescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, we decompose the sources of senescence heterogeneity into interclonal and intraclonal components, and show that the latter is based on the asymmetry of the telomere replication mechanism. We also evidence telomere rank-switching events with distinct frequencies in short-lived versus long-lived lineages, revealing that telomere shortening dynamics display important variations. Thus, the intrinsic heterogeneity of replicative senescence and its consequences find their roots in the asymmetric structure of telomeres. PMID:26468778

  7. Ease of articulation: A replication.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Linda I; Cottrill, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Researchers, as well as the lay public and the popular press, have become increasingly concerned about the lack of reproducibility of research findings. Despite this concern, research has shown that replications of previously published work comprise a very small proportion of published studies. Moreover, there are fewer published direct replications of research studies by independent investigators, and this type of replication is much less likely to confirm the results of the original research than are replications by the original investigator or conceptual replications. A search of the communication disorders research literature reveals that direct replications by independent investigators are virtually non-existent. The purpose of this project was to describe the major issues related to research reproducibility and report the results of a direct replication of a study by Locke (1972) regarding ease of articulation. Two methods for rating ease of articulation were employed. We were able to reproduce the results of the original study for the first method, obtaining a moderate positive correlation between our rankings of phoneme difficulty and Locke's rankings. We obtained a very high positive correlation between our phoneme rankings and rankings obtained in the original study for the second method. Moreover, we found a higher correlation between difficulty rankings and order of speech sound acquisition for American English than was found in the original study. Direct replication is not necessary for all studies in communication disorders, but should be considered for high impact studies, treatment studies, and those that provide data to support models and theories. The reader will be able to: (1) describe the major concerns related to the replicability of research findings; (2) describe the status of research replications in communication disorders; (3) describe how ease of articulation may relate to the order of speech sound acquisition in children; (4) list some

  8. Rapid mold replication

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G. Jr.; Brown, D.L.

    1995-06-01

    The desire to reduce tooling costs have driven manufacturers to investigate new manufacturing methods and materials. In the plastics injection molding industry replicating molds to meet production needs is time consuming (up to 6 months) and costly in terms of lost business. We have recently completed a feasibility study demonstrating the capability of high rate Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) in producing mold inserts in days, not months. In the current practice a graphite mandrel, in the shape of the insert`s negative image, was exposed to a jet of metal vapor atoms emanating from an electron beam heated source of an aluminum-bronze alloy. The condensation rate of the metal atoms on the mandrel was sufficient to allow the deposit to grow at over 30 {mu}m/min or 1.2 mils per minute. The vaporization process continued for approximately 14 hours after which the mandrel and deposit were removed from the EBPVD vacuum chamber. The mandrel and condensate were easily separated resulting in a fully dense aluminum-bronze mold insert about 2.5 cm or one inch thick. This mold was subsequently cleaned and drilled for water cooling passages and mounted on a fixture for operation in an actual injection molding machine. Results of the mold`s operation were extremely successful showing great promise for this technique. This paper describes the EBPVD feasibility demonstration in more detail and discusses future development work needed to bring this technique into practice.

  9. Analysis of viroid replication.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Gas, Marída-Eugenia; Molina, Diego; Hernández, Carmen; Darós, José-Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Viroids, as a consequence of not encoding any protein, are extremely dependent on their hosts. Replication of these minimal genomes, composed exclusively by a circular RNA of 246-401 nt, occurs in the nucleus (family Pospiviroidae) or in the chloroplast (family Avsunviroidae) by an RNA-based rolling-circle mechanism with three steps: (1) synthesis of longer-than-unit strands catalyzed by host DNA-dependent RNA polymerases recruited and redirected to transcribe RNA templates, (2) cleavage to unit-length, which in family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, and (3) circularization through an RNA ligase or autocatalytically. This consistent but still fragmentary picture has emerged from a combination of studies with in vitro systems (analysis of RNA preparations from infected plants, transcription assays with nuclear and chloroplastic fractions, characterization of enzymes and ribozymes mediating cleavage and ligation of viroid strands, dissection of 5' terminal groups of viroid strands, and in situ hybridization and microscopy of subcellular fractions and tissues), and in vivo systems (tissue infiltration studies, protoplasts, studies in planta and use of transgenic plants expressing viroid RNAs).

  10. Ultima Replicated Optics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James; Engelhaupt, Darell

    1997-01-01

    Designs are reviewed incorporating processes suitable for replication of precision spherical segments of very large (greater than 20 meter diameter) telescopes combining ultra-lightweight and high precision. These designs must be amenable to assembly and alignment after deployment . The methods considered lie outside the present scope of fabrication, deployment and alignment considered to date. Design guidelines for reducing the weight and low frequency resonance in low G environment were given by The Serius Group, Dr. Glenn Zeiders, and are considered baseline for this activity. The goal of a rigid design of 10 Kg/sq M is being persued for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and is not likely adequate for advanced efforts. Flexures have been considered for maintaining the figure of many lightweight structures by control loop processes. This adds to the complexity and weight to the extent that it becomes difficult to recover the benefits. Two fabrication guidelines lead to a stiffer and concurrently lighter structure. First the use of thin vertical wall triangular structural reinforcements to increase the resistance to bending is preferred over hexagonal or square similar sections. Secondly, the incorporation of a similar back sheet on a cellular structure markedly improves the geometric stiffness. Neither improves the short range stiffness. Also often overlooked is that selected material properties must include high microyield and low hysteresis in addition to high elastic modulus to weight (stiffness). The fabrication steps can easily exceed the strain requirement.

  11. Replication initiation and genome instability: a crossroads for DNA and RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jacqueline H; Nussenzweig, André

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear DNA replication requires the concerted action of hundreds of proteins to efficiently unwind and duplicate the entire genome while also retaining epigenetic regulatory information. Initiation of DNA replication is tightly regulated, rapidly firing thousands of origins once the conditions to promote rapid and faithful replication are in place, and defects in replication initiation lead to proliferation defects, genome instability, and a range of developmental abnormalities. Interestingly, DNA replication in metazoans initiates in actively transcribed DNA, meaning that replication initiation occurs in DNA that is co-occupied with tens of thousands of poised and active RNA polymerase complexes. Active transcription can induce genome instability, particularly during DNA replication, as RNA polymerases can induce torsional stress, formation of secondary structures, and act as a physical barrier to other enzymes involved in DNA metabolism. Here we discuss the challenges facing mammalian DNA replication, their impact on genome instability, and the development of cancer.

  12. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel MA; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin AM; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-01-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication, and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify DONSON as a novel fork protection factor, and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilises forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATR-dependent signalling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity, and potentiating chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in patient cells, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we identify mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism, and establish DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:28191891

  13. Activation of DNA replication in yeast by recruitment of the RNA polymerase II transcription complex.

    PubMed

    Stagljar, I; Hübscher, U; Barberis, A

    1999-05-01

    Activators of transcription are known to also play an important and direct role in activating DNA replication. However, the mechanism whereby they stimulate replication has remained elusive. One model suggests that, in the context of replication origins, transcriptional activators work by interacting with replication factors. We show that a defined, single interaction between a DNA-bound derivative of the activator Gal4 and Gal11P, a mutant form of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme component Gal11, suffices for stimulating DNA replication as it does for transcription. Moreover, recruitment of TBP, which can activate transcription from a gene promoter, also stimulates DNA replication from an origin site. These results strongly argue that transcriptional activators may not necessarily need to contact DNA replication factors directly, but can stimulate replication by recruiting the RNA polymerase II transcription complex to DNA.

  14. Distinct functions of human RecQ helicases during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Urban, Vaclav; Dobrovolna, Jana; Janscak, Pavel

    2016-11-15

    DNA replication is the most vulnerable process of DNA metabolism in proliferating cells and therefore it is tightly controlled and coordinated with processes that maintain genomic stability. Human RecQ helicases are among the most important factors involved in the maintenance of replication fork integrity, especially under conditions of replication stress. RecQ helicases promote recovery of replication forks being stalled due to different replication roadblocks of either exogenous or endogenous source. They prevent generation of aberrant replication fork structures and replication fork collapse, and are involved in proper checkpoint signaling. The essential role of human RecQ helicases in the genome maintenance during DNA replication is underlined by association of defects in their function with cancer predisposition.

  15. Archaeology of Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the characterization of the archaeal DNA replication system together with comparative genomic analysis have led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized archaeal proteins involved in replication and currently reveal a nearly complete correspondence between the components of the archaeal and eukaryotic replication machineries. It can be inferred that the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes and even the last common ancestor of all extant archaea possessed replication machineries that were comparable in complexity to the eukaryotic replication system. The eukaryotic replication system encompasses multiple paralogs of ancestral components such that heteromeric complexes in eukaryotes replace archaeal homomeric complexes, apparently along with subfunctionalization of the eukaryotic complex subunits. In the archaea, parallel, lineage-specific duplications of many genes encoding replication machinery components are detectable as well; most of these archaeal paralogs remain to be functionally characterized. The archaeal replication system shows remarkable plasticity whereby even some essential components such as DNA polymerase and single-stranded DNA-binding protein are displaced by unrelated proteins with analogous activities in some lineages. PMID:23881942

  16. Regulating DNA Replication in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Maria de la Paz; Costas, Celina; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication in plants has requirements and constraints similar to those in other eukaryotes. However, some aspects are plant-specific. Studies of DNA replication control in plants, which have unique developmental strategies, can offer unparalleled opportunities of comparing regulatory processes with yeast and, particularly, metazoa to identify common trends and basic rules. In addition to the comparative molecular and biochemical studies, genomic studies in plants that started with Arabidopsis thaliana in the year 2000 have now expanded to several dozens of species. This, together with the applicability of genomic approaches and the availability of a large collection of mutants, underscores the enormous potential to study DNA replication control in a whole developing organism. Recent advances in this field with particular focus on the DNA replication proteins, the nature of replication origins and their epigenetic landscape, and the control of endoreplication will be reviewed. PMID:23209151

  17. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, F.; Carbone, A.; Perez, E. D.; D'Apice, A.; dell'Agnello, L.; Duellmann, D.; Girone, M.; Re, G. L.; Martelli, B.; Peco, G.; Ricci, P. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Vagnoni, V.; Vitlacil, D.

    2008-07-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  18. Mcm10: A Dynamic Scaffold at Eukaryotic Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Baxley, Ryan M.; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2017-01-01

    To complete the duplication of large genomes efficiently, mechanisms have evolved that coordinate DNA unwinding with DNA synthesis and provide quality control measures prior to cell division. Minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) is a conserved component of the eukaryotic replisome that contributes to this process in multiple ways. Mcm10 promotes the initiation of DNA replication through direct interactions with the cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45)-minichromosome maintenance complex proteins 2-7 (Mcm2-7)-go-ichi-ni-san GINS complex proteins, as well as single- and double-stranded DNA. After origin firing, Mcm10 controls replication fork stability to support elongation, primarily facilitating Okazaki fragment synthesis through recruitment of DNA polymerase-α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Based on its multivalent properties, Mcm10 serves as an essential scaffold to promote DNA replication and guard against replication stress. Under pathological conditions, Mcm10 is often dysregulated. Genetic amplification and/or overexpression of MCM10 are common in cancer, and can serve as a strong prognostic marker of poor survival. These findings are compatible with a heightened requirement for Mcm10 in transformed cells to overcome limitations for DNA replication dictated by altered cell cycle control. In this review, we highlight advances in our understanding of when, where and how Mcm10 functions within the replisome to protect against barriers that cause incomplete replication. PMID:28218679

  19. Construction of Expression Shuttle Vectors for the Haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. J7 Based on Its Chromosomal Origins of Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuchen; Chen, Beibei; Sima, Linshan; Cao, Mengzhuo

    2017-01-01

    Haloarchaeon Natrinema sp. J7, the first reported archaeon harboring both plasmid and chromosome-based temperate viruses, is a useful model for investigating archaeal virus-host and virus-virus interactions. However, the lack of genetic tools has limited such studies. On the basis of the automatically replicating sequences of the J7 chromosome and the pyrF marker, we constructed seven vectors, six of which were confirmed to possess replication ability in a pyrF-deletion derivative of J7 (J7-F). Among these vectors, pFJ1, pFJ4, and pFJ6 could be transformed into the host strain with relatively high efficiency (approximately 103 colony-forming units/μg DNA) and were present at about one copy per chromosome. These three vectors could be stably maintained in J7-F without selection and were used for heterologous protein expression. Only pFJ6 was found to be present in the transformed cells in an exclusively episomal, nonintegrated state (one copy per chromosome). In contrast, some pFJ1 and pFJ4 DNA was probably integrated into the J7-F chromosome. In addition, pFJ6 was found to be compatible with pYCJ in J7 cells, suggesting that these two vectors could be used for further studies of virus-virus and virus-host interactions. PMID:28348508

  20. Dynamics of Pre-replicative Complex Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Bell, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    The pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) is formed at all potential origins of replication through the action of the origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6, Cdt1, and the Mcm2-7 complex. The end result of pre-RC formation is the loading of the Mcm2-7 replicative helicase onto origin DNA. We examined pre-RC formation in vitro and found that it proceeds through separable binding events. Origin-bound ORC recruits Cdc6, and this ternary complex then promotes helicase loading in the presence of a pre-formed Mcm2-7-Cdt1 complex. Using a stepwise pre-RC assembly assay, we investigated the fate of pre-RC components during later stages of the reaction. We determined that helicase loading is accompanied by dissociation of ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1 from origin DNA. This dissociation requires ATP hydrolysis at a late stage of pre-RC assembly. Our results indicate that pre-RC formation is a dynamic process. PMID:20097898

  1. Combinatorial mutagenesis and selection to understand and improve yeast promoters.

    PubMed

    Berg, Laila; Strand, Trine Aakvik; Valla, Svein; Brautaset, Trygve

    2013-01-01

    Microbial promoters are important targets both for understanding the global gene expression and developing genetic tools for heterologous expression of proteins and complex biosynthetic pathways. Previously, we have developed and used combinatorial mutagenesis methods to analyse and improve bacterial expression systems. Here, we present for the first time an analogous strategy for yeast. Our model promoter is the strong and inducible P AOX1 promoter in methylotrophic Pichia pastoris. The Zeocin resistance gene was applied as a valuable reporter for mutant P AOX1 promoter activity, and we used an episomal plasmid vector to ensure a constant reporter gene dosage in the yeast host cells. This novel design enabled direct selection for colonies of recombinant cells with altered Zeocin tolerance levels originating solely from randomly introduced point mutations in the P AOX1 promoter DNA sequence. We demonstrate that this approach can be used to select for P AOX1 promoter variants with abolished glucose repression in large mutant libraries. We also selected P AOX1 promoter variants with elevated expression level under induced conditions. The properties of the selected P AOX1 promoter variants were confirmed by expressing luciferase as an alternative reporter gene. The tools developed here should be useful for effective screening, characterization, and improvement of any yeast promoters.

  2. SMARCAL1 maintains telomere integrity during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Poole, Lisa A; Zhao, Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G; Lovejoy, Courtney A; Eischen, Christine M; Cortez, David

    2015-12-01

    The SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent, regulator of chromatin, subfamily A-like 1) DNA translocase is one of several related enzymes, including ZRANB3 (zinc finger, RAN-binding domain containing 3) and HLTF (helicase-like transcription factor), that are recruited to stalled replication forks to promote repair and restart replication. These enzymes can perform similar biochemical reactions such as fork reversal; however, genetic studies indicate they must have unique cellular activities. Here, we present data showing that SMARCAL1 has an important function at telomeres, which present an endogenous source of replication stress. SMARCAL1-deficient cells accumulate telomere-associated DNA damage and have greatly elevated levels of extrachromosomal telomere DNA (C-circles). Although these telomere phenotypes are often found in tumor cells using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway for telomere elongation, SMARCAL1 deficiency does not yield other ALT phenotypes such as elevated telomere recombination. The activity of SMARCAL1 at telomeres can be separated from its genome-maintenance activity in bulk chromosomal replication because it does not require interaction with replication protein A. Finally, this telomere-maintenance function is not shared by ZRANB3 or HLTF. Our results provide the first identification, to our knowledge, of an endogenous source of replication stress that requires SMARCAL1 for resolution and define differences between members of this class of replication fork-repair enzymes.

  3. Involvement of FKBP6 in hepatitis C virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Hirotake; Kawakami, Kunihiro; Yokoe, Hiromasa; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Matsuda, Masanori; Yasumoto, Jun; Maekawa, Shinya; Yamashita, Atsuya; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki; Okamoto, Toru; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Sakamoto, Naoya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Sen; Fujii, Hideki; Tsubuki, Masayoshi; Kusunoki, Masami; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The chaperone system is known to be exploited by viruses for their replication. In the present study, we identified the cochaperone FKBP6 as a host factor required for hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. FKBP6 is a peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase with three domains of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR), but lacks FK-506 binding ability. FKBP6 interacted with HCV nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) and also formed a complex with FKBP6 itself or FKBP8, which is known to be critical for HCV replication. The Val121 of NS5A and TPR domains of FKBP6 were responsible for the interaction between NS5A and FKBP6. FKBP6 was colocalized with NS5A, FKBP8, and double-stranded RNA in HCV-infected cells. HCV replication was completely suppressed in FKBP6-knockout hepatoma cell lines, while the expression of FKBP6 restored HCV replication in FKBP6-knockout cells. A treatment with the FKBP8 inhibitor N-(N′, N′-dimethylcarboxamidomethyl)cycloheximide impaired the formation of a homo- or hetero-complex consisting of FKBP6 and/or FKBP8, and suppressed HCV replication. HCV infection promoted the expression of FKBP6, but not that of FKBP8, in cultured cells and human liver tissue. These results indicate that FKBP6 is an HCV-induced host factor that supports viral replication in cooperation with NS5A. PMID:26567527

  4. Vaccinia-like cytoplasmic replication of the giant Mimivirus.

    PubMed

    Mutsafi, Yael; Zauberman, Nathan; Sabanay, Ilana; Minsky, Abraham

    2010-03-30

    Poxviruses are considered to be unique among all DNA viruses, because their infection cycle is carried out exclusively in the host cytoplasm. Such an infection strategy is of interest, because it necessitates generation of elaborate factories in which viral replication and assembly are promoted. By using diverse imaging techniques, we show that the infection cycle of the largest virus currently identified, the Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus, similarly occurs exclusively in the host cytoplasm. We further show that newly synthesized mRNAs accumulate at discrete cytoplasmic sites that are distinct from the sites where viral replication occurs, and this is observed in vaccinia infection. By revealing substantial physiologic similarity between poxviruses and Mimivirus and thus, implying that an entirely cytoplasmic viral replication might be more common than generally considered, these findings underscore the ability of DNA viruses to generate large and elaborate replication factories.

  5. Vaccinia-like cytoplasmic replication of the giant Mimivirus

    PubMed Central

    Mutsafi, Yael; Zauberman, Nathan; Sabanay, Ilana; Minsky, Abraham

    2010-01-01

    Poxviruses are considered to be unique among all DNA viruses, because their infection cycle is carried out exclusively in the host cytoplasm. Such an infection strategy is of interest, because it necessitates generation of elaborate factories in which viral replication and assembly are promoted. By using diverse imaging techniques, we show that the infection cycle of the largest virus currently identified, the Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus, similarly occurs exclusively in the host cytoplasm. We further show that newly synthesized mRNAs accumulate at discrete cytoplasmic sites that are distinct from the sites where viral replication occurs, and this is observed in vaccinia infection. By revealing substantial physiologic similarity between poxviruses and Mimivirus and thus, implying that an entirely cytoplasmic viral replication might be more common than generally considered, these findings underscore the ability of DNA viruses to generate large and elaborate replication factories. PMID:20231474

  6. A CI-Independent Form of Replicative Inhibition: Turn Off of Early Replication of Bacteriophage Lambda

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sidney; Horbay, Monique A.; Hayes, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Several earlier studies have described an unusual exclusion phenotype exhibited by cells with plasmids carrying a portion of the replication region of phage lambda. Cells exhibiting this inhibition phenotype (IP) prevent the plating of homo-immune and hybrid hetero-immune lambdoid phages. We have attempted to define aspects of IP, and show that it is directed to repλ phages. IP was observed in cells with plasmids containing a λ DNA fragment including oop, encoding a short OOP micro RNA, and part of the lambda origin of replication, oriλ, defined by iteron sequences ITN1-4 and an adjacent high AT-rich sequence. Transcription of the intact oop sequence from its promoter, pO is required for IP, as are iterons ITN3–4, but not the high AT-rich portion of oriλ. The results suggest that IP silencing is directed to theta mode replication initiation from an infecting repλ genome, or an induced repλ prophage. Phage mutations suppressing IP, i.e., Sip, map within, or adjacent to cro or in O, or both. Our results for plasmid based IP suggest the hypothesis that there is a natural mechanism for silencing early theta-mode replication initiation, i.e. the buildup of λ genomes with oop+ oriλ+ sequence. PMID:22590552

  7. Gastric colonisation with a restricted commensal microbiota replicates the promotion of neoplastic lesions by diverse intestinal microbiota in the Helicobacter pylori INS-GAS mouse model of gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Whary, Mark T; M