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Sample records for prone breast radiotherapy

  1. Changes in breast radiotherapy: prone positioning and hypofractionation.

    PubMed

    Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Maisonet, Olivier; Formenti, Silvia C

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer management has drastically changed since the 1990s. Many patients with breast cancer now can opt to conserve their breast through a lumpectomy and radiation (breast conservation therapy), rather than a full mastectomy. Advances in the techniques of delivery and length of breast radiotherapy have been rapidly evolving. This article attempts to summarize some of those changes for nurses caring for patients with breast cancer during radiation therapy.

  2. Prone versus supine position for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a prospective study in patients with pendulous breasts.

    PubMed

    Krengli, Marco; Masini, Laura; Caltavuturo, Tina; Pisani, Carla; Apicella, Giuseppina; Negri, Eleonora; Deantonio, Letizia; Brambilla, Marco; Gambaro, Giuseppina

    2013-10-08

    To analyze dosimetric parameters of patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) in the prone versus supine position. Forty-one out of 55 patients with pendulous breasts and candidates for adjuvant RT were enrolled in the study after informed consent. They underwent computed tomography (CT)-simulation in both prone and supine position. Target and non target volumes were outlined on CT images. Prescribed dose was 50 Gy delivered by two tangential photon fields followed by 10 Gy electron boost. Target coverage and dose homogeneity to clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were assessed by V95, V105 and V107 and dose to lung, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) by V5, V10, V20, and mean and maximum dose. Data were analyzed by Student's t-test. CTV and PTV coverage was significantly better in supine than in prone position. Lung V5, V10, and V20 were significantly lower in prone than in supine position. Heart V5, V10, V20, and LAD mean and maximum dose, in the 17 patients with left breast tumor, were lower in prone than in supine position, but without statistical significance. Based on treatment planning data and on treatment feasibility, 29/41 patients (70.7%) were treated in prone position. Acute and late toxicities of patients treated in prone and in supine position were not statistically different. Prone position is a favorable alternative for irradiation of mammary gland in patients with pendulous breasts and in our series was adopted in 71% of the cases.

  3. Prone versus supine position for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a prospective study in patients with pendulous breasts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze dosimetric parameters of patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) in the prone versus supine position. Methods and materials Forty-one out of 55 patients with pendulous breasts and candidates for adjuvant RT were enrolled in the study after informed consent. They underwent computed tomography (CT)-simulation in both prone and supine position. Target and non target volumes were outlined on CT images. Prescribed dose was 50 Gy delivered by two tangential photon fields followed by 10 Gy electron boost. Target coverage and dose homogeneity to clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) were assessed by V95, V105 and V107 and dose to lung, heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) by V5, V10, V20, and mean and maximum dose. Data were analyzed by Student’s t-test. Results CTV and PTV coverage was significantly better in supine than in prone position. Lung V5, V10, and V20 were significantly lower in prone than in supine position. Heart V5, V10, V20, and LAD mean and maximum dose, in the 17 patients with left breast tumor, were lower in prone than in supine position, but without statistical significance. Based on treatment planning data and on treatment feasibility, 29/41 patients (70.7%) were treated in prone position. Acute and late toxicities of patients treated in prone and in supine position were not statistically different. Conclusion Prone position is a favorable alternative for irradiation of mammary gland in patients with pendulous breasts and in our series was adopted in 71% of the cases. PMID:24103708

  4. Accelerated Whole Breast Irradiation With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to the Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Croog, Victoria J.; Wu, Abraham J.; McCormick, Beryl; Beal, Kathryn P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Whole breast irradiation (WBI) is the standard of care for patients with early-stage breast cancer who opt for breast conservation. After a randomized trial demonstrated equivalent cosmesis and disease control with accelerated WBI (AWBI), our institution began to offer AWBI to appropriate patients. The aim of this study was to examine our unique experience with AWBI using prone positioning and simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning with a sequential boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: We identified 356 patients who had been treated with prone WBI using IMRT in our department between January 2004 and December 2006. Of these, 128 (36%) patients had received AWBI (representing 131 treated breasts), consisting of 16 daily fractions of 265 cGy to a total dose of 4,240 cGy followed by a conventionally fractionated boost. Results: Patients who opted for AWBI were similar demographically to the patients undergoing conventional WBI. In the AWBI cohort, 83% of the patients had Stage T1 disease and 22% had nodal involvement (N1). The tumors were estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-positive and Her-2/Neu-amplified in 82%, 69%, and 11%, respectively. The median duration of AWBI plus a boost was 29 days, and no patient required a toxicity-related treatment break. No Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity developed. At a median follow-up of 18 months, one ipsilateral breast recurrence developed that was salvaged with mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. Conclusion: AWBI to the prone breast using simplified IMRT with a sequential boost offers women requiring breast-only adjuvant radiotherapy an abbreviated treatment with early tumor control and cosmesis comparable to that with standard fractionation.

  5. Individual positioning: a comparative study of adjuvant breast radiotherapy in the prone versus supine position.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán; Hideghéty, Katalin; Mezo, Tamás; Nikolényi, Alíz; Thurzó, László; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    To study breast radiotherapy in the prone vs. supine positions through dosimetry and clinical implementation. Conformal radiotherapy plans in 61 patients requiring only breast irradiation were developed for both the prone and supine positions. After evaluation of the of the first 20 plan pairs, the patients were irradiated in the prone or supine position in a randomized fashion. These cases were analyzed for repositioning accuracy and skin reactions related to treatment position and patient characteristics. The planning target volume covered with 47.5-53.5 Gy in the prone vs. the supine position was 85.1% +/- 4.2% vs. 89.2 +/- 2.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Radiation exposure of the ipsilateral lung, expressed in terms of the mean lung dose and the V(20Gy), was dramatically lower in the prone vs. supine position (p < 0.0001), but the doses to the heart did not differ. There was no difference in the need to correct positioning during radiotherapy, but the extent of displacement was significantly higher in the prone vs. supine position (p = 0.021). The repositioning accuracy in the prone position exhibited an improvement over time and did not depend on any patient-related parameters. Significantly more radiodermatitis of Grade 1-2 developed following prone vs. supine irradiation (p = 0.025). Conformal breast radiotherapy is feasible in the prone position. Its primary advantage is the substantially lower radiation dose to the ipsilateral lung. The higher dose inhomogeneity and increased rate of Grade 1-2 skin toxicity, however, may be of concern.

  6. Individual Positioning: A Comparative Study of Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy in the Prone Versus Supine Position

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Hideghety, Katalin; Mezo, Tamas; Nikolenyi, Aliz; Thurzo, Laszlo; Kahan, Zsuzsanna

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To study breast radiotherapy in the prone vs. supine positions through dosimetry and clinical implementation. Methods and Materials: Conformal radiotherapy plans in 61 patients requiring only breast irradiation were developed for both the prone and supine positions. After evaluation of the of the first 20 plan pairs, the patients were irradiated in the prone or supine position in a randomized fashion. These cases were analyzed for repositioning accuracy and skin reactions related to treatment position and patient characteristics. Results: The planning target volume covered with 47.5-53.5 Gy in the prone vs. the supine position was 85.1% {+-} 4.2% vs. 89.2 {+-} 2.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Radiation exposure of the ipsilateral lung, expressed in terms of the mean lung dose and the V{sub 20Gy}, was dramatically lower in the prone vs. supine position (p < 0.0001), but the doses to the heart did not differ. There was no difference in the need to correct positioning during radiotherapy, but the extent of displacement was significantly higher in the prone vs. supine position (p = 0.021). The repositioning accuracy in the prone position exhibited an improvement over time and did not depend on any patient-related parameters. Significantly more radiodermatitis of Grade 1-2 developed following prone vs. supine irradiation (p = 0.025). Conclusions: Conformal breast radiotherapy is feasible in the prone position. Its primary advantage is the substantially lower radiation dose to the ipsilateral lung. The higher dose inhomogeneity and increased rate of Grade 1-2 skin toxicity, however, may be of concern.

  7. SU-E-T-292: Dosimetric Advantage of Prone Breast Radiotherapy for Korean Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y; Shin, J; Yu, J; Park, W; Choi, D; Huh, S; Han, Y; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric benefit of prone breast radiotherapy for Korean left-sided early-stage breast cancer patients who have relatively small breast Methods: From April to June, 2014, 10 left-sided breast cancer patients received the whole breast irradiation in prone position after partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection. All patients were pTmi-2N0-1mi. Each patient underwent two computed tomoradiography (CT) simulations in supine and prone positions. The whole breast, ipsilateral lung, heart, and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) were contoured on each simulation CT images, and then tangential-fields treatment plan in each position was designed for the whole breast irradiation with the total dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Dose-volume histograms of two setups were compared for target coverage and radiation dose to normal organs with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: The median age of patients was 47 years (range, 37 to 53). The median chest size was 82.5 cm (range, 75 to 90) and bra cup size was A in 4, B in 4, and C in 2 patients. The radiation dose to the whole breast was similar when comparing mean dose (Dmean) and dose covering 95% of the breast volume, but maximum dose (Dmax) of breast was higher in supine (median 52.3 vs. 52.7 Gy, p=0.013). Prone position reduced significantly the radiation dose in ipsilateral lung, heart, and LAD by median 5.7, 1.1, and 6.9 Gy of Dmean (p=0.005, 0.007, and 0.005) and 28.2, 18.8, and 35.0 Gy of Dmax (p=0.005, 0.005, and 0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Prone breast radiotherapy could be beneficial for Korean breast cancer patients since it substantially spared normal organs while achieving adequate coverage of the breast tissue. Further prospective study is required to validate the potential benefit of prone breast radiotherapy.

  8. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Uma Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N.

    2016-07-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000 mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9 cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal–oxide–semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6 MV photons at 200 cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94 cGy, and

  9. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Uma; Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal-oxide-semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6MV photons at 200cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94cGy, and shielded dose

  10. Evaluation of the anatomical parameters for normal tissue sparing in the prone position radiotherapy with small sized left breasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Jinyoung

    2016-01-01

    Prone position radiotherapy for a small (< 750 cm3) breast is controversial because of the variable benefits for the irradiated heart volume. The objective anatomical parameters related with chest wall shape that can determine the heart dose sparing patients in the prone position. Twenty-one patients underwent CT-simulation in supine and prone position. Dose volume parameters were compared and the objective indexes such as the Haller index, anthropometric index, mid-sternum thickness, and central lung distance (CLD) were evaluated the relationship between the shape of the chest wall and irradiated normal tissue volume in prone position. The median breast volume was 440.10 cm3 (range, 151.5–727.41 cm3). There was no difference of breast target volume between supine and prone position (p = 0.178). The Haller index under 2.5 (p = 0.046), an anthropometric index over 0.05 (p = 0.007), and the CLD over 2 (p = 0.023) conferred a greater heart sparing effect in the prone position. In conclusions, the objective anatomical parameters related chest wall shape predict the decrease in irradiated heart volume in the prone position. Therefore, it is possible to screen for patients with a reduced heart volume irradiation among those with small breasts before applying prone position radiotherapy. PMID:27756882

  11. Whole breast radiotherapy in prone and supine position: is there a place for multi-beam IMRT?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early stage breast cancer patients are long-term survivors and finding techniques that may lower acute and late radiotherapy-induced toxicity is crucial. We compared dosimetry of wedged tangential fields (W-TF), tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (TF-IMRT) and multi-beam IMRT (MB-IMRT) in prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Methods MB-IMRT, TF-IMRT and W-TF treatment plans in prone and supine positions were generated for 18 unselected breast cancer patients. The median prescription dose to the optimized planning target volume (PTVoptim) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-volume parameters and indices of conformity were calculated for the PTVoptim and organs-at-risk. Results Prone MB-IMRT achieved (p<0.01) the best dose homogeneity compared to WTF in the prone position and WTF and MB-IMRT in the supine position. Prone IMRT scored better for all dose indices. MB-IMRT lowered lung and heart dose (p<0.05) in supine position, however the lowest ipsilateral lung doses (p<0.001) were in prone position. In left-sided breast cancer patients population averages for heart sparing by radiation dose was better in prone position; though non-significant. For patients with a PTVoptim volume ≥600 cc heart dose was consistently lower in prone position; while for patients with smaller breasts heart dose metrics were comparable or worse compared to supine MB-IMRT. Doses to the contralateral breast were similar regardless of position or technique. Dosimetry of prone MB-IMRT and prone TF-IMRT differed slightly. Conclusions MB-IMRT is the treatment of choice in supine position. Prone IMRT is superior to any supine treatment for right-sided breast cancer patients and left-sided breast cancer patients with larger breasts by obtaining better conformity indices, target dose distribution and sparing of the organs-at-risk. The influence of treatment techniques in prone position is less pronounced; moreover dosimetric differences between TF

  12. Whole breast radiotherapy in prone and supine position: is there a place for multi-beam IMRT?

    PubMed

    Mulliez, Thomas; Speleers, Bruno; Madani, Indira; De Gersem, Werner; Veldeman, Liv; De Neve, Wilfried

    2013-06-24

    Early stage breast cancer patients are long-term survivors and finding techniques that may lower acute and late radiotherapy-induced toxicity is crucial. We compared dosimetry of wedged tangential fields (W-TF), tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (TF-IMRT) and multi-beam IMRT (MB-IMRT) in prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation (WBI). MB-IMRT, TF-IMRT and W-TF treatment plans in prone and supine positions were generated for 18 unselected breast cancer patients. The median prescription dose to the optimized planning target volume (PTVoptim) was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose-volume parameters and indices of conformity were calculated for the PTVoptim and organs-at-risk. Prone MB-IMRT achieved (p<0.01) the best dose homogeneity compared to WTF in the prone position and WTF and MB-IMRT in the supine position. Prone IMRT scored better for all dose indices. MB-IMRT lowered lung and heart dose (p<0.05) in supine position, however the lowest ipsilateral lung doses (p<0.001) were in prone position. In left-sided breast cancer patients population averages for heart sparing by radiation dose was better in prone position; though non-significant. For patients with a PTVoptim volume ≥600 cc heart dose was consistently lower in prone position; while for patients with smaller breasts heart dose metrics were comparable or worse compared to supine MB-IMRT. Doses to the contralateral breast were similar regardless of position or technique. Dosimetry of prone MB-IMRT and prone TF-IMRT differed slightly. MB-IMRT is the treatment of choice in supine position. Prone IMRT is superior to any supine treatment for right-sided breast cancer patients and left-sided breast cancer patients with larger breasts by obtaining better conformity indices, target dose distribution and sparing of the organs-at-risk. The influence of treatment techniques in prone position is less pronounced; moreover dosimetric differences between TF-IMRT and MB-IMRT are rather small.

  13. Prospective Assessment of Optimal Individual Position (Prone Versus Supine) for Breast Radiotherapy: Volumetric and Dosimetric Correlations in 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lymberis, Stella C.; Wyngaert, John Keith de; Parhar, Preeti; Chhabra, Arpit M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Chang Jengwha; Hochman, Tsivia; Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Damage to heart and lung from breast radiotherapy is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and lung cancer development. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate which position is best to spare lung and heart from radiotherapy exposure. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive Stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients consented to participate in a research trial that required two computed tomography simulation scans for planning both supine and prone positions. The optimal position was defined as that which best covered the contoured breast and tumor bed while it minimized critical organ irradiation, as quantified by the in-field heart and lung volume. The trial was designed to plan the first 100 patients in each position to study correlations between in-field volumes of organs at risk and dose. Results: Fifty-three left and 47 right breast cancer patients were consecutively accrued to the trial. In all patients, the prone position was optimal for sparing lung volume compared to the supine setup (mean lung volume reduction was 93.5 cc for right and 103.6 cc for left breast cancer patients). In 46/53 (87%) left breast cancer patients best treated prone, in-field heart volume was reduced by a mean of 12 cc and by 1.8 cc for the other 7/53 (13%) patients best treated supine. As predicted, supine-prone differences in in-field volume and mean dose of heart and lung were highly correlated (Spearman's correlation coefficient for left breast cancer patients was 0.90 for heart and 0.94 for lung and 0.92 for right breast cancer patients for lung). Conclusions: Prone setup reduced the amount of irradiated lung in all patients and reduced the amount of heart volume irradiated in 87% of left breast cancer patients. In-field organ volume is a valid surrogate for predicting dose; the trial continued to the planned target of 400.

  14. Increased Skin Dose With the Use of a Custom Mattress for Prone Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Stewart J. Patel, Rakesh R.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the loss of buildup to the skin of the breast in the prone position due to 2 different positioning systems during tangential external beam irradiation. Two experiments were performed; one with a standard nylon-covered foam support and another with a novel helium-filled Mylar bag support. The choice of helium-filled Mylar was to reduce the contamination to as low as possible. The experiments were designed to allow a surface dose measurement and a depth dose profile with the pads placed in the path of the beam in front of the detector. All measurements were taken using a Capintec PS-033 thin-window parallel plate ionization chamber. The standard nylon-covered foam pad caused the surface dose to rise as it got closer to the skin. When the pad was directly touching the surface, the surface dose increased by 300% compared to the result when no pad was present. This loss of buildup to the surface was similar to that of a custom bolus material. The opposite effect occurred with the use of the helium-filled Mylar bag, namely the surface dose gradually decreased as the pad got closer to the phantom. When the Mylar pad was directly touching the phantom, the surface dose was decreased by 7% compared to when no pad was present. The use of a foam pad could potentially result in a significant higher dose to the skin, resulting in an enhanced acute skin reaction. Therefore, special care should be taken in this clinical scenario and further investigation of an air- or helium-based mylar support pad should be investigated in the context of definitive breast radiation treatment.

  15. Hypofractionated breast cancer radiotherapy. Helical tomotherapy in supine position or classic 3D-conformal radiotherapy in prone position: which is better?

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Fabrizio; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Iadanza, Luciano; Cutillo, Luisa; Muto, Matteo; Toledo, Diego; Ravo, Vincenzo; Falivene, Sara; Muto, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    We propose a comparative dosimetric study of whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) in supine position and 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in prone position. Twelve patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy were retrospectively selected from October to December 2012. Specific dose-volume parameters were selected for the study. The target coverage was adequate in all patients for both techniques. Significant differences in lung dose distribution were observed: maximum dose (mean value over the 12 plans) was 23.41 Gy in HT plans and 6.65 Gy in 3D-CRT; V20 (i.e. the lung volume receiving 20 Gy) was 0.31% in HT plans and 0.0% in 3D-CRT plans. The mean dose to the heart was 5.57 Gy and 0.93 Gy, respectively. The differences between the two techniques were significant (p<0.05) only for some parameters. We noted better results in the prone position, but with HT, dose constraints were mentioned for the whole set of considered organs.

  16. Prospective Study of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Becker, Stewart J.; Lymberis, Stella; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report setup variations during prone accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods: New York University (NYU) 07-582 is an institutional review board-approved protocol of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to deliver image-guided ABPI in the prone position. Eligible are postmenopausal women with pT1 breast cancer excised with negative margins and no nodal involvement. A total dose of 30 Gy in five daily fractions of 6 Gy are delivered to the planning target volume (the tumor cavity with 1.5-cm margin) by image-guided radiotherapy. Patients are set up prone, on a dedicated mattress, used for both simulation and treatment. After positioning with skin marks and lasers, CBCTs are performed and the images are registered to the planning CT. The resulting shifts (setup corrections) are recorded in the three principal directions and applied. Portal images are taken for verification. If they differ from the planning digital reconstructed radiographs, the patient is reset, and a new CBCT is taken. Results: 70 consecutive patients have undergone a total of 343 CBCTs: 7 patients had four of five planned CBCTs performed. Seven CBCTs (2%) required to be repeated because of misalignment in the comparison between portal and digital reconstructed radiograph image after the first CBCT. The mean shifts and standard deviations in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were -0.19 (0.54), -0.02 (0.33), and -0.02 (0.43) cm, respectively. The average root mean squares of the daily shifts were 0.50 (0.28), 0.29 (0.17), and 0.38 (0.20). A conservative margin formula resulted in a recommended margin of 1.26, 0.73, 0.96 cm in the AP, SI, and ML directions. Conclusion: CBCTs confirmed that the NYU prone APBI setup and treatment technique are reproducible, with interfraction variation comparable to those reported for supine setup. The currently applied margin (1.5 cm) adequately compensates for the setup variation detected.

  17. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C.; Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, Keith J.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest but

  18. Prone Whole-Breast Irradiation Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Early Disease Yields High Rates of Excellent to Good Cosmetic Outcomes in Patients With Large and/or Pendulous Breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy; Morrow, Natalya; Wilson, J. Frank; Walker, Alonzo; Xiang Qun; Ahn, Kwang Woo; White, Julia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our institution's experience using prone positioning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation (WBI) in a cohort of women with large and/or pendulous breasts, to determine the rate of acute and late toxicities and, more specifically, cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that using 3D-CRT for WBI in the prone position would reduce or eliminate patient and breast size as negative prognostic indicators for toxicities associated with WBI. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 110 cases were treated with prone WBI using 3D-CRT. The lumpectomy, breast target volumes, heart, and lung were contoured on all computed tomography scans. A dose of 45-50 Gy was prescribed to the breast volume using standard fractionation schemes. The planning goals were {>=}95% of prescription to 95% of the breast volume, and 100% of boost dose to 95% of lumpectomy planning target volume. Toxicities and cosmesis were prospectively scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects Version 3.0 and the Harvard Scale. The median follow-up was 40 months. Results: The median body mass index (BMI) was 33.6 kg/m{sup 2}, and median breast volume was 1396 cm{sup 3}. The worst toxicity encountered during radiation was Grade 3 dermatitis in 5% of our patient population. Moist desquamation occurred in 16% of patients, with only 2% of patients with moist desquamation outside the inframammary/axillary folds. Eleven percent of patients had Grade {>=}2 late toxicities, including Grade 3 induration/fibrosis in 2%. Excellent to good cosmesis was achieved in 89%. Higher BMI was associated with moist desquamation and breast pain, but BMI and breast volume did not impact fibrosis or excellent to good cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients with higher BMI and/or large-pendulous breasts, delivering prone WBI using 3D-CRT results in favorable toxicity profiles and high excellent to good cosmesis rates. Higher BMI was

  19. Comparison of Acute and Late Toxicity of Two Regimens of 3- and 5-Week Concomitant Boost Prone IMRT to Standard 6-Week Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shahzad; Lymberis, Stella C.; Ciervide, Raquel; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Magnolfi, Chiara; Rosenstein, Barry; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Limited information is available comparing toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy (RT) to that of standard fractionation RT for early stage breast cancer. We report early and late toxicities of two prone regimens of accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a concomitant boost (CB) to the tumor bed delivered over 3 or 5 weeks as compared to standard 6 week RT with a sequential electron boost. Methods: From 2/2003 to 12/2007, 169 consecutive patients with Stage I–II breast cancer were offered the choice to undergo prone RT with either: a 6-week standard RT regimen of 46 Gy/23 fractions (fx) to the whole breast (WB), followed by a14 Gy sequential boost (SB) to the tumor bed (6wSB), a 5-week regimen of 50 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 6.25 Gy in 25 fx (5wCB); or a 3-week protocol of 40.5 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 7.5 Gy in 15 fx (3wCB). These regimens were estimated as biologically equivalent, based on alpha/beta = 4 for tumor control. Toxicities were reported using RTOG and LENT/SOMA scoring. Results: 51/169 patients chose standard 6wSB, 28 selected 5wCB, and 90 enrolled in 3wCB protocol. Maximum acute toxicity was Grade 3 dermatitis in 4% of the patients in the 6wSB compared 1% in 3wCB. In general, acute complications (breast pain, fatigue, and dermatitis) were significantly less in the 3wCB than in the other schedules (P < 0.05). With a median follow-up of 61 months, the only Grade 3 late toxicity was telangiectasia in two patients: one in 3wCB and one in 5wCB group. Notably, fibrosis was comparable among the three groups (P = NS). Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that accelerated regimens of breast RT over 3 or 5 weeks in the prone position, with an IMRT tumor bed CB, result in comparable late toxicity to standard fractionation with a sequential tumor boost delivered over 6 weeks. As predicted by radiobiological modeling the shorter regimen was associated with less acute effects. PMID:22649788

  20. The Role of a Prone Setup in Breast Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials. PMID:22655240

  1. The role of a prone setup in breast radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; Dewyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  2. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. . E-mail: patel@humonc.wisc.edu; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD{sub mean}) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value <0.05. The mean V100 was significantly lower for IB (12% vs. 15% for PT, 18% for ST, and 26% for 3D-CRT). A greater significant differential was seen when comparing V50 with mean values of 24%, 43%, 47%, and 52% for IB, PT, ST, and 3D-CRT, respectively. The IB and PT were similar and delivered an average lung NTD{sub mean} dose of 1.3 Gy{sub 3} and 1.2 Gy{sub 3}, respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals.

  3. Tumor Bed Delineation for Partial Breast and Breast Boost Radiotherapy Planned in the Prone Position: What Does MRI Add to X-ray CT Localization of Titanium Clips Placed in the Excision Cavity Wall?

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Anna M. Yarnold, John R.; Evans, Philip M.; Morgan, Veronica A.; Schmidt, Maria A.; Scurr, Erica D.; Souza, Nandita de

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To compare tumor bed (TB) volumes delineated using magnetic resonance imaging plus computed tomography and clips (MRCT) with those delineated using CT and clips (CT/clips) alone in postlumpectomy breast cancer patients positioned prone and to determine the value of MRCT for planning partial breast irradiation (PBI). Methods and Materials: Thirty women with breast cancer each had 6 to 12 titanium clips secured in the excision cavity walls at lumpectomy. Patients underwent CT imaging in the prone position, followed by MRI (T{sub 1}-weighted [standard and fat-suppressed] and T{sub 2}-weighted sequences) in the prone position. TB volumes were delineated separately on CT and on fused MRCT datasets. Clinical target volumes (CTV) (where CTV = TB + 15 mm) and planning target volumes (PTV) (where PTV = CTV + 10 mm) were generated. Conformity indices between CT- and MRCT-defined target volumes were calculated (ratio of the volume of agreement to total delineated volume). Discordance was expressed as a geographical miss index (GMI) (where the GMI = the fraction of total delineated volume not defined by CT) and a normal tissue index (the fraction of total delineated volume designated as normal tissue on MRCT). PBI dose distributions were generated to cover CT-defined CTV (CTV{sub CT}) with {>=}95% of the reference dose. The percentage of MRCT-defined CTV (CTV{sub MRCT}) receiving {>=}95% of the reference dose was measured. Results: Mean conformity indices were 0.54 (TB), 0.84 (CTV), and 0.89 (PTV). For TB volumes, the GMI was 0.37, and the NTI was 0.09. Median percentage volume coverage of CTV{sub CT} was 97.1% (range, 95.3%-100.0%) and of CTV{sub MRCT} was 96.5% (range, 89.0%-100.0%). Conclusions: Addition of MR to CT/clip data generated TB volumes that were discordant with those based on CT/clips alone. However, clinically satisfactory coverage of CTV{sub MRCT} by CTV{sub CT}-based tangential PBI fields provides support for CT/clip-based TB delineation remaining the

  4. Whole breast and regional nodal irradiation in prone versus supine position in left sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Deseyne, Pieter; Speleers, Bruno; De Neve, Wilfried; Boute, Bert; Paelinck, Leen; Van Hoof, Tom; Van de Velde, Joris; Van Greveling, Annick; Monten, Chris; Post, Giselle; Depypere, Herman; Veldeman, Liv

    2017-05-26

    Prone whole breast irradiation (WBI) leads to reduced heart and lung doses in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. In this feasibility trial, we investigated the prone position for whole breast + lymph node irradiation (WB + LNI). A new support device was developed for optimal target coverage, on which patients are positioned in a position resembling a phase from the crawl swimming technique (prone crawl position). Five left sided breast cancer patients were included and simulated in supine and prone position. For each patient, a treatment plan was made in prone and supine position for WB + LNI to the whole axilla and the unoperated part of the axilla. Patients served as their own controls for comparing dosimetry of target volumes and organs at risk (OAR) in prone versus in supine position. Target volume coverage differed only slightly between prone and supine position. Doses were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in prone position for ipsilateral lung (Dmean, D2, V5, V10, V20, V30), contralateral lung (Dmean, D2), contralateral breast (Dmean, D2 and for total axillary WB + LNI also V5), thyroid (Dmean, D2, V5, V10, V20, V30), oesophagus (Dmean and for partial axillary WB + LNI also D2 and V5), skin (D2 and for partial axillary WB + LNI V105 and V107). There were no significant differences for heart and humeral head doses. Prone crawl position in WB + LNI allows for good breast and nodal target coverage with better sparing of ipsilateral lung, thyroid, contralateral breast, contralateral lung and oesophagus when compared to supine position. There is no difference in heart and humeral head doses. No trial registration was performed because there were no therapeutic interventions.

  5. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  6. Preliminary Results on Setup Precision of Prone-Lateral Patient Positioning for Whole Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; Speleers, Bruno; Bakker, Marlies; Jacobs, Filip; Coghe, Marc; De Gersem, Werner; Impens, Aline; Nechelput, Sarah; De Wagter, Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and reproducible technique for prone positioning and to compare dose-volume indices in prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients underwent computed tomography imaging for radiotherapy planning in prone and supine position. Experience was gained in the first eight patients, which lead to modifications of the Horizon prone breast board (Civco Medical Solutions, Orange City, Iowa, USA) and the patient setup technique. A unilateral breast holder (U-BH) was developed (Van de Velde, Schellebelle, Belgium) to retract the contralateral breast away from the treated breast. The technique was then applied to an additional 10 patients. The setup precision was evaluated using daily cone-beam CT. Results: Modifications to the breast board were made to secure a prone-lateral rather then a pure prone position. We evolved from a classical setup using laser marks on the patients' body to a direct breast setup using marks on the breast only. The setup precision of the direct positioning procedure with the modified breast board and the U-BH is comparable to supine setup data in the literature. Dose-volume indices for heart and lung show significantly better results for prone than for supine position, and dose homogeneity within the treated breast did not differ according to the treatment position. Conclusions: The setup precision of our prone-lateral positioning technique is comparable to supine data in literature. Our data show the advantage of prone radiotherapy to spare the lung and heart. Further research is necessary to reduce the duration of prone setup.

  7. Symmetric Biomechanically Guided Prone-to-Supine Breast Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Eiben, Björn; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Hipwell, John H; Kabus, Sven; Buelow, Thomas; Lorenz, Cristian; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Reis, Sara; Williams, Norman R; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hawkes, David J

    2016-01-01

    Prone-to-supine breast image registration has potential application in the fields of surgical and radiotherapy planning, image guided interventions, and multi-modal cancer diagnosis, staging, and therapy response prediction. However, breast image registration of three dimensional images acquired in different patient positions is a challenging problem, due to large deformations induced to the soft breast tissue caused by the change in gravity loading. We present a symmetric, biomechanical simulation based registration framework which aligns the images in a central, virtually unloaded configuration. The breast tissue is modelled as a neo-Hookean material and gravity is considered as the main source of deformation in the original images. In addition to gravity, our framework successively applies image derived forces directly into the unloading simulation in place of a subsequent image registration step. This results in a biomechanically constrained deformation. Using a finite difference scheme avoids an explicit meshing step and enables simulations to be performed directly in the image space. The explicit time integration scheme allows the motion at the interface between chest and breast to be constrained along the chest wall. The feasibility and accuracy of the approach presented here was assessed by measuring the target registration error (TRE) using a numerical phantom with known ground truth deformations, nine clinical prone MRI and supine CT image pairs, one clinical prone-supine CT image pair and four prone-supine MRI image pairs. The registration reduced the mean TRE for the numerical phantom experiment from initially 19.3 to 0.9 mm and the combined mean TRE for all fourteen clinical data sets from 69.7 to 5.6 mm.

  8. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Baum, Michael; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Joseph, David; Wenz, Frederik; Houghton, Joan; Saunders, Christobel; Corica, Tammy; D'Souza, Derek; Sainsbury, Richard; Massarut, Samuele; Taylor, Irving; Hilaris, Basil

    2004-03-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy, which forms part of breast-conserving therapy, may not need to encompass the whole breast. Apart from the consumption of huge resources and patients' time, postoperative radiotherapy deters many women from receiving the benefits of breast-conserving surgery, forcing them to choose a mastectomy instead. If radiotherapy could be given in the operating theatre immediately after surgery, many of these disadvantages could be overcome. One striking fact about local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is that most occurs in the area of breast immediately next to the primary tumour; this is despite the finding that two-thirds of mastectomy samples have microscopic tumours distributed throughout the breast, even when radiotherapy is omitted. Thus, only the area adjacent to the tumour may need treatment with radiotherapy. On the basis of this premise, clinical scientists have used new technology to administer radiotherapy to the area at greatest risk of local recurrence, with the aim of completing the whole local treatment in one sitting. In this review, we have elaborated on the rationale and different methods of delivery of intraoperative radiotherapy. If this approach is validated by the results of current randomised trials, it could save time, money, and breasts.

  9. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  10. Simultaneous irradiation of the breast and regional lymph nodes in prone position using helical tomotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kainz, K; White, J; Chen, G-P; Hermand, J; England, M; Li, X A

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated dosimetric advantages of using helical tomotherapy to simultaneously irradiate the breast and regional lymph nodes for patients positioned prone, and compared tomotherapy plan qualities for the prone position with those previously published for the supine position. Methods Tomotherapy plans for 11 patients (5 left breast, 6 right) simulated with the involved breast suspended downward were generated. Each target (ipsilateral breast and supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary chain nodes) was to receive 45 Gy. Results For targets, V40.5≥99.9% and V42.8≥99.5% for all patients, where V40.5 and V42.8 denote the relative target volume receiving at least 40.5 and 42.8 Gy, respectively. The targets' maximum dose was, on average, approximately 49.5 Gy. The mean doses to the contralateral lung and heart were lower for right-breast cases (2.8 Gy lung, 2.7 Gy heart) than for left-breast cases (3.8 Gy lung, 8.7 Gy heart). Mean organ doses to the ipsilateral lung (9.3 Gy) and contralateral breast (2.3 Gy) from the prone breast tomotherapy plans were similar to those reported for conventional radiotherapy techniques. For the left breast with regional nodes, tomotherapy plans for prone-positioned patients yielded lower mean doses to the contralateral breast and heart than previously reported data for tomotherapy plans for supine-positioned patients. Conclusion Helical tomotherapy with prone breast positioning can simultaneously cover the breast and regional nodes with acceptable uniformity and can provide reduced mean dose to proximal organs at risk compared with tomotherapy with supine position. The similarity of plan quality to existing data for conventional breast radiotherapy indicates that this planning approach is appropriate, and that the risk of secondary tumour formation should not be significantly greater. PMID:22457317

  11. PRONE ACCELERATED PARTIAL BREAST IRRADIATION AFTER BREAST-CONSERVING SURGERY: FIVE YEAR RESULTS OF 100 PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position (P-APBI). Methods Post-menopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with non palpable <2 cm tumors, negative margins, and negative nodes, positive hormonal receptors, and no extensive intraductal component (EIC) were eligible. The trial was offered only once eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone set-up. The 3D-CRT delivered was 30 Gy in five 6 Gy/daily fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Ipsilateral breast, ipsilateral nodal, contralateral breast, and distant failure (IBF, INF, CBF, DF) were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival (DFS, OS, CSS) were recorded. Results One hundred patients accrued to this IRB- approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation and another elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients are evaluable for toxicity and, in one case, both breasts were treated with PBI. Median patient age was 68 years (range 53–88 years); in 55% the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormonal receptor positive cancers: 87% underwent adjuvant anti-hormonal therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2–125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% IBF) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% CBF). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (1 breast edema, 1 transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36 months follow-up. Conclusions Five-year efficacy and toxicity of 3D-CRT to deliver prone-PBI are comparable to other experiences with similar

  12. Whole-breast irradiation: a subgroup analysis of criteria to stratify for prone position treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; Ippolito, Edy; Fiore, Michele; Cellini, Francesco; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Greco, Carlo; Ramponi, Sara; Cammilluzzi, Eugenio; Cesarini, Claudio; Piermattei, Angelo; Cesario, Alfredo; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria

    2012-07-01

    To select among breast cancer patients and according to breast volume size those who may benefit from 3D conformal radiotherapy after conservative surgery applied with prone-position technique. Thirty-eight patients with early-stage breast cancer were grouped according to the target volume (TV) measured in the supine position: small ({<=}400 mL), medium (400-700 mL), and large ({>=}700 ml). An ad-hoc designed and built device was used for prone set-up to displace the contralateral breast away from the tangential field borders. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography in both the supine and prone positions. Dosimetric data to explore dose distribution and volume of normal tissue irradiated were calculated for each patient in both positions. Homogeneity index, hot spot areas, the maximum dose, and the lung constraints were significantly reduced in the prone position (p < 0.05). The maximum heart distance and the V{sub 5Gy} did not vary consistently in the 2 positions (p = 0.06 and p = 0.7, respectively). The number of necessary monitor units was significantly higher in the supine position (312 vs. 232, p < 0.0001). The subgroups analysis pointed out the advantage in lung sparing in all TV groups (small, medium and large) for all the evaluated dosimetric constraints (central lung distance, maximum lung distance, and V{sub 5Gy}, p < 0.0001). In the small TV group, a dose reduction in nontarget areas of 22% in the prone position was detected (p = 0.056); in the medium and high TV groups, the difference was of about -10% (p = NS). The decrease in hot spot areas in nontarget tissues was 73%, 47%, and 80% for small, medium, and large TVs in the prone position, respectively. Although prone breast radiotherapy is normally proposed in patients with breasts of large dimensions, this study gives evidence of dosimetric benefit in all patient subgroups irrespective of breast volume size.

  13. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  14. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

  15. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  16. Differences in breast tissue oxygenation following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dornfeld, Ken; Gessert, Charles E; Renier, Colleen M; McNaney, David D; Urias, Rodolfo E; Knowles, Denise M; Beauduy, Jean L; Widell, Sherry L; McDonald, Bonita L

    2011-08-01

    Tissue perfusion and oxygenation changes following radiotherapy may result from and/or contribute to the toxicity of treatment. Breast tissue oxygenation levels were determined in the treated and non-treated breast 1 year after radiotherapy for breast conserving treatment. Transcutaneous oxygenation varied between subjects in both treated and non-treated breast. Subjects without diabetes mellitus (n=16) had an average oxygenation level of 64.8 ± 19.9mmHg in the irradiated breast and an average of 72.3 ± 18.1mmHg (p=0.018) at the corresponding location in the control breast. Patients with diabetes (n=4) showed a different oxygenation pattern, with lower oxygenation levels in control tissue and no decrease in the irradiated breast. This study suggests oxygenation levels in normal tissues vary between patients and may respond differently after radiotherapy.

  17. Novel 10-fraction breast irradiation in prone and supine position: technical, dosimetric and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guenzi, Marina; Bosetti, Davide; Lamanna, Giorgio; Siffredi, Guido; Bonzano, Elisabetta; Gusinu, Marco; Garelli, Stefania; Pupillo, Francesco; Corvò, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the planned dose distribution and acute toxicity of adjuvant hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy (RT) delivered in the prone vs. supine position. Twenty-four patients were enrolled; 12 underwent adjuvant RT with a supine setup and 12 with a prone setup. We included patients according to breast volume (≥500 mL), disease stage (≤pT2/pN1), and clinical/biological features. Patients received a regimen of 35 Gy in 10 fractions for 2.5 weeks, and a concomitant boost of 3/4 Gy in 1 fraction/week. Target coverage was assessed by volume, V90, V95, V100, V103 and V105. Heart, LADCA and ipsilateral lung doses were evaluated according to volume, maximum dose, mean dose, V14, V10 and V5. We evaluated acute skin toxicity during RT, at the end of treatment, and after 1 month according to RTOG scales. Radiobiological equivalence was warranted with satisfactory BED values: considering α/β = 4 for breast cancer, the 10-fraction schedule equaled 74 or 77 Gy depending on the boost dose (3 Gy vs. 4 Gy, respectively). Toxicity was low and similar for supine and prone treatments. Dose sparing was significant in the ipsilateral lung in the prone position (median Dmax: 28.7 Gy vs. 38.4 Gy; median Dmean: 0.8 Gy vs. 6.3 Gy; median V14: 0.6% vs. 13.5%; median V5: 0 vs. 19.3%, p<0.001). This novel 10-fraction schedule is feasible and well tolerated; the prone position allows better saving of OARs, with a statistically significant value for the ipsilateral lung.

  18. [Radiotherapy for breast cancer and pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Menard, J; Campana, F; Kirov, K M; Bollet, M-A; Dendale, R; Fournier-Bidoz, N; Marchand, V; Mazal, A; Estève, M; Fourquet, A; Kirova, Y M

    2011-06-01

    Patients with permanent cardiac pacemakers occasionally require radiotherapy. Therapeutic irradiation may cause pacemakers to malfunction due to the effects of ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. We studied the breast cancer patients who needed breast and/or chest wall and lymph node irradiation to assess the feasibility and tolerance in this population of patients. From November 2008 to December 2009, more than 900 patients received radiotherapy for their breast cancer in our department using megavoltage linear accelerator (X 4-6 MV and electrons). Among them, seven patients were with permanent pacemaker. All patients have been treated to the breast and chest wall and/or lymph nodes. Total dose to breast and/or chest wall was 50 Gy/25 fractions and 46 Gy/23 fractions to lymph nodes. Patients who underwent conserving surgery followed by breast irradiation were boosted when indicated to tumour bed with 16 Gy/8 fractions. All patients were monitored everyday in presence of radiation oncologist to follow the function of their pacemaker. All pacemakers were controlled before and after radiotherapy by the patients' cardiologist. Seven patients were referred in our department for postoperative breast cancer radiotherapy. Among them, only one patient was declined for radiotherapy and underwent mastectomy without radiotherapy. In four cases the pacemaker was repositioned before the beginning of radiotherapy. Six patients, aged between 48 and 84 years underwent irradiation for their breast cancer. Four patients were treated with conserving surgery followed by breast radiotherapy and two with mastectomy followed by chest wall and internal mammary chain, supra- and infra-clavicular lymph node irradiation. The dose to the pacemaker generator was kept below 2 Gy. There was no pacemaker dysfunction observed during the radiotherapy. The multidisciplinary work with position change of the pacemaker before radiotherapy and everyday monitoring permitted the safe

  19. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  20. Prone breast intensity modulated radiation therapy: 5-year results.

    PubMed

    Osa, Etin-Osa O; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D; Formenti, Silvia C

    2014-07-15

    To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm(3), mean 19.65 cm(3). In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm(3), mean 1.59 cm(3). There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and fractionation approach to standard 6-week radiation therapy with a

  1. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  2. Does breast composition influence late adverse effects in breast radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Juneja, Prabhjot; Bonora, Maria; Haviland, Joanne S; Harris, Emma; Evans, Phil; Somaiah, Navita

    2016-04-01

    Large breast size is associated with increased risk of late adverse effects after surgery and radiotherapy for early breast cancer. It is hypothesised that effects of radiotherapy on adipose tissue are responsible for some of the effects seen. In this study, the association of breast composition with late effects was investigated along with other breast features such as fibroglandular tissue distribution, seroma and scar. The patient dataset comprised of 18 cases with changes in breast appearance at 2 years follow-up post-radiotherapy and 36 controls with no changes, from patients entered into the FAST-Pilot and UK FAST trials at The Royal Marsden. Breast composition, fibroglandular tissue distribution, seroma and scar were assessed on planning CT scan images and compared using univariate analysis. The association of all features with late-adverse effect was tested using logistic regression (adjusting for confounding factors) and matched analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. In univariate analyses, no statistically significant differences were found between cases and controls in terms of breast features studied. A statistically significant association (p < 0.05) between amount of seroma and change in photographic breast appearance was found in unmatched and matched logistic regression analyses with odds ratio (95% CI) of 3.44 (1.28-9.21) and 2.57 (1.05-6.25), respectively. A significant association was found between seroma and late-adverse effects after radiotherapy although no significant associations were noted with breast composition in this study. Therefore, the cause for large breast size as a risk factor for late effects after surgery and optimally planned radiotherapy remains unresolved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L. )

    1994-04-30

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Prone Positioning Causes the Heart To Be Displaced Anteriorly Within the Thorax: Implications for Breast Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chino, Junzo P. Marks, Lawrence B.

    2008-03-01

    Introduction: Prone positioning has been suggested as an alternative to the conventional supine position for patients receiving breast radiotherapy, but few data exist on how this may alter heart location. We herein quantitatively compare the intrathoracic location of the heart in the prone and supine positions in patients treated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In 16 patients treated with tangent photons for breast cancer, the computed tomography planning images (obtained in the supine position) and diagnostic magnetic resonance images (obtained in the prone position) were studied. For each case, the distance between the anterior pericardium and the anterior chest wall was measured at nine specific points; three points at each of three axial levels. The differences in the measurements between the prone and supine positions were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: There is a systematic displacement of the lateral and superior aspect of the heart closer to the chest wall in the prone vs. supine position (mean displacement 19 mm (95% confidence interval 13.7-25.1 mm, p < 0.001); the medial and inferior aspects remain fixed. There was also a reduction in volume of lung interposed between the heart and chest wall when prone (mean decrease of 22 mL, p < 0.001 for difference). Conclusions: The superior and lateral aspects of the heart typically move anteriorly during prone positioning compared with the supine position. This may have negative consequences in situations in which the high-risk target tissues include the chest wall or deep breast.

  5. Breast Molecular Profiling and Radiotherapy Considerations.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Omar; Haffty, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen major changes in the management of breast cancer. Heterogeneity regarding histology, therapeutic response, dissemination patterns, and patient outcome is evident. Molecular profiling provides an accurate tool to predict treatment outcome compared with classical clinicopathologic features. The genomic profiling unveiled the heterogeneity of breast cancer and identified distinct biologic subtypes. These advanced techniques were integrated into the clinical management; predicting systemic therapy benefit and overall survival. Utilizing genotyping to guide locoregional management decisions needs further characterization. In this chapter we will review available data on molecular classification of breast cancer, their association with locoregional outcome, their radiobiological properties and radiotherapy considerations.

  6. Breast Cancer Patients’ Experience of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical component of treatment for the majority of women with breast cancer, particularly those who receive breast conserving surgery. Although medically beneficial, radiotherapy can take a physical and psychological toll on patients. However, little is known about the specific thoughts and feelings experienced by women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Therefore, the study aim was to use qualitative research methods to develop an understanding of these thoughts and feelings based on 180 diary entries, completed during radiotherapy by 15 women with Stage 0-III breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified four primary participant concerns: (a) a preoccupation with time; (b) fantasies (both optimistic and pessimistic) about life following radiotherapy; (c) the toll their side-effect experience takes on their self-esteem; and (d) feeling mystified by radiotherapy. These themes are consistent with previous literature on illness and identity. These findings have implications for the treatment and care of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19380502

  7. Smokers May Be Prone to Risks from Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smokers May Be Prone to Risks From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy Long-term chances of heart attack, ... 29, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who smoke have an increased risk for ...

  8. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: oncology, cosmesis and complications

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Breast reconstruction plays a highly important role in the management of patients with breast cancer, from a psycho-social and sexual stand-point. Given that immediate breast reconstruction does not impair the oncologic safety of breast cancer management, with no increase in local recurrence rates, and no delays in the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy, the need to balance cosmesis in reconstruction with the oncologic needs of breast cancer patients is no more evident than in the discussion of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is essential adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer, with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy widely shown to reduce local recurrence after both partial and total mastectomy and shown to prolong both disease-free and overall survival in patients with nodal disease. In the setting of breast reconstruction, the effects of radiotherapy are potentially two-fold, with consideration required of the impact of breast reconstruction on the administration of and the initiation of radiotherapy, as well as the effects of radiotherapy on operative complications and cosmetic outcome following immediate breast reconstruction. The current editorial piece aims to analyze this balance, contrasting both autologous and implant-based reconstruction. The literature is still evolving as to the relative role of autologous vs. alloplastic reconstruction in the setting of radiotherapy, and the more recent introduction of acellular dermal matrix and other compounds further complicate the evidence. Fat grafting and evolving techniques in breast reconstruction will herald new discussions on this front. PMID:25083434

  9. Ventilation with facial mask in the prone position for radiotherapy procedures in children.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ferrer, A; Gredilla-Díaz, E; de Vicente-Sánchez, J; Kollmann-Camaiora, A; Escribano, A

    2016-04-01

    Ventilation of patients undergoing procedures in the prone position represents a challenge for the anesthesiologist, especially when trying to avoid tracheal intubation. This study aimed to test the effectiveness and safety of a prototype designed for pediatric facial mask ventilation in the prone position. A prospective descriptive study was conducted on 105 sedations performed in 3 children scheduled for radiotherapy treatment of posterior fossa desmoplastic medulloblastoma (6 and 4 y.o. males), and neuroblastoma in temporal area (4 y.o. male). Induction and maintenance of sedation were conducted with sevoflurane in oxygen, maintaining spontaneous ventilation. After achieving loss of consciousness and immobility, the patients were placed in the prone position. Their heads were fixed with the forehead and face supported by a prototype made with a cast of expanded polystyrene (EPS), which held the facial mask (connected to a Mapleson D circuit), and the back of the head immobilized with a layer of thermoplastic material. Time variables and complications were recorded. All sedations were performed according to the planned protocol. All patients maintained oxygen saturation levels above 95%, and no complications were reported. Daily hospital length of stay including the procedure and post anesthetic recovery was 54.4±7.9 min (mean±SD). The prototype and the sedation technique with face mask in the prone position employed were effective and safe, allowing the completion of the radiotherapy sessions and securing the airway in a minimally invasive way, maintaining adequate ventilation, light sedation and enabling early hospital discharge. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Koulis, Theodora A; Phan, Tien; Olivotto, Ivo A

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is an important part of breast cancer management but the dose and fractionation schedules used are variable. A total of 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions delivered over 5 weeks is often considered the “standard” adjuvant RT prescription. Hypofractionated regimes such as 42.5 Gy in 16 daily fractions or 40 Gy in 15 daily fractions following breast-conserving surgery have proven to be equally effective and achieve similar or better cosmetic and normal tissue outcomes for both invasive and in situ diseases and when treating the regional nodes. Hypofractionation is more convenient for patients and less costly. However, certain patients at higher risk of RT late effects may benefit from a less intense, even more extended fractionation schedule. This review describes the indications for whole breast hypofractionated adjuvant RT for patients with breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery and proposes that hypofractionation should be the new “standard” for adjuvant breast cancer RT. PMID:26604820

  11. Radiotherapy issues in elderly breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older 'low-risk' patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial breast irradiation (external beam or intraoperative or postoperative brachytherapy) is potentially an attractive option for older patients, but the evidence base is insufficient to recommend it routinely. Similarly, shortened (hypofractionated) dose fraction schedules may be more convenient for older patients and are supported by level 1 evidence. There remains uncertainty about whether there is a subgroup of older low-risk patients in whom postoperative RT can be omitted after breast-conserving surgery. Biomarkers of 'low risk' are needed to refine the selection of patients for the omission of adjuvant RT. The role of postmastectomy irradiation is well established for 'high-risk' patients but uncertain in the intermediate-risk category of patients with 1-3 involved axillary nodes or node-negative patients with other risk factors where its role is investigational.

  12. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  13. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3 Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0 cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  14. Supine breast US: how to correlate breast lesions from prone MRI

    PubMed Central

    Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato A; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate spatial displacement of breast lesions from prone MR to supine ultrasound positions, and to determine whether the degree of displacement may be associated with breast density and lesion histotype. Methods: 380 patients underwent breast MR and second-look ultrasound. The MR and ultrasound lesion location within the breast gland, distances from anatomical landmarks (nipple, skin and pectoral muscle), spatial displacement (distance differences from the landmarks within the same breast region) and region displacement (breast region change) were prospectively evaluated. Differences between MR and ultrasound measurements, association between the degree of spatial displacement and both breast density and lesion histotypes were calculated. Results: In 290/380 (76%) patients, 300 MR lesions were detected. 285/300 (95%) lesions were recognized on ultrasound. By comparing MR and ultrasound, spatial displacement occurred in 183/285 (64.3%) cases while region displacement in 102/285 (35.7%) cases with a circumferential movement along an arc centred on the nipple, having supine ultrasound as the reference standard. A significant association between the degree of lesion displacement and breast density was found (p < 0.00001) with a significant higher displacement in case of fatty breasts. No significant association between the degree of displacement and lesion histotype was found (p = 0.1). Conclusion: Lesion spatial displacement from MRI to ultrasound may occur especially in adipose breasts. Lesion–nipple distance and circumferential displacement from the nipple need to be considered for ultrasound lesion detection. Advances in knowledge: Second-look ultrasound breast lesion detection could be improved by calculating the lesion–nipple distance and considering that spatial displacement from MRI occurs with a circumferential movement along an arc centred on the nipple. PMID:26689093

  15. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Versus Whole-Breast External Beam Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Zhirui; Mei, Xin; Yang, Zhaozhi; Ma, Jinli; Chen, Xingxing; Wang, Junqi; Liu, Guangyu; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has not been a clear answer about the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the available evidence comparing the efficacy and safety of IORT with those of whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to October 2014. Two authors independently conducted the literature selection and data extraction. Studies that compared IORT with whole-breast EBRT were included in the systematic review. IORT was defined as a single dose of irradiation to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery rather than whole-breast irradiation. Qualities of RCTs were evaluated according to the PEDro scale. Qualities of non-RCTs were evaluated according to the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). The risk ratios (RRs) of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were pooled using a random-effects model. Four studies with 5415 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 non-RCTs. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was significantly higher in patients with IORT compared to those with whole-breast EBRT (RR 2.83, 95% CI 1.23–6.51), but with significant heterogeneity (I2 = 58.5%, P = 0.065). Comparing IORT with whole-breast EBRT, the pooled RRs for overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66–1.17), 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77–1.86), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.44–1.31), and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.61–1.49), respectively. IORT had a significantly higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence than whole-breast EBRT. Overall mortality did not differ significantly. IORT should be used in conjunction with the prudent selection of

  16. SU-E-T-538: Does Abdominal Compression Through Prone Patient Position Reduce Respiratory Motion in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Catron, T; Rosu, M; Weiss, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the effect of physiological abdominal compression from prone positioning by comparing respiratory-induced tumor movements in supine and prone positions. Methods: 19 lung cancer patients underwent repeated supine and prone free-breathing 4DCT scans. The effect of patient position on motion magnitude was investigated for tumors, lymph nodes (9 cases), and subgroups of central (11 cases), peripheral (8 cases) and small peripheral tumors (5 cases), by evaluating the population average excursions, absolute and relative to a carina-point. Results: Absolute motion analysis: In prone, motion increased by ~20% for tumors and ~25% for lymph nodes. Central tumors moved more compared to peripheral tumors in both supine and prone (~22%, and ~4% respectively). Central tumors movement increased by ~12% in prone. For peripheral tumors the increase in prone position was ~25% (~40% and 29% changes on along RL and AP directions). Motion relative to carina-point analysis: Overall, tumor excursions relative to carina-point increased by ~17% in prone. Lymph node relative magnitudes were lower by ~4%. Likewise, the central tumors moved ~7% less in prone. The subgroup of peripheral tumors exhibited increased amplitudes by ~44%; the small peripheral tumors had even larger relative displacements in prone (~46%). Conclusion: Tumor and lymph node movement in the patient population from this study averaged to be higher in prone than in supine position. Results from carina analysis also suggest that peripheral tissues have more physiologic freedom of motility when placed in the prone position, regardless of size. From these observations we should continue to avoid prone positioning for all types of primary lung tumor, suggesting that patients should receive radiotherapy for primary lung cancer in supine position to minimize target tissue mobility during normal respiratory effort. Further investigation will include more patients with peripheral tumors to validate our

  17. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  18. Role of hypofractionated radiotherapy in breast locoregional radiation.

    PubMed

    Caudrelier, J-M; Truong, P T

    2015-06-01

    Long-term results of randomised trials have confirmed the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy using approximately 2.6 Gy per fraction to lower total doses of 40-42.6 Gy delivered over 3 weeks, for postoperative treatment of early breast cancer. In these trials, hypofractionated radiotherapy was predominantly used for breast only treatment, while there are fewer trials that specifically examined hypofractionated radiotherapy to the breast plus regional nodes. Hypofractionated locoregional radiation is considered a standard of care in the United Kingdom and in some parts of Canada. We aim to review the radiobiology and normal tissue effects of hypofractionated locoregional radiation and to summarize available published clinical experiences using this treatment strategy as adjuvant therapy after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for women with early breast cancer.

  19. Optical measurement of dimensional parameters of the breast with subjects in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, Ann-Christin; Althoff, Felix; Jaeger, Florian; Kalender, Willi; Wenkel, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Various applications require information on breast parameters, such as breast length and volume. An optical system was designed and tested for measuring these parameters with subjects in a prone position. The study results were used for optimizing patient positioning and handling for a future breast computed tomography (BCT) system. Measurements were conducted using an optical measurement system. To test the functionality and accuracy of the system, measurements were performed using reference phantoms. Additionally, 20 women and 5 men were examined to calculate breast parameters in alternative positions and breathing states. The results of the optical measurements were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Volume and length of the reference phantoms were determined with errors below 2%. The patient study demonstrated a mean breast volume of 530.7 ml for women during normal breathing. During an exhalation state, breast volume increased significantly by 17.7 ml in comparison with normal breathing. Differences with MRI measurements were found to be 3% for breast length and 9% for breast volume on average. The proposed optical measurement system was found to be suitable for measuring the dimensional parameters of the breast in a prone position and provides a tool for evaluating breast coverage for BCT. PMID:26240833

  20. Pectoral stretching program for women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, T S; Kilbreath, S L; Refshauge, K M; Pendlebury, S C; Beith, J M; Lee, M J

    2007-05-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy commonly cause adverse musculoskeletal problems, particularly loss of strength and range of motion, in the upper quadrant of breast cancer patients. Few well-designed studies have investigated whether these impairments can be prevented. Stretching is an effective technique for increasing range of motion, hence the aim of this study was to investigate whether a stretching program reduced acute musculoskeletal impairments in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-four women were recruited prior to commencement of radiotherapy following breast cancer surgery. Participants were randomised to either a control or stretch group. Participants in both groups were reviewed by the physical therapist on a weekly basis for approximately 6 weeks, and were given general information about skin care and lymphedema. The control group received no advice about exercise. The stretch group received instruction on low-load, prolonged pectoral stretches, which were to be performed daily and were checked at weekly visits. Shoulder range of motion, strength, arm circumference, and quality of life measurements were taken prior to, and at completion of radiotherapy, and at 7 months after radiotherapy. There was no difference in any outcome between groups. Breast symptoms increased for both groups during radiotherapy, without loss of strength or range of movement. The incidence of lymphedema during the study was low for both groups and did not differ between groups. The pectoral stretching program did not influence the outcomes measured because the symptoms reported by patients were not a consequence of contracture.

  1. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended.

  2. Erythema multiforme after radiotherapy with aromatase inhibitor administration in breast-conservation treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kimiko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Ue, Hironobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Tanaka, Yousuke; Kodama, Hajime; Sasaguri, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Generalized eruptions associated with radiotherapy such as erythema multiforme (EM), Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are uncommon reactions. A few cases of generalized eruptions during and after radiotherapy have been reported with the use of anticonvulsants and anticancer drugs. However, no reports have described mucocutaneous reactions associated with radiotherapy and concurrent use of anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor. This report describes EM occurring after radiotherapy performed during breast-conserving treatment for breast cancer in a patient who was taking oral anastrozole.

  3. Long-term Clinical Outcomes of Whole-Breast Irradiation Delivered in the Prone Position

    SciTech Connect

    Stegman, Lauren D.; Beal, Katherine P.; Hunt, Margie A.; Fornier, Monica N.; McCormick, Beryl . E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the effectiveness and toxicity of post-lumpectomy whole-breast radiation therapy delivered with prone positioning. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and August 2004, 245 women with 248 early-stage invasive or in situ breast cancers were treated using a prone breast board. Photon fields treated the whole breast to 46 to 50.4 Gy with standard fractionation. The target volume was clinically palpable breast tissue; no attempt was made to irradiate chest wall lymphatics. Tumor bed boosts were delivered in 85% of cases. Adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy were administered to 42% and 62% of patients, respectively. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 years, the 5 year actuarial true local and elsewhere ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates were 4.8% and 1.3%, respectively. The 5-year actuarial rates of regional nodal recurrence and distant metastases were 1.6% and 7.4%. Actuarial disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates at 5 years were 89.4%, 97.3%, and 93%, respectively. Treatment breaks were required by 2.4% of patients. Grade 3 acute dermatitis and edema were each limited to 2% of patients. Only 4.9% of patients complained of acute chest wall discomfort. Chronic Grade 2 to 3 skin and subcutaneous tissue toxicities were reported in 4.4% and 13.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: Prone position breast radiation results in similar long-term disease control with a favorable toxicity profile compared with standard supine tangents. The anatomic advantages of prone positioning may contribute to improving the therapeutic ratio of post-lumpectomy radiation by improving dose homogeneity and minimizing incidental cardiac and lung dose.

  4. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia after radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kenji; Ikawa, Aiko; Shimizu, Shigeki; Tsuboi, Kazuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiro; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of lasting fever and cough with pulmonary infiltrates progressing 4 months after adjuvant radiotherapy following surgery for breast cancer. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated alveolar opacities outside the irradiated pulmonary area. Laboratory data revealed neutrophilia and increased levels of C-reactive protein. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid displayed increased lymphocyte counts, and transbronchial lung biopsy revealed histological patterns compatible with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). Corticosteroid therapy resulted in marked clinical improvement. From the histological and clinical findings, this case was judged to be a case of COP induced after radiotherapy for breast cancer, similar to those reported recently.

  5. Accelerated hypofractionated breast radiotherapy: FAQs (frequently asked questions) and facts.

    PubMed

    Montero, Angel; Sanz, Xavier; Hernanz, Raul; Cabrera, Dolores; Arenas, Meritxell; Bayo, Eloisa; Moreno, Ferran; Algara, Manel

    2014-08-01

    The demand for breast cancer care has increased as cancer treatment innovations have proliferated. Adjuvant radiotherapy to the breast is considered to be part of the standard treatment in breast cancer. The role of radiotherapy in terms of reducing loco-regional recurrence and increased survival after conservative surgery, and also after a mastectomy in selected cases, has been previously shown in several randomized trials. Patterns of radiotherapy commonly used for breast cancer comprise a period of approximately five weeks, frequently with the addition of an additional 1-1.5 weeks of a radiation boost to the primary tumour area. In last years, there has been a renewed interest in hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy schedules that reduce the overall treatment time to barely three weeks, leading to an improvement in quality of life for patients and also optimizing workload of radiation oncology departments. However, despite the existing evidence supporting the use of hypofractionated treatment regimens, their widespread is still far from complete. Many questions have generated resistance among clinical oncologists for their regular use. The aim of this review is to answer those questions that may arise with the use of moderate hypofractionation in breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypofractionated adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-11-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging.

  7. SU-E-T-307: Dosimetric Comparison of Prone Versus Supine Positioning for Adjuvant Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C; O’Connor, B; Hayes, L; Rella, J; Ruiz, B; Yang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The prone treatment position has been used to reduce ipsilateral lung and heart dose in left breast radiation. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the difference in the dosimetry between prone and supine treatment positions. Methods: Eight left breast cancer patients were simulated in both the supine and prone positions as a pretreatment evaluation for the optimal treatment position. Treatment plans were created for all patients in both the supine and prone positions using a field in field three dimensional planning technique. Prescribed dose was 45 Gy delivered by two tangential photon fields. Irradiated volume (IV) was evaluated by V50, V100, and dose to lung and heart by V5, V10, V20, and the mean dose were evaluated. Results: All dosimetry metrics for both the supine and prone plans met our internal normal structure guidelines which are based on Quantec data. The average IVs (50% and 100%) were 2223cc and 1361cc prone, 2315cc and 1315cc supine. The average ipsilateral lung Mean dose (0.83Gy prone vs 5.8Gy supine), V5 (1.6% prone vs 20.9% supine), V10 (0.78% prone vs 15% supine) and V20 (0.36% prone vs 11% supine) were significantly lower in prone position. Heart Mean dose (1.4Gy prone vs 2.9Gy supine), V10 (1.4% prone vs 5.0% supine) and V20 (0.4% prone vs 3.5% supine) were found improved for all patients except one where the mean dose was the same and all other values were improved. Conclusion: The prone position offer preferable dosimetry for all patients planned in our study. These patients were chosen based on the physician’s belief that they would benefit from prone treatment either because they had large pendulous breasts or due to the amount of heart seen in the field on CT simulation.

  8. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Steineck, Gunnar; Malmstroem, Per; Alsadius, David; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Karlsson, Per

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  9. Cardiac Toxicity after Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Myths and Facts.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Mirko; Pahl, René; Huber, Karen; Eilf, Kirsten; Dunst, Juergen

    2015-04-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component in the multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer. In recent years, the cardiac risks of radiation have been discussed several times. This problem has long been known and resolved from the radiotherapeutic point of view. The current data is briefly described here.

  10. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  11. Assessment and Minimization of Contralateral Breast Dose for Conventional and Intensity Modulated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Burmeister, Jay Alvarado, Nicole; Way, Sarah; McDermott, Patrick; Bossenberger, Todd; Jaenisch, Harriett; Patel, Rajiv; Washington, Tara

    2008-04-01

    Breast radiotherapy is associated with an increased risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) in women under age 45 at the time of treatment. This risk increases with increasing absorbed dose to the contralateral breast. The use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is expected to substantially reduce the dose to the contralateral breast by eliminating scattered radiation from physical beam modifiers. The absorbed dose to the contralateral breast was measured for 5 common radiotherapy techniques, including paired 15 deg. wedges, lateral 30 deg. wedge only, custom-designed physical compensators, aperture based (field-within-field) IMRT with segments chosen by the planner, and inverse planned IMRT with segments chosen by a leaf sequencing algorithm after dose volume histogram (DVH)-based fluence map optimization. Further reduction in contralateral breast dose through the use of lead shielding was also investigated. While shielding was observed to have the most profound impact on surface dose, the radiotherapy technique proved to be most important in determining internal dose. Paired wedges or compensators result in the highest contralateral breast doses (nearly 10% of the prescription dose on the medial surface), while use of IMRT or removal of the medial wedge results in significantly lower doses. Aperture-based IMRT results in the lowest internal doses, primarily due to the decrease in the number of monitor units required and the associated reduction in leakage dose. The use of aperture-based IMRT reduced the average dose to the contralateral breast by greater than 50% in comparison to wedges or compensators. Combined use of IMRT and 1/8-inch-thick lead shielding reduced the dose to the interior and surface of the contralateral breast by roughly 60% and 85%, respectively. This reduction may warrant the use of IMRT for younger patients who have a statistically significant risk of contralateral breast cancer associated with breast radiotherapy.

  12. Alternated Prone and Supine Whole-Breast Irradiation Using IMRT: Setup Precision, Respiratory Movement and Treatment Time

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Truyens, Bart; Van Greveling, Annick; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare setup precision, respiration-related breast movement and treatment time between prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery were treated with prone and supine whole breast-irradiation in a daily alternating schedule. Setup precision was monitored using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Respiration-related breast movement in the vertical direction was assessed by magnetic sensors. The time needed for patient setup and for the CBCT procedure, the beam time, and the length of the whole treatment slot were also recorded. Results: Random and systematic errors were not significantly different between positions in individual patients for each of the three axes (left-right, longitudinal, and vertical). Respiration-related movement was smaller in prone position, but about 80% of observations showed amplitudes <1 mm in both positions. Treatment slots were longer in prone position (21.2 {+-} 2.5 min) than in supine position (19.4 {+-} 0.8 min; p = 0.044). Conclusion: Comparison of setup precision between prone and supine position in the same patient showed no significant differences in random and systematic errors. Respiratory movement was smaller in prone position. The longer treatment slots in prone position can probably be attributed to the higher repositioning need.

  13. Reducing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast with a mobile, conformal shield during breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Macklis, R M; Crownover, R L; Crowe, J; Willoughby, T; Sohn, J

    1999-08-01

    During a standard course of breast radiotherapy, the contralateral breast generally receives approximately 2.5 to 6.0 Gy of scattered radiation. Although most studies have not found an overall increase in metachronous contralateral breast cancers in patients undergoing radiotherapy, a cohort of younger women may be genetically more susceptible to radiation-induced breast cancers and may thus be adversely affected by the scattered radiation. We are attempting to develop a simple, convenient, effective mechanism for minimizing the scattered radiation to the contralateral breast during the process of clinical breast radiotherapy. We therefore designed a conformal, platform-based breast shield consisting of 2.5 cm of molded lead in a mobile counterweighted polystyrene casing. This shield was intended to serve as a physical barrier to prevent both low and high energy scattered photons from the medial and lateral tangential fields. We conducted a prospective trial of 20 women, each woman serving as her own control. Each woman received breast radiotherapy with and without shield, and an array of thermoluminescent dosimeters was positioned across the contralateral breast to evaluate the in vivo dosimetry and the impact of the breast shield on surface absorption of scattered radiation. We found that the use of the breast shield reduced the median dose of scattered radiation by approximately 60% (p < 0.0001). This represented a median dose reduction of approximately 300 cGy at the nipple. The shield was easily positioned and added < 1 min to daily setup time. We conclude that the use of this sort of surface barrier shielding technique was feasible, effective, and practical for clinical use. The degree of scatter reduction accomplished through the use of this breast shield may be biologically significant, especially for those patients with biologic or epidemiologic risk factors that may predispose them to the development of radiogenic breast cancers.

  14. Application of compensator filters in the radiotherapy of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnell, G. D.; Ramírez de Llano, S.; Ning, Y.; Withnell, J. L.; Dietrich, E. S.

    1998-08-01

    Breast cancer is a challenging case in radiation therapy because of the breast's irregular contour and inhomogeneous tissue density. Use of compensators in radiotherapy solves the problem of irregular dose distribution. Before clinical use we tested one of the available systems for the construction of such compensator filters. A breast phantom was designed and constructed of polystyrene beads of 5 mm diameter embedded in wax. The breast phantom was irradiated using a Siemens KD accelerator with parallel opposed 6 MV x-ray beams. The irradiated films were then scanned with a Theratronics Therascan film system. Isodoses are exhibited to compare results: in open field, with wedges, and with compensator. A simple film dosimetry test is performed to check the accuracy of construction and position of compensators before they are used on patients. An average of 2% difference was found between calculated and measured point doses. The system described here is now routinely used in this clinic on all breast cancer patients.

  15. Application of compensator filters in the radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Withnell, G. D.; Ramirez de Llano, S.; Ning, Y.; Withnell, J. L.; Dietrich, E. S.

    1998-08-28

    Breast cancer is a challenging case in radiation therapy because of the breast's irregular contour and inhomogeneous tissue density. Use of compensators in radiotherapy solves the problem of irregular dose distribution. Before clinical use we tested one of the available systems for the construction of such compensator filters. A breast phantom was designed and constructed of polystyrene beads of 5 mm diameter embedded in wax. The breast phantom was irradiated using a Siemens KD accelerator with parallel opposed 6 MV x-ray beams. The irradiated films were then scanned with a Theratronics Therascan film system. Isodoses are exhibited to compare results: in open field, with wedges, and with compensator. A simple film dosimetry test is performed to check the accuracy of construction and position of compensators before they are used on patients. An average of 2% difference was found between calculated and measured point doses. The system described here is now routinely used in this clinic on all breast cancer patients.

  16. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia: a consequence of breast radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Ahmed; Campbell, Anne P; Hart, Simon Paul

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe a case of 51-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. A chest radiograph and thoracic CT scan revealed extensive airspace consolidation affecting right upper and lower lobes. A trans-bronchial biopsy revealed evidence of foamy macrophages and fibroblastic plugs within alveoli, consistent with organising pneumonia. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed evidence of antiepithelial antibodies. Gradual but complete resolution occurred without any specific treatment. This case highlights the importance of considering radiation induced bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in the context of parenchymal shadowing following radiotherapy. Although corticosteroids are widely recommended for treatment, this case illustrates that organising pneumonia may resolve spontaneously. PMID:22665870

  17. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia: a consequence of breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Ahmed; Campbell, Anne P; Hart, Simon Paul

    2012-01-18

    The authors describe a case of 51-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. A chest radiograph and thoracic CT scan revealed extensive airspace consolidation affecting right upper and lower lobes. A trans-bronchial biopsy revealed evidence of foamy macrophages and fibroblastic plugs within alveoli, consistent with organising pneumonia. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed evidence of antiepithelial antibodies. Gradual but complete resolution occurred without any specific treatment. This case highlights the importance of considering radiation induced bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in the context of parenchymal shadowing following radiotherapy. Although corticosteroids are widely recommended for treatment, this case illustrates that organising pneumonia may resolve spontaneously.

  18. Male Malignant Phyllodes Breast Tumor After Prophylactic Breast Radiotherapy and Bicalutamide Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karihtala, Peeter; Rissanen, Tarja; Tuominen, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor in male breast is an exceptionally rare neoplasm with only few published case reports. Herein, we present a case of malignant phyllodes tumor in male breast nine years after prophylactic breast 10 Gy radiotherapy and after nine year bicalutamide treatment. The imaging findings of the tumor and pathological correlation are also presented. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Radiotherapy of stage IEA primary breast lymphoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Juretić, Antonio; Zivković, Mirko; Samija, Mirko; Bagović, Davorin; Purisić, Anka; Viculin, Tomislav; Bistrović, Matija; Stanec, Mladen; Juzbasić, Stjepan; Lesar, Miro; Tomek, Rudolf

    2002-10-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred for the treatment to our Hospital because of a palpable nodule in the upper medial quadrant of her right breast. After tumor excision, pathohistological examination showed a follicular center cell lymphoma grade 2, B-cell type (CD20+, bc16+, CD10+, bcl2+). The final diagnosis was stage IEA primary extranodal non-Hodgkin s breast lymphoma. The involved breast was irradiated isocentrically with two opposite 6-megavolt (MeV) photon beams delivered from the linear accelerator (tangential fields) using asymmetric collimator opening. Radiation volume, inclinations of the medial and lateral field, and the part of the underlying chest wall and lung parenchyma were determined during the radiotherapy simulation process. The total irradiation dose was 44 Gy delivered in single daily doses of 2 Grays (Gy). After breast photon irradiation, a boost to the tumor bed was performed by a direct 12 MeV electron beam, with a total dose of 6 Gy delivered over three days. Since primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the breast is rather rare, there has been no uniform approach to its treatment. The advantage of applying the asymmetric collimator jaw opening in breast radiotherapy is the instant reduction of the dose at margin fields, resulting in both the protection of neighboring lung parenchyma and the good coverage of planned target volume.

  20. Partial Breast Irradiation Versus Whole Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Wittenberg, Eve; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy between women treated with partial breast irradiation (PBI) vs. whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrences were separated into local recurrences and elsewhere failures. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) risk was extracted from the Oxford overview, and rates and utilities were adapted from the literature. We studied two cohorts of women (aged 40 and 55 years), both of whom received adjuvant tamoxifen. Results: Assuming a no evidence of disease (NED)-PBI utility of 0.93, quality-adusted life expectancy after PBI (and WBRT) was 12.61 (12.57) and 12.10 (12.06) years for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively. The NED-PBI utility thresholds for preferring PBI over WBRT were 0.923 and 0.921 for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively, both slightly greater than the NED-WBRT utility. Outcomes were sensitive to the utility of NED-PBI, the PBI hazard ratio for local recurrence, the baseline IBTR risk, and the percentage of IBTRs that were local. Overall the degree of superiority of PBI over WBRT was greater for 55-year-old women than for 40-year-old women. Conclusions: For most utility values of the NED-PBI health state, PBI was the preferred treatment modality. This result was highly sensitive to patient preferences and was also dependent on patient age, PBI efficacy, IBTR risk, and the fraction of IBTRs that were local.

  1. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III--radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways.

    PubMed

    Sautter-Bihl, M-L; Sedlmayer, F; Budach, W; Dunst, J; Feyer, P; Fietkau, R; Fussl, C; Haase, W; Harms, W; Piroth, M D; Souchon, R; Wenz, F; Sauer, R

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: "breast cancer", "radiotherapy", "regional node irradiation". Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data suggest that the current restrictive use of RNI should be

  2. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciervide, Raquel; Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  3. Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of fever, dyspnea, respiratory failure and migratory, recurrent and bilateral lung opacities 4 months after radiotherapy and hormone therapy following surgery for breast cancer. Computerized tomography (CT) scans showed infiltrates outside the radiation fields. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed lymphocytic alveolitis, whereas laboratory analysis demonstrated a mild systemic inflammation. Systemic steroids resulted in clinical and radiological improvement, but a disease relapse was evident at withdrawal of therapy, with definitive clinical and radiological normalization after a second cycle of therapy. This is a case of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) (previously known as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia) primed by radiotherapy, as in previously reported cases. It is extremely important to be aware of the possibility of this complication, in order to optimize radiation and hormone treatment of breast cancer. PMID:22958364

  4. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Bixiu; Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences. Conclusions: Our

  5. [Radiation induced lung injuries secondary to radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Toma, Claudia Lucia; Ciprut, Tudor; Bugarin, Svetlana; Roşca, Dorina; Bogdan, Miron Alexandru

    2011-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy decreased the number and severity of the effects of irradiation on the lung. Yet, the increased cancer incidence makes the related radiation injuries to remain actual, radiotherapy being frequently used in cancer treatment. Aim of the study consists in analysis of the radiological pattern of radiation induced lung disease due to radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-eight female patients were evaluated for clinical and radiological suspicion of radiation pneumonitis after radiotherapy for breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 in "Marius Nasta" Institute of Pneumophtiziology, Bucharest. The following procedures were performed: medical history, physical examination, chest radiography and CT-scan (in a subgroup of 27 patients). Radiotherapy toxicity was evaluated based on the RTOG/EORTC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) classification and radiological lesions based on Arriagada classification. Fifty patients (73.5%) were symptomatic (fever, dry cough, dyspnea, chest pain, fatigability), the other 18 were asymptomatic. Symptoms were mild to moderate corresponding to grade 1 (27 patients, 39.7%) or grade 2 (23 patients, 33.8%) according to RTOG/EORTC scale. All patients had radiological lesions: 25 patients (36.7%) had grade 2 lesions (linear opacities), 25 patients (36.7%) had grade 3 lesions (patchy opacities) and 18 patients (26.5%) had grade 4 lesions (dense opacities), according to Arriagada classification. Symptoms were more frequent in patients with extensive lesions on chest radiography. CT-scan, performed in 27 patients, showed more accurate images. Chest radiography remains the simplest method in screening for radiation pneumonitis and monitoring its outcome. Adverse effects secondary to radiotherapy are usually mild and self-limited, and the most difficult task remains the differential diagnosis with infections and cancer relapse.

  6. Pushing the limits of hypofractionation for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Randomised trials report no disadvantages for hypofractionation based on 2.67 Gy fractions of adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy in terms of local tumour control and late adverse effects. Current 15- or 16-fraction schedules may not represent the limits of this approach, and limited data suggest that fewer larger fractions can be delivered safely provided appropriate downward adjustments are made to the total dose. Therapeutic gain will be undermined if breast cancer proves to be, on average, significantly less sensitive to fraction size than the dose-limiting late reacting normal tissues. If so, shortening overall treatment time might wholly or partially offset these limitations, and these uncertainties are addressed in ongoing or planned trials. Meanwhile, the experience of accelerated partial breast irradiation suggests a strong volume effect for late normal tissue damage. Schedules that may be safe when delivered to small partial volumes cannot be assumed to be safe if delivered to larger partial volumes or to the whole breast. Based on current evidence, testing the effectiveness of a 5-fraction schedule of hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy appears to be a realisable research objective.

  7. Rapid onset of cutaneous angiosarcoma after radiotherapy for breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, C.N.; Peschel, R.; McKhann, C.; Merino, M.J.; Duray, P.H.

    1986-06-01

    Malignant neoplasms known to develop following external beam radiation include squamous cell carcinoma, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, mixed mullerian tumors, malignant schwannoma, myelogenous leukemia and angiosarcoma. Latency periods of many years characterize the onset of these tumors following the exposure. Cutaneous angiosarcoma following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma has been rarely documented, occurring up to 13 years postirradiation. Two cases of this entity are reported occurring 37 months postradiotherapy at the site of mastectomy performed for mammary duct carcinoma.

  8. Axillary lymph node dose with tangential whole breast radiation in the prone versus supine position: a dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Kara Lynne; Solomon, David; Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Hiatt, Jessica R; Wazer, David E; DiPetrillo, Thomas A

    2012-05-18

    Prone breast positioning reduces skin reaction and heart and lung dose, but may also reduce radiation dose to axillary lymph nodes (ALNs). Women with early stage breast cancer treated with whole breast irradiation (WBI) in the prone position were identified. Patients treated in the supine position were matched for treating physician, laterality, and fractionation. Ipsilateral breast, tumor bed, and Level I, II, and III ALNs were contoured according to the RTOG breast atlas. Clips marking surgically removed sentinel lymph nodes (SLN)s were contoured. Treatment plans developed for each patient were retrospectively analyzed. V90% and V95% was calculated for each axillary level. When present, dose to axillary surgical clips was calculated. Treatment plans for 46 women (23 prone and 23 supine) were reviewed. The mean V90% and V95% of ALN Level I was significantly lower for patients treated in the prone position (21% and 14%, respectively) than in the supine position (50% and 37%, respectively) (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Generally, Level II & III ALNs received little dose in either position. Sentinel node biopsy clips were all contained within axillary Level I. The mean V95% of SLN clips was 47% for patients treated in the supine position and 0% for patients treated in the prone position (p < 0.0001). Mean V90% to SLN clips was 96% for women treated in the supine position but only 13% for women treated in the prone position. Standard tangential breast irradiation in the prone position results in substantially reduced dose to the Level I axilla as compared with treatment in the supine position. For women in whom axillary coverage is indicated such as those with positive sentinel lymph node biopsy who do not undergo completion axillary dissection, treatment in the prone position may be inappropriate.

  9. Axillary lymph node dose with tangential whole breast radiation in the prone versus supine position: a dosimetric study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prone breast positioning reduces skin reaction and heart and lung dose, but may also reduce radiation dose to axillary lymph nodes (ALNs). Methods Women with early stage breast cancer treated with whole breast irradiation (WBI) in the prone position were identified. Patients treated in the supine position were matched for treating physician, laterality, and fractionation. Ipsilateral breast, tumor bed, and Level I, II, and III ALNs were contoured according to the RTOG breast atlas. Clips marking surgically removed sentinel lymph nodes (SLN)s were contoured. Treatment plans developed for each patient were retrospectively analyzed. V90% and V95% was calculated for each axillary level. When present, dose to axillary surgical clips was calculated. Results Treatment plans for 46 women (23 prone and 23 supine) were reviewed. The mean V90% and V95% of ALN Level I was significantly lower for patients treated in the prone position (21% and 14%, respectively) than in the supine position (50% and 37%, respectively) (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Generally, Level II & III ALNs received little dose in either position. Sentinel node biopsy clips were all contained within axillary Level I. The mean V95% of SLN clips was 47% for patients treated in the supine position and 0% for patients treated in the prone position (p < 0.0001). Mean V90% to SLN clips was 96% for women treated in the supine position but only 13% for women treated in the prone position. Conclusions Standard tangential breast irradiation in the prone position results in substantially reduced dose to the Level I axilla as compared with treatment in the supine position. For women in whom axillary coverage is indicated such as those with positive sentinel lymph node biopsy who do not undergo completion axillary dissection, treatment in the prone position may be inappropriate. PMID:22607612

  10. Comparison of Different Techniques in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kara, F. Gülşen; Haydaroğlu, Ayfer; Eren, Hakan; Kitapçıoğlu, Gül

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to minimize the radiation dose to organs other than the target tissue during adjuvant therapy applied for breast cancer, by using different planning methods. Materials and Methods 30 women with T1-2 N1-3 M0 breast cancer were included in the study. Planning was performed using four different methods to the supraclavicular area, internal, and external tangential fields. All planning was done in a virtual environment by and the requested data was obtained. All patients were treated by the 1st method. Method 1: Different isocenter, complete supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 2: Different isocenter, half supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 3: Single isocenter, half supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 4: Different isocenter, supraclavicular area full beam, breast full beam. Results Evaluation of PTV values showed a statistically significant reduction in D-max, 110% and 115% values by method III. Lower doses in other parameters were not statistically significant. Conclusion Based on these results, the application of single isocenter, 3D radiotherapy in breast cancer provides significant advantages especially in PTV and pulmonary dosages.

  11. Effects of Setup Errors and Shape Changes on Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mourik, Anke van; Kranen, Simon van; Hollander, Suzanne den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Herk, Marcel van; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify the robustness of the dose distributions from three whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques involving different levels of intensity modulation against whole patient setup inaccuracies and breast shape changes. Methods and Materials: For 19 patients (one computed tomography scan and five cone beam computed tomography scans each), three treatment plans were made (wedge, simple intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], and full IMRT). For each treatment plan, four dose distributions were calculated. The first dose distribution was the original plan. The other three included the effects of patient setup errors (rigid displacement of the bony anatomy) or breast errors (e.g., rotations and shape changes of the breast with respect to the bony anatomy), or both, and were obtained through deformable image registration and dose accumulation. Subsequently, the effects of the plan type and error sources on target volume coverage, mean lung dose, and excess dose were determined. Results: Systematic errors of 1-2 mm and random errors of 2-3 mm (standard deviation) were observed for both patient- and breast-related errors. Planning techniques involving glancing fields (wedge and simple IMRT) were primarily affected by patient errors ({approx}6% loss of coverage near the dorsal field edge and {approx}2% near the skin). In contrast, plan deterioration due to breast errors was primarily observed in planning techniques without glancing fields (full IMRT, {approx}2% loss of coverage near the dorsal field edge and {approx}4% near the skin). Conclusion: The influences of patient and breast errors on the dose distributions are comparable in magnitude for whole breast RT plans, including glancing open fields, rendering simple IMRT the preferred technique. Dose distributions from planning techniques without glancing open fields were more seriously affected by shape changes of the breast, demanding specific attention in partial breast

  12. Benefit of Radiation Boost After Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Iannalfi, Alberto; Greto, Daniela; Paiar, Fabiola; Scoccianti, Silvia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Bianchi, Simonetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a boost to the tumor bed after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) to the whole breast affects local control and disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,138 patients with pT1 to pT2 breast cancer underwent adjuvant RT at the University of Florence. We analyzed only patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year (range, 1-20 years), with negative surgical margins. The median age of the patient population was 52.0 years (+-7.9 years). The breast cancer relapse incidence probability was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and differences between patient subgroups were compared by the log rank test. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the risk of breast cancer relapse. Results: On univariate survival analysis, boost to the tumor bed reduced breast cancer recurrence (p < 0.0001). Age and tamoxifen also significantly reduced breast cancer relapse (p = 0.01 and p = 0.014, respectively). On multivariate analysis, the boost and the medium age (45-60 years) were found to be inversely related to breast cancer relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 0.27; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.14-0.52, and HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37-0.99, respectively). The effect of the boost was more evident in younger patients (HR, 0.15 and 95% CI, 0.03-0.66 for patients <45 years of age; and HR, 0.31 and 95% CI, 0.13-0.71 for patients 45-60 years) on multivariate analyses stratified by age, although it was not a significant predictor in women older than 60 years. Conclusion: Our results suggest that boost to the tumor bed reduces breast cancer relapse and is more effective in younger patients.

  13. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences.

    PubMed

    Harms, Wolfgang; Budach, W; Dunst, J; Feyer, P; Fietkau, R; Haase, W; Krug, D; Piroth, M D; Sautter-Bihl, M-L; Sedlmayer, F; Souchon, R; Wenz, F; Sauer, R

    2016-04-01

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases "locoregional breast cancer recurrence", "chest wall recurrence", "local recurrence", "regional recurrence", and "breast cancer" was performed, using the limits "clinical trials", "randomized trials", "meta-analysis", "systematic review", and "guidelines". Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts depend on the time interval to first radiotherapy, presence of late radiation effects, and concurrent or sequential systemic treatment. Combination with hyperthermia can further improve tumor control. In patients with

  14. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0-III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment.

  15. The performance of a wire mesh collimator SPECT camera for different breast volumes in prone position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, R. E.; Saad, W. H. Mohd; Saripan, M. I.; Hashim, S.; Choong, W.-S.

    2010-07-01

    The multihole collimator is the most commonly used collimator in conventional SPECT cameras for general purpose imaging. However, there are some limitations with this collimator, which includes the lack of sensitivity as a trade-off for obtaining better spatial resolution. This paper looks at the performance of a wire mesh collimator that was introduced recently in order to improve the ability of SPECT cameras in mapping breast cancer cells, utilizing the Technetium-99 m 140 keV radiotracer. In this work, various volumes of breast are modelled and simulated using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) code, derived based on the real cup sizes and volumes in prone position. The size of tumour is 1 cm in diameter with tumour to background ratios (TBRs) ranging between TBR from 1:1 to TBR 20:1, and located 2 cm inside breast skin. The results show that wire mesh collimator 1 (WM-1) has the highest sensitivity and signal to noise ratio (SNR) in comparison with wire mesh collimator 2 (WM-2) and the multihole collimator (MHC). This indicates the potential of using a wire mesh collimator for early mapping of breast cancer cells.

  16. Radiotherapy for breast cancer: The predictable consequences of an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Danielle; Knaul, Felicia M; Lui, Tracey Y; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy has had a transformative impact on the treatment of breast cancer, but is unavailable to the majority of breast cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries. In these settings, where many women present with advanced disease at an age when they are often the primary caregiver for their families, the lack of access to radiotherapy is particularly devastating. Until recently, this disparity has been largely neglected in the medical literature and it had been difficult to convince governments, industry, and policymakers of the importance of investing in radiotherapy, as well as broader cancer control strategies, in low-resource settings. The Lancet Radiotherapy Commission report published in 2015 challenged many assumptions about the affordability of radiotherapy treatment. Data from the Commission is presented here to support radiotherapy investment for breast cancer and discuss how the morbidity and premature mortality among adult women caused by breast cancer has a huge detrimental effect on both the health sector and the economy.

  17. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible for Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhenyu; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jiayan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huanxin; Guan, Xunxing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. The present study evaluated the feasibility, early toxicity, initial efficacy, and cosmetic outcomes of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Chinese female patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria and an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (APBI-IMRT) plan was designed for each patient. The prescription dose was 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 3.4 Gy per fraction, twice a day, in intervals of more than 6 hours. Results Of the 38 patients, six patients did not meet the planning criteria. The remaining 32 patients received APBI-IMRT with a mean target volume conformity index of 0.67 and a dose homogeneity index of 1.06. The median follow-up time was 53 months and no local recurrence or distant metastasis was detected. The most common acute toxicities observed within 3 months after radiotherapy were erythema, breast edema, pigmentation, and pain in the irradiated location, among which 43.8%, 12.5%, 31.3%, and 28.1% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. The most common late toxicities occurring after 3 months until the end of the follow-up period were breast edema, pigmentation, pain in the irradiated location, and subcutaneous fibrosis, among which 6.2%, 28.1%, 21.9%, and 37.5% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. Thirty-one patients (96.8%) had fine or excellent cosmetic outcomes, and only one patient had a poor cosmetic outcome. Conclusion It is feasible for Chinese females to receive APBI-IMRT after breast conserving surgery. The radiotherapeutic toxicity is acceptable, and both the initial efficacy and cosmetic outcomes are good. PMID:25320624

  18. Omission of Breast Radiotherapy in Low-risk Luminal A Breast Cancer: Impact on Health Care Costs.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Yap, M L; Yong, J H E; Mittmann, N; Hoch, J S; Fyles, A W; Warde, P; Gutierrez, E; Lymberiou, T; Foxcroft, S; Liu, F F

    2016-09-01

    The economic burden of cancer care is substantial, including steep increases in costs for breast cancer management. There is mounting evidence that women age ≥ 60 years with grade I/II T1N0 luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2- and Ki67 ≤ 13%) breast cancer have such low local recurrence rates that adjuvant breast radiotherapy might offer limited value. We aimed to determine the total savings to a publicly funded health care system should omission of radiotherapy become standard of care for these patients. The number of women aged ≥ 60 years who received adjuvant radiotherapy for T1N0 ER+ HER2- breast cancer in Ontario was obtained from the provincial cancer agency. The cost of adjuvant breast radiotherapy was estimated through activity-based costing from a public payer perspective. The total saving was calculated by multiplying the estimated number of luminal A cases that received radiotherapy by the cost of radiotherapy minus Ki-67 testing. In 2010, 748 women age ≥ 60 years underwent surgery for pT1N0 ER+ HER2- breast cancer; 539 (72%) underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, of whom 329 were estimated to be grade I/II luminal A subtype. The cost of adjuvant breast radiotherapy per case was estimated at $6135.85; the cost of Ki-67 at $114.71. This translated into an annual saving of about $2.0million if radiotherapy was omitted for all low-risk luminal A breast cancer patients in Ontario and $5.1million across Canada. There will be significant savings to the health care system should omission of radiotherapy become standard practice for women with low-risk luminal A breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Relations between radiotherapy resources and breast cancer patient survival rates.

    PubMed

    Mochimaru, Yuko; Ohno, Yuko; Numasaki, Hodaka; Theshima, Teruki; Shibuya, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, the number of patients that have been treated with radiotherapy (RT), particularly those with breast cancer, has increased in the past decade, and is expected to double in the next decade. There is, however, a shortage of RT resources, particularly personnel, which represents a social problem. The shortage of RT resources might cause a difference in survival rate among treated patients. This study analyzed the characteristics of RT resources in RT facilities from Osaka based on the Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO) database with principle component analysis and cluster analysis. In addition, the relation between RT resources and treatment outcome of breast cancer patients was investigated by linking together Osaka Cancer Registry (OCR) and JASTRO data via a stratified key cord. By using the linked dataset it was shown that the prognosis of breast cancer patients was highly correlated with the scale of RT resources available at the RT facilities collaterally. From cluster analysis, four groups were identified based on RT facility information. The breast cancer survival rates for localized stage patients obtained in classified hospital groups showed a similar pattern, however, large differences (up to 20%) were seen in regional stage patients. Additional findings were: RT facilities with less than 1 radiation oncologist had the poorest outcome; RT was performed primarily at University hospitals; and differences in RT resources within the RT facilities had an effect on breast cancer patient prognosis in Osaka, Japan.

  20. Application of 3D surface imaging in breast cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Honnef, Joeri; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Accurate dose delivery in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for patients with breast cancer relies on precise treatment setup and monitoring of the depth of the breath hold. This study entailed performance evaluation of a 3D surface imaging system for image guidance in DIBH radiotherapy by comparison with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients, treated with DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery, were included. The performance of surface imaging was compared to the use of CBCT for setup verification. Retrospectively, breast surface registrations were performed for CBCT to planning CT as well as for a 3D surface, captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis. For the differences between setup errors, group mean, systematic and random errors were calculated. Furthermore, a residual error after registration (RRE) was assessed for both systems by investigating the root-mean-square distance between the planning CT surface and registered CBCT/captured surface. Results: Good correlation between setup errors was found: R2=0.82, 0.86, 0.82 in left-right, cranio-caudal and anteriorposterior direction, respectively. Systematic and random errors were <=0.16cm and <=0.13cm in all directions, respectively. RRE values for surface imaging and CBCT were on average 0.18 versus 0.19cm with a standard deviation of 0.10 and 0.09cm, respectively. Wilcoxon-signed-ranks testing showed that CBCT registrations resulted in higher RRE values than surface imaging registrations (p=0.003). Conclusion: This performance evaluation study shows very promising results

  1. [What is the role of intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment?].

    PubMed

    Aumont, M

    2016-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast postoperative irradiation is considered to be the current standard treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer. It allows an excellent local tumour control with 6% of local recurrence. Over the last years, partial breast radiotherapy has been developed to reduce treatment volume and duration. Intraoperative radiotherapy is one of the techniques. It offers an excellent delineation of the tumour bed and high normal tissue sparing. This purpose of this review is to describe the different intraoperative radiotherapy techniques available, to assess their potential clinical efficiency and tolerance, the recommendations for new practice with a selected population of patients and for future research.

  2. Reliability of Reconstructed Breast Flap after Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Immediate Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Heon; Park, Su-Seong; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Cho, Se-Heon; Lee, Mi-Ri; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Dae-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Background Postmastectomy adjuvant therapy is used to prevent locoregional recurrence and improve overall breast cancer specific survival rates. However, it can adversely affect the cosmetic results of reconstruction. Therefore, the authors examined flap stability and patients' satisfaction with immediate breast reconstruction after adjuvant therapy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 204 patients from January 2006 to November 2011. For complication rates, the authors categorized the patients who underwent the immediate breast reconstruction into 4 groups: adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy group, adjuvant chemotherapy only group, adjuvant radiotherapy only group, and the group that did not undergo adjuvant therapy. For comparison of patients' satisfaction, the study was performed with an additional 16 patients who had undergone delayed breast reconstruction. Results Regarding complication rates, the group that had undergone adjuvant therapy showed no significant difference compared to the group that did not undergo adjuvant therapy. In evaluating the patients' satisfaction, there was no significant difference. Conclusions Even after adjuvant therapy, immediate breast reconstruction showed good results with respect to flap stability and patients' satisfaction. Immediate breast reconstruction and adjuvant therapy is a safe and useful option for breast cancer patients. PMID:23094245

  3. Prospective Trial of Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles . E-mail: charles.leonard@usoncology.com; Carter, Dennis; Kercher, Jane; Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Cornish, Patricia C.; Hunter, Kari C.; Kondrat, Janis

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and acute toxicities of an accelerated, partial breast, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol. Methods and Materials: Between February 2004 and August 2005, 55 patients with Stage I breast cancer and initial follow-up were enrolled at four facilities on a HealthONE and Western institutional review board-approved accelerated partial breast IMRT protocol. All patients were treated in 10 equal fractions delivered twice daily within 5 consecutive days. The first 7 patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 48 patients were treated to 38.5 Gy. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 10 months (range, <1-19) and after diagnosis was 11.5 months (range, 2-21). No local or distant recurrences developed. The T stage distribution was as follows: T1a in 11 patients, T1b in 24, and T1c in 20. The median tumor size was 9 mm (range, 1-20 mm). Breast cosmesis was judged by the patient as poor by 2, good by 12, and excellent by 40 (1 patient was legally blind) and by the physician as poor for 1, good for 10, and excellent for 44 patients. Breast pain, as judged by patient, was none in 34, mild in 19, moderate in 2, and severe in 0 patients. There was a single report of telangiectasia but no incidents of significant edema. Compared with historic controls for whom three-dimensional treatment planning techniques were used, IMRT provided similar dose delivery to the target while reducing the volume of normal breast included in the 100%, 75%, and 50% isodose lines. Conclusion: This initial report prospectively explored the feasibility of accelerated partial breast IMRT. After short-term follow-up, the dose delivery and clinical outcomes were very acceptable. We believe this regimen deserves additional investigation under institutional review board guidance.

  4. Changes in biophysical properties of the skin following radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Hou, Ming-Feng; Luo, Kuei-Hau; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Wei, Shu-Yi; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Chiang, Wenchang; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2014-12-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a common adverse effect in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. However, the effects of radiotherapy on biophysical properties of the skin have rarely been investigated. In this prospective cohort study, we seek to determine the effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer on skin biophysical parameters. We measured various skin biophysical parameters (skin hydration, pH, sebum level, pigmentation, and blood flow) in 144 breast cancer patients by non-invasive techniques before and after radiotherapy. The measurements were simultaneously performed on the irradiated breast and the corresponding contralateral unirradiated breast for comparison. Following radiotherapy, the irradiated breast showed a significant decrease in skin hydration, increase in skin pH, increase in pigmentation, and increase in cutaneous blood flow. The contralateral unirradiated breast showed a slight increase in pigmentation but no significant changes in any of the other biophysical parameters after radiotherapy. No significant associations were found between patient characteristics (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, type of surgery, chemotherapy, hormone therapy) and changes in skin biophysical parameters following radiotherapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy for breast cancer induces measurable and significant changes in biophysical properties of the skin including hydration, pH, pigmentation, and blood flow. These findings give us a greater understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation on skin physiology, and provide non-invasive and objective methods to assess radiation dermatitis. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. Sequence of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan J.; Palen, Job van der; Brinkhuis, Marieel; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast-conserving therapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: From 1983 through 2007, a total of 641 patients with 653 instances of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are the basis of this analysis. Patients were divided into three groups. Groups A and B comprised patients treated before 2005, Group A radiotherapy first and Group B chemotherapy first. Group C consisted of patients treated from 2005 onward, when we had a fixed sequence of radiotherapy first, followed by chemotherapy. Results: Local control did not show any differences among the three groups. For distant metastasis, no difference was shown between Groups A and B. Group C, when compared with Group A, showed, on univariate and multivariate analyses, a significantly better distant metastasis-free survival. The same was noted for disease-free survival. With respect to disease-specific survival, no differences were shown on multivariate analysis among the three groups. Conclusion: Radiotherapy, as an integral part of the primary treatment of BCT, should be administered first, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  6. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUVpeak and SUVmax, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4–30.9 min), which was significantly—but not completely—reduced by the linear correction method. SUVpeak and SUVmax from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUVpeak and SUVmax were significantly lower than supine in both original

  7. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4–30.9 min), which was significantly—but not completely—reduced by the linear correction method. SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} were

  8. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jason M; Rani, Sudheer D; Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R; Partridge, Savannah C; Kang, Hakmook; Whisenant, Jennifer G; Abramson, Richard G; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors' primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUVpeak and SUVmax, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland-Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4-30.9 min), which was significantly-but not completely-reduced by the linear correction method. SUVpeak and SUVmax from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUVpeak and SUVmax were significantly lower than supine in both original and uptake time-adjusted data

  9. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution. PMID:27358592

  10. SU-E-T-588: Characterization and Clinical Validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dewyngaert, K; Jozsef, G; Formenti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care: a platform for prone breast radiation therapy. Methods: Patients treated using Breast Conserving Radiation Therapy may benefit from treatment in the prone position with the breast tissue falling freely away from the body. This geometry allows the breast tissue to be treated while avoiding the lung and heart tissue. Eighteen patients simulated and treated using the Varian Medical Systems Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care were monitored over the course of treatment for positioning integrity and reproducibility. As this carbon-fiber platform actually replaces a portion of the couch top, indexing is inherent to its design. Patients were positioned on the couch and aligned using fiducial markers and lateral SSD to the breast fiducial point. The daily couch coordinates then serves as indicators for positioning variability with this system. Results: The variations in couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral positions were centered on a mean value of zero with standard deviations of 0.44cm, 0.75cm and 0.79cm respectively. Other factors explored were variations in distance of mid-sternum to table edge and patient rotation into the opening. The median rotation of the chest wall was found to be 11.5 degrees at CT-Simulation with a median distance of 2.5cm from midsternum to support opening. Patient rotation was not associated with either breast size or distance from edge of platform. Conclusion: The Pivotal™ Treatment solution consists of a couch top that replaces the standard top and as such is open from beneath without obstruction. This is a distinction from all other solutions which rely on a platform positioned above and indexed to the treatment couch. We found the reproducibility to be consistent with our historical measures while offering benefits of an integrated solution as stated above. supported by Professional Services Agreeement with

  11. Patient preferences and physician practice patterns regarding breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoopes, David J; Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick; Weed, Daniel; Smith, Benjamin D; Hale, E Ronald; Johnstone, Peter A

    2012-02-01

    There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ± 2.3% for patients and < ± 5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopes, David J.; Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick; Weed, Daniel; Smith, Benjamin D.; Hale, E. Ronald; Johnstone, Peter A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < {+-}2.3% for patients and < {+-}5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  13. Ipsilateral axillary recurrence after breast conservative surgery: The protective effect of whole breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, Oreste; Botteri, Edoardo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Rotmensz, Nicole; Vila, Jose; Peradze, Nickolas; Thomazini, Maria Virginia; Jereczek, Barbara Alicja; Galimberti, Viviana; Luini, Alberto; Veronesi, Paolo; Orecchia, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is one of the possible reasons for the low rate of axillary recurrence after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). We retrospectively collected data from 4,129 consecutive patients with breast cancer ⩽2cm and negative sentinel lymph node who underwent BCS between 1997 and 2007. We compared the risk of axillary lymph node recurrence between patients treated by WBRT (n=2939) and patients who received partial breast irradiation (PBI; n=1,190) performed by a single dose of electron intraoperative radiotherapy. Median tumour diameter was 1.1cm in both WBRT and PBI. Women who received WBRT were significantly younger and expressed significantly more multifocality, extensive in situ component, negative oestrogen receptor status and HER2 over-expression than women who received PBI. After a median follow-up of 8.3years, 37 and 28 axillary recurrences were observed in the WBRT and PBI arm, respectively, corresponding to a 10-year cumulative incidence of 1.3% and 4.0% (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis resulted in a hazard ratio of 0.30 (95% CI 0.17-0.51) in favour of WBRT. In this large series of women with T1 breast cancer and negative sentinel lymph node treated by BCS, WBRT lowered the risk of axillary recurrence by two thirds as compared to PBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  15. Cardiac Exposures in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy: 1950s-1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Carolyn W. Nisbet, Andrew; McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah C.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the doses to the heart and coronary arteries from common breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) regimens used worldwide from the 1950s to the 1990s. Methods and Materials: Virtual simulation and computed tomography planning were used to reconstruct the megavoltage and electron regimens. Manual planning was used for the orthovoltage and brachytherapy regimens. Several sources of variability associated with the dose estimates were assessed. Results: Breast or chest wall RT resulted in whole heart doses of 0.9-14 Gy for left-sided and of 0.4-6 Gy for right-sided irradiation. Internal mammary chain RT delivered heart doses of 3-17 Gy and 2-10 Gy for left- and right-sided irradiation, respectively. For most regimens, the dose to the left anterior descending coronary artery was greater than the heart dose. Scar boost, supraclavicular fossa, and axillary RT delivered mean cardiac doses of {<=}3 Gy. The greatest source of variability in estimating dose from a given regimen was patient anatomy. Conclusion: For most techniques, the greatest radiation doses were received by the anterior part of the heart and the left anterior descending coronary artery, a common site of atherosclerosis causing myocardial infarction. Irradiation of these structures might have contributed to the excess risk of death from heart disease seen after some past breast cancer RT regimens.

  16. Post-breast cancer radiotherapy bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Epler, Gary R

    2013-04-01

    Post-radiotherapy bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia may occur in as many as 2.3% of women receiving radiation therapy for breast cancer. Cough and fever are common symptoms, and a quarter of these women have no symptoms. Latency period is usually within 6 months after completion of therapy but may be as long as 1 year. Pulmonary function is normal or will show slight decreases in vital capacity and diffusing capacity. Chest computed tomography studies show ground-glass opacities with air bronchograms within and outside the radiation field, and there are often peripheral triangular-shaped infiltrates. Management consists of close monitoring of women who have no symptoms or minimal symptoms, and a short-course of corticosteroid therapy for women who have symptoms and extensive bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. The prognosis is excellent; there have been no deaths reported.

  17. MRI fused with prone FDG PET/CT improves the primary tumour staging of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Velloso, Maria J; Ribelles, Maria J; Rodriguez, Macarena; Fernandez-Montero, Alejandro; Sancho, Lidia; Prieto, Elena; Santisteban, Marta; Rodriguez-Spiteri, Natalia; Idoate, Miguel A; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando; Elizalde, Arlette; Pina, Luis J

    2017-08-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fused with prone 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in primary tumour staging of patients with breast cancer. This retrospective study evaluated 45 women with 49 pathologically proven breast carcinomas. MRI and prone PET-CT scans with time-of-flight and point-spread-function reconstruction were performed with the same dedicated breast coil. The studies were assessed by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, and evaluation of fused images was made by consensus. The final diagnosis was based on pathology (90 lesions) or follow-up ≥ 24 months (17 lesions). The study assessed 72 malignant and 35 benign lesions with a median size of 1.8 cm (range 0.3-8.4 cm): 31 focal, nine multifocal and nine multicentric cases. In lesion-by-lesion analysis, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 97%, 80%, 91% and 93% for MRI, 96%, 71%, 87%, and 89% for prone PET, and 97%. 94%, 97% and 94% for MRI fused with PET. Areas under the curve (AUC) were 0.953, 0.850, and 0.983, respectively (p < 0.01). MRI fused with FDG-PET is more accurate than FDG-PET in primary tumour staging of breast cancer patients and increases the specificity of MRI. • FDG PET-CT may improve the specificity of MRI in breast cancer staging. • MRI fused with prone 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET-CT has better overall diagnostic performance than MRI. • The clinical role of fused PET-MRI has not yet been established.

  18. The impact of radiotherapy costs on clinical outcomes in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In cost-effective healthcare systems, the cost of services should parallel patient complexity or quality of care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the cost of radiotherapy correlates with patient-related outcomes among a large cohort of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant breast radiation. Materials and Methods 23,127 women with non-metastatic breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 2000-2009. Medicare reimbursements were used as a proxy for cost of radiotherapy, and Medicare claims were examined to identify local toxicities, and breast cancer-related endpoints. The impact of cost on these outcomes was studied with multivariable Fine-Gray models to account for competing risks. Results The median cost (and interquartile range) of a course of breast radiation was $8,100 ($6,700-$9,700). Increased radiation costs were not associated with the occurrence of treatment-related toxicities (all p-values > 0.05), ipsilateral breast recurrence (p=0.55), or breast cancer-related mortality (p=0.55). Conclusion Higher costs for adjuvant radiation in breast cancer were not associated with a decreased risk of patient-related outcomes, suggesting inefficiency in Medicare reimbursements. Future efforts should focus on prospective evaluation of alternative payment models for radiotherapy. PMID:26472317

  19. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  20. Quantifying intra- and inter-fractional motion in breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Scott; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Owen, Rebecca; Ramsay, Jonathan

    2015-03-15

    The magnitude of intra- and inter-fractional variation in the set up of breast cancer patients treated with tangential megavoltage photon beams was investigated using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Daily cine-EPID images were captured during delivery of the tangential fields for ten breast cancer patients treated in the supine position. Measurements collected from each image included the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), superior axial measurement (SAM) and the inferior axial measurement (IAM). The variation of motion within a fraction (intra-fraction) and the variation between fractions (inter-fraction) was analysed to quantify set up variation and motion due to respiration. Altogether 3775 EPID images were collected from 10 patients. The effect of respiratory motion during treatment was <0.1 cm standard deviation (SD) in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. The inter-fraction movement caused by variations in daily set up was larger at 0.28 cm SD in the AP direction. Superior–inferior (SI) variation was more difficult to summarise and proved unreliable as the measurements were taken to an ambiguous point on the images. It was difficult to discern true SI movement from that implicated by AP movement. There is minimal intra-fractional chest wall motion due to respiration during treatment. Inter-fractional variation was larger, however, on average it remained within departmental tolerance (0.5 cm) for set up variations. This review of our current breast technique provides confidence in the feasibility of utilising advanced treatment techniques (field-in-field, intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) following a review of the current imaging protocol.

  1. Dosimetric evaluation of breast radiotherapy in a dynamic phantom.

    PubMed

    Menon, Geetha; Pudney, Delia; Smith, Wendy

    2011-12-07

    This phantom study quantifies changes in delivered dose due to respiratory motion for four breast radiotherapy planning techniques: three intensity-modulated techniques (forward-planned, surface-compensated and hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)); using a combination of open fields and inverse planned IMRT) and a 2D conventional technique. The plans were created on CT images of a wax breast phantom with a cork lung insert, and dose distributions were measured using films inserted through slits in the axial and sagittal planes. Films were irradiated according to each plan under a static (modeling breathhold) and three dynamic conditions--isocenter set at mid-respiratory cycle with motion amplitudes of 1 and 2 cm and at end-cycle with 2 cm motion amplitude (modeling end-exhale). Differences between static and moving deliveries were most pronounced for the more complex planning techniques with hot spots of up to 107% appearing in the anterior portion of all three IMRT plans at the largest motion at the end-exhale set-up. The delivered dose to the moving phantom was within 5% of that to the static phantom for all cases, while measurement accuracy was ±3%. The homogeneity index was significantly decreased only for the 2 cm motion end-exhale set-up; however, this same motion increased the equivalent uniform dose because of improved posterior breast coverage. Overall, the study demonstrates that the effect of respiratory motion is negligible for all planning techniques except in occasional instances of large motion.

  2. Dosimetric evaluation of breast radiotherapy in a dynamic phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Geetha; Pudney, Delia; Smith, Wendy

    2011-12-01

    This phantom study quantifies changes in delivered dose due to respiratory motion for four breast radiotherapy planning techniques: three intensity-modulated techniques (forward-planned, surface-compensated and hybrid intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)); using a combination of open fields and inverse planned IMRT) and a 2D conventional technique. The plans were created on CT images of a wax breast phantom with a cork lung insert, and dose distributions were measured using films inserted through slits in the axial and sagittal planes. Films were irradiated according to each plan under a static (modeling breathhold) and three dynamic conditions—isocenter set at mid-respiratory cycle with motion amplitudes of 1 and 2 cm and at end-cycle with 2 cm motion amplitude (modeling end-exhale). Differences between static and moving deliveries were most pronounced for the more complex planning techniques with hot spots of up to 107% appearing in the anterior portion of all three IMRT plans at the largest motion at the end-exhale set-up. The delivered dose to the moving phantom was within 5% of that to the static phantom for all cases, while measurement accuracy was ±3%. The homogeneity index was significantly decreased only for the 2 cm motion end-exhale set-up; however, this same motion increased the equivalent uniform dose because of improved posterior breast coverage. Overall, the study demonstrates that the effect of respiratory motion is negligible for all planning techniques except in occasional instances of large motion.

  3. Estimating Cardiac Exposure From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.W. McGale, P.; Povall, J.M.; Thomas, E.; Kumar, S.; Dodwell, D.; Darby, S.C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of maximum heart distance (MHD) in predicting the dose and biologically effective dose (BED) to the heart and the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery for left-tangential breast or chest wall irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 consecutive breast cancer patients given adjuvant left-tangential irradiation at a large U.K. radiotherapy center during 2006 were selected. For each patient, the following were derived using three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) planning: (1) mean dose and BED to the heart, (2) mean dose and BED to the LAD coronary artery, (3) MHD, (4) position of the CT slice showing the maximum area of the irradiated heart relative to the mid-plane slice, and (5) sternal and contralateral breast thickness (measures of body fat). Results: A strong linear correlation was found between the MHD and the mean heart dose. For every 1-cm increase in MHD, the mean heart dose increased by 2.9% on average (95% confidence interval 2.5-3.3). A strong linear-quadratic relationship was seen between the MHD and the mean heart BED. The mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED were also correlated with the MHD but the associations were weaker. These relationships were not affected by body fat. The mid-plane CT slice did not give a reliable assessment of cardiac irradiation. Conclusion: The MHD is a reliable predictor of the mean heart dose and BED and gives an approximate estimate of the mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED. Doses predicted by the MHD could help assess the risk of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity where individual CT-based cardiac dosimetry is not possible.

  4. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Plus Hypnosis for Distress During Breast Radiotherapy: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Guy H; Sucala, Madalina; Dillon, Matthew J; Schnur, Julie B

    2017-10-01

    Radiotherapy is a common and effective treatment for women with breast cancer. However, radiotherapy has also been shown to adversely affect patients' emotional well-being. Currently, few mind-body interventions are designed to improve patients' quality of life during radiotherapy. One intervention which has demonstrated clinical efficacy in the breast cancer radiotherapy setting is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis. The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis on emotional distress in women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to either the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis (n = 50) or Attention Control (n = 50) group. Results revealed significant benefits of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis on emotional distress at the mid-point (d = 0.54), the conclusion (d = 0.64), and 4 weeks following the conclusion (d = 0.65) of radiotherapy (all ps < 0.05). In summary, results support further study of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis as an evidence-based intervention to reduce emotional distress in women with breast cancer. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis has the benefits of being brief, noninvasive, lacking side-effects, and producing beneficial effects which last beyond the conclusion of radiotherapy. Given these strengths, we propose that Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy plus Hypnosis is a strong candidate for greater dissemination and implementation in cancer populations.

  5. Effect of postoperative radiotherapy on autologous deep inferior epigastric perforator flap volume after immediate breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, J S; Lee, A; Anderson, W; Baker, L; Stevenson, J H; Dewar, J A; Thompson, A M

    2009-10-01

    The effect of postoperative radiotherapy following autologous flap breast reconstruction is controversial. The aim of this study was to measure whether adjuvant radiotherapy following immediate deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) free flap breast reconstruction affected flap volume. Sixty-eight women underwent immediate autologous DIEP flap reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. Twenty-two of the 68 received postoperative radiotherapy (45Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks). Intraoperative flap volume data were collected prospectively. Volumetric assessment was carried out a minimum of 1 year after surgery. Patients who had volume adjustment surgery after initial reconstruction were analysed separately. The mean age of the women was 52 (range 37-69) years and median follow-up was 3.5 (range 1-10) years. There was no statistically significant difference in volume change between patients who had and those who did not have postreconstruction radiotherapy for the whole cohort (median reduction 65 versus 0 ml) or when women who had undergone further volume adjustment surgery were excluded. In this study postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly affect breast volume after DIEP flap reconstruction. The potential need for postoperative radiotherapy should not deter women from undergoing immediate DIEP flap breast reconstruction.

  6. Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0435 TITLE: Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by...Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0435 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  7. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI) delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT) are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT. PMID:25180098

  8. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography for Breast Target Volume Delineation in Prone and Supine Positions.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Elise M; Delaney, Geoff P; Ahern, Verity; Boxer, Miriam M; Chan, Christine; David, Steven; Dimigen, Marion; Harvey, Jennifer A; Koh, Eng-Siew; Lim, Karen; Papadatos, George; Yap, Mei Ling; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Lazarus, Elizabeth; Dundas, Kylie; Shafiq, Jesmin; Liney, Gary; Moran, Catherine; Metcalfe, Peter; Holloway, Lois

    2016-11-15

    To determine whether T2-weighted MRI improves seroma cavity (SC) and whole breast (WB) interobserver conformity for radiation therapy purposes, compared with the gold standard of CT, both in the prone and supine positions. Eleven observers (2 radiologists and 9 radiation oncologists) delineated SC and WB clinical target volumes (CTVs) on T2-weighted MRI and CT supine and prone scans (4 scans per patient) for 33 patient datasets. Individual observer's volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient, volume overlap index, center of mass shift, and Hausdorff distances. An average cavity visualization score was also determined. Imaging modality did not affect interobserver variation for WB CTVs. Prone WB CTVs were larger in volume and more conformal than supine CTVs (on both MRI and CT). Seroma cavity volumes were larger on CT than on MRI. Seroma cavity volumes proved to be comparable in interobserver conformity in both modalities (volume overlap index of 0.57 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.54-0.60) for CT supine and 0.52 (95% CI 0.48-0.56) for MRI supine, 0.56 (95% CI 0.53-0.59) for CT prone and 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.59) for MRI prone); however, after registering modalities together the intermodality variation (Dice similarity coefficient of 0.41 (95% CI 0.36-0.46) for supine and 0.38 (0.34-0.42) for prone) was larger than the interobserver variability for SC, despite the location typically remaining constant. Magnetic resonance imaging interobserver variation was comparable to CT for the WB CTV and SC delineation, in both prone and supine positions. Although the cavity visualization score and interobserver concordance was not significantly higher for MRI than for CT, the SCs were smaller on MRI, potentially owing to clearer SC definition, especially on T2-weighted MR images. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Double-edged sword of radiotherapy: a cause of secondary angiosarcoma after breast conservation therapy.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad Mujtaba; Ahmed, Balen; Vidya, Raghavan

    2016-04-25

    Angiosarcomas are rare and aggressive malignant tumours of vascular or endothelial origin that can originate in the breast. They can be classified as primary or secondary, with the latter most commonly due to postoperative radiotherapy as part of breast conservation therapy (wide local excision and adjuvant radiotherapy) for breast cancer. We report a case of postirradiation secondary angiosarcoma in a 56-year-old woman, alongside a review of the current literature, to inform clinicians of its clinical presentation and characteristics as a high index of clinical suspicion is required for an accurate diagnosis. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    SciTech Connect

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael; Delaney, Geoff; Holloway, Lois

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  11. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  12. Automatic segmentation of the heart in radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Ebbe L; Ewertz, Marianne; Brink, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two fully automatic segmentation methods in comparison with manual delineations for their use in delineating the heart on planning computed tomography (CT) used in radiotherapy for breast cancer. Automatic delineation of heart in 15 breast cancer patients was performed by two different automatic delineation systems. Analysis of accuracy and precision of the differences between manual and automatic delineations were evaluated on volume, mean dose, maximum dose and spatial distance differences. Two sets of manual delineations were used in the evaluation: 1) a set prior to common delineation guidelines; and 2) a second set repeated with a common set of guidelines. Systematic differences between automatic and manual delineations were small for volume as well as dose. The uncertainty of the difference in volume was smaller than or similar to the inter-observer variation in manual delineations. For dose, the uncertainty was similar to manual delineations performed without common guidelines but slightly higher than the variation in manual delineations with common guidelines. Spatial differences between average manual and automatic delineations were largest at the base of the heart, where also large variations are observed in the manual delineations. Both algorithms could be improved slightly at the apex of the heart where the variation of automatic delineation was larger than for the manual delineations. Automatic delineation is an equal alternative to manual delineation when compared to the inter-observer variation. The reduction in precision of measured dose was small compared to other uncertainties affecting the estimated heart dose and would for most applications be outweighed by the benefits of fully automated delineations.

  13. Dosimetric feasibility of an "off-breast isocenter" technique for whole-breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Ortega, Juan-Francisco; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; Casals, Joan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the viability of placing the treatment isocenter at the patient midline for breast cancer radiotherapy in order to avoid the risk of collisions during image-guided setup and treatment delivery. The use of kilovoltage orthogonal setup images has spread in last years in breast radiotherapy. There is a potential risk of an imaging system-patient collision when the isocenter is laterally placed. Twenty IMRT plans designed by placing the isocenter within the breast volume ("plan_ref"), were retrospectively replanned by shifting the isocenter at the patient's midline ("plan_off-breast"). An integrated simultaneous boost (SIB) technique was used. Multiple metrics for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and organs at risk (OARs) were compared for both approaches using a paired t test. Comparing plan_ref vs. plan_off-breast, no significant differences in PTV coverage (V95%) were found (96.5% vs. 96.2%; p = 0.361 to PTVbreast; 97.0% vs. 97.0%; p = 0.977 to PTVtumor_bed). With regard to OARs, no substantial differences were observed in any analyzed metric: V5Gy (30.3% vs. 31.4%; p = 0.486), V20Gy (10.3% vs. 10.3%; p = 0.903) and mean dose (7.1 Gy vs. 7.1 Gy; p = 0.924) to the ipsilateral lung; V5Gy (11.2% vs. 10.0%; p = 0.459), V30Gy (0.7% vs. 0.6%; p = 0.251) and mean dose (2.3 Gy vs. 2.2 Gy; p = 0.400) to the heart; and average dose to the contralateral breast (0.4 Gy vs. 0.5 Gy; p = 0.107). The off-breast isocenter solution resulted in dosimetrically comparable plans as the reference technique, avoiding the collision risk during the treatment session.

  14. Association between adjuvant regional radiotherapy and cognitive function in breast cancer patients treated with conservation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shibayama, Osamu; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Eisho; Sugawara, Yuriko; Akechi, Tatsuo; Wada, Noriaki; Imoto, Shigeru; Murakami, Koji; Ogawa, Asao; Akabayashi, Akira; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    Although protracted cognitive impairment has been reported to occur after radiotherapy even when such therapy is not directed to brain areas, the mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether breast cancer patients exposed to local radiotherapy showed lower cognitive function mediated by higher plasma interleukin (IL)-6 levels than those unexposed. We performed the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) and measured plasma IL-6 levels for 105 breast cancer surgical patients within 1 year after the initial therapy. The group differences in each of the indices of WMS-R were investigated between cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy (n = 51) and those unexposed (n = 54) using analysis of covariance. We further investigated a mediation effect by plasma IL-6 levels on the relationship between radiotherapy and the indices of WMS-R using the bootstrapping method. The radiotherapy group showed significantly lower Immediate Verbal Memory Index and Delayed Recall Index (P = 0.001, P = 0.008, respectively). Radiotherapy exerted an indirect effect on the lower Delayed Recall Index of WMS-R through elevation of plasma IL-6 levels (bootstrap 95% confidence interval = −2.6626 to −0.0402). This study showed that breast cancer patients exposed to adjuvant regional radiotherapy in conservation therapy might have cognitive impairment even several months after their treatment. The relationship between the therapy and the cognitive impairment could be partially mediated by elevation of plasma IL-6 levels. PMID:24756915

  15. Automated beam placement for breast radiotherapy using a support vector machine based algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xuan; Kong, Dewen; Jozsef, Gabor; Chang, Jenghwa; Wong, Edward K.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Wang Yao

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated beam placement technique for whole breast radiotherapy using tangential beams. We seek to find optimal parameters for tangential beams to cover the whole ipsilateral breast (WB) and minimize the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods: A support vector machine (SVM) based method is proposed to determine the optimal posterior plane of the tangential beams. Relative significances of including/avoiding the volumes of interests are incorporated into the cost function of the SVM. After finding the optimal 3-D plane that separates the whole breast (WB) and the included clinical target volumes (CTVs) from the OARs, the gantry angle, collimator angle, and posterior jaw size of the tangential beams are derived from the separating plane equation. Dosimetric measures of the treatment plans determined by the automated method are compared with those obtained by applying manual beam placement by the physicians. The method can be further extended to use multileaf collimator (MLC) blocking by optimizing posterior MLC positions. Results: The plans for 36 patients (23 prone- and 13 supine-treated) with left breast cancer were analyzed. Our algorithm reduced the volume of the heart that receives >500 cGy dose (V5) from 2.7 to 1.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.058) on average and the volume of the ipsilateral lung that receives >1000 cGy dose (V10) from 55.2 to 40.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0013). The dose coverage as measured by volume receiving >95% of the prescription dose (V95%) of the WB without a 5 mm superficial layer decreases by only 0.74% (p = 0.0002) and the V95% for the tumor bed with 1.5 cm margin remains unchanged. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a SVM-based algorithm to determine optimal beam placement without a physician's intervention. The proposed method reduced the dose to OARs, especially for supine treated patients, without any relevant degradation of dose homogeneity and coverage in general.

  16. Baseline Utilization of Breast Radiotherapy Before Institution of the Medicare Practice Quality Reporting Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Benjamin D. Smith, Grace L.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: In 2007, Medicare implemented the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative (PQRI), which provides financial incentives to physicians who report their performance on certain quality measures. PQRI measure no. 74 recommends radiotherapy for patients treated with conservative surgery (CS) for invasive breast cancer. As a first step in evaluating the potential impact of this measure, we assessed baseline use of radiotherapy among women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before implementation of PQRI. Methods and Materials: Using the SEER-Medicare data set, we identified women aged 66-70 diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and treated with CS between 2000 and 2002. Treatment with radiotherapy was determined using SEER and claims data. Multivariate logistic regression tested whether receipt of radiotherapy varied significantly across clinical, pathologic, and treatment covariates. Results: Of 3,674 patients, 94% (3,445) received radiotherapy. In adjusted analysis, the presence of comorbid illness (odds ratio [OR] 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.42) and unmarried marital status were associated with omission of radiotherapy (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.20). In contrast, receipt of chemotherapy was protective against omission of radiotherapy (OR 0.25; 95% CI, 0.16-0.38). Race and geographic region did not correlate with radiotherapy utilization. Conclusions: Utilization of radiotherapy following CS was high for patients treated before institution of PQRI, suggesting that at most 6% of patients could benefit from measure no. 74. Further research is needed to determine whether institution of PQRI will affect radiotherapy utilization.

  17. Hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy and concomitant boost after breast conservation in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Cante, Domenico; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Sciacero, Piera; Girelli, Giuseppe; Pasquino, Massimo; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Tofani, Santi; Porta, Maria Rosa La; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    To report the 5- and 10-year results of accelerated hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) with concomitant boost to the tumor bed in 83 consecutive patients with early breast cancer aged >70 years. All patients were treated with breast conservation and hypofractionated WBRT. The prescription dose to the whole breast was 45 Gy (2.25 Gy/20 fractions) with an additional daily concomitant boost of 0.25 Gy to the surgical cavity (2.5 Gy/20 fractions up to 50 Gy). The maximum detected toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We considered as skin toxicity: erythema, edema, desquamation, ulceration, hemorrhage, necrosis, telangiectasia, fibrosis-induration, hyperpigmentation, retraction and atrophy. Cosmetic results were assessed as set by the Harvard criteria. With a median follow-up of 60 months (range 36-88), no local recurrence was observed. The maximum detected acute skin toxicity was G0 in 57% of patients, G1 in 40% and G2 in 3%. Late skin and subcutaneous toxicity was generally mild with no ≥G3 events. The cosmetic results were excellent in 69% of patients, good in 22%, fair in 5%, and poor in 4%. The present results support the use of hypofractionation employing a concomitant boost to the lumpectomy cavity in women aged >70 years. This is a convenient treatment option for both this type of population and health-care providers.

  18. Reduced dose to small bowel with the prone position and a belly board versus the supine position in neoadjuvant 3D conformal radiotherapy for rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    White, Rohen; Foroudi, Farshad; Sia, Joseph; Marr, Mary Ann; Lim Joon, Daryl

    2017-06-01

    No consensus exists regarding the optimal treatment setup for neoadjuvant radiotherapy of rectal cancer using a 3D conformal (3D CRT) technique. Positioning the patient prone with a belly board aims to reduce the amount of small bowel irradiated. Twenty-five patients with locally advanced rectal cancer underwent computed tomography (CT) planning for neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Patients were simulated prone with a belly board and then in the supine position. Questionnaires rating the comfort of each position were completed. 3D CRT plans were generated for both positions to a prescribed dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. Dose-volume parameters in 5 Gy increments for small bowel, large bowel and bladder wall were compared. Small bowel V5 Gy, V10 Gy, V15 Gy and V20 Gy values were significantly higher in the supine position (398, 366, 245, 151 cm(3) for supine vs. 243, 213, 161, 122 cm(3) for prone respectively; P < 0.001, <0.001, <0.001 and 0.025). Large bowel V5 Gy, V10 Gy and V15 Gy values were significantly higher in the supine position (266, 209, 147 cm(3) supine, 175, 139, 108 cm(3) prone respectively; P = 0.001, <0.001, 0.003). There was a significant difference in comfort scores favouring the supine position (P = 0.015). A significant increase in small and large bowel dose was seen in the supine plans. Treatment in the prone position with a belly board may reduce toxicity when using a 3D CRT technique. Whilst both setup positions were tolerable the supine was more comfortable. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  19. Partial breast brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brachytherapy; Accelerated partial breast irradiation - brachytherapy; Partial breast radiation therapy - brachytherapy; Permanent breast seed implant; PBSI; Low-dose radiotherapy - breast; High-dose radiotherapy - breast; Electronic balloon ...

  20. [Approaches to individual radiotherapy in breast cancer: individual risk estimation and individualized techniques].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán; Csenki, Melinda; Szabó, Júlia; Szil, Elemér; Fekete, Gábor; Hideghéty, Katalin; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzó, László

    2007-05-06

    Radiotherapy comprises an integral part of the curative therapy of breast cancer by improving the locoregional control and survival when given on an individualized basis. Conformal radiotherapy and three-dimensional radiation treatment planning enhance the safety of radiotherapy by adjusting the irradiated volume to the shape of the target volume, and providing control of the radiation dose to the organs at risk (OARs). The methods introduced at the authors' institute in 2002 are demonstrated. The breast/chest wall and lymph node areas were irradiated provided that there was a minimum risk of local or locoregional relapse of 10%. CT-based 3D radiotherapy treatment planning and individual patient-positioning were applied, with thermoplastic mask-fixation in the second part of the study. The dose constraints of the OARs were given in accordance with the literature recommendations. In the first group of patients, individually shaped blocks, in the second group, multileaf collimator, and in the third group, with the aim of a more homogenous dose-distribution in the target volume, intensity-modulated beams were applied. During the study, 737 breast cancer patients received conformal radiotherapy based on individual risk estimation. In 372 cases only local, while in 365 cases locoregional radiotherapy was delivered. The dose-homogeneity in the target volume was significantly improved in the second period of the study, when segments were superposed on the radiotherapy fields. The proportions of the target volumes irradiated with +/-10% of the planned dose in the breast/chest wall, axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes and internal mammary lymph nodes varied between 90.5-94.2%, 84.1-93.8% and 86.7-91.6%, respectively, depending on the radiation technique used. The parameters indicating the dose to the ipsilateral lung or to the heart were significantly higher when locoregional radiotherapy was applied compared to that in case of local radiotherapy. Radiation dose to the

  1. Full-dose intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons during breast-conserving surgery: experience with 590 cases.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto; Luini, Alberto; Galimberti, Viviana; Gatti, Giovanna; Intra, Mattia; Veronesi, Paolo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ciocca, Mario; Lazzari, Roberta; Caldarella, Pietro; Simsek, Serife; Silva, Luzemira Santos; Sances, Daniele

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies show that local recurrences after breast-conserving treatment occur in the site of the primary tumor. The need for postoperative radiotherapy on the whole breast is challenged in favor of radiotherapy limited to the area of the breast at high risk of recurrence. The new mobile linear accelerators easily moved close to the operating table to allow the full-dose irradiation during surgery. From July 1999 to December 2003, 590 patients affected by unifocal breast carcinoma up to a diameter of 2.5 cm received wide resection of the breast followed by intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT). Most patients received 21 Gy intraoperatively, biologically equivalent to 58 to 60 Gy in standard fractionation. Patients were evaluated 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery, and thereafter every 6 months, to look for early, intermediate, late complications, and other events. After a follow-up from 4 to 57 months (mean, 24 months; median, 20 months), 19 patients (3.2%) developed breast fibrosis, mild in 18, severe in 1, which resolved within 24 months. Three patients (0.5%) developed local recurrences, 3 patients ipsilateral carcinomas in other quadrants and other 5 patients contralateral breast carcinoma. One patient (0.2%) died of distant metastases. ELIOT is a safe method for treating conservatively operated breasts, avoids the long period of postoperative radiotherapy, and reduces drastically the cost of radiotherapy. ELIOT reduces radiation to normal tissues and organs. Results on short-term and middle-term toxicity up to 5 years of follow-up are good. Data on local control are encouraging.

  2. Full-Dose Intraoperative Radiotherapy With Electrons During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto; Luini, Alberto; Galimberti, Viviana; Gatti, Giovanna; Intra, Mattia; Veronesi, Paolo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ciocca, Mario; Lazzari, Roberta; Caldarella, Pietro; Simsek, Serife; Silva, Luzemira Santos; Sances, Daniele

    2005-01-01

    Background: Previous studies show that local recurrences after breast-conserving treatment occur in the site of the primary tumor. The need for postoperative radiotherapy on the whole breast is challenged in favor of radiotherapy limited to the area of the breast at high risk of recurrence. The new mobile linear accelerators easily moved close to the operating table to allow the full-dose irradiation during surgery. Patients and Methods: From July 1999 to December 2003, 590 patients affected by unifocal breast carcinoma up to a diameter of 2.5 cm received wide resection of the breast followed by intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT). Most patients received 21 Gy intraoperatively, biologically equivalent to 58 to 60 Gy in standard fractionation. Patients were evaluated 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery, and thereafter every 6 months, to look for early, intermediate, late complications, and other events. Results: After a follow-up from 4 to 57 months (mean, 24 months; median, 20 months), 19 patients (3.2%) developed breast fibrosis, mild in 18, severe in 1, which resolved within 24 months. Three patients (0.5%) developed local recurrences, 3 patients ipsilateral carcinomas in other quadrants and other 5 patients contralateral breast carcinoma. One patient (0.2%) died of distant metastases. Conclusions: ELIOT is a safe method for treating conservatively operated breasts, avoids the long period of postoperative radiotherapy, and reduces drastically the cost of radiotherapy. ELIOT reduces radiation to normal tissues and organs. Results on short-term and middle-term toxicity up to 5 years of follow-up are good. Data on local control are encouraging. PMID:15973107

  3. Impact of radiotherapy in the risk of esophageal cancer as subsequent primary cancer after breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Eeva K. . E-mail: eevsal@utu.fi; Pukkala, Eero; Kiel, Krys D.; Hakulinen, Timo T.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk of esophageal cancer as second cancer among breast-cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The records of the Finnish Cancer Registry from 1953 to 2000 were used to assess the risk of esophageal cancer as second cancer among 75,849 breast-cancer patients. Patients were treated with surgery (n = 33,672), radiotherapy (n = 35,057), chemotherapy and radiotherapy (n = 4673), or chemotherapy (n = 2,447). The risk of a new primary cancer was expressed as standardized incidence ratio (SIR), defined as the ratio of observed to expected cases. Results: By the end of 2000, the number of observed cases esophageal cancers was 80 vs. 72 expected cases (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.1, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.9 to 1.5). Among patients followed for 15 years and treated with radiotherapy, the SIR for esophageal cancer was 2.3 (95% CI = 1.4 to 5.4). No increase in risk was seen for patients treated without radiotherapy. The risk of esophageal cancer was increased among patients diagnosed during 1953 to 1974, although age at the treatment did not have marked effect on the risk estimate. Conclusion: Increased risk of second cancer in the esophagus was observed for breast-cancer patients in Finland, especially among patients with over 15 years of follow-up and treated in the earliest period, which may relate to the type of radiotherapy.

  4. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) after thoracic radiotherapy for breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Robin; Senan, Suresh; Antonisse, Imogeen E; Liem, Hauw; Tan, Youke KY; Rudolphus, Arjan; Aerts, Joachim GJV

    2007-01-01

    Common complications of thoracic radiotherapy include esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis. However, it is important to be aware of uncommon post-radiotherapy complications such as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP). We report on two patients with carcinoma of the breast who developed an interstitial lung disease consistent with BOOP. BOOP responds to treatment with corticosteroids and the prognosis is generally good despite of the need for long-term administration of corticosteroids as relapses can occur during tapering of steroids. This report provides guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of patients with pulmonary infiltrates after radiotherapy. PMID:17201913

  5. Overview of the Randomized Trials of Radiotherapy in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Individual patient data were available for all four of the randomized trials that began before 1995, and that compared adjuvant radiotherapy vs no radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 3729 women were eligible for analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the absolute 10-year risk of any ipsilateral breast event (ie, either recurrent DCIS or invasive cancer) by 15.2% (SE 1.6%, 12.9% vs 28.1% 2 P <.00001), and it was effective regardless of the age at diagnosis, extent of breast-conserving surgery, use of tamoxifen, method of DCIS detection, margin status, focality, grade, comedonecrosis, architecture, or tumor size. The proportional reduction in ipsilateral breast events was greater in older than in younger women (2P < .0004 for difference between proportional reductions; 10-year absolute risks: 18.5% vs 29.1% at ages <50 years, 10.8% vs 27.8% at ages ≥50 years) but did not differ significantly according to any other available factor. Even for women with negative margins and small low-grade tumors, the absolute reduction in the 10-year risk of ipsilateral breast events was 18.0% (SE 5.5, 12.1% vs 30.1%, 2P = .002). After 10 years of follow-up, there was, however, no significant effect on breast cancer mortality, mortality from causes other than breast cancer, or all-cause mortality. PMID:20956824

  6. [Hypofractionated adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer: no signs of increased risk of cardiotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Aleman, Berthe M P; van Leeuwen, Floor E

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy is frequently used in women with breast cancer to improve both local control of the tumour and overall survival. Hypofractionated regimens are increasingly being used as they involve fewer treatment sessions and, in terms of tumour control, the effects of conventionally fractionated and hypofractionated radiotherapy seem to be comparable. However, there is concern regarding increased cardiotoxicity following hypofractionated radiotherapy treatment to the left side. In order to determine if cardiac mortality increases with hypofractionation relative to conventional fractionation, a Canadian research group performed a retrospective analysis in 5334 women with breast cancer treated between 1990-1998 with postoperative radiotherapy to the breast/chest wall only. At 15-year follow-up the authors concluded that cardiac mortality was not statistically different among patients with left-sided breast cancer whether treated with hypofractionated or conventionally fractionated whole breast/chest wall irradiation. This commentary discusses the data presented in the paper, puts them into perspective and describes the clinical implications.

  7. Risk of ischemic heart disease in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darby, Sarah C; Ewertz, Marianne; McGale, Paul; Bennet, Anna M; Blom-Goldman, Ulla; Brønnum, Dorthe; Correa, Candace; Cutter, David; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Gigante, Bruna; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Nisbet, Andrew; Peto, Richard; Rahimi, Kazem; Taylor, Carolyn; Hall, Per

    2013-03-14

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain. We conducted a population-based case-control study of major coronary events (i.e., myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, or death from ischemic heart disease) in 2168 women who underwent radiotherapy for breast cancer between 1958 and 2001 in Sweden and Denmark; the study included 963 women with major coronary events and 1205 controls. Individual patient information was obtained from hospital records. For each woman, the mean radiation doses to the whole heart and to the left anterior descending coronary artery were estimated from her radiotherapy chart. The overall average of the mean doses to the whole heart was 4.9 Gy (range, 0.03 to 27.72). Rates of major coronary events increased linearly with the mean dose to the heart by 7.4% per gray (95% confidence interval, 2.9 to 14.5; P<0.001), with no apparent threshold. The increase started within the first 5 years after radiotherapy and continued into the third decade after radiotherapy. The proportional increase in the rate of major coronary events per gray was similar in women with and women without cardiac risk factors at the time of radiotherapy. Exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation during radiotherapy for breast cancer increases the subsequent rate of ischemic heart disease. The increase is proportional to the mean dose to the heart, begins within a few years after exposure, and continues for at least 20 years. Women with preexisting cardiac risk factors have greater absolute increases in risk from radiotherapy than other women. (Funded by Cancer Research UK and others.).

  8. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  9. Dose-response relationship for breast cancer induction at radiotherapy dose.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Uwe; Sumila, Marcin; Robotka, Judith; Gruber, Günther; Mack, Andreas; Besserer, Jürgen

    2011-06-08

    Cancer induction after radiation therapy is known as a severe side effect. It is therefore of interest to predict the probability of second cancer appearance for the patient to be treated including breast cancer. In this work a dose-response relationship for breast cancer is derived based on(i) the analysis of breast cancer induction after Hodgkin's disease,(ii) a cancer risk model developed for high doses including fractionation based on the linear quadratic model, and(iii) the reconstruction of treatment plans for Hodgkin's patients treated with radiotherapy,(iv) the breast cancer induction of the A-bomb survivor data. The fitted model parameters for an α/β = 3 Gy were α = 0.067Gy-1 and R = 0.62. The risk for breast cancer is according to this model for small doses consistent with the finding of the A-bomb survivors, has a maximum at doses of around 20 Gy and drops off only slightly at larger doses. The predicted EAR for breast cancer after radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is 11.7/10000PY which can be compared to the findings of several epidemiological studies where EAR for breast cancer varies between 10.5 and 29.4/10000PY. The model was used to predict the impact of the reduction of radiation volume on breast cancer risk. It was estimated that mantle field irradiation is associated with a 3.2-fold increased risk compared with mediastinal irradiation alone, which is in agreement with a published value of 2.7. It was also shown that the modelled age dependency of breast cancer risk is in satisfying agreement with published data. The dose-response relationship obtained in this report can be used for the prediction of radiation induced secondary breast cancer of radiotherapy patients.

  10. Usefulness of a thermoplastic breast bra for breast cancer radiotherapy : A prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Piroth, Marc D; Petz, Dalma; Pinkawa, Michael; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Despite modern techniques, in some patients receiving whole breast radiotherapy (WBI) parts of the heart and the lung might receive doses which are nowadays considered relevant for the development of late morbidity. Our aim was to analyze the usefulness of a thermoplastic breast brassiere to reduce lung and heart doses. A total of 29 patients with left-sided and 16 patients with right-sided breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery and WBI between 2012 and 2013 were included in a prospective study analyzing the effectiveness of a thermoplastic breast bra. WBI was performed using 3D tangential fields up to 50.4 Gy. Treatment planning was performed with and without bra. Several dosimetrical parameters were analyzed comparatively focusing on the heart and ipsilateral lung. For heart dose comparisons, subvolumes like the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and a defined apical region, so-called "apical myocardial territory" (AMT), were defined. By using the bra, the mean lung dose was reduced by 30.6 % (left-sided cancer) and 29.5 % (right-sided; p < 0.001). The V20Gy for the left lung was reduced by 39.5 % (4.9 vs. 8.1 % of volume; p < 0.001). The mean and maximum heart doses were significantly lower (1.6 vs. 2.1 Gy and 30.7 vs. 39.3 Gy; p = 0.01 and p < 0.001), which also applies to the mean and maximum dose for the AMT (2.5 vs. 4.4 Gy and 31.0 vs. 47.2 Gy; p < 0.01 and p < 0.001). The mean and maximum dose for LAD was lower without reaching significance. No acute skin toxicities > grade 2 were observed. By using a thermoplastic breast bra, radiation doses to the heart and especially parts of the heart apex and ipsilateral lung can be significantly lowered without additional skin toxicity.

  11. The UK Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) trials of radiotherapy hypofractionation for treatment of early breast cancer: 10-year follow-up results of two randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Joanne S; Owen, J Roger; Dewar, John A; Agrawal, Rajiv K; Barrett, Jane; Barrett-Lee, Peter J; Dobbs, H Jane; Hopwood, Penelope; Lawton, Pat A; Magee, Brian J; Mills, Judith; Simmons, Sandra; Sydenham, Mark A; Venables, Karen; Bliss, Judith M; Yarnold, John R

    2013-10-01

    5-year results of the UK Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) trials suggested that lower total doses of radiotherapy delivered in fewer, larger doses (fractions) are at least as safe and effective as the historical standard regimen (50 Gy in 25 fractions) for women after primary surgery for early breast cancer. In this prespecified analysis, we report the 10-year follow-up of the START trials testing 13 fraction and 15 fraction regimens. From 1999 to 2002, women with completely excised invasive breast cancer (pT1-3a, pN0-1, M0) were enrolled from 35 UK radiotherapy centres. Patients were randomly assigned to a treatment regimen after primary surgery followed by chemotherapy and endocrine treatment (where prescribed). Randomisation was computer-generated and stratified by centre, type of primary surgery (breast-conservation surgery or mastectomy), and tumour bed boost radiotherapy. In START-A, a regimen of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks was compared with 41·6 Gy or 39 Gy in 13 fractions over 5 weeks. In START-B, a regimen of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks was compared with 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Eligibility criteria included age older than 18 years and no immediate surgical reconstruction. Primary endpoints were local-regional tumour relapse and late normal tissue effects. Analysis was by intention to treat. Follow-up data are still being collected. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN59368779. START-A enrolled 2236 women. Median follow-up was 9·3 years (IQR 8·0-10·0), after which 139 local-regional relapses had occurred. 10-year rates of local-regional relapse did not differ significantly between the 41·6 Gy and 50 Gy regimen groups (6·3%, 95% CI 4·7-8·5 vs 7·4%, 5·5-10·0; hazard ratio [HR] 0·91, 95% CI 0·59-1·38; p=0·65) or the 39 Gy (8·8%, 95% CI 6·7-11·4) and 50 Gy regimen groups (HR 1·18, 95% CI 0·79-1·76; p=0·41). In START-A, moderate or marked

  12. Image guidance during breast radiotherapy: a phantom dosimetry and radiation-induced second cancer risk study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, A.; Holloway, L.; Metcalfe, P.

    2013-06-01

    Imaging procedures utilised for patient position verification during breast radiotherapy can add a considerable dose to organs surrounding the target volume on top of therapeutic scatter dose. This study investigated the dose from a breast kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT), a breast megavoltage fan-beam CT (MV-FBCT), and a TomoDirectTM breast treatment. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed within a female anthropomorphic phantom were utilised to measure the dose to various organs and tissues. The contralateral breast, lungs and heart received 0.40 cGy, 0.45 cGy and 0.40 cGy from the kV-CBCT and 1.74 cGy, 1.39 cGy and 1.73 cGy from the MV-FBCT. In comparison to treatment alone, daily imaging would increase the contralateral breast, contralateral lung and heart dose by a relative 12%, 24% and 13% for the kV-CBCT, and 52%, 101% and 58% for the MV-FBCT. The impact of the imaging dose relative to the treatment dose was assessed with linear and linear-quadratic radiation-induced secondary cancer risk models for the contralateral breast. The additional imaging dose and risk estimates presented in this study should be taken into account when considering an image modality and frequency for patient position verification protocols in breast radiotherapy.

  13. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  14. A Dosimetric Analysis of IMRT and Multistatic Fields Techniques for Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Soo Young; Lee, Mi Jo; Keum, Hyun Sup; Kim, Seung Jin; Youn, Seon Min

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric difference between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using 3 or 5 beams and multistatic field technique (MSF) in radiotherapy of the left breast. We made comparative analysis of two kinds of radiotherapy that can achieve improved dose homogeneity. First is a MSF that uses both major and small irradiation fields at the same time. The other is IMRT using 3 or 5 beams with an inverse planning system using multiple static multileaf collimators. We made treatment plans for 16 early left breast cancer patients who were randomly selected and had undergone breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy, and analyzed them in the dosimetric aspect. For the mean values of V{sub 95} and dose homogeneity index, no statistically significant difference was observed among the three therapies. Extreme hot spots receiving >110% of prescribed dose were not found in any of the three methods. Using Tukey's test, IMRT showed a significantly larger increase in exposure dose to the ipsilateral lung and the heart than MSF in the low-dose area, but in the high-dose area, MSF showed a slight increase. To improve dose homogeneity, the application of MSF, which can be easily planned and applied more widely, is considered optimal as an alternative to IMRT for radiotherapy of early left breast cancer.

  15. Long-term symptoms after radiotherapy of supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Steineck, Gunnar; Alsadius, David; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Karlsson, Per

    2012-05-01

    Irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes has historically increased the risk of brachial plexopathy. We report long-term symptoms after modern radiotherapy (based on 3D dose planning) in breast cancer patients with or without irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. We collected information from 814 women consecutively treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. The women had breast surgery with axillary dissection (AD) or sentinel node biopsy (SNB). The breast area was treated to 50 Gy in 2.0 Gy fractions. Women with >three lymph node metastases had regional radiotherapy (RRT) to the supraclavicular lymph nodes. Three to eight years after radiotherapy, they received a questionnaire asking about paraesthesia, oedema, pain, and strength in the upper limb. Paraesthesia was reported by 38/192 (20%) after AD with RRT compared to 68/505 (13%) after AD without RRT (relative risk [RR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.11) and by 9/112 (8%) after SNB without RRT (RR 2.46; 95% CI 1.24-4.90). Corresponding risks adjusted for oedema (RR 1.28; 95% CI 0.93-1.76) and (RR 1.75; 95% CI 0.90-3.39). In women ≤ 49years with AD and RRT, 27% reported paraesthesia. No significant pain or decreased strength was reported after RRT. Radiotherapy to the supraclavicular lymph nodes after axillary dissection increases the occurrence of paraesthesia, mainly among younger women. When adjusted for oedema the contribution from radiotherapy is no longer formally statistically significant indicating that there is also an indirect effect mediated by the oedema. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Axillary radiotherapy in conservative surgery for early-stage breast cancer (stage I and II).

    PubMed

    García Novoa, Alejandra; Acea Nebril, Benigno; Díaz, Inma; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; Varela, Cristina; Cereijo, Carmen; Mosquera Oses, Joaquín; López Calviño, Beatriz; Seoane Pillado, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical studies analyze axillary treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer because of changes in the indication for axillary lymph node dissection. The aim of the study is to analyze the impact of axillary radiotherapy in disease-free and overall survival in women with early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy. Retrospective study in women with initial stages of breast carcinoma treated by lumpectomy. A comparative analysis of high-risk women with axillary lymph node involvement who received axillary radiotherapy with the group of women with low risk without radiotherapy was performed. Logistic regression was used to determine factors influencing survival and lymphedema onset. A total of 541 women were included in the study: 384 patients (71%) without axillary lymph node involvement and 157 women (29%) with 1-3 axillary lymph node involvement. Patients with axillary radiotherapy had a higher number of metastatic lymph node compared to non-irradiated (1.6±0.7 vs. 1.4±0.6, P=.02). The group of women with axillary lymph node involvement and radiotherapy showed an overall and disease-free survival at 10 years similar to that obtained in patients without irradiation (89.7% and 77.2%, respectively). 3 lymph nodes involved multiplied by more than 7 times the risk of death (HR=7.20; 95% CI: 1.36 to 38.12). The multivariate analysis showed axillary lymph node dissection as the only variable associated with the development of lymphedema. The incidence of axillary relapse on stage I and II breast cancer is rare. In these patients axillary radiotherapy does not improve overall survival, but contributes to regional control in those patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast Background Parenchymal Enhancement on Screening Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Women Who Received Chest Radiotherapy for Childhood Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Lo, Glen; Moshonov, Hadas; Liang, Jiachao; Hodgson, David; Crystal, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the screening of women with a history of chest radiotherapy and consequent increased breast cancer risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of prior chest radiotherapy on breast tissue background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) at screening breast MRI. A departmental database was reviewed to identify asymptomatic women with either a history of chest radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma or age-matched controls who underwent screening breast MRI between 2009 and 2013. MRI studies were analyzed on an automated breast MRI viewing platform to calculate breast BPE and breast density. A total of 61 cases (mean age 41.6 ± 6.75 years) and 61 controls (mean age 40.8 ± 6.99 years) were included. The age of patients at the time of chest radiotherapy was 22.6 ± 8.17 years. Screening MRI was performed 19.0 ± 7.43 years after chest radiotherapy. BPE was significantly higher in patients who received chest radiotherapy (50% vs. 37%, P <0.01). A weak to moderate positive correlation (r > 0.3; P < 0.03) was found between BPE and number of years post radiotherapy. There was a trend toward significant difference between the two groups in the correlation of BPE and age (P = 0.05). Breast density was not significantly different between the two groups. BPE is significantly greater in women who receive chest radiotherapy for childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma, and unexpectedly, it positively correlates with the number of years passed after radiation therapy. Long-term biological effects of radiation therapy on breast parenchyma need further research. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anti-cancer activities of tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate in breast cancer patients under radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Wang, Y; Zhang, Y; Wan, X; Li, J; Liu, K; Wang, F; Liu, K; Liu, Q; Yang, C; Yu, P; Huang, Y; Wang, S; Jiang, P; Qu, Z; Luan, J; Duan, H; Zhang, L; Hou, A; Jin, S; Hsieh, T-C; Wu, E

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol present in abundance in widely consumed tea, inhibits cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis in breast cancer patients. EGCG in 400 mg capsules was orally administered three times daily to breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with radiotherapy. Parameters related to cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis were analyzed while blood samples were collected at different time points to determine efficacy of the EGCG treatment. Compared to patients who received radiotherapy alone, those given radiotherapy plus EGCG for an extended time period (two to eight weeks) showed significantly lower serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and reduced activation of metalloproteinase-9 and metalloproteinase-2 (MMP9/MMP2). Addition of sera obtained from patients treated with combination of radiotherapy and EGCG feeding for 2-8 weeks to in vitro cultures of highly-metastatic human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the following significant changes: (1) suppression of cell proliferation and invasion; (2) arrest of cell cycles at the G0/G1 phase; (3) reduction of activation of MMP9/MMP2, expressions of Bcl-2/Bax, c-Met receptor, NF-κB, and the phosphorylation of Akt. MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to 5-10 µM EGCG also showed significant augmentation of the apoptosis inducing effects of γ-radiation, concomitant with reduced NF-κB protein level and AKT phosphorylation. These results provide hitherto unreported evidence that EGCG potentiated efficacy of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, and raise the possibility that this tea polyphenol has potential to be a therapeutic adjuvant against human metastatic breast cancer.

  19. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon; Liu, Tian X.; Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian; Hu, Y. Angie

    2014-10-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Results in Significant Decrease in Clinical Toxicities Compared With Conventional Wedge-Based Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Jolly, Shruti; Jones, Cortney; Lala, Moinaktar; Martinez, Alvaro; Schell, Scott; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a static multileaf collimator process results in a more homogenous dose distribution compared with conventional wedge-based whole breast irradiation (WBI). In the present analysis, we reviewed the acute and chronic toxicity of this IMRT approach compared with conventional wedge-based treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 172 patients with Stage 0-IIB breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy followed by WBI. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography and received WBI (median dose, 45 Gy) followed by a boost to 61 Gy. Of the 172 patients, 93 (54%) were treated with IMRT, and the 79 patients (46%) treated with wedge-based RT in a consecutive fashion immediately before this cohort served as the control group. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Results: A significant reduction in acute Grade 2 or worse dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation was seen with IMRT compared with wedges. A trend was found toward reduced acute Grade 3 or greater dermatitis (6% vs. 1%, p = 0.09) in favor of IMRT. Chronic Grade 2 or worse breast edema was significantly reduced with IMRT compared with conventional wedges. No difference was found in cosmesis scores between the two groups. In patients with larger breasts ({>=}1,600 cm{sup 3}, n = 64), IMRT resulted in reduced acute (Grade 2 or greater) breast edema (0% vs. 36%, p <0.001) and hyperpigmentation (3% vs. 41%, p 0.001) and chronic (Grade 2 or greater) long-term edema (3% vs. 30%, p 0.007). Conclusion: The use of IMRT in the treatment of the whole breast results in a significant decrease in acute dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation and a reduction in the development of chronic breast edema compared with conventional wedge-based RT.

  1. Uncertainties in estimating heart doses from 2D-tangential breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Ebbe L; Brink, Carsten; Taylor, Carolyn W; Darby, Sarah C; Ewertz, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of three methods of estimating radiation dose to the heart from two-dimensional tangential radiotherapy for breast cancer, as used in Denmark during 1982-2002. Three tangential radiotherapy regimens were reconstructed using CT-based planning scans for 40 patients with left-sided and 10 with right-sided breast cancer. Setup errors and organ motion were simulated using estimated uncertainties. For left-sided patients, mean heart dose was related to maximum heart distance in the medial field. For left-sided breast cancer, mean heart dose estimated from individual CT-scans varied from <1Gy to >8Gy, and maximum dose from 5 to 50Gy for all three regimens, so that estimates based only on regimen had substantial uncertainty. When maximum heart distance was taken into account, the uncertainty was reduced and was comparable to the uncertainty of estimates based on individual CT-scans. For right-sided breast cancer patients, mean heart dose based on individual CT-scans was always <1Gy and maximum dose always <5Gy for all three regimens. The use of stored individual simulator films provides a method for estimating heart doses in left-tangential radiotherapy for breast cancer that is almost as accurate as estimates based on individual CT-scans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Immediate Breast Reconstruction with Abdominal Free Flap and Adjuvant Radiotherapy: Evaluation of Quality of Life and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pont, Luis Parra; Marcelli, Stefano; Robustillo, Manuel; Song, Dajiang; Grandes, Daniel; Martin, Marcos; Iglesias, Israel; Aso, Jorge; Laloumet, Iñaki; Díaz, Antonio J

    2017-10-01

    The effects of postoperative radiotherapy on free flap-based breast reconstruction are still controversial. Poor outcomes, breast distortion, and fat necrosis have been traditionally documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adjuvant radiotherapy affects the quality of life, satisfaction, and cosmetic result in patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction with autologous free flap. Between January of 2013 and December of 2016, 230 patients underwent mastectomy with immediate free flap reconstruction at the authors' institution. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they received postmastectomy radiotherapy. Quality of life measured with the BREAST-Q questionnaire, self-reported aesthetic outcomes, and general satisfaction were assessed and compared. Fat necrosis of the flap and its severity were also analyzed as the main surgical outcomes. Mean follow-up time after reconstruction was 23 months (range, 6 to 48 months). No significant difference in quality of life or satisfaction scores were found between patients that underwent postmastectomy radiotherapy and patients who did not receive adjuvant radiotherapy. There were no significant differences in rates of fat necrosis between the groups (11.1 percent versus 13.76 percent; p = 0.75). Postmastectomy radiotherapy in patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction with free flaps does not seem to affect quality of life, satisfaction with the outcome, or the cosmetic result as perceived by the patients. The potential need for postoperative radiotherapy should not hinder women from the benefits of autologous immediate breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  3. Generalized lichen ruber planus--induced by radiotherapy of the breast?

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Michael; Harms, Wolfgang; Bolz, Sven; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof

    2006-11-01

    Lichen ruber planus is an inflammatory, pruritic disease of the skin and mucous membranes, which can be either generalized or localized. The etiology is unknown. A 56-year-old female was treated with standard local radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery due to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast. During radiotherapy, the patient began to complain about increasing disseminated itching papules of the breast. The efflorescences appeared as flat-topped, solid, purplish papules spreading to the limbs and trunk. A thorough clinical examination revealed additionally suspicious cob-web like and white-coated mucosal lesions of the oral cavity consistent with the clinical diagnosis of a generalized lichen ruber planus with an oral manifestation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a generalized manifestation of lichen ruber planus presumably induced by radiation therapy.

  4. [A case of locally advanced breast cancer treated with hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, M; Yayoi, E; Kishibuchi, M; Nishi, T; Yagyu, T; Kawasaki, K; Ostapenko, V; Nishide, T

    2001-10-01

    A 59-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of massive bleeding from a right breast tumor. The breast tumor had existed for ten years occupied the entire right breast (23 x 20 cm), its central part forming an ulcer 17 x 15 cm in size. Radiotherapy to the right breast and medication with tamoxifen were started, after which five courses of CMF chemotherapy were given. The tumor decreased to 16 x 14 cm, and hyperthermia to the right breast was performed for a total of 87 sessions from January 1999. The irregular protruding portion of the ulcer caused the necrosis, and was sloughed off about one month after hyperthermia. No viable tumor cells were observed in a biopsy taken at 5 months after the start of treatment (40 sessions). A total of 87 hyperthermia sessions were performed, and the ulcer disappeared. For 15 months after the end of hyperthermia, the patient showed a continuous CR. Hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy for breast cancer may produce a remarkable effect as in the present case, and may become one choice for medical treatment of locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer.

  5. Retrospective Analysis of Efficacy and Toxicity of Hypo-fractionated Radiotherapy in Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Rohini; Mishra, Himanshu; Rastogi, Madhup; Hadi, Rahat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The conventional dose fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) to whole breast is 45–50 Gy in 25 fractions as 1.8–2.0-Gy per fraction. Lumpectomy cavity with a 1.5–2-cm margin receieves additional 10- 16 Gy doseas boost. Alternative dose fraction schedules used in various randomised trials have established the role of hypofractionated radiotherapy (HRT) in early breast cancer. HRT allows time and cost saving thus better patient compliance. However the efficacy and toxicity of HRT in locally advanced breast cancer is still under evaluation. Aim To study the toxicity and efficacy of Hypofractionated Radiotherapy (HRT) as compared to Conventional Radiotherapy (CRT) in breast cancer at our centre. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis of breast cancer patients treated between October 2012- September 2014 with adjuvant radiation therapy as CRT or HRT. The data of these patients was retrieved and analysed regarding demographic profile, stage at presentation, pathological type, extent of surgery, chemotherapy, efficacy and toxicity of HRT. The toxicity assessment was done as per RTOG toxicity criteria. The data were analysed using SPSS software version 20.0. Results A total of 100 patients with carcinoma breast who received radiotherapy over two years were analysed. Age ranged from 18-90 years, mean 49.15 ± 12.7 years. Fifty-five patients were post-menopausal, predominant clinical feature was painless lump in the breast (98%). Early stage (Stage I and II) constituted 41%, locally advanced disease in 59%. Modified radical mastectomy was done in 75%, breast conserving surgery in 25%. A 56 patients received HRT and 44 were treated with CRT. The most common acute toxicity was skin grade I. An 18% patients in HRT arm and 30% patients in conventional arm developed grade II skin toxicity (p=0.23). Dysphagia grade I was seen in 10% cases in CRT arm and 12% in HRT arm. The median follow-up period was 11.3 months with 2 loco-regional failures in each

  6. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  7. Tangential Radiotherapy Without Axillary Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Julia S.; Winer, Eric P.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, 'high tangential' breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were {>=}55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. Results: For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. Conclusion: In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity.

  8. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Reed; Carter, Dennis L. Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Johnson, Tim; Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Leonard, Charles E.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  9. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Trial: Comparison of Clinician- versus Patient-reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, M B; Qian, W; Wah Hak, C C; Wilkinson, J S; Barnett, G C; Moody, A M; Wilson, C; Coles, C E

    2016-06-01

    Breast radiotherapy-associated toxicity is often reported using clinical and photographic assessments. The addition of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is becoming more common. This study investigated the concordance between clinician- and patient-reported outcomes. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) trial prospectively collected data on clinician assessment and PROMs at 2 and 5 years after breast radiotherapy. Clinician assessment included physical examination and photographic assessment. PROMs included European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BR23 questionnaire and four breast radiotherapy-specific questions. The correlation between patient and clinician scores were analysed on an independent patient basis using percentage agreement, Cohen's kappa coefficient (k) and Bowker's test of symmetry. The analysis was repeated after stratifying patients based on age, baseline Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and baseline body image score. At 2 and 5 years, a weak level of concordance was seen between the clinician-based assessment and PROMS for all the five toxicity end points (k = 0.05-0.21), with individual patient-based agreement of 32.9-78.3% and a highly discordant Bowker's test of symmetry (P < 0.001). The most frequently reported moderate-severe toxicity by patients was change in breast appearance (14% at both 2 and 5 years), whereas it was breast induration (36% and 25% at 2 and 5 years, respectively) by the clinicians. The lack of concordance was not affected by patient's age, baseline HADS and baseline body image score. This study found that moderate-severe toxicity reported by patients is low and the overall concordance between clinicians and patients is low. This could be due to methodological limitations or alternatively reflects the subjective nature of PROMs. Incorporation of a patient's perception on treatment-related toxicity will have important implications for treatment

  10. Dosimetric comparison of preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy techniques: 3D CRT, noncoplanar IMRT, coplanar IMRT, and VMAT.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sua; Blitzblau, Rachel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of treatment plans among four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy in order to select an optimal treatment technique. The techniques evaluated were noncoplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTNC), coplanar IMRT (IMRTCO), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The planning CT scans of 16 patients in the prone position were used in this study, with the single-fraction prescription doses of 15 Gy for the first eight patients and 18 Gy for the remaining eight patients. Six (6) MV photon beams were designed to avoid the heart and contralateral breast. Optimization for IMRT and VMAT was performed to reduce the dose to the skin and normal breast. All plans were normalized such that 100% of the prescribed dose covered greater than 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) consisting of gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.5 cm margin. Mean homogeneity index (HI) was the lowest (1.05 ± 0.02) for 3D CRT and the highest (1.11 ± 0.04) for VMAT. Mean conformity index (CI) was the lowest (1.42 ± 0.32) for IMRTNC and the highest (1.60 ± 0.32) for VMAT. Mean of the maximum point dose to skin was the lowest (73.7 ± 11.5%) for IMRTNC and the highest (86.5 ± 6.68%) for 3D CRT. IMRTCO showed very similar HI, CI, and maximum skin dose to IMRTNC (differences <1%). The estimated mean treatment delivery time, excluding the time spent for patient positioning and imaging, was 7.0 ± 1.0, 8.3 ± 1.1, 9.7 ± 1.0, and 11.0 ± 1.5min for VMAT, IMRTCO, IMRTNC and 3D CRT, respectively. In comparison of all four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy, we can conclude that noncoplanar or coplanar IMRT were optimal in this study as IMRT plans provided homogeneous and conformal target coverage, skin sparing, and relatively short treatment delivery time.

  11. Association of XRCC1 variants with acute skin reaction after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liqing; Xia, Jianhong; Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jianrong; Hu, Yimin

    2010-12-01

    After irradiation results in cytotoxic effects by DNA damage, base excision repair (BER) pathway is involved in the repair of single-strand breaks and nonhomologous end joining and homologous repair of double-strand breaks caused by radiotherapy. Alterations in the function of BER DNA repair genes may affect DNA repair proficiency and influence the response of patients with cancer to radiotherapy. The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms of BER DNA repair X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1) and risk of radiotherapy-induced ≥grade 2 acute skin reaction in patients with breast cancer was examined. It was found that the risk of ≥grade 2 acute skin toxicity after radiotherapy could be increased by 2.86-fold in patients carrying the XRCC1 -77TC and CC genotypes (p = 0.016). However, the other three coding XRCC1 variants did not influence the risk of ≥grade 2 acute skin toxicity for patients with breast cancer after radiotherapy. Our results suggested that the XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of radiation-induced acute skin reaction in a Chinese population.

  12. Postoperative Proton Radiotherapy for Localized and Locoregional Breast Cancer: Potential for Clinically Relevant Improvements?

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Carmen; Khan, Shaka; MacArtain, Anne M.; Heuberger, Juerg; Goitein, Gudrun; Gruber, Guenther; Lutters, Gerd; Hug, Eugen B.; Bodis, Stephan; Lomax, Antony J.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To study the potential reduction of dose to organs at risk (OARs) with intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) photon radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Comparative treatment-planning was performed using planning computed tomography scans of 20 left-sided breast cancer patients. For each patient, three increasingly complex locoregional volumes (planning target volumes [PTVs]) were defined: whole breast (WB) or chest wall (CW) = (PTV1), WB/CW plus medial-supraclavicular (MSC), lateral-supraclavicular (LSC), and level III axillary (AxIII) nodes = (PTV2) and WB/CW+MSC+LSC+AxIII plus internal mammary chain = (PTV3). For each patient, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and IMPT plans were optimized for PTV coverage. Dose to OARs was compared while maintaining target coverage. Results: All the techniques met the required PTV coverage except the 3D-CRT plans for PTV3-scenario. All 3D-CRT plans for PTV3 exceeded left-lung V20. IMPT vs. 3D-CRT: significant dose reductions were observed for all OARs using IMPT for all PTVs. IMPT vs. IMRT: For PTV2 and PTV3, low (V5) left lung and cardiac doses were reduced by a factor >2.5, and cardiac doses (V22.5) were by a factor of >20 lower with IMPT compared with IMRT. Conclusions: When complex-target irradiation is needed, 3D-CRT often compromises the target coverage and increases the dose to OARs; IMRT can provide better results but will increase the integral dose. The benefit of IMPT is based on improved target coverage and reduction of low doses to OARs, potentially reducing the risk of late-toxicity. These results indicate a potential role of proton-radiotherapy for extended locoregional irradiation in left breast cancer.

  13. Implications for breast cancer treatment from increased autotaxin production in adipose tissue after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guanmin; Tang, Xiaoyun; Yang, Zelei; Benesch, Matthew G K; Marshall, Alison; Murray, David; Hemmings, Denise G; Wuest, Frank; McMullen, Todd P W; Brindley, David N

    2017-09-01

    We have previously established that adipose tissue adjacent to breast tumors becomes inflamed by tumor-derived cytokines. This stimulates autotaxin (ATX) secretion from adipocytes, whereas breast cancer cells produce insignificant ATX. Lysophosphatidate produced by ATX promotes inflammatory cytokine secretion in a vicious inflammatory cycle, which increases tumor growth and metastasis and decreases response to chemotherapy. We hypothesized that damage to adipose tissue during radiotherapy for breast cancer should promote lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling and further inflammatory signaling, which could potentially protect cancer cells from subsequent fractions of radiation therapy. To test this hypothesis, we exposed rat and human adipose tissue to radiation doses (0.25-5 Gy) that were expected during radiotherapy. This exposure increased mRNA levels for ATX, cyclooxygenase-2, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and LPA1 and LPA2 receptors by 1.8- to 5.1-fold after 4 to 48 h. There were also 1.5- to 2.5-fold increases in the secretion of ATX and 14 inflammatory mediators after irradiating at 1 Gy. Inhibition of the radiation-induced activation of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, or ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein blocked inflammatory responses to γ-radiation. Consequently, collateral damage to adipose tissue during radiotherapy could establish a comprehensive wound-healing response that involves increased signaling by LPA, cyclooxygenase-2, and other inflammatory mediators that could decrease the efficacy of further radiotherapy or chemotherapy.-Meng, G., Tang, X., Yang, Z., Benesch, M. G. K., Marshall, A., Murray, D., Hemmings, D. G., Wuest, F., McMullen, T. P. W., Brindley, D. N. Implications for breast cancer treatment from increased autotaxin production in adipose tissue after radiotherapy. © FASEB.

  14. Radiation dose distribution in functional heart regions from tangential breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wollschläger, Daniel; Karle, Heiko; Stockinger, Marcus; Bartkowiak, Detlef; Bührdel, Sandra; Merzenich, Hiltrud; Wiegel, Thomas; Blettner, Maria; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the distribution of individually-determined radiation dose to the heart and its functional sub-structures after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients treated in Germany during 1998-2008. We obtained electronic treatment planning records for 769 female breast cancer patients treated with megavoltage tangential field radiotherapy. All dose distributions were re-calculated using Eclipse with the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) for photon fields, and the electron Monte Carlo algorithm for electron boost fields. Based on individual dose volume histograms for the complete heart and several functional sub-structures, we estimated various dose measures in patient groups. Mean heart dose spanned a range of 0.9-19.1Gy for left-sided radiotherapy and 0.3-11.6Gy for right-sided radiotherapy. Average (median) mean heart dose was 4.6Gy (3.7Gy) for left-sided radiotherapy, and 1.7Gy (1.4Gy) for right-sided RT. With left-sided radiotherapy, 66% of the patients had 2cm(3) of the complete heart exposed to at least 40Gy. Younger age, higher body mass index, tumor location in a medial quadrant, and presence of a parasternal field were also associated with higher heart dose. Tumor location and treatment choices influence cardiac dose with complex interactions. There is considerable variability in heart dose, with dose metrics of different cardiac sub-structures showing different patterns in their dependency on external influences. Dose-response analysis of late cardiac effects after radiotherapy requires detailed individual dosimetry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. GammaPod-A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao Xinyu; Deng Jianchun; Duan Zhengcheng; Zhang Jin; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Regine, William

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%-95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously.

  16. GammaPod—A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao, Xinyu; Zhang, Jin; Regine, William; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Deng, Jianchun; Duan, Zhengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%–95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously. PMID:23635251

  17. Breast cancer after radiotherapy for skin hemangioma in infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Lundell, M.; Mattsson, A.; Hakulinen, T.; Holm, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Between 1920 and 1959, 9675 women were irradiated in infancy for skin hemangioma at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. They were exposed to low to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. The mean age at first exposure was 6 months and the mean absorbed dose to the breast anlage was 0.39 Gy (range < 0.01-35.8 Gy). The breast cancer incidence was analyzed by record linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register for the period 1958-1986. Seventy-five breast cancers were found after a mean absorbed dose of 1.5 Gy in the breasts with cancer. The analyses showed a significant dose-response relationship with a linear model estimate for the excess relative risk (ERR) of 0.38 at 1 Gy (95% CI 0.09-0.85). This relationship was not modified significantly by age at exposure or by dose to the ovaries. The ERR increased significantly with time after exposure and for > 50 years after exposure the ERR at 1 Gy was 2.25 (95% CI 0.59-5.62). The fitted excess absolute risk (EAR) was 22.9 per 10{sup 4} breast-year gray. The breast absorbed dose and time after exposure were important risk determinants for breast cancer excess risk. Forty to 50 years of follow-up was necessary for the excess risk to be expressed. The study confirms previous findings that the breast anlage of female infants is sensitive to ionizing radiation. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Overview on cardiac, pulmonary and cutaneous toxicity in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Guenzi, Marina; Fozza, Alessandra; Vidali, Cristiana; Rovea, Paolo; Meacci, Fiammetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Conservative management of breast cancer represents the standard treatment for early disease. Breast conserving surgery associated with radiotherapy for stage I-II has been proven to be as equally effective as mastectomy in term of local control, distant disease, and overall survival. The growing minimal invasive surgical approach on the axillary region, and the new breast reconstructive techniques, will probably lead to a significant decrease of the rate of side-effects related to mastectomy. Therefore, the adverse events caused by adjuvant radiation still remain a challenge. Cutaneous, pulmonary and cardiac toxicity represent the main toxicities of adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Safety profile of radiation is strongly dependent on the multidisciplinary management of the single case (systemic treatment, endocrine therapy, surgery), individual characteristics (i.e., co-morbidities, age, habits), and radiation-related aspects. Radiation techniques development, and facilities implementation concerning organs-at-risk sparing systems (i.e., image-guided radiotherapy, tracking systems, respiratory gating), represent brand new tools for the clinical oncologist, that would certainly minimize toxicity profile in the next future. However, data reported from published literature will greatly help physicians, to give to the patients appropriate counseling regarding the efficacy and potential adverse events of treatments, thus optimizing the informed decision-making process.

  19. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T. )

    1991-07-17

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug.

  20. Exclusive and adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program and the European Concerted Action on survival and Care of Cancer Patients (EUROCARE) project indicate that about 6% of women newly diagnosed with breast cancer have stage IV disease, representing about 12 600 new cases per year in the United States in 2005. Historically, local therapy of the primary tumor in this setting has been aimed solely at symptom palliation. However, several studies suggest that surgical excision of the primary tumor can prolong these patients' survival. Discussion Exclusive locoregional radiotherapy is an alternative form of locoregional treatment in this setting and may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Here we discuss current issues regarding exclusive and adjuvant locoregional radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases. Summary Several studies suggest that surgery or exclusive irradiation of the primary tumor is associated with better survival in breast cancer patients with synchronous metastases and that exclusive locoregional radiotherapy may represent an effective alternative to surgery in this setting. Results of well-designed prospective studies are needed to re-evaluate treatment of the primary breast tumor in patients with metastases at diagnosis, and to identify those patients who are most likely to benefit. PMID:21083907

  1. Toxicity of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Tokita, Mari; MacAusland, Stephanie G.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Price, Lori Lyn; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence and severity of late normal tissue toxicity using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Treatment planning and delivery were in strict accordance with the technique and specified dose-volume constraints of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0413 protocol. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading schema. The cosmetic outcome was scored using the Harvard criteria. Univariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the correlation of dosimetric variables with outcome. Results: At a median follow-up of 15 months, moderate-to-severe late toxicity developed in 10% of patients. The most pronounced late toxicity was subcutaneous fibrosis: 25% Grade 2-4 and 8.3% Grade 3-4. The modified planning tumor volume/whole breast volume ratio, ratio of the volume of breast tissue receiving 5%, 20%, 50%, and 80% of the prescription dose to the whole breast volume, and maximal dose within the breast correlated with the development of fibrosis (p = .10, p = .03, p = .04, p = .06, p = .09, and p = .046, respectively). The overall cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in 81.7%, fair in 11.7%, and poor in 6.7%. The presence of subcutaneous fibrosis, modified planning tumor volume/whole breast volume ratio, ratio of the volume of breast tissue receiving 5% and 20% of the prescription dose to the whole breast volume, and pathologic specimen volume correlated with the risk of a fair/poor cosmetic outcome (p < .001, p = .02, p = .05, p = .04, p = .01, respectively). Conclusion: The three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy technique for accelerated partial breast irradiation as specified in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project

  2. Cytokine levels as biomarkers of radiation fibrosis in patients treated with breast radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation fibrosis is not easily measurable although clinical scores have been developed for this purpose. Biomarkers present an alternative more objective approach to quantification, and estimation in blood provides accessible samples. We investigated if blood cytokines could be used to measure established fibrosis in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for breast cancer. Methods We studied two cohorts treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the UK START Trial A, one with breast fibrosis (cases) and one with no or minimal fibrosis (controls). Two candidate cytokines, plasma connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and serum interleukin-6 (IL6) were estimated by ELISA. Comparisons between cases and controls used the t-test or Mann–Whitney test and associations between blood concentration and clinical factors were assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Seventy patients were included (26 cases, 44 controls). Mean time since radiotherapy was 9.9 years (range 8.3-12.0). No statistically significant differences between cases and controls in serum IL6 (median (IQR) 0.84 pg/ml (0.57-1.14), 0.75 pg/ml (0.41-1.43) respectively) or plasma CTGF (331.4 pg/ml (234.8-602.9), 334.5 pg/ml (270.0-452.8) were identified. There were no significant associations between blood cytokine concentration and age, fibrosis severity, breast size or time since radiotherapy. Conclusions No significant difference in IL6 or CTGF concentrations was detected between patients with breast fibrosis and controls with minimal or no fibrosis. PMID:24885397

  3. Breast cancer risk following radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma: modification by other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deirdre A.; Gilbert, Ethel; Dores, Graça M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Holowaty, Eric; Glimelius, Bengt; Andersson, Michael; Wiklund, Tom; Lynch, Charles F.; van't Veer, Mars; Storm, Hans; Pukkala, Eero; Stovall, Marilyn; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Allan, James M.; Boice, John D.; Travis, Lois B.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of genetic and other risk factors in the development of breast cancer after radiotherapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has not been determined. We analyzed data from a breast cancer case-control study (105 patients, 266 control subjects) conducted among 3 817 survivors of HL diagnosed at age 30 years or younger in 6 population-based cancer registries. Odds ratios (ORs) and excess relative risks (ERRs) were calculated using conditional regression. Women who received RT exposure (≥ 5 Gy radiation dose to the breast) had a 2.7-fold increased breast cancer risk (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-5.2), compared with those given less than 5 Gy. RT exposure (≥ 5 Gy) was associated with an OR of 0.8 (95% CI, 0.2-3.4) among women with a first- or second-degree family history of breast or ovarian cancer, and 5.8 (95% CI, 2.1-16.3) among all other women (interaction P = .03). History of a live birth appeared to increase the breast cancer risk associated with RT among women not treated with ovarian-damaging therapies. Breast cancer risk following RT varied little according to other factors. The additional increased relative risk of breast cancer after RT for HL is unlikely to be larger among women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer than among other women. PMID:16051739

  4. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  5. Skin-sparing helical tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal radiotherapy for adjuvant breast radiotherapy: in vivo skin dosimetry study.

    PubMed

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; Mackenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin(V50) (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin(V40) and skin(V30) (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients receiving adjuvant breast RT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole...provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < ±2.3% for patients and < ±5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole...and clinical evidence. 2011 Elsevier Inc. Patient preference, Partial breast irradiation, Hypofractionation , Practice patterns, Breast

  7. [Breast-conserving surgery without radiotherapy in the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo].

    PubMed

    Kasumi, Fujio; Takahashi, Kaoru; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Tada, Keiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Tada, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Masataka; Akiyama, Futoshi; Akiyama, Goi

    2002-11-01

    We began performing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in 1986 to achieve complete resection of breast cancer and omit postoperative radiotherapy (RT) if serial and detailed pathologic examination of the resected specimen within a 5-mm width showed that the of margin was cancer free. At of the end of 1998, 1,233 sides of the breast had been conserved, of which 827 sides were shown to have cancer-free margins. As of the end of 2001, with a mean observation period of 79 months, ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was recognized on 46 sides (19 recurrences, 27 multiple cancers), for a recurrence rate 5.6% and an annual recurrence rate of 0.85%. This rate is slightly better than those reported by eminent institutions in the USA and Europe which all perform RT, confirming the accuracy and safety of our BCS.

  8. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  9. Patient-reported symptoms of radiation dermatitis during breast cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Im-Ryung; Kang, Danbee; Cho, Juhee

    2017-07-01

    To find out which symptoms most frequently and severely affect breast cancer patients during radiotherapy and how patients manage the symptoms and unmet needs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 111 patients who receive radiotherapy for breast cancer from January to April 2015 at Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea. Participants were asked about symptoms and discomfort due to radiotherapy, management methods for radiation dermatitis, unmet needs for radiation dermatitis care, and clinical and socio-demographic information. Of total, 108 out of 111 patients (97.3%) reported symptoms related to radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most commonly reported uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. On average, patients reported 8.6 radiotherapy-induced skin problems (range, 0-11). Of total, 59 (53.2%) patients stated that they wanted care for radiation dermatitis, and 80.0, 59.4, and 51% of patients searched for information, used products, and visited the hospital to manage radiotherapy-related skin problems. Patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation were 11.73, 7.02, 5.10, 4.27, and 2.80 times more likely to have management needs than patients without those symptoms, respectively, adjusting age, current cycle of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and type of surgery. Most of the breast cancer patients experience multiple symptoms associated with radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most common and uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. Majority of patients wanted management for radiation dermatitis and patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation had higher needs for radiation dermatitis management.

  10. Dose calculation accuracies in whole breast radiotherapy treatment planning: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Shogo; Miyabe, Yuki; Tohyama, Naoki; Kumazaki, Yu; Kurooka, Masahiko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kito, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Ohotomo, Yuko; Ikagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Miwako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishio, Teiji

    2015-07-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the variation in the doses delivered among institutions due to dose calculation inaccuracies in whole breast radiotherapy. We have developed practical procedures for quality assurance (QA) of radiation treatment planning systems. These QA procedures are designed to be performed easily at any institution and to permit comparisons of results across institutions. The dose calculation accuracy was evaluated across seven institutions using various irradiation conditions. In some conditions, there was a >3 % difference between the calculated dose and the measured dose. The dose calculation accuracy differs among institutions because it is dependent on both the dose calculation algorithm and beam modeling. The QA procedures in this study are useful for verifying the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm and of the beam model before clinical use for whole breast radiotherapy.

  11. In vivo skin dose measurement using MOSkin detectors in tangential breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jong, W L; Ung, N M; Wong, J H D; Ng, K H; Wan Ishak, W Z; Abdul Malik, R; Phua, V C E; Cutajar, D L; Metcalfe, P E; Rosenfeld, A B; Ho, G F

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure patient skin dose in tangential breast radiotherapy. Treatment planning dose calculation algorithm such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and in vivo dosimetry techniques such as radiochromic film can be used to accurately monitor radiation doses at tissue depths, but they are inaccurate for skin dose measurement. A MOSFET-based (MOSkin) detector was used to measure skin dose in this study. Tangential breast radiotherapies ("bolus" and "no bolus") were simulated on an anthropomorphic phantom and the skin doses were measured. Skin doses were also measured in 13 patients undergoing each of the techniques. In the patient study, the EBT2 measurements and PBC calculation tended to over-estimate the skin dose compared with the MOSkin detector (p<0.05) in the "no bolus radiotherapy". No significant differences were observed in the "bolus radiotherapy" (p>0.05). The results from patients were similar to that of the phantom study. This shows that the EBT2 measurement and PBC calculation, while able to predict accurate doses at tissue depths, are inaccurate in predicting doses at build-up regions. The clinical application of the MOSkin detectors showed that the average total skin doses received by patients were 1662±129cGy (medial) and 1893±199cGy (lateral) during "no bolus radiotherapy". The average total skin doses were 4030±72cGy (medial) and 4004±91cGy (lateral) for "bolus radiotherapy". In some cases, patient skin doses were shown to exceed the dose toxicity level for skin erythema. Hence, a suitable device for in vivo dosimetry is necessary to accurately determine skin dose. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-F-BRB-02: Towards Quantitative Clinical Decision On Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Or Prone for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H; Gao, Y; Liu, T; Gelblum, D; Ho, A; Powell, S; Tang, X; Xu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop quantitative clinical guidelines between supine Deep Inspiratory Breath Hold (DIBH) and prone free breathing treatments for breast patients, we applied 3D deformable phantoms to perform Monte Carlo simulation to predict corresponding Dose to the Organs at Risk (OARs). Methods: The RPI-adult female phantom (two selected cup sizes: A and D) was used to represent the female patient, and it was simulated using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code. Doses to OARs were investigated for supine DIBH and prone treatments, considering two breast sizes. The fluence maps of the 6-MV opposed tangential fields were exported. In the Monte Carlo simulation, the fluence maps allow each simulated photon particle to be weighed in the final dose calculation. The relative error of all dose calculations was kept below 5% by simulating 3*10{sup 7} photons for each projection. Results: In terms of dosimetric accuracy, the RPI Adult Female phantom with cup size D in DIBH positioning matched with a DIBH treatment plan of the patient. Based on the simulation results, for cup size D phantom, prone positioning reduced the cardiac dose and the dose to other OARs, while cup size A phantom benefits more from DIBH positioning. Comparing simulation results for cup size A and D phantom, dose to OARs was generally higher for the large breast size due to increased scattering arising from a larger portion of the body in the primary beam. The lower dose that was registered for the heart in the large breast phantom in prone positioning was due to the increase of the distance between the heart and the primary beam when the breast was pendulous. Conclusion: Our 3D deformable phantom appears an excellent tool to predict dose to the OARs for the supine DIBH and prone positions, which might help quantitative clinical decisions. Further investigation will be conducted. National Institutes of Health R01EB015478.

  13. Advanced chemoresistant breast cancer responding to multidisciplinary treatment with hyperthermia, radiotherapy, and intraarterial infusion.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Goro; Fujii, Teruhiko; Ogo, Etsuyo; Yanaga, Hiroshi; Toh, Uhi; Yamaguchi, Miki; Mishima, Mai; Takamori, Shinzo; Shirouzu, Kazuo; Yamana, Hideaki

    2005-04-01

    We employed multidisciplinary therapy, consisting of hyperthermia, radiotherapy, and intraarterial infusion, for a patient with progressive advanced breast cancer that was resistant to epirubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide (EC) therapy as well as being resistant to docetaxel hydrate, and obtained a good therapeutic response. Because estrogen and progesterone receptors were both negative and HER2 was 3(+), administration of trastuzumab was started, and this patient has shown no signs of recurrence at 33 months after our treatment. The results suggested that our multidisciplinary therapy can be an effective method for the treatment of progressive breast cancer showing resistance to major chemotherapy agents such as anthracyclines and taxanes.

  14. Risk of secondary cancers in women with breast cancer and the influence of radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Yao; Chen, Sih-Hao; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lee, Song-Tay; Guo, How-Ran; Kuo, Shu-Chun; Su, Shih-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide; thus, the prolongation of survival, and the incidence and risk factors, including radiotherapy, for developing secondary malignancies are important. We compared the incidence of secondary and new primary cancers in women with breast cancer (CAPos) and well-matched for age, geographic region, and monthly income cancer-free controls (CANeg). The risk for secondary cancers with and without radiotherapy was also compared in CAPos women. We enrolled 2422 CAPos patients and CANeg 12,110 controls. In a 4-year follow-up, the secondary cancers risk was significant in the CAPos group (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–2.18). Only the risk of uterine cancer was significant compared with the controls (AHR: 6.30; 95% CI: 2.28–17.38). CAPos patients and <50 years old had a higher risk for secondary cancers. Developing secondary cancers was significant in the first follow-up year (AHR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.11–2.06). Radiotherapy had no significant effect on the CAPos group, but it was significant (P = 0.0298) in women ≥60 years old (elderly). We recommend monitoring secondary cancers in CAPos women, especially those <50 years old, and during the first year of follow-up. Radiotherapy should be used more carefully in elderly CAPos women. PMID:27930560

  15. Side effects of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients : The Internet as an information source.

    PubMed

    Janssen, S; Käsmann, L; Fahlbusch, F B; Rades, D; Vordermark, D

    2017-08-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type among women necessitating adjuvant radiotherapy. As the Internet has become a major source of information for cancer patients, this study aimed to evaluate the quality of websites giving information on side effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. A patients' search for the English terms "breast cancer - radiotherapy - side effects" and the corresponding German terms "Brustkrebs - Strahlentherapie - Nebenwirkungen" was carried out twice (5 months apart) using the search engine Google. The first 30 search results each were evaluated using the validated 16-question DISCERN Plus instrument, the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria. The overall quality (DISCERN score) of the retrieved websites was further compared to queries via Bing and Yahoo search engines. The DISCERN score showed a great range, with the majority of websites ranking fair to poor. Significantly superior results were found for English websites, particularly for webpages run by hospitals/universities and nongovernmental organizations (NGO), when compared to the respective German categories. In general, only a minority of websites met all JAMA benchmarks and was HONcode certified (both languages). We did not determine a relevant temporal change in website ranking among the top ten search hits, while significant variation occurred thereafter. Mean overall DISCERN score was similar between the various search engines. The Internet can give breast cancer patients seeking information on side effects of radiotherapy an overview. However, based on the currently low overall quality of websites and the lack of transparency for the average layperson, we emphasize the value of personal contact with the treating radio-oncologist in order to integrate and interpret the information found online.

  16. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    repair of radiation-induced damage. Furthermore, cells possessing a mutated copy of this gene are more radiosensitive than cells from individuals with...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0503 TITLE: ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast...2005 Annual 1 Jul 2004 - 30 Jun 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity

  17. Morbidity of ischemic heart disease in early breast cancer 15-20 years after adjuvant radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gyenes, G.; Rutqvist, L.E. ); Fornander, T.; Carlens, P.

    1994-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiac side effects, primarily the occurrence of ischemic heart disease, in symptom-free patients with early breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. Thirty-seven survivors of a former randomized study of early breast cancer were examined. Twenty patients irradiated pre- or postoperatively for left sided disease (study group patients) were compared with 17 controls who were either treated for right sided disease, or were nonirradiated patients. Radiotherapy was randomized in the original study; either tangential field [sup 60]Co, or electron-therapy was delivered. Echocardiography and bicycle ergometry stress test with [sup 99m]Tc SestaMIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were carried out and the patients' major risk factors for ischemic heart disease were also listed. Our results showed a significant difference between the scintigraphic findings of the two groups. Five of the 20 study group patients (25%), while none of the 17 controls exhibited some kind of significant defects on scintigraphy, indicating ischemic heart disease (p < 0.05). No deterioration in left ventricular systolic and/or diastolic function could be detected by echocardiography. Radiotherapy for left sided breast cancer with the mentioned treatment technique may present as an independent risk factor in the long-term development of ischemic heart disease, while left ventricular dysfunction could not be related to the previous irradiation. The authors emphasize the need to optimize adjuvant radiotherapy for early breast cancer by considering the dose both to the heart as well as the cancer. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Intact Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 Complex Predicts Good Response to Radiotherapy in Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soederlund, Karin . E-mail: karin.soderlund@ibk.liu.se; Stal, Olle; Skoog, Lambert; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the expression and predictive role of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) for the outcome of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The protein expression of ATM and the DNA repair proteins in the MRN complex were investigated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from 224 women with early breast cancer, who were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Compared with normal breast tissue, the staining intensity of Mre11, Rad50, Nbs1, and ATM was reduced in a majority of the tumors. Weak expression of the MRN complex was correlated with high histologic grade and estrogen receptor negativity (p = 0.01 and p 0.0001, respectively). Radiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence as compared with chemotherapy (p = 0.04). The greatest benefit of radiotherapy was seen in patients with moderate/strong expression of the MRN complex (relative risk = 0.27, 95% confidence interval = 0.098-0.72, p 0.009), whereas patients with negative/weak MRN expression had no benefit of radiotherapy compared with adjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that an intact MRN complex is important for the tumor cell eradicating effect of radiotherapy. Conclusions: Reduced expression of the MRN complex predicts a poor effect of radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer.

  19. Radiotherapy improves serum fatty acids and lipid profile in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sana; Channa, Naseem Aslam; Talpur, Farha Naz; Younis, Muhammad; Tabassum, Naila

    2017-05-18

    Breast cancer is a disease with diverse clinical symptoms, molecular profiles, and its nature to response its therapeutic treatments. Radiotherapy (RT), along with surgery and chemotherapy is a part of treatment in breast cancer. The aim of present study was to investigate pre and post treatment effects of radiotherapy in serum fatty acids and its lipids profile in patients with breast cancer. In this comparative as well as follow up study, Serum fatty acids were performed by gas chromatography to investigate fatty acids and Microlab for analysis of lipid profile. Among serum free and total fatty acids the major saturated fatty acids (SFAs) in serum lipids of breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) were stearic acid (18:0) and palmitic acid (16:0). These fatty acids contributed about 35-50% of total fatty acids. The decreased concentrations of linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4) with a lower ratio of C18:2/C18:1 was found in pretreated breast cancer patients as compared to controls. The n-3/n-6 ratio of breast cancer patients was decreased before treatment but it was 35% increased after treatment. In addition, plasma activity of D6 desaturase was increased in the breast cancer patients, while the activity of D5 desaturase was decreased. Increased levels of SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and decreased polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) levels in breast cancer patients (pre and post treated) as compared to controls. Serum total cholesterol (TC) (224.4 mg/dL) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (142.9 mg/dL) were significantly increased in pretreated breast cancer patients but after the radiotherapy treatment, the TC (150.2 mg/dL) and LDL-C (89.8 mg/dL) were decreased. It seems that RT would have played a potential role in the treatment of BC. After RT the serum levels of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C are improved. Our study reinforces the important role of RT in the management of BC. The level of PUFAs, TC, and LDL-C can be

  20. Comparison of nine prognostic scores in patients with brain metastases of breast cancer receiving radiotherapy of the brain.

    PubMed

    Laakmann, Elena; Riecke, Kerstin; Goy, Yvonne; Kersten, Jan F; Krüll, Andreas; Müller, Volkmar; Petersen, Cordula; Witzel, Isabell

    2016-01-01

    Several prognostic indices (PI) have been developed to stratify patients with brain metastases in groups with good or bad prognosis. The aim of our study was to compare nine prognostic scores for patients with brain metastases (BM) of breast cancer receiving radiotherapy. The clinical data of 139 breast cancer patients with BM were collected retrospectively. All patients were treated with cerebral radiotherapy or surgery followed by radiotherapy between January 2007 and December 2012. The prognostic value and accuracy of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA), RPA II, graded prognostic assessment (GPA), basic score for BM, Breast-RPA, Breast-GPA, Rades Score 2011, Germany Score and Breast Rades Score were assessed. The median survival after BM diagnosis in our cohort was 14 months. The overall 6-month, 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 49.6, 37.4, 20.9 and 13.7 %, respectively. Most of the PI were associated with OS, but univariate analysis favored GPA regarding OS. GPA was the most accurate score to identify patients with long (longer than 12 months) and Breast-GPA patients with short (<3 months) life expectancy. GPA and Breast-GPA seem to be the most useful scores and perform better than other PI for breast cancer patients with BM receiving radiotherapy.

  1. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, William C.; Kim, Janice; Kim, Edward; Silverman, Paula; Overmoyer, Beth; Cooper, Brenda W.; Anthony, Sue; Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary; Hanks, Shelli H.; Lyons, Janice A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  2. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio; Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Lima Souza Castro, Andre; Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  3. Spectrophotometer and ultrasound evaluation of late toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, E J; Chen, H; Torres, M A; Curran, W J; Liu, T

    2011-10-01

    Radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicities are common, complex, and distressing side effects that affect 90% of patients receiving breast-cancer radiotherapy and 40% of patients post radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigated the use of spectrophotometry and ultrasound to quantitatively measure radiation-induced skin discoloration and subcutaneous-tissue fibrosis. The study's purpose is to determine whether skin discoloration correlates with the development of fibrosis in breast-cancer radiotherapy. Eighteen breast-cancer patients were enrolled in our initial study. All patients were previously treated with a standard course of radiation, and the median follow-up time was 22 months. The treated and untreated breasts were scanned with a spectrophotometer and an ultrasound. Two spectrophotometer parameters-melanin and erythema indices-were used to quantitatively assess skin discoloration. Two ultrasound parameters-skin thickness and Pearson coefficient of the hypodermis-were used to quantitatively assess severity of fibrosis. These measurements were correlated with clinical assessments (RTOG late morbidity scores). Significant measurement differences between the treated and contralateral breasts were observed among all patients: 27.3% mean increase in skin thickness (p < 0.001), 34.1% mean decrease in Pearson coefficient (p < 0.001), 27.3% mean increase in melanin (p < 0.001), and 22.6% mean increase in erythema (p < 0.001). All parameters except skin thickness correlated with RTOG scores. A moderate correlation exists between melanin and erythema; however, spectrophotometer parameters do not correlate with ultrasound parameters. Spectrophotometry and quantitative ultrasound are objective tools that assess radiation-induced tissue injury. Spectrophotometer parameters did not correlate with those of quantitative ultrasound suggesting that skin discoloration cannot be used as a marker for subcutaneous fibrosis. These tools may prove useful

  4. Spectrophotometer and ultrasound evaluation of late toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, E. J.; Chen, H.; Torres, M. A.; Curran, W. J.; Liu, T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicities are common, complex, and distressing side effects that affect 90% of patients receiving breast-cancer radiotherapy and 40% of patients post radiotherapy. In this study, the authors investigated the use of spectrophotometry and ultrasound to quantitatively measure radiation-induced skin discoloration and subcutaneous-tissue fibrosis. The study’s purpose is to determine whether skin discoloration correlates with the development of fibrosis in breast-cancer radiotherapy.Methods : Eighteen breast-cancer patients were enrolled in our initial study. All patients were previously treated with a standard course of radiation, and the median follow-up time was 22 months. The treated and untreated breasts were scanned with a spectrophotometer and an ultrasound. Two spectrophotometer parameters—melanin and erythema indices—were used to quantitatively assess skin discoloration. Two ultrasound parameters—skin thickness and Pearson coefficient of the hypodermis—were used to quantitatively assess severity of fibrosis. These measurements were correlated with clinical assessments (RTOG late morbidity scores).Results: Significant measurement differences between the treated and contralateral breasts were observed among all patients: 27.3% mean increase in skin thickness (p < 0.001), 34.1% mean decrease in Pearson coefficient (p < 0.001), 27.3% mean increase in melanin (p < 0.001), and 22.6% mean increase in erythema (p < 0.001). All parameters except skin thickness correlated with RTOG scores. A moderate correlation exists between melanin and erythema; however, spectrophotometer parameters do not correlate with ultrasound parameters.Conclusions: Spectrophotometry and quantitative ultrasound are objective tools that assess radiation-induced tissue injury. Spectrophotometer parameters did not correlate with those of quantitative ultrasound suggesting that skin discoloration cannot be used as a marker for

  5. Improving the efficiency of breast radiotherapy treatment planning using a semi-automated approach.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert A; Wai, Philip; Colgan, Ruth; Kirby, Anna M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2017-01-01

    To reduce treatment planning times while maintaining plan quality through the introduction of semi-automated planning techniques for breast radiotherapy. Automatic critical structure delineation was examined using the Smart Probabilistic Image Contouring Engine (SPICE) commercial autosegmentation software (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) for a cohort of ten patients. Semiautomated planning was investigated by employing scripting in the treatment planning system to automate segment creation for breast step-and-shoot planning and create objectives for segment weight optimization; considerations were made for three different multileaf collimator (MLC) configurations. Forty patients were retrospectively planned using the script and a planning time comparison performed. The SPICE heart and lung outlines agreed closely with clinician-defined outlines (median Dice Similarity Coefficient > 0.9); median difference in mean heart dose was 0.0 cGy (range -10.8 to 5.4 cGy). Scripted treatment plans demonstrated equivalence with their clinical counterparts. No statistically significant differences were found for target parameters. Minimal ipsilateral lung dose increases were also observed. Statistically significant (P < 0.01) time reductions were achievable for MLCi and Agility MLC (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK) plans (median 4.9 and 5.9 min, respectively). The use of commercial autosegmentation software enables breast plan adjustment based on doses to organs at risk. Semi-automated techniques for breast radiotherapy planning offer modest reductions in planning times. However, in the context of a typical department's breast radiotherapy workload, minor savings per plan translate into greater efficiencies overall. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Cost-effectiveness Analysis Of Breast Reconstruction Options In The Setting Of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Using The BREAST-Q

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, Shantanu N.; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Ro, Teresa; Cohen, Wess A.; Mehrara, Babak J.; McCarthy, Colleen M.; Disa, Joseph J.; Pusic, Andrea L.; Matros, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background A consensus is lacking on a uniform reconstructive algorithm for patients with locally advanced breast cancer who require postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Both delayed autologous and immediate prosthetic techniques have inherent advantages and complications. The study hypothesis is that implants are more cost-effective than autologous reconstruction in the setting of PMRT because of immediate restoration of the breast mound. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis model using the payer perspective was created comparing delayed autologous and immediate prosthetic techniques against the do-nothing option of mastectomy without reconstruction. Costs were obtained from Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2010 database. Effectiveness was determined using the BREAST-Q patient reported outcome measure. A Breast-QALY was considered one year of perfect breast health related quality of life. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated for both treatments compared to the do-nothing option. Results BREAST-Q scores were obtained from patients who underwent immediate prosthetic reconstruction (n=196), delayed autologous reconstruction (n=76) and mastectomy alone (n=71). The ICER for immediate prosthetic and delayed autologous reconstruction compared to mastectomy alone was $57,906 and $102,509 respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that the ICER for both treatment options decreased with increasing life expectancy. Conclusion For patients with advanced breast cancer who require PMRT, immediate prosthetic based breast reconstruction is a cost-effective approach. Despite high complication rates, implant use can be rationalized based on low cost as well as HRQOL benefit derived from early breast mound restoration. If greater life expectancy is anticipated, autologous transfer is cost-effective as well and may be a superior option. PMID:26910695

  7. Subclavian artery occlusion after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Hashmonai, M.; Elami, A.; Kuten, A.; Lichtig, C.; Torem, S.

    1988-05-15

    Disturbance of the arterial circulation in the ipsilateral upper limb following mastectomy is a rare sequel attributed to adjuvant radiotherapy. A review of the literature revealed 20 such cases, and two more are presented. Different mechanisms of injury leading to arterial occlusion have been proposed. This is a late complication with a considerable time lag between irradiation and onset of symptoms. The symptoms vary in type and severity, but are consistent with peripheral occlusive arterial disease. To alleviate symptoms and prevent limb loss, reconstructive vascular surgery is advocated, and was successfully performed in one of our patients. 18 references.

  8. MR-guided breast radiotherapy: feasibility and magnetic-field impact on skin dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2013-09-01

    The UMC Utrecht MRI/linac (MRL) design provides image guidance with high soft-tissue contrast, directly during radiotherapy (RT). Breast cancer patients are a potential group to benefit from better guidance in the MRL. However, due to the electron return effect, the skin dose can be increased in presence of a magnetic field. Since large skin areas are generally involved in breast RT, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the skin dose, for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). In ten patients with early-stage breast cancer, targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on postoperative CT scans co-registered with MRI. The OARs included the skin, comprising the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions. Three intensity-modulated RT techniques were considered (2× WBI, 1× APBI). Individual beam geometries were used for all patients. Specially developed MRL treatment-planning software was used. Acceptable plans were generated for 0 T, 0.35 T and 1.5 T, using a class solution. The skin dose was augmented in WBI in the presence of a magnetic field, which is a potential drawback, whereas in APBI the induced effects were negligible. This opens possibilities for developing MR-guided partial-breast treatments in the MRL.

  9. Intraoperative radiotherapy during breast conserving surgery: a study on 1,822 cases treated with electrons.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Umberto; Orecchia, Roberto; Luini, Alberto; Galimberti, Viviana; Zurrida, Stefano; Intra, Mattia; Veronesi, Paolo; Arnone, Paolo; Leonardi, Maria Cristina; Ciocca, Mario; Lazzari, Roberta; Caldarella, Pietro; Rotmensz, Nicole; Sangalli, Claudia; Sances, Daniele; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) after conservative surgery for breast carcinoma was introduced at the IEO in 1999 as a research programme. The results on 1,822 patients treated from January 2000 to December 2008 are reported. Women with unicentric primary breast carcinoma of less than 2.5 cm in the largest diameter were assessed by imaging. All patients were treated with breast-conserving surgery (quadrantectomy). ELIOT was delivered by two mobile linear accelerators immediately after breast resection with a single dose of 21 Gy. Local side effects of ELIOT were mainly liponecrosis (4.2%) and fibrosis (1.8%). After a mean follow-up of 36.1 months, 42 women (2.3%) developed a local recurrence, 24 (1.3%) a new primary ipsilateral carcinomas and 26 (1.4%) distant metastases as first event. Forty-six women died (2.5%), 28 for breast carcinoma and 18 for other causes. Five- and ten-year survivals were, respectively, 97.4 and 89.7%. ELIOT appears a promising feature in early breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery, reducing the exposure of normal tissues to radiations and shortening the radiation course from 6 weeks to one single session.

  10. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  11. MO-DE-210-06: Development of a Supercompounded 3D Volumetric Ultrasound Image Guidance System for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, T; Hrycushko, B; Zhao, B; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For early-stage breast cancer, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a cost-effective breast-conserving treatment. Irradiation in a prone position can mitigate respiratory induced breast movement and achieve maximal sparing of heart and lung tissues. However, accurate dose delivery is challenging due to breast deformation and lumpectomy cavity shrinkage. We propose a 3D volumetric ultrasound (US) image guidance system for accurate prone APBI Methods: The designed system, set beneath the prone breast board, consists of a water container, an US scanner, and a two-layer breast immobilization cup. The outer layer of the breast cup forms the inner wall of water container while the inner layer is attached to patient breast directly to immobilization. The US transducer scans is attached to the outer-layer of breast cup at the dent of water container. Rotational US scans in a transverse plane are achieved by simultaneously rotating water container and transducer, and multiple transverse scanning forms a 3D scan. A supercompounding-technique-based volumetric US reconstruction algorithm is developed for 3D image reconstruction. The performance of the designed system is evaluated with two custom-made gelatin phantoms containing several cylindrical inserts filled in with water (11% reflection coefficient between materials). One phantom is designed for positioning evaluation while the other is for scaling assessment. Results: In the positioning evaluation phantom, the central distances between the inserts are 15, 20, 30 and 40 mm. The distances on reconstructed images differ by −0.19, −0.65, −0.11 and −1.67 mm, respectively. In the scaling evaluation phantom, inserts are 12.7, 19.05, 25.40 and 31.75 mm in diameter. Measured inserts’ sizes on images differed by 0.23, 0.19, −0.1 and 0.22 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The phantom evaluation results show that the developed 3D volumetric US system can accurately localize target position and determine

  12. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field.

    PubMed

    Farhood, B; Bahreyni Toossi, M T; Vosoughi, H; Khademi, S; Knaup, C

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient's setup, the technologists' experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient's setup time. Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient's setup, etc. could be considered.

  13. Cardiac dose estimates from Danish and Swedish breast cancer radiotherapy during 1977–2001

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Carolyn W.; Brønnum, Dorthe; Darby, Sarah C.; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Hall, Per; Jensen, Maj-Britt; McGale, Paul; Nisbet, Andrew; Ewertz, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose To estimate target and cardiac doses from breast cancer radiotherapy in Denmark and in the Stockholm and Umeå areas of Sweden during 1977–2001. Methods Representative samples of irradiated women were identified from the databases of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group and the Swedish Nationwide Cancer Registry. Virtual simulation, computed tomography planning and manual planning were used to reconstruct radiotherapy regimens on a typical woman. Estimates of target dose and various measures of cardiac dose were derived from individual radiotherapy charts. Results Doses were estimated in 681 Danish and 130 Swedish women. Mean heart dose for individual women varied from 1.6 to 14.9 Gray in Denmark and from 1.2 to 22.1 Gray in Sweden. In Denmark, mean target doses averaged across women increased from 40.6 to 53.8 Gray during 1977–2001 but, despite this, mean heart dose averaged across women remained around 6 Gy for left-sided and 2–3 Gray for right-sided radiotherapy. In Sweden mean target dose averaged across women increased from 38.7 to 46.6 Gray during 1977–2001, while mean heart dose averaged across women decreased from 12.0 to 7.3 Gray for left-sided and from 3.6 to 3.2 Gray for right-sided radiotherapy. Temporal trends for mean biologically effective dose [BED] to the heart, mean dose to the left anterior descending coronary artery, the right coronary artery and the circumflex coronary artery were broadly similar. Conclusions Cardiac doses in Denmark were low relative to those in Sweden. In both countries, target dose increased during 1977–2001. Despite this, cardiac doses remained constant in Denmark and decreased in Sweden. PMID:21376412

  14. Full-dose intra-operative radiotherapy with electrons (ELIOT) during breast-conserving surgery: experience with 1246 cases.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, U; Orecchia, R; Luini, A; Galimberti, V; Gatti, G; Intra, M; Veronesi, P; Leonardi, M C; Ciocca, M; Lazzari, R; Caldarella, P; Rotmensz, N; Sangalli, C; Silva, L S; Sances, D

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, radiotherapy may be applied to the portion of the breast where the primary tumour was removed (partial breast irradiation (PBI), avoiding the irradiation of the whole breast. We developed a procedure of PBI consisting of a single high dose of radiotherapy of 21 Gy with electrons equivalent to 58-60 Gy in fractionated doses, delivered during the surgical session by a mobile linear accelerator, positioned close to the operating table. From July 1999 to December 2006, 1246 patients with primary carcinoma of less than 2.5-cm maximum diameter, mostly over 48 years, were treated with electron intra-operative radiotherapy (ELIOT) at a single dose of 21 Gy. After a follow-up from 0.3 to 94.7 months (median 26), 24 (1.9%) patients showed a local recurrence and 22 developed distant metastases. Sixteen patients died, seven from breast carcinoma and nine from others causes. The five-year crude survival was 96.5%. Six (0.5%) developed severe breast fibrosis, which resolved in 2-3 years. An additional 40 patients suffered for mild fibrosis. Cosmetic results were good. Electron intra-operative radiotherapy is a safe method for treating conservatively operated breasts and avoids the long period of post-operative radiotherapy, greatly improving the quality of life and reduces the cost of radiotherapy. ELIOT markedly reduces the radiation to normal surrounding tissues and deep organs. Results on short- and medium-term toxicity are good. Data on local control are encouraging.

  15. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    PubMed

    Bagnera, Silvia; Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology-Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. "No change" was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5-9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after AWB-RT treatment (up to 5-9 years after radiotherapy) justifies large

  16. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    PubMed Central

    Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. Methods: A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Results: Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology–Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. “No change” was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). Conclusion: No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5–9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. Advances in knowledge: The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after

  17. Symptoms 10-17 years after breast cancer radiotherapy data from the randomised SWEBCG91-RT trial.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Malmström, Per; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Alsadius, David; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Anderson, Harald; Steineck, Gunnar; Karlsson, Per

    2010-11-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy decreases the risk for local recurrence and improves overall survival in women with breast cancer. We have limited information on radiotherapy-induced symptoms 10-17 years after therapy. Between 1991 and 1997, women with lymph node-negative breast cancer were randomised in a Swedish multi-institutional trial to breast conserving surgery with or without postoperative radiotherapy. In 2007, 10-17 years after randomisation, the group included 422 recurrence-free women. We collected data with a study-specific questionnaire on eight pre-selected symptom groups. For six symptom groups (oedema in breast or arm, erysipelas, heart symptoms, lung symptoms, rib fractures, and decreased shoulder mobility) we found similar occurrence in both groups. Excess occurrence after radiotherapy was observed for pain in the breast or in the skin, reported to occur "occasionally" by 38.1% of survivors having undergone radiotherapy and surgery versus 24.0% of those with surgery alone (absolute difference 14.1%; p=0.004) and at least once a week by 10.3% of the radiotherapy group versus 1.7% (absolute difference 8.6%; p=0.001). Daily life and analgesic use did not differ between the groups. Ten to 17 years after postoperative radiotherapy 1 in 12 women had weekly pain that could be attributed to radiotherapy. The symptoms did not significantly affect daily life and thus the reduced risk for local recurrence seems to outweigh the risk for long-term symptoms for most women. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of locoregional radiotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Geovanne Pedro; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Stuart, Silva Radwanski; Mano, Max Senna; Marta, Gustavo Nader

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to assess the clinical outcomes of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who underwent local radiation therapy (RT) for the primary site. Between 2005 and 2013, we retrospectively evaluated patients with MBC who received breast or chest wall RT with or without regional lymph node irradiation. 2761 patients with breast cancer were treated with RT. Of them, 125 women with stage IV breast carcinoma were included. The median follow-up was 15 months (ranging from 3.8 to 168 months), when 54.7% of the patients had died; local progression was observed in 22.8% of the patients. The mean overall survival (OS) and local progression free survival (LoPFS) were 23.4 ± 2.4 months and 45.1 ± 2.9 months, respectively. Three- and five-year overall survival rates were, respectively, 21.2% and 13.3%. Local progression free survival was the same, 67.3%, at three and five years, respectively. Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) (p = 0.015), number of metastatic sites (p = 0.031), RT dose (p = 0.0001) and hormone therapy (p = 0.0001) were confirmed as independent significant variables correlated with OS. The variables that were independently correlated with LoPFS were the number of previous chemotherapy lines (p = 0.038) and RT dose (p = 0.0001). RT of the primary site in patients with MBC is well tolerated. The factors that presented positive impact on survival were good KPS, low disease burden (1-3 metastatic sites), and the use of hormone therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiotherapy dosimetry of the breast : Factors affecting dose to the patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Karen

    The work presented in this thesis developed from the quality assurance for the START trial. This provided a unique opportunity to perform measurements in a breast shaped, soft tissue equivalent phantom in over 40 hospitals, representing 75% of the radiotherapy centres in the UK. A wide range of planning systems using beam library, beam model and convolution based algorithms have been compared. The limitations of current algorithms as applied to breast radiotherapy have been investigated by analysing the results of the START quality assurance programme, performing further measurements of surface dose and setting up of a Monte Carlo system to calculate dose distributions and superficial doses. Measurements in both 2D and 3D breast phantoms indicated that the average measured dose at the centre of the breast was lower than that calculated on the planning system by approximately 2%. Surface dose measurements showed good agreement between measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with values ranging from 6% of the maximum dose for a small field (5cmx5cm) at normal incidence to 37% for a large field (9cmx20cm) at an angle of 75°. Calculation on CT plans with pixel by pixel correction for the breast density indicated that monitor units are lower by an average 3% compared to a bulk density corrected plan assuming a density of 1g.cm-3. The average dose estimated from TLD in build-up caps placed on the patient surface was 0.99 of the prescribed dose. This shows that the underestimation of dose due to the assumption of unit density tissue is partially cancelled by the overestimation of dose by the algorithms. The work showed that simple calculation algorithms can be used for calculation of dose to the breast, however they are less accurate for patients who have undergone a mastectomy and in regions close to inhomogeneities where more complex algorithms are needed.

  20. Skin Dosimetry in Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer: a Comparison between EBT and EBT3 Radiochromic Films

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toosi, M.T.; Mohamadian, N.; Ghorbani, M.; Khorshidi, F.; Akbari, F.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Radiochromic EBT3 film is a later generation of radiochromic films. The aim of this study is to compare EBT and EBT3 radiochromic films in radiotherapy fields of breast cancer. Methods A RANDO phantom was irradiated by a 6 MV Siemens Primus linac with medial and lateral fields of radiotherapy of breast cancer. Dosimetry was performed in various points in the fields using EBT and EBT3 films. Films were scanned by a Microtek color scanner. Dose values from two films in corresponding points were compared. Results In the investigation of calibration, net optical density (NOD) of EBT radiochromic is more than the EBT3 radiochromic film. The highest percentage difference between NODs of two films is related to 0.75 Gy and equals to 14.19%. The lowest value is related to 0.2 Gy dose and is equal to 3.31%. The highest percentage difference between two films on the RANDO phantom in breast cancer fields is 13.51% and the minimum value is equal to 0.33%. Conclusion From the comparison between the two films, most of the points show differences in dose in the measurements in fields of breast cancer radiotherapy. These differences are attributed to the thickness of the active layers, the overall thickness of the films, and the difference in the calibration fitted functions. The advantage of EBT film over EBT3 is a higher sensitivity; on the other hand EBT3 film allows to use its both sides in the scanning process and it is a new version of this film type. PMID:27672625

  1. Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: Clinical Characteristics Associated with Low Interobserver Concordance

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ross P.; Truong, Pauline T. Kader, Hosam A.; Berthelet, Eric; Lee, Junella C.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Kader, Adam S.; Beckham, Wayne A.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To examine variability in target volume delineation for partial breast radiotherapy planning and evaluate characteristics associated with low interobserver concordance. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who underwent planning CT for adjuvant breast radiotherapy formed the study cohort. Using a standardized scale to score seroma clarity and consensus contouring guidelines, three radiation oncologists independently graded seroma clarity and delineated seroma volumes for each case. Seroma geometric center coordinates, maximum diameters in three axes, and volumes were recorded. Conformity index (CI), the ratio of overlapping volume and encompassing delineated volume, was calculated for each case. Cases with CI {<=}0.50 were analyzed to identify features associated with low concordance. Results: The median time from surgery to CT was 42.5 days. For geometric center coordinates, variations from the mean were 0.5-1.1 mm and standard deviations (SDs) were 0.5-1.8 mm. For maximum seroma dimensions, variations from the mean and SDs were predominantly <5 mm, with the largest SDs observed in the medial-lateral axis. The mean CI was 0.61 (range, 0.27-0.84). Five cases had CI {<=}0.50. Conformity index was significantly associated with seroma clarity (p < 0.001) and seroma volume (p < 0.002). Features associated with reduced concordance included tissue stranding from the surgical cavity, proximity to muscle, dense breast parenchyma, and benign calcifications that may be mistaken for surgical clips. Conclusion: Variability in seroma contouring occurred in three dimensions, with the largest variations in the medial-lateral axis. Awareness of clinical features associated with reduced concordance may be applied toward training staff and refining contouring guidelines for partial breast radiotherapy trials.

  2. [Electronic tissue compensation for breast external radiotherapy: use of digital reconstructive radiography].

    PubMed

    Grès, B; Foulquier, J N; Orthuon, A; Huguet, F; Keraudy, K; Touboul, E

    2009-06-01

    In case of external breast radiotherapy, the usual treatment consists of two tangential beams homogeneously attenuated by a dynamic or physics wedge in order to obtain the most homogeneous dose distribution as possible. Depending of the shape and size of the breast volume, we may observe with this technique dose heterogeneity over 20% from the recommendation of the International Committee on Radiation Units and Measurements (95-107%). We propose to study breast treatment planning by compensating tissues thickness in order to decrease dose heterogeneity observed on the dose distribution for conventional treatment. We have segmented the initial tangential beams used for this kind of treatment into several smaller beams. Their shape was adapted to the distribution of the greys level on the DRR image. Therefore, we have compensated the thickness gradient and we have given the right dose to the right thickness group. Dose distribution performed with this method shows an improvement of the dose homogeneity in the three space dimensions and a decrease of the maximal dose between 5 and 10% over the ICRU recommendation. This technique allows us to perform breast irradiation on a single photon energy linac even if the treated volume presents important thickness gradient. However, in case of large breast, this method is not able to reduce the overdosage at the entry of the volume due to inappropriate photon energy relative to the breast thickness.

  3. Enhancement of radiotherapy by ceria nanoparticles modified with neogambogic acid in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xiao Hong; Hu, Xiao Dan; Zhang, Wei; Lou, Zhi Chao; Xie, Li Hua; Liu, Pei Dang; Zhang, Hai Qian

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main strategies for cancer treatment but has significant challenges, such as cancer cell resistance and radiation damage to normal tissue. Radiosensitizers that selectively increase the susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation can enhance the effectiveness of radiotherapy. We report here the development of a novel radiosensitizer consisting of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles (CNPs) covered with the anticancer drug neogambogic acid (NGA-CNPs). These were used in conjunction with radiation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and the efficacy and mechanisms of action of this combined treatment approach were evaluated. NGA-CNPs potentiated the toxic effects of radiation, leading to a higher rate of cell death than either treatment used alone and inducing the activation of autophagy and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, while pretreatment with NGA or CNPs did not improve the rate of radiation-induced cancer cells death. However, NGA-CNPs decreased both endogenous and radiation-induced reactive oxygen species formation, unlike other nanomaterials. These results suggest that the adjunctive use of NGA-CNPs can increase the effectiveness of radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment by lowering the radiation doses required to kill cancer cells and thereby minimizing collateral damage to healthy adjacent tissue. PMID:26316742

  4. Should adjuvant radiotherapy to the supraclavicular fossa be routinely given in patients with breast conservative treatment?

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Wei; Kuo, Wen-Hong; Chang, King-Jen; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2007-08-01

    To analyze the overall outcome, supraclavicular fossa (SCF) recurrence rate, and pattern of failure in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy excluding SCF treatment. A total of 143 patients were enrolled in the study. Ninety-two percent of patients were stages I and II, and 8% were stage III. The median age was 44 years, and 31% of patients were Radiotherapy was delivered to the ipsilateral breast excluding the SCF. The 5-year overall survival rate of the cohort was 95%, and disease-free survival rate was 91%. The cumulative incidence of SCF recurrence was 18% in patients with involved axillary nodes (N) >/= 4, and 0.8% in patients with N < 4. The 5-year SCF-recurrence-free survival in patients with N >/= 4 and N < 4 was 80% and 99%, respectively (P < 0.001). N >/= 4 was the only independent predictor for locoregional control (P = 0.045), disease-free survival (P = 0.001), and overall survival (P = 0.008) in multivariate analysis. Women with N >/= 4 have a significantly higher risk of SCF recurrence and poorer survival. The SCF might be safely spared in patients with N < 4, but should be routinely included in the radiotherapy design for those with N >/= 4.

  5. The effects of enteral glutamine on radiotherapy induced dermatitis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Eda, Kucuktulu; Uzer, Kucuktulu; Murat, Topbas; Cenk, Umay

    2016-04-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical component of breast cancer treatment. Many skin reactions ranging from erythema to moist desquamation and ulceration can be induced by high dose external beam radiotherapy. There is no golden standard for treating radiation dermatitis. Glutamine is an amino acid which improved wound healing through its anabolic effects and improvements in wound matrix formation in burn patients. We designed a study to show effects of glutamine in radiation induced dermatitis. Forty patients who received radiotherapy for breast cancer were randomized into 2 groups. In group 1 the patients were treated with 15 gr of enteral glutamine whereas the patients in group 2 were treated with placebo. The radiation induced skin reactions were evaluated in both groups. In glutamine treated group 88, 9% of patients developed grade I toxicity comparing to 80% of patients in placebo group developed grade II toxicity. This difference between the groups was statistically significant. (p < 0.001) CONCLUSION: Enteral glutamine minimizes radiation induced dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  6. Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Relapse: Local Recurrence Versus New Primary Tumor and the Effect of Whole-Breast Radiotherapy on the Rate of New Primaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Sumo, Georges; Owen, John R.; Ashton, Anita; Bliss, Judith M.; Haviland, Joanne; Yarnold, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The justification for partial breast radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery assumes that ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) outside the index quadrant are mostly new primary (NP) tumors that develop despite radiotherapy. We tested the hypothesis that whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is ineffective in preventing NP by comparing development rates in irradiated and contralateral breasts after tumor excision and WBRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,410 women with breast cancer who were entered into a prospective randomized trial of radiotherapy fractionation and monitored annually for ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) and contralateral breast cancer (CLBC). Cases of IBTR were classified into local recurrence (LR) or NP tumors based on location and histology and were subdivided as definite or likely depending on clinical data. Rates of ipsilateral NP and CLBC were compared over a 15-year period of follow-up. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.1 years, there were 150 documented cases of IBTR: 118 (79%) cases were definite or likely LR; 27 (18%) cases were definite or likely NP; and 5 (3%) cases could not be classified. There were 71 cases of CLBC. The crude proportion of definite-plus-likely NP was 1.9% (27/1,410) patients compared with 5% (71/1,410) CLBC patients. Cumulative incidence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 0.8%, 2.0%, and 3.5%, respectively, for definite-plus-likely NP and 2.4%, 5.8%, and 7.9%, respectively for CLBC, suggesting a difference in the rates of NP and CLBC. Conclusions: This analysis suggests that WBRT reduces the rate of ipsilateral NP tumors. The late presentation of NP has implications for the reporting of trials that are testing partial breast radiotherapy.

  7. Is Radiotherapy an Option for Early Breast Cancers With Complete Clinical Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Daveau, Caroline; Savignoni, Alexia; Abrous-Anane, Soumya; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Gautier, Chantal; Kirova, Youlia M.; Dendale, Remi; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the exclusive use of radiotherapy (ERT) could be a treatment option after complete clinical response (cCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) for early breast cancer (EBC). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1999, 1,477 patients received NCT for EBC considered too large for primary conservative surgery. Of 165 patients with cCR, 65 patients were treated with breast surgery (with radiotherapy) and 100 patients were treated with ERT. Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics, except for larger initial tumor sizes in the ERT group. There were no significant differences in overall, disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates. Five-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 91% and 77% in the no-surgery group and 82% and 79% in the surgery group, respectively (p = 0.9). However, a nonsignificant trend toward higher locoregional recurrence rates (LRR) was observed in the no-surgery group (31% vs. 17% at 10 years; p = 0.06). In patients with complete responses on mammography and/or ultrasound, LRR were not significantly different (p = 0.45, 10-year LRR: 21% in surgery vs. 26% in ERT). No significant differences were observed in terms of the rate of cutaneous, cardiac, or pulmonary toxicities. Conclusions: Surgery is a key component of locoregional treatment for breast cancers that achieved cCR to NCT.

  8. True Local Recurrence Rate in the Conserved Breast After Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Targeted Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whipp, Elisabeth; Beresford, Mark; Sawyer, Elinor

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Better accuracy of local radiotherapy may substantially improve local control and thus long-term breast cancer survival. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has high resolution and sensitivity in breast tissue and may depict the tumor bed more accurately than conventional planning techniques. A postoperative complex (POCx) comprises all visible changes thought to be related to surgery within the breast and acts as a surrogate for the tumor bed. This study reports on local recurrence rates after MRI-assisted radiotherapy planning to ensure adequate coverage of the POCx. Methods and Materials: Simple opposed tangential fields were defined by surface anatomy in the conventional manner in 221 consecutive patients. After MRI, fields were modified by a single radiation oncologist to ensure encompassment of the POCx with a 10-mm margin. Genetic analysis was performed on all local relapses (LRs) to distinguish true recurrences (TRs) from new primaries (NPs). Results: This was a high risk cohort at 5 years: only 9.5% were classified as low risk (St Gallen): 43.4% were Grade 3 and 19.9% had surgical margins <1 mm; 62.4% of patients received boosts. Adjustments of standard field margins were required in 69%. After a median follow-up of 5 years, there were 3 LRs (1.3%) as the site of first relapse in 221 patients, comprising two TRs (0.9%) and one NP (0.4%). Conclusions: Accurate targeting of the true tumor bed is critical. MRI may better define the tumor bed.

  9. Radiation pneumonitis in breast cancer patients who received radiotherapy using the partially wide tangent technique after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoonsun; Yoon, Hong In; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Seung Kwon; Keum, Ki Chang; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2012-09-01

    We assessed the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in terms of dosimetric parameters in breast cancer patients, who received radiotherapy using the partially wide tangent technique (PWT), following breast conservation surgery (BCS). We analyzed the data from 100 breast cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy using PWT. The entire breast, supraclavicular lymph node, and internal mammary lymph node (IMN) were irradiated with 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. RP was scored on a scale of 0 to 5, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. The dosimetric parameters, used in analysis for the ipsilateral lung, were the mean lung dose (MLD), V(5) (percentage of lung volume that received a dose of 5 Gy or more)-V(50), and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Of the 100 patients, three suffered from symptomatic RP (symptom grade ≥2), but were relieved by supportive care. The risk of RP was not correlated with the treatment regimen. RP associated mostly with asymptomatic minimal pulmonary radiologic change or mild dry cough developed more frequently in the group with MLD ≥20.5 Gy or NTCP ≥23% than in the group with MLD <20.5 Gy and NTCP <23% (48.6% vs. 25.4%, p=0.018). Dosimetric parameters of MLD and NTCP were correlated with the incidence of RP, but the clinical impact was minimal. We suggest that PWT is a safe technique for the treatment of IMN for BCS patients with low risk of symptomatic RP.

  10. 3D Ultrasound Can Contribute to Planning CT to Define the Target for Partial Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berrang, Tanya S.; Truong, Pauline T. Popescu, Carmen; Drever, Laura; Kader, Hosam A.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Mitchell, Tracy; Soh, S.Y.; Sands, Letricia; Silver, Stuart; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of three-dimensional breast ultrasound (3D US) in planning partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT) is unknown. This study evaluated the accuracy of coregistration of 3D US to planning computerized tomography (CT) images, the seroma contouring consistency of radiation oncologists using the two imaging modalities and the clinical situations in which US was associated with improved contouring consistency compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled prospectively after breast-conserving surgery. Subjects underwent 3D US at CT simulation for adjuvant RT. Three radiation oncologists independently contoured the seroma on separate CT and 3D US image sets. Seroma clarity, seroma volumes, and interobserver contouring consistency were compared between the imaging modalities. Associations between clinical characteristics and seroma clarity were examined using Pearson correlation statistics. Results: 3D US and CT coregistration was accurate to within 2 mm or less in 19/20 (95%) cases. CT seroma clarity was reduced with dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.035), small seroma volume (p < 0.001), and small volume of excised breast tissue (p = 0.01). US seroma clarity was not affected by these factors (p = NS). US was associated with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in 8/20 (40%) cases. Of these 8 cases, 7 had low CT seroma clarity scores and 4 had heterogeneously to extremely dense breast parenchyma. Conclusion: 3D US can be a useful adjunct to CT in planning PBRT. Radiation oncologists were able to use US images to contour the seroma target, with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in cases with dense breast parenchyma and poor CT seroma clarity.

  11. Autologous fat graft in postmastectomy pain syndrome following breast conservative surgery and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luca; Vinci, Valeriano; Caviggioli, Fabio; Klinger, Francesco; Banzatti, Barbara; Catania, Barbara; Lisa, Andrea; Klinger, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide, affecting one in eight women. Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) has become a well-established alternative to mastectomy in the treatment of breast cancer, providing a less invasive treatment. Just as life expectancy after breast cancer has improved, so has morbidity increased. One of the most relevant and debilitating consequences of oncological breast surgery is postmastectomy pain syndrome (PMPS). Our results published in 2011 on the treatment of PMPS in patients who had undergone mastectomy and radiotherapy and our experience in scar treatment with fat grafts were the theoretical bases for this prospective study. From April 2011 to April 2012 a total of 96 patients, who had undergone lumpectomy and radiation therapy, with the diagnosis of PMPS were considered for fat grafts. We performed autologous fat grafting in 59 patients (study group), whereas 37 patients did not receive any further surgical procedure (control group). Pain assessment was performed using the visual analog scale (VAS) before and after treatment in the treated group and in the control group at the first visit and the control visit, with a mean follow-up of 10 months. Results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Four patients were lost to follow-up (two patients in the control group and two patients in the treated group). A significant VAS pain decrease was detected in patients treated with autologous fat grafting (3.1 point reduction, p ≤ 0.005). Because of the safety, efficacy, and optimal tolerability of the procedure, we believe that fat grafting can be considered useful in treating PMPS in patients who have undergone BCS and radiotherapy. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  12. Intrathecal Methotrexate and Craniospinal Radiotherapy Can Be an Effective Treatment of Carcinomatous Meningitis in Patients with Breast Cancer: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Magdalena; Addeo, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carcinomatous meningitis in breast cancer occurs as a complication in up to 5% of all cases. It is a very devastating diagnosis, with a median patient survival of about 3 months. Treatment is very controversial, and different modalities of treatment have been used but none of them show significant benefit for overall survival. Case Reports We report 2 cases of carcinomatous meningitis in breast cancer patients. They received a similar treatment of a combination of intrathecal (IT) methotrexate followed by craniospinal radiotherapy. Both patients survived for many years after treatment and are in complete clinical and radiological remission. Conclusion Meningeal metastasis from breast cancer can be very effectively treated with IT and/or systemic chemotherapy followed by craniospinal radiotherapy. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of this sequential combination of chemotherapy with radiotherapy. PMID:27920689

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jo, In Young; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2017-01-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with early left-sided breast cancer. Twenty left breast cancer patients treated with whole breast radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in this study, and the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were generated for each patient. To evaluate the dose delivered to the skin, 2 mm thickness skin (2-mm skin) and 3 mm thickness skin (3-mm skin) were contoured and a dosimetric comparison between the 2 plans was performed. The target volume coverage was better in IMRT than in 3D-CRT. The mean dose was 50.8 Gy for 3D-CRT and 51.1 Gy for IMRT. V40Gy was 99.4% for 3D-CRT and 99.9% for IMRT. In the case of skin, the mean dose was higher in 3D-CRT than in IMRT (mean dose of 2-mm skin: 32.8 Gy and 24.2 Gy; mean dose of 3-mm skin: 37.2 Gy and 27.8 Gy, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). These results indicated that the skin-sparing effect is more prominent in IMRT compared to 3D-CRT without compromising the target volume coverage.

  14. TU-A-12A-06: Intra-Observer Variability in Delineation of Target Volumes in Breast Radiotherapy and Its Effect On Accuracy of Deformation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bonora, M; Evans, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In breast radiotherapy, the target volume may change during treatment and need adaptation of the treatment plan. This is possible for both tumour bed (TB) and whole breast (WB) target volumes. Delineation of the target (to detect changes) is also subject to uncertainty due to intra- and inter-observer variability. This work measured the uncertainty, due to intraobserver variability, in the quantification of tissue deformation. Methods: Datasets consisting of paired prone and supine CT scans of three patients were used. Significant deformation in target volumes is expected between prone and supine patient positions. The selected cases had 1) no seroma, 2) some seroma, and 3) large seroma. The TB and WB were outlined on each dataset three times by one clinician. Delineation variability was defined as the standard deviations of the distances between observer outlines. For each target volume and each case, tissue deformation between prone and supine delineations was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the average surface distance (ASD). The uncertainty in the tissue deformation (due to delineation variability) was quantified by measuring the ranges of DSC and ASD using all combinations of pairs of outlines (9 pairs). Results: For the TB, the range of delineation variability was 0.44-1.16 mm. The deformation, DSC and ASD, (and uncertainty in measurement) of the TB between prone and supine position of the cases were: 1) 0.21 (0.17-0.28) and 12.4 mm (11.8-13 mm); 2) 0.54 (0.51-0.57) and 3.3 mm (3.1-3.5 mm); 3) 0.62 (0.61-0.64) and 4.9 mm (4.6-5.2 mm). WB deformation measurements were subject to less uncertainty due to delineation variability than TB deformation measurements. Conclusion: For the first time, the uncertainty, due to observer variability, in the measurement of the deformation of breast target volumes was investigated. Deformations in these ranges would be difficult to detect. This work was supported in part by Cancer Research

  15. Factors influencing acute and late toxicity in the era of adjuvant hypofractionated breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M C; Bonfantini, F; Di Salvo, F; Dispinzieri, M; Mantero, E; Soncini, F; Baili, P; Sant, M; Bianchi, G; Maggi, C; Di Cosimo, S; Agresti, R; Pignoli, E; Valdagni, R; Lozza, L

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy and whole breast hypofractionated radiotherapy, and to identify the risk factors for toxicity. 537 early breast cancer patients receiving hypofractionated radiotherapy after conservative surgery were enrolled from April 2009 to December 2014, in an Italian cancer institute. The dose was 42.4 Gy in 16 daily fractions, 2.65 Gy per fraction. The boost to the tumor bed was administered only in grade III breast cancer patients and in patients with close or positive margins. Acute and late toxicity were prospectively assessed during and after radiotherapy according to RTOG scale. The impact of patients clinical characteristics, performed treatments and dose inhomogeneities on the occurrence of an higher level of acute skin toxicity and late fibrosis has been evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The mean age was 74 (range 46-91 yrs). 27% of patients received boost. 22% of cases (n = 119) received also chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 32 months. G1 and G2/G3 acute skin toxicity were 61.3% and 20.5% and G1 and G2/G3 late fibrosis 12.6% and 4.3% respectively. Chemotherapy (p = 0.04), diabetes (p = 0.04) and boost administration (p < 0.01) were found to be statistically significant on the occurrence of late fibrosis, but a multivariate analysis did not show any factors connected. The boost administration (p < 0.01), the breast volume (p = 0.05), dose inhomogeneities (p < 0.01) and boost volume (p = 0.04) were found to be statistically significant as concerns the occurrence of acute skin reaction at the univariate analysis, but only the boost administration (p = 0.02), at multivariate analysis. The results of our study, according to the large randomized trials, confirmed that hypofractionated whole breast irradiation is safe, and only the boost administration seems to be an important predictor for toxicity. Chemotherapy does not

  16. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  17. Second Cancer Incidence Risk Estimates using BEIR VII Models for Standard and Complex External Beam Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, E M; James, H; Bonora, M; Yarnold, JR; Evans, PM

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy including cone beam CT verification following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Method Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated : (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) non-coplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low local cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contra-lateral breast, left and right lung, oesophagus, stomach, liver, colon and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionising Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine Lifetime Attributable Risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 years according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver and bladder (< 0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB

  18. Radiotherapy concurrent versus sequential with endocrine therapy in breast cancer: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Fen; Chang, Li; Li, Wen-Hui; Xiao, Min-Yang; Wang, Yong; He, Wen-Jie; Xia, Yao-Xiong; Wang, Li; Chen, Yan

    2016-06-01

    This study compared treatment outcomes of radiotherapy concurrent with endocrine therapy and radiotherapy sequential with endocrine therapy in breast cancer. Eligible studies of radiotherapy concurrent and sequential with endocrine therapy in breast cancer were retrieved through extensive searches of the PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane library, FEBM, FMJS, Web of science, Wiley, CBM, CNKI, Wang fang, Cqvip databases from 2000 to 2014. Original English and Chinese publications of radiotherapy concurrent and sequential with endocrine therapy in breast cancer were included. The primary endpoint was radiation-induced toxicity including upper than grade 2 skin related toxicity, radiation pneumonia and pulmonary fibrosis; the second endpoint was survival date, including local recurrence, distant metastasis, 5-year OS, 10-year OS. Eleven eligible trials were identified, six in English and five in Chinese. Totally, there were 1291 women in concurrent groups, and 1179 in sequential groups. Statistical analysis showed that there was no statistical difference between concurrent and sequential groups in skin related toxicity (RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.92-1.56, P = 0.17), radiation pneumonia (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.46-2.70, P = 0.81) and pulmonary fibrosis (RR 1.35, 95% CI 0.75-2.41, P = 0.32). Meanwhile, no statistical difference was found in survival data, (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.79-1.28, P = 0.26), (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.66-1.12, P = 0.27) in local recurrence and distant metastasis respectively, (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.96-1.06, P = 0.65), (RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.93-1.02, P = 0.32) in 5-year and 10-year overall survival respectively. Stratification analysis was proceeded, grouped by tamoxifen and AI in different treatment timing, however, no statistical difference was found in radiation-induced toxicity and survival outcomes. Radiotherapy concurrent with endocrine therapy didn't increase or decrease neither the incidence of radiation-induced toxicity nor the survival rate compared with that

  19. Impact of Radiation in Critical Organs in Radiotherapy Treatment of Breast and Lung Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyakuryal, Anil; Chen, Chiu-Hao; Dhungana, Sudarshan

    2010-02-01

    Various 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) techniques are commonly used in the treatment of cancerous tumors at appropriate prescription doses (PDs). The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of radiation in heart and lungs in left breast and left lung cancer patients treated using 3DCRT techniques. Treatment plans for the eight breast cancer patients (n=8), eight lung cancer patients at early stage (m=8), and eight lung cancer patients at stage II and III (k=8) were evaluated. Relative complication probabilities (RCPs) for the irradiated organs were computed from the plans using HART [Med. Phys. 36, p.2547 (2009)] program at PD. The RCPs were found to be (i) 2.3% (n=8, PD=56 Gy), 6.4% (m=8, PD=30.7 Gy), and 16.7% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the heart, (ii) 1% (n=6, PD=58.4 Gy) for the left lung, and (iii) 7% (m=6, PD=31 Gy) and 5.3% (k=8, PD=54.8 Gy) for the whole lung. Homogeneous target coverage and improved dose conformality were the major advantages in the treatment of breast cancer. Therefore, simple 3DCRT based whole-breast irradiation and partial lung treatment techniques can offer promising results while adequately sparing the organs in the treatment of breast and lung cancers. )

  20. [Two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) induced radiotherapy after surgery of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hojo, Shigeyuki; Yoshioka, Setsuko; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Kaori; Yoshioka, Akiko; Fujie, Yujiro; Fukunaga, Hiroki; Ota, Hirofumi; Endo, Wakio; Maeura, Yoshiichi

    2010-11-01

    We report two cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) induced radiotherapy after surgery of breast cancer. One of the patients was a 58-year-old woman. She underwent a conserving surgery for bilateral breast cancers, and received radiation therapy to the remaining part of bilateral breasts. Two months after the termination of irradiation, cough, fever and general fatigue developed. We clinically diagnosed this case as BOOP after radiation therapy. After initiation of oral steroid therapy, the clinical symptoms and radiographic findings disappeared. Another patient was a 57-year-old woman. She underwent radical mastectomy for right breast cancer. A month after the operation, she suffered from local recurrence, so radiation therapy to the thoracic wall was performed. After irradiation, resection of the thoracic wall lesion was performed because of malignancy from local skin biopsy specimen. Two months after the termination of irradiation, cough, dyspnea and fever developed. We clinically diagnosed this case as radiation-induced BOOP by BAL and TBLB findings. After an initiation of steroid therapy, the clinical symptoms and radiographic findings disappeared. It is important to be aware of BOOP as a complication in the patient who was given radiation after surgery of breast cancer.

  1. 3D surface imaging for guidance in breast cancer radiotherapy: organs at risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the variability in heart position in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for breast cancer when 3D surface imaging would be used for monitoring the depth of the breath hold during treatment. Materials and Methods: Ten patients who received DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Retrospectively, heart-based registrations were performed for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to planning CT and breast surface registrations were performed for a 3D surface (two different regions of interest [ROIs]), captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to investigate the prediction quality of 3D surface imaging for 3D heart displacement. Further, the residual setup errors (systematic [Σ] and random [σ]) of the heart were estimated relative to the surface registrations. Results: When surface imaging [ROIleft-side;ROIboth-sides] would be used for monitoring, the residual errors of the heart position are in left-right: Σ=[0.360.12], σ=[0.160.14] cranio-caudal: Σ=[0.540.54], σ=[0.280.31] and in anteriorposterior: Σ=[0.180.14], σ=[0.200.19] cm. Correlations between setup errors were: R2 = [0.23;0.73], [0.67;0.65], [0.65;0.73] in left-right, cranio-caudal, and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. ROC analysis resulted in an area under the ROC curve of [0.82;0.78]. Conclusion: The use of ROIboth-sides provided promising results. However, considerable variability in the heart position, particularly in CC direction, is observed when 3D surface imaging would be used for guidance in DIBH radiotherapy after BCS. Planning organ at risk volume margins should be used to take into account the heart-position variability.

  2. The impact of immediate breast reconstruction on the technical delivery of postmastectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Motwani, Sabin B.; Strom, Eric A. . E-mail: estrom@mdanderson.org; Schechter, Naomi R.; Butler, Charles E.; Lee, Gordon K.; Langstein, Howard N.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Ibrahim, Nuhad K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) planning. Methods: A total of 110 patients (112 treatment plans) who had mastectomy with immediate reconstruction followed by radiotherapy were compared with contemporaneous stage-matched patients who had undergone mastectomy without intervening reconstruction. A scoring system was used to assess optimal radiotherapy planning using four parameters: breadth of chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, minimization of lung, and avoidance of heart. An 'optimal' plan achieved all objectives or a minor 0.5 point deduction; 'moderately' compromised treatment plans had 1.0 or 1.5 point deductions; and 'major' compromised plans had {>=}2.0 point deductions. Results: Of the 112 PMRT plans scored after reconstruction, 52% had compromises compared with 7% of matched controls (p < 0.0001). Of the compromised plans after reconstruction, 33% were considered to be moderately compromised plans and 19% were major compromised treatment plans. Optimal chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, lung minimization, and heart avoidance was achieved in 79%, 45%, 84%, and 84% of the plans in the group undergoing immediate reconstruction, compared respectively with 100%, 93%, 97%, and 92% of the plans in the control group (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.0015, and p = 0.1435). In patients with reconstructions, 67% of the 'major' compromised radiotherapy plans were left-sided (p < 0.16). Conclusions: Radiation treatment planning after immediate breast reconstruction was compromised in more than half of the patients (52%), with the largest compromises observed in those with left-sided cancers. For patients with locally advanced breast cancer, the potential for compromised PMRT planning should be considered when deciding between immediate and delayed reconstruction.

  3. A Qualitative Analysis of Acute Skin Toxicity among Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; DiLorenzo, Terry A.; Green, Sheryl; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives One of the most common acute side effects of breast cancer radiotherapy is treatment induced skin changes, referred to as skin toxicity. Yet no research to date has focused expressly on skin toxicity-related quality of life in breast cancer radiotherapy patients. Therefore, our aim was to use qualitative approaches to better understand the impact of skin toxicity on quality of life. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women (Stage 0-III breast cancer), during their last week of external beam radiotherapy. Each interview was transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was performed. Results Three themes were identified based on the interview responses: First, skin changes affect multiple dimensions of quality of life. They cause physical discomfort, body image disturbance, emotional distress, and impair both day-to-day functioning and satisfaction with radiation treatment. Second, individual differences affect women’s experiences. Generally African-American women, younger women, women who are not currently in a relationship, women who are being treated during the summer, and women who are more invested in their appearance are more distressed by skin toxicity. Third, women use a variety of symptom management strategies including self-medication, complementary/alternative medicine approaches, and psychological strategies. Conclusions Implications of results are: 1) Skin toxicity affects numerous dimensions of quality of life, and assessment approaches and psychosocial interventions should address this; 2) individual differences may affect the experience of skin toxicity, and should be considered in treatment and education approaches; and 3) participants’ own creativity and problem-solving should be used to improve the treatment experience. PMID:20238306

  4. A qualitative analysis of acute skin toxicity among breast cancer radiotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Schnur, Julie B; Ouellette, Suzanne C; Dilorenzo, Terry A; Green, Sheryl; Montgomery, Guy H

    2011-03-01

    One of the most common acute side effects of breast cancer radiotherapy is treatment-induced skin changes, referred to as skin toxicity. Yet no research to date has focused expressly on skin toxicity-related quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer radiotherapy patients. Therefore, our aim was to use qualitative approaches to better understand the impact of skin toxicity on QOL. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 20 women (Stage 0-III breast cancer), during their last week of external beam radiotherapy. Each interview was transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was performed. Three themes were identified based on the interview responses: First, skin changes affect multiple dimensions of QOL. They cause physical discomfort, body image disturbance, emotional distress, and impair both day-to-day functioning and satisfaction with radiation treatment. Second, individual differences affect women's experiences. Generally African American women, younger women, women who are not currently in a relationship, women who are being treated during the summer, and women who are more invested in their appearance are more distressed by skin toxicity. Third, women use a variety of symptom management strategies including self-medication, complementary/alternative medicine approaches, and psychological strategies. Implications of results are as follows: (1) skin toxicity affects numerous dimensions of QOL, and assessment approaches and psychosocial interventions should address this; (2) individual differences may affect the experience of skin toxicity and should be considered in treatment and education approaches; and (3) participants' own creativity and problem-solving should be used to improve the treatment experience. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  6. [Preoperative irradiation and interstitial radiotherapy-hyperthermia boost in breast tumors > or = 3 cm. The Düsseldorf experience].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, K A; Audretsch, W; Carl, U M; Gripp, S; Kolotas, C; Muskalla, K; Rezai, M; Schnabel, T; Waap, I; Zamboglou, N; Schmitt, G

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this protocol was to investigate breast conservation rates with and without flap-supported surgery after preoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hyperthermia. One hundred and fifty-eight patients with stage IIA-IV breast cancers were initially treated with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hyperthermia. Radiation treatment consisted of an interstitial boost of 10 Gy 192Ir-afterloading therapy and a course of external beam radiotherapy of 50 Gy, using 5 x 2 Gy/week. Local hyperthermia with 43.5-44.5 degrees C over 60 minutes was delivered immediately before interstitial radiotherapy. One hundred and forty-two patients underwent salvage surgery. A breast-conserving approach was possible in 74 patients (52%). Fifty-three patients (37%) underwent flap-supported surgery. After a median follow-up of 20 months, one patient developed isolated local recurrence. In 14 cases, locoregional recurrences occurred in combination with distant metastases. In about 50%, breast conservation was achieved by chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hyperthermia. The low isolated local recurrence rate of 0.6% (1/158) has to be substantiated by further follow-up.

  7. Efficiency and prognosis of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinhong; Luo, Bo; Wei, Shaozhong; Luo, Yan; Feng, Yaojun; Xu, Juan; Wei, Wei

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the treatment efficiency of whole brain irradiation combined with precise radiotherapy on triple-negative (TN) phenotype breast cancer patients with brain metastases and their survival times. A total of 112 metastatic breast cancer patients treated with whole brain irradiation and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) were analyzed. Thirty-seven patients were of TN phenotype. Objective response rates were compared. Survival times were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to compare the survival time difference between the TN and non-TN groups. Potential prognostic factors were determined by using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. The efficiency of radiotherapy treatment on TN and non-TN phenotypes was 96.2% and 97%, respectively. TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times than non-TN phenotype after radiotherapy (6.9 months vs. 17 months) (P < 0.01). On multivariate analysis, good prognosis was associated with non-TN status, lower graded prognosis assessment class, and nonexistence of active extracranial metastases. After whole brain irradiation followed by IMRT or 3DCRT treatment, TN phenotype breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis had high objective response rates but shorter survival time. With respect to survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis, the TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor.

  8. Is internal mammary nodes irradiation as a part of breast cancer postoperative radiotherapy necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Yang, Zhao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy plays an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer. However, it remains a controversy whether it is necessary to carry out prophylactic internal mammary nodes irradiation (IMNI). This review will focus on this topic. In our opinion, the total risk of relapse should be considered during the decision-making on IMNI; in particular, IMNI is recommended for high-risk patients whose tumor is located at the central/medial area or in patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. PMID:28066623

  9. Comparison of Radiation Treatment Plans for Breast Cancer between 3D Conformal in Prone and Supine Positions in Contrast to VMAT and IMRT Supine Positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano Buele, Ana Isabel

    The treatment regimen for breast cancer patients typically involves Whole Breast Irradiation (WBI). The coverage and extent of the radiation treatment is dictated by location of tumor mass, breast tissue distribution, involvement of lymph nodes, and other factors. The current standard treatment approach used at our institution is a 3D tangential beam geometry, which involves two fields irradiating the breast, or a four field beam arrangement covering the whole breast and involved nodes, while decreasing the dose to organs as risk (OARs) such as the lung and heart. The coverage of these targets can be difficult to achieve in patients with unfavorable thoracic geometries, especially in those cases in which the planning target volume (PTV) is extended to the chest wall. It is a well-known fact that exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation has been proved to increase the subsequent rate of ischemic heart disease. In these cases, inverse planned treatments have become a proven alternative to the 3D approach. The goal of this research project is to evaluate the factors that affect our current techniques as well as to adapt the development of inverse modulated techniques for our clinic, in which breast cancer patients are one of the largest populations treated. For this purpose, a dosimetric comparison along with the evaluation of immobilization devices was necessary. Radiation treatment plans were designed and dosimetrically compared for 5 patients in both, supine and prone positions. For 8 patients, VMAT and IMRT plans were created and evaluated in the supine position. Skin flash incorporation for inverse modulated plans required measurement of the surface dose as well as an evaluation of breast volume changes during a treatment course. It was found that prone 3D conformal plans as well as the VMAT and IMRT plans are generally superior in sparing OARs to supine plans with comparable PTV coverage. Prone setup leads to larger shifts in breast volume as well as in

  10. Dose to the Contralateral Breast From Radiotherapy and Risk of Second Primary Breast Cancer in the WECARE Study

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Marilyn Smith, Susan A.; Langholz, Bryan M.; Boice, John D.; Shore, Roy E.; Andersson, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Haile, Robert W.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the risk of second primary breast cancer in the contralateral breast (CB) after radiotherapy (RT) for first breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study population included participants in the Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology study: 708 cases (women with asynchronous bilateral breast cancer) and 1399 controls (women with unilateral breast cancer) counter-matched on radiation treatment. Participants were <55 years of age at first breast cancer. Absorbed doses to quadrants of the CB were estimated. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models. Results: Across all patients, the mean radiation dose to the specific quadrant of the CB tumor was 1.1 Gy. Women <40 years of age who received >1.0 Gy of absorbed dose to the specific quadrant of the CB had a 2.5-fold greater risk for CB cancer than unexposed women (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.5). No excess risk was observed in women >40 years of age. Women <40 years of age with follow-up periods >5 years had a RR of 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1), and the dose response was significant (excess RR per Gy of 1.0, 95% CI 0.1-3.0). Conclusions: Women <40 years of age who received a radiation dose >1.0 Gy to the CB had an elevated, long-term risk of developing a second primary CB cancer. The risk is inversely related to age at exposure and is dose dependent.

  11. Dose to the contralateral breast from radiotherapy and risk of second primary breast cancer in the WECARE study.

    PubMed

    Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A; Langholz, Bryan M; Boice, John D; Shore, Roy E; Andersson, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A; Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F; Malone, Kathleen E; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Haile, Robert W; Rosenstein, Barry S; Reiner, Anne S; Thomas, Duncan C; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2008-11-15

    To quantify the risk of second primary breast cancer in the contralateral breast (CB) after radiotherapy (RT) for first breast cancer. The study population included participants in the Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology study: 708 cases (women with asynchronous bilateral breast cancer) and 1399 controls (women with unilateral breast cancer) counter-matched on radiation treatment. Participants were <55 years of age at first breast cancer. Absorbed doses to quadrants of the CB were estimated. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models. Across all patients, the mean radiation dose to the specific quadrant of the CB tumor was 1.1 Gy. Women <40 years of age who received >1.0 Gy of absorbed dose to the specific quadrant of the CB had a 2.5-fold greater risk for CB cancer than unexposed women (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.5). No excess risk was observed in women >40 years of age. Women <40 years of age with follow-up periods >5 years had a RR of 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1), and the dose response was significant (excess RR per Gy of 1.0, 95% CI 0.1-3.0). Women <40 years of age who received a radiation dose >1.0 Gy to the CB had an elevated, long-term risk of developing a second primary CB cancer. The risk is inversely related to age at exposure and is dose dependent.

  12. Radiation field design and patterns of locoregional recurrence following definitive radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Susie A; Schuster, David M; Mister, Donna; Liu, Tian; Godette, Karen; Torres, Mylin A

    2013-02-01

    Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with (18)F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as ≥95% of the LRR volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose to ≥95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Susie A.; Schuster, David M.; Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as {>=}95% of the LRR volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose to {>=}95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  14. Quantitative Ultrasonic Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Late Tissue Toxicity: Pilot Study of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tian; Zhou Jun; Yoshida, Emi J.; Woodhouse, Shermian A.; Schiff, Peter B.; Wang, Tony J.C.; Lu Zhengfeng; Pile-Spellman, Eliza; Zhang Pengpeng; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of advanced ultrasonic imaging to quantitatively evaluate normal-tissue toxicity in breast-cancer radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighteen breast cancer patients who received radiation treatment were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical study. Radiotherapy involved a radiation dose of 50.0 to 50.4 Gy delivered to the entire breast, followed by an electron boost of 10.0 to 16.0 Gy delivered to the tumor bed. Patients underwent scanning with ultrasound during follow-up, which ranged from 6 to 94 months (median, 22 months) postradiotherapy. Conventional ultrasound images and radio-frequency (RF) echo signals were acquired from treated and untreated breasts. Three ultrasound parameters, namely, skin thickness, Pearson coefficient, and spectral midband fit, were computed from RF signals to measure radiation-induced changes in dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue, respectively. Ultrasound parameter values of the treated breast were compared with those of the untreated breast. Ultrasound findings were compared with clinical assessment using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) late-toxicity scores. Results: Significant changes were observed in ultrasonic parameter values of the treated vs. untreated breasts. Average skin thickness increased by 27.3%, from 2.05 {+-} 0.22mm to 2.61 {+-} 0.52mm; Pearson coefficient decreased by 31.7%, from 0.41 {+-} 0.07 to 0.28 {+-} 0.05; and midband fit increased by 94.6%, from -0.92 {+-} 7.35 dB to 0.87 {+-} 6.70 dB. Ultrasound evaluations were consistent with RTOG scores. Conclusions: Quantitative ultrasound provides a noninvasive, objective means of assessing radiation-induced changes to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. This imaging tool will become increasingly valuable as we continue to improve radiation therapy technique.

  15. Automated Planning of Tangential Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using Heuristic Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Letourneau, Daniel; Hill, Christine; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To present an automated technique for two-field tangential breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Method and Materials: A total of 158 planned patients with Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer treated using whole-breast IMRT were retrospectively replanned using automated treatment planning tools. The tools developed are integrated into the existing clinical treatment planning system (Pinnacle{sup 3}) and are designed to perform the manual volume delineation, beam placement, and IMRT treatment planning steps carried out by the treatment planning radiation therapist. The automated algorithm, using only the radio-opaque markers placed at CT simulation as inputs, optimizes the tangential beam parameters to geometrically minimize the amount of lung and heart treated while covering the whole-breast volume. The IMRT parameters are optimized according to the automatically delineated whole-breast volume. Results: The mean time to generate a complete treatment plan was 6 min, 50 s {+-} 1 min 12 s. For the automated plans, 157 of 158 plans (99%) were deemed clinically acceptable, and 138 of 158 plans (87%) were deemed clinically improved or equal to the corresponding clinical plan when reviewed in a randomized, double-blinded study by one experienced breast radiation oncologist. In addition, overall the automated plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the clinical plans when scored for target coverage and lung and heart doses. Conclusion: We have developed robust and efficient automated tools for fully inversed planned tangential breast IMRT planning that can be readily integrated into clinical practice. The tools produce clinically acceptable plans using only the common anatomic landmarks from the CT simulation process as an input. We anticipate the tools will improve patient access to high-quality IMRT treatment by simplifying the planning process and will reduce the effort and cost of incorporating more advanced planning into clinical

  16. Dosimetric research on intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy planning for left breast cancer after breast-preservation surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yong; Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Ma Changsheng; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai; Wang Ruozheng

    2012-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has played an important role in breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-preservation surgery. Our aim was to study the dosimetric and implementation features/feasibility between IMRT and intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (Varian RapidArc, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The forward IMRT plan (f-IMRT), the inverse IMRT, and the RapidArc plan (RA) were generated for 10 patients. Afterward, we compared the target dose distribution of the 3 plans, radiation dose on organs at risk, monitor units, and treatment time. All 3 plans met clinical requirements, with RA performing best in target conformity. In target homogeneity, there was no statistical significance between RA and IMRT, but both of homogeneity were less than f-IMRT's. With regard to the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the left lung, those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT; for V{sub 20} and V{sub 30}, the lowest was observed in RA; and in the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the right lung, as well as the mean dose in normal-side breast and right lung, there was no statistically significance difference between RA and IMRT, and the lowest value was observed in f-IMRT. As for the maximum dose in the normal-side breast, the lowest value was observed in RA. Regarding monitor units (MUs), those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT. Treatment time of RA was 84.6% and 88.23% shorter than f-IMRT and IMRT, respectively, on average. Compared with f-IMRT and IMRT, RA performed better in target conformity and can reduce high-dose volume in the heart and left lung-which are related to complications-significantly shortening treatment time as well. Compared with IMRT, RA can also significantly reduce low-dose volume and MUs of the afflicted lung.

  17. Surface dose measurements in and out of field: Implications for breast radiotherapy with megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Lonski, Peta; Ramachandran, Prabhakar; Franich, Rick; Kron, Tomas

    2017-06-05

    This study examines the difference in surface dose between flat and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in the context of breast radiotherapy. The surface dose was measured for 6MV, 6MV FFF, 10MV, 10MV FFF and 18MV photon beams using a thin window ionisation chamber for various field sizes. Profiles were acquired to ascertain the change in surface dose off-axis. Out-of-field measurements were included in a clinically representative half beam block tangential breast field. In the field centres of FFF beams the surface dose was found to be increased for small fields and decreased for large fields compared to flat beams. For FFF beams, surface dose was found to decrease off-axis and resulted in lower surface dose out-of-field compared to flat beams. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  18. Use of Three-Dimensional Ultrasound in the Detection of Breast Tumor Bed Displacement During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Philip; Muanza, Thierry; Reynard, Eric; Robert, Karine; Barker, Jennifer; Sultanem, Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of a three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) image-guided system in identifying and tracking the tumor bed (TB) for planning and daily localization before radiation delivery for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty breast cancer patients underwent two CT scans at the time of simulation and just before their boost. Three-dimensional ultrasound images were acquired immediately after the CT scans, to which the images were automatically fused. Three-dimensional ultrasound images were also acquired immediately before treatment. Spatial and temporal TB differences between CT and US were evaluated. Results: The TB was not visible on US and CT in 1 subject who had and 1 subject who had not received chemotherapy before whole-breast radiotherapy. The mean (SD) TB volume overlap was 78% (14%). The mean centroid position of the TB on CT vs. US differed by 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. The mean (SD) absolute radial displacement of the TB on each fraction from the treatment plan was 10.8 (6.3) mm. Conclusions: The TB was well visualized by US for the majority of patients. Clinically insignificant differences in the displacements calculated by paired CT vs. paired US demonstrate the feasibility of using 3D-US. The present study suggests that a 10-mm planning target volume margin could result in undercoverage of the clinical target volumes in 50% of treatments. Multimodality planning and image-guided radiotherapy with US potentially offers an accurate and non-ionizing solution for the daily definition of the TB position during partial-breast irradiation and boost treatments.

  19. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, B.; Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Vosoughi, H.; Khademi, S.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered. PMID:27853722

  20. In Vivo Dosimetry for Single-Fraction Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (TARGIT) for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, David J.; Best, Bronagh; Brew-Graves, Chris; Duck, Stephen; Ghaus, Tabasom; Gonzalez, Regina; Pigott, Katharine; Reynolds, Claire; Williams, Norman R.; Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In vivo dosimetry provides an independent check of delivered dose and gives confidence in the introduction or consistency of radiotherapy techniques. Single-fraction intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast can be performed with the Intrabeam compact, mobile 50 kV x-ray source (Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) can be used to estimate skin doses during these treatments. Methods and Materials: Measurements of skin doses were taken using TLDs for 72 patients over 3 years of clinical treatments. Phantom studies were also undertaken to assess the uncertainties resulting from changes in beam quality and backscatter conditions in vivo. Results: The mean measured skin dose was 2.9 {+-} 1.6 Gy, with 11% of readings higher than the prescription dose of 6 Gy, but none of these patients showed increased complications. Uncertainties due to beam hardening and backscatter reduction were small compared with overall accuracy. Conclusions: TLDs are a useful and effective method to measure in vivo skin doses in intraoperative radiotherapy and are recommended for the initial validation or any modification to the delivery of this technique. They are also an effective tool to show consistent and safe delivery on a more frequent basis or to determine doses to other critical structures as required.

  1. Supervised physical therapy in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer 1

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Nara Fernanda Braz da Silva; de Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of physical therapy on the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. Methods: a total of 35 participants were randomized into two groups, with 18 in the control group (CG) and 17 in the study group (SG). Both of the groups underwent three evaluations to assess the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs, and the study group underwent supervised physical therapy for the upper limbs. Results: the CG had deficits in external rotation in evaluations 1, 2, and 3, whereas the SG had deficits in flexion, abduction, and external rotation in evaluation 1. The deficit in abduction was recovered in evaluation 2, whereas the deficits in all movements were recovered in evaluation 3. No significant differences in perimetry were observed between the groups. Conclusion: the applied supervised physical therapy was effective in recovering the deficit in abduction after radiotherapy, and the deficits in flexion and external rotation were recovered within two months after the end of radiotherapy. Registration number of the clinical trial: NCT02198118. PMID:27533265

  2. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in pT3N0M0 breast cancer: is it needed?

    PubMed

    Helintö, M; Blomqvist, C; Heikkilä, P; Joensuu, H

    1999-09-01

    It is not been established whether breast cancer patients who have a primary tumor 5 cm or larger but no axillary nodal or distant metastases at the time of the diagnosis (pT3N0M0) benefit from post-operative radiation therapy after mastectomy. We identified 81 patients with T3N0M0 breast cancer out of the total of 4190 breast cancer patients treated in one university radiotherapy department from 1987 to 1994 from the department patient registry, and examined the clinical records and histopathological slides. Only 38 of the 81 patients had true pT3N0M0 breast cancer after the review (0.9% of the 4190 new breast cancer patients registered in the department from 1987 to 1994). Three (60%) of the five patients who were not treated with post-operative radiation therapy developed locoregional recurrence of breast cancer as compared with only three (9%) of the 33 patients who were given post-operative radiotherapy during a median follow-up of 58 months (P = 0.0003). Patients who were given post-operative radiotherapy had a better distant disease-free survival rate (P = 0.04) and overall survival rate (P = 0.03) than the ones who were not treated with radiation therapy after surgery. Of the 29 patients who had chest wall irradiation only, one had in-field recurrence at the surgical scar, one both at the scar and the unirradiated axilla, and only one (3%) solely in the axilla. Patients with true pT3N0M0 breast cancer are rare. The results suggest that women with pT3N0M0 breast cancer benefit from post-operative radiotherapy, but the value of irradiating the dissected ipsilateral axilla remains unsettled.

  3. Real-time 3D surface-image-guided beam setup in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Djajaputra, David; Li Shidong

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach for external beam radiotherapy of breast cancer that utilizes the three-dimensional (3D) surface information of the breast. The surface data of the breast are obtained from a 3D optical camera that is rigidly mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. This 3D camera utilizes light in the visible range therefore it introduces no ionization radiation to the patient. In addition to the surface topographical information of the treated area, the camera also captures gray-scale information that is overlaid on the 3D surface image. This allows us to visualize the skin markers and automatically determine the isocenter position and the beam angles in the breast tangential fields. The field sizes and shapes of the tangential, supraclavicular, and internal mammary gland fields can all be determined according to the 3D surface image of the target. A least-squares method is first introduced for the tangential-field setup that is useful for compensation of the target shape changes. The entire process of capturing the 3D surface data and subsequent calculation of beam parameters typically requires less than 1 min. Our tests on phantom experiments and patient images have achieved the accuracy of 1 mm in shift and 0.5 deg. in rotation. Importantly, the target shape and position changes in each treatment session can both be corrected through this real-time image-guided system.

  4. Dosimetric verification of modulated electron radiotherapy delivered using a photon multileaf collimator for intact breasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Ma, C.-M.; Fan, J.; Eldib, A.; Price, R. A.; Chen, L.; Wang, L.; Chi, Z.; Xu, Q.; Sherif, M.; Li, J. S.

    2008-11-01

    Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) may potentially be an effective modality for the treatment of shallow tumors, but dose calculation accuracy and delivery efficiency challenges remain. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dose accuracy of MERT delivery using a photon multileaf collimator (pMLC) on a Siemens Primus accelerator. A Monte Carlo (MC)-based inverse treatment planning system was developed for the 3D treatment planning process. Phase space data of 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV electron beams were commissioned and used as the input source for MC dose calculations. A treatment plan was performed based on the 3D CT data of a heterogeneous 'breast phantom' that mimics a breast cancer patient, and delivered with 22 segments, each associated with a particular energy and Monitor Unit value. Film and ion chamber dosimetry was carefully performed for the conversion from measurement reading to dose, and the results were employed for plan verification using the heterogeneous breast phantom and a solid water phantom. Dose comparisons between measurements and calculations showed agreement within 2% or 1 mm. We conclude that our in-house MC treatment planning system is capable of performing treatment planning and accurate dose calculations for MERT using the pMLC to deliver radiation therapy to the intact breast.

  5. Iterative dataset optimization in automated planning: Implementation for breast and rectal cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiawei; Wang, Jiazhou; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Weigang

    2017-06-01

    To develop a new automated treatment planning solution for breast and rectal cancer radiotherapy. The automated treatment planning solution developed in this study includes selection of the iterative optimized training dataset, dose volume histogram (DVH) prediction for the organs at risk (OARs), and automatic generation of clinically acceptable treatment plans. The iterative optimized training dataset is selected by an iterative optimization from 40 treatment plans for left-breast and rectal cancer patients who received radiation therapy. A two-dimensional kernel density estimation algorithm (noted as two parameters KDE) which incorporated two predictive features was implemented to produce the predicted DVHs. Finally, 10 additional new left-breast treatment plans are re-planned using the Pinnacle(3) Auto-Planning (AP) module (version 9.10, Philips Medical Systems) with the objective functions derived from the predicted DVH curves. Automatically generated re-optimized treatment plans are compared with the original manually optimized plans. By combining the iterative optimized training dataset methodology and two parameters KDE prediction algorithm, our proposed automated planning strategy improves the accuracy of the DVH prediction. The automatically generated treatment plans using the dose derived from the predicted DVHs can achieve better dose sparing for some OARs without compromising other metrics of plan quality. The proposed new automated treatment planning solution can be used to efficiently evaluate and improve the quality and consistency of the treatment plans for intensity-modulated breast and rectal cancer radiation therapy. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  7. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. Material and methods The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Results Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point

  8. [Optimized definition and delineation of supraclavicular lymph nodes target in postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Huang, Shujing; Huang, Xiaobo; Wang, Xicheng; Zhang, Yujing; Sun, Jiayuan; He, Liru; Wen, Ge; He, Zhichun

    2014-07-01

    To explore the optimized methods to define and delineate supraclavicular lymph nodal target in postmastectomy radiotherapy for breast cancer patients. From September 2012 to August 2013, a total of 10 breast cancer patients at Sun Yan-sen University Cancer were selected for mastectomy plus postoperative radiotherapy. The clinical target volume (CTV) of every patient was delineated on CT-slices after computed tomography (CT) simulation by 6 radiation oncologists. Then the coverage discrepancy in anatomic lymphatic drainage subregions was analyzed among both CTVs by different oncologists and CTVs for patients with different clinical characters. The average volume of SCLN-CTVs was 110 ± 28 cm(3). All SCLN, neck-IV and axilla III regions were covered in CTV, none of axillaIregion. The covergy rates of nonsurgery-axillaII, Rotter-LN, intraclavicular-LN, neck-Vb, scalenus gap, neck-III and surgery-axilla IIregions was 75%, 85%, 73%, 88%, 68%, 10%, 17% , respectively. SCLN, neck-IV and axilla III regions should be covered according to consensus. However, the opinions of nonsurgery-axillaII, Rotter-LN, intraclavicular-LN, neck-Vb, scalenus gap, neck-III and surgery-axilla IIremain divisive.

  9. High-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy and inverse optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hurkmans, Coen W. . E-mail: coen.hurkmans@cze.nl; Meijer, Gert J.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Cassee, Jorien

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: Recently a Phase III randomized trial has started comparing a boost of 16 Gy as part of whole-breast irradiation to a high boost of 26 Gy in young women. Our main aim was to develop an efficient simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) technique for the high-dose arm of the trial. Methods and Materials: Treatment planning was performed for 5 left-sided and 5 right-sided tumors. A tangential field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique added to a sequentially planned 3-field boost (SEQ) was compared with a simultaneously planned technique (SIB) using inverse optimization. Normalized total dose (NTD)-corrected dose volume histogram parameters were calculated and compared. Results: The intended NTD was produced by 31 fractions of 1.66 Gy to the whole breast and 2.38 Gy to the boost volume. The average volume of the PTV-breast and PTV-boost receiving more than 95% of the prescribed dose was 97% or more for both techniques. Also, the mean lung dose and mean heart dose did not differ much between the techniques, with on average 3.5 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SEQ and 3.8 Gy and 2.6 Gy for the SIB, respectively. However, the SIB resulted in a significantly more conformal irradiation of the PTV-boost. The volume of the PTV-breast, excluding the PTV-boost, receiving a dose higher than 95% of the boost dose could be reduced considerably using the SIB as compared with the SEQ from 129 cc (range, 48-262 cc) to 58 cc (range, 30-102 cc). Conclusions: A high-dose simultaneously integrated breast boost technique has been developed. The unwanted excessive dose to the breast was significantly reduced.

  10. Evaluation of the field-in-field technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Kajiura, Yuichi; Kitahara, Masashi; Matsuyama, Katsuya; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several studies have reported the advantages of the field-in-field (FIF) technique in breast radiotherapy, including dose reduction in the lungs by using lung field blocks. We evaluated the FIF technique with lung blocks for breast tangential radiotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent free breathing (FB) computed tomography (CT), followed by two CT procedures performed during breath hold after light inhalation (IN) and light exhalation (EX). Three radiotherapy plans were created using the FIF technique based on the FB-CT images: one without lung blocks (LB0) and two with lung blocks whose monitor units (MUs) were 5 (LB5) and 10 (LB10), respectively. These plans were copied to the IN-CT and EX-CT images. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy of the ipsilateral lung and V100%, V95%, and the mean dose (Dmean) to the planning target volume (PTV) were analyzed. The extent of changes in these parameters on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was evaluated. V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy were significantly smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0; similar results were obtained for the IN-plan and EX-plan. V100%, V95%, and Dmean were also significant smaller for FB-LB5 and FB-LB10 than for FB-LB0. The extent of changes in V20Gy, V30Gy, and V40Gy on the IN-plan and EX-plan compared with the FB-plan was not statistically significant. Lung blocks were useful for dose reduction in the lung and a simultaneous PTV decrease. This technique should not be applied in the general population. PMID:26412879

  11. Single-Fraction Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Early Cosmetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, Kathryn McCormick, Beryl; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Borgen, Patrick; Fey, Jane; Goldberg, Jessica; Sacchini, Virgilio

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic outcome of patients treated with wide local excision and intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 women were treated on a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy at wide local excision. The eligibility criteria included age >60, tumor size {<=}2.0 cm, clinically negative lymph nodes, and biopsy-established diagnosis. After wide local excision, a custom breast applicator was placed in the excision cavity, and a dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm. After 18 patients were treated, the dose was constrained laterally to 18 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by photographs at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Four examiners graded the photographs for symmetry, edema, discoloration, contour, and scarring. The grades were evaluated in relationship to the volume of irradiated tissue, tumor location, and dose at the lateral aspects of the cavity. Results: The median volume of tissue receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 47 cm{sup 3} (range, 20-97 cm{sup 3}). Patients with {<=}47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue had better cosmetic outcomes than did the women who had >47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue. Women who had received 18 Gy at the lateral aspects of their cavities had better cosmetic outcomes than did women who had received 20 Gy at the lateral aspects. When comparing the 6- and 12-month results, the scores remained stable for 63%, improved for 17%, and worsened for 20%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy appears feasible for selected patients. A favorable cosmetic outcome appears to be related to a smaller treatment volume. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable, although additional follow-up is necessary.

  12. The Bronchoalveolar Lavage Pattern in Radiation Pneumonitis Secondary to Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Claudia Lucia; Serbescu, Aneta; Alexe, Mihai; Cervis, Luminita; Ionita, Diana; Bogdan, Miron Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and purpose: Radiotherapy in breast cancer patients is limited by lung tissue tolerance. Two complications involving the lung are known: radiation pneumonitis (RP) and radiation fibrosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the pattern of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with RP after radiotherapy for breast cancer in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Material and methods: Sixty-five female patients (mean age 58.3 yrs) with RP after radiotherapy for breast cancer were included in the study. The majority of patients had previous breast surgery (mastectomy or lumpectomy and axillary dissection) and received doses of radiations of 45-50Gy. All patients had adjuvant chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and epirubicin or methotrexate. Results: All patients had an infiltrate or consolidation on chest radiography confined to the upper lobe of the irradiated lung, as marker of RP. Based on the presence or absence of symptoms, we divided the patients in 2 groups: 49 patients (75.4%) with symptomatic RP (fever, cough, dyspnea, chest pain and fatigue) and 16 patients (24.6%) without any symptom. Symptomatic RP patients had a BAL with significant increase in total cells (18.0±12.2 x106 cells•100mL-1) when compared to BAL in asymptomatic patients (11.9±6.2 x106 cells•100mL-1), p=0.01. Lymphocytosis in BAL was significantly increased in symptomatic group, compared with asymptomatic one (35.4±18.7% vs. 26.1±14.3%, p=0.045), with predominance of T lymphocytes (CD3). It was also a predominance of CD4 lymphocytes in all patients, but the CD4/CD8 ratio was inside normal range in the majority of cases. Five patients had clinical features of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) secondary to irradiation with increased percentages of lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells in BAL and one patient without history of atopic disease had a percentage of 40% eosinophils. Only a mild reduction in diffusing

  13. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy for synchronous bilateral breast irradiation using a mono iso-center technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Karthick Raj; Basu, Saumen; Bhuiyan, Md Anisuzzaman; Ahmed, Sharif; Sumon, Mostafa Aziz; Haque, Kh Anamul; Sengupta, Ashim Kumar; Un Nabi, Md Rashid; Das, K. J. Maria

    2017-06-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the synchronous bilateral breast irradiation radiotherapy technique using a single isocenter. Materials and Methods: Six patients of synchronous bilateral breast were treated with single isocenter technique from February 2011 to June 2016. All the patients underwent a CT-simulation using appropriate positioning device. Target volumes and critical structures like heart, lung, esophagus, thyroid, etc., were delineated slice by slice in the CT data. An isocenter was placed above the sternum on the skin and both medial tangential and lateral tangential of the breast / chest wall were created using asymmetrical jaws to avoid the beam divergence through the lung and heart. The field weighting were adjusted manually to obtain a homogenous dose distribution. The planning objectives were to deliver uniform doses around the target and keep the doses to the organ at risk within the permissible limit. The beam energy of 6 MV or combination of 6 MV and 15 MV photons were used in the tangential fields according to the tangential separation. Boluses were used for all the mastectomy patients to increase the doses on the chest wall. In addition to that enhanced dynamic wedge and field in field technique were also used to obtain a homogenous distribution around the target volume and reduce the hot spots. The isocenter was just kept on the skin, such that the beam junctions will be overlapped only on the air just above the sternum. Acute toxicity during the treatment and late toxicity were recorded during the patient's follow-up. Results: During the radiotherapy treatment follow-up there were no acute skin reactions in the field junctions, but one patient had grade 1 esophagitis and two patients had grade 2 skin reactions in the chest wall. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months (range: 8 - 49 months), no patients had a local recurrence, but one patients with triple negative disease had a distant metastases in brain and died

  14. SU-E-T-814: Whole Breast Irradiation with Two Different Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Yin, Y; Lin, X; Zhang, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer now mainly received forward intensity modulation radiotherapy (f-IMRT) and inverse IMRT (i-IMRT). The purpose of this study was to observe the differences of two treatment methods. Methods: 10 patients after left breast-conserving surgery were selected to receive radiotherapy. For each patient, two treatment plans (f-IMRT and i-IMRT) were designed. For f-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target, and in each tangent orientation two or three segment beams were designed to reduced high dose region in the target and the dose of lung received. For i-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target and the treatment planning system optimize the dose according to the optimization parameters. For each plan 50Gy was prescribed. Results: In f-IMRT and i-IMRT plans, the average target conformal index (CI) were (0.67±0.06) and (0.66±0.06), (P>0.05); average homogeneity index (HI) were (28.2±6.0)% and (26.1±6.8)%, (P>0.05); volume of left lung received 20Gy (V20) were (18.7±3.3)% and (17.0±2.8)%, (P<0.05), V30 were (15.5±3.0)% and (14.0±2.6)%, (P<0.05); V30 of heart were (4.1±3.1)% and (3.5±2.5)%, (P>0.05); Monitor Unit (MU) were (262±5)MU and (308±14)MU. Conclusion: Compared with i-IMRT plan, for breast cancer, the differences of CI and HI were not significant. Because of fewer MU, f-IMRT plan could reduce the machine abrasion and treatment time, but dose of normal tissue received were higher significantly than i-IMRT plan.

  15. Quality of life in elderly patients with localized breast cancer treated with radiotherapy. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Manterola, Ana; Asin, Gemma; Illarramendi, Jose Juan; Cruz, Susana de la; Ibañez, Berta; Delfrade, Josu; Salgado, Esteban; Zarandona, Uxue; Cambra, Koldo; Vera, Ruth; Dominguez, Miguel Angel

    2016-04-01

    There is a debate on the role of adjuvant Radiotherapy (RT) in elderly breast cancer patients. The aim is to study Quality of Life (QL) throughout the treatment and follow-up periods in early stages breast cancer patients who have started radiotherapy, and to compare the QL of axillary surgery groups. 173 patients, ≥65 years completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BR23, and the Interview for Deterioration in Daily Living Activities in Dementia(IDDD) questionnaires three times throughout treatment and follow-up periods. Linear mixed effect models were used to evaluate longitudinal changes in QL, and whether these changes differed among axillary surgery groups. QL scores were high (>70/100 points) in most QL areas, with moderate limitations (>30) in sexual functioning and enjoyment, future perspective and global QL. In six areas there was a decline at the RT sessions end, that after 6 weeks was recovered. For three areas, there was an improvement in the follow-up measurement compared to the previous assessments. Changes in seven areas were <5 points. Axillary node dissection patients had a body image decrease (6 points) in the follow up period. The lymphadenectomy group had more fatigue (10 points, p = 0.078) than the other two axillary surgery groups. Results orientate towards good patients' adaptation to their disease and treatments, and to administering RT in early stages breast cancer patients. QL differences between the axillary surgery groups and in their evolutions were few but have appeared in key QL areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Lung dose analysis in loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Mohammad A.; Bahadur, Yasir A.; Constantinescu, Camelia T.; Eltaher, Maha M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the ipsilateral lung dosimetry data of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT). Methods: Treatment plans of 150 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Unit, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and March 2015 by HFRT for BC were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received 42.4 Gy in 16 fractions by tangential and supra-clavicular fields with 6 MV, 18 MV, or mixed energies. Ipsilateral lung dosimetric data V20Gy and mean lung dose (MLD) were recorded. Correlations between lung dose, patient characteristics, and treatment delivery parameters were assessed by a logistic regression test. Results: The mean ipsilateral lung V20Gy was 24.6% and mean MLD was 11.9 Gy. A weak, but statistically significant correlation was found between lung dose and lung volume (p=0.043). The lung dose was significantly decreasing with patient separation and depth of axillary lymph node (ALN) and supra-claviculary lymph nodes (SCLN) (p<0.0001), and increasing with ALN (p=0.001) and SCLN (p=0.003) dose coverage. Lung dose significantly decreased with beam energy (p<0.0001): mean V20Gy was 27.8%, 25.4% for 6 MV, mixed energy, and 21.2% for 18 MV. The use of a low breast-board angle correlates with low lung dose. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the use of high energy photon beams and low breast-board angulation can reduce the lung dose. PMID:27279508

  17. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging.

  18. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. Methods For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. Results After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Conclusion Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging. PMID:26451242

  19. Effects of magnetic induction hyperthermia and radiotherapy alone or combined on a murine 4T1 metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Li, Xiao; Xi, Xuping; Hu, Bingqiang; Zhao, Lingyun; Liao, Yuping; Tang, Jintian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of MIH and radiotherapy alone or combined on metastatic breast cancer and the underlying mechanisms. A murine 4T1 metastatic breast cancer model was established and randomly assigned into four treatment groups: C (control), R (radiotherapy), MIH, and MIH+R. Tumour volume, lung metastasis, the expression of Bax and MMP-9, T cell subsets, serum cytokine levels, and mouse survival were evaluated. Group MIH + R showed significantly reduced tumour volume, lung metastasis, improved survival and increased Bax expression compared to group R or MIH (P<0.05). MMP-9 expression in the primary tumour tissue was significantly increased in group R compared to the other groups (P<0.05), which could be brought down by combined MIH treatment. Group MIH +R showed significantly higher CD4(+) T cell percentage as well as CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio than group R (P<0.05). Group MIH+R showed significantly higher serum levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-2 than group R (P<0.05). MIH not only promotes the tumour-cell killing effect of radiotherapy through Bax-mediated cell death, but also improves cellular immunity in mice under radiotherapy and decreases the potential of radiotherapy to enhance MMP-9 expression, which leads to significant improvement in lung metastasis and overall survival of mice under combined treatment of MIH and R. This study is the first to have explored the effect of combined hyperthermia and radiotherapy on tumour metastasis and the underlying mechanisms. It provides insights into the application of MIH as an adjuvant to radiotherapy for metastatic breast cancer.

  20. Predictive parameters in hypofractionated whole-breast 3D conformal radiotherapy according to the Ontario Canadian trial

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Grazia; Terlizzi, Angela; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Perri, Francesco; De Chiara, Vincenzo; Turi, Barbara; Silvano, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the possible role of dosimetric parameters according Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) model as predictive of late toxicity and cosmesis in hypofractionated whole-breast three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis on 215 consecutive early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (according the Ontario Canadian trial), with a 6 years median follow-up was conducted. To assess the impact of 10%–20% dose hotspots on different percent values of planning target volume (PTV) of the breast, we retrospectively employed the NTCP model of Lyman. PTV breast (PTVbr), V110 were identified. For statistical analysis the χ2 and paired t-test were used to find a correlation between late skin and subcutaneous toxicity and cosmetic outcome with dosimetrical parameters Multivariate analysis was performed with the aim to assess independently the impact of dosimetric and clinical parameters on late toxicity and cosmesis using Pearson’s covariance. Results Late skin toxicity was recorded in 47/215 (22%); and G3 toxicity occurred in 11 patients (5%). Cosmesis with excellent–good score was found in 172 patients (80%) while fair–poor score was found in 43 patients (20%). In univariate χ2 analysis the V110 >10% of the PTV breast significantly correlated with higher toxicity (P<0.005, OR 9.60 [CI 3.89–23.72]). Cosmesis related to V110 >10% and PTV breast volume over 1,300 cc was significant at multivariate analysis (P<0.005, OR 6.07 [CI 2.36–15.59]). Conclusion To safely use one of the most important whole-breast hypofractionated radiotherapy schedules, we found some predictive paramaters on the basis of NTCP model by Lyman. These parameters may be useful in selection of elegible patients. PMID:28392704

  1. Predictive parameters in hypofractionated whole-breast 3D conformal radiotherapy according to the Ontario Canadian trial.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Grazia; Terlizzi, Angela; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Perri, Francesco; De Chiara, Vincenzo; Turi, Barbara; Silvano, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the possible role of dosimetric parameters according Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) model as predictive of late toxicity and cosmesis in hypofractionated whole-breast three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis on 215 consecutive early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (according the Ontario Canadian trial), with a 6 years median follow-up was conducted. To assess the impact of 10%-20% dose hotspots on different percent values of planning target volume (PTV) of the breast, we retrospectively employed the NTCP model of Lyman. PTV breast (PTVbr), V110 were identified. For statistical analysis the χ(2) and paired t-test were used to find a correlation between late skin and subcutaneous toxicity and cosmetic outcome with dosimetrical parameters Multivariate analysis was performed with the aim to assess independently the impact of dosimetric and clinical parameters on late toxicity and cosmesis using Pearson's covariance. Late skin toxicity was recorded in 47/215 (22%); and G3 toxicity occurred in 11 patients (5%). Cosmesis with excellent-good score was found in 172 patients (80%) while fair-poor score was found in 43 patients (20%). In univariate χ(2) analysis the V110 >10% of the PTV breast significantly correlated with higher toxicity (P<0.005, OR 9.60 [CI 3.89-23.72]). Cosmesis related to V110 >10% and PTV breast volume over 1,300 cc was significant at multivariate analysis (P<0.005, OR 6.07 [CI 2.36-15.59]). To safely use one of the most important whole-breast hypofractionated radiotherapy schedules, we found some predictive paramaters on the basis of NTCP model by Lyman. These parameters may be useful in selection of elegible patients.

  2. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    PubMed

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  3. A multicentre study of the evidence for customized margins in photon breast boost radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mukesh, Mukesh B; Donovan, Ellen M; Kirby, Anna M; Haviland, Joanne S; Jena, Raj; Yarnold, John; Baker, Angela; Dean, June; Eagle, Sally; Mayles, Helen; Griffin, Claire; Perry, Rosalind; Poynter, Andrew; Coles, Charlotte E; Evans, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine if subsets of patients may benefit from smaller or larger margins when using laser setup and bony anatomy verification of breast tumour bed (TB) boost radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Verification imaging data acquired using cone-beam CT, megavoltage CT or two-dimensional kilovoltage imaging on 218 patients were used (1574 images). TB setup errors for laser-only setup (dlaser) and for bony anatomy verification (dbone) were determined using clips implanted into the TB as a gold standard for the TB position. Cases were grouped by centre-, patient- and treatment-related factors, including breast volume, TB position, seroma visibility and surgical technique. Systematic (Σ) and random (σ) TB setup errors were compared between groups, and TB planning target volume margins (MTB) were calculated. Results: For the study population, Σlaser was between 2.8 and 3.4 mm, and Σbone was between 2.2 and 2.6 mm, respectively. Females with larger breasts (p = 0.03), easily visible seroma (p ≤ 0.02) and open surgical technique (p ≤ 0.04) had larger Σlaser. Σbone was larger for females with larger breasts (p = 0.02) and lateral tumours (p = 0.04). Females with medial tumours (p < 0.01) had smaller Σbone. Conclusion: If clips are not used, margins should be 8 and 10 mm for bony anatomy verification and laser setup, respectively. Individualization of TB margins may be considered based on breast volume, TB and seroma visibility. Advances in knowledge: Setup accuracy using lasers and bony anatomy is influenced by patient and treatment factors. Some patients may benefit from clip-based image guidance more than others. PMID:26585543

  4. Megavoltage cone beam CT near surface dose measurements: potential implications for breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Cutajar, Dean; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Metcalfe, Peter

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is fast becoming standard on modern linear accelerators. CBCT increases the dose to regions within and outside the treatment field, potentially increasing secondary cancer induction and toxicity. This study quantified megavoltage (MV) CBCT skin dose and compared it to skin dose delivered during standard tangential breast radiotherapy.Method: Dosimetry was performed both in- and out-of-field using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and a metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) detector specifically designed for skin dosimetry; these were placed superficially on a female anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The skin dose from a single treatment fraction ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 Gy on the ipsilateral breast, 0.031-0.18 Gy on the contralateral breast, and 0-0.02 Gy in the head and pelvic region. An 8 MU MV CBCT delivered a skin dose that ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 Gy in the chest region and was less than 0.01 Gy in the head and pelvis regions. One MV CBCT per fraction was found to increase the out-of-field skin dose from both the CBCT and the treatment fields by approximately 20%. The imaging dose as a percentage of treatment doses in the ipsilateral breast region was 3% for both dosimeters.Conclusion: Imaging increases the skin dose to regions outside the treatment field particularly regions immediately adjacent the target volume. This small extra dose to the breasts should be considered when developing clinical protocols and assessing dose for clinical trials.

  5. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2–positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT. Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed. At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor–positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR−/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–15.35; P = 0.039). Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:27512838

  6. A support vector machine (SVM) for predicting preferred treatment position in radiotherapy of patients with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xuan; Wong, Edward K.; Wang Yao; Lymberis, Stella; Wen Bixiu; Formenti, Silvia; Chang Jenghwa

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: NYU 05-181 protocol compared the CT simulation in both supine and prone positions for 400 patients with breast cancer (200 left-breast and 200 right-breast) to identify which setup is better at sparing heart and lung involvement in the treatment process. The results demonstrated that all right-breast patients benefited from the prone treatment position, while for left-breast patients, 85% were better treated prone and 15% were better treated supine. Using the clinical data collected from this protocol, the authors aimed at developing an automated tool capable of identifying which of the left-breast cancer patients are better treated supine without obtaining a second CT scan in the supine position. Methods: Prone CT scans from 198 of the 200 left-breast cancer patients enrolled in NYU 05-181 protocol were deidentified and exported to a dedicated research planning workstation. Three-dimensional geometric features of the organs at risk and tumor bed were extracted. A two-stage classifier was used to classify patients into the prone class or the supine class. In the first stage, the authors use simple thresholding to divide the patients into two groups based on their in-field heart volume. For patients with in-field heart volume {<=}0.1 cc, the prone position was chosen as the preferred treatment position. Patients with in-field heart volume >0.1 cc will be further classified in the second stage by a weighted support vector machine (SVM). The weight parameters of the SVM were adjusted to maximize the specificity [true-supine/(true-supine+false-prone)] at the cost of lowering but still maintaining reasonable sensitivity [true-prone/(true-prone+false-supine)]. The authors used K-fold cross validations to test the performance of the SVM classifier. A feature selection algorithm was also used to identify features that give the best classification performance. Results: After the first stage, 49 of the 198 left-breast cancer patients were found to have >0.1 cc of in

  7. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Sylvie . E-mail: sylvie.vass@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  8. SU-E-T-777: Use of Tennis Racket and Air Gap Between the Body and Carbon Fiber Couch for Skin Sparing in Radiation Therapy of Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lief, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To reduce the skin dose from the carbon fiber couch scatter in radiation treatment of breast cancer in the prone position. If this issue is not addressed, the prone breast touching the solid carbon fiber couch can absorb significant dose to the skin and cause the skin reaction. Methods: 1. Use of “tennis racket” instead of the solid couch. To check this hypothesis, we measured the dose at the depth of 5 mm in solid water phantom placed on the couch, using a Farmer chamber. A plan for a patient with 6MV beams, gantry angles of 113 and 286 degrees Varian scale was used. It was found that treatment with “tennis racket” instead of the solid carbon fiber couch reduces the surface dose by 5–7%, depending on the beam direction. 2. Use of the air gap between the couch and the body was analyzed using radiochromic film on the surface of the solid water phantom 10 cm thick. Initially the phantom was placed on the couch with the film sandwiched in between. Two fields at the angles of 135 and 315 degrees were used. The measurements were repeated for the air gap of 2 and 5 cm and 6 and 15 MV beams. Results: It was found that a 2-cm gap decreased the surface dose by 3% for a 6 MV beam and by 5.5% for a 15 MV beam. A 5-cm gap reduced the dose by 9% for 6 MV and 13.5% for 15 MV. Conclusion: Use of both methods (combined if possible) can significantly reduce the surface dose in radiation therapy of the prone breast and possible skin reaction. We plan to explore dependence of the dose reduction upon the angle of incidence.

  9. Risk of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction in Older Women After Contemporary Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Hirofumi; Petersen, Ivy A; Scott, Christopher G; Bailey, Kent R; Dunlay, Shannon M; Finley, Randi R; Ruddy, Kathryn J; Yan, Elizabeth; Redfield, Margaret M

    2017-04-11

    Cardiomyocytes are resistant to radiation. However, cardiac radiation exposure causes coronary microvascular endothelial inflammation, a perturbation implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) and particularly HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Radiotherapy for breast cancer results in variable cardiac radiation exposure and may increase the risk of HF. We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident HF in 170 female residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota (59 cases and 111 controls), who underwent contemporary (1998-2013) radiotherapy for breast cancer with computed tomography-assisted radiotherapy planning. Controls were matched to cases for age, tumor side, chemotherapy use, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Mean cardiac radiation dose (MCRD) in each patient was calculated from the patient's computed tomography images and radiotherapy plan. Mean age at radiotherapy was 69±9 years. Of HF cases, 38 (64%) had EF≥50% (HFpEF), 18 (31%) had EF<50% (HF with reduced EF), and 3 (5%) did not have EF measured. The EF was ≥40% in 50 of the 56 HF cases (89%) with an EF measurement. The mean interval from radiotherapy to HF was 5.8±3.4 years. The odds of HF was higher in patients with a history of ischemic heart disease or atrial fibrillation. The MCRD was 2.5 Gy (range, 0.2-13.1 Gy) and higher in cases (3.3±2.7 Gy) than controls (2.1±2.0 Gy; P=0.004). The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for HF per log MCRD was 9.1 (3.4-24.4) for any HF, 16.9 (3.9-73.7) for HFpEF, and 3.17 (0.8-13.0) for HF with reduced EF. The increased odds of any HF or HFpEF with increasing MCRD remained significant after adjustment for HF risk factors and in sensitivity analyses matching by cancer stage rather than tumor side. Only 18.6% of patients experienced new or recurrent ischemic events between radiotherapy and the onset of HF. The relative risk of HFpEF increases with increasing cardiac radiation exposure during contemporary conformal breast cancer

  10. Predictors of breast radiotherapy plan modifications: quality assurance rounds in a large cancer centre.

    PubMed

    Lymberiou, Timothy; Galuszka, Susanne; Lee, Grace; Xu, Wei; Fyles, Anthony; Su, Susie; Purdie, Thomas G; Catton, Pamela; Chung, Caroline; Dinniwell, Robert; Koch, Anne; Levin, Wilfred; Manchul, Lee; Warde, Padraig; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the process and outcomes of breast radiotherapy (RT) quality assurance (QA) rounds, seeking to identify variables associated with plan modifications. Real-time data were prospectively collected over 2 years. Descriptive statistics determined the proportion of cases requiring no (A), minor (B), or major (C) modifications, which were then subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses. A total of 2223 breast cancer QA cases were reviewed; 47 cases (2.1%) underwent a minor, and 52 cases (2.3%) required a major modification. Common changes included boost, volume, seroma, and bolus. On univariate analysis, regional nodal irradiation (RNI), tumour size, and axillary node dissection were significantly associated with major modifications. Upon multivariate analysis, the only independent predictor was RNI (OR 2.12, p=0.0075). For patients with no RNI, <2 cm tumours, no axillary lymph node dissection, and no boosts (n=420); the likelihood of category C was only 1.4%. It is feasible to conduct QA review for all breast cancer cases prior to commencing RT. Patients undergoing RNI had a higher likelihood of plan modifications; a group with low risk of modification was identified, which could direct future re-structuring of QA rounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Severe reaction to radiotherapy for breast cancer as the presenting feature of ataxia telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, P J; Srinivasan, V; Last, J I; Smith, A; Biggs, P; Carney, E F; Exley, A; Abson, C; Stewart, G S; Izatt, L; Taylor, A M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Severe early and late radiation reaction to radiotherapy is extremely rare in breast cancer patients. Such a reaction prompted an investigation into a 44-year-old mother (patient A-T213). Methods: A neurological examination was performed and blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts were assessed for radiosensitivity chromosomally and by colony-forming assay. The ATM gene was sequenced and ATM mutations modelled by site-directed mutagenesis. The ATM kinase activity was also assessed. Results: Patient A-T213 was normally ambulant with no ataxia and minimal other neurological features. T lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts were unusually radiosensitive, although less sensitive than in classical ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). A lymphoblastoid cell line and skin fibroblasts expressed ATM protein with some retained kinase activity. One missense ATM mutation c.8672G>A (p.Gly2891Asp) and a c.1A>G substitution were identified. In the modelling system, the p.Gly2891Asp mutant protein was expressed and shown to have residual ATM kinase activity. Conclusion: Patient A-T213 has a milder form of A-T with biallelic ATM mutations, which may have contributed to breast cancer development, and certainly caused the severe radiation reaction. Ataxia telangiectasia should be investigated as a potential cause of untoward severe early and late radiation reactions in breast cancer patients. PMID:22146522

  12. Exclusive electron intraoperative radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer: a monoinstitutional experience.

    PubMed

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Carnevale, Alessia; Bracci, Stefano; Amanti, Claudio; Lombardi, Augusto; Maggi, Stefano; DE Sanctis, Vitaliana; Valeriani, Maurizio; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) in breast cancer in terms of local control, esthetic results and disease-free survival. From June 2007 to October 2011, 110 patients with early-stage breast cancer were submitted to quadrantectomy and IORT. A total dose of 21 Gy prescribed at 90-100% isodose was delivered in all cases. Patients were evaluated after surgery for early and late complications. Median follow-up was 27 (range: 2-54) months. In 10 patients (9.1%), breast ultrasound showed liponecrosis. Six patients (5.5%) developed grade 2 fibrosis. Disease-free survival rates at 2 and 3 years were 96.8% and 92.9 %. Three patients (2.7%) developed local recurrence, two patients (1.8%) distant metastasis. Two patients died. The 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 100% and 97.3%, respectively. IORT could be an appropriate therapeutic alternative in selected patients although it remains investigational; longer follow-up to confirm these results is required.

  13. Severe reaction to radiotherapy for breast cancer as the presenting feature of ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Byrd, P J; Srinivasan, V; Last, J I; Smith, A; Biggs, P; Carney, E F; Exley, A; Abson, C; Stewart, G S; Izatt, L; Taylor, A M

    2012-01-17

    Severe early and late radiation reaction to radiotherapy is extremely rare in breast cancer patients. Such a reaction prompted an investigation into a 44-year-old mother (patient A-T213). A neurological examination was performed and blood lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts were assessed for radiosensitivity chromosomally and by colony-forming assay. The ATM gene was sequenced and ATM mutations modelled by site-directed mutagenesis. The ATM kinase activity was also assessed. Patient A-T213 was normally ambulant with no ataxia and minimal other neurological features. T lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts were unusually radiosensitive, although less sensitive than in classical ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). A lymphoblastoid cell line and skin fibroblasts expressed ATM protein with some retained kinase activity. One missense ATM mutation c.8672G>A (p.Gly2891Asp) and a c.1A>G substitution were identified. In the modelling system, the p.Gly2891Asp mutant protein was expressed and shown to have residual ATM kinase activity. Patient A-T213 has a milder form of A-T with biallelic ATM mutations, which may have contributed to breast cancer development, and certainly caused the severe radiation reaction. Ataxia telangiectasia should be investigated as a potential cause of untoward severe early and late radiation reactions in breast cancer patients.

  14. SU-E-J-160: Comparing the Setup Accuracy of Non-Ionizing Patient Localization Systems with CBCT to Reduce Imaging Dose in Prone Breast Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E; Yamamoto, T; Mayadev, J; Dieterich, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CBCT is the current gold standard to verify prone breast patient setup. We investigated in a phantom if non-ionizing localization systems can replace ionizing localization systems for prone breast treatments. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was positioned on a prone breast board. Electromagnetic transponders were attached on the left chest surface. The CT images of the phantom were imported to the treatment planning system. The isocenter was set to the center of the transponders. The positions of the isocenter and transponders transferred to the transponder tracking system. The posterior phantom surface was contoured and exported to the optical surface tracking system. A CBCT was taken for the initial setup alignment on the treatment machine. Using the electromagnetic and optical localization systems, the deviation of the phantom setup from the original CT images was measured. This was compared with the difference between the original CT and kV-CBCT images. Results: For the electromagnetic localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 1.5 mm, 0.0 mm and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) directions. For the optical localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 2.0 mm, −2.0 mm and 0.1 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. For the CBCT, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 4.0 mm, 1.0 mm and −1.0 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. The measured values from the non-ionizing localization systems differed from those with the CBCT less than 3.0 mm in all directions. Conclusions: This phantom study showed the feasibility of using a combination of non-ionizing localization systems to achieve a similar setup accuracy as CBCT for prone breast patients. This could potentially eliminate imaging dose. As a next step, we are expanding this study to actual patients. This work has been in part supported by Departmental Research Award RODEPT1-JS

  15. Tumour bed delineation for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy: what is the optimal number of implanted markers?

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anna Nm; Jena, Rajesh; Harris, Emma J; Evans, Phil M; Crowley, Clare; Gregory, Deborah L; Coles, Charlotte E

    2013-02-01

    International consensus has not been reached regarding the optimal number of implanted tumour bed (TB) markers for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy target volume delineation. Four common methods are: insertion of 6 clips (4 radial, 1 deep and 1 superficial), 5 clips (4 radial and 1 deep), 1 clip at the chest wall, and no clips. We compared TB volumes delineated using 6, 5, 1 and 0 clips in women who have undergone wide-local excision (WLE) of breast cancer (BC) with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity, in order to determine the additional margin required for breast boost or partial breast irradiation (PBI) when fewer than 6 clips are used. Ten patients with invasive ductal BC who had undergone WLE followed by implantation of six fiducial markers (titanium clips) each underwent CT imaging for radiotherapy planning purposes. Retrospective processing of the DICOM image datasets was performed to remove markers and associated imaging artefacts, using an in-house software algorithm. Four observers outlined TB volumes on four different datasets for each case: (1) all markers present (CT6M); (2) the superficial marker removed (CT(5M)); (3) all but the chest wall marker removed (CTCW); (4) all markers removed (CT(0M)). For each observer, the additional margin required around each of TB(0M), TBCW, and TB(5M) in order to encompass TB(6M) was calculated. The conformity level index (CLI) and differences in centre-of-mass (COM) between observers were quantified for CT(0M), CTCW, CT(5M), CT(6M). The overall median additional margins required to encompass TB(6M) were 8mm (range 0-28 mm) for TB(0M), 5mm (range 1-13 mm) for TBCW, and 2mm (range 0-7 mm) for TB(5M). CLI were higher for TB volumes delineated using CT(6M) (0.31) CT(5M) (0.32) than for CTCW (0.19) and CT(0M) (0.15). In women who have undergone WLE of breast cancer with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity and who are proceeding to PBI or breast boost RT, target volume delineation based on 0 or

  16. Comparison Between Hybrid Direct Aperture Optimized Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Forward Planning Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Whole Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Descovich, Martina; Fowble, Barbara; Bevan, Alison; Schechter, Naomi; Park, Catherine; Xia Ping

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the planning efficiency and dosimetric characteristics of hybrid direct aperture optimized (hDAO) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with forward planning (FP)-IMRT for whole breast irradiation with two tangential beams. Methods and Materials: A total of 15 patients with left-sided breast cancer, categorized with three different breast volumes, were selected for this study. All patients were treated with FP plans to 50 Gy in 25 fractions. The hDAO plans were created by combining two open fields with eight segments in two tangential beam directions and were inversely optimized. Results: The FP and hDAO plans achieved similar breast coverage and sparing of critical organs. The volume of breast receiving 105% of the prescription dose was significantly smaller in the hDAO than in the FP plans: 25% vs. 63% (p = .008) for small, 22% vs. 57% (p = .005) for medium, and 28% vs. 53% (p = .005) for large breasts. Furthermore, the tumor cavity coverage was slightly better in the hDAO plans (92.4% vs. 90.9%). Conclusion: Compared with FP-IMRT, hDAO-IMRT provided dosimetric advantages, significantly reducing the size of the hot spot and slightly improving the coverage of the tumor cavity. In addition, hDAO-IMRT required less planning time and was less dependent on the planner's ability.

  17. Preoperative Single Fraction Partial Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Palta, Manisha; Yoo, Sua; Adamson, Justus D.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Horton, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several recent series evaluating external beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (PBI) have reported adverse cosmetic outcomes, possibly related to large volumes of normal tissue receiving near-prescription doses. We hypothesized that delivery of external beam PBI in a single fraction to the preoperative tumor volume would be feasible and result in a decreased dose to the uninvolved breast compared with institutional postoperative PBI historical controls. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 patients with unifocal Stage T1 breast cancer were identified. Contrast-enhanced subtraction magnetic resonance images were loaded into an Eclipse treatment planning system and used to define the target volumes. A 'virtual plan' was created using four photon beams in a noncoplanar beam arrangement and optimized to deliver 15 Gy to the planning target volume. Results: The median breast volume was 1,713 cm{sup 3} (range: 1,014-2,140), and the median clinical target volume was 44 cm{sup 3} (range: 26-73). In all cases, 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the clinical target volume. The median conformity index was 0.86 (range: 0.70-1.12). The median percentage of the ipsilateral breast volume receiving 100% and 50% of the prescribed dose was 3.8% (range: 2.2-6.9) and 13.3% (range: 7.5-20.8) compared with 18% (range: 3-42) and 53% (range: 24-65) in the institutional historical controls treated with postoperative external beam PBI (p = .002). The median maximum skin dose was 9 Gy. The median dose to 1 and 10 cm{sup 3} of skin was 6.7 and 4.9 Gy. The doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung were negligible. Conclusion: Preoperative PBI resulted in a substantial reduction in ipsilateral breast tissue dose compared with postoperative PBI. The skin dose appeared reasonable, given the small volumes. A prospective Phase I trial evaluating this technique is ongoing.

  18. Serum levels of selenium in patients with breast cancer before and after treatment of external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Franca, C A S; Nogueira, C R; Ramalho, A; Carvalho, A C P; Vieira, S L; Penna, A B R C

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of radiotherapy on the selenium serum levels of breast cancer patients. This prospective study includes 209 breast cancer patients treated by external beam radiotherapy from December 2007 until August 2008. Plasma selenium concentrations were determined before and at the end of the radiotherapeutic treatment. Age, clinical stage, prior chemotherapy, body mass index (BMI) and personal habits (smoking and alcoholism) were recorded for each patient. The mean age was 61 years; the mean BMI was 28.7. One hundred and seventy-four patients (83.3%) were nonsmokers. One hundred and eighty-nine patients (90.4%) showed no drinking habits and 110 (52.6%) have no prior chemotherapy. Sixty patients (28.7%) were in clinical stage I, 141 (67.5%) in clinical stage II and 8 (3.8%) in clinical stage III. At the beginning of radiotherapy, the mean selenium value for all patients was 86.4 μg/l and after radiation this value dropped to 47.8 μg/l. Multivariate analysis showed statistically significant difference in the plasma selenium concentration before and after radiotherapy for age (P > 0.001), BMI (P > 0.001), smoking (P > 0.001), alcoholism (P > 0.001), chemotherapy (P > 0.001) and clinical stage (P > 0.001). Significant reduction in plasma levels of selenium is recorded in patients undergoing radiotherapy, suggesting attention to the nutritional status of this micronutrient and other antioxidant agents.

  19. For Stage II Node-Positive Breast Cancer, is it Worthwhile to Consider Adjuvant Radiotherapy Following Mastectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mohammed A. M.; Elkady, Mohammad S.; Nasr, Khalid E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), loco-regional recurrence (LRR), and toxicities for early breast-cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes, by the addition of radiotherapy to adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients were eligible for enrollment into the study if they had pathologically proven stages II breast cancer, with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups; Group 1; adjuvant chemotherapy then radiotherapy, and group 2; adjuvant chemotherapy only. Results: Between September 2008 and August 2014, 75 patients were enrolled. Forty patients group 1, and 35 group 2. The 4-year OS for group 1, and two were 77.5 and 71.4%, respectively. The 4-year PFS for group 1 and 2 were 72.5 and 60%, respectively. During the 54 months follow-up period, 11 patients from group 1 had recurrence (three locoregional, seven metastatic, and one both), and 14 patients from group 2 had recurrence (seven locoregional, three metastatic, and four both). The distant metastasis rate was the same in the two groups. However, the metastasis sites were different in the two groups. Conclusion: The addition of radiotherapy in stage II breast cancer with one to three positive lymph nodes improved the PFS, and LRR. Radiotherapy improved OS in patients with high-risk features. PMID:25478324

  20. Examining Mediators and Moderators of Yoga for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G.; Milbury, Kathrin; Chandwani, Kavita D.; Chaoul, Alejandro; Perkins, George; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Haddad, Robin; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao; Raghuram, N. V.; Spelman, Amy; Arun, Banu; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 1-, 3-, and 6-months posttreatment. Results Baseline depressive symptoms (P = .03) and sleep disturbances (P < .01) moderated the Group × Time effect on MCS, but not PCS. Women with high baseline depressive symptoms in YG reported marginally higher 3-month MCS than their counterparts in WL (P = .11). Women with high baseline sleep disturbances in YG reported higher 3-months MCS than their counterparts in WL (P < .01) and higher 6-month MCS than their counterparts in ST (P = .01). YG led to greater benefit finding than ST and WL across the follow-up (P = .01). Three-month benefit finding partially mediated the effect of YG on 6-month PCS. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and cortisol slope did not mediate treatment effect on QOL. Conclusion Yoga may provide the greatest mental-health–related QOL benefits for those experiencing pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms. Yoga may improve physical-health–related QOL by increasing ability to find benefit in the cancer experience. PMID:26867802

  1. Is there a role for salvage radiotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer refractory to neoadjuvant chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Coelho, R C; Da Silva, F M L; Do Carmo, I M L; Bonaccorsi, B V; Hahn, S M; Faroni, L D

    2017-02-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) is a major problem, especially in developing countries. The standard treatment for LABC is neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with or without anti-Her2 therapy, followed by surgery, radiotherapy, and adjuvant systemic treatment if appropriate. However, there are few data in the literature addressing alternatives when neoadjuvant chemotherapy fails to reduce the tumour for surgery. We conducted a retrospective study including all patients who had non-metastatic LABC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and who were not eligible for surgical resection; these patients were submitted to salvage radiotherapy (RTX) between January 2000 and December 2012 at the Brazilian National Cancer Institute. Fifty-seven patients were included, with a median age of 51 (23-72) years. The most frequent clinical stages were IIIA and IIIB, corresponding to 19.3% and 70.2%, respectively; mean tumour size was 8.74 (3-18) cm, and 44 patients (77.2%) had nodal involvement. Chemotherapeutic regimens containing anthracyclines were prescribed to 98.2% of the patients. Fifteen patients (26.3%) received taxanes and anthracyclines. Radiation dose was 50 Gy divided into 25 fractions; 43 patients (75.4%) had their tumours downsized by RTX and underwent mastectomy. Overall survival (OS) was 38 (23-52) months. Patients who were submitted to surgery had an OS of 49 (28-70) months and those who were not eligible for mastectomy after radiotherapy had an OS of 18 (9-27) months. This retrospective study confirms that RTX is an effective treatment to downsize LABC tumours with low or no response to chemotherapy, thereby enabling surgical resection which may improve overall patient outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mean heart dose variation over a course of breath-holding breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunkerley, Nicolle; Bartlett, Frederick R; Kirby, Anna M; Evans, Philip M; Donovan, Ellen M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the work was to estimate the dose received by the heart throughout a course of breath-holding breast radiotherapy. 113 cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired for 20 patients treated within the HeartSpare 1A study, in which both an active breathing control (ABC) device and a voluntary breath-hold (VBH) method were used. Predicted mean heart doses were obtained from treatment plans. CBCT scans were imported into a treatment planning system, heart outlines defined, images registered to the CT planning scan and mean heart dose recorded. Two observers outlined two cases three times each to assess interobserver and intraobserver variation. There were no statistically significant differences between ABC and VBH heart dose data from CT planning scans, or in the CBCT-based estimates of heart dose, and no effect from the order of the breath-hold method. Variation in mean heart dose per fraction over the three imaged fractions was <6 cGy without setup correction, decreasing to 3.3 cGy with setup correction. If scaled to 15 fractions, all differences between predicted and estimated mean heart doses were <0.5 Gy and in 80% of cases, they were <0.25 Gy. Variation in mean heart dose was at an acceptable level over the duration of breath-holding radiotherapy and was well predicted by the planning system. Advances in knowledge: Mean heart dose was not adversely affected by fraction-to-fraction variations throughout a course of heart-sparing radiotherapy using two well-established breath-holding methods.

  3. Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flejmer, Anna M; Edvardsson, Anneli; Dohlmar, Frida; Josefsson, Dan; Nilsson, Mats; Witt Nyström, Petra; Dasu, Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating. Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student's t-test. Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy  (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) with protons in comparison with photons. Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose.

  4. Hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection as short adjuvant regimen after breast-conserving surgery: interim report.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Michael I; Tsoutsou, Pelagia G; Abatzoglou, Ioannis M; Sismanidou, Kyriaki; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios

    2009-07-15

    Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  5. Radiotherapy in Italy after conservative treatment of early breast cancer. A survey by the Italian Society of Radiation Oncology (AIRO).

    PubMed

    Aristei, Cynthia; Amichetti, Maurizio; Ciocca, Mario; Nardone, Luigia; Bertoni, Filippo; Vidali, Cristiana

    2008-01-01

    The aim of surveys on clinical practice is to stimulate discussion and optimize practice. In this paper the current Italian radiotherapy practice after breast-conserving surgery for early breast cancer is described and adherence to national and international guidelines is assessed. Furthermore, results are compared with an earlier survey in northern Italy and international reports. A multiple-choice questionnaire sent to all 138 Italian radiation oncology centers. 48% of centers responded. Most performed breast-conserving surgery when tumor size was < or =3 cm. All centers routinely performed axillary dissection; 45 carried out sentinel node biopsy followed by axillary dissection when the sentinel node was positive. Most centers re-excised when resection margins were positive. The median interval between surgery and radiotherapy, when chemotherapy was not administered, was 60 days. Adjuvant chemotherapy was preferably administered before radiotherapy. Regional lymph nodes were never irradiated in 10 centers; in all others irradiation depended on the number of positive lymph nodes and/or involvement of axillary fat and/or tumor location in medial quadrants. All centers used standard fractionation; hypofractionated schemes were available in 6. Most centers used 4-6 MV photons. In 59 centers the boost dose of 10 Gy could be increased if margins were not negative. All centers ensured patient setup reproducibility. Treatment planning was computerized in 59 centers. The irradiation dose was prescribed at the ICRU point in 56 centers and portal films were made in 54 centers. Intraoperative radiotherapy was used in 4 centers: for partial breast irradiation in 1 and for boost administration in 3 centers. Although the quality of radiotherapy delivery has improved in Italy in recent years, approaches that do not conform to international standards persist.

  6. Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiotherapy With Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection as Short Adjuvant Regimen After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Short radiotherapy schedules might be more convenient for patients and overloaded radiotherapy departments, provided late toxicity is not increased. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated and highly accelerated radiotherapy regimen supported with cytoprotection provided by amifostine in breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. Methods and Materials: A total of 92 patients received 12 consecutive fractions of radiotherapy (3.5 Gy/fraction for 10 fractions) to the breast and/or axillary/supraclavicular area and 4 Gy/fraction for 2 fractions to the tumor bed). Amifostine at a dose of 1,000 mg/d was administered subcutaneously. The follow-up of patients was 30-60 months (median, 39). Results: Using a dose individualization algorithm, 77.1% of patients received 1,000 mg and 16.3% received 750 mg of amifostine daily. Of the 92 patients, 13% interrupted amifostine because of fever/rash symptoms. Acute Grade 2 breast toxicity developed in 6.5% of patients receiving 1,000 mg of amifostine compared with 46.6% of the rest of the patients (p < .0001). The incidence of Grade 2 late sequelae was less frequent in the high amifostine dose group (3.2% vs. 6.6%; p = NS). Grade 1 lung fibrosis was infrequent (3.3%). The in-field relapse rate was 3.3%, and an additional 2.2% of patients developed a relapse in the nonirradiated supraclavicular area. c-erbB-2 overexpression was linked to local control failure (p = .01). Distant metastasis appeared in 13% of patients, and this was marginally related to more advanced T/N stage (p = .06). Conclusion: Within a minimal follow-up of 2.5 years after therapy, hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy with subcutaneous amifostine cytoprotection has proved a well-tolerated and effective regimen. Longer follow-up is required to assess the long-term late sequelae.

  7. The Risk of Early and Late Lung Sequelae After Conformal Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, Zsuzsanna . E-mail: kahan@onko.szote.u-szeged.hu; Csenki, Melinda; Varga, Zoltan; Szil, Elemer; Cserhati, Adrienn; Balogh, Attila; Gyulai, Zsofia; Mandi, Yvette; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzo, Laszlo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To study the risks of early and late radiogenic lung damage in breast cancer patients after conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Radiogenic lung sequelae were assessed prospectively in 119 patients by means of clinical signs, radiologic abnormalities, and the mean density change (MDC) of the irradiated lung on CT. Results: Significant positive associations were detected between the development of lung abnormalities 3 months or 1 year after the radiotherapy and the age of the patient, the ipsilateral mean lung dose (MLD), the radiation dose to 25% of the ipsilateral lung (D{sub 25%}) and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}). The irradiation of the axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes favored the development of pneumonitis but not that of fibrosis. No relation was found between the preradiotherapy plasma TGF-{beta} level and the presence of radiogenic lung damage. At both time points, MDC was strongly related to age. Significant positive associations were demonstrated between the risks of pneumonitis or fibrosis and the age of the patient, MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy}. A synergistic effect of MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy} with age in patients older than 59 years is suggested. Conclusion: Our analyses indicate that the risks of early and late radiogenic lung sequelae are strongly related to the age of the patient, the volume of the irradiated lung, and the dose to it.

  8. Dosimetry and field matching for radiotherapy to the breast and superclavicular fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, Elizabeth

    Radiotherapy for early breast cancer aims to achieve local disease control and decrease loco-regional recurrence rates. Treatment may be directed to breast or chest wall alone or, include regional lymph nodes. When using tangential fields to treat the breast a separate anterior field directed to the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (SCF) is needed to treat nodal areas. The complex geometry of this region necessitates matching of adjacent radiation fields in three dimensions. The potential exists for zones of overdosage or underdosage along the match line. Cosmetic results may be compromised if treatment fields are not accurately aligned. Techniques for field matching vary between centres in the UK. A study of dosimetry across the match line region using different techniques, as reported in the multi-centre START Trial Quality Assurance (QA) programme, was undertaken. A custom-made anthropomorphic phantom was designed to assess dose distribution in three dimensions using film dosimetry. Methods with varying degrees of complexity were employed to match tangential and SCF beams. Various techniques combined half beam blocking and machine rotations to achieve geometric alignment. Matching of asymmetric beams allowed a single isocentre technique to be used. Where field matching was not undertaken a gap between tangential and SCF fields was employed. Results demonstrated differences between techniques in addition to variations within the same technique between different centres. Geometric alignment techniques produced more homogenous dose distributions in the match region than gap techniques or those techniques not correcting for field divergence. For this multi-centre assessment of match plane techniques film dosimetry used in conjunction with a breast shaped phantom provided relative dose information. This study has highlighted the difficulties of matching treatment fields to achieve homogenous dose distribution through the region of the match plane and the degree of

  9. Automated skin segmentation in ultrasonic evaluation of skin toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Chen, Hao; Torres, Mylin; Yoshida, Emi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuefeng; Curran, Walter; Liu, Tian

    2013-11-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common side effect of breast cancer radiotherapy and impairs the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. We, along with other researchers, have recently found quantitative ultrasound to be effective as a skin toxicity assessment tool. Although more reliable than standard clinical evaluations (visual observation and palpation), the current procedure for ultrasound-based skin toxicity measurements requires manual delineation of the skin layers (i.e., epidermis-dermis and dermis-hypodermis interfaces) on each ultrasound B-mode image. Manual skin segmentation is time consuming and subjective. Moreover, radiation-induced skin injury may decrease image contrast between the dermis and hypodermis, which increases the difficulty of delineation. Therefore, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation tool (ASST) based on the active contour model with two significant modifications: (i) The proposed algorithm introduces a novel dual-curve scheme for the double skin layer extraction, as opposed to the original single active contour method. (ii) The proposed algorithm is based on a geometric contour framework as opposed to the previous parametric algorithm. This ASST algorithm was tested on a breast cancer image database of 730 ultrasound breast images (73 ultrasound studies of 23 patients). We compared skin segmentation results obtained with the ASST with manual contours performed by two physicians. The average percentage differences in skin thickness between the ASST measurement and that of each physician were less than 5% (4.8 ± 17.8% and -3.8 ± 21.1%, respectively). In summary, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation method that ensures objective assessment of radiation-induced changes in skin thickness. Our ultrasound technology offers a unique opportunity to quantify tissue injury in a more meaningful and reproducible manner than the subjective assessments currently employed in the clinic. Copyright © 2013 World

  10. Risks and benefits of reducing target volume margins in breast tangent radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Basaula, Deepak; Quinn, Alexandra; Walker, Amy; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Kumar, Shivani; Delaney, Geoff P; Holloway, Lois

    2017-02-27

    This study investigates the potential benefits of planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction for whole breast radiotherapy in relation to dose received by organs at risk (OARs), as well as reductions in radiation-induced secondary cancer risk. Such benefits were compared to the increased radiation-induced secondary cancer risk attributed from increased ionizing radiation imaging doses. Ten retrospective patients' computed tomography datasets were considered. Three computerized treatment plans with varied PTV margins (0, 5 and 10 mm) were created for each patient complying with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1005 protocol requirements. The BEIR VII lifetime attributable risk (LAR) model was used to estimate secondary cancer risk to OARs. The LAR was assessed for all treatment plans considering (a) doses from PTV margin variation and (b) doses from two (daily and weekly) kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) imaging protocols during the course of treatment. We found PTV margins from largest to smallest resulted in a mean OAR relative dose reduction of 31% (heart), 28% (lung) and 23% (contralateral breast) and the risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer by a relative 23% (contralateral breast) and 22% (contralateral lung). Daily image-guidance using kV CBCT increased the risk of radiation induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast and contralateral lung by a relative 1.6-1.9% and 1.9-2.5% respectively. Despite the additional dose from kV CBCT for the two considered imaging protocols, smaller PTV margins would still result in an overall reduction in secondary cancer risk.

  11. AUTOMATED SKIN SEGMENTATION IN ULTRASONIC EVALUATION OF SKIN TOXICITY IN BREAST CANCER RADIOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Chen, Hao; Torres, Mylin; Yoshida, Emi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuefeng; Curran, Walter; Liu, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common side effect of breast cancer radiotherapy and impairs the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. We, along with other researchers, have recently found quantitative ultrasound to be effective as a skin toxicity assessment tool. Although more reliable than standard clinical evaluations (visual observation and palpation), the current procedure for ultrasound-based skin toxicity measurements requires manual delineation of the skin layers (i.e., epidermis-dermis and dermis-hypodermis interfaces) on each ultrasound B-mode image. Manual skin segmentation is time consuming and subjective. Moreover, radiation-induced skin injury may decrease image contrast between the dermis and hypodermis, which increases the difficulty of delineation. Therefore, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation tool (ASST) based on the active contour model with two significant modifications: (i) The proposed algorithm introduces a novel dual-curve scheme for the double skin layer extraction, as opposed to the original single active contour method. (ii) The proposed algorithm is based on a geometric contour framework as opposed to the previous parametric algorithm. This ASST algorithm was tested on a breast cancer image database of 730 ultrasound breast images (73 ultrasound studies of 23 patients). We compared skin segmentation results obtained with the ASST with manual contours performed by two physicians. The average percentage differences in skin thickness between the ASST measurement and that of each physician were less than 5% (4.8 ± 17.8% and −3.8 ± 21.1%, respectively). In summary, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation method that ensures objective assessment of radiation-induced changes in skin thickness. Our ultrasound technology offers a unique opportunity to quantify tissue injury in a more meaningful and reproducible manner than the subjective assessments currently employed in the clinic. PMID:23993172

  12. Coverage of axillary lymph nodes with high tangential fields in breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alço, G; Iğdem, S I; Ercan, T; Dinçer, M; Sentürk, R; Atilla, S; Oral Zengin, F; Okkan, S

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the coverage of axillary nodal volumes with high tangent fields (HTF) in breast radiotherapy and to determine the utility of customised blocking. The treatment plans of 30 consecutive patients with early breast cancer were evaluated. The prescription dose was 50 Gy to the whole breast. Axillary level I-II lymph node volumes were delineated and the cranial border of the tangential fields was set just below the humeral head to create HTF. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to calculate the doses received by axillary nodal volumes. In a second planning set, HTF were modified with multileaf collimators (MLC-HTF) to obtain an adequate dose coverage of axillary nodes. The mean doses of the axillary nodes, the ipsilateral lung and heart were compared between the two plans (HTF vs MLC-HTF) using a paired sample t-test. The doses received by 95% of the breast volumes were not significantly different for the two plans. The doses received by 95% of the level I and II axillary volumes were 16.79 Gy and 11.59 Gy, respectively, for HTF, increasing to 47.2 Gy and 45.03 Gy, respectively, for MLC-HTF. Mean lung doses and per cent volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy (V20) were also increased from 6.47 Gy and 10.47%, respectively, for HTF, to 9.56 Gy and 16.77%, respectively, for MLC-HTF. Our results suggest that HTF do not adequately cover the level I and II axillary lymph node regions. Modification of HTF with MLC is necessary to obtain an adequate coverage of axillary levels without compromising healthy tissue in the majority of the patients.

  13. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    SciTech Connect

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  14. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  15. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Santana, Marco Antônio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Lopes, Maurício Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; da Silva, João Luis Fernandes; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. PMID:27403017

  16. Lumpectomy with or without postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer with favourable prognostic features: results of a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Holli, K; Saaristo, R; Isola, J; Joensuu, H; Hakama, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to study the value of adding post-operative radiotherapy to lumpectomy in a subgroup of breast cancer patients with favourable patient-, tumour-, and treatment-related prognostic features. 152 women aged over 40 with unifocal breast cancer seen in preoperative mammography were randomly assigned to lumpectomy alone (no-XRT group) or to lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy to the ipsilateral breast (50 Gy given within 5 weeks, XRT group). All cancers were required to be invasive node-negative, smaller than 2 cm in diameter and well or moderately differentiated, to contain no extensive intraductal component, to be progesterone receptor-positive, DNA diploid, have S-phase fraction ≤7 and be excised with at least 1 cm margin. During a mean follow-up time of 6.7 years, 13 (18.1%) cancers recurred locally in the no-XRT and 6 (7.5%) in the XRT group (P = 0.03). There was no difference between the groups in the ultimate breast preservation rate (95.0% vs. 94.4% in XRT and no-XRT, respectively, P = 0.88), distant metastasis-free survival (P = 0.36), or 5-year cancer-specific survival (97.1% in XRT and 98.6 in no-XRT). Radiation therapy given after lumpectomy reduces the frequency of ipsilateral breast recurrences even in women with small breast cancer with several favourable clinical and biological features. However, the breast preservation rate may not increase due to more frequent use of salvage mastectomies in patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161371

  17. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured.

  19. Impact of hypofractionation and tangential beam IMRT on the acute skin reaction in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Ghaida, Salam Abou; Alaradi, Aziz

    2016-07-30

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the impact of multiple prognostic factors on the acute skin reaction in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy, in particular the impact of hypofractionation (HF) compared to conventional fractionation (CF) and tangential beam (TB) IMRT compared to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Two-hundred and sixty-six breast cancer patients with postoperative radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were treated with HF (15 fractions of 2.67 Gy; n = 121) or CF (28 fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy; n = 145) and TB-IMRT (n = 151) or 3DCRT (n = 115). The acute skin reactions were prospectively assessed using the CTCAE v4 grading scale. Ordinal regression analysis was used to assess the impact of possible prognostic factors on the maximal acute skin reaction. Grade 2 skin reactions were observed in 19 % of the patients treated with CF compared to 2 % treated with HF. On univariate analysis, the fractionation regimen, the PTV (breast versus chest wall), the volume of the PTV and the body mass index were significant prognostic factors for the maximum acute skin reaction. On multivariate analysis, the fractionation regimen (p < 0.00001) and the volume of the PTV (p = 0.0002) remained as independent significant factors. Our data suggest that HF is associated with a significantly reduced maximal acute skin reaction compared to CF.

  20. Nipple reconstruction after implant-based breast reconstruction: a "matched-pair" outcome analysis focusing on the effects of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Arash; Ghaly, Mina; Gupta, Deepak; Gurtner, Geoffrey; Kahn, David M; Karanas, Yvonne L; Lee, Gordon K

    2013-09-01

    The major focus of research when addressing nipple reconstruction has been on developing new techniques to provide for long-lasting nipple projection. Rarely, has the outcome of nipple reconstruction as it relates to postoperative morbidity, particularly after implant-based breast reconstruction, been analyzed. A "matched-pair" study was designed to specifically answer the question whether a history of radiotherapy predisposes to a higher complication rate after nipple reconstruction in patients after implant-based breast reconstruction. Only patients with a history of unilateral radiotherapy who underwent bilateral mastectomy and implant-based breast reconstruction followed by bilateral nipple reconstruction were included in the study. A total of 17 patients (i.e. 34 nipple reconstructions) were identified who met inclusion criteria. The mean age of the study population was 43.5 years (range, 23-69). Complications were seen after a total of 8 nipple reconstructions (23.5 percent). Of these, 7 complications were seen on the irradiated side (41.2 percent) (p = 0.03). While nipple reconstruction is a safe procedure after implant-based breast reconstruction in patients without a history of radiotherapy the presence of an irradiated field converts it to a procedure with a significant increase in postoperative complication rate. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 'If we get too close to your bones they'll go brittle': women's initial fears about radiotherapy for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Halkett, Georgia K B; Kristjanson, Linda J; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2008-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for breast cancer. However, previous studies have shown that women who present for radiotherapy fear its use and associated side effects. The aims of this study were to develop further understanding of breast cancer patients' fears of radiotherapy, ascertain how patients deal with these fears and determine the best time in the treatment planning trajectory for health professionals to address these concerns. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with early breast cancer patients at four time points during their experiences of radiotherapy. Grounded theory was used to analyse the data. Symbolic interactionism informed data interpretation. Thirty-four participants were interviewed. The two main themes that emerged prior to treatment commencement were 'fears about receiving radiotherapy' and 'ways of coping with the fear of radiotherapy'. Sub-themes that emerged as components of the theme 'fears about receiving radiotherapy' were: 'fearing the unknown', 'getting burnt', 'damaging internal parts' and 'anticipating tiredness'. Patients were able to cope with their fears by trying not to worry about their fears and by seeking information. Many patients found that their fears about radiotherapy were much worse than their actual experiences of receiving treatment and the side effects they experienced. In discussing radiotherapy with patients, health professionals have a window of opportunity at the planning appointment, prior to the commencement of radiotherapy, to assess patients' understanding and concerns about radiotherapy, listen to their fears, address meanings they assign to radiotherapy and provide reassurance about radiotherapy and the management of side effects. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. In vivo dosimetry with radiochromic films in low-voltage intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Avanzo, M.; Rink, A.; Dassie, A.; Massarut, S.; Roncadin, M.; Borsatti, E.; Capra, E.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: EBT2 radiochromic films were studied and used for in vivo dosimetry in targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT), a technique in which the Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) is used to perform intraoperative partial breast irradiation with x-rays of 50 kV{sub p}. Methods: The energy of the radiation emitted by the Intrabeam with the different spherical applicators, under 1 and 2 cm of solid water, and under the tungsten impregnated rubber used for shielding of the heart in TARGIT of the breast, was characterized with measurements of half-value layer (HVL). The stability of response of EBT2 was verified inside this range of energies. EBT2 films were calibrated using the red and green channels of the absorption spectrum in the 0-20 Gy dose range delivered by the Intrabeam x-rays. The dependence of film response on temperature during irradiation was measured. For in vivo dosimetry, pieces of radiochromic films wrapped in sterile envelopes were inserted after breast conserving surgery and before TARGIT into the excision cavity, on the skin and on the shielded pectoralis fascia for treatments of the left breast. Results: HVLs of the Intrabeam in TARGIT of the breast correspond to effective energies of 20.7-36.3 keV. The response of EBT2 was constant inside this range of energies. We measured the dose to the target tissue and to organs at risk in 23 patients and obtained an average dose of 13.52 {+-} 1.21 Gy to the target tissue. Dose to the skin in close proximity to the applicator was 2.22 {+-} 0.97 Gy, 0.29 {+-} 0.17 Gy at 5-10 cm from the applicator, and 0.08 {+-} 0.07 Gy at more than 10 cm from the applicator. Dose to the pectoral muscle for left breast treatment was 0.57 {+-} 0.23 Gy. Conclusions: Our results show that EBT2 films are accurate at the beam energies, dose range, and irradiation temperature found in TARGIT and that in vivo dosimetry in TARGIT with EBT2 films wrapped in sterile envelopes is a feasible procedure. Measured

  3. Correlation between anthropometric parameters and acute skin toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy patients: a pilot assessment study.

    PubMed

    Méry, Benoîte; Vallard, Alexis; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Pacaut, Cécile; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Espenel, Sophie; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Ollier, Edouard; Wang, Guoping; Diao, Peng; Bigot, Lise; Mengue Ndong, Sylvie; Bosacki, Claire; Ben Mrad, Majed; Magné, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify acute skin toxicity risk factors linked to the anthropometric characteristics of patients with breast cancer treated with radiation therapy. Consecutive patients with breast cancer were enrolled after breast-conserving surgery and before radiotherapy course. Acute skin toxicity was assessed weekly during the 7 weeks of radiotherapy with the International Classification from National Cancer Institute. Grade 2 defined acute skin toxicity. Patient characteristics and anthropometric measurements were collected. 54 patients were enrolled in 2013. Eight patients (14.8%) had grade ≥2 toxicity. The average weight and chest size were 65.5 kg and 93.6 cm, respectively. Bra cup size is significantly associated with a risk of grade 2 dermatitis [odds ratio (OR) 3.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.29-11.92), p = 0.02]. Anthropometric breast fat mass measurements, such as thickness of left [OR 2.72, 95% CI (1.08-8.26), p = 0.04] and right [OR 2.45, 95% CI (0.99-7.27), p = 0.05] axillary fat, are correlated with an increased risk. Distance between the pectoral muscle and nipple is a reproducible measurement of breast size and is associated with acute skin toxicity with significant tendency (OR = 2.21, 95% CI (0.97-5.98), p = 0.07). Breast size and its different anthropometric measurements (thickness of left and right axillary fat, nipple-to-pectoral muscle distance) are correlated with the risk of skin toxicity. The present article analyses several characteristics and anthropomorphic measurements of breast in order to assess breast size. A standardized and reproducible protocol to measure breast volume is described.

  4. SU-E-T-217: Comprehensive Dosimetric Evaluation On 3D-CRT, IMRT and Non-Coplanar Arc Treatment for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, T; Yan, Y; Ramirez, E; Lee, P; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an effective treatment for early stage breast-cancer. Irradiation in a prone position can mitigate breast motion and spare heart and lung. In this study, a comprehensive study is performed to evaluate various treatment techniques for prone APBI treatment including: 3D-CRT, IMRT, co-planar and non-coplanar partial arcs treatment. Methods: In this treatment planning study, a left breast patient treated in prone position in our clinic was imported into Varian Eclipse TPS. Six beams tangential to chest wall were used in both 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. These six beams were coplanar in a transactional plane achieved by both gantry and couch rotation. A 60-beam IMRT plan was also created to explore the maximum benefit of co-planar IMRT. Within deliverable couch rotation range (±30°), partial arc treatment plans with one and up to ten couch positions were generated for comparison. For each plan, 30Gy in 6 fractions was prescribed to 95% PTV volume. Critical dosimetric parameters, such as conformity index, mean, maximum, and volume dose of organ at risk, are evaluated. Results: The conformity indexes (CI) are 3.53, 3.17, 2.21 and 1.08 respectively to 3D-CRT, 6-beam IMRT, 60-beam IMRT, and two-partial-arcs coplanar plans. However, arc plans increase heart dose. CI for non-coplanar arc plans decreases from 1.19 to 1.10 when increases couch positions. Maximum dose in ipsilateral lung (1.98 to 1.13 Gy), and heart (0.62 to 0.43 Gy) are steadily decreased with the increased number of non-coplanar arcs. Conclusions: The dosimetric evaluation results show that partial arc plans have improved CIs compared to conventional 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. Increasing number of partial arcs decreases lung and heart dose. The dosimetric benefit obtained from non-coplanar arcs should be considered with treatment delivery time.

  5. Early cardiac toxicity following adjuvant radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer with or without concurrent trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Chang, Cai; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Feng, Yan; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of concurrent trastuzumab on the cardiotoxicity in patients receiving left-sided adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and Methods Medical records of stage I-III left-sided breast cancer patients, including 64 receiving concurrent trastuzumab with radiotherapy and 73 receiving radiotherapy alone were retrospectively reviewed. All of the patients had normal LVEF after adjuvant chemotherapy. Information of doses volume to cardiac structures was collected. Cardiac events were assessed according to CTC 2.0. Results Median follow-up of LVEF and clinical assessment of cardiac function from the initiation of radiotherapy was 6.7 months (range 3–60.9) and 26 months (range 6.4–60.9), respectively. Grade 1 LVEF dysfunction occurred in 5 (7.8%) and 3 (4.1%) patients of the concurrent-trastuzumab and radiotherapy alone cohort, respectively. Trastuzumab was the only significant factor influencing absolute LVEF decrease in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis of concurrent-trastuzumab cohort, IMC radiotherapy and start trastuzumab during radiotherapy were independent risk factors. For concurrent cohort, mean heart dose, as well as D10-D30, D50-D55, V5-V20 of the heart and D30-D45, D65-D75, V6-V15 of the LV were significantly higher in patients developing LVEF dysfunction. Conclusions Concurrent trastuzumab and left-sided radiotherapy is well tolerated in terms of cardiotoxicity in patients with normal baseline cardiac function after adjuvant chemotherapy. However, increases in mean dose and low–dose volume of cardiac structures are associated with a higher risk of acute LVEF dysfunction. PMID:26460956

  6. Improvement of dose distribution with irregular surface compensator in whole breast radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hideki, Fujita; Nao, Kuwahata; Hiroyuki, Hattori; Hiroshi, Kinoshita; Haruyuki, Fukuda

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric aspects of whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) between an irregular surface compensator (ISC) and a conventional tangential field technique using physical wedges. Treatment plans were produced for 20 patients. The Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) was used for the dose calculation: For the physical wedge technique, the wedge angle was selected to provide the best dose homogeneity; for the ISC technique, the fluence editor application was used to extend the optimal fluence. These two treatment plans were compared in terms of doses in the planning target volume, the dose homogeneity index, the maximum dose, ipsilateral lung and heart doses for left breast irradiation, and the monitor unit counts required for treatment. Compared with the physical wedge technique, the ISC technique significantly reduced the dose homogeneity index, the maximum dose, the volumes received at 105% of the prescription dose, as well as reducing both the ipsilateral lung and heart doses (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). However, the monitor unit counts were not significantly different between the techniques (P > 0.05). Thus, the ISC technique for WBRT enables significantly better dose distribution in the planning target volume. PMID:24049317

  7. Lymphoscintigraphy Can Select Breast Cancer Patients for Internal Mammary Chain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hindie, Elif; Groheux, David; Hennequin, Christophe; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Vercellino, Laetitia; Berenger, Nathalie; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Maylin, Claude; Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert; Espie, Marc

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Given the risk of undesired toxicity, prophylactic internal mammary (IM) chain irradiation should be offered only to patients at high risk of occult involvement. Lymphoscintigraphy for axillary sentinel node biopsy might help in selecting these patients. Methods and Materials: We reviewed published studies with the following selection criteria: {>=}300 breast cancer patients referred for axilla sentinel node biopsy; scintigraphy performed after peritumoral or intratumoral tracer injection; IM biopsy in the case of IM drainage; and axilla staged routinely independent of IM status. Results: Six prospective studies, for a total of 3,876 patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Parasternal drainage was present in 792 patients (20.4%). IM biopsy was performed in 644 patients and was positive in 111 (17.2%). Of the positive IM biopsies, 40% were associated with tumors in the lateral breast quadrants. A major difference in the IM positivity rate was found according to the axilla sentinel node status. In patients with negative axilla, the IM biopsy was positive in 7.8% of cases. In patients with positive axilla, however, the IM biopsy was positive in 41% (p < .00001). Because biopsy of multiple IM hot nodes is difficult, the true risk could be even greater, probably close to 50%. Conclusions: Patients with IM drainage on lymphoscintigraphy and a positive axilla sentinel node have a high risk of occult IM involvement. These women should be considered for IM radiotherapy.

  8. A systematic review of complications of implant-based breast reconstruction with prereconstruction and postreconstruction radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Momoh, Adeyiza O; Ahmed, Raouf; Kelley, Brian P; Aliu, Oluseyi; Kidwell, Kelley M; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess outcomes data on complications associated with implant-based breast reconstruction performed before or after chest wall radiation to assist in guiding the decision-making process for reconstruction of the irradiated breast. Studies from a PubMed search that met predetermined inclusion criteria were identified and included. Complications of interest were low- and high-grade capsular contractures, minor and major complications, reconstruction failure rates, and reconstruction completion rates. Pooled complication rates were calculated. A total of 26 articles were included in the study after screening 1,006 publications, with 14 studies presenting data on prereconstruction radiation and 23 studies presenting data on postreconstruction radiation. Complication rates evaluated in patients exposed to radiation before or after implant reconstruction were not significantly different. Reconstruction failure rates were similar at 19 and 20 % for pre- and postreconstruction radiation patients, respectively. Completion rates were similar at 83 and 80 % for pre- and postreconstruction radiation patients, respectively. Review of the current literature suggests similar overall success and failure rates with radiotherapy provided both before and after reconstruction. Failure rates in both groups of patients are clinically significant when considering implant reconstruction in the setting of radiation.

  9. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stefan; Holz-Sapra, Edna; Rades, Dirk; Moser, Alexander; Studer, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords 'nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy', 'whole skin mastectomy' and 'NAC preservation'. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0-28.4% and 0-3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0-100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient.

  10. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Korreman, Stine S. . E-mail: stine.k@rh.dk; Pedersen, Anders N.; Aarup, Lasse Rye; Nottrup, Trine J.; Specht, Lena; Nystroem, Hakan

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Substantial reductions of cardio-pulmonary radiation doses can be achieved using voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or free breathing inspiration gating (IG) in radiotherapy after conserving surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological implications of such dosimetric benefits. Methods and Materials: Patients from previously reported studies were pooled for a total of 33 patients. All patients underwent DIBH and free breathing (FB) scans, and 17 patients underwent an additional IG scan. Tangential conformal treatment plans covering the remaining breast, internal mammary, and periclavicular nodes were optimized for each scan, prescription dose 48 Gy. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated using the relative seriality model for the heart, and the model proposed by Burman et al. for the lung. Results: Previous computed tomography studies showed that both voluntary DIBH and IG provided reduction of the lung V{sub 5} (relative volume receiving more than 50% of prescription dose) on the order of 30-40%, and a 80-90% reduction of the heart V{sub 5} for left-sided cancers. Corresponding pneumonitis probability of 28.1% (range, 0.7-95.6%) for FB could be reduced to 2.6% (range, 0.1-40.1%) for IG, and 4.3% (range, 0.1-59%) for DIBH. The cardiac mortality probability could be reduced from 4.8% (range, 0.1-23.4%) in FB to 0.5% (range, 0.1-2.6%) for IG and 0.1% (range, 0-3.0%) for DIBH. Conclusions: Remarkable potential is shown for simple voluntary DIBH and free breathing IG to reduce the risk of both cardiac mortality and pneumonitis for the common technique of adjuvant tangential breast irradiation.

  11. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  12. Radiotherapy Timing in 4,820 Patients With Breast Cancer: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Rampini, Andrea; Petrucci, Alessia; Detti, Beatrice; Bruni, Alessio; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between a delay in radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery and ipsilateral breast recurrence (BR). Methods and Materials: We included in our analysis 4,820 breast cancer patients who had undergone postoperative RT at University of Florence. The patients were categorized into four groups according to the interval between surgery and RT (T1, <60 days; T2, 61-120 days; T3, 121-180 days; and T4, >180 days). Results: On multivariate analysis, the timing of RT did not reach statistical significance in patients who received only postoperative RT (n = 1,935) or RT and hormonal therapy (HT) (n = 1,684) or RT, chemotherapy (CHT), and HT (n = 529). In the postoperative RT-only group, age at presentation, surgical margin status, and a boost to the tumor bed were independent prognostic factors for BR. In the RT plus HT group, age at presentation and boost emerged as independent prognostic factors for BR (p = 0.006 and p = 0.049, respectively). Finally, in the RT, CHT, and HT group, only multifocality was an independent BR predictor (p = 0.01). Only in the group of patients treated with RT and CHT (n = 672) did multivariate analysis with stepwise selection show RT timing as an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; p = 0.045). Analyzing this group of patients, we found that most patients included had worse prognostic factors and had received CHT consisting of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil before undergoing RT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the timing of RT itself does not affect local recurrence, which is mainly related to prognostic factors. Thus, the 'waiting list' should be thought of as a 'programming list,' with patients scheduled for RT according to their prognostic factors.

  13. Common variants of eNOS and XRCC1 genes may predict acute skin toxicity in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Terrazzino, Salvatore; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Masini, Laura; Caltavuturo, Tina; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Genazzani, Armando A; Krengli, Marco

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of functional polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair mechanisms (XRCC1, TP53, MSH2, MSH3, XPD), oxidative stress response (GSTP1, GSTA1, eNOS, SOD2) and fibroblast proliferation (TGFβ1) on the risk of acute skin toxicity in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Skin toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria in 286 breast cancer patients who received radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP analysis and real-time PCR allelic discrimination assay on genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood. In the multivariate analysis, nominally significant associations, before multiple testing corrections, were found between XRCC1 T-77C (T carriers vs. CC, OR: 2.240, 95% CI: 1.015-4.941, P=0.046), eNOS G894T polymorphisms (TT vs. G carriers, OR: 2.473, 95% CI: 1.220-5.012, P=0.012), breast diameter (OR: 1.138, 95% CI: 1.001-1.293, P=0.048), boost dose-fractionation (3 Gy vs. no boost, OR: 4.902, 95% CI: 1.458-16.483, P=0.010) and ≥ grade 2 acute radiation skin toxicity in breast cancer patients. As our exploratory study suggests that XRCC1 T-77C and eNOS G874T may confer an increased risk of acute skin reactions to radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, further confirmatory studies are warranted to determine the clinical significance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Breast lesions of a metastatic melanoma on a radiotherapy territory: Treatment by vemurafenib and carcinologic surgery].

    PubMed

    Fernandez, J; Montaudié, H; Courdi, A; Georgiou, C; Camuzard, O; Chignon-Sicard, B

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the unique case of a female patient who presented distant melanoma metastasis on the breast while having irradiation therapy for breast cancer. This happened eight months after the initial treatment for a melanoma of the back (under the right scapula). Furthermore, this case report demonstrates the efficiency of Vemurafenib® as a treatment for late stage melanomas. The patient was a 47-year-old female that had a superficial spreading melanoma under the right scapula (Breslow 1.02mm) that was treated with 2cm skin excision and sentinel lymph node sampling that was negative. The melanoma was positive for the BRAF600E mutation. One month after this incident, the patient developed breast cancer that was treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy. Three months after the end of the irradiation treatment, she developed multiple melanoma metastasis on the skin of the breast. Our multidisciplinary team decided to initiate a treatment with vemurafenib. The patient showed an excellent response, so the surgical team completed the treatment with a radical mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap. The histologic report of the mastectomy specimen showed no sign of melanocytic proliferation, that demonstrates the efficacy of vemurafenib. The patient showed no relapse after two years of follow-up. The speed of development and location of cutaneous metastases in this case brought us to think about the effects of radiation therapy on the skin. Radiation therapy causes acute complications (radiodermatitis) by cellular and molecular mechanisms. Moreover, depressed immunity is found after irradiation. Association of these mecanisms could explain the appearance of these metastases in irradiation field. The efficiency of vemurafenib found in our case is consistent with what is described in literature, especially with the improvement in median overall survival. This case demonstrates a unique case of distant melanoma

  15. Kilovoltage Rotational External Beam Radiotherapy on a Breast Computed Tomography Platform: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) platform to deliver rotational kilovoltage (kV) external beam radiotherapy (RT) for partial breast irradiation, whole breast irradiation, and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Rotational kV-external beam RT using the geometry of a prototype bCT platform was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulator. A point source emitting 178 keV photons (approximating a 320-kVp spectrum with 4-mm copper filtration) was rotated around a 14-cm voxelized polyethylene disk (0.1 cm tall) or cylinder (9 cm tall) to simulate primary and primary plus scattered photon interactions, respectively. Simulations were also performed using voxelized bCT patient images. Beam collimation was varied in the x-y plane (1-14 cm) and in the z-direction (0.1-10 cm). Dose painting for multiple foci, line, and ring distributions was demonstrated using multiple rotations with varying beam collimation. Simulations using the scanner's native hardware (120 kVp filtered by 0.2-mm copper) were validated experimentally. Results: As the x-y collimator was narrowed, the two-dimensional dose profiles shifted from a cupped profile with a high edge dose to an increasingly peaked central dose distribution with a sharp dose falloff. Using a 1-cm beam, the cylinder edge dose was <7% of the dose deposition at the cylinder center. Simulations using 120-kVp X-rays showed distributions similar to the experimental measurements. A homogeneous dose distribution (<2.5% dose fluctuation) with a 20% decrease in dose deposition at the cylinder edge (i.e., skin sparing) was demonstrated by weighted summation of four dose profiles using different collimation widths. Simulations using patient bCT images demonstrated the potential for treatment planning and image-guided RT. Conclusions: Rotational kV-external beam RT for partial breast irradiation, dose painting, and whole breast irradiation with skin sparing is feasible on a bCT platform with

  16. Comparison of health utility weights among elderly patients receiving breast-conserving surgery plus hormonal therapy with or without radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Askal Ayalew; Xiao, Hong; Tawk, Rima; Campbell, Ellen; Semykina, Anastasia; Montero, Alberto J.; Diaby, Vakaramoko

    2017-01-01

    Background The selection of the most appropriate treatment combinations requires the balancing of benefits and harms of these treatment options as well as the patients’ preferences for the resulting outcomes. Objective This research aimed at estimating and comparing the utility weights between elderly women with early stage hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer receiving a combination of radiotherapy and hormonal therapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) and those receiving a combination of BCS and hormonal therapy. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) linked with Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was used as the data source. Health utility weights were derived from the VR-12 health-related quality of life instrument using a mapping algorithm. Descriptive statistics of the sample were provided. Two sample t-tests were performed to determine potential differences in mean health utility weights between the two groups after propensity score matching. Results The average age at diagnosis was 72 vs. 76 years for the treated and the untreated groups, respectively. The results showed an inverse relationship between the receipt of radiotherapy and age. Patients who received radiotherapy had, on average, a higher health utility weight (0.70; SD = 0.123) compared with those who did not receive radiotherapy (0.676; SD = 0.130). Only treated patients who had more than two comorbid conditions had significantly higher health utility weights compared with patients who were not treated. Conclusions The mean health utility weights estimated for the radiotherapy and no radiotherapy groups can be used to inform a comparative cost-effectiveness analysis of the treatment options. However, the results of this study may not be generalizable to those who are outside a managed care plan because MHOS data is collected on managed care beneficiaries. PMID:27819160

  17. Unusual complication after radiotherapy for breast cancer bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gabriella; Battista, Cleonice; Montesano, Marilena; Carino, Rita; Primavera, Angelo; Costantino, Sebastiano; Spoto, Silvia; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Altomare, Vittorio

    2005-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy play an important role in the treatment of early breast cancer. Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is an uncommon syndrome reported to be one of the complications of adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman who developed cough, dyspnea and fever three weeks after radiation therapy to the left breast for breast carcinoma. Chest X-ray and computed tomography scan demonstrated alveolar opacities within both lungs. Antibiotic therapy against any probable septic pathology did not improve the symptoms, while corticosteroid treatment resulted in rapid clinical improvement together with regression of the pulmonary opacities. Irradiation was thought to be the cause of the migratory pneumonitis, hence this case was clinically diagnosed as radiation-induced migratory pneumonitis similar to BOOP, without lung biopsy. The present case suggests that one should be mindful of this disease when treating patients with a history of irradiation to the breast. BOOP promptly responds to systemic corticosteroid therapy with rapid improvement of symptoms and regression of the pulmonary opacities.

  18. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates radiation-induced acute skin damage in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Hanxi; Sun, Xiaorong; Meng, Xiangjiao; Zhao, Xianguang; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming; Zheng, Meizhu

    2016-01-01

    There are few effective treatment options for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients. We conducted a single-arm trial to tested the hypothesis that topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is effective against radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Forty-nine patients participated in this study. The patients underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Topical EGCG was applied daily, starting when grade I dermatitis appeared and ending two weeks after radiotherapy. The maximum dermatitis observed during the EGCG treatment was as follows: Grade 1 toxicity, 71.4% (35 patients); grade 2 toxicity, 28.6% (14 patients); there were no patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The majority of the radiation-induced dermatitis was observed 1 week after the end of radiotherapy. EGCG reduced the pain in 85.7% of patients, burning-feeling in 89.8%, itching in 87.8%, pulling in 71.4%, and tenderness in 79.6%. These findings suggest topical EGCG may be an effective treatment for radiation-induced dermatitis and has acceptable toxicity. PMID:27224910

  19. Risk of secondary cancers in women with breast cancer and the influence of radiotherapy: A national cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Yao; Chen, Sih-Hao; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lee, Song-Tay; Guo, How-Ran; Kuo, Shu-Chun; Su, Shih-Bin

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide; thus, the prolongation of survival, and the incidence and risk factors, including radiotherapy, for developing secondary malignancies are important. We compared the incidence of secondary and new primary cancers in women with breast cancer (CA) and well-matched for age, geographic region, and monthly income cancer-free controls (CA). The risk for secondary cancers with and without radiotherapy was also compared in CA women. We enrolled 2422 CA patients and CA 12,110 controls. In a 4-year follow-up, the secondary cancers risk was significant in the CA group (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.18). Only the risk of uterine cancer was significant compared with the controls (AHR: 6.30; 95% CI: 2.28-17.38). CA patients and <50 years old had a higher risk for secondary cancers. Developing secondary cancers was significant in the first follow-up year (AHR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.11-2.06). Radiotherapy had no significant effect on the CA group, but it was significant (P = 0.0298) in women ≥60 years old (elderly). We recommend monitoring secondary cancers in CA women, especially those <50 years old, and during the first year of follow-up. Radiotherapy should be used more carefully in elderly CA women.

  20. Prolongation of overall treatment time as a cause of treatment failure in early breast cancer: An analysis of the UK START (Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy) trials of radiotherapy fractionation.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Joanne S; Bentzen, Søren M; Bliss, Judith M; Yarnold, John R

    2016-12-01

    Tests of tumour treatment time effect in patients prescribed post-operative radiotherapy for early breast cancer have focussed on time to start of radiotherapy rather than overall treatment time. The START randomised trials of radiotherapy fractionation provide an opportunity to directly estimate the effect of treatment acceleration. Between 1986 and 2002, a total of 5861 women with early breast cancer were recruited into the UK START pilot (START-P), START-A and START-B randomised trials. START-P and START-A tested 13 fractions of 3.0-3.3Gy against 25 fractions of 2.0Gy with a fixed treatment duration of 5weeks for all schedules; START-B tested 15 fractions of 2.67Gy in 3weeks against 25 fractions of 2.0Gy over 5weeks. Estimates of the effect of length of treatment for local-regional relapse and for a measure of late normal tissue effects (change in photographic breast appearance, for patients following breast conserving surgery) were obtained from Cox proportional hazards regression analyses stratified according to trial. At a median follow-up of 10years, 444/5831 (7.6%) patients with data available had a local-regional relapse, and 1135/3185 (35.6%) had mild or marked change in photographic breast appearance by 5years. Adjusting for prognostic factors, the estimate of the overall treatment time effect for local-regional relapse was 0.60Gy/day (95%CI 0.10 to 1.18Gy/day, p=0.02), and 0.14Gy/day (95%CI -0.09 to 0.34Gy/day, p=0.29) for change in photographic breast appearance. Combined analysis of the START trials generates the hypothesis that overall treatment time is a significant determinant of local cancer control after adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy, with approximately 0.6Gy per day 'wasted' in compensating for tumour cell proliferation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Using injectable hydrogel markers to assess resimulation for boost target volume definition in a patient undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Henal; Goyal, Sharad; Kim, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Several publications have recommended that patients undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy be resimulated for boost planning. The rationale for this is that the seroma may be smaller when compared with the initial simulation. However, the decision remains whether to use the earlier or later images to define an appropriate boost target volume. A patient undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy had new, injectable, temporary hydrogel fiducial markers placed 1 to 3 cm from the seroma at the time of initial simulation. The patient was resimulated 4.5 weeks later for conformal photon boost planning. Computed tomography (CT) scans acquired at the beginning and the end of whole-breast radiotherapy showed that shrinkage of the lumpectomy cavity was not matched by a corresponding reduction in the surrounding tissue volume, as demarcated by hydrogel markers. This observation called into question the usual interpretation of cavity shrinkage for boost target definition. For this patient, it was decided to define the boost target volume on the initial planning CT instead of the new CT.

  2. Treating breast cancer radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation with a traditional Chinese medicine formula: a case series pilot study.

    PubMed

    Xiaoshan, Wang; Zhixi, Li; Liang, Liang; Shuchun, Luo; Xia, Wang; Yuyi, Wang; Feng, Luo

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Objective: A case series is presented to investigate the efficacy and safety of Erhegao for patients with breast cancer who have radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation. Eighteen women with breast cancer who received radiotherapy and developed moist desquamation were enrolled. Erhegao cream, a Traditional Chinese Medicine formula consisting of zinc oxide powder, calamine powder, and lithospermum oil, was applied on areas of moist desquamation. Application was repeated once a day until healing. The primary end point for efficacy was the time to healing of the moist desquamation areas. A numerical rating scale was used to measure wound pain relief daily. Incidence of toxicity was also assessed. The average time to healing of the moist desquamation area was 13.56 days. The mean pain scores on the first, third, and seventh days were 5.22, 2.94, and 0.83, respectively. Eight-three percent of patients reported pain relief after the first 3 days, and 94%, after the first week. The mean daily reduction in the pain score was 0.40. None of the patients developed clinical infections or reported any toxicity. This formula is effective and safe, especially for pain relief, and may be an alternative treatment for radiotherapy-induced moist desquamation in patients with breast cancer. Future randomized, controlled studies are needed to better evaluate the efficacy of Erhegao cream.

  3. Breast dosimetry in transverse and longitudinal field MRI-Linac radiotherapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, S. R.; Esmaeeli, A. D.; Pouladian, M.; Sardari, D.; Bagheri, S.; Monfared, A. S.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In the framework of developing the integration of a MRI-Linac system, configurations of MRI-Linac units were simulated in order to improve the dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using transverse and longitudinal magnetic field geometries of Lorentz force for both medial and lateral tangential fields. Methods: In this work, the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized to compare dose distributions in breast radiotherapy for Linac-MR systems in the transverse and longitudinal geometries within humanoid phantoms across a range of magnetic field strengths of 0.5 and 1.5 T. The dose increment due to scattering from the coils was investigated for both geometries as well. Computed tomography images of two patients were used for MC simulations. One patient had intact breast while the other was mastectomized. In the simulations, planning and methods of chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical planning. Results: In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the lateral spread of secondary electrons to the lung, heart, and contralateral organs, which reduced the mean dose of the ipsilateral lung and heart by means of 17.2% and 6% at 1.5 T, respectively. The transverse configuration exhibits a significant increase in tissue interface effects, which increased dose buildup in the entrance regions of the lateral and medial tangent beams to the planning target volume (PTV) and improved dose homogeneity within the PTV. The improved relative average homogeneity index for two patients to the PTV at magnetic field strength of 1.5 T with respect to no magnetic field case evaluated was 11.79% and 34.45% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. In both geometries, the simulations show significant mean dose reductions in the contralateral breast and chest wall skin, respectively, by a mean of 16.6% and 24.9% at 0.5 T and 17.2% and 28.1% at 1.5 T in the transverse geometry, and 10.56% and 14.6% at 0.5 T and 11.3% and

  4. Breast dosimetry in transverse and longitudinal field MRI-Linac radiotherapy systems.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, S R; Esmaeeli, A D; Pouladian, M; Monfared, A S; Sardari, D; Bagheri, S

    2015-02-01

    In the framework of developing the integration of a MRI-Linac system, configurations of MRI-Linac units were simulated in order to improve the dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using transverse and longitudinal magnetic field geometries of Lorentz force for both medial and lateral tangential fields. In this work, the geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized to compare dose distributions in breast radiotherapy for Linac-MR systems in the transverse and longitudinal geometries within humanoid phantoms across a range of magnetic field strengths of 0.5 and 1.5 T. The dose increment due to scattering from the coils was investigated for both geometries as well. Computed tomography images of two patients were used for MC simulations. One patient had intact breast while the other was mastectomized. In the simulations, planning and methods of chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical planning. In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the lateral spread of secondary electrons to the lung, heart, and contralateral organs, which reduced the mean dose of the ipsilateral lung and heart by means of 17.2% and 6% at 1.5 T, respectively. The transverse configuration exhibits a significant increase in tissue interface effects, which increased dose buildup in the entrance regions of the lateral and medial tangent beams to the planning target volume (PTV) and improved dose homogeneity within the PTV. The improved relative average homogeneity index for two patients to the PTV at magnetic field strength of 1.5 T with respect to no magnetic field case evaluated was 11.79% and 34.45% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. In both geometries, the simulations show significant mean dose reductions in the contralateral breast and chest wall skin, respectively, by a mean of 16.6% and 24.9% at 0.5 T and 17.2% and 28.1% at 1.5 T in the transverse geometry, and 10.56% and 14.6% at 0.5 T and 11.3% and 16.3% at 1.5 T in the

  5. Exclusive Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Nonmetastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer: 20 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgier, Celine; Pessoa, Eduardo Lima; Dunant, Ariane; Heymann, Steve; Spielmann, Marc; Uzan, Catherine; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Arriagada, Rodrigo; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-02-01

    Background: Locoregional treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is crucial because local relapses may be highly symptomatic and are commonly associated with distant metastasis. With a median follow-up of 20 years, we report here the long-term results of a monocentric clinical trial combining primary chemotherapy (CT) with a schedule of anthracycline-based CT and an alternating split-course of radiotherapy (RT Asterisk-Operator CT) without mastectomy. Methods and Materials: From September 1983 to December 1989, 124 women with nonmetastatic IBC (T4d M0) were treated with three cycles of primary AVCMF chemotherapy (anthracycline, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and then an alternating RT Asterisk-Operator CT schedule followed by three cycles of FAC. Hormonal therapy was systematically administered: ovarian irradiation (12 Gy in four fractions) or tamoxifen 20 mg daily. Results: Local control was achieved in 82% of patients. The 10- and 20-year local relapse rates were 26% and 33%, respectively, but only 10% of locally controlled cases were not associated with concurrent distant metastasis. The 10- and 20-year overall survival rates were 39% and 19%, respectively. Severe fibrosis occurred in 54% of patients, grade 3 brachial plexus neuropathy in 4%, grade 2 pneumonitis in 9%. Grade 1, 2 and 3 cardiac toxicity was observed in 3.8%, 3.8% and 1.2% of cases respectively. Conclusions: This combined regimen allowed good long-term local control without surgery. Survival rates were similar to those obtained with conventional regimens (primary chemotherapy, total mastectomy, and adjuvant radiotherapy). Since IBC continues to be an entity with a dismal prognosis, this approach, safely combining preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy and systemic treatments, should be reassessed when suitable targeted agents are available.

  6. [Techniques of radiotherapy in so-called operable carcinoma of the breast].

    PubMed

    Pierquin, B

    1973-06-01

    The techniques of radiotherapy alone in carcinoma of the breast are determined by the possibilities of durable cure of the tumoral process using locoregional treatment. It seems undisputable that the risk of metastases at a distance from the tumor is related to the topographical as well as volum extension of lymph node involvement. Such risk is low with N-; it rapidly increases with lower axillary N+; it predominates with medial mammary N+; it becomes almost constant with upper axillary (subclavian) and supraclavicular N+. This explains why dose distribution should aim at curing, even at the price of some cosmetic or functional risk, tumoral lesions of the mammary gland, of the lower axillary area and, to a certain extent, of the medial mammary area. On the contrary, it is illusory to deliver an overdosage at ultrahigh dose-rates to the sub- and supraclavicular areas, where the chances for durable cure are almost nul if lymph nodes are invaded. This explains why curative radiotherapy alone appears only indicated in little developed cancers in their mammary (T1 or T2) as well as lymph node (N0 or N1 a) aspects. This also explains why such a responsability implies for the radiotherapist absolutely perfect technical conditions of spotting, centring and dose-measurements; careful protection of all healthy structures surrounding the target-volumes should, in particular, be obtained (for instance, accurate delimitation of beams, use of lead shields or even compensatory wedges should provide appropriate protection to the lung parenchyma, pectoral muscle, head of the humerus, laryngotracheal system). Finally, it is in the axillary area that the major technical hazards are encountered with: an insufficient dose is liable to cause lymph node recurrence, an excessive dose is liable to provoke irreversible muscular, articular, vascular or nervous sequelae. Provided a high level of technicity, it should be admitted to-day that a durable locoregional cure can be obtained in the

  7. Quantifying radiation dose delivered to individual shoulder muscles during breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lipps, David B; Sachdev, Sean; Strauss, Jonathan B

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for managing breast cancer, but patients may experience shoulder morbidity after completing radiotherapy. There is a knowledge gap regarding how the inclusion of the regional lymphatics in radiation treatment regimens influence the radiation dose delivered to the underlying shoulder musculature. Five standardized radiation treatment regimens were developed from the computed tomography (CT) scans of 11 patients: tangent fields only (T), high tangent fields (HT), T+supraclavicular fossa and axillary apex with an anterior oblique beam (SCV), T+SCV+axillary nodes with an anterior oblique beam (SCV+AX), and T+SCV+AX with the nodal regions treated with a directly opposed beam configuration (DO). The muscle volumes for nine shoulder muscles anatomically located with the treatment regimens were segmented from the same CT scans. The effect of the nine muscles and five treatment regimens on the percentage of each muscle receiving at least 48Gy (V48Gy) was analyzed with two-way and one-way repeated measures ANOVAs. A statistically significant interaction existed between the nine shoulder muscles and five treatment regimens (p<0.001) on the V48Gy dose. Subsequent one-way analyses found statistically significant main effects of treatment plan on the V48Gy dose for each muscle (p<0.001). The pectoralis major and minor had the greatest V48 doses across the five treatments regimens. The HT, SCV+AX and DO treatment regimens produced statistically significant increases in the V48 dose of the latissimus dorsi and teres major. The infraspinatus, subscapularis, supraspinatus, teres minor, and trapezius only observed statistically significant V48 doses when treated with a DO plan. These findings highlight the muscles (pectoralis major, pectoralis minor, latissimus dorsi, and teres major) that may exhibit future morbidity after radiation, and indicate that nodal RT delivered with a DO beam arrangement delivers the highest muscle dose. Copyright

  8. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients

  9. Radiotherapy of early breast cancer in scleroderma patients: our experience with four cases and a short review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgias, George; Theodorou, Kiki; Zygogianni, Anna; Tsanadis, Konstantinos; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Tzitzikas, John; Koukourakis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Connective vascular diseases (CVD), including scleroderma, are reported to represent for some researchers a relative contraindication and for others absolute contraindication for radiotherapy. The purpose of our study is to add four new cases to the existing body of international literature and to determine whether women with pre-existing scleroderma who have been surgically treated for early breast cancer could undergo postsurgical radiotherapy without serious early and late complications. Patients and methods From May 1998 to November 2010, we irradiated for early breast cancer four patients suffering from pre-existing scleroderma; after conservative surgery, we performed whole breast postoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy total dose to the whole breast plus a 9 Gy boost to the tumor bed. We reviewed the records of all four patients and evaluated the early and late reactions using acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG], American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA) and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC], Brussels, Belgium and RTOG). Results After a median follow-up of 105 months (range 12–155 months) the early and late toxicity concerning the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the lungs, and the heart have been acceptable and are in full accordance with what have been reported in international literature. Conclusion This study matches global experience, which shows that patients with scleroderma and breast cancer must be discussed by the multidisciplinary tumor board in order for a personalized treatment strategy to be formulated. Radiation therapy can be proposed as a postsurgical therapeutic option in selected cases. PMID:24367188

  10. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Miranda, Alberto; Arrieta, Oscar; Gamboa-Vignolle, Carlos; Saavedra-Perez, David; Morales-Barrera, Rafael; Bargallo-Rocha, Enrique; Zinser-Sierra, Juan; Perez-Sanchez, Victor; Ramirez-Ugalde, Teresa; Lara-Medina, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC), or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC) IV in four 21-day courses) followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg), and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Results Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR) in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5%) and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5%) if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%). No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04). Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%). The toxicity profile was acceptable. Conclusion This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted. PMID:19591689

  11. Randomized controlled trial of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early breast cancer: 5-year results confirm superior overall cosmesis.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, Mukesh B; Barnett, Gillian C; Wilkinson, Jennifer S; Moody, Anne M; Wilson, Charles; Dorling, Leila; Chan Wah Hak, Charleen; Qian, Wendi; Twyman, Nicola; Burnet, Neil G; Wishart, Gordon C; Coles, Charlotte E

    2013-12-20

    There are few randomized controlled trial data to confirm that improved homogeneity with simple intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) decreases late breast tissue toxicity. The Cambridge Breast IMRT trial investigated this hypothesis, and the 5-year results are reported. Standard tangential plans of 1,145 trial patients were analyzed; 815 patients had inhomogeneous plans (≥ 2 cm(3) receiving 107% of prescribed dose: 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) and were randomly assigned to standard radiotherapy (RT) or replanned with simple IMRT; 330 patients with satisfactory dose homogeneity were treated with standard RT and underwent the same follow-up as the randomly assigned patients. Breast tissue toxicities were assessed at 5 years using validated methods: photographic assessment (overall cosmesis and breast shrinkage compared with baseline pre-RT photographs) and clinical assessment (telangiectasia, induration, edema, and pigmentation). Comparisons between different groups were analyzed using polychotomous logistic regression. On univariate analysis, compared with standard RT, fewer patients in the simple IMRT group developed suboptimal overall cosmesis (odds ratio [OR], 0.68; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.96; P = .027) and skin telangiectasia (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.92; P = .021). No evidence of difference was seen for breast shrinkage, breast edema, tumor bed induration, or pigmentation. The benefit of IMRT was maintained on multivariate analysis for both overall cosmesis (P = .038) and skin telangiectasia (P = .031). Improved dose homogeneity with simple IMRT translates into superior overall cosmesis and reduces the risk of skin telangiectasia. These results are practice changing and should encourage centers still using two-dimensional RT to implement simple breast IMRT.

  12. Long-term toxicity of an intraoperative radiotherapy boost using low energy X-rays during breast-conserving surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta . E-mail: uta.kraus-tiefenbacher@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Bauer, Lelia; Scheda, Antonella; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Keller, Anke; Herskind, Carsten; Steil, Volker; Melchert, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a boost for breast cancer delivers a high single dose of radiation to a late-reacting tissue; therefore late toxicity is of particular interest, and long-term follow-up is warranted. To date there are only limited data available on breast cancer patients treated with IORT using low energy X-rays. We analyzed toxicity and cosmesis after IORT as a boost with a minimum follow-up of 18 months. Methods and Materials: A total of 73 patients treated with IORT (20 Gy/50 kV X-rays; INTRABEAM [Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany]) to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery as a boost followed by whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT, 46 Gy) underwent a prospective, predefined follow-up (median, 25 months; range 18-44 months), including clinical examination and breast ultrasound at 6-months and mammographies at 1-year intervals. Toxicities were documented using the common toxicity criteria (CTC)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the LENT-SOMA score. Cosmesis was evaluated with a score from 1 to 4. Results: The IORT in combination with WBRT was well tolerated, with no Grade 3 or 4 skin toxicities and no telangiectasias. Fibrosis of the entire breast was observed in 5% of the patients. A circumscribed fibrosis around the tumor bed was palpable in up to 27% with a peak around 18 months after therapy and a decline thereafter. The observed toxicitiy rates were not influenced by age, tumor stage, or systemic therapy. The cosmetic outcome was good to excellent in {>=}90% of cases. Conclusions: After IORT of the breast using low-energy X-rays, no unexpected toxicity rates were observed during long-term-follow-up.

  13. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Eng-Yen; Liang, Ji-An; Meng, Fan-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2013-03-06

    To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations.

  14. Germline TP53 alterations in Finnish breast cancer families are rare and occur at conserved mutation-prone sites

    PubMed Central

    Rapakko, K; Allinen, M; Syrjäkoski, K; Vahteristo, P; Huusko, P; Vähäkangas, K; Eerola, H; Kainu, T; Kallioniemi, O-P; Nevanlinna, H; Winqvist, R

    2001-01-01

    We have screened for germline TP53 mutations in Finnish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative families. This study represents the largest survey of the entire protein-encoding portion of TP53, and indicates that mutations are only found at conserved domains in breast cancer families also meeting the criteria for Li-Fraumeni/Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome, explaining only a very small additional fraction of the hereditary breast cancer cases. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11139324

  15. SU-C-BRB-06: Dosimetric Impact of Breast Contour Reconstruction Errors in GammaPod Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Y; Becker, S; Mutaf, Y; Yu, C

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The first GammaPod™ unit, a dedicated prone stereotactic treatment device for early stage breast cancer, has been installed and commissioned at University of Maryland School of Medicine. The objective of this study was to investigate potential dosimetric impact of inaccurate breast contour. Methods: In GammaPod treatments, patient’s beast is immobilized by a breast cup device (BCID) throughout the entire same-day imaging and treatment procedure. 28 different BICD sizes are available to accommodate patients with varying breast sizes. A mild suction helps breast tissue to conform to the shape of the cup with selected size. In treatment planning, dose calculation utilizes previously calculated dose distributions for available cup geometry rather than the breast shape from CT image. Patient CT images with breast cups indicate minor geometric discrepancy between the matched shape of the cup and the breast contour, i.e., the contour size is larger or smaller. In order to investigate the dosimetric impact of these discrepancies, we simulated such discrepancies and reassessed the dose to target as well as skin. Results: In vicinity of skin, hot/cold spots were found when matched cup size was smaller/larger than patient’s breast after comparing the corrected dose profiles from Monte Carlo simulation with the planned dose from TPS. The overdosing/underdosing of target could yield point dose differences as large as 5% due to these setup errors (D95 changes within 2.5%). Maximal skin dose was overestimated/underestimated up to 25%/45% when matched cup size was larger/smaller than real breast contour. Conclusion: The dosimetric evaluation suggests substantial underdosing/overdosing with inaccurate cup geometry during planning, which is acceptable for current clinical trial. Further studies are needed to evaluate such impact to treating small volume close to skin.

  16. Revisiting the impact of age and molecular subtype on overall survival after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian-Hua; Diest, Paul J van; Perez-Losada, Jesus; Snijders, Antoine M

    2017-10-03

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in breast cancer (BC) is often used to eradicate remaining tumor cells following surgery with the goal of maximizing local control and increasing overall survival. The current study investigated the impact of age and BC molecular subtype on overall survival after RT using a meta-analysis of the METABRIC and TCGA BC patient cohorts. We found that RT significantly prolonged survival across the whole BC patient population. The survival benefit of RT was predominantly observed in stage II BC patients treated with breast conserving surgery. Patients were then stratified by age and molecular subtype to investigate survival rate associated with RT. An increase in survival for the luminal-A and basal BC molecular subtypes was observed after RT. Stratifying patients based on age revealed that increased survival was restricted to younger patients (≤60 years of age at diagnosis). There was a significant survival benefit of radiotherapy for younger patients with tumors of the luminal A and basal molecular subtypes. Patients with other breast tumor subtypes or older breast cancer patients did not seem to benefit effects of RT. Therefore, alternate local treatment strategies should be considered for older, luminal B, and HER2 driven BC patients.

  17. Intraoperative radiotherapy given as a boost for early breast cancer: Long-term clinical and cosmetic results

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David . E-mail: azria@valdorel.fnclcc.fr; Thezenas, Simon; Gutowski, Marian; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Rouanet, Philippe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Ailleres, Norbert; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: The standard radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer consists of 50 Gy external beam RT (EBRT) to the whole breast followed by an electron boost of 10-16 Gy to the tumor bed, but this has several cosmetic disadvantages. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) could be an alternative to overcome these. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 50 women with early breast cancer operated on in a dedicated IORT facility. Median dose of 10 Gy was delivered using 9-MeV electron beams. All patients received postoperative EBRT (50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions). Late toxicity and cosmetic results were assessed independently by two physicians according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event v3.0 grading system and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 9.1 years (range, 5-15 years), two local recurrences were observed within the primary tumor bed. At the time of analysis, 45 patients are alive with (n = 1) or without disease. Among the 42 disease-free remaining patients, 6 experienced Grade 2 late subcutaneous fibrosis within the boost area. Overall, the scores indicated a very good quality of life and cosmesis was good to excellent in the evaluated patients. Conclusion: Our results confirm that IORT given as a boost after breast-conserving surgery is a reliable alternative to conventional postoperative fractionated boost radiation.

  18. Clinical impact of IMPORT HIGH trial (CRUK/06/003) on breast radiotherapy practices in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Ciurlionis, Laura; Kirby, Anna M; Locke, Imogen; Venables, Karen; Yarnold, John R; Titley, Jenny; Bliss, Judith; Coles, Charlotte E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: IMPORT HIGH is a multicentre randomized UK trial testing dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after tumour excision in females with early breast cancer and higher than average local recurrence risk. A survey was carried out to investigate the impact of this trial on the adoption of advanced breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques in the UK. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 26 IMPORT HIGH recruiting RT centres to determine whether the trial has influenced non-trial breast RT techniques in terms of volume delineation, dosimetry, treatment delivery and verification. In order to compare the clinical practice of breast RT between IMPORT HIGH and non–IMPORT HIGH centres, parts of the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) breast RT audit result were used in this study. Results: 26/26 participating centres completed the questionnaire. After joining the trial, the number of centres routinely using tumour bed clips to guide whole-breast RT rose from 5 (19%) to 21 (81%). 20/26 (77%) centres now contour target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) in some or all patients compared with 14 (54%) before the trial. 14/26 (54%) centres offer inverse-planned IMRT for selected non-trial patients with breast cancer, and 10/14 (71%) have adopted the IMPORT HIGH trial protocol for target volume and OARs dose constraints. Only 2/26 (8%) centres used clip information routinely for breast treatment verification prior to IMPORT HIGH, a minority that has since risen to 7/26 (27%). Data on 1386 patients was included from the RCR audit. This suggested that more cases from IMPORT HIGH centres had surgical clips implanted (83 vs 67%), were treated using CT guided planning with full three-dimensional dose compensation (100 vs 75%), and were treated with photon boost RT (30 vs 8%). Conclusion: The study suggests that participation in the IMPORT HIGH trial has played an important part in providing the guidance and support networks needed for the safe integration of

  19. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  20. Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco Sacco, Mariano; Loi, Gianfranco; Masini, Laura; Ferrante, Daniela; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Ronco, Marco; Magnani, Corrado; Carriero, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose {>=}25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving {>=}25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity.

  1. Using Histopathology Breast Cancer Data to Reduce Clinical Target Volume Margins at Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, Joep Schlief, Angelique; Alderliesten, Tanja; Peterse, Hans; Bartelink, Harry; Gilhuijs, Kenneth

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the incidence and extension of microscopic disease around primary breast tumors in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT), focusing on a potential application to reduce radiotherapy boost volumes. Methods and Materials: An extensive pathology tumor-distribution study was performed using 38 wide local excision specimens of BCT patients. Specimen orientation was recorded and microscopic findings reconstructed to assess the incidence of microscopic disease around the macroscopic tumor. A model of disease spread was built, showing probability of disease extension outside a treated volume (P{sub out,vol}). The model was applied in 10 new BCT patients. Taking asymmetry of tumor excision into account, new asymmetric margins for the clinical target volume of the boost (CTV{sub boost}) were evaluated that minimize the volume without increasing P{sub out,TTV} (TTV being total treated volume: V{sub surgery} + CTV{sub boost}). Potential reductions in CTV{sub boost} and TTV were evaluated. Results: Microscopic disease beyond the tumor boundary occurred isotropically at distances > 1 cm (intended surgical margin) and > 1.5 cm (intended TTV margin) in 53% and 36% of the excision specimens, respectively. In the 10 prospective patients, the average P{sub out,TTV} was, however, only 16% due to larger surgical margins than intended in some directions. Asymmetric CTV{sub boost} margins reduced the CTV{sub boost} and TTV by 27% (20 cc) and 12% (21 cc) on average, without compromising tumor coverage. Conclusions: Microscopic disease extension may occur beyond the current CTV{sub boost} in approximately one sixth of patients. An asymmetric CTV{sub boost} that corrects for asymmetry of the surgical excision has the potential to reduce boost volumes while maintaining tumor coverage.

  2. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V5). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in mast cell number and stem cell factor expression in human skin after radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Westbury, Charlotte B; Freeman, Alex; Rashid, Mohammed; Pearson, Ann; Yarnold, John R; Short, Susan C

    2014-05-01

    Mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis and may be a therapeutic target. The mechanism of increased mast cell number in relation to acute and late tissue responses in human skin was investigated. Punch biopsies of skin 1 and 15-18 months after breast radiotherapy and a contralateral control biopsy were collected. Mast cells were quantified by immunohistochemistry using the markers c-Kit and tryptase. Stem cell factor (SCF) and collagen-1 expression was analysed by qRT-PCR. Clinical photographic scores were performed at post-surgical baseline and 18 months and 5 years post-radiotherapy. Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HDMEC) cultures were exposed to 2Gy ionising radiation and p53 and SCF expression was analysed by Western blotting and ELISA. Dermal mast cell numbers were increased at 1 (p=0.047) and 18 months (p=0.040) using c-Kit, and at 18 months (p=0.024) using tryptase immunostaining. Collagen-1 mRNA in skin was increased at 1 month (p=0.047) and 18 months (p=0.032) and SCF mRNA increased at 1 month (p=0.003). None of 16 cases scored had a change in photographic appearance at 5 years, compared to baseline. SCF expression was not increased in HDMECs irradiated in vitro. Increased mast cell number was associated with up-regulated collagen-1 expression in human skin at early and late time points. This increase could be secondary to elevated SCF expression at 1 month after radiotherapy. Although mast cells accumulate around blood vessels, no endothelial cell secretion of SCF was seen after in vitro irradiation. Modification of mast cell number and collagen-1 expression may be observed in skin at 1 and 18 months after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with no change in photographic breast appearance at 5 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimating the Need for Radiotherapy for Patients With Prostate, Breast, and Lung Cancers: Verification of Model Estimates of Need With Radiotherapy Utilization Data From British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Tyldesley, Scott; Delaney, Geoff; Foroudi, Farshad; Barbera, Lisa; Kerba, Marc; Mackillop, William

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: Estimates of the need for radiotherapy (RT) using different methods (criterion based benchmarking [CBB]and the Canadian [C-EBEST]and Australian [A-EBEST]epidemiologically based estimates) exist for various cancer sites. We compared these model estimates to actual RT rates for lung, breast, and prostate cancers in British Columbia (BC). Methods and Materials: All cases of lung, breast, and prostate cancers in BC from 1997 to 2004 and all patients receiving RT within 1 year (RT{sub 1Y}) and within 5 years (RT{sub 5Y}) of diagnosis were identified. The RT{sub 1Y} and RT{sub 5Y} proportions in health regions with a cancer center for the most recent year were then calculated. RT rates were compared with CBB and EBEST estimates of RT needs. Variation was assessed by time and region. Results: The RT{sub 1Y} in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 51%, 58%, and 33% compared with 45%, 57%, and 32% for C-EBEST and 41%, 61%, and 37% for CBB models. The RT{sub 5Y} rates in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 59%, 61%, and 40% compared with 61%, 66%, and 61% for C-EBEST and 75%, 83%, and 60% for A-EBEST models. The RT{sub 1Y} rates increased for breast and prostate cancers. Conclusions: C-EBEST and CBB model estimates are closer to the actual RT rates than the A-EBEST estimates. Application of these model estimates by health care decision makers should be undertaken with an understanding of the methods used and the assumptions on which they were based.

  5. Breast Cancer Patients' Preferences for Adjuvant Radiotherapy Post Lumpectomy: Whole Breast Irradiation vs. Partial Breast Irradiation-Single Institutional Study.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Katija; McGuffin, Merrylee; Presutti, Roseanna; Harth, Tamara; Mesci, Aruz; Feldman-Stewart, Deb; Chow, Edward; Di Prospero, Lisa; Vesprini, Danny; Rakovitch, Eileen; Lee, Justin; Paszat, Lawrence; Doherty, Mary; Soliman, Hany; Ackerman, Ida; Cao, Xingshan; Kiss, Alex; Szumacher, Ewa

    2016-03-15

    This study was conducted to elucidate patients with early breast cancer preference for standard whole breast irradiation (WBI) or partial breast irradiation (PBI) following lumpectomy, as well as identify important factors for patients when making their treatment decisions. Based on relevant literature and ASTRO consensus statement guidelines, an educational tool and questionnaire were developed. Consenting, eligible women reviewed the educational tool and completed the trade-off questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated, as well as chi-squares and a logistic regression model. Of the 90 patients who completed the study, 62 % preferred WBI, 30 % preferred PBI, 4 % required more information, and 3 % had no preferences. Of the patients who chose WBI, 58 % preferred hypofractionated RT, whereas 25 % preferred the conventional RT regimen. The majority of patients rated recurrence rate [WBI = 55/55 (100 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] and survival [WBI = 54/55 (98 %), PBI = 26/26 (100 %)] as important factors contributing to their choice of treatment preference. Financial factors [WBI = 21/55 (38 %), PBI = 14/26 (53 %)] and convenience [WBI = 36/54 (67 %), PBI = 18/26 (69 %)] were rated as important less frequently. Significantly, more patients who preferred WBI also rated standard method of treatment as important when compared to patients who preferred PBI [WBI = 52/54 (96 %), PBI = 16/26 (61 %), χ (2) = 16.63, p = 0.001]. The majority of patients with early breast cancer who were surveyed for this study preferred WBI as an adjuvant treatment post lumpectomy, yet there was a sizeable minority who preferred PBI. This was associated with the importance patients place on standard treatment. These results will help medical professionals treat patients according to patient values.

  6. A randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis intervention on positive and negative affect during breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; David, Daniel; Kangas, Maria; Green, Sheryl; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy can be an emotionally difficult experience. Despite this, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological interventions to reduce negative affect, and none to date have explicitly examined interventions to improve positive affect among breast cancer radiotherapy patients. The present study examined the effectiveness of a multimodal psychotherapeutic approach, combining cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis (CBTH), to reduce negative affect and increase positive affect in 40 women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either CBTH or standard care. Participants completed weekly self-report measures of positive and negative affect. Repeated and univariate analyses of variance revealed that the CBTH approach reduced levels of negative affect [F (1, 38) = 13.49; p = .0007], and increased levels of positive affect [F (1, 38) = 9.67; p = .0035, ω2 = .48], during the course of radiotherapy. Additionally, relative to control group, the CBTH group demonstrated significantly more intense positive affect [F (1,38) = 7.09; p = .0113, d = .71] and significantly less intense negative affect [F (1,38) = 10.30; p = .0027, d = .90] during radiotherapy. The CBTH group also had a significantly higher frequency of days where positive affect was greater than negative affect (85% of days assessed for the CBTH group versus 43% of the Control group) [F (1,38) = 18.16; p = .0001, d = 1.16]. Therefore, the CBTH intervention has the potential to improve the affective experience of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19226611

  7. A phase III randomized study on the sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the conservative management of early-stage breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio . E-mail: arcangeli@ifo.it; Pinnaro, Paola; Rambone, Rita; Giannarelli, Diana; Benassi, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two different timings of radiation treatment in patients with breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery and were candidates to receive adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 206 patients who had quadrantectomy and axillary dissection for breast cancer and were planned to receive adjuvant CMF chemotherapy were randomized to concurrent or sequential radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered only to the whole breast through tangential fields to a dose of 50 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost of 10-15 Gy in 4-6 fractions to the tumor bed. Results: No differences in 5-year breast recurrence-free, metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were observed in the two treatment groups. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. No evidence of an increased risk of toxicity was observed between the two arms. No difference in radiotherapy and in the chemotherapy dose intensity was observed in the two groups. Conclusions: In patients with negative surgical margins receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy can be delayed to up to 7 months. Concurrent administration of CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy is safe and might be reserved for patients at high risk of local recurrence, such as those with positive surgical margins or larger tumor diameters.

  8. In vivo verification of radiation dose delivered to healthy tissue during radiotherapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonski, P.; Taylor, M. L.; Hackworth, W.; Phipps, A.; Franich, R. D.; Kron, T.

    2014-03-01

    Different treatment planning system (TPS) algorithms calculate radiation dose in different ways. This work compares measurements made in vivo to the dose calculated at out-of-field locations using three different commercially available algorithms in the Eclipse treatment planning system. LiF: Mg, Cu, P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed with 1 cm build-up at six locations on the contralateral side of 5 patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. TLD readings were compared to calculations of Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC), Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (XB). AAA predicted zero dose at points beyond 16 cm from the field edge. In the same region PBC returned an unrealistically constant result independent of distance and XB showed good agreement to measured data although consistently underestimated by ~0.1 % of the prescription dose. At points closer to the field edge XB was the superior algorithm, exhibiting agreement with TLD results to within 15 % of measured dose. Both AAA and PBC showed mixed agreement, with overall discrepancies considerably greater than XB. While XB is certainly the preferable algorithm, it should be noted that TPS algorithms in general are not designed to calculate dose at peripheral locations and calculation results in such regions should be treated with caution.

  9. Fatal herpetic encephalitis during brain radiotherapy in a cerebral metastasized breast cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Koudriavtseva, Tatiana; Onesti, Emanuela; Tonachella, Riccardo; Pelagalli, Lorella; Vidiri, Antonello; Jandolo, Bruno

    2010-10-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a life-threatening condition with high mortality. The pathogenesis underlying the reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV) remains undefined. We present the case of a 55-year-old female who developed HSE type 1 during brain irradiation and antioedematous dexamethasone treatment for leptomeningeal metastasized breast tumor with epileptic seizures. During the radiotherapy (RT), after a total of 32 Gray administrated in 16 fractions, our patient developed cognitive impairment and partial epileptic status without fever. Two days later the patient's clinical conditions had deteriorated and high fever manifested. A diagnosis of HSE type 1 was made by a positive cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction. Antiviral therapy with high doses of acyclovir was practiced for four weeks but the comatose state persisted. The patient died 59 days after the last RT fraction. The temporal relationship of RT to the occurrence of HSE suggests that cranial irradiation may play a role in the reactivation of latent HSV. Although antiviral therapy resistance is infrequent in immunocompetent patients, it is one of the main problems in immunocompromized patients.

  10. Evaluation of the peripheral dose to uterus in breast carcinoma radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Martín Rincón, C; Jerez Sainz, I; Modolell Farré, I; España López, M L; López Franco, P; Muñiz, J L; Romero, A M; Rodríguez, R

    2002-01-01

    The absorbed dose outside of the direct fields of radiotherapy treatment (or peripheral dose, PD) is responsible for radiation exposure of the fetus in pregnant women. Because the radiological protection of the unborn child is of particular concern in the early period of the pregnancy, the aim of this study is to estimate the PD in order to assess the absorbed dose in the uterus in a pregnant patient irradiated for breast carcinoma therapy. The treatment was simulated on an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom, and the radiation dose to the fetus was measured using an ionisation chamber and thermoluminescence dosemeters. Two similar treatments plans with and without wedges were delivered, using a 6 MV photon beam with two isocentric opposite tangential fields with a total dose of 50 Gy, in accordance with common established procedures. Average field parameters for more than 300 patients were studied. Measurements showed the fetal dose to be slightly lower than 50 mGy, a level at which the risk to the fetus is uncertain, although several authors consider this value as the dose threshold for deterministic effects. The planning system (PS) underestimated PD values and no significant influence was found with the use of wedge filters.

  11. Extended radical mastectomy versus simple mastectomy followed by radiotherapy in primary breast cancer. A fifty-year follow-up to the Copenhagen Breast Cancer randomised study.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Helge; Kaae, Sigvard; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Mouridsen, Henning T

    2008-01-01

    From November 1951 to December 1957, 666 consecutive patients with untreated primary breast cancer admitted to the Radium Center in Copenhagen were randomised before their operability was evaluated into two groups, simple mastectomy with postoperative radiotherapy or extended radical mastectomy. Following physical examination 241 of the patients were excluded, primarily due to tumours deemed inoperable due to clinical criteria (n =107) and due to poor general condition (n =69). Twenty-five years results of disease-free free survival and fifty years results of survival are presented, showing no difference between the two groups. Patients with clinical stage I did significantly better than patients with stage II-III tumours. Patients with grade I tumours had a better survival than patients with grade II-III. The breast cancer associated mortality was lower in premenopausal patients compared to postmenopausal patients. An excess mortality due to breast cancer was evident up to 20-25 years following the primary diagnosis.

  12. Haplotype-Based Analysis of Genes Associated With Risk of Adverse Skin Reactions After Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, Tomo; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Kohda, Masakazu; Otsuka, Yoshimi; Yamada, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Naohito; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Kuninori; Sho, Keizen; Omura, Motoko; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kikuchi, Yuzo; Michikawa, Yuichi; Noda, Shuhei; Sagara, Masashi; Ohashi, Jun; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Mizoe, Junetsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To identify haplotypes of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with the risk of early adverse skin reactions (EASRs) after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: DNA was sampled from 399 Japanese breast cancer patients who qualified for breast-conserving radiotherapy. Using the National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria scoring system, version 2, the patients were grouped according to EASRs, defined as those occurring within 3 months of starting radiotherapy (Grade 1 or less, n = 290; Grade 2 or greater, n = 109). A total of 999 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 137 candidate genes for radiation susceptibility were genotyped, and the haplotype associations between groups were assessed. Results: The global haplotype association analysis (p < 0.05 and false discovery rate < 0.05) indicated that estimated haplotypes in six loci were associated with EASR risk. A comparison of the risk haplotype with the most frequent haplotype in each locus showed haplotype GGTT in CD44 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-4.43) resulted in a significantly greater EASR risk. Five haplotypes, CG in MAD2L2 (OR = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.35-0.87), GTTG in PTTG1 (OR = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24-0.96), TCC (OR = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26-0.89) and CCG (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92) in RAD9A, and GCT in LIG3 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.93) were associated with a reduced EASR risk. No significant risk haplotype was observed in REV3L. Conclusion: Individual radiosensitivity can be partly determined by these haplotypes in multiple loci. Our findings may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the genetic variation in radiation sensitivity and resistance among breast cancer patients.

  13. The expression level of HJURP has an independent prognostic impact and predicts the sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhi; Huang, Ge; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Gu, Shenda; Lenburg, Marc E; Pai, Melody; Bayani, Nora; Blakely, Eleanor A; Gray, Joe W; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2010-06-25

    Introduction: HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) is a newly discovered gene reported to function at centromeres and to interact with CENPA. However its role in tumor development remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of HJURP in breast cancer and its correlation with radiotherapeutic outcome. Methods: We measured HJURP expression level in human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers by Western blot and/or by Affymetrix Microarray; and determined its associations with clinical variables using standard statistical methods. Validation was performed with the use of published microarray data. We assessed cell growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells after radiation using high-content image analysis. Results: HJURP was expressed at higher level in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. HJURP mRNA levels were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade, age and Ki67 proliferation indices, but not with pathologic stage, ERBB2, tumor size, or lymph node status. Higher HJURP mRNA levels significantly decreased disease-free and overall survival. HJURP mRNA levels predicted the prognosis better than Ki67 proliferation indices. In a multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression, including clinical variables as covariates, HJURP mRNA levels remained an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. In addition HJURP mRNA levels were an independent prognostic factor over molecular subtypes (normal like, luminal, Erbb2 and basal). Poor clinical outcomes among patients with high HJURP expression werevalidated in five additional breast cancer cohorts. Furthermore, the patients with high HJURP levels were much more sensitive to radiotherapy. In vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines showed that cells with high HJURP levels were more sensitive to radiation treatment and had a higher rate of apoptosis

  14. Late radiation side effects, cosmetic outcomes and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy : Risk-modifying factors.

    PubMed

    Hille-Betz, Ursula; Vaske, Bernhard; Bremer, Michael; Soergel, Philipp; Kundu, Sudip; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Hillemanns, Peter; Henkenberens, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify parameters influencing the risk of late radiation side effects, fair or poor cosmetic outcomes (COs) and pain in breast cancer patients after breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2006 and 2013, 159 patients were treated at the Hannover Medical School. Physician-rated toxicity according to the LENT-SOMA criteria, CO and pain were assessed by multivariate analysis. LENT-SOMA grade 1-4 toxicity was observed as follows: fibrosis 10.7 %, telangiectasia 1.2 %, arm oedema 8.8 % and breast oedema 5.0 %. In addition, 15.1 % of patients reported moderate or severe breast pain, and 21.4 % complained about moderate or severe pain in the arm or shoulder. In multivariate analysis, axillary clearing (AC) was significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm [odds ratio (OR) 4.37, p = 0.011, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.4-13.58]. Breast oedema was also highly associated with AC (OR 10.59, p = 0.004, 95 % CI 2.1-53.36), a ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C (OR 5.34, p = 0.029, 95 % CI 1.2-24.12). A ptosis grade 2/3 or pseudoptosis and a bra size ≥ cup C were the parameters significantly associated with an unfavourable CO (OR 3.19, p = 0.019, 95 % CI 1.2-8.4). Concerning chronic breast pain, we found a trend related to the prescribed radiation dose including boost (OR 1.077, p = 0.060, 95 % CI 0.997-1.164). Chronic shoulder or arm pain was statistically significantly associated with lymphoedema of the arm (OR 3.9, p = 0.027, 95 % CI 1.17-13.5). Chronic arm and breast oedema were significantly influenced by the extent of surgery (AC). Ptotic and large breasts were significantly associated with unfavourable COs and chronic breast oedema. Late toxicities exclusive breast pain were not associated with radiotherapy parameters.

  15. Effect of intrafractional prostate motion on simultaneous boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate: A simulation study based on intrafractional motion in the prone position

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Itaru; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ono, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Monzen, Hajime; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Although the prostate displacement of patients in the prone position is affected by respiration-induced motion, the effect of intrafractional prostate motion in the prone position during “simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy” (SIB-IMRT) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects of intrafractional motion on SIB-IMRT to a dominant intraprostatic lesion (IPL) using measured motion data of patients in a prone position, fixed with a thermoplastic shell. We obtained 2 orthogonal x-ray fluoroscopic images at the same moment every 0.2 seconds for 30 seconds before and after treatment, once weekly, from 7 patients with localized prostate cancer with detectable prostatic calcification. Prostate displacements in the left-right (LR), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions were calculated using the prostatic calcification as a fiducial marker. We defined the displacement between pretreatment and posttreatment as baseline drift (BD). An SIB-IMRT plan was generated in which each IPL + 3 mm received a dose of 94.5 Gy, whereas the remainder of the prostate + 7 mm received a dose of 75.6 Gy in 9 fields. A simulated plan of dose blurring was generated by the convolution of isocenter-shifted plans using measured motion data in 30 seconds and motion in 30 seconds + distance between pretreatment and posttreatment position (BD) for each of the 7 patients. The motion in 30 seconds mainly reflected respiration-induced motion. The mean displacements of BD were 1.4 mm (− 3.1 to 8.2 mm), − 2.2 mm (− 9.1 to 1.5 mm), and − 0.3 mm (− 5.0 to 1.8 mm) in the AP, SI, and LR directions, respectively. The differences in the target coverage with V{sub 90%} of the IPL and V{sub 100%} of the prostate between the simulated plan and original plan were − 3.9% to − 0.3% and − 0.6% to 1.1% for respiration-induced motion and 3.1% to − 67.8% and 3.6% to − 13.3% for BD with respiration-induced motion

  16. A pilot study to investigate the role of the 26S proteasome in radiotherapy resistance and loco-regional recurrence following breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfadl, Dalia; Hodgkinson, Victoria C; Long, Ervine D; Scaife, Lucy; Drew, Philip J; Lind, Michael J; Cawkwell, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy is a currently accepted method for managing patients with early stage breast cancer. However, approximately 7% of patients may develop loco-regional tumour recurrence within 5 years. We previously reported that expression of the 26S proteasome may be associated with radio-resistance. Here we aimed to analyse the 26S proteasome in a pilot series of early breast cancers and correlate the findings with loco-regional recurrence. Fourteen patients with early breast cancer who developed loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of completing breast conserving therapy were selected according to strict criteria and compared with those from 14 patients who were disease-free at 10 years. Decreased expression of the 26S proteasome was significantly associated with radio-resistance, manifested as the development of a loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of breast conserving therapy (p = 0.018). This small pilot study provides further suggestion that the 26S proteasome may be associated with response to radiotherapy.

  17. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen

    2003-10-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher Tpot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer: agr = 0.3 Gy-1, agr/bgr = 10 Gy and sub

  18. Radiation Therapy Resources and Guideline-Concordant Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients in an Underserved Region

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nengliang; Matthews, Stephen A; Hillemeier, Marianne M; Anderson, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between radiation therapy resources and guideline-concordant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in Kentucky. Data Sources The SEER registry and Area Resource File provided county-level data describing cancer care resources and socioeconomic conditions of Kentucky residents. Study Design The outcome variable was rate of BCS without radiotherapy in each county for 2000–2007. Eight-year weighted average rates of radiation therapy providers and hospitals per 100,000 residents were explanatory variables of interest. Exploratory spatial data analyses and spatial econometric models were estimated. Principal Findings Appalachian counties in Kentucky had significantly fewer radiation oncologists, hospitals with radiation therapy facilities, and surgeons per 100,000 residents than non-Appalachian counties. The likelihood of BCS without radiation was significantly higher among Appalachian compared to non-Appalachian women (42.5 percent vs. 29.0 percent, p < .001). Higher proportions of women not receiving recommended radiotherapy after BCS were clustered in Eastern Kentucky around Lexington. This geographic disparity was partially explained by significantly fewer radiation therapy facilities in Appalachian Kentucky in adjusted analyses. Conclusions Scarce radiation therapy resources in Appalachian Kentucky are associated with disparities in receipt of guideline-concordant radiotherapy, suggesting that policy action is needed to improve the cancer treatment infrastructure in disadvantaged mountainous areas. PMID:23445478

  19. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  20. No difference in dose distribution in organs at risk in postmastectomy radiotherapy with or without breast implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, Annelie; Unukovych, Dmytro; Gagliardi, Giovanna; Bjöhle, Judith; Wickman, Marie; Johansson, Hemming; Sandelin, Kerstin

    2014-01-09

    The aim of this study was to quantify the variation in doses to organs at risk (ipsilateral lung and heart) and the clinical target volume (CTV) in the presence of breast implants. In this retrospective cohort study, patients were identified through the National Breast Cancer Register. Consecutive breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy between 2009 and 2011 and completing a full course of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) were eligible. All included patients (n = 818) were identified in the ARIA© oncology information system and further stratified for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR+, n = 162) and no immediate breast reconstruction (IBR-, n = 656). Dose statistics for ipsilateral lung, heart and CTV were retrieved from the system. Radiation plans for patients with chest wall (CW) only (n = 242) and CW plus lymph nodes (n = 576) irradiation were studied separately.The outcome variables were dichotomized as follows: lung, V(20Gy) ≤ 30% vs. V(20Gy) > 30%; heart, D(mean) ≤ 5 Gy vs. D(mean) > 5 Gy; CTV, V95% ≥ median vs. V95% < median.In the univariate and multivariate regression models no correlation between potential confounders (i.e. breast reconstruction, side of PMRT, CW index) and the outcome variables was found. Multivariate analysis of CW plus lymph nodes radiation plans, for example, showed no association of breast reconstruction with dosimetric outcomes in neither lung nor heart- lung V(20Gy) (odds ratio [OR]: 0.6, 95%CI, 0.4 to 1.0, p = 0.07) or heart D(mean) (OR: 1.2, 95%CI, 0.5 to 3.1, p = 0.72), respectively.CTV was statistically significantly larger in the IBR+ group (i.e. included breast implant), but no correlation between the implant type and dosimetric characteristics of the organs at risk was revealed.In the current study, the presence of breast implants during postmastectomy radiotherapy was not associated with increased doses to ipsilateral lung and heart, but CTV definition and its dosimetric characteristics urge further

  1. No difference in dose distribution in organs at risk in postmastectomy radiotherapy with or without breast implant reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the variation in doses to organs at risk (ipsilateral lung and heart) and the clinical target volume (CTV) in the presence of breast implants. In this retrospective cohort study, patients were identified through the National Breast Cancer Register. Consecutive breast cancer patients undergoing mastectomy between 2009 and 2011 and completing a full course of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) were eligible. All included patients (n = 818) were identified in the ARIA© oncology information system and further stratified for immediate breast reconstruction (IBR+, n = 162) and no immediate breast reconstruction (IBR-, n = 656). Dose statistics for ipsilateral lung, heart and CTV were retrieved from the system. Radiation plans for patients with chest wall (CW) only (n = 242) and CW plus lymph nodes (n = 576) irradiation were studied separately. The outcome variables were dichotomized as follows: lung, V20Gy ≤ 30% vs. V20Gy > 30%; heart, Dmean ≤ 5 Gy vs. Dmean > 5 Gy; CTV, V95% ≥ median vs. V95% < median. In the univariate and multivariate regression models no correlation between potential confounders (i.e. breast reconstruction, side of PMRT, CW index) and the outcome variables was found. Multivariate analysis of CW plus lymph nodes radiation plans, for example, showed no association of breast reconstruction with dosimetric outcomes in neither lung nor heart- lung V20Gy (odds ratio [OR]: 0.6, 95%CI, 0.4 to 1.0, p = 0.07) or heart Dmean (OR: 1.2, 95%CI, 0.5 to 3.1, p = 0.72), respectively. CTV was statistically significantly larger in the IBR+ group (i.e. included breast implant), but no correlation between the implant type and dosimetric characteristics of the organs at risk was revealed. In the current study, the presence of breast implants during postmastectomy radiotherapy was not associated with increased doses to ipsilateral lung and heart, but CTV definition and its

  2. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-08-02

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype.

  3. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype. PMID:27340922

  4. Incidence of heart disease in 35,000 women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer in Denmark and Sweden.

    PubMed

    McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah C; Hall, Per; Adolfsson, Jan; Bengtsson, Nils-Olof; Bennet, Anna M; Fornander, Tommy; Gigante, Bruna; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Peto, Richard; Rahimi, Kazem; Taylor, Carolyn W; Ewertz, Marianne

    2011-08-01

    To study incidence of radiation-related heart disease in a large population of breast cancer patients followed for up to 30 years. 72,134 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark or Sweden during 1976-2006 and followed prospectively. Radiation-related risk was studied by comparing women with left-sided and right-sided tumours. 34,825 women (48%) received radiotherapy. Among unirradiated women tumour laterality had little relevance to heart disease. Among irradiated women mean dose to the whole heart was 6.3 Gy for left-sided tumours and 2.7 Gy for right-sided tumours. Mortality was similar in irradiated women with left-sided and right-sided tumours, but incidence ratios, left-sided versus right-sided, were raised: acute myocardial infarction 1.22 (95% CI 1.06-1.42), angina 1.25 (1.05-1.49), pericarditis 1.61 (1.06-2.43), valvular heart disease 1.54 (1.11-2.13). Incidence ratios for all heart disease were as high for women irradiated since 1990 (1.09 [1.00-1.19]) as for women irradiated during 1976-1989 (1.08 [0.99-1.17]), and were higher for women diagnosed with ischaemic heart disease prior to breast cancer than for other women (1.58 [1.19-2.10] versus 1.08 [1.01-1.15], p for difference=0.01). Breast cancer radiotherapy has, at least until recently, increased the risk of developing ischaemic heart disease, pericarditis and valvular disease. Women with ischaemic heart disease before breast cancer diagnosis may have incurred higher risks than others. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Lorraine; Cox, Jennifer; Morgia, Marita; Atyeo, John; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  6. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-03-15

    A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation.

  7. Phase I study of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanxi; Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Xianguang; Li, Xiaolin; Meng, Xiangjiao; Kong, Lingling; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety, tolerability and preliminary effectiveness of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) for radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy to the chest wall after mastectomy were enrolled. EGCG solution was sprayed to the radiation field from the initiation of Grade 1 radiation dermatitis until 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. EGCG concentration escalated from 40 to 660 μmol l−1 in 7 levels with 3–6 patients in each level. EGCG toxicity was graded using the NCI (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) v. 3.0. Any adverse event >Grade 1 attributed to EGCG was considered dose-limiting toxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was defined as the dose level that induced dose-limiting toxicity in more than one-third of patients at a given cohort. Radiation dermatitis was recorded weekly by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring and patient-reported symptoms. Results: From March 2012 to August 2013, 24 patients were enrolled. Acute skin redness was observed in 1 patient and considered to be associated with the EGCG treatment at 140 μmol l−1 level. Three more patients were enrolled at this level and did not experience toxicity to EGCG. The dose escalation stopped at 660 μmol l−1. No other reported acute toxicity was associated with EGCG. Grade 2 radiation dermatitis was observed in eight patients during or after radiotherapy, but all decreased to Grade 1 after EGCG treatments. Patient-reported symptom scores were significantly decreased at 2 weeks after the end of radiotherapy in pain, burning, itching and tenderness, p < 0.05. Conclusion: The topical administration of EGCG was well tolerated and the maximum tolerated dose was not found. EGCG may be effective in treating radiation dermatitis with preliminary investigation. Advances in

  8. Monte Carlo skin dose simulation in intraoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer using spherical applicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, F.; Ung, N. M.; Khandaker, M. U.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Saad, M.; Malik, R. Abdul; Bustam, A. Z.; Zaili, Z.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The relatively new treatment modality electronic intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is gaining popularity, irradiation being obtained within a surgically produced cavity being delivered via a low-energy x-ray source and spherical applicators, primarily for early stage breast cancer. Due to the spatially dramatic dose-rate fall off with radial distance from the source and effects related to changes in the beam quality of the low keV photon spectra, dosimetric account of the Intrabeam system is rather complex. Skin dose monitoring in IORT is important due to the high dose prescription per treatment fraction. In this study, modeling of the x-ray source and related applicators were performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. The dosimetric characteristics of the model were validated against measured data obtained using an ionization chamber and EBT3 film as dosimeters. By using a simulated breast phantom, absorbed doses to the skin for different combinations of applicator size (1.5-5 cm) and treatment depth (0.5-3 cm) were calculated. Simulation results showed overdosing of the skin (>30% of prescribed dose) at a treatment depth of 0.5 cm using applicator sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Skin doses were significantly increased with applicator size, insofar as delivering 12 Gy (60% of the prescribed dose) to skin for the largest sized applicator (5 cm diameter) and treatment depth of 0.5 cm. It is concluded that the recommended 0.5-1 cm distance between the skin and applicator surface does not guarantee skin safety and skin dose is generally more significant in cases with the larger applicators. Highlights: • Intrabeam x-ray source and spherical applicators were simulated and skin dose was calculated. • Skin dose for constant skin to applicator distance strongly depends on applicator size. • Use of larger applicators generally results in higher skin dose. • The recommended 0.5-1 cm skin to applicator distance does not guarantee skin

  9. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max

  10. Multiple field hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy in advanced carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Engin, K; Tupchong, L; Waterman, F M; Komarnicky, L; Mansfield, C M; Hussain, N; Hoh, L L; McFarlane, J D; Leeper, D B

    1994-01-01

    Extensive recurrences on the chest wall of advanced carcinoma of the breast in 20 patients were treated with multiple field patchwork hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy between 1987-1991. The objective of the study was to evaluate the feasibility, tumour response and complications of treating extensive lesions with multiple, overlapping fields of hyperthermia. All lesions were diffuse encompassing up to 2900 cm2 in area with or without multiple nodules < or = 3 cm deep. All lesions had failed previous therapy with all but three failing previous radiotherapy. Hyperthermia consisted of 282 hyperthermia applicator fields and 357 hyperthermia treatments with external 915 MHz microwaves using commercially available applicators. Hyperthermia applicator fields were defined by the surface 50% SAR distribution of a particular applicator, and hyperthermia fields were abutted to cover the entire tumour bearing area. Radiation therapy consisted of 81 fields to a mean dose of 40 +/- 1 Gy (SE), 88% of fields received between 30 and 50 Gy. The equivalent dose was 42 +/- 1 Gy, based on the linear-quadratic model and alpha/beta = 25 (Fowler 1989). Overlapping hyperthermia fields were separated by an interval of at least three days. Up to four heat sessions per week were required to cover the entire tumour in a rotating fashion. The hyperthermia treatment time was 60 min. Hyperthermia treatments were continued for the duration of radiation therapy. Each hyperthermia applicator field was heated at least once. Patients were exposed to a mean of 14 +/- 3 hyperthermia applicator fields (range of 3-46 fields) and a mean of 18 +/- 3 hyperthermia treatments (range of 6-61) delivered over a mean of 7.5 +/- 0.9 weeks (range of 3-17 weeks). Each field was heated an average of 1.3 times. The tumour complete response rate was 95% with a recurrence rate of 5%. Nevertheless, the mean survival of patients with a complete response was only 10.8 +/- 1.7 months (range of 2-28 months

  11. Five-year results of a prospective clinical trial investigating accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy after lumpectomy for early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Horst, Kathleen C; Fasola, Carolina; Ikeda, Debra; Daniel, Bruce; Ognibene, Grant; Goffinet, Don R; Dirbas, Frederick M

    2016-08-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is emerging as an alternative to whole-breast irradiation. This study presents the results of a prospective trial evaluating 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver APBI for early-stage breast cancer. Patients with unifocal stage 0-II breast cancer measuring ≤2.5 cm without lymph node involvement wer