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Sample records for prone breast radiotherapy

  1. Accelerated Whole Breast Irradiation With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to the Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Croog, Victoria J.; Wu, Abraham J.; McCormick, Beryl; Beal, Kathryn P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Whole breast irradiation (WBI) is the standard of care for patients with early-stage breast cancer who opt for breast conservation. After a randomized trial demonstrated equivalent cosmesis and disease control with accelerated WBI (AWBI), our institution began to offer AWBI to appropriate patients. The aim of this study was to examine our unique experience with AWBI using prone positioning and simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning with a sequential boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: We identified 356 patients who had been treated with prone WBI using IMRT in our department between January 2004 and December 2006. Of these, 128 (36%) patients had received AWBI (representing 131 treated breasts), consisting of 16 daily fractions of 265 cGy to a total dose of 4,240 cGy followed by a conventionally fractionated boost. Results: Patients who opted for AWBI were similar demographically to the patients undergoing conventional WBI. In the AWBI cohort, 83% of the patients had Stage T1 disease and 22% had nodal involvement (N1). The tumors were estrogen receptor-positive, progesterone receptor-positive and Her-2/Neu-amplified in 82%, 69%, and 11%, respectively. The median duration of AWBI plus a boost was 29 days, and no patient required a toxicity-related treatment break. No Grade 3 or greater acute toxicity developed. At a median follow-up of 18 months, one ipsilateral breast recurrence developed that was salvaged with mastectomy and immediate reconstruction. Conclusion: AWBI to the prone breast using simplified IMRT with a sequential boost offers women requiring breast-only adjuvant radiotherapy an abbreviated treatment with early tumor control and cosmesis comparable to that with standard fractionation.

  2. SU-E-T-292: Dosimetric Advantage of Prone Breast Radiotherapy for Korean Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Y; Shin, J; Yu, J; Park, W; Choi, D; Huh, S; Han, Y; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric benefit of prone breast radiotherapy for Korean left-sided early-stage breast cancer patients who have relatively small breast Methods: From April to June, 2014, 10 left-sided breast cancer patients received the whole breast irradiation in prone position after partial mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection. All patients were pTmi-2N0-1mi. Each patient underwent two computed tomoradiography (CT) simulations in supine and prone positions. The whole breast, ipsilateral lung, heart, and left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) were contoured on each simulation CT images, and then tangential-fields treatment plan in each position was designed for the whole breast irradiation with the total dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. Dose-volume histograms of two setups were compared for target coverage and radiation dose to normal organs with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results: The median age of patients was 47 years (range, 37 to 53). The median chest size was 82.5 cm (range, 75 to 90) and bra cup size was A in 4, B in 4, and C in 2 patients. The radiation dose to the whole breast was similar when comparing mean dose (Dmean) and dose covering 95% of the breast volume, but maximum dose (Dmax) of breast was higher in supine (median 52.3 vs. 52.7 Gy, p=0.013). Prone position reduced significantly the radiation dose in ipsilateral lung, heart, and LAD by median 5.7, 1.1, and 6.9 Gy of Dmean (p=0.005, 0.007, and 0.005) and 28.2, 18.8, and 35.0 Gy of Dmax (p=0.005, 0.005, and 0.007), respectively. Conclusion: Prone breast radiotherapy could be beneficial for Korean breast cancer patients since it substantially spared normal organs while achieving adequate coverage of the breast tissue. Further prospective study is required to validate the potential benefit of prone breast radiotherapy.

  3. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Uma Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N.

    2016-07-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000 mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9 cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal–oxide–semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6 MV photons at 200 cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94 cGy, and

  4. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Uma; Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal-oxide-semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6MV photons at 200cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94cGy, and shielded dose

  5. Evaluation of the anatomical parameters for normal tissue sparing in the prone position radiotherapy with small sized left breasts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Jinyoung

    2016-01-01

    Prone position radiotherapy for a small (< 750 cm3) breast is controversial because of the variable benefits for the irradiated heart volume. The objective anatomical parameters related with chest wall shape that can determine the heart dose sparing patients in the prone position. Twenty-one patients underwent CT-simulation in supine and prone position. Dose volume parameters were compared and the objective indexes such as the Haller index, anthropometric index, mid-sternum thickness, and central lung distance (CLD) were evaluated the relationship between the shape of the chest wall and irradiated normal tissue volume in prone position. The median breast volume was 440.10 cm3 (range, 151.5–727.41 cm3). There was no difference of breast target volume between supine and prone position (p = 0.178). The Haller index under 2.5 (p = 0.046), an anthropometric index over 0.05 (p = 0.007), and the CLD over 2 (p = 0.023) conferred a greater heart sparing effect in the prone position. In conclusions, the objective anatomical parameters related chest wall shape predict the decrease in irradiated heart volume in the prone position. Therefore, it is possible to screen for patients with a reduced heart volume irradiation among those with small breasts before applying prone position radiotherapy. PMID:27756882

  6. Prospective Assessment of Optimal Individual Position (Prone Versus Supine) for Breast Radiotherapy: Volumetric and Dosimetric Correlations in 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lymberis, Stella C.; Wyngaert, John Keith de; Parhar, Preeti; Chhabra, Arpit M.; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Chang Jengwha; Hochman, Tsivia; Guth, Amber; Roses, Daniel; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Damage to heart and lung from breast radiotherapy is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and lung cancer development. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate which position is best to spare lung and heart from radiotherapy exposure. Methods and Materials: One hundred consecutive Stage 0-IIA breast cancer patients consented to participate in a research trial that required two computed tomography simulation scans for planning both supine and prone positions. The optimal position was defined as that which best covered the contoured breast and tumor bed while it minimized critical organ irradiation, as quantified by the in-field heart and lung volume. The trial was designed to plan the first 100 patients in each position to study correlations between in-field volumes of organs at risk and dose. Results: Fifty-three left and 47 right breast cancer patients were consecutively accrued to the trial. In all patients, the prone position was optimal for sparing lung volume compared to the supine setup (mean lung volume reduction was 93.5 cc for right and 103.6 cc for left breast cancer patients). In 46/53 (87%) left breast cancer patients best treated prone, in-field heart volume was reduced by a mean of 12 cc and by 1.8 cc for the other 7/53 (13%) patients best treated supine. As predicted, supine-prone differences in in-field volume and mean dose of heart and lung were highly correlated (Spearman's correlation coefficient for left breast cancer patients was 0.90 for heart and 0.94 for lung and 0.92 for right breast cancer patients for lung). Conclusions: Prone setup reduced the amount of irradiated lung in all patients and reduced the amount of heart volume irradiated in 87% of left breast cancer patients. In-field organ volume is a valid surrogate for predicting dose; the trial continued to the planned target of 400.

  7. Increased Skin Dose With the Use of a Custom Mattress for Prone Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Stewart J. Patel, Rakesh R.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the loss of buildup to the skin of the breast in the prone position due to 2 different positioning systems during tangential external beam irradiation. Two experiments were performed; one with a standard nylon-covered foam support and another with a novel helium-filled Mylar bag support. The choice of helium-filled Mylar was to reduce the contamination to as low as possible. The experiments were designed to allow a surface dose measurement and a depth dose profile with the pads placed in the path of the beam in front of the detector. All measurements were taken using a Capintec PS-033 thin-window parallel plate ionization chamber. The standard nylon-covered foam pad caused the surface dose to rise as it got closer to the skin. When the pad was directly touching the surface, the surface dose increased by 300% compared to the result when no pad was present. This loss of buildup to the surface was similar to that of a custom bolus material. The opposite effect occurred with the use of the helium-filled Mylar bag, namely the surface dose gradually decreased as the pad got closer to the phantom. When the Mylar pad was directly touching the phantom, the surface dose was decreased by 7% compared to when no pad was present. The use of a foam pad could potentially result in a significant higher dose to the skin, resulting in an enhanced acute skin reaction. Therefore, special care should be taken in this clinical scenario and further investigation of an air- or helium-based mylar support pad should be investigated in the context of definitive breast radiation treatment.

  8. Prospective Study of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Becker, Stewart J.; Lymberis, Stella; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report setup variations during prone accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods: New York University (NYU) 07-582 is an institutional review board-approved protocol of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to deliver image-guided ABPI in the prone position. Eligible are postmenopausal women with pT1 breast cancer excised with negative margins and no nodal involvement. A total dose of 30 Gy in five daily fractions of 6 Gy are delivered to the planning target volume (the tumor cavity with 1.5-cm margin) by image-guided radiotherapy. Patients are set up prone, on a dedicated mattress, used for both simulation and treatment. After positioning with skin marks and lasers, CBCTs are performed and the images are registered to the planning CT. The resulting shifts (setup corrections) are recorded in the three principal directions and applied. Portal images are taken for verification. If they differ from the planning digital reconstructed radiographs, the patient is reset, and a new CBCT is taken. Results: 70 consecutive patients have undergone a total of 343 CBCTs: 7 patients had four of five planned CBCTs performed. Seven CBCTs (2%) required to be repeated because of misalignment in the comparison between portal and digital reconstructed radiograph image after the first CBCT. The mean shifts and standard deviations in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were -0.19 (0.54), -0.02 (0.33), and -0.02 (0.43) cm, respectively. The average root mean squares of the daily shifts were 0.50 (0.28), 0.29 (0.17), and 0.38 (0.20). A conservative margin formula resulted in a recommended margin of 1.26, 0.73, 0.96 cm in the AP, SI, and ML directions. Conclusion: CBCTs confirmed that the NYU prone APBI setup and treatment technique are reproducible, with interfraction variation comparable to those reported for supine setup. The currently applied margin (1.5 cm) adequately compensates for the setup variation detected.

  9. Hypofractionated breast cancer radiotherapy. Helical tomotherapy in supine position or classic 3D-conformal radiotherapy in prone position: which is better?

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Fabrizio; Giugliano, Francesca Maria; Iadanza, Luciano; Cutillo, Luisa; Muto, Matteo; Toledo, Diego; Ravo, Vincenzo; Falivene, Sara; Muto, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    We propose a comparative dosimetric study of whole-breast hypofractionated radiation therapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) in supine position and 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in prone position. Twelve patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy were retrospectively selected from October to December 2012. Specific dose-volume parameters were selected for the study. The target coverage was adequate in all patients for both techniques. Significant differences in lung dose distribution were observed: maximum dose (mean value over the 12 plans) was 23.41 Gy in HT plans and 6.65 Gy in 3D-CRT; V20 (i.e. the lung volume receiving 20 Gy) was 0.31% in HT plans and 0.0% in 3D-CRT plans. The mean dose to the heart was 5.57 Gy and 0.93 Gy, respectively. The differences between the two techniques were significant (p<0.05) only for some parameters. We noted better results in the prone position, but with HT, dose constraints were mentioned for the whole set of considered organs.

  10. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C.; Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, Keith J.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest but

  11. Prone Whole-Breast Irradiation Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Early Disease Yields High Rates of Excellent to Good Cosmetic Outcomes in Patients With Large and/or Pendulous Breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy; Morrow, Natalya; Wilson, J. Frank; Walker, Alonzo; Xiang Qun; Ahn, Kwang Woo; White, Julia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our institution's experience using prone positioning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation (WBI) in a cohort of women with large and/or pendulous breasts, to determine the rate of acute and late toxicities and, more specifically, cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that using 3D-CRT for WBI in the prone position would reduce or eliminate patient and breast size as negative prognostic indicators for toxicities associated with WBI. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 110 cases were treated with prone WBI using 3D-CRT. The lumpectomy, breast target volumes, heart, and lung were contoured on all computed tomography scans. A dose of 45-50 Gy was prescribed to the breast volume using standard fractionation schemes. The planning goals were {>=}95% of prescription to 95% of the breast volume, and 100% of boost dose to 95% of lumpectomy planning target volume. Toxicities and cosmesis were prospectively scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects Version 3.0 and the Harvard Scale. The median follow-up was 40 months. Results: The median body mass index (BMI) was 33.6 kg/m{sup 2}, and median breast volume was 1396 cm{sup 3}. The worst toxicity encountered during radiation was Grade 3 dermatitis in 5% of our patient population. Moist desquamation occurred in 16% of patients, with only 2% of patients with moist desquamation outside the inframammary/axillary folds. Eleven percent of patients had Grade {>=}2 late toxicities, including Grade 3 induration/fibrosis in 2%. Excellent to good cosmesis was achieved in 89%. Higher BMI was associated with moist desquamation and breast pain, but BMI and breast volume did not impact fibrosis or excellent to good cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients with higher BMI and/or large-pendulous breasts, delivering prone WBI using 3D-CRT results in favorable toxicity profiles and high excellent to good cosmesis rates. Higher BMI was

  12. Comparison of Acute and Late Toxicity of Two Regimens of 3- and 5-Week Concomitant Boost Prone IMRT to Standard 6-Week Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shahzad; Lymberis, Stella C.; Ciervide, Raquel; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Magnolfi, Chiara; Rosenstein, Barry; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Limited information is available comparing toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy (RT) to that of standard fractionation RT for early stage breast cancer. We report early and late toxicities of two prone regimens of accelerated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a concomitant boost (CB) to the tumor bed delivered over 3 or 5 weeks as compared to standard 6 week RT with a sequential electron boost. Methods: From 2/2003 to 12/2007, 169 consecutive patients with Stage I–II breast cancer were offered the choice to undergo prone RT with either: a 6-week standard RT regimen of 46 Gy/23 fractions (fx) to the whole breast (WB), followed by a14 Gy sequential boost (SB) to the tumor bed (6wSB), a 5-week regimen of 50 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 6.25 Gy in 25 fx (5wCB); or a 3-week protocol of 40.5 Gy to WB with an IMRT CB of 7.5 Gy in 15 fx (3wCB). These regimens were estimated as biologically equivalent, based on alpha/beta = 4 for tumor control. Toxicities were reported using RTOG and LENT/SOMA scoring. Results: 51/169 patients chose standard 6wSB, 28 selected 5wCB, and 90 enrolled in 3wCB protocol. Maximum acute toxicity was Grade 3 dermatitis in 4% of the patients in the 6wSB compared 1% in 3wCB. In general, acute complications (breast pain, fatigue, and dermatitis) were significantly less in the 3wCB than in the other schedules (P < 0.05). With a median follow-up of 61 months, the only Grade 3 late toxicity was telangiectasia in two patients: one in 3wCB and one in 5wCB group. Notably, fibrosis was comparable among the three groups (P = NS). Conclusion: These preliminary data suggest that accelerated regimens of breast RT over 3 or 5 weeks in the prone position, with an IMRT tumor bed CB, result in comparable late toxicity to standard fractionation with a sequential tumor boost delivered over 6 weeks. As predicted by radiobiological modeling the shorter regimen was associated with less acute effects. PMID:22649788

  13. The Role of a Prone Setup in Breast Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials. PMID:22655240

  14. The role of a prone setup in breast radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Huppert, Nelly; Jozsef, Gabor; Dewyngaert, Keith; Formenti, Silvia Chiara

    2011-01-01

    Most patients undergoing breast conservation therapy receive radiotherapy in the supine position. Historically, prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. With the advent of CT planning, the prone technique has become both feasible and reproducible. It was shown to be advantageous not only for women with larger breasts but in most patients since it consistently reduces, if not eliminates, the inclusion of heart and lung within the field. The prone setup has been accepted as the best localizing position for both MRI and stereotactic biopsy, but its adoption has been delayed in radiotherapy. New technological advances including image-modulated radiation therapy and image-guided radiation therapy have made possible the exploration of accelerated fractionation schemes with a concomitant boost to the tumor bed in the prone position, along with better imaging and verification of reproducibility of patient setup. This review describes some of the available techniques for prone breast radiotherapy and the available experience in their application. The NYU prone breast radiotherapy approach is discussed, including a summary of the results from several prospective trials.

  15. A Dosimetric Comparison of Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Techniques: Multicatheter Interstitial Brachytherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, and Supine Versus Prone Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh R. . E-mail: patel@humonc.wisc.edu; Becker, Stewart J.; Das, Rupak K.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dosimetrically four different techniques of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in the same patient. Methods and Materials: Thirteen post-lumpectomy interstitial brachytherapy (IB) patients underwent imaging with preimplant computed tomography (CT) in the prone and supine position. These CT scans were then used to generate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and prone and supine helical tomotherapy (PT and ST, respectively) APBI plans and compared with the treated IB plans. Dose-volume histogram analysis and the mean dose (NTD{sub mean}) values were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage was excellent for all methods. Statistical significance was considered to be a p value <0.05. The mean V100 was significantly lower for IB (12% vs. 15% for PT, 18% for ST, and 26% for 3D-CRT). A greater significant differential was seen when comparing V50 with mean values of 24%, 43%, 47%, and 52% for IB, PT, ST, and 3D-CRT, respectively. The IB and PT were similar and delivered an average lung NTD{sub mean} dose of 1.3 Gy{sub 3} and 1.2 Gy{sub 3}, respectively. Both of these methods were statistically significantly lower than the supine external beam techniques. Overall, all four methods yielded similar low doses to the heart. Conclusions: The use of IB and PT resulted in greater normal tissue sparing (especially ipsilateral breast and lung) than the use of supine external beam techniques of 3D-CRT or ST. However, the choice of APBI technique must be tailored to the patient's anatomy, lumpectomy cavity location, and overall treatment goals.

  16. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  17. Preliminary Results on Setup Precision of Prone-Lateral Patient Positioning for Whole Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; Speleers, Bruno; Bakker, Marlies; Jacobs, Filip; Coghe, Marc; De Gersem, Werner; Impens, Aline; Nechelput, Sarah; De Wagter, Carlos

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and reproducible technique for prone positioning and to compare dose-volume indices in prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients underwent computed tomography imaging for radiotherapy planning in prone and supine position. Experience was gained in the first eight patients, which lead to modifications of the Horizon prone breast board (Civco Medical Solutions, Orange City, Iowa, USA) and the patient setup technique. A unilateral breast holder (U-BH) was developed (Van de Velde, Schellebelle, Belgium) to retract the contralateral breast away from the treated breast. The technique was then applied to an additional 10 patients. The setup precision was evaluated using daily cone-beam CT. Results: Modifications to the breast board were made to secure a prone-lateral rather then a pure prone position. We evolved from a classical setup using laser marks on the patients' body to a direct breast setup using marks on the breast only. The setup precision of the direct positioning procedure with the modified breast board and the U-BH is comparable to supine setup data in the literature. Dose-volume indices for heart and lung show significantly better results for prone than for supine position, and dose homogeneity within the treated breast did not differ according to the treatment position. Conclusions: The setup precision of our prone-lateral positioning technique is comparable to supine data in literature. Our data show the advantage of prone radiotherapy to spare the lung and heart. Further research is necessary to reduce the duration of prone setup.

  18. Symmetric Biomechanically Guided Prone-to-Supine Breast Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Eiben, Björn; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Hipwell, John H; Kabus, Sven; Buelow, Thomas; Lorenz, Cristian; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Reis, Sara; Williams, Norman R; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hawkes, David J

    2016-01-01

    Prone-to-supine breast image registration has potential application in the fields of surgical and radiotherapy planning, image guided interventions, and multi-modal cancer diagnosis, staging, and therapy response prediction. However, breast image registration of three dimensional images acquired in different patient positions is a challenging problem, due to large deformations induced to the soft breast tissue caused by the change in gravity loading. We present a symmetric, biomechanical simulation based registration framework which aligns the images in a central, virtually unloaded configuration. The breast tissue is modelled as a neo-Hookean material and gravity is considered as the main source of deformation in the original images. In addition to gravity, our framework successively applies image derived forces directly into the unloading simulation in place of a subsequent image registration step. This results in a biomechanically constrained deformation. Using a finite difference scheme avoids an explicit meshing step and enables simulations to be performed directly in the image space. The explicit time integration scheme allows the motion at the interface between chest and breast to be constrained along the chest wall. The feasibility and accuracy of the approach presented here was assessed by measuring the target registration error (TRE) using a numerical phantom with known ground truth deformations, nine clinical prone MRI and supine CT image pairs, one clinical prone-supine CT image pair and four prone-supine MRI image pairs. The registration reduced the mean TRE for the numerical phantom experiment from initially 19.3 to 0.9 mm and the combined mean TRE for all fourteen clinical data sets from 69.7 to 5.6 mm.

  19. [Respiratory synchronization and breast radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mège, A; Ziouèche-Mottet, A; Bodez, V; Garcia, R; Arnaud, A; de Rauglaudre, G; Pourel, N; Chauvet, B

    2016-10-01

    Adjuvant radiation therapy following breast cancer surgery continues to improve locoregional control and overall survival. But the success of highly targeted-conformal radiotherapy such as intensity-modulated techniques, can be compromised by respiratory motion. The intrafraction motion can potentially result in significant under- or overdose, and also expose organs at risk. This article summarizes the respiratory motion and its effects on imaging, dose calculation and dose delivery by radiotherapy for breast cancer. We will review the methods of respiratory synchronization available for breast radiotherapy to minimize the respiratory impact and to spare organs such as heart and lung.

  20. PRONE ACCELERATED PARTIAL BREAST IRRADIATION AFTER BREAST-CONSERVING SURGERY: FIVE YEAR RESULTS OF 100 PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position (P-APBI). Methods Post-menopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with non palpable <2 cm tumors, negative margins, and negative nodes, positive hormonal receptors, and no extensive intraductal component (EIC) were eligible. The trial was offered only once eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone set-up. The 3D-CRT delivered was 30 Gy in five 6 Gy/daily fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Ipsilateral breast, ipsilateral nodal, contralateral breast, and distant failure (IBF, INF, CBF, DF) were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival (DFS, OS, CSS) were recorded. Results One hundred patients accrued to this IRB- approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation and another elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients are evaluable for toxicity and, in one case, both breasts were treated with PBI. Median patient age was 68 years (range 53–88 years); in 55% the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormonal receptor positive cancers: 87% underwent adjuvant anti-hormonal therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2–125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% IBF) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% CBF). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (1 breast edema, 1 transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36 months follow-up. Conclusions Five-year efficacy and toxicity of 3D-CRT to deliver prone-PBI are comparable to other experiences with similar

  1. Whole-breast irradiation: a subgroup analysis of criteria to stratify for prone position treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramella, Sara; Trodella, Lucio; Ippolito, Edy; Fiore, Michele; Cellini, Francesco; Stimato, Gerardina; Gaudino, Diego; Greco, Carlo; Ramponi, Sara; Cammilluzzi, Eugenio; Cesarini, Claudio; Piermattei, Angelo; Cesario, Alfredo; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria

    2012-07-01

    To select among breast cancer patients and according to breast volume size those who may benefit from 3D conformal radiotherapy after conservative surgery applied with prone-position technique. Thirty-eight patients with early-stage breast cancer were grouped according to the target volume (TV) measured in the supine position: small ({<=}400 mL), medium (400-700 mL), and large ({>=}700 ml). An ad-hoc designed and built device was used for prone set-up to displace the contralateral breast away from the tangential field borders. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography in both the supine and prone positions. Dosimetric data to explore dose distribution and volume of normal tissue irradiated were calculated for each patient in both positions. Homogeneity index, hot spot areas, the maximum dose, and the lung constraints were significantly reduced in the prone position (p < 0.05). The maximum heart distance and the V{sub 5Gy} did not vary consistently in the 2 positions (p = 0.06 and p = 0.7, respectively). The number of necessary monitor units was significantly higher in the supine position (312 vs. 232, p < 0.0001). The subgroups analysis pointed out the advantage in lung sparing in all TV groups (small, medium and large) for all the evaluated dosimetric constraints (central lung distance, maximum lung distance, and V{sub 5Gy}, p < 0.0001). In the small TV group, a dose reduction in nontarget areas of 22% in the prone position was detected (p = 0.056); in the medium and high TV groups, the difference was of about -10% (p = NS). The decrease in hot spot areas in nontarget tissues was 73%, 47%, and 80% for small, medium, and large TVs in the prone position, respectively. Although prone breast radiotherapy is normally proposed in patients with breasts of large dimensions, this study gives evidence of dosimetric benefit in all patient subgroups irrespective of breast volume size.

  2. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Norman R.; Pigott, Katharine H.; Brew-Graves, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT) as a treatment for breast cancer is a relatively new technique that is designed to be a replacement for whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in selected women suitable for breast-conserving therapy. This article reviews twelve reasons for the use of the technique, with a particular emphasis on targeted intra-operative radiotherapy (TARGIT) which uses X-rays generated from a portable device within the operating theatre immediately after the breast tumour (and surrounding margin of healthy tissue) has been removed. The delivery of a single fraction of radiotherapy directly to the tumour bed at the time of surgery, with the capability of adding EBRT at a later date if required (risk-adaptive technique) is discussed in light of recent results from a large multinational randomised controlled trial comparing TARGIT with EBRT. The technique avoids irradiation of normal tissues such as skin, heart, lungs, ribs and spine, and has been shown to improve cosmetic outcome when compared with EBRT. Beneficial aspects to both institutional and societal economics are discussed, together with evidence demonstrating excellent patient satisfaction and quality of life. There is a discussion of the published evidence regarding the use of IORT twice in the same breast (for new primary cancers) and in patients who would never be considered for EBRT because of their special circumstances (such as the frail, the elderly, or those with collagen vascular disease). Finally, there is a discussion of the role of the TARGIT Academy in developing and sustaining high standards in the use of the technique. PMID:25083504

  3. Cardiac Side-effects From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C W; Kirby, A M

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer radiotherapy reduces the risk of cancer recurrence and death. However, it usually involves some radiation exposure of the heart and analyses of randomised trials have shown that it can increase the risk of heart disease. Estimates of the absolute risks of radiation-related heart disease are needed to help oncologists plan each individual woman's treatment. The risk for an individual woman varies according to her estimated cardiac radiation dose and her background risk of ischaemic heart disease in the absence of radiotherapy. When it is known, this risk can then be compared with the absolute benefit of the radiotherapy. At present, many UK cancer centres are already giving radiotherapy with mean heart doses of less than 3 Gy and for most women the benefits of the radiotherapy will probably far outweigh the risks. Technical approaches to minimising heart dose in breast cancer radiotherapy include optimisation of beam angles, use of multileaf collimator shielding, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, treatment in a prone position, treatment in deep inspiration (including the use of breath-hold and gating techniques), proton therapy and partial breast irradiation. The multileaf collimator is suitable for many women with upper pole left breast cancers, but for women with central or lower pole cancers, breath-holding techniques are now recommended in national UK guidelines. Ongoing work aims to identify ways of irradiating pan-regional lymph nodes that are effective, involve minimal exposure of organs at risk and are feasible to plan, deliver and verify. These will probably include wide tangent-based field-in-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy or arc radiotherapy techniques in combination with deep inspiratory breath-hold, and proton beam irradiation for women who have a high predicted heart dose from intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

  4. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Five-year Results of 100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Formenti, Silvia C.; Hsu, Howard; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Roses, Daniel; Guth, Amber; Jozsef, Gabor; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, J. Keith

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a prospective trial of three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation in the prone position. Methods and Materials: Postmenopausal patients with Stage I breast cancer with nonpalpable tumors <2 cm, negative margins and negative nodes, positive hormone receptors, and no extensive intraductal component were eligible. The trial was offered only after eligible patients had refused to undergo standard whole-breast radiotherapy. Patients were simulated and treated on a dedicated table for prone setup. 3D-CRT was delivered at a dose of 30 Gy in five 6-Gy/day fractions over 10 days with port film verification at each treatment. Rates of ipsilateral breast failure, ipsilateral nodal failure, contralateral breast failure, and distant failure were estimated using the cumulative incidence method. Rates of disease-free, overall, and cancer-specific survival were recorded. Results: One hundred patients were enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective trial, one with bilateral breast cancer. One patient withdrew consent after simulation, and another patient elected to interrupt radiotherapy after receiving two treatments. Ninety-eight patients were evaluable for toxicity, and, in 1 case, both breasts were treated with partial breast irradiation. Median patient age was 68 years (range, 53-88 years); in 55% of patients the tumor size was <1 cm. All patients had hormone receptor-positive cancers: 87% of patients underwent adjuvant antihormone therapy. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 2-125 months), there was one local recurrence (1% ipsilateral breast failure) and one contralateral breast cancer (1% contralateral breast failure). There were no deaths due to breast cancer by 5 years. Grade 3 late toxicities occurred in 2 patients (one breast edema, one transient breast pain). Cosmesis was rated good/excellent in 89% of patients with at least 36

  5. Differences in breast tissue oxygenation following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dornfeld, Ken; Gessert, Charles E; Renier, Colleen M; McNaney, David D; Urias, Rodolfo E; Knowles, Denise M; Beauduy, Jean L; Widell, Sherry L; McDonald, Bonita L

    2011-08-01

    Tissue perfusion and oxygenation changes following radiotherapy may result from and/or contribute to the toxicity of treatment. Breast tissue oxygenation levels were determined in the treated and non-treated breast 1 year after radiotherapy for breast conserving treatment. Transcutaneous oxygenation varied between subjects in both treated and non-treated breast. Subjects without diabetes mellitus (n=16) had an average oxygenation level of 64.8 ± 19.9mmHg in the irradiated breast and an average of 72.3 ± 18.1mmHg (p=0.018) at the corresponding location in the control breast. Patients with diabetes (n=4) showed a different oxygenation pattern, with lower oxygenation levels in control tissue and no decrease in the irradiated breast. This study suggests oxygenation levels in normal tissues vary between patients and may respond differently after radiotherapy.

  6. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  7. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    SciTech Connect

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith; Roses, Daniel; Speyer, James; Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah; Fenton Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  8. Breast cellulitis after conservative surgery and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, J.; McCormick, B.; Brown, A.E.; Myskowski, P.L. )

    1994-04-30

    Cellulitis is a previously unreported complication of conservative surgery and radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer. Patients who presented with breast cellulitis after conservative therapy are described. Eleven patients that developed cellulitis of the breast over a 38-month period of observation are the subject of this report. Clinical characteristics of patients with cellulitis and their treatment and outcome are reported. Potential patient and treatment-related correlates for the development of cellulitis are analyzed. The risk of cellulitis persists years after initial breast cancer therapy. The clinical course of the patients was variable: some patients required aggressive, long-duration antibiotic therapy, while others had rapid resolution with antibiotics. Three patients suffered from multiple episodes of cellulitis. Patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery and radiotherapy are at risk for breast cellulitis. Systematic characterization of cases of cellulitis may provide insight into diagnosis, prevention, and more effective therapy for this uncommon complication. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Prone Positioning Causes the Heart To Be Displaced Anteriorly Within the Thorax: Implications for Breast Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chino, Junzo P. Marks, Lawrence B.

    2008-03-01

    Introduction: Prone positioning has been suggested as an alternative to the conventional supine position for patients receiving breast radiotherapy, but few data exist on how this may alter heart location. We herein quantitatively compare the intrathoracic location of the heart in the prone and supine positions in patients treated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In 16 patients treated with tangent photons for breast cancer, the computed tomography planning images (obtained in the supine position) and diagnostic magnetic resonance images (obtained in the prone position) were studied. For each case, the distance between the anterior pericardium and the anterior chest wall was measured at nine specific points; three points at each of three axial levels. The differences in the measurements between the prone and supine positions were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: There is a systematic displacement of the lateral and superior aspect of the heart closer to the chest wall in the prone vs. supine position (mean displacement 19 mm (95% confidence interval 13.7-25.1 mm, p < 0.001); the medial and inferior aspects remain fixed. There was also a reduction in volume of lung interposed between the heart and chest wall when prone (mean decrease of 22 mL, p < 0.001 for difference). Conclusions: The superior and lateral aspects of the heart typically move anteriorly during prone positioning compared with the supine position. This may have negative consequences in situations in which the high-risk target tissues include the chest wall or deep breast.

  10. Smokers May Be Prone to Risks from Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Smokers May Be Prone to Risks From Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy Long-term chances of heart attack, ... 29, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who smoke have an increased risk for ...

  11. Breast Cancer Patients’ Experience of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical component of treatment for the majority of women with breast cancer, particularly those who receive breast conserving surgery. Although medically beneficial, radiotherapy can take a physical and psychological toll on patients. However, little is known about the specific thoughts and feelings experienced by women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. Therefore, the study aim was to use qualitative research methods to develop an understanding of these thoughts and feelings based on 180 diary entries, completed during radiotherapy by 15 women with Stage 0-III breast cancer. Thematic analysis identified four primary participant concerns: (a) a preoccupation with time; (b) fantasies (both optimistic and pessimistic) about life following radiotherapy; (c) the toll their side-effect experience takes on their self-esteem; and (d) feeling mystified by radiotherapy. These themes are consistent with previous literature on illness and identity. These findings have implications for the treatment and care of women undergoing breast cancer radiotherapy. PMID:19380502

  12. Radiotherapy and breast reconstruction: oncology, cosmesis and complications

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Breast reconstruction plays a highly important role in the management of patients with breast cancer, from a psycho-social and sexual stand-point. Given that immediate breast reconstruction does not impair the oncologic safety of breast cancer management, with no increase in local recurrence rates, and no delays in the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy, the need to balance cosmesis in reconstruction with the oncologic needs of breast cancer patients is no more evident than in the discussion of radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is essential adjuvant therapy in the treatment of breast cancer, with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy widely shown to reduce local recurrence after both partial and total mastectomy and shown to prolong both disease-free and overall survival in patients with nodal disease. In the setting of breast reconstruction, the effects of radiotherapy are potentially two-fold, with consideration required of the impact of breast reconstruction on the administration of and the initiation of radiotherapy, as well as the effects of radiotherapy on operative complications and cosmetic outcome following immediate breast reconstruction. The current editorial piece aims to analyze this balance, contrasting both autologous and implant-based reconstruction. The literature is still evolving as to the relative role of autologous vs. alloplastic reconstruction in the setting of radiotherapy, and the more recent introduction of acellular dermal matrix and other compounds further complicate the evidence. Fat grafting and evolving techniques in breast reconstruction will herald new discussions on this front. PMID:25083434

  13. Radiotherapy issues in elderly breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kunkler, Ian

    2012-12-01

    Breast cancer in the elderly is a rising health care challenge. Under-treatment is common. While the proportion of older patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is rising, the proportion undergoing breast-conserving surgery without irradiation has also risen. The evidence base for loco-regional treatment is limited, reflecting the historical exclusion of older patients from randomised trials. The 2011 Oxford overview shows that the risk of first recurrence is halved in all age groups by adjuvant RT after breast-conserving surgery, although the absolute benefit in older 'low-risk' patients is small. There is level 1 evidence that a breast boost after breast-conserving surgery and whole-breast irradiation reduces local recurrence in older as in younger women, although in the former the absolute reduction is modest. Partial breast irradiation (external beam or intraoperative or postoperative brachytherapy) is potentially an attractive option for older patients, but the evidence base is insufficient to recommend it routinely. Similarly, shortened (hypofractionated) dose fraction schedules may be more convenient for older patients and are supported by level 1 evidence. There remains uncertainty about whether there is a subgroup of older low-risk patients in whom postoperative RT can be omitted after breast-conserving surgery. Biomarkers of 'low risk' are needed to refine the selection of patients for the omission of adjuvant RT. The role of postmastectomy irradiation is well established for 'high-risk' patients but uncertain in the intermediate-risk category of patients with 1-3 involved axillary nodes or node-negative patients with other risk factors where its role is investigational.

  14. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  15. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3 Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0 cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  16. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Versus Whole-Breast External Beam Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Zhirui; Mei, Xin; Yang, Zhaozhi; Ma, Jinli; Chen, Xingxing; Wang, Junqi; Liu, Guangyu; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There has not been a clear answer about the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the available evidence comparing the efficacy and safety of IORT with those of whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for women with early-stage breast cancer. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to October 2014. Two authors independently conducted the literature selection and data extraction. Studies that compared IORT with whole-breast EBRT were included in the systematic review. IORT was defined as a single dose of irradiation to the tumor bed during breast-conserving surgery rather than whole-breast irradiation. Qualities of RCTs were evaluated according to the PEDro scale. Qualities of non-RCTs were evaluated according to the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS). The risk ratios (RRs) of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence, overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were pooled using a random-effects model. Four studies with 5415 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 non-RCTs. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was significantly higher in patients with IORT compared to those with whole-breast EBRT (RR 2.83, 95% CI 1.23–6.51), but with significant heterogeneity (I2 = 58.5%, P = 0.065). Comparing IORT with whole-breast EBRT, the pooled RRs for overall mortality, breast cancer mortality, non-breast cancer mortality, and distant metastasis were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.66–1.17), 1.20 (95% CI: 0.77–1.86), 0.76 (95% CI: 0.44–1.31), and 0.95 (95% CI: 0.61–1.49), respectively. IORT had a significantly higher risk of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence than whole-breast EBRT. Overall mortality did not differ significantly. IORT should be used in conjunction with the prudent selection of

  17. SU-E-T-538: Does Abdominal Compression Through Prone Patient Position Reduce Respiratory Motion in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Catron, T; Rosu, M; Weiss, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the effect of physiological abdominal compression from prone positioning by comparing respiratory-induced tumor movements in supine and prone positions. Methods: 19 lung cancer patients underwent repeated supine and prone free-breathing 4DCT scans. The effect of patient position on motion magnitude was investigated for tumors, lymph nodes (9 cases), and subgroups of central (11 cases), peripheral (8 cases) and small peripheral tumors (5 cases), by evaluating the population average excursions, absolute and relative to a carina-point. Results: Absolute motion analysis: In prone, motion increased by ~20% for tumors and ~25% for lymph nodes. Central tumors moved more compared to peripheral tumors in both supine and prone (~22%, and ~4% respectively). Central tumors movement increased by ~12% in prone. For peripheral tumors the increase in prone position was ~25% (~40% and 29% changes on along RL and AP directions). Motion relative to carina-point analysis: Overall, tumor excursions relative to carina-point increased by ~17% in prone. Lymph node relative magnitudes were lower by ~4%. Likewise, the central tumors moved ~7% less in prone. The subgroup of peripheral tumors exhibited increased amplitudes by ~44%; the small peripheral tumors had even larger relative displacements in prone (~46%). Conclusion: Tumor and lymph node movement in the patient population from this study averaged to be higher in prone than in supine position. Results from carina analysis also suggest that peripheral tissues have more physiologic freedom of motility when placed in the prone position, regardless of size. From these observations we should continue to avoid prone positioning for all types of primary lung tumor, suggesting that patients should receive radiotherapy for primary lung cancer in supine position to minimize target tissue mobility during normal respiratory effort. Further investigation will include more patients with peripheral tumors to validate our

  18. Development of three-dimensional radiotherapy techniques in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Charlotte E.

    Radiotherapy following conservation surgery decreases local relapse and death from breast cancer. Currently, the challenge is to minimise the morbidity caused by this treatment without losing efficacy. Despite many advances in radiation techniques in other sites of the body, the majority of breast cancer patients are still planned and treated using 2-dimensional simple radiotherapy techniques. In addition, breast irradiation currently consumes 30% of the UK's radiotherapy workload. Therefore, any change to more complex treatment should be of proven benefit. The primary objective of this research is to develop and evaluate novel radiotherapy techniques to decrease irradiation of normal structures and improve localisation of the tumour bed. I have developed a forward-planned intensity modulated (IMRT) breast radiotherapy technique, which has shown improved dosimetry results compared to standard breast radiotherapy. Subsequently, I have developed and implemented a phase III randomised controlled breast IMRT trial. This National Cancer Research Network adopted trial will answer an important question regarding the clinical benefit of breast IMRT. It will provide DNA samples linked with high quality clinical outcome data, for a national translational radiogenomics study investigating variation in normal tissue toxicity. Thus, patients with significant late normal tissue side effects despite good dose homogeneity will provide the best model for finding differences due to underlying genetics. I evaluated a novel technique using high definition free-hand 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound in a phantom study, and the results suggested that this is an accurate and reproducible method for tumour bed localisation. I then compared recognised methods of tumour bed localisation with the 3D ultrasound method in a clinical study. The 3D ultrasound technique appeared to accurately represent the shape and spatial position of the tumour cavity. This tumour bed localisation research

  19. Role of hypofractionated radiotherapy in breast locoregional radiation.

    PubMed

    Caudrelier, J-M; Truong, P T

    2015-06-01

    Long-term results of randomised trials have confirmed the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy using approximately 2.6 Gy per fraction to lower total doses of 40-42.6 Gy delivered over 3 weeks, for postoperative treatment of early breast cancer. In these trials, hypofractionated radiotherapy was predominantly used for breast only treatment, while there are fewer trials that specifically examined hypofractionated radiotherapy to the breast plus regional nodes. Hypofractionated locoregional radiation is considered a standard of care in the United Kingdom and in some parts of Canada. We aim to review the radiobiology and normal tissue effects of hypofractionated locoregional radiation and to summarize available published clinical experiences using this treatment strategy as adjuvant therapy after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for women with early breast cancer.

  20. Optical measurement of dimensional parameters of the breast with subjects in prone position

    PubMed Central

    Roessler, Ann-Christin; Althoff, Felix; Jaeger, Florian; Kalender, Willi; Wenkel, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Various applications require information on breast parameters, such as breast length and volume. An optical system was designed and tested for measuring these parameters with subjects in a prone position. The study results were used for optimizing patient positioning and handling for a future breast computed tomography (BCT) system. Measurements were conducted using an optical measurement system. To test the functionality and accuracy of the system, measurements were performed using reference phantoms. Additionally, 20 women and 5 men were examined to calculate breast parameters in alternative positions and breathing states. The results of the optical measurements were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Volume and length of the reference phantoms were determined with errors below 2%. The patient study demonstrated a mean breast volume of 530.7 ml for women during normal breathing. During an exhalation state, breast volume increased significantly by 17.7 ml in comparison with normal breathing. Differences with MRI measurements were found to be 3% for breast length and 9% for breast volume on average. The proposed optical measurement system was found to be suitable for measuring the dimensional parameters of the breast in a prone position and provides a tool for evaluating breast coverage for BCT. PMID:26240833

  1. Pectoral stretching program for women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, T S; Kilbreath, S L; Refshauge, K M; Pendlebury, S C; Beith, J M; Lee, M J

    2007-05-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy commonly cause adverse musculoskeletal problems, particularly loss of strength and range of motion, in the upper quadrant of breast cancer patients. Few well-designed studies have investigated whether these impairments can be prevented. Stretching is an effective technique for increasing range of motion, hence the aim of this study was to investigate whether a stretching program reduced acute musculoskeletal impairments in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-four women were recruited prior to commencement of radiotherapy following breast cancer surgery. Participants were randomised to either a control or stretch group. Participants in both groups were reviewed by the physical therapist on a weekly basis for approximately 6 weeks, and were given general information about skin care and lymphedema. The control group received no advice about exercise. The stretch group received instruction on low-load, prolonged pectoral stretches, which were to be performed daily and were checked at weekly visits. Shoulder range of motion, strength, arm circumference, and quality of life measurements were taken prior to, and at completion of radiotherapy, and at 7 months after radiotherapy. There was no difference in any outcome between groups. Breast symptoms increased for both groups during radiotherapy, without loss of strength or range of movement. The incidence of lymphedema during the study was low for both groups and did not differ between groups. The pectoral stretching program did not influence the outcomes measured because the symptoms reported by patients were not a consequence of contracture.

  2. Lactation following conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Varsos, G.; Yahalom, J. )

    1991-02-01

    A 38-year-old woman with early stage invasive breast cancer was treated with wide excision of the tumor, axillary lymph node dissection, and breast irradiation. Three years later, she gave birth to a normal baby. She attempted breast feeding and had full lactation from the untreated breast. The irradiated breast underwent only minor changes during pregnancy and postpartum but produced small amounts of colostrum and milk for 2 weeks postpartum. There are only a few reports of lactation after breast irradiation. These cases are reviewed, and possible factors affecting breast function after radiotherapy are discussed. Because of scant information available regarding its safety for the infant, nursing from the irradiated breast is not recommended.

  3. Erythema multiforme after radiotherapy with aromatase inhibitor administration in breast-conservation treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kimiko; Matsumoto, Masaaki; Ue, Hironobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Tanaka, Yousuke; Kodama, Hajime; Sasaguri, Shiro; Ogawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Generalized eruptions associated with radiotherapy such as erythema multiforme (EM), Steven-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are uncommon reactions. A few cases of generalized eruptions during and after radiotherapy have been reported with the use of anticonvulsants and anticancer drugs. However, no reports have described mucocutaneous reactions associated with radiotherapy and concurrent use of anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor. This report describes EM occurring after radiotherapy performed during breast-conserving treatment for breast cancer in a patient who was taking oral anastrozole.

  4. Male Malignant Phyllodes Breast Tumor After Prophylactic Breast Radiotherapy and Bicalutamide Treatment: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karihtala, Peeter; Rissanen, Tarja; Tuominen, Hannu

    2016-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor in male breast is an exceptionally rare neoplasm with only few published case reports. Herein, we present a case of malignant phyllodes tumor in male breast nine years after prophylactic breast 10 Gy radiotherapy and after nine year bicalutamide treatment. The imaging findings of the tumor and pathological correlation are also presented.

  5. Long-term Clinical Outcomes of Whole-Breast Irradiation Delivered in the Prone Position

    SciTech Connect

    Stegman, Lauren D.; Beal, Katherine P.; Hunt, Margie A.; Fornier, Monica N.; McCormick, Beryl . E-mail: mccormib@mskcc.org

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the effectiveness and toxicity of post-lumpectomy whole-breast radiation therapy delivered with prone positioning. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and August 2004, 245 women with 248 early-stage invasive or in situ breast cancers were treated using a prone breast board. Photon fields treated the whole breast to 46 to 50.4 Gy with standard fractionation. The target volume was clinically palpable breast tissue; no attempt was made to irradiate chest wall lymphatics. Tumor bed boosts were delivered in 85% of cases. Adjuvant chemotherapy and hormonal therapy were administered to 42% and 62% of patients, respectively. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 years, the 5 year actuarial true local and elsewhere ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates were 4.8% and 1.3%, respectively. The 5-year actuarial rates of regional nodal recurrence and distant metastases were 1.6% and 7.4%. Actuarial disease-free, disease-specific, and overall survival rates at 5 years were 89.4%, 97.3%, and 93%, respectively. Treatment breaks were required by 2.4% of patients. Grade 3 acute dermatitis and edema were each limited to 2% of patients. Only 4.9% of patients complained of acute chest wall discomfort. Chronic Grade 2 to 3 skin and subcutaneous tissue toxicities were reported in 4.4% and 13.7% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: Prone position breast radiation results in similar long-term disease control with a favorable toxicity profile compared with standard supine tangents. The anatomic advantages of prone positioning may contribute to improving the therapeutic ratio of post-lumpectomy radiation by improving dose homogeneity and minimizing incidental cardiac and lung dose.

  6. Hypofractionated adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-11-01

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging.

  7. Risk Factors of Developing Long-Lasting Breast Pain After Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Steineck, Gunnar; Malmstroem, Per; Alsadius, David; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Karlsson, Per

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy decreases breast cancer mortality. However, studies have revealed a long-lasting breast pain among some women after radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors that contribute to breast pain after breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We identified 1,027 recurrence-free women in two cohorts of Swedish women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, the breast was treated to 48 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions or to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions. Young women received a boost of up to 16 Gy. Women with more than three lymph node metastases had locoregional radiotherapy. Systemic treatments were given according to health-care guidelines. Three to 17 years after radiotherapy, we collected data using a study-specific questionnaire. We investigated the relation between breast pain and potential risk modifiers: age at treatment, time since treatment, chemotherapy, photon energy, fractionation size, boost, loco-regional radiotherapy, axillary surgery, overweight, and smoking. Results: Eight hundred seventy-seven women (85%) returned the questionnaires. Among women up to 39 years of age at treatment, 23.1% had breast pain, compared with 8.7% among women older than 60 years (RR 2.66; 95% CI 1.33-5.36). Higher age at treatment (RR 0.96; 95% CI 0.94-0.98, annual decrease) and longer time since treatment (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98, annual decrease) were related to a lower occurrence of breast pain. Chemotherapy increased the occurrence of breast pain (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.19-2.47). In the multivariable model only age and time since treatment were statistically significantly related to the occurrence of breast pain. We found no statistically significant relation between breast pain and the other potential risk modifiers. Conclusions: Younger women having undergone breast-conserving surgery with postoperative radiotherapy report a higher occurrence of long

  8. SU-E-T-307: Dosimetric Comparison of Prone Versus Supine Positioning for Adjuvant Breast Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C; O’Connor, B; Hayes, L; Rella, J; Ruiz, B; Yang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The prone treatment position has been used to reduce ipsilateral lung and heart dose in left breast radiation. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the difference in the dosimetry between prone and supine treatment positions. Methods: Eight left breast cancer patients were simulated in both the supine and prone positions as a pretreatment evaluation for the optimal treatment position. Treatment plans were created for all patients in both the supine and prone positions using a field in field three dimensional planning technique. Prescribed dose was 45 Gy delivered by two tangential photon fields. Irradiated volume (IV) was evaluated by V50, V100, and dose to lung and heart by V5, V10, V20, and the mean dose were evaluated. Results: All dosimetry metrics for both the supine and prone plans met our internal normal structure guidelines which are based on Quantec data. The average IVs (50% and 100%) were 2223cc and 1361cc prone, 2315cc and 1315cc supine. The average ipsilateral lung Mean dose (0.83Gy prone vs 5.8Gy supine), V5 (1.6% prone vs 20.9% supine), V10 (0.78% prone vs 15% supine) and V20 (0.36% prone vs 11% supine) were significantly lower in prone position. Heart Mean dose (1.4Gy prone vs 2.9Gy supine), V10 (1.4% prone vs 5.0% supine) and V20 (0.4% prone vs 3.5% supine) were found improved for all patients except one where the mean dose was the same and all other values were improved. Conclusion: The prone position offer preferable dosimetry for all patients planned in our study. These patients were chosen based on the physician’s belief that they would benefit from prone treatment either because they had large pendulous breasts or due to the amount of heart seen in the field on CT simulation.

  9. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  10. Alternated Prone and Supine Whole-Breast Irradiation Using IMRT: Setup Precision, Respiratory Movement and Treatment Time

    SciTech Connect

    Veldeman, Liv; De Gersem, Werner; Speleers, Bruno; Truyens, Bart; Van Greveling, Annick; Van den Broecke, Rudy; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to compare setup precision, respiration-related breast movement and treatment time between prone and supine positions for whole-breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage breast carcinoma after breast-conserving surgery were treated with prone and supine whole breast-irradiation in a daily alternating schedule. Setup precision was monitored using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. Respiration-related breast movement in the vertical direction was assessed by magnetic sensors. The time needed for patient setup and for the CBCT procedure, the beam time, and the length of the whole treatment slot were also recorded. Results: Random and systematic errors were not significantly different between positions in individual patients for each of the three axes (left-right, longitudinal, and vertical). Respiration-related movement was smaller in prone position, but about 80% of observations showed amplitudes <1 mm in both positions. Treatment slots were longer in prone position (21.2 {+-} 2.5 min) than in supine position (19.4 {+-} 0.8 min; p = 0.044). Conclusion: Comparison of setup precision between prone and supine position in the same patient showed no significant differences in random and systematic errors. Respiratory movement was smaller in prone position. The longer treatment slots in prone position can probably be attributed to the higher repositioning need.

  11. Radiotherapy of stage IEA primary breast lymphoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Juretić, Antonio; Zivković, Mirko; Samija, Mirko; Bagović, Davorin; Purisić, Anka; Viculin, Tomislav; Bistrović, Matija; Stanec, Mladen; Juzbasić, Stjepan; Lesar, Miro; Tomek, Rudolf

    2002-10-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred for the treatment to our Hospital because of a palpable nodule in the upper medial quadrant of her right breast. After tumor excision, pathohistological examination showed a follicular center cell lymphoma grade 2, B-cell type (CD20+, bc16+, CD10+, bcl2+). The final diagnosis was stage IEA primary extranodal non-Hodgkin s breast lymphoma. The involved breast was irradiated isocentrically with two opposite 6-megavolt (MeV) photon beams delivered from the linear accelerator (tangential fields) using asymmetric collimator opening. Radiation volume, inclinations of the medial and lateral field, and the part of the underlying chest wall and lung parenchyma were determined during the radiotherapy simulation process. The total irradiation dose was 44 Gy delivered in single daily doses of 2 Grays (Gy). After breast photon irradiation, a boost to the tumor bed was performed by a direct 12 MeV electron beam, with a total dose of 6 Gy delivered over three days. Since primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the breast is rather rare, there has been no uniform approach to its treatment. The advantage of applying the asymmetric collimator jaw opening in breast radiotherapy is the instant reduction of the dose at margin fields, resulting in both the protection of neighboring lung parenchyma and the good coverage of planned target volume.

  12. Partial Breast Irradiation Versus Whole Breast Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Wittenberg, Eve; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy between women treated with partial breast irradiation (PBI) vs. whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We developed a Markov model to describe health states in the 15 years after radiotherapy for estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer. Breast cancer recurrences were separated into local recurrences and elsewhere failures. Ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) risk was extracted from the Oxford overview, and rates and utilities were adapted from the literature. We studied two cohorts of women (aged 40 and 55 years), both of whom received adjuvant tamoxifen. Results: Assuming a no evidence of disease (NED)-PBI utility of 0.93, quality-adusted life expectancy after PBI (and WBRT) was 12.61 (12.57) and 12.10 (12.06) years for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively. The NED-PBI utility thresholds for preferring PBI over WBRT were 0.923 and 0.921 for 40-year-old and 55-year-old women, respectively, both slightly greater than the NED-WBRT utility. Outcomes were sensitive to the utility of NED-PBI, the PBI hazard ratio for local recurrence, the baseline IBTR risk, and the percentage of IBTRs that were local. Overall the degree of superiority of PBI over WBRT was greater for 55-year-old women than for 40-year-old women. Conclusions: For most utility values of the NED-PBI health state, PBI was the preferred treatment modality. This result was highly sensitive to patient preferences and was also dependent on patient age, PBI efficacy, IBTR risk, and the fraction of IBTRs that were local.

  13. Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Compliance to the Dosimetry Requirements of RTOG-0413

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Bixiu; Hsu, Howard; Formenti-Ujlaki, George F.; Lymberis, Stella; Magnolfi, Chiara; Zhao Xuan; Chang Jenghwa; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Jozsef, Gabor; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric results from our institution's trials of prone accelerated partial breast irradiation are compared with the dosimetric requirements of RTOG-0413. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 and Trial 2 are 2 consecutive trials of prone-accelerated partial breast irradiation. Eligible for both trials were stage I breast cancer patients with negative margins after breast-conserving surgery. The planning target tumor volume (PTV) was created by extending the surgical cavity 2.0 cm for Trial 1 and 1.5 cm for Trial 2, respectively. Contralateral breast, heart, lungs, and thyroid were contoured. Thirty Gray was delivered in five daily fractions of 6 Gy by a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy technique in Trial 1 and were by image-guided radiation therapy/intensity-modulated radiation therapy in Trial 2. Dosimetric results from the trials are reported and compared with RTOG 0413 requirements. Results: One hundred forty-six consecutive plans were analyzed: 67 left and 79 right breast cancers. The plans from the trials complied with the required >90% of prescribed dose covering 90% of PTV{sub E}VAL (=generated from the PTV by cropping 0.5 cm from the skin edge and excluding the chest wall): V90% was 98.1 {+-} 3.0% (with V100% and V95%, 89.4 {+-} 12.8%, 96.4 {+-} 5.1%, respectively). No significant difference between laterality was found (Student's t test). The dose constraints criteria of the RTOG-0413 protocol for ipsilateral and contralateral lung (V30 <15% and Dmax <3%), heart (V5 <40%), and thyroid (Dmax <3%) were satisfied because the plans showed an average V5% of 0.6% (range, 0-13.4) for heart, an average V30% of 0.6% (range, 0-9.1%) for ipsilateral lung, and <2% maximum dose to the thyroid. However, our partial breast irradiation plans demonstrated a higher dose to contralateral breast than that defined by RTOG constraints, with a median value of maximum doses of 4.1% (1.2 Gy), possibly as a result of contouring differences. Conclusions: Our

  14. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciervide, Raquel; Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  15. Pushing the limits of hypofractionation for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, John; Haviland, Joanne

    2010-06-01

    Randomised trials report no disadvantages for hypofractionation based on 2.67 Gy fractions of adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy in terms of local tumour control and late adverse effects. Current 15- or 16-fraction schedules may not represent the limits of this approach, and limited data suggest that fewer larger fractions can be delivered safely provided appropriate downward adjustments are made to the total dose. Therapeutic gain will be undermined if breast cancer proves to be, on average, significantly less sensitive to fraction size than the dose-limiting late reacting normal tissues. If so, shortening overall treatment time might wholly or partially offset these limitations, and these uncertainties are addressed in ongoing or planned trials. Meanwhile, the experience of accelerated partial breast irradiation suggests a strong volume effect for late normal tissue damage. Schedules that may be safe when delivered to small partial volumes cannot be assumed to be safe if delivered to larger partial volumes or to the whole breast. Based on current evidence, testing the effectiveness of a 5-fraction schedule of hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy appears to be a realisable research objective.

  16. Comparison of Different Techniques in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Planning

    PubMed Central

    Kara, F. Gülşen; Haydaroğlu, Ayfer; Eren, Hakan; Kitapçıoğlu, Gül

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to minimize the radiation dose to organs other than the target tissue during adjuvant therapy applied for breast cancer, by using different planning methods. Materials and Methods 30 women with T1-2 N1-3 M0 breast cancer were included in the study. Planning was performed using four different methods to the supraclavicular area, internal, and external tangential fields. All planning was done in a virtual environment by and the requested data was obtained. All patients were treated by the 1st method. Method 1: Different isocenter, complete supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 2: Different isocenter, half supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 3: Single isocenter, half supraclavicular area, breast half beam. Method 4: Different isocenter, supraclavicular area full beam, breast full beam. Results Evaluation of PTV values showed a statistically significant reduction in D-max, 110% and 115% values by method III. Lower doses in other parameters were not statistically significant. Conclusion Based on these results, the application of single isocenter, 3D radiotherapy in breast cancer provides significant advantages especially in PTV and pulmonary dosages.

  17. Effects of Setup Errors and Shape Changes on Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mourik, Anke van; Kranen, Simon van; Hollander, Suzanne den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Herk, Marcel van; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to quantify the robustness of the dose distributions from three whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques involving different levels of intensity modulation against whole patient setup inaccuracies and breast shape changes. Methods and Materials: For 19 patients (one computed tomography scan and five cone beam computed tomography scans each), three treatment plans were made (wedge, simple intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], and full IMRT). For each treatment plan, four dose distributions were calculated. The first dose distribution was the original plan. The other three included the effects of patient setup errors (rigid displacement of the bony anatomy) or breast errors (e.g., rotations and shape changes of the breast with respect to the bony anatomy), or both, and were obtained through deformable image registration and dose accumulation. Subsequently, the effects of the plan type and error sources on target volume coverage, mean lung dose, and excess dose were determined. Results: Systematic errors of 1-2 mm and random errors of 2-3 mm (standard deviation) were observed for both patient- and breast-related errors. Planning techniques involving glancing fields (wedge and simple IMRT) were primarily affected by patient errors ({approx}6% loss of coverage near the dorsal field edge and {approx}2% near the skin). In contrast, plan deterioration due to breast errors was primarily observed in planning techniques without glancing fields (full IMRT, {approx}2% loss of coverage near the dorsal field edge and {approx}4% near the skin). Conclusion: The influences of patient and breast errors on the dose distributions are comparable in magnitude for whole breast RT plans, including glancing open fields, rendering simple IMRT the preferred technique. Dose distributions from planning techniques without glancing open fields were more seriously affected by shape changes of the breast, demanding specific attention in partial breast

  18. Benefit of Radiation Boost After Whole-Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo; Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Iannalfi, Alberto; Greto, Daniela; Paiar, Fabiola; Scoccianti, Silvia; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Bianchi, Simonetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a boost to the tumor bed after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) to the whole breast affects local control and disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,138 patients with pT1 to pT2 breast cancer underwent adjuvant RT at the University of Florence. We analyzed only patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year (range, 1-20 years), with negative surgical margins. The median age of the patient population was 52.0 years (+-7.9 years). The breast cancer relapse incidence probability was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and differences between patient subgroups were compared by the log rank test. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the risk of breast cancer relapse. Results: On univariate survival analysis, boost to the tumor bed reduced breast cancer recurrence (p < 0.0001). Age and tamoxifen also significantly reduced breast cancer relapse (p = 0.01 and p = 0.014, respectively). On multivariate analysis, the boost and the medium age (45-60 years) were found to be inversely related to breast cancer relapse (hazard ratio [HR], 0.27; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.14-0.52, and HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37-0.99, respectively). The effect of the boost was more evident in younger patients (HR, 0.15 and 95% CI, 0.03-0.66 for patients <45 years of age; and HR, 0.31 and 95% CI, 0.13-0.71 for patients 45-60 years) on multivariate analyses stratified by age, although it was not a significant predictor in women older than 60 years. Conclusion: Our results suggest that boost to the tumor bed reduces breast cancer relapse and is more effective in younger patients.

  19. Long-Term Breast Cancer Patient Outcomes After Adjuvant Radiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy or Conventional Tangential Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Fu; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chun-Shu; Chao, Hsing-Lung; Chen, Chang-Ming; Lo, Cheng-Hsiang; Fan, Chao-Yueh; Tsao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Wen-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze breast cancer patient clinical outcomes after long-term follow-up using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or conventional tangential radiotherapy (cRT). We retrospectively reviewed patients with stage 0-III breast cancer who received breast conserving therapy between April 2004 and December 2007. Of the 234 patients, 103 (44%) were treated with IMRT and 131 (56%) were treated with cRT. A total prescription dose of 45 to 50 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the whole breast. A 14 Gy boost dose was delivered in 7 fractions. The median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five of 131 (3.8%) cRT-treated patients and 2 of 103 (1.9%) IMRT-treated patients had loco-regional failure. The 8-year loco-regional failure-free survival rates were 96.7% and 97.6% (P = 0.393) in the cRT and IMRT groups, respectively, whereas the 8-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 91.2% and 93.1%, respectively (P = 0.243). Patients treated with IMRT developed ≥ grade 2 acute dermatitis less frequently than patients treated with cRT (40.8% vs 56.5%; P = 0.017). There were no differences in late toxicity. IMRT reduces ≥ grade 2 acute skin toxicity. Local control, DFS, and overall survival were equivalent with IMRT and cRT. IMRT can be considered a standard technique for breast cancer treatment.

  20. Radiotherapy for breast cancer: The predictable consequences of an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Danielle; Knaul, Felicia M; Lui, Tracey Y; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy has had a transformative impact on the treatment of breast cancer, but is unavailable to the majority of breast cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries. In these settings, where many women present with advanced disease at an age when they are often the primary caregiver for their families, the lack of access to radiotherapy is particularly devastating. Until recently, this disparity has been largely neglected in the medical literature and it had been difficult to convince governments, industry, and policymakers of the importance of investing in radiotherapy, as well as broader cancer control strategies, in low-resource settings. The Lancet Radiotherapy Commission report published in 2015 challenged many assumptions about the affordability of radiotherapy treatment. Data from the Commission is presented here to support radiotherapy investment for breast cancer and discuss how the morbidity and premature mortality among adult women caused by breast cancer has a huge detrimental effect on both the health sector and the economy.

  1. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation with Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible for Chinese Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhenyu; Wu, Sangang; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Jiayan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huanxin; Guan, Xunxing

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Several accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) techniques are being investigated in patients with early-stage breast cancer. The present study evaluated the feasibility, early toxicity, initial efficacy, and cosmetic outcomes of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for Chinese female patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. Methods A total of 38 patients met the inclusion criteria and an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (APBI-IMRT) plan was designed for each patient. The prescription dose was 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 3.4 Gy per fraction, twice a day, in intervals of more than 6 hours. Results Of the 38 patients, six patients did not meet the planning criteria. The remaining 32 patients received APBI-IMRT with a mean target volume conformity index of 0.67 and a dose homogeneity index of 1.06. The median follow-up time was 53 months and no local recurrence or distant metastasis was detected. The most common acute toxicities observed within 3 months after radiotherapy were erythema, breast edema, pigmentation, and pain in the irradiated location, among which 43.8%, 12.5%, 31.3%, and 28.1% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. The most common late toxicities occurring after 3 months until the end of the follow-up period were breast edema, pigmentation, pain in the irradiated location, and subcutaneous fibrosis, among which 6.2%, 28.1%, 21.9%, and 37.5% were grade 1 toxicities, respectively. Thirty-one patients (96.8%) had fine or excellent cosmetic outcomes, and only one patient had a poor cosmetic outcome. Conclusion It is feasible for Chinese females to receive APBI-IMRT after breast conserving surgery. The radiotherapeutic toxicity is acceptable, and both the initial efficacy and cosmetic outcomes are good. PMID:25320624

  2. [What is the role of intraoperative radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment?].

    PubMed

    Aumont, M

    2016-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast postoperative irradiation is considered to be the current standard treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer. It allows an excellent local tumour control with 6% of local recurrence. Over the last years, partial breast radiotherapy has been developed to reduce treatment volume and duration. Intraoperative radiotherapy is one of the techniques. It offers an excellent delineation of the tumour bed and high normal tissue sparing. This purpose of this review is to describe the different intraoperative radiotherapy techniques available, to assess their potential clinical efficiency and tolerance, the recommendations for new practice with a selected population of patients and for future research.

  3. Prospective Trial of Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles . E-mail: charles.leonard@usoncology.com; Carter, Dennis; Kercher, Jane; Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Cornish, Patricia C.; Hunter, Kari C.; Kondrat, Janis

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and acute toxicities of an accelerated, partial breast, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol. Methods and Materials: Between February 2004 and August 2005, 55 patients with Stage I breast cancer and initial follow-up were enrolled at four facilities on a HealthONE and Western institutional review board-approved accelerated partial breast IMRT protocol. All patients were treated in 10 equal fractions delivered twice daily within 5 consecutive days. The first 7 patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 48 patients were treated to 38.5 Gy. Results: The median follow-up after IMRT was 10 months (range, <1-19) and after diagnosis was 11.5 months (range, 2-21). No local or distant recurrences developed. The T stage distribution was as follows: T1a in 11 patients, T1b in 24, and T1c in 20. The median tumor size was 9 mm (range, 1-20 mm). Breast cosmesis was judged by the patient as poor by 2, good by 12, and excellent by 40 (1 patient was legally blind) and by the physician as poor for 1, good for 10, and excellent for 44 patients. Breast pain, as judged by patient, was none in 34, mild in 19, moderate in 2, and severe in 0 patients. There was a single report of telangiectasia but no incidents of significant edema. Compared with historic controls for whom three-dimensional treatment planning techniques were used, IMRT provided similar dose delivery to the target while reducing the volume of normal breast included in the 100%, 75%, and 50% isodose lines. Conclusion: This initial report prospectively explored the feasibility of accelerated partial breast IMRT. After short-term follow-up, the dose delivery and clinical outcomes were very acceptable. We believe this regimen deserves additional investigation under institutional review board guidance.

  4. Changes in biophysical properties of the skin following radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Hou, Ming-Feng; Luo, Kuei-Hau; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Wei, Shu-Yi; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Chiang, Wenchang; Huang, Chih-Jen

    2014-12-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a common adverse effect in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. However, the effects of radiotherapy on biophysical properties of the skin have rarely been investigated. In this prospective cohort study, we seek to determine the effects of radiotherapy for breast cancer on skin biophysical parameters. We measured various skin biophysical parameters (skin hydration, pH, sebum level, pigmentation, and blood flow) in 144 breast cancer patients by non-invasive techniques before and after radiotherapy. The measurements were simultaneously performed on the irradiated breast and the corresponding contralateral unirradiated breast for comparison. Following radiotherapy, the irradiated breast showed a significant decrease in skin hydration, increase in skin pH, increase in pigmentation, and increase in cutaneous blood flow. The contralateral unirradiated breast showed a slight increase in pigmentation but no significant changes in any of the other biophysical parameters after radiotherapy. No significant associations were found between patient characteristics (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, type of surgery, chemotherapy, hormone therapy) and changes in skin biophysical parameters following radiotherapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy for breast cancer induces measurable and significant changes in biophysical properties of the skin including hydration, pH, pigmentation, and blood flow. These findings give us a greater understanding of the effects of ionizing radiation on skin physiology, and provide non-invasive and objective methods to assess radiation dermatitis.

  5. Sequence of Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jobsen, Jan J.; Palen, Job van der; Brinkhuis, Marieel; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast-conserving therapy is unknown. Methods and Materials: From 1983 through 2007, a total of 641 patients with 653 instances of breast-conserving therapy (BCT), received both chemotherapy and radiotherapy and are the basis of this analysis. Patients were divided into three groups. Groups A and B comprised patients treated before 2005, Group A radiotherapy first and Group B chemotherapy first. Group C consisted of patients treated from 2005 onward, when we had a fixed sequence of radiotherapy first, followed by chemotherapy. Results: Local control did not show any differences among the three groups. For distant metastasis, no difference was shown between Groups A and B. Group C, when compared with Group A, showed, on univariate and multivariate analyses, a significantly better distant metastasis-free survival. The same was noted for disease-free survival. With respect to disease-specific survival, no differences were shown on multivariate analysis among the three groups. Conclusion: Radiotherapy, as an integral part of the primary treatment of BCT, should be administered first, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy.

  6. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Lee, Tzu-Cheng; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C.; Kang, Hakmook; Linden, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4–30.9 min), which was significantly—but not completely—reduced by the linear correction method. SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} were

  7. SU-E-T-588: Characterization and Clinical Validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dewyngaert, K; Jozsef, G; Formenti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care: a platform for prone breast radiation therapy. Methods: Patients treated using Breast Conserving Radiation Therapy may benefit from treatment in the prone position with the breast tissue falling freely away from the body. This geometry allows the breast tissue to be treated while avoiding the lung and heart tissue. Eighteen patients simulated and treated using the Varian Medical Systems Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care were monitored over the course of treatment for positioning integrity and reproducibility. As this carbon-fiber platform actually replaces a portion of the couch top, indexing is inherent to its design. Patients were positioned on the couch and aligned using fiducial markers and lateral SSD to the breast fiducial point. The daily couch coordinates then serves as indicators for positioning variability with this system. Results: The variations in couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral positions were centered on a mean value of zero with standard deviations of 0.44cm, 0.75cm and 0.79cm respectively. Other factors explored were variations in distance of mid-sternum to table edge and patient rotation into the opening. The median rotation of the chest wall was found to be 11.5 degrees at CT-Simulation with a median distance of 2.5cm from midsternum to support opening. Patient rotation was not associated with either breast size or distance from edge of platform. Conclusion: The Pivotal™ Treatment solution consists of a couch top that replaces the standard top and as such is open from beneath without obstruction. This is a distinction from all other solutions which rely on a platform positioned above and indexed to the treatment couch. We found the reproducibility to be consistent with our historical measures while offering benefits of an integrated solution as stated above. supported by Professional Services Agreeement with

  8. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution. PMID:27358592

  9. Patient Preferences and Physician Practice Patterns Regarding Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopes, David J.; Kaziska, David; Chapin, Patrick; Weed, Daniel; Smith, Benjamin D.; Hale, E. Ronald; Johnstone, Peter A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: There are multiple current strategies for breast radiotherapy (RT). The alignment of physician practice patterns with best evidence and patient preferences will enhance patient autonomy and improve cancer care. However, there is little information describing patient preferences for breast RT and physician practice patterns. Methods and Materials: Using a reliable and valid instrument, we assessed the preferences of 5,000 randomly selected women (with or without cancer) undergoing mammography. To assess practice patterns, 2,150 randomly selected physician-members of American Society for Radiation Oncology were surveyed. Results: A total of 1,807 women (36%) and 363 physicians (17%) provided usable responses. The 95% confidence interval is < {+-}2.3% for patients and < {+-}5.3% for physicians. Patient preferences were hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (HF-WBI) 62%, partial breast irradiation (PBI) 28%, and conventionally fractionated whole breast irradiation (CF-WBI) 10%. By comparison, 82% of physicians use CF-WBI for more than 2/3 of women and 56% never use HF-WBI. With respect to PBI, 62% of women preferred three-dimensional (3D)-PBI and 38% favor brachytherapy-PBI, whereas 36% of physicians offer 3D-PBI and 66% offer brachytherapy-PBI. 70% of women prefer once-daily RT over 10 days vs. twice-daily RT over 5 days. 55% of physicians who use PBI do not offer PBI on clinical trial. Conclusions: HF-WBI, while preferred by patients and supported by evidence, falls behind the unproven and less preferred strategy of PBI in clinical practice. There is a discrepancy between women's preferences for PBI modality and type of PBI offered by physicians. Further alignment is needed between practice patterns, patient preferences, and clinical evidence.

  10. Cardiac Exposures in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy: 1950s-1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Carolyn W. Nisbet, Andrew; McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah C.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the doses to the heart and coronary arteries from common breast cancer radiotherapy (RT) regimens used worldwide from the 1950s to the 1990s. Methods and Materials: Virtual simulation and computed tomography planning were used to reconstruct the megavoltage and electron regimens. Manual planning was used for the orthovoltage and brachytherapy regimens. Several sources of variability associated with the dose estimates were assessed. Results: Breast or chest wall RT resulted in whole heart doses of 0.9-14 Gy for left-sided and of 0.4-6 Gy for right-sided irradiation. Internal mammary chain RT delivered heart doses of 3-17 Gy and 2-10 Gy for left- and right-sided irradiation, respectively. For most regimens, the dose to the left anterior descending coronary artery was greater than the heart dose. Scar boost, supraclavicular fossa, and axillary RT delivered mean cardiac doses of {<=}3 Gy. The greatest source of variability in estimating dose from a given regimen was patient anatomy. Conclusion: For most techniques, the greatest radiation doses were received by the anterior part of the heart and the left anterior descending coronary artery, a common site of atherosclerosis causing myocardial infarction. Irradiation of these structures might have contributed to the excess risk of death from heart disease seen after some past breast cancer RT regimens.

  11. Current role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozyigit, Gokhan; Gultekin, Melis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy in females. Advances in systemic therapies and radiotherapy (RT) provided long survival rates in breast cancer patients. RT has a major role in the management of breast cancer. During the past 15 years several developments took place in the field of imaging and irradiation techniques, intensity modulated RT, hypofractionation and partial-breast irradiation. Currently, improvements in the RT technology allow us a subsequent decrease in the treatment-related complications such as fibrosis and long-term cardiac toxicity while improving the loco-regional control rates and cosmetic results. Thus, it is crucial that modern radiotherapy techniques should be carried out with maximum care and efficiency. Several randomized trials provided evidence for the feasibility of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. However, the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer will continue to be defined by the mature results of randomized trials. Current review will provide an up-to-date evidence based data on the role of modern radiotherapy techniques in the management of breast cancer. PMID:25114857

  12. Estimating Cardiac Exposure From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.W. McGale, P.; Povall, J.M.; Thomas, E.; Kumar, S.; Dodwell, D.; Darby, S.C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of maximum heart distance (MHD) in predicting the dose and biologically effective dose (BED) to the heart and the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery for left-tangential breast or chest wall irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 consecutive breast cancer patients given adjuvant left-tangential irradiation at a large U.K. radiotherapy center during 2006 were selected. For each patient, the following were derived using three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) planning: (1) mean dose and BED to the heart, (2) mean dose and BED to the LAD coronary artery, (3) MHD, (4) position of the CT slice showing the maximum area of the irradiated heart relative to the mid-plane slice, and (5) sternal and contralateral breast thickness (measures of body fat). Results: A strong linear correlation was found between the MHD and the mean heart dose. For every 1-cm increase in MHD, the mean heart dose increased by 2.9% on average (95% confidence interval 2.5-3.3). A strong linear-quadratic relationship was seen between the MHD and the mean heart BED. The mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED were also correlated with the MHD but the associations were weaker. These relationships were not affected by body fat. The mid-plane CT slice did not give a reliable assessment of cardiac irradiation. Conclusion: The MHD is a reliable predictor of the mean heart dose and BED and gives an approximate estimate of the mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED. Doses predicted by the MHD could help assess the risk of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity where individual CT-based cardiac dosimetry is not possible.

  13. Quantifying intra- and inter-fractional motion in breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Scott; Fitzgerald, Rhys; Owen, Rebecca; Ramsay, Jonathan

    2015-03-15

    The magnitude of intra- and inter-fractional variation in the set up of breast cancer patients treated with tangential megavoltage photon beams was investigated using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Daily cine-EPID images were captured during delivery of the tangential fields for ten breast cancer patients treated in the supine position. Measurements collected from each image included the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), superior axial measurement (SAM) and the inferior axial measurement (IAM). The variation of motion within a fraction (intra-fraction) and the variation between fractions (inter-fraction) was analysed to quantify set up variation and motion due to respiration. Altogether 3775 EPID images were collected from 10 patients. The effect of respiratory motion during treatment was <0.1 cm standard deviation (SD) in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. The inter-fraction movement caused by variations in daily set up was larger at 0.28 cm SD in the AP direction. Superior–inferior (SI) variation was more difficult to summarise and proved unreliable as the measurements were taken to an ambiguous point on the images. It was difficult to discern true SI movement from that implicated by AP movement. There is minimal intra-fractional chest wall motion due to respiration during treatment. Inter-fractional variation was larger, however, on average it remained within departmental tolerance (0.5 cm) for set up variations. This review of our current breast technique provides confidence in the feasibility of utilising advanced treatment techniques (field-in-field, intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) following a review of the current imaging protocol.

  14. Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0435 TITLE: Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by...Optimization of Breast Cancer Treatment by Dynamic Intensity Modulated Electron Radiotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0435 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  15. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    SciTech Connect

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael; Delaney, Geoff; Holloway, Lois

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  16. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: The Lasting Effects of a Fleeting Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    In well-selected patients who choose to pursue breast conservation therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer, partial breast irradiation (PBI) delivered externally or intraoperatively, may be a viable alternative to conventional whole breast irradiation. Two large, contemporary randomized trials have demonstrated breast intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) to be noninferior to whole breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) when assessing for ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence in select patients. Additionally, IORT and other PBI techniques are likely to be more widely adopted in the future because they improve patient convenience by offering an accelerated course of treatment. Coupled with these novel techniques for breast radiotherapy (RT) are distinct toxicity profiles and unique cosmetic alterations that differ from conventional breast EBRT and have the potential to impact disease surveillance and patient satisfaction. This paper will review the level-one evidence for treatment efficacy as well as important secondary endpoints like RT toxicity, breast cosmesis, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and surveillance mammography following BCT with IORT. PMID:25180098

  17. SU-E-J-223: A BOLD Contrast Imaging Sequence to Evaluate Oxygenation Changes Due to Breath Holding for Breast Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, J; Chang, Z; Cai, J; Palta, M; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust MRI sequence to measure BOLD breath hold induced contrast in context of breast radiotherapy. Methods: Two sequences were selected from prior studies as candidates to measure BOLD contrast attributable to breath holding within the breast: (1) T2* based Gradient Echo EPI (TR/TE = 500/41ms, flip angle = 60°), and (2) T2 based Single Shot Fast Spin Echo (SSFSE) (TR/TE = 3000/60ms). We enrolled ten women post-lumpectomy for breast cancer who were undergoing treatment planning for whole breast radiotherapy. Each session utilized a 1.5T GE MRI and 4 channel breast coil with the subject immobilized prone on a custom board. For each sequence, 1–3 planes of the lumpectomy breast were imaged continuously during a background measurement (1min) and intermittent breath holds (20–40s per breath hold, 3–5 holds per sequence). BOLD contrast was quantified as correlation of changes in per-pixel intensity with the breath hold schedule convolved with a hemodynamic response function. Subtle motion was corrected using a deformable registration algorithm. Correlation with breath-holding was considered significant if p<0.001. Results: The percentage of the breast ROI with positive BOLD contrast measured by the two sequences were in agreement with a correlation coefficient of R=0.72 (p=0.02). While both sequences demonstrated areas with strong BOLD response, the response was more systematic throughout the breast for the SSFSE (T2) sequence (% breast with response in the same direction: 51.2%±0.7% for T2* vs. 68.1%±16% for T2). In addition, the T2 sequence was less prone to magnetic susceptibility artifacts, especially in presence of seroma, and provided a more robust image with little distortion or artifacts. Conclusion: A T2 SSFSE sequence shows promise for measuring BOLD contrast in the context of breast radiotherapy utilizing a breath hold technique. Further study in a larger patient cohort is warranted to better refine this novel technique.

  18. Automated beam placement for breast radiotherapy using a support vector machine based algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xuan; Kong, Dewen; Jozsef, Gabor; Chang, Jenghwa; Wong, Edward K.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Wang Yao

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated beam placement technique for whole breast radiotherapy using tangential beams. We seek to find optimal parameters for tangential beams to cover the whole ipsilateral breast (WB) and minimize the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Methods: A support vector machine (SVM) based method is proposed to determine the optimal posterior plane of the tangential beams. Relative significances of including/avoiding the volumes of interests are incorporated into the cost function of the SVM. After finding the optimal 3-D plane that separates the whole breast (WB) and the included clinical target volumes (CTVs) from the OARs, the gantry angle, collimator angle, and posterior jaw size of the tangential beams are derived from the separating plane equation. Dosimetric measures of the treatment plans determined by the automated method are compared with those obtained by applying manual beam placement by the physicians. The method can be further extended to use multileaf collimator (MLC) blocking by optimizing posterior MLC positions. Results: The plans for 36 patients (23 prone- and 13 supine-treated) with left breast cancer were analyzed. Our algorithm reduced the volume of the heart that receives >500 cGy dose (V5) from 2.7 to 1.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.058) on average and the volume of the ipsilateral lung that receives >1000 cGy dose (V10) from 55.2 to 40.7 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0013). The dose coverage as measured by volume receiving >95% of the prescription dose (V95%) of the WB without a 5 mm superficial layer decreases by only 0.74% (p = 0.0002) and the V95% for the tumor bed with 1.5 cm margin remains unchanged. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using a SVM-based algorithm to determine optimal beam placement without a physician's intervention. The proposed method reduced the dose to OARs, especially for supine treated patients, without any relevant degradation of dose homogeneity and coverage in general.

  19. Baseline Utilization of Breast Radiotherapy Before Institution of the Medicare Practice Quality Reporting Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Benjamin D. Smith, Grace L.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: In 2007, Medicare implemented the Physician Quality Reporting Initiative (PQRI), which provides financial incentives to physicians who report their performance on certain quality measures. PQRI measure no. 74 recommends radiotherapy for patients treated with conservative surgery (CS) for invasive breast cancer. As a first step in evaluating the potential impact of this measure, we assessed baseline use of radiotherapy among women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer before implementation of PQRI. Methods and Materials: Using the SEER-Medicare data set, we identified women aged 66-70 diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and treated with CS between 2000 and 2002. Treatment with radiotherapy was determined using SEER and claims data. Multivariate logistic regression tested whether receipt of radiotherapy varied significantly across clinical, pathologic, and treatment covariates. Results: Of 3,674 patients, 94% (3,445) received radiotherapy. In adjusted analysis, the presence of comorbid illness (odds ratio [OR] 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-2.42) and unmarried marital status were associated with omission of radiotherapy (OR 1.65; 95% CI, 1.22-2.20). In contrast, receipt of chemotherapy was protective against omission of radiotherapy (OR 0.25; 95% CI, 0.16-0.38). Race and geographic region did not correlate with radiotherapy utilization. Conclusions: Utilization of radiotherapy following CS was high for patients treated before institution of PQRI, suggesting that at most 6% of patients could benefit from measure no. 74. Further research is needed to determine whether institution of PQRI will affect radiotherapy utilization.

  20. Impact of radiotherapy in the risk of esophageal cancer as subsequent primary cancer after breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Salminen, Eeva K. . E-mail: eevsal@utu.fi; Pukkala, Eero; Kiel, Krys D.; Hakulinen, Timo T.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk of esophageal cancer as second cancer among breast-cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The records of the Finnish Cancer Registry from 1953 to 2000 were used to assess the risk of esophageal cancer as second cancer among 75,849 breast-cancer patients. Patients were treated with surgery (n = 33,672), radiotherapy (n = 35,057), chemotherapy and radiotherapy (n = 4673), or chemotherapy (n = 2,447). The risk of a new primary cancer was expressed as standardized incidence ratio (SIR), defined as the ratio of observed to expected cases. Results: By the end of 2000, the number of observed cases esophageal cancers was 80 vs. 72 expected cases (standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.1, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.9 to 1.5). Among patients followed for 15 years and treated with radiotherapy, the SIR for esophageal cancer was 2.3 (95% CI = 1.4 to 5.4). No increase in risk was seen for patients treated without radiotherapy. The risk of esophageal cancer was increased among patients diagnosed during 1953 to 1974, although age at the treatment did not have marked effect on the risk estimate. Conclusion: Increased risk of second cancer in the esophagus was observed for breast-cancer patients in Finland, especially among patients with over 15 years of follow-up and treated in the earliest period, which may relate to the type of radiotherapy.

  1. Overview of the Randomized Trials of Radiotherapy in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Individual patient data were available for all four of the randomized trials that began before 1995, and that compared adjuvant radiotherapy vs no radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 3729 women were eligible for analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the absolute 10-year risk of any ipsilateral breast event (ie, either recurrent DCIS or invasive cancer) by 15.2% (SE 1.6%, 12.9% vs 28.1% 2 P <.00001), and it was effective regardless of the age at diagnosis, extent of breast-conserving surgery, use of tamoxifen, method of DCIS detection, margin status, focality, grade, comedonecrosis, architecture, or tumor size. The proportional reduction in ipsilateral breast events was greater in older than in younger women (2P < .0004 for difference between proportional reductions; 10-year absolute risks: 18.5% vs 29.1% at ages <50 years, 10.8% vs 27.8% at ages ≥50 years) but did not differ significantly according to any other available factor. Even for women with negative margins and small low-grade tumors, the absolute reduction in the 10-year risk of ipsilateral breast events was 18.0% (SE 5.5, 12.1% vs 30.1%, 2P = .002). After 10 years of follow-up, there was, however, no significant effect on breast cancer mortality, mortality from causes other than breast cancer, or all-cause mortality. PMID:20956824

  2. Intraoperative radiotherapy in early stage breast cancer: potential indications and evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, A M

    2015-01-01

    Following early results of recent studies of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in the adjuvant treatment of patients with early breast cancer, the clinical utility of IORT is a subject of much recent debate within the breast oncology community. This review describes the intraoperative techniques available, the potential indications and the evidence to date pertaining to local control and toxicity. We also discuss any implications for current practice and future research. PMID:25734489

  3. Dosimetric Comparison Between 3-Dimensional Conformal and Robotic SBRT Treatment Plans for Accelerated Partial Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goggin, L M; Descovich, M; McGuinness, C; Shiao, S; Pouliot, J; Park, C

    2016-06-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is an attractive alternative to conventional whole breast radiotherapy for selected patients. Recently, CyberKnife has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation. In this retrospective study, we present a dosimetric comparison between 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans and CyberKnife plans using circular (Iris) and multi-leaf collimators. Nine patients who had undergone breast-conserving surgery followed by whole breast radiation were included in this retrospective study. The CyberKnife planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the lumpectomy cavity + 10 mm + 2 mm with prescription dose of 30 Gy in 5 fractions. Two sets of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans were created, one used the same definitions as described for CyberKnife and the second used the RTOG-0413 definition of the PTV: lumpectomy cavity + 15 mm + 10 mm with prescription dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. Using both PTV definitions allowed us to compare the dose delivery capabilities of each technology and to evaluate the advantage of CyberKnife tracking. For the dosimetric comparison using the same PTV margins, CyberKnife and 3-dimensional plans resulted in similar tumor coverage and dose to critical structures, with the exception of the lung V5%, which was significantly smaller for 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 6.2% when compared to 39.4% for CyberKnife-Iris and 17.9% for CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator. When the inability of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to track motion is considered, the result increased to 25.6%. Both CyberKnife-Iris and CyberKnife-multi-leaf collimator plans demonstrated significantly lower average ipsilateral breast V50% (25.5% and 24.2%, respectively) than 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (56.2%). The CyberKnife plans were more conformal but less homogeneous than the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plans. Approximately 50% shorter

  4. A Dosimetric Analysis of IMRT and Multistatic Fields Techniques for Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Seong Kwon; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Soo Young; Lee, Mi Jo; Keum, Hyun Sup; Kim, Seung Jin; Youn, Seon Min

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric difference between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using 3 or 5 beams and multistatic field technique (MSF) in radiotherapy of the left breast. We made comparative analysis of two kinds of radiotherapy that can achieve improved dose homogeneity. First is a MSF that uses both major and small irradiation fields at the same time. The other is IMRT using 3 or 5 beams with an inverse planning system using multiple static multileaf collimators. We made treatment plans for 16 early left breast cancer patients who were randomly selected and had undergone breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy, and analyzed them in the dosimetric aspect. For the mean values of V{sub 95} and dose homogeneity index, no statistically significant difference was observed among the three therapies. Extreme hot spots receiving >110% of prescribed dose were not found in any of the three methods. Using Tukey's test, IMRT showed a significantly larger increase in exposure dose to the ipsilateral lung and the heart than MSF in the low-dose area, but in the high-dose area, MSF showed a slight increase. To improve dose homogeneity, the application of MSF, which can be easily planned and applied more widely, is considered optimal as an alternative to IMRT for radiotherapy of early left breast cancer.

  5. Left-sided breast cancer irradiation using rotational and fixed-field radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon; Liu, Tian X.; Liu, Arthur K.; Newman, Francis; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Kavanagh, Brian; Hu, Y. Angie

    2014-10-01

    The 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) technique is the standard for breast cancer radiotherapy. During treatment planning, not only the coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) but also the minimization of the dose to critical structures, such as the lung, heart, and contralateral breast tissue, need to be considered. Because of the complexity and variations of patient anatomy, more advanced radiotherapy techniques are sometimes desired to better meet the planning goals. In this study, we evaluated external-beam radiation treatment techniques for left breast cancer using various delivery platforms: fixed-field including TomoDirect (TD), static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and rotational radiotherapy including Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and tomotherapy helical (TH). A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer who did or did not have positive lymph nodes and were previously treated with 3DCRT/sIMRT to the entire breast were selected, their treatment was planned with Monaco VMAT, TD, and TH. Dosimetric parameters including PTV coverage, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, dose-volume histograms, and target minimum/maximum/mean doses were evaluated. It is found that for plans providing comparable PTV coverage, the Elekta VMAT plans were generally more inhomogeneous than the TH and TD plans. For the cases with regional node involvement, the average mean doses administered to the heart were 9.2 (± 5.2) and 8.8 (± 3.0) Gy in the VMAT and TH plans compared with 11.9 (± 6.4) and 11.8 (± 9.2) Gy for the 3DCRT and TD plans, respectively, with slightly higher doses given to the contralateral lung or breast or both. On average, the total monitor units for VMAT plans are 11.6% of those TH plans. Our studies have shown that VMAT and TH plans offer certain dosimetric advantages over fixed-field IMRT plans for advanced breast cancer requiring regional nodal treatment. However, for early-stage breast cancer fixed

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Results in Significant Decrease in Clinical Toxicities Compared With Conventional Wedge-Based Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Jolly, Shruti; Jones, Cortney; Lala, Moinaktar; Martinez, Alvaro; Schell, Scott; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a static multileaf collimator process results in a more homogenous dose distribution compared with conventional wedge-based whole breast irradiation (WBI). In the present analysis, we reviewed the acute and chronic toxicity of this IMRT approach compared with conventional wedge-based treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 172 patients with Stage 0-IIB breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy followed by WBI. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography and received WBI (median dose, 45 Gy) followed by a boost to 61 Gy. Of the 172 patients, 93 (54%) were treated with IMRT, and the 79 patients (46%) treated with wedge-based RT in a consecutive fashion immediately before this cohort served as the control group. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Results: A significant reduction in acute Grade 2 or worse dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation was seen with IMRT compared with wedges. A trend was found toward reduced acute Grade 3 or greater dermatitis (6% vs. 1%, p = 0.09) in favor of IMRT. Chronic Grade 2 or worse breast edema was significantly reduced with IMRT compared with conventional wedges. No difference was found in cosmesis scores between the two groups. In patients with larger breasts ({>=}1,600 cm{sup 3}, n = 64), IMRT resulted in reduced acute (Grade 2 or greater) breast edema (0% vs. 36%, p <0.001) and hyperpigmentation (3% vs. 41%, p 0.001) and chronic (Grade 2 or greater) long-term edema (3% vs. 30%, p 0.007). Conclusion: The use of IMRT in the treatment of the whole breast results in a significant decrease in acute dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation and a reduction in the development of chronic breast edema compared with conventional wedge-based RT.

  7. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    PubMed

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  8. Tangential Radiotherapy Without Axillary Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Julia S.; Winer, Eric P.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, 'high tangential' breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were {>=}55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. Results: For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. Conclusion: In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity.

  9. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Reed; Carter, Dennis L. Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Johnson, Tim; Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Leonard, Charles E.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  10. Dosimetric comparison of preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy techniques: 3D CRT, noncoplanar IMRT, coplanar IMRT, and VMAT.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sua; Blitzblau, Rachel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of treatment plans among four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy in order to select an optimal treatment technique. The techniques evaluated were noncoplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTNC), coplanar IMRT (IMRTCO), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The planning CT scans of 16 patients in the prone position were used in this study, with the single-fraction prescription doses of 15 Gy for the first eight patients and 18 Gy for the remaining eight patients. Six (6) MV photon beams were designed to avoid the heart and contralateral breast. Optimization for IMRT and VMAT was performed to reduce the dose to the skin and normal breast. All plans were normalized such that 100% of the prescribed dose covered greater than 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) consisting of gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.5 cm margin. Mean homogeneity index (HI) was the lowest (1.05 ± 0.02) for 3D CRT and the highest (1.11 ± 0.04) for VMAT. Mean conformity index (CI) was the lowest (1.42 ± 0.32) for IMRTNC and the highest (1.60 ± 0.32) for VMAT. Mean of the maximum point dose to skin was the lowest (73.7 ± 11.5%) for IMRTNC and the highest (86.5 ± 6.68%) for 3D CRT. IMRTCO showed very similar HI, CI, and maximum skin dose to IMRTNC (differences <1%). The estimated mean treatment delivery time, excluding the time spent for patient positioning and imaging, was 7.0 ± 1.0, 8.3 ± 1.1, 9.7 ± 1.0, and 11.0 ± 1.5min for VMAT, IMRTCO, IMRTNC and 3D CRT, respectively. In comparison of all four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy, we can conclude that noncoplanar or coplanar IMRT were optimal in this study as IMRT plans provided homogeneous and conformal target coverage, skin sparing, and relatively short treatment delivery time.

  11. Radiation Pneumonitis After Conventional Radiotherapy For Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Isiah, Rajesh; Subhashini, J; Backianathan, Selvamani; Thangakunam, Balamugesh; Christopher, Devasagayam J

    2015-01-01

    Background Loco-regional radiotherapy is an important treatment modality in breast cancer and radiation pneumonitis (RP) is one of the early toxicities. Aim To study the occurrence, correlation of RP with patient and radiotherapy related factors and the effects on pulmonary function following conventional radiotherapy in breast cancer. Settings and Design Prospective study, from a tertiary hospital in a developing country. Materials and Methods Prospective analysis of clinical symptoms, pulmonary function and radiologic changes was done prior to and 12 weeks after adjuvant radiotherapy (n=46). Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 10 software. Results Radiological and clinical RP was seen in 45.65% (n=21) and 19.56% (n=9) respectively. RP was significantly higher with age >50 years (OR 4.4), chest wall irradiation with electrons, (electrons 83.3% vs cobalt60 32.4%, p=0.02) and supraclavicular field treatment with 6 MV photons (p= 0.011). There was significant relationship between Inferior Lung Distance (ILD) and RP (p=0.013). The fall in Total Lung Capacity (TLC) was significantly more in those with RP (p=0.02). Conclusion Clinical RP occurs in almost one-fifth of breast cancer patients treated with conventional radiotherapy. Chest wall irradiation with electrons, supraclavicular field irradiation with 6 MV photons, higher ILD and age >50 years was associated with increased RP. The pulmonary function parameter most affected was TLC. The factors associated with increased RP should be considered when adjuvant radiotherapy is planned to minimize its likelihood and intervene appropriately. PMID:26393189

  12. GammaPod—A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao, Xinyu; Zhang, Jin; Regine, William; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Deng, Jianchun; Duan, Zhengcheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%–95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously. PMID:23635251

  13. GammaPod-A new device dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Cedric X.; Shao Xinyu; Deng Jianchun; Duan Zhengcheng; Zhang Jin; Zheng, Mike; Yu, Ying S.; Regine, William

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a new external beam radiotherapy device named GammaPod that is dedicated for stereotactic radiotherapy of breast cancer. Methods: The design goal of the GammaPod as a dedicated system for treating breast cancer is the ability to deliver ablative doses with sharp gradients under stereotactic image guidance. Stereotactic localization of the breast is achieved by a vacuum-assisted breast immobilization cup with built-in stereotactic frame. Highly focused radiation is achieved at the isocenter due to the cross-firing from 36 radiation arcs generated by rotating 36 individual Cobalt-60 beams. The dedicated treatment planning system optimizes an optimal path of the focal spot using an optimization algorithm borrowed from computational geometry such that the target can be covered by 90%-95% of the prescription dose and the doses to surrounding tissues are minimized. The treatment plan is intended to be delivered with continuous motion of the treatment couch. In this paper the authors described in detail the gamma radiation unit, stereotactic localization of the breast, and the treatment planning system of the GammaPod system. Results: A prototype GammaPod system was installed at University of Maryland Medical Center and has gone through a thorough functional, geometric, and dosimetric testing. The mechanical and functional performances of the system all meet the functional specifications. Conclusions: An image-guided breast stereotactic radiotherapy device, named GammaPod, has been developed to deliver highly focused and localized doses to a target in the breast under stereotactic image guidance. It is envisioned that the GammaPod technology has the potential to significantly shorten radiation treatments and even eliminate surgery by ablating the tumor and sterilizing the tumor bed simultaneously.

  14. Breast cancer after radiotherapy for skin hemangioma in infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Lundell, M.; Mattsson, A.; Hakulinen, T.; Holm, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Between 1920 and 1959, 9675 women were irradiated in infancy for skin hemangioma at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. They were exposed to low to moderate doses of ionizing radiation. The mean age at first exposure was 6 months and the mean absorbed dose to the breast anlage was 0.39 Gy (range < 0.01-35.8 Gy). The breast cancer incidence was analyzed by record linkage with the Swedish Cancer Register for the period 1958-1986. Seventy-five breast cancers were found after a mean absorbed dose of 1.5 Gy in the breasts with cancer. The analyses showed a significant dose-response relationship with a linear model estimate for the excess relative risk (ERR) of 0.38 at 1 Gy (95% CI 0.09-0.85). This relationship was not modified significantly by age at exposure or by dose to the ovaries. The ERR increased significantly with time after exposure and for > 50 years after exposure the ERR at 1 Gy was 2.25 (95% CI 0.59-5.62). The fitted excess absolute risk (EAR) was 22.9 per 10{sup 4} breast-year gray. The breast absorbed dose and time after exposure were important risk determinants for breast cancer excess risk. Forty to 50 years of follow-up was necessary for the excess risk to be expressed. The study confirms previous findings that the breast anlage of female infants is sensitive to ionizing radiation. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Breast cancer risk following radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma: modification by other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deirdre A.; Gilbert, Ethel; Dores, Graça M.; Gospodarowicz, Mary; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Holowaty, Eric; Glimelius, Bengt; Andersson, Michael; Wiklund, Tom; Lynch, Charles F.; van't Veer, Mars; Storm, Hans; Pukkala, Eero; Stovall, Marilyn; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Allan, James M.; Boice, John D.; Travis, Lois B.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of genetic and other risk factors in the development of breast cancer after radiotherapy (RT) for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has not been determined. We analyzed data from a breast cancer case-control study (105 patients, 266 control subjects) conducted among 3 817 survivors of HL diagnosed at age 30 years or younger in 6 population-based cancer registries. Odds ratios (ORs) and excess relative risks (ERRs) were calculated using conditional regression. Women who received RT exposure (≥ 5 Gy radiation dose to the breast) had a 2.7-fold increased breast cancer risk (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-5.2), compared with those given less than 5 Gy. RT exposure (≥ 5 Gy) was associated with an OR of 0.8 (95% CI, 0.2-3.4) among women with a first- or second-degree family history of breast or ovarian cancer, and 5.8 (95% CI, 2.1-16.3) among all other women (interaction P = .03). History of a live birth appeared to increase the breast cancer risk associated with RT among women not treated with ovarian-damaging therapies. Breast cancer risk following RT varied little according to other factors. The additional increased relative risk of breast cancer after RT for HL is unlikely to be larger among women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer than among other women. PMID:16051739

  16. Overview on cardiac, pulmonary and cutaneous toxicity in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Guenzi, Marina; Fozza, Alessandra; Vidali, Cristiana; Rovea, Paolo; Meacci, Fiammetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Conservative management of breast cancer represents the standard treatment for early disease. Breast conserving surgery associated with radiotherapy for stage I-II has been proven to be as equally effective as mastectomy in term of local control, distant disease, and overall survival. The growing minimal invasive surgical approach on the axillary region, and the new breast reconstructive techniques, will probably lead to a significant decrease of the rate of side-effects related to mastectomy. Therefore, the adverse events caused by adjuvant radiation still remain a challenge. Cutaneous, pulmonary and cardiac toxicity represent the main toxicities of adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Safety profile of radiation is strongly dependent on the multidisciplinary management of the single case (systemic treatment, endocrine therapy, surgery), individual characteristics (i.e., co-morbidities, age, habits), and radiation-related aspects. Radiation techniques development, and facilities implementation concerning organs-at-risk sparing systems (i.e., image-guided radiotherapy, tracking systems, respiratory gating), represent brand new tools for the clinical oncologist, that would certainly minimize toxicity profile in the next future. However, data reported from published literature will greatly help physicians, to give to the patients appropriate counseling regarding the efficacy and potential adverse events of treatments, thus optimizing the informed decision-making process.

  17. Incidence of new primary cancers after adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M.; Storm, H.H.; Mouridsen, H.T. )

    1991-07-17

    The incidence of new primary cancers was evaluated in 3538 postmenopausal patients who had received surgical treatment for primary breast cancer. Of these patients, 1828 with a low risk of recurrence received no further treatment. High-risk patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group (n = 846) received postoperative radiotherapy, while the second group (n = 864) received radiotherapy plus tamoxifen at a dose of 30 mg given daily for 48 weeks. The median observation time was 7.9 years. In comparison with the number of new cancers in the general population, the number of new cancers in the three groups was elevated mostly due to a high number of cancers of the contralateral breast and of colorectal cancers in the high-risk groups. The cumulative risk of nonlymphatic leukemia was increased among patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (P = .04). Cancer incidence in the high-risk tamoxifen-treated group relative to that in the high-risk group not treated with tamoxifen was not significant (1.3). No protective effect of tamoxifen on the opposite breast was seen (rate ratio for breast cancer = 1.1), but a tendency to an elevated risk of endometrial cancer was observed (rate ratio = 3.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.6-32.4). Continued and careful follow-up of women treated with tamoxifen is necessary to clarify the potential cancer-suppressive or cancer-promoting effects of this drug.

  18. Cytokine levels as biomarkers of radiation fibrosis in patients treated with breast radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation fibrosis is not easily measurable although clinical scores have been developed for this purpose. Biomarkers present an alternative more objective approach to quantification, and estimation in blood provides accessible samples. We investigated if blood cytokines could be used to measure established fibrosis in patients who have undergone radiotherapy for breast cancer. Methods We studied two cohorts treated by breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the UK START Trial A, one with breast fibrosis (cases) and one with no or minimal fibrosis (controls). Two candidate cytokines, plasma connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and serum interleukin-6 (IL6) were estimated by ELISA. Comparisons between cases and controls used the t-test or Mann–Whitney test and associations between blood concentration and clinical factors were assessed using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Seventy patients were included (26 cases, 44 controls). Mean time since radiotherapy was 9.9 years (range 8.3-12.0). No statistically significant differences between cases and controls in serum IL6 (median (IQR) 0.84 pg/ml (0.57-1.14), 0.75 pg/ml (0.41-1.43) respectively) or plasma CTGF (331.4 pg/ml (234.8-602.9), 334.5 pg/ml (270.0-452.8) were identified. There were no significant associations between blood cytokine concentration and age, fibrosis severity, breast size or time since radiotherapy. Conclusions No significant difference in IL6 or CTGF concentrations was detected between patients with breast fibrosis and controls with minimal or no fibrosis. PMID:24885397

  19. Skin-sparing Helical Tomotherapy vs 3D-conformal Radiotherapy for Adjuvant Breast Radiotherapy: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Study

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, Lisa; Warkentin, Heather; MacKenzie, Marc; Joseph, Kurian; Gabos, Zsolt; Pervez, Nadeem; Tankel, Keith; Chafe, Susan; Amanie, John; Ghosh, Sunita; Parliament, Matthew; Abdulkarim, Bassam

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We investigated whether treatment-planning system (TPS)-calculated dose accurately reflects skin dose received for patients receiving adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) with standard three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) or skin-sparing helical tomotherapy (HT). Methods and Materials: Fifty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial investigating acute skin toxicity from adjuvant breast RT with 3D-CRT compared to skin-sparing HT, where a 5-mm strip of ipsilateral breast skin was spared. Thermoluminescent dosimetry or optically stimulated luminescence measurements were made in multiple locations and were compared to TPS-calculated doses. Skin dosimetric parameters and acute skin toxicity were recorded in these patients. Results: With HT there was a significant correlation between calculated and measured dose in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.67, P<.001; r = 0.44, P=.03, respectively) and the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.73, P<.001; r = 0.88, P<.001, respectively). With 3D-CRT there was a significant correlation in the medial and lateral ipsilateral breast (r = 0.45, P=.03; r = 0.68, P<.001, respectively); the medial and central contralateral breast (r = 0.62, P=.001; r = 0.86, P<.001, respectively); and the mid neck (r = 0.42, P=.04, respectively). On average, HT-calculated dose overestimated the measured dose by 14%; 3D-CRT underestimated the dose by 0.4%. There was a borderline association between highest measured skin dose and moist desquamation (P=.05). Skin-sparing HT had greater skin homogeneity (homogeneity index of 1.39 vs 1.65, respectively; P=.005) than 3D-CRT plans. HT plans had a lower skin{sub V50} (1.4% vs 5.9%, respectively; P=.001) but higher skin{sub V40} and skin{sub V30} (71.7% vs 64.0%, P=.02; and 99.0% vs 93.8%, P=.001, respectively) than 3D-CRT plans. Conclusion: The 3D-CRT TPS more accurately reflected skin dose than the HT TPS, which tended to overestimate dose received by 14% in patients

  20. Long-Term Results of Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (Targit) Boost During Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, Jayant S.; Baum, Michael; Tobias, Jeffrey S.; Wenz, Frederik; Massarut, Samuele; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Hilaris, Basil; Saunders, Christobel; Williams, Norman R.; Brew-Graves, Chris; Corica, Tammy; Roncadin, Mario; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Suetterlin, Marc; Bulsara, Max; Joseph, David

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: We have previously shown that delivering targeted radiotherapy to the tumour bed intraoperatively is feasible and desirable. In this study, we report on the feasibility, safety, and long-term efficacy of TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (Targit), using the Intrabeam system. Methods and Materials: A total of 300 cancers in 299 unselected patients underwent breast-conserving surgery and Targit as a boost to the tumor bed. After lumpectomy, a single dose of 20 Gy was delivered intraoperatively. Postoperative external beam whole-breast radiotherapy excluded the usual boost. We also performed a novel individualized case control (ICC) analysis that computed the expected recurrences for the cohort by estimating the risk of recurrence for each patient using their characteristics and follow-up period. Results: The treatment was well tolerated. The median follow up was 60.5 months (range, 10-122 months). Eight patients have had ipsilateral recurrence: 5-year Kaplan Meier estimate for ipsilateral recurrence is 1.73% (SE 0.77), which compares well with that seen in the boosted patients in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study (4.3%) and the UK STAndardisation of breast RadioTherapy study (2.8%). In a novel ICC analysis of 242 of the patients, we estimated that there should be 11.4 recurrences; in this group, only 6 recurrences were observed. Conclusions: Lumpectomy and Targit boost combined with external beam radiotherapy results in a low local recurrence rate in a standard risk patient population. Accurate localization and the immediacy of the treatment that has a favorable effect on tumour microenvironment may contribute to this effect. These long-term data establish the long-term safety and efficacy of the Targit technique and generate the hypothesis that Targit boost might be superior to an external beam boost in its efficacy and justifies a randomized trial.

  1. SU-F-BRB-02: Towards Quantitative Clinical Decision On Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) Or Prone for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H; Gao, Y; Liu, T; Gelblum, D; Ho, A; Powell, S; Tang, X; Xu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop quantitative clinical guidelines between supine Deep Inspiratory Breath Hold (DIBH) and prone free breathing treatments for breast patients, we applied 3D deformable phantoms to perform Monte Carlo simulation to predict corresponding Dose to the Organs at Risk (OARs). Methods: The RPI-adult female phantom (two selected cup sizes: A and D) was used to represent the female patient, and it was simulated using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code. Doses to OARs were investigated for supine DIBH and prone treatments, considering two breast sizes. The fluence maps of the 6-MV opposed tangential fields were exported. In the Monte Carlo simulation, the fluence maps allow each simulated photon particle to be weighed in the final dose calculation. The relative error of all dose calculations was kept below 5% by simulating 3*10{sup 7} photons for each projection. Results: In terms of dosimetric accuracy, the RPI Adult Female phantom with cup size D in DIBH positioning matched with a DIBH treatment plan of the patient. Based on the simulation results, for cup size D phantom, prone positioning reduced the cardiac dose and the dose to other OARs, while cup size A phantom benefits more from DIBH positioning. Comparing simulation results for cup size A and D phantom, dose to OARs was generally higher for the large breast size due to increased scattering arising from a larger portion of the body in the primary beam. The lower dose that was registered for the heart in the large breast phantom in prone positioning was due to the increase of the distance between the heart and the primary beam when the breast was pendulous. Conclusion: Our 3D deformable phantom appears an excellent tool to predict dose to the OARs for the supine DIBH and prone positions, which might help quantitative clinical decisions. Further investigation will be conducted. National Institutes of Health R01EB015478.

  2. Dose calculation accuracies in whole breast radiotherapy treatment planning: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Shogo; Miyabe, Yuki; Tohyama, Naoki; Kumazaki, Yu; Kurooka, Masahiko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kito, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Ohotomo, Yuko; Ikagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Miwako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishio, Teiji

    2015-07-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the variation in the doses delivered among institutions due to dose calculation inaccuracies in whole breast radiotherapy. We have developed practical procedures for quality assurance (QA) of radiation treatment planning systems. These QA procedures are designed to be performed easily at any institution and to permit comparisons of results across institutions. The dose calculation accuracy was evaluated across seven institutions using various irradiation conditions. In some conditions, there was a >3 % difference between the calculated dose and the measured dose. The dose calculation accuracy differs among institutions because it is dependent on both the dose calculation algorithm and beam modeling. The QA procedures in this study are useful for verifying the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm and of the beam model before clinical use for whole breast radiotherapy.

  3. Effect of respiratory motion on the delivery of breast radiotherapy using SMLC intensity modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiang; McDermott, Patrick; Burmeister, Jay

    2007-01-15

    This study evaluates the effects of respiratory motion on breast radiotherapy delivered using segmented multileaf collimator (SMLC) intensity modulation. An anthropomorphic breast phantom was constructed of polystyrene plates between which radiographic films were inserted. The phantom was mounted on a moving platform to simulate one-dimensional sinusoidal oscillation with variable amplitude and frequency. The motion effect on two breast IMRT techniques, a beamlet-based plan created using the Corvus treatment planning system and an aperture-based plan, was evaluated via film comparison. Motion-induced differences in the treatment region are generally within {+-}5%, with the exception of the posterior field edge and the apex of the breast in the Corvus IMRT plan. Considering the experimental uncertainty arising from the setup and film dosimetry, this result indicates that respiratory motion-induced dose variations are generally relatively insignificant. It appears that the anterior hot spots observed in the Corvus IMRT plan result from the high intensity fluence delivered to the ''virtual bolus'' area which must be created during the planning process in order to provide ''flash'' for the respiratory motion. The potential magnitude of such effects resulting from the interplay between fluence modulation and patient motion are unique to the individual planning system and planning technique, as well as the delivery equipment and technique. Such effects should be carefully investigated prior to the implementation of IMRT for breast radiotherapy.

  4. Risk of secondary cancers in women with breast cancer and the influence of radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Yao; Chen, Sih-Hao; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lee, Song-Tay; Guo, How-Ran; Kuo, Shu-Chun; Su, Shih-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide; thus, the prolongation of survival, and the incidence and risk factors, including radiotherapy, for developing secondary malignancies are important. We compared the incidence of secondary and new primary cancers in women with breast cancer (CAPos) and well-matched for age, geographic region, and monthly income cancer-free controls (CANeg). The risk for secondary cancers with and without radiotherapy was also compared in CAPos women. We enrolled 2422 CAPos patients and CANeg 12,110 controls. In a 4-year follow-up, the secondary cancers risk was significant in the CAPos group (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–2.18). Only the risk of uterine cancer was significant compared with the controls (AHR: 6.30; 95% CI: 2.28–17.38). CAPos patients and <50 years old had a higher risk for secondary cancers. Developing secondary cancers was significant in the first follow-up year (AHR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.11–2.06). Radiotherapy had no significant effect on the CAPos group, but it was significant (P = 0.0298) in women ≥60 years old (elderly). We recommend monitoring secondary cancers in CAPos women, especially those <50 years old, and during the first year of follow-up. Radiotherapy should be used more carefully in elderly CAPos women. PMID:27930560

  5. Intact Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 Complex Predicts Good Response to Radiotherapy in Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soederlund, Karin . E-mail: karin.soderlund@ibk.liu.se; Stal, Olle; Skoog, Lambert; Rutqvist, Lars Erik; Askmalm, Marie Stenmark

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the expression and predictive role of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) for the outcome of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The protein expression of ATM and the DNA repair proteins in the MRN complex were investigated using immunohistochemistry in tumors from 224 women with early breast cancer, who were randomized to receive postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Compared with normal breast tissue, the staining intensity of Mre11, Rad50, Nbs1, and ATM was reduced in a majority of the tumors. Weak expression of the MRN complex was correlated with high histologic grade and estrogen receptor negativity (p = 0.01 and p 0.0001, respectively). Radiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of local recurrence as compared with chemotherapy (p = 0.04). The greatest benefit of radiotherapy was seen in patients with moderate/strong expression of the MRN complex (relative risk = 0.27, 95% confidence interval = 0.098-0.72, p 0.009), whereas patients with negative/weak MRN expression had no benefit of radiotherapy compared with adjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that an intact MRN complex is important for the tumor cell eradicating effect of radiotherapy. Conclusions: Reduced expression of the MRN complex predicts a poor effect of radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer.

  6. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, William C.; Kim, Janice; Kim, Edward; Silverman, Paula; Overmoyer, Beth; Cooper, Brenda W.; Anthony, Sue; Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary; Hanks, Shelli H.; Lyons, Janice A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  7. Dosimetric Comparison in Breast Radiotherapy of 4 MV and 6 MV on Physical Chest Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio; Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Lima Souza Castro, Andre; Alves de oliveira, Marcio; Galvao Dias, Humberto

    2015-07-01

    According to the World Health Organization (2014) breast cancer is the main cause of death by cancer in women worldwide. The biggest challenge of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer is to deposit the entire prescribed dose homogeneously in the breast, sparing the surrounding tissue. In this context, this paper aimed at evaluating and comparing internal dose distribution in the mammary gland based on experimental procedures submitted to two distinct energy spectra produced in breast cancer radiotherapy. The methodology consisted of reproducing opposite parallel fields used in the treatment of breast tumors in a chest phantom. This simulator with synthetic breast, composed of equivalent tissue material (TE), was previously developed by the NRI Research Group (UFMG). The computer tomography (CT) scan of the simulator was obtained antecedently. The radiotherapy planning systems (TPS) in the chest phantom were performed in the ECLIPSE system from Varian Medical Systems and CAT 3D system from MEVIS. The irradiations were reproduced in the Varian linear accelerator, model SL- 20 Precise, 6 MV energy and Varian linear accelerator, 4 MV Clinac 6x SN11 model. Calibrations of the absorbed dose versus optical density from radiochromic films were generated in order to obtain experimental dosimetric distribution at the films positioned within the glandular and skin equivalent tissues of the chest phantom. The spatial dose distribution showed equivalence with the TPS on measurement data performed in the 6 MV spectrum. The average dose found in radiochromic films placed on the skin ranged from 49 to 79%, and from 39 to 49% in the mammary areola, for the prescribed dose. Dosimetric comparisons between the spectra of 4 and 6 MV, keeping the constant geometry of the fields applied in the same phantom, will be presented showing their equivalence in breast radiotherapy, as well as the variations will be discussed. To sum up, the dose distribution has reached the value expected in

  8. MR-guided breast radiotherapy: feasibility and magnetic-field impact on skin dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2013-09-01

    The UMC Utrecht MRI/linac (MRL) design provides image guidance with high soft-tissue contrast, directly during radiotherapy (RT). Breast cancer patients are a potential group to benefit from better guidance in the MRL. However, due to the electron return effect, the skin dose can be increased in presence of a magnetic field. Since large skin areas are generally involved in breast RT, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the skin dose, for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). In ten patients with early-stage breast cancer, targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on postoperative CT scans co-registered with MRI. The OARs included the skin, comprising the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions. Three intensity-modulated RT techniques were considered (2× WBI, 1× APBI). Individual beam geometries were used for all patients. Specially developed MRL treatment-planning software was used. Acceptable plans were generated for 0 T, 0.35 T and 1.5 T, using a class solution. The skin dose was augmented in WBI in the presence of a magnetic field, which is a potential drawback, whereas in APBI the induced effects were negligible. This opens possibilities for developing MR-guided partial-breast treatments in the MRL.

  9. MO-DE-210-06: Development of a Supercompounded 3D Volumetric Ultrasound Image Guidance System for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, T; Hrycushko, B; Zhao, B; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For early-stage breast cancer, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a cost-effective breast-conserving treatment. Irradiation in a prone position can mitigate respiratory induced breast movement and achieve maximal sparing of heart and lung tissues. However, accurate dose delivery is challenging due to breast deformation and lumpectomy cavity shrinkage. We propose a 3D volumetric ultrasound (US) image guidance system for accurate prone APBI Methods: The designed system, set beneath the prone breast board, consists of a water container, an US scanner, and a two-layer breast immobilization cup. The outer layer of the breast cup forms the inner wall of water container while the inner layer is attached to patient breast directly to immobilization. The US transducer scans is attached to the outer-layer of breast cup at the dent of water container. Rotational US scans in a transverse plane are achieved by simultaneously rotating water container and transducer, and multiple transverse scanning forms a 3D scan. A supercompounding-technique-based volumetric US reconstruction algorithm is developed for 3D image reconstruction. The performance of the designed system is evaluated with two custom-made gelatin phantoms containing several cylindrical inserts filled in with water (11% reflection coefficient between materials). One phantom is designed for positioning evaluation while the other is for scaling assessment. Results: In the positioning evaluation phantom, the central distances between the inserts are 15, 20, 30 and 40 mm. The distances on reconstructed images differ by −0.19, −0.65, −0.11 and −1.67 mm, respectively. In the scaling evaluation phantom, inserts are 12.7, 19.05, 25.40 and 31.75 mm in diameter. Measured inserts’ sizes on images differed by 0.23, 0.19, −0.1 and 0.22 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The phantom evaluation results show that the developed 3D volumetric US system can accurately localize target position and determine

  10. Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.

  11. Radiotherapy dosimetry of the breast : Factors affecting dose to the patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Karen

    The work presented in this thesis developed from the quality assurance for the START trial. This provided a unique opportunity to perform measurements in a breast shaped, soft tissue equivalent phantom in over 40 hospitals, representing 75% of the radiotherapy centres in the UK. A wide range of planning systems using beam library, beam model and convolution based algorithms have been compared. The limitations of current algorithms as applied to breast radiotherapy have been investigated by analysing the results of the START quality assurance programme, performing further measurements of surface dose and setting up of a Monte Carlo system to calculate dose distributions and superficial doses. Measurements in both 2D and 3D breast phantoms indicated that the average measured dose at the centre of the breast was lower than that calculated on the planning system by approximately 2%. Surface dose measurements showed good agreement between measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with values ranging from 6% of the maximum dose for a small field (5cmx5cm) at normal incidence to 37% for a large field (9cmx20cm) at an angle of 75°. Calculation on CT plans with pixel by pixel correction for the breast density indicated that monitor units are lower by an average 3% compared to a bulk density corrected plan assuming a density of 1g.cm-3. The average dose estimated from TLD in build-up caps placed on the patient surface was 0.99 of the prescribed dose. This shows that the underestimation of dose due to the assumption of unit density tissue is partially cancelled by the overestimation of dose by the algorithms. The work showed that simple calculation algorithms can be used for calculation of dose to the breast, however they are less accurate for patients who have undergone a mastectomy and in regions close to inhomogeneities where more complex algorithms are needed.

  12. Skin Dosimetry in Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer: a Comparison between EBT and EBT3 Radiochromic Films

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toosi, M.T.; Mohamadian, N.; Ghorbani, M.; Khorshidi, F.; Akbari, F.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Radiochromic EBT3 film is a later generation of radiochromic films. The aim of this study is to compare EBT and EBT3 radiochromic films in radiotherapy fields of breast cancer. Methods A RANDO phantom was irradiated by a 6 MV Siemens Primus linac with medial and lateral fields of radiotherapy of breast cancer. Dosimetry was performed in various points in the fields using EBT and EBT3 films. Films were scanned by a Microtek color scanner. Dose values from two films in corresponding points were compared. Results In the investigation of calibration, net optical density (NOD) of EBT radiochromic is more than the EBT3 radiochromic film. The highest percentage difference between NODs of two films is related to 0.75 Gy and equals to 14.19%. The lowest value is related to 0.2 Gy dose and is equal to 3.31%. The highest percentage difference between two films on the RANDO phantom in breast cancer fields is 13.51% and the minimum value is equal to 0.33%. Conclusion From the comparison between the two films, most of the points show differences in dose in the measurements in fields of breast cancer radiotherapy. These differences are attributed to the thickness of the active layers, the overall thickness of the films, and the difference in the calibration fitted functions. The advantage of EBT film over EBT3 is a higher sensitivity; on the other hand EBT3 film allows to use its both sides in the scanning process and it is a new version of this film type. PMID:27672625

  13. Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Relapse: Local Recurrence Versus New Primary Tumor and the Effect of Whole-Breast Radiotherapy on the Rate of New Primaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gujral, Dorothy M.; Sumo, Georges; Owen, John R.; Ashton, Anita; Bliss, Judith M.; Haviland, Joanne; Yarnold, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The justification for partial breast radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery assumes that ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) outside the index quadrant are mostly new primary (NP) tumors that develop despite radiotherapy. We tested the hypothesis that whole-breast radiotherapy (WBRT) is ineffective in preventing NP by comparing development rates in irradiated and contralateral breasts after tumor excision and WBRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,410 women with breast cancer who were entered into a prospective randomized trial of radiotherapy fractionation and monitored annually for ipsilateral breast tumor relapses (IBTR) and contralateral breast cancer (CLBC). Cases of IBTR were classified into local recurrence (LR) or NP tumors based on location and histology and were subdivided as definite or likely depending on clinical data. Rates of ipsilateral NP and CLBC were compared over a 15-year period of follow-up. Results: At a median follow-up of 10.1 years, there were 150 documented cases of IBTR: 118 (79%) cases were definite or likely LR; 27 (18%) cases were definite or likely NP; and 5 (3%) cases could not be classified. There were 71 cases of CLBC. The crude proportion of definite-plus-likely NP was 1.9% (27/1,410) patients compared with 5% (71/1,410) CLBC patients. Cumulative incidence rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 0.8%, 2.0%, and 3.5%, respectively, for definite-plus-likely NP and 2.4%, 5.8%, and 7.9%, respectively for CLBC, suggesting a difference in the rates of NP and CLBC. Conclusions: This analysis suggests that WBRT reduces the rate of ipsilateral NP tumors. The late presentation of NP has implications for the reporting of trials that are testing partial breast radiotherapy.

  14. Enhancement of radiotherapy by ceria nanoparticles modified with neogambogic acid in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Xiao Hong; Hu, Xiao Dan; Zhang, Wei; Lou, Zhi Chao; Xie, Li Hua; Liu, Pei Dang; Zhang, Hai Qian

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main strategies for cancer treatment but has significant challenges, such as cancer cell resistance and radiation damage to normal tissue. Radiosensitizers that selectively increase the susceptibility of cancer cells to radiation can enhance the effectiveness of radiotherapy. We report here the development of a novel radiosensitizer consisting of monodispersed ceria nanoparticles (CNPs) covered with the anticancer drug neogambogic acid (NGA-CNPs). These were used in conjunction with radiation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and the efficacy and mechanisms of action of this combined treatment approach were evaluated. NGA-CNPs potentiated the toxic effects of radiation, leading to a higher rate of cell death than either treatment used alone and inducing the activation of autophagy and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase, while pretreatment with NGA or CNPs did not improve the rate of radiation-induced cancer cells death. However, NGA-CNPs decreased both endogenous and radiation-induced reactive oxygen species formation, unlike other nanomaterials. These results suggest that the adjunctive use of NGA-CNPs can increase the effectiveness of radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment by lowering the radiation doses required to kill cancer cells and thereby minimizing collateral damage to healthy adjacent tissue. PMID:26316742

  15. 3D Ultrasound Can Contribute to Planning CT to Define the Target for Partial Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berrang, Tanya S.; Truong, Pauline T. Popescu, Carmen; Drever, Laura; Kader, Hosam A.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Mitchell, Tracy; Soh, S.Y.; Sands, Letricia; Silver, Stuart; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The role of three-dimensional breast ultrasound (3D US) in planning partial breast radiotherapy (PBRT) is unknown. This study evaluated the accuracy of coregistration of 3D US to planning computerized tomography (CT) images, the seroma contouring consistency of radiation oncologists using the two imaging modalities and the clinical situations in which US was associated with improved contouring consistency compared to CT. Materials and Methods: Twenty consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer were enrolled prospectively after breast-conserving surgery. Subjects underwent 3D US at CT simulation for adjuvant RT. Three radiation oncologists independently contoured the seroma on separate CT and 3D US image sets. Seroma clarity, seroma volumes, and interobserver contouring consistency were compared between the imaging modalities. Associations between clinical characteristics and seroma clarity were examined using Pearson correlation statistics. Results: 3D US and CT coregistration was accurate to within 2 mm or less in 19/20 (95%) cases. CT seroma clarity was reduced with dense breast parenchyma (p = 0.035), small seroma volume (p < 0.001), and small volume of excised breast tissue (p = 0.01). US seroma clarity was not affected by these factors (p = NS). US was associated with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in 8/20 (40%) cases. Of these 8 cases, 7 had low CT seroma clarity scores and 4 had heterogeneously to extremely dense breast parenchyma. Conclusion: 3D US can be a useful adjunct to CT in planning PBRT. Radiation oncologists were able to use US images to contour the seroma target, with improved interobserver consistency compared with CT in cases with dense breast parenchyma and poor CT seroma clarity.

  16. Is Radiotherapy an Option for Early Breast Cancers With Complete Clinical Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Daveau, Caroline; Savignoni, Alexia; Abrous-Anane, Soumya; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Gautier, Chantal; Kirova, Youlia M.; Dendale, Remi; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the exclusive use of radiotherapy (ERT) could be a treatment option after complete clinical response (cCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) for early breast cancer (EBC). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1999, 1,477 patients received NCT for EBC considered too large for primary conservative surgery. Of 165 patients with cCR, 65 patients were treated with breast surgery (with radiotherapy) and 100 patients were treated with ERT. Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics, except for larger initial tumor sizes in the ERT group. There were no significant differences in overall, disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates. Five-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 91% and 77% in the no-surgery group and 82% and 79% in the surgery group, respectively (p = 0.9). However, a nonsignificant trend toward higher locoregional recurrence rates (LRR) was observed in the no-surgery group (31% vs. 17% at 10 years; p = 0.06). In patients with complete responses on mammography and/or ultrasound, LRR were not significantly different (p = 0.45, 10-year LRR: 21% in surgery vs. 26% in ERT). No significant differences were observed in terms of the rate of cutaneous, cardiac, or pulmonary toxicities. Conclusions: Surgery is a key component of locoregional treatment for breast cancers that achieved cCR to NCT.

  17. Intrathecal Methotrexate and Craniospinal Radiotherapy Can Be an Effective Treatment of Carcinomatous Meningitis in Patients with Breast Cancer: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Magdalena; Addeo, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carcinomatous meningitis in breast cancer occurs as a complication in up to 5% of all cases. It is a very devastating diagnosis, with a median patient survival of about 3 months. Treatment is very controversial, and different modalities of treatment have been used but none of them show significant benefit for overall survival. Case Reports We report 2 cases of carcinomatous meningitis in breast cancer patients. They received a similar treatment of a combination of intrathecal (IT) methotrexate followed by craniospinal radiotherapy. Both patients survived for many years after treatment and are in complete clinical and radiological remission. Conclusion Meningeal metastasis from breast cancer can be very effectively treated with IT and/or systemic chemotherapy followed by craniospinal radiotherapy. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of this sequential combination of chemotherapy with radiotherapy. PMID:27920689

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jo, In Young; Kim, Shin-Wook; Son, Seok Hyun

    2017-01-10

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skin-sparing effects of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with early left-sided breast cancer. Twenty left breast cancer patients treated with whole breast radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery were enrolled in this study, and the 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were generated for each patient. To evaluate the dose delivered to the skin, 2 mm thickness skin (2-mm skin) and 3 mm thickness skin (3-mm skin) were contoured and a dosimetric comparison between the 2 plans was performed. The target volume coverage was better in IMRT than in 3D-CRT. The mean dose was 50.8 Gy for 3D-CRT and 51.1 Gy for IMRT. V40Gy was 99.4% for 3D-CRT and 99.9% for IMRT. In the case of skin, the mean dose was higher in 3D-CRT than in IMRT (mean dose of 2-mm skin: 32.8 Gy and 24.2 Gy; mean dose of 3-mm skin: 37.2 Gy and 27.8 Gy, for 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively). These results indicated that the skin-sparing effect is more prominent in IMRT compared to 3D-CRT without compromising the target volume coverage.

  19. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that

  20. The impact of immediate breast reconstruction on the technical delivery of postmastectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Motwani, Sabin B.; Strom, Eric A. . E-mail: estrom@mdanderson.org; Schechter, Naomi R.; Butler, Charles E.; Lee, Gordon K.; Langstein, Howard N.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Ibrahim, Nuhad K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) planning. Methods: A total of 110 patients (112 treatment plans) who had mastectomy with immediate reconstruction followed by radiotherapy were compared with contemporaneous stage-matched patients who had undergone mastectomy without intervening reconstruction. A scoring system was used to assess optimal radiotherapy planning using four parameters: breadth of chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, minimization of lung, and avoidance of heart. An 'optimal' plan achieved all objectives or a minor 0.5 point deduction; 'moderately' compromised treatment plans had 1.0 or 1.5 point deductions; and 'major' compromised plans had {>=}2.0 point deductions. Results: Of the 112 PMRT plans scored after reconstruction, 52% had compromises compared with 7% of matched controls (p < 0.0001). Of the compromised plans after reconstruction, 33% were considered to be moderately compromised plans and 19% were major compromised treatment plans. Optimal chest wall coverage, treatment of the ipsilateral internal mammary chain, lung minimization, and heart avoidance was achieved in 79%, 45%, 84%, and 84% of the plans in the group undergoing immediate reconstruction, compared respectively with 100%, 93%, 97%, and 92% of the plans in the control group (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.0015, and p = 0.1435). In patients with reconstructions, 67% of the 'major' compromised radiotherapy plans were left-sided (p < 0.16). Conclusions: Radiation treatment planning after immediate breast reconstruction was compromised in more than half of the patients (52%), with the largest compromises observed in those with left-sided cancers. For patients with locally advanced breast cancer, the potential for compromised PMRT planning should be considered when deciding between immediate and delayed reconstruction.

  1. 3D surface imaging for guidance in breast cancer radiotherapy: organs at risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Betgen, Anja; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Remeijer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the variability in heart position in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) radiotherapy for breast cancer when 3D surface imaging would be used for monitoring the depth of the breath hold during treatment. Materials and Methods: Ten patients who received DIBH radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) were included. Retrospectively, heart-based registrations were performed for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to planning CT and breast surface registrations were performed for a 3D surface (two different regions of interest [ROIs]), captured concurrently with CBCT, to planning CT. The resulting setup errors were compared with linear regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to investigate the prediction quality of 3D surface imaging for 3D heart displacement. Further, the residual setup errors (systematic [Σ] and random [σ]) of the heart were estimated relative to the surface registrations. Results: When surface imaging [ROIleft-side;ROIboth-sides] would be used for monitoring, the residual errors of the heart position are in left-right: Σ=[0.360.12], σ=[0.160.14] cranio-caudal: Σ=[0.540.54], σ=[0.280.31] and in anteriorposterior: Σ=[0.180.14], σ=[0.200.19] cm. Correlations between setup errors were: R2 = [0.23;0.73], [0.67;0.65], [0.65;0.73] in left-right, cranio-caudal, and anterior-posterior direction, respectively. ROC analysis resulted in an area under the ROC curve of [0.82;0.78]. Conclusion: The use of ROIboth-sides provided promising results. However, considerable variability in the heart position, particularly in CC direction, is observed when 3D surface imaging would be used for guidance in DIBH radiotherapy after BCS. Planning organ at risk volume margins should be used to take into account the heart-position variability.

  2. Dose to the Contralateral Breast From Radiotherapy and Risk of Second Primary Breast Cancer in the WECARE Study

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Marilyn Smith, Susan A.; Langholz, Bryan M.; Boice, John D.; Shore, Roy E.; Andersson, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Capanu, Marinela; Bernstein, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Haile, Robert W.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the risk of second primary breast cancer in the contralateral breast (CB) after radiotherapy (RT) for first breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The study population included participants in the Women's Environmental, Cancer, and Radiation Epidemiology study: 708 cases (women with asynchronous bilateral breast cancer) and 1399 controls (women with unilateral breast cancer) counter-matched on radiation treatment. Participants were <55 years of age at first breast cancer. Absorbed doses to quadrants of the CB were estimated. Rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression models. Results: Across all patients, the mean radiation dose to the specific quadrant of the CB tumor was 1.1 Gy. Women <40 years of age who received >1.0 Gy of absorbed dose to the specific quadrant of the CB had a 2.5-fold greater risk for CB cancer than unexposed women (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.5). No excess risk was observed in women >40 years of age. Women <40 years of age with follow-up periods >5 years had a RR of 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1), and the dose response was significant (excess RR per Gy of 1.0, 95% CI 0.1-3.0). Conclusions: Women <40 years of age who received a radiation dose >1.0 Gy to the CB had an elevated, long-term risk of developing a second primary CB cancer. The risk is inversely related to age at exposure and is dose dependent.

  3. Comparison of Radiation Treatment Plans for Breast Cancer between 3D Conformal in Prone and Supine Positions in Contrast to VMAT and IMRT Supine Positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano Buele, Ana Isabel

    The treatment regimen for breast cancer patients typically involves Whole Breast Irradiation (WBI). The coverage and extent of the radiation treatment is dictated by location of tumor mass, breast tissue distribution, involvement of lymph nodes, and other factors. The current standard treatment approach used at our institution is a 3D tangential beam geometry, which involves two fields irradiating the breast, or a four field beam arrangement covering the whole breast and involved nodes, while decreasing the dose to organs as risk (OARs) such as the lung and heart. The coverage of these targets can be difficult to achieve in patients with unfavorable thoracic geometries, especially in those cases in which the planning target volume (PTV) is extended to the chest wall. It is a well-known fact that exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation has been proved to increase the subsequent rate of ischemic heart disease. In these cases, inverse planned treatments have become a proven alternative to the 3D approach. The goal of this research project is to evaluate the factors that affect our current techniques as well as to adapt the development of inverse modulated techniques for our clinic, in which breast cancer patients are one of the largest populations treated. For this purpose, a dosimetric comparison along with the evaluation of immobilization devices was necessary. Radiation treatment plans were designed and dosimetrically compared for 5 patients in both, supine and prone positions. For 8 patients, VMAT and IMRT plans were created and evaluated in the supine position. Skin flash incorporation for inverse modulated plans required measurement of the surface dose as well as an evaluation of breast volume changes during a treatment course. It was found that prone 3D conformal plans as well as the VMAT and IMRT plans are generally superior in sparing OARs to supine plans with comparable PTV coverage. Prone setup leads to larger shifts in breast volume as well as in

  4. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation.

  5. Is internal mammary nodes irradiation as a part of breast cancer postoperative radiotherapy necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Yang, Zhao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy plays an important role in the multidisciplinary treatment of breast cancer. However, it remains a controversy whether it is necessary to carry out prophylactic internal mammary nodes irradiation (IMNI). This review will focus on this topic. In our opinion, the total risk of relapse should be considered during the decision-making on IMNI; in particular, IMNI is recommended for high-risk patients whose tumor is located at the central/medial area or in patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. PMID:28066623

  6. Dosimetric research on intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy planning for left breast cancer after breast-preservation surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Yong; Chen Jinhu; Sun Tao; Ma Changsheng; Lu Jie; Liu Tonghai; Wang Ruozheng

    2012-10-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has played an important role in breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-preservation surgery. Our aim was to study the dosimetric and implementation features/feasibility between IMRT and intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy (Varian RapidArc, Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The forward IMRT plan (f-IMRT), the inverse IMRT, and the RapidArc plan (RA) were generated for 10 patients. Afterward, we compared the target dose distribution of the 3 plans, radiation dose on organs at risk, monitor units, and treatment time. All 3 plans met clinical requirements, with RA performing best in target conformity. In target homogeneity, there was no statistical significance between RA and IMRT, but both of homogeneity were less than f-IMRT's. With regard to the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the left lung, those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT; for V{sub 20} and V{sub 30}, the lowest was observed in RA; and in the V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the right lung, as well as the mean dose in normal-side breast and right lung, there was no statistically significance difference between RA and IMRT, and the lowest value was observed in f-IMRT. As for the maximum dose in the normal-side breast, the lowest value was observed in RA. Regarding monitor units (MUs), those in RA were higher than in f-IMRT but were lower than in IMRT. Treatment time of RA was 84.6% and 88.23% shorter than f-IMRT and IMRT, respectively, on average. Compared with f-IMRT and IMRT, RA performed better in target conformity and can reduce high-dose volume in the heart and left lung-which are related to complications-significantly shortening treatment time as well. Compared with IMRT, RA can also significantly reduce low-dose volume and MUs of the afflicted lung.

  7. Automated Planning of Tangential Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Using Heuristic Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Purdie, Thomas G.; Dinniwell, Robert E.; Letourneau, Daniel; Hill, Christine; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To present an automated technique for two-field tangential breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Method and Materials: A total of 158 planned patients with Stage 0, I, and II breast cancer treated using whole-breast IMRT were retrospectively replanned using automated treatment planning tools. The tools developed are integrated into the existing clinical treatment planning system (Pinnacle{sup 3}) and are designed to perform the manual volume delineation, beam placement, and IMRT treatment planning steps carried out by the treatment planning radiation therapist. The automated algorithm, using only the radio-opaque markers placed at CT simulation as inputs, optimizes the tangential beam parameters to geometrically minimize the amount of lung and heart treated while covering the whole-breast volume. The IMRT parameters are optimized according to the automatically delineated whole-breast volume. Results: The mean time to generate a complete treatment plan was 6 min, 50 s {+-} 1 min 12 s. For the automated plans, 157 of 158 plans (99%) were deemed clinically acceptable, and 138 of 158 plans (87%) were deemed clinically improved or equal to the corresponding clinical plan when reviewed in a randomized, double-blinded study by one experienced breast radiation oncologist. In addition, overall the automated plans were dosimetrically equivalent to the clinical plans when scored for target coverage and lung and heart doses. Conclusion: We have developed robust and efficient automated tools for fully inversed planned tangential breast IMRT planning that can be readily integrated into clinical practice. The tools produce clinically acceptable plans using only the common anatomic landmarks from the CT simulation process as an input. We anticipate the tools will improve patient access to high-quality IMRT treatment by simplifying the planning process and will reduce the effort and cost of incorporating more advanced planning into clinical

  8. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Susie A.; Schuster, David M.; Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as {>=}95% of the LRR volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose to {>=}95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  9. Use of Three-Dimensional Ultrasound in the Detection of Breast Tumor Bed Displacement During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Philip; Muanza, Thierry; Reynard, Eric; Robert, Karine; Barker, Jennifer; Sultanem, Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of a three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) image-guided system in identifying and tracking the tumor bed (TB) for planning and daily localization before radiation delivery for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty breast cancer patients underwent two CT scans at the time of simulation and just before their boost. Three-dimensional ultrasound images were acquired immediately after the CT scans, to which the images were automatically fused. Three-dimensional ultrasound images were also acquired immediately before treatment. Spatial and temporal TB differences between CT and US were evaluated. Results: The TB was not visible on US and CT in 1 subject who had and 1 subject who had not received chemotherapy before whole-breast radiotherapy. The mean (SD) TB volume overlap was 78% (14%). The mean centroid position of the TB on CT vs. US differed by 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. The mean (SD) absolute radial displacement of the TB on each fraction from the treatment plan was 10.8 (6.3) mm. Conclusions: The TB was well visualized by US for the majority of patients. Clinically insignificant differences in the displacements calculated by paired CT vs. paired US demonstrate the feasibility of using 3D-US. The present study suggests that a 10-mm planning target volume margin could result in undercoverage of the clinical target volumes in 50% of treatments. Multimodality planning and image-guided radiotherapy with US potentially offers an accurate and non-ionizing solution for the daily definition of the TB position during partial-breast irradiation and boost treatments.

  10. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, B.; Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Vosoughi, H.; Khademi, S.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered. PMID:27853722

  11. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  12. Real-time 3D surface-image-guided beam setup in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Djajaputra, David; Li Shidong

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach for external beam radiotherapy of breast cancer that utilizes the three-dimensional (3D) surface information of the breast. The surface data of the breast are obtained from a 3D optical camera that is rigidly mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. This 3D camera utilizes light in the visible range therefore it introduces no ionization radiation to the patient. In addition to the surface topographical information of the treated area, the camera also captures gray-scale information that is overlaid on the 3D surface image. This allows us to visualize the skin markers and automatically determine the isocenter position and the beam angles in the breast tangential fields. The field sizes and shapes of the tangential, supraclavicular, and internal mammary gland fields can all be determined according to the 3D surface image of the target. A least-squares method is first introduced for the tangential-field setup that is useful for compensation of the target shape changes. The entire process of capturing the 3D surface data and subsequent calculation of beam parameters typically requires less than 1 min. Our tests on phantom experiments and patient images have achieved the accuracy of 1 mm in shift and 0.5 deg. in rotation. Importantly, the target shape and position changes in each treatment session can both be corrected through this real-time image-guided system.

  13. In Vivo Dosimetry for Single-Fraction Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy (TARGIT) for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, David J.; Best, Bronagh; Brew-Graves, Chris; Duck, Stephen; Ghaus, Tabasom; Gonzalez, Regina; Pigott, Katharine; Reynolds, Claire; Williams, Norman R.; Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In vivo dosimetry provides an independent check of delivered dose and gives confidence in the introduction or consistency of radiotherapy techniques. Single-fraction intraoperative radiotherapy of the breast can be performed with the Intrabeam compact, mobile 50 kV x-ray source (Carl Zeiss Surgical, Oberkochen, Germany). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) can be used to estimate skin doses during these treatments. Methods and Materials: Measurements of skin doses were taken using TLDs for 72 patients over 3 years of clinical treatments. Phantom studies were also undertaken to assess the uncertainties resulting from changes in beam quality and backscatter conditions in vivo. Results: The mean measured skin dose was 2.9 {+-} 1.6 Gy, with 11% of readings higher than the prescription dose of 6 Gy, but none of these patients showed increased complications. Uncertainties due to beam hardening and backscatter reduction were small compared with overall accuracy. Conclusions: TLDs are a useful and effective method to measure in vivo skin doses in intraoperative radiotherapy and are recommended for the initial validation or any modification to the delivery of this technique. They are also an effective tool to show consistent and safe delivery on a more frequent basis or to determine doses to other critical structures as required.

  14. Supervised physical therapy in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer 1

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Nara Fernanda Braz da Silva; de Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of physical therapy on the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs in women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer. Methods: a total of 35 participants were randomized into two groups, with 18 in the control group (CG) and 17 in the study group (SG). Both of the groups underwent three evaluations to assess the range of motion of the shoulders and perimetry of the upper limbs, and the study group underwent supervised physical therapy for the upper limbs. Results: the CG had deficits in external rotation in evaluations 1, 2, and 3, whereas the SG had deficits in flexion, abduction, and external rotation in evaluation 1. The deficit in abduction was recovered in evaluation 2, whereas the deficits in all movements were recovered in evaluation 3. No significant differences in perimetry were observed between the groups. Conclusion: the applied supervised physical therapy was effective in recovering the deficit in abduction after radiotherapy, and the deficits in flexion and external rotation were recovered within two months after the end of radiotherapy. Registration number of the clinical trial: NCT02198118. PMID:27533265

  15. Single-Fraction Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Early Cosmetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, Kathryn McCormick, Beryl; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Borgen, Patrick; Fey, Jane; Goldberg, Jessica; Sacchini, Virgilio

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic outcome of patients treated with wide local excision and intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 women were treated on a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy at wide local excision. The eligibility criteria included age >60, tumor size {<=}2.0 cm, clinically negative lymph nodes, and biopsy-established diagnosis. After wide local excision, a custom breast applicator was placed in the excision cavity, and a dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm. After 18 patients were treated, the dose was constrained laterally to 18 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by photographs at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Four examiners graded the photographs for symmetry, edema, discoloration, contour, and scarring. The grades were evaluated in relationship to the volume of irradiated tissue, tumor location, and dose at the lateral aspects of the cavity. Results: The median volume of tissue receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 47 cm{sup 3} (range, 20-97 cm{sup 3}). Patients with {<=}47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue had better cosmetic outcomes than did the women who had >47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue. Women who had received 18 Gy at the lateral aspects of their cavities had better cosmetic outcomes than did women who had received 20 Gy at the lateral aspects. When comparing the 6- and 12-month results, the scores remained stable for 63%, improved for 17%, and worsened for 20%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy appears feasible for selected patients. A favorable cosmetic outcome appears to be related to a smaller treatment volume. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable, although additional follow-up is necessary.

  16. Predictive parameters in hypofractionated whole-breast 3D conformal radiotherapy according to the Ontario Canadian trial

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Grazia; Terlizzi, Angela; Della Vittoria Scarpati, Giuseppina; Perri, Francesco; De Chiara, Vincenzo; Turi, Barbara; Silvano, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the possible role of dosimetric parameters according Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) model as predictive of late toxicity and cosmesis in hypofractionated whole-breast three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis on 215 consecutive early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery and adjuvant hypofractionated whole-breast radiotherapy (according the Ontario Canadian trial), with a 6 years median follow-up was conducted. To assess the impact of 10%–20% dose hotspots on different percent values of planning target volume (PTV) of the breast, we retrospectively employed the NTCP model of Lyman. PTV breast (PTVbr), V110 were identified. For statistical analysis the χ2 and paired t-test were used to find a correlation between late skin and subcutaneous toxicity and cosmetic outcome with dosimetrical parameters Multivariate analysis was performed with the aim to assess independently the impact of dosimetric and clinical parameters on late toxicity and cosmesis using Pearson’s covariance. Results Late skin toxicity was recorded in 47/215 (22%); and G3 toxicity occurred in 11 patients (5%). Cosmesis with excellent–good score was found in 172 patients (80%) while fair–poor score was found in 43 patients (20%). In univariate χ2 analysis the V110 >10% of the PTV breast significantly correlated with higher toxicity (P<0.005, OR 9.60 [CI 3.89–23.72]). Cosmesis related to V110 >10% and PTV breast volume over 1,300 cc was significant at multivariate analysis (P<0.005, OR 6.07 [CI 2.36–15.59]). Conclusion To safely use one of the most important whole-breast hypofractionated radiotherapy schedules, we found some predictive paramaters on the basis of NTCP model by Lyman. These parameters may be useful in selection of elegible patients. PMID:28392704

  17. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    PubMed

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  18. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging.

  19. Lung dose analysis in loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Mohammad A.; Bahadur, Yasir A.; Constantinescu, Camelia T.; Eltaher, Maha M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the ipsilateral lung dosimetry data of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT). Methods: Treatment plans of 150 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Unit, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and March 2015 by HFRT for BC were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received 42.4 Gy in 16 fractions by tangential and supra-clavicular fields with 6 MV, 18 MV, or mixed energies. Ipsilateral lung dosimetric data V20Gy and mean lung dose (MLD) were recorded. Correlations between lung dose, patient characteristics, and treatment delivery parameters were assessed by a logistic regression test. Results: The mean ipsilateral lung V20Gy was 24.6% and mean MLD was 11.9 Gy. A weak, but statistically significant correlation was found between lung dose and lung volume (p=0.043). The lung dose was significantly decreasing with patient separation and depth of axillary lymph node (ALN) and supra-claviculary lymph nodes (SCLN) (p<0.0001), and increasing with ALN (p=0.001) and SCLN (p=0.003) dose coverage. Lung dose significantly decreased with beam energy (p<0.0001): mean V20Gy was 27.8%, 25.4% for 6 MV, mixed energy, and 21.2% for 18 MV. The use of a low breast-board angle correlates with low lung dose. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the use of high energy photon beams and low breast-board angulation can reduce the lung dose. PMID:27279508

  20. SU-E-T-814: Whole Breast Irradiation with Two Different Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Yin, Y; Lin, X; Zhang, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer now mainly received forward intensity modulation radiotherapy (f-IMRT) and inverse IMRT (i-IMRT). The purpose of this study was to observe the differences of two treatment methods. Methods: 10 patients after left breast-conserving surgery were selected to receive radiotherapy. For each patient, two treatment plans (f-IMRT and i-IMRT) were designed. For f-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target, and in each tangent orientation two or three segment beams were designed to reduced high dose region in the target and the dose of lung received. For i-IMRT plans, two tangent beams were designed to the target and the treatment planning system optimize the dose according to the optimization parameters. For each plan 50Gy was prescribed. Results: In f-IMRT and i-IMRT plans, the average target conformal index (CI) were (0.67±0.06) and (0.66±0.06), (P>0.05); average homogeneity index (HI) were (28.2±6.0)% and (26.1±6.8)%, (P>0.05); volume of left lung received 20Gy (V20) were (18.7±3.3)% and (17.0±2.8)%, (P<0.05), V30 were (15.5±3.0)% and (14.0±2.6)%, (P<0.05); V30 of heart were (4.1±3.1)% and (3.5±2.5)%, (P>0.05); Monitor Unit (MU) were (262±5)MU and (308±14)MU. Conclusion: Compared with i-IMRT plan, for breast cancer, the differences of CI and HI were not significant. Because of fewer MU, f-IMRT plan could reduce the machine abrasion and treatment time, but dose of normal tissue received were higher significantly than i-IMRT plan.

  1. An imaging evaluation of the simultaneously integrated boost breast radiotherapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Turley, Jessica; Claridge Mackonis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate in-field megavoltage (MV) imaging of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) breast fields to determine its feasibility in treatment verification for the SIB breast radiotherapy technique, and to assess whether the current-imaging protocol and treatment margins are sufficient. Methods For nine patients undergoing SIB breast radiotherapy, in-field MV images of the SIB fields were acquired on days that regular treatment verification imaging was performed. The in-field images were matched offline according to the scar wire on digitally reconstructed radiographs. The offline image correction results were then applied to a margin recipe formula to calculate safe margins that account for random and systematic uncertainties in the position of the boost volume when an offline correction protocol has been applied. Results After offline assessment of the acquired images, 96% were within the tolerance set in the current department-imaging protocol. Retrospectively performing the maximum position deviations on the Eclipse™ treatment planning system demonstrated that the clinical target volume (CTV) boost received a minimum dose difference of 0.4% and a maximum dose difference of 1.4% less than planned. Furthermore, applying our results to the Van Herk margin formula to ensure that 90% of patients receive 95% of the prescribed dose, the calculated CTV margins were comparable to the current departmental procedure used. Conclusion Based on the in-field boost images acquired and the feasible application of these results to the margin formula the current CTV-planning target volume margins used are appropriate for the accurate treatment of the SIB boost volume without additional imaging. PMID:26451242

  2. A multicentre study of the evidence for customized margins in photon breast boost radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mukesh, Mukesh B; Donovan, Ellen M; Kirby, Anna M; Haviland, Joanne S; Jena, Raj; Yarnold, John; Baker, Angela; Dean, June; Eagle, Sally; Mayles, Helen; Griffin, Claire; Perry, Rosalind; Poynter, Andrew; Coles, Charlotte E; Evans, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine if subsets of patients may benefit from smaller or larger margins when using laser setup and bony anatomy verification of breast tumour bed (TB) boost radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Verification imaging data acquired using cone-beam CT, megavoltage CT or two-dimensional kilovoltage imaging on 218 patients were used (1574 images). TB setup errors for laser-only setup (dlaser) and for bony anatomy verification (dbone) were determined using clips implanted into the TB as a gold standard for the TB position. Cases were grouped by centre-, patient- and treatment-related factors, including breast volume, TB position, seroma visibility and surgical technique. Systematic (Σ) and random (σ) TB setup errors were compared between groups, and TB planning target volume margins (MTB) were calculated. Results: For the study population, Σlaser was between 2.8 and 3.4 mm, and Σbone was between 2.2 and 2.6 mm, respectively. Females with larger breasts (p = 0.03), easily visible seroma (p ≤ 0.02) and open surgical technique (p ≤ 0.04) had larger Σlaser. Σbone was larger for females with larger breasts (p = 0.02) and lateral tumours (p = 0.04). Females with medial tumours (p < 0.01) had smaller Σbone. Conclusion: If clips are not used, margins should be 8 and 10 mm for bony anatomy verification and laser setup, respectively. Individualization of TB margins may be considered based on breast volume, TB and seroma visibility. Advances in knowledge: Setup accuracy using lasers and bony anatomy is influenced by patient and treatment factors. Some patients may benefit from clip-based image guidance more than others. PMID:26585543

  3. Megavoltage cone beam CT near surface dose measurements: potential implications for breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Cutajar, Dean; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Metcalfe, Peter

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is fast becoming standard on modern linear accelerators. CBCT increases the dose to regions within and outside the treatment field, potentially increasing secondary cancer induction and toxicity. This study quantified megavoltage (MV) CBCT skin dose and compared it to skin dose delivered during standard tangential breast radiotherapy.Method: Dosimetry was performed both in- and out-of-field using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and a metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) detector specifically designed for skin dosimetry; these were placed superficially on a female anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The skin dose from a single treatment fraction ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 Gy on the ipsilateral breast, 0.031-0.18 Gy on the contralateral breast, and 0-0.02 Gy in the head and pelvic region. An 8 MU MV CBCT delivered a skin dose that ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 Gy in the chest region and was less than 0.01 Gy in the head and pelvis regions. One MV CBCT per fraction was found to increase the out-of-field skin dose from both the CBCT and the treatment fields by approximately 20%. The imaging dose as a percentage of treatment doses in the ipsilateral breast region was 3% for both dosimeters.Conclusion: Imaging increases the skin dose to regions outside the treatment field particularly regions immediately adjacent the target volume. This small extra dose to the breasts should be considered when developing clinical protocols and assessing dose for clinical trials.

  4. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2–positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT. Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed. At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor–positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR−/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–15.35; P = 0.039). Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:27512838

  5. SU-E-T-777: Use of Tennis Racket and Air Gap Between the Body and Carbon Fiber Couch for Skin Sparing in Radiation Therapy of Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lief, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To reduce the skin dose from the carbon fiber couch scatter in radiation treatment of breast cancer in the prone position. If this issue is not addressed, the prone breast touching the solid carbon fiber couch can absorb significant dose to the skin and cause the skin reaction. Methods: 1. Use of “tennis racket” instead of the solid couch. To check this hypothesis, we measured the dose at the depth of 5 mm in solid water phantom placed on the couch, using a Farmer chamber. A plan for a patient with 6MV beams, gantry angles of 113 and 286 degrees Varian scale was used. It was found that treatment with “tennis racket” instead of the solid carbon fiber couch reduces the surface dose by 5–7%, depending on the beam direction. 2. Use of the air gap between the couch and the body was analyzed using radiochromic film on the surface of the solid water phantom 10 cm thick. Initially the phantom was placed on the couch with the film sandwiched in between. Two fields at the angles of 135 and 315 degrees were used. The measurements were repeated for the air gap of 2 and 5 cm and 6 and 15 MV beams. Results: It was found that a 2-cm gap decreased the surface dose by 3% for a 6 MV beam and by 5.5% for a 15 MV beam. A 5-cm gap reduced the dose by 9% for 6 MV and 13.5% for 15 MV. Conclusion: Use of both methods (combined if possible) can significantly reduce the surface dose in radiation therapy of the prone breast and possible skin reaction. We plan to explore dependence of the dose reduction upon the angle of incidence.

  6. A cosmetic evaluation of breast cancer treatment: A randomized study of radiotherapy boost technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vass, Sylvie . E-mail: sylvie.vass@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Bairati, Isabelle

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To compare cosmetic results of two different radiotherapy (RT) boost techniques used in the treatment of breast cancer after whole breast radiotherapy and to identify factors affecting cosmetic outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 1998, 142 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer were treated with breast conservative surgery and adjuvant RT. Patients were then randomly assigned to receive a boost dose of 15 Gy delivered to the tumor bed either by iridium 192, or a combination of photons and electrons. Cosmetic evaluations were done on a 6-month basis, with a final evaluation at 36 months after RT. The evaluations were done using a panel of global and specific subjective scores, a digitized scoring system using the breast retraction assessment (BRA) measurement, and a patient's self-assessment evaluation. As cosmetic results were graded according to severity, the comparison of boost techniques was done using the ordinal logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) are presented. Results: At 36 months of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the global subjective cosmetic outcome (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.69-2.85, p = 0.35). Good to excellent scores were observed in 65% of implant patients and 62% of photon/electron patients. At 24 months and beyond, telangiectasia was more severe in the implant group with an OR of 9.64 (95%CI = 4.05-22.92, p < 0.0001) at 36 months. The only variable associated with a worse global cosmetic outcome was the presence of concomitant chemotherapy (OR = 3.87; 95%CI = 1.74-8.62). The BRA value once adjusted for age, concomitant chemotherapy, and boost volume showed a positive association with the boost technique. The BRA value was significantly greater in the implant group (p 0.03). There was no difference in the patient's final self-assessment score between the two groups. Three variables were statistically associated with

  7. A support vector machine (SVM) for predicting preferred treatment position in radiotherapy of patients with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Xuan; Wong, Edward K.; Wang Yao; Lymberis, Stella; Wen Bixiu; Formenti, Silvia; Chang Jenghwa

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: NYU 05-181 protocol compared the CT simulation in both supine and prone positions for 400 patients with breast cancer (200 left-breast and 200 right-breast) to identify which setup is better at sparing heart and lung involvement in the treatment process. The results demonstrated that all right-breast patients benefited from the prone treatment position, while for left-breast patients, 85% were better treated prone and 15% were better treated supine. Using the clinical data collected from this protocol, the authors aimed at developing an automated tool capable of identifying which of the left-breast cancer patients are better treated supine without obtaining a second CT scan in the supine position. Methods: Prone CT scans from 198 of the 200 left-breast cancer patients enrolled in NYU 05-181 protocol were deidentified and exported to a dedicated research planning workstation. Three-dimensional geometric features of the organs at risk and tumor bed were extracted. A two-stage classifier was used to classify patients into the prone class or the supine class. In the first stage, the authors use simple thresholding to divide the patients into two groups based on their in-field heart volume. For patients with in-field heart volume {<=}0.1 cc, the prone position was chosen as the preferred treatment position. Patients with in-field heart volume >0.1 cc will be further classified in the second stage by a weighted support vector machine (SVM). The weight parameters of the SVM were adjusted to maximize the specificity [true-supine/(true-supine+false-prone)] at the cost of lowering but still maintaining reasonable sensitivity [true-prone/(true-prone+false-supine)]. The authors used K-fold cross validations to test the performance of the SVM classifier. A feature selection algorithm was also used to identify features that give the best classification performance. Results: After the first stage, 49 of the 198 left-breast cancer patients were found to have >0.1 cc of in

  8. SU-E-J-160: Comparing the Setup Accuracy of Non-Ionizing Patient Localization Systems with CBCT to Reduce Imaging Dose in Prone Breast Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, E; Yamamoto, T; Mayadev, J; Dieterich, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: CBCT is the current gold standard to verify prone breast patient setup. We investigated in a phantom if non-ionizing localization systems can replace ionizing localization systems for prone breast treatments. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was positioned on a prone breast board. Electromagnetic transponders were attached on the left chest surface. The CT images of the phantom were imported to the treatment planning system. The isocenter was set to the center of the transponders. The positions of the isocenter and transponders transferred to the transponder tracking system. The posterior phantom surface was contoured and exported to the optical surface tracking system. A CBCT was taken for the initial setup alignment on the treatment machine. Using the electromagnetic and optical localization systems, the deviation of the phantom setup from the original CT images was measured. This was compared with the difference between the original CT and kV-CBCT images. Results: For the electromagnetic localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 1.5 mm, 0.0 mm and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI) and left-right (LR) directions. For the optical localization system, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 2.0 mm, −2.0 mm and 0.1 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. For the CBCT, the phantom position deviated from the original CT in 4.0 mm, 1.0 mm and −1.0 mm in the AP, SI and LR directions. The measured values from the non-ionizing localization systems differed from those with the CBCT less than 3.0 mm in all directions. Conclusions: This phantom study showed the feasibility of using a combination of non-ionizing localization systems to achieve a similar setup accuracy as CBCT for prone breast patients. This could potentially eliminate imaging dose. As a next step, we are expanding this study to actual patients. This work has been in part supported by Departmental Research Award RODEPT1-JS

  9. Cardiac Motion During Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold: Implications for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Pan Tinsu; Pinnix, Chelsea; Zhang, Sean X.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sun, Tzouh Liang; Gladish, Gregory; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Hoffman, Karen E.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Many patients with left-sided breast cancer receive adjuvant radiotherapy during deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) to minimize radiation exposure to the heart. We measured the displacement of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and heart owing to cardiac motion during DIBH, relative to the standard tangential fields for left breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients who had undergone computed tomography-based coronary angiography with retrospective electrocardiographic gating were randomly selected for the present study. The patients underwent scanning during DIBH to control the influence of respiration on cardiac motion. Standard medial and lateral tangential fields were placed, and the LADs were contoured on the systolic- and diastolic-phase computed tomography data sets by the clinicians. Displacement of the LAD during cardiac contractions was calculated in three directions: toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, left-right, and anteroposterior. Displacement of the entire heart was measured on the maximal and minimal intensity projection computed tomography images. Results: The mean displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction without the influence of respiration for 20 patients was 2.3 mm (range, 0.7-3.8) toward the posterior edge of the treatment fields, 2.6 mm (range, 1.0-6.8) in the left-right direction, and 2.3 mm (range, 0.6-6.5) in the anteroposterior direction. At least 30% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in any direction in 2 patients (10%), and <10% of the LAD volume was displaced >5 mm in 10 patients (50%). The extent of displacement of the heart periphery during cardiac motion was negligible near the treatment fields. Conclusions: Displacement of the heart periphery near the treatment fields was negligible during DIBH; however, displacement of the LAD from cardiac contraction varied substantially between and within patients. We recommend maintaining {>=}5 mm of distance between

  10. For Stage II Node-Positive Breast Cancer, is it Worthwhile to Consider Adjuvant Radiotherapy Following Mastectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Mohammed A. M.; Elkady, Mohammad S.; Nasr, Khalid E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), loco-regional recurrence (LRR), and toxicities for early breast-cancer patients with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes, by the addition of radiotherapy to adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients were eligible for enrollment into the study if they had pathologically proven stages II breast cancer, with one to three positive axillary lymph nodes. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups; Group 1; adjuvant chemotherapy then radiotherapy, and group 2; adjuvant chemotherapy only. Results: Between September 2008 and August 2014, 75 patients were enrolled. Forty patients group 1, and 35 group 2. The 4-year OS for group 1, and two were 77.5 and 71.4%, respectively. The 4-year PFS for group 1 and 2 were 72.5 and 60%, respectively. During the 54 months follow-up period, 11 patients from group 1 had recurrence (three locoregional, seven metastatic, and one both), and 14 patients from group 2 had recurrence (seven locoregional, three metastatic, and four both). The distant metastasis rate was the same in the two groups. However, the metastasis sites were different in the two groups. Conclusion: The addition of radiotherapy in stage II breast cancer with one to three positive lymph nodes improved the PFS, and LRR. Radiotherapy improved OS in patients with high-risk features. PMID:25478324

  11. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  12. Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flejmer, Anna M; Edvardsson, Anneli; Dohlmar, Frida; Josefsson, Dan; Nilsson, Mats; Witt Nyström, Petra; Dasu, Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating. Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student's t-test. Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy  (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) with protons in comparison with photons. Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose.

  13. Dosimetry and field matching for radiotherapy to the breast and superclavicular fossa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, Elizabeth

    Radiotherapy for early breast cancer aims to achieve local disease control and decrease loco-regional recurrence rates. Treatment may be directed to breast or chest wall alone or, include regional lymph nodes. When using tangential fields to treat the breast a separate anterior field directed to the axilla and supraclavicular fossa (SCF) is needed to treat nodal areas. The complex geometry of this region necessitates matching of adjacent radiation fields in three dimensions. The potential exists for zones of overdosage or underdosage along the match line. Cosmetic results may be compromised if treatment fields are not accurately aligned. Techniques for field matching vary between centres in the UK. A study of dosimetry across the match line region using different techniques, as reported in the multi-centre START Trial Quality Assurance (QA) programme, was undertaken. A custom-made anthropomorphic phantom was designed to assess dose distribution in three dimensions using film dosimetry. Methods with varying degrees of complexity were employed to match tangential and SCF beams. Various techniques combined half beam blocking and machine rotations to achieve geometric alignment. Matching of asymmetric beams allowed a single isocentre technique to be used. Where field matching was not undertaken a gap between tangential and SCF fields was employed. Results demonstrated differences between techniques in addition to variations within the same technique between different centres. Geometric alignment techniques produced more homogenous dose distributions in the match region than gap techniques or those techniques not correcting for field divergence. For this multi-centre assessment of match plane techniques film dosimetry used in conjunction with a breast shaped phantom provided relative dose information. This study has highlighted the difficulties of matching treatment fields to achieve homogenous dose distribution through the region of the match plane and the degree of

  14. Automated skin segmentation in ultrasonic evaluation of skin toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Chen, Hao; Torres, Mylin; Yoshida, Emi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuefeng; Curran, Walter; Liu, Tian

    2013-11-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common side effect of breast cancer radiotherapy and impairs the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. We, along with other researchers, have recently found quantitative ultrasound to be effective as a skin toxicity assessment tool. Although more reliable than standard clinical evaluations (visual observation and palpation), the current procedure for ultrasound-based skin toxicity measurements requires manual delineation of the skin layers (i.e., epidermis-dermis and dermis-hypodermis interfaces) on each ultrasound B-mode image. Manual skin segmentation is time consuming and subjective. Moreover, radiation-induced skin injury may decrease image contrast between the dermis and hypodermis, which increases the difficulty of delineation. Therefore, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation tool (ASST) based on the active contour model with two significant modifications: (i) The proposed algorithm introduces a novel dual-curve scheme for the double skin layer extraction, as opposed to the original single active contour method. (ii) The proposed algorithm is based on a geometric contour framework as opposed to the previous parametric algorithm. This ASST algorithm was tested on a breast cancer image database of 730 ultrasound breast images (73 ultrasound studies of 23 patients). We compared skin segmentation results obtained with the ASST with manual contours performed by two physicians. The average percentage differences in skin thickness between the ASST measurement and that of each physician were less than 5% (4.8 ± 17.8% and -3.8 ± 21.1%, respectively). In summary, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation method that ensures objective assessment of radiation-induced changes in skin thickness. Our ultrasound technology offers a unique opportunity to quantify tissue injury in a more meaningful and reproducible manner than the subjective assessments currently employed in the clinic.

  15. Risks and benefits of reducing target volume margins in breast tangent radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Basaula, Deepak; Quinn, Alexandra; Walker, Amy; Batumalai, Vikneswary; Kumar, Shivani; Delaney, Geoff P; Holloway, Lois

    2017-02-27

    This study investigates the potential benefits of planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction for whole breast radiotherapy in relation to dose received by organs at risk (OARs), as well as reductions in radiation-induced secondary cancer risk. Such benefits were compared to the increased radiation-induced secondary cancer risk attributed from increased ionizing radiation imaging doses. Ten retrospective patients' computed tomography datasets were considered. Three computerized treatment plans with varied PTV margins (0, 5 and 10 mm) were created for each patient complying with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1005 protocol requirements. The BEIR VII lifetime attributable risk (LAR) model was used to estimate secondary cancer risk to OARs. The LAR was assessed for all treatment plans considering (a) doses from PTV margin variation and (b) doses from two (daily and weekly) kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) imaging protocols during the course of treatment. We found PTV margins from largest to smallest resulted in a mean OAR relative dose reduction of 31% (heart), 28% (lung) and 23% (contralateral breast) and the risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer by a relative 23% (contralateral breast) and 22% (contralateral lung). Daily image-guidance using kV CBCT increased the risk of radiation induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast and contralateral lung by a relative 1.6-1.9% and 1.9-2.5% respectively. Despite the additional dose from kV CBCT for the two considered imaging protocols, smaller PTV margins would still result in an overall reduction in secondary cancer risk.

  16. AUTOMATED SKIN SEGMENTATION IN ULTRASONIC EVALUATION OF SKIN TOXICITY IN BREAST CANCER RADIOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Tannenbaum, Allen; Chen, Hao; Torres, Mylin; Yoshida, Emi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yuefeng; Curran, Walter; Liu, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common side effect of breast cancer radiotherapy and impairs the quality of life of many breast cancer survivors. We, along with other researchers, have recently found quantitative ultrasound to be effective as a skin toxicity assessment tool. Although more reliable than standard clinical evaluations (visual observation and palpation), the current procedure for ultrasound-based skin toxicity measurements requires manual delineation of the skin layers (i.e., epidermis-dermis and dermis-hypodermis interfaces) on each ultrasound B-mode image. Manual skin segmentation is time consuming and subjective. Moreover, radiation-induced skin injury may decrease image contrast between the dermis and hypodermis, which increases the difficulty of delineation. Therefore, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation tool (ASST) based on the active contour model with two significant modifications: (i) The proposed algorithm introduces a novel dual-curve scheme for the double skin layer extraction, as opposed to the original single active contour method. (ii) The proposed algorithm is based on a geometric contour framework as opposed to the previous parametric algorithm. This ASST algorithm was tested on a breast cancer image database of 730 ultrasound breast images (73 ultrasound studies of 23 patients). We compared skin segmentation results obtained with the ASST with manual contours performed by two physicians. The average percentage differences in skin thickness between the ASST measurement and that of each physician were less than 5% (4.8 ± 17.8% and −3.8 ± 21.1%, respectively). In summary, we have developed an automatic skin segmentation method that ensures objective assessment of radiation-induced changes in skin thickness. Our ultrasound technology offers a unique opportunity to quantify tissue injury in a more meaningful and reproducible manner than the subjective assessments currently employed in the clinic. PMID:23993172

  17. Examining Mediators and Moderators of Yoga for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G.; Milbury, Kathrin; Chandwani, Kavita D.; Chaoul, Alejandro; Perkins, George; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Haddad, Robin; Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao; Raghuram, N. V.; Spelman, Amy; Arun, Banu; Wei, Qi; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis This study examines moderators and mediators of a yoga intervention targeting quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes in women with breast cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods Women undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy were randomized to a yoga (YG; n = 53) or stretching (ST; n = 56) intervention or a waitlist control group (WL; n = 54). Depressive symptoms and sleep disturbances were measured at baseline. Mediator (posttraumatic stress symptoms, benefit finding, and cortisol slope) and outcome (36-item Short Form [SF]-36 mental and physical component scales [MCS and PCS]) variables were assessed at baseline, end-of-treatment, and 1-, 3-, and 6-months posttreatment. Results Baseline depressive symptoms (P = .03) and sleep disturbances (P < .01) moderated the Group × Time effect on MCS, but not PCS. Women with high baseline depressive symptoms in YG reported marginally higher 3-month MCS than their counterparts in WL (P = .11). Women with high baseline sleep disturbances in YG reported higher 3-months MCS than their counterparts in WL (P < .01) and higher 6-month MCS than their counterparts in ST (P = .01). YG led to greater benefit finding than ST and WL across the follow-up (P = .01). Three-month benefit finding partially mediated the effect of YG on 6-month PCS. Posttraumatic stress symptoms and cortisol slope did not mediate treatment effect on QOL. Conclusion Yoga may provide the greatest mental-health–related QOL benefits for those experiencing pre-radiotherapy sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms. Yoga may improve physical-health–related QOL by increasing ability to find benefit in the cancer experience. PMID:26867802

  18. The Risk of Early and Late Lung Sequelae After Conformal Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, Zsuzsanna . E-mail: kahan@onko.szote.u-szeged.hu; Csenki, Melinda; Varga, Zoltan; Szil, Elemer; Cserhati, Adrienn; Balogh, Attila; Gyulai, Zsofia; Mandi, Yvette; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzo, Laszlo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To study the risks of early and late radiogenic lung damage in breast cancer patients after conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Radiogenic lung sequelae were assessed prospectively in 119 patients by means of clinical signs, radiologic abnormalities, and the mean density change (MDC) of the irradiated lung on CT. Results: Significant positive associations were detected between the development of lung abnormalities 3 months or 1 year after the radiotherapy and the age of the patient, the ipsilateral mean lung dose (MLD), the radiation dose to 25% of the ipsilateral lung (D{sub 25%}) and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}). The irradiation of the axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes favored the development of pneumonitis but not that of fibrosis. No relation was found between the preradiotherapy plasma TGF-{beta} level and the presence of radiogenic lung damage. At both time points, MDC was strongly related to age. Significant positive associations were demonstrated between the risks of pneumonitis or fibrosis and the age of the patient, MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy}. A synergistic effect of MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy} with age in patients older than 59 years is suggested. Conclusion: Our analyses indicate that the risks of early and late radiogenic lung sequelae are strongly related to the age of the patient, the volume of the irradiated lung, and the dose to it.

  19. Targeted Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer in Patients in Whom External Beam Radiation Is Not Possible

    SciTech Connect

    Keshtgar, Mohammed R.S.; Joseph, David; Stacey, Chris; Metaxas, Marinos G.; Corica, Tammy; Williams, Norman R.; Baum, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) following wide local excision of the primary tumor is the standard treatment in early breast cancer. In some circumstances this procedure is not possible or is contraindicated or difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) when EBRT is not feasible. Methods and Materials: We report our experience with TARGIT in three centers (Australia, Germany, and the United Kingdom) between 1999 and 2008. Patients at these centers received a single radiation dose of 20 Gy to the breast tissue in contact with the applicator (or 6 Gy at 1-cm distance), as they could not be given EBRT and were keen to avoid mastectomy. Results: Eighty patients were treated with TARGIT. Reasons for using TARGIT were 21 patients had previously received EBRT, and 31 patients had clinical reasons such as systemic lupus erythematosus, motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, morbid obesity, and cardiovascular or severe respiratory disease. Three of these patients received percutaneous radiotherapy without surgery; 28 patients were included for compelling personal reasons, usually on compassionate grounds. After a median follow-up of 38 months, only two local recurrences were observed, an annual local recurrence rate of 0.75% (95% confidence interval, 0.09%-2.70%). Conclusions: While we await the results of the randomized trial (over 2,000 patients have already been recruited), TARGIT is an acceptable option but only in highly selected cases that cannot be recruited in the trial and in whom EBRT is not feasible/possible.

  20. Lumpectomy with or without postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer with favourable prognostic features: results of a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Holli, K; Saaristo, R; Isola, J; Joensuu, H; Hakama, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to study the value of adding post-operative radiotherapy to lumpectomy in a subgroup of breast cancer patients with favourable patient-, tumour-, and treatment-related prognostic features. 152 women aged over 40 with unifocal breast cancer seen in preoperative mammography were randomly assigned to lumpectomy alone (no-XRT group) or to lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy to the ipsilateral breast (50 Gy given within 5 weeks, XRT group). All cancers were required to be invasive node-negative, smaller than 2 cm in diameter and well or moderately differentiated, to contain no extensive intraductal component, to be progesterone receptor-positive, DNA diploid, have S-phase fraction ≤7 and be excised with at least 1 cm margin. During a mean follow-up time of 6.7 years, 13 (18.1%) cancers recurred locally in the no-XRT and 6 (7.5%) in the XRT group (P = 0.03). There was no difference between the groups in the ultimate breast preservation rate (95.0% vs. 94.4% in XRT and no-XRT, respectively, P = 0.88), distant metastasis-free survival (P = 0.36), or 5-year cancer-specific survival (97.1% in XRT and 98.6 in no-XRT). Radiation therapy given after lumpectomy reduces the frequency of ipsilateral breast recurrences even in women with small breast cancer with several favourable clinical and biological features. However, the breast preservation rate may not increase due to more frequent use of salvage mastectomies in patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161371

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  2. Incidental irradiation of internal mammary lymph nodes in breast cancer: conventional two-dimensional radiotherapy versus conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy*

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Ugino, Rafael Tsuneki; Santana, Marco Antônio; Ferreira, Denis Vasconcelos; Lopes, Maurício Russo; Pelosi, Edilson Lopes; da Silva, João Luis Fernandes; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate incidental irradiation of the internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) through opposed tangential fields with conventional two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy techniques and to compare the results between the two techniques. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective study of 80 breast cancer patients in whom radiotherapy of the IMLNs was not indicated: 40 underwent 2D radiotherapy with computed tomography for dosimetric control, and 40 underwent 3D radiotherapy. The total prescribed dose was 50.0 Gy or 50.4 Gy (2.0 or 1.8 Gy/day, respectively). We reviewed all plans and defined the IMLNs following the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recommendations. For the IMLNs, we analyzed the proportion of the volume that received 45 Gy, the proportion of the volume that received 25 Gy, the dose to 95% of the volume, the dose to 50% of the volume, the mean dose, the minimum dose (Dmin), and the maximum dose (Dmax). Results Left-sided treatments predominated in the 3D cohort. There were no differences between the 2D and 3D cohorts regarding tumor stage, type of surgery (mastectomy, breast-conserving surgery, or mastectomy with immediate reconstruction), or mean delineated IMLN volume (6.8 vs. 5.9 mL; p = 0.411). Except for the Dmin, all dosimetric parameters presented higher mean values in the 3D cohort (p < 0.05). The median Dmax in the 3D cohort was 50.34 Gy. However, the mean dose to the IMLNs was 7.93 Gy in the 2D cohort, compared with 20.64 Gy in the 3D cohort. Conclusion Neither technique delivered enough doses to the IMLNs to achieve subclinical disease control. However, all of the dosimetric parameters were significantly higher for the 3D technique. PMID:27403017

  3. Correlation between anthropometric parameters and acute skin toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy patients: a pilot assessment study

    PubMed Central

    Méry, Benoîte; Vallard, Alexis; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Pacaut, Cécile; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Espenel, Sophie; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Ollier, Edouard; Wang, Guoping; Diao, Peng; Bigot, Lise; Mengue Ndong, Sylvie; Bosacki, Claire; Ben Mrad, Majed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to identify acute skin toxicity risk factors linked to the anthropometric characteristics of patients with breast cancer treated with radiation therapy. Methods: Consecutive patients with breast cancer were enrolled after breast-conserving surgery and before radiotherapy course. Acute skin toxicity was assessed weekly during the 7 weeks of radiotherapy with the International Classification from National Cancer Institute. Grade 2 defined acute skin toxicity. Patient characteristics and anthropometric measurements were collected. Results: 54 patients were enrolled in 2013. Eight patients (14.8%) had grade ≥2 toxicity. The average weight and chest size were 65.5 kg and 93.6 cm, respectively. Bra cup size is significantly associated with a risk of grade 2 dermatitis [odds ratio (OR) 3.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.29–11.92), p = 0.02]. Anthropometric breast fat mass measurements, such as thickness of left [OR 2.72, 95% CI (1.08–8.26), p = 0.04] and right [OR 2.45, 95% CI (0.99–7.27), p = 0.05] axillary fat, are correlated with an increased risk. Distance between the pectoral muscle and nipple is a reproducible measurement of breast size and is associated with acute skin toxicity with significant tendency (OR = 2.21, 95% CI (0.97–5.98), p = 0.07). Conclusion: Breast size and its different anthropometric measurements (thickness of left and right axillary fat, nipple-to-pectoral muscle distance) are correlated with the risk of skin toxicity. Advances in knowledge: The present article analyses several characteristics and anthropomorphic measurements of breast in order to assess breast size. A standardized and reproducible protocol to measure breast volume is described. PMID:26394280

  4. SU-E-T-217: Comprehensive Dosimetric Evaluation On 3D-CRT, IMRT and Non-Coplanar Arc Treatment for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, T; Yan, Y; Ramirez, E; Lee, P; Jiang, S; Gu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an effective treatment for early stage breast-cancer. Irradiation in a prone position can mitigate breast motion and spare heart and lung. In this study, a comprehensive study is performed to evaluate various treatment techniques for prone APBI treatment including: 3D-CRT, IMRT, co-planar and non-coplanar partial arcs treatment. Methods: In this treatment planning study, a left breast patient treated in prone position in our clinic was imported into Varian Eclipse TPS. Six beams tangential to chest wall were used in both 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. These six beams were coplanar in a transactional plane achieved by both gantry and couch rotation. A 60-beam IMRT plan was also created to explore the maximum benefit of co-planar IMRT. Within deliverable couch rotation range (±30°), partial arc treatment plans with one and up to ten couch positions were generated for comparison. For each plan, 30Gy in 6 fractions was prescribed to 95% PTV volume. Critical dosimetric parameters, such as conformity index, mean, maximum, and volume dose of organ at risk, are evaluated. Results: The conformity indexes (CI) are 3.53, 3.17, 2.21 and 1.08 respectively to 3D-CRT, 6-beam IMRT, 60-beam IMRT, and two-partial-arcs coplanar plans. However, arc plans increase heart dose. CI for non-coplanar arc plans decreases from 1.19 to 1.10 when increases couch positions. Maximum dose in ipsilateral lung (1.98 to 1.13 Gy), and heart (0.62 to 0.43 Gy) are steadily decreased with the increased number of non-coplanar arcs. Conclusions: The dosimetric evaluation results show that partial arc plans have improved CIs compared to conventional 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. Increasing number of partial arcs decreases lung and heart dose. The dosimetric benefit obtained from non-coplanar arcs should be considered with treatment delivery time.

  5. Nipple-sparing mastectomy in breast cancer patients: The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (Review).

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stefan; Holz-Sapra, Edna; Rades, Dirk; Moser, Alexander; Studer, Gabriela

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) following nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM) for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive breast cancer, based on the published literature. Currently, there is no standard for RT following NSM. NSM aims to spare the nipple areola complex (NAC) without compromising locoregional control. Long-term follow-up studies have begun to show promising results. A search of the English literature was performed using the Medline database and Cochrane central library, with the keywords 'nipple/areola-sparing mastectomy', 'whole skin mastectomy' and 'NAC preservation'. A total of 32 original studies with data on NSM in terms of locoregional control, NAC control, NAC necrosis and adjuvant RT were identified. The median locoregional and NAC recurrence rates were 3.2 and 1.4% (range, 0-28.4% and 0-3.7%), respectively. The volume of remaining breast tissue following NSM was reported inconsistently. In 15 studies, RT was not mentioned. In the remaining 17 studies, RT was administered in 0-100% of patients. Only 7 studies provided detailed information regarding the use of adjuvant RT. Adjuvant thoracic wall irradiation was not used in certain studies, not even for locoregionally advanced tumors. Overall, NSM appears a feasible treatment without increased risk of locoregional recurrence for selected patients. The role of adjuvant RT following NSM requires further clarification. The decision regarding adjuvant RT must be made in interdisciplinary tumor boards and with consideration of the individual situation of the patient.

  6. Lymphoscintigraphy Can Select Breast Cancer Patients for Internal Mammary Chain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hindie, Elif; Groheux, David; Hennequin, Christophe; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Vercellino, Laetitia; Berenger, Nathalie; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Maylin, Claude; Vilcoq, Jacques-Robert; Espie, Marc

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Given the risk of undesired toxicity, prophylactic internal mammary (IM) chain irradiation should be offered only to patients at high risk of occult involvement. Lymphoscintigraphy for axillary sentinel node biopsy might help in selecting these patients. Methods and Materials: We reviewed published studies with the following selection criteria: {>=}300 breast cancer patients referred for axilla sentinel node biopsy; scintigraphy performed after peritumoral or intratumoral tracer injection; IM biopsy in the case of IM drainage; and axilla staged routinely independent of IM status. Results: Six prospective studies, for a total of 3,876 patients, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Parasternal drainage was present in 792 patients (20.4%). IM biopsy was performed in 644 patients and was positive in 111 (17.2%). Of the positive IM biopsies, 40% were associated with tumors in the lateral breast quadrants. A major difference in the IM positivity rate was found according to the axilla sentinel node status. In patients with negative axilla, the IM biopsy was positive in 7.8% of cases. In patients with positive axilla, however, the IM biopsy was positive in 41% (p < .00001). Because biopsy of multiple IM hot nodes is difficult, the true risk could be even greater, probably close to 50%. Conclusions: Patients with IM drainage on lymphoscintigraphy and a positive axilla sentinel node have a high risk of occult IM involvement. These women should be considered for IM radiotherapy.

  7. Improvement of dose distribution with irregular surface compensator in whole breast radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hideki, Fujita; Nao, Kuwahata; Hiroyuki, Hattori; Hiroshi, Kinoshita; Haruyuki, Fukuda

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric aspects of whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) between an irregular surface compensator (ISC) and a conventional tangential field technique using physical wedges. Treatment plans were produced for 20 patients. The Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) was used for the dose calculation: For the physical wedge technique, the wedge angle was selected to provide the best dose homogeneity; for the ISC technique, the fluence editor application was used to extend the optimal fluence. These two treatment plans were compared in terms of doses in the planning target volume, the dose homogeneity index, the maximum dose, ipsilateral lung and heart doses for left breast irradiation, and the monitor unit counts required for treatment. Compared with the physical wedge technique, the ISC technique significantly reduced the dose homogeneity index, the maximum dose, the volumes received at 105% of the prescription dose, as well as reducing both the ipsilateral lung and heart doses (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). However, the monitor unit counts were not significantly different between the techniques (P > 0.05). Thus, the ISC technique for WBRT enables significantly better dose distribution in the planning target volume. PMID:24049317

  8. Radiotherapy Timing in 4,820 Patients With Breast Cancer: University of Florence Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo Borghesi, Simona; Saieva, Calogero; Meattini, Icro; Rampini, Andrea; Petrucci, Alessia; Detti, Beatrice; Bruni, Alessio; Paiar, Fabiola; Mangoni, Monica; Marrazzo, Livia; Agresti, Benedetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between a delay in radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery and ipsilateral breast recurrence (BR). Methods and Materials: We included in our analysis 4,820 breast cancer patients who had undergone postoperative RT at University of Florence. The patients were categorized into four groups according to the interval between surgery and RT (T1, <60 days; T2, 61-120 days; T3, 121-180 days; and T4, >180 days). Results: On multivariate analysis, the timing of RT did not reach statistical significance in patients who received only postoperative RT (n = 1,935) or RT and hormonal therapy (HT) (n = 1,684) or RT, chemotherapy (CHT), and HT (n = 529). In the postoperative RT-only group, age at presentation, surgical margin status, and a boost to the tumor bed were independent prognostic factors for BR. In the RT plus HT group, age at presentation and boost emerged as independent prognostic factors for BR (p = 0.006 and p = 0.049, respectively). Finally, in the RT, CHT, and HT group, only multifocality was an independent BR predictor (p = 0.01). Only in the group of patients treated with RT and CHT (n = 672) did multivariate analysis with stepwise selection show RT timing as an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; p = 0.045). Analyzing this group of patients, we found that most patients included had worse prognostic factors and had received CHT consisting of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil before undergoing RT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the timing of RT itself does not affect local recurrence, which is mainly related to prognostic factors. Thus, the 'waiting list' should be thought of as a 'programming list,' with patients scheduled for RT according to their prognostic factors.

  9. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  10. Reduction of cardiac and pulmonary complication probabilities after breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Korreman, Stine S. . E-mail: stine.k@rh.dk; Pedersen, Anders N.; Aarup, Lasse Rye; Nottrup, Trine J.; Specht, Lena; Nystroem, Hakan

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Substantial reductions of cardio-pulmonary radiation doses can be achieved using voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or free breathing inspiration gating (IG) in radiotherapy after conserving surgery for breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiobiological implications of such dosimetric benefits. Methods and Materials: Patients from previously reported studies were pooled for a total of 33 patients. All patients underwent DIBH and free breathing (FB) scans, and 17 patients underwent an additional IG scan. Tangential conformal treatment plans covering the remaining breast, internal mammary, and periclavicular nodes were optimized for each scan, prescription dose 48 Gy. Normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated using the relative seriality model for the heart, and the model proposed by Burman et al. for the lung. Results: Previous computed tomography studies showed that both voluntary DIBH and IG provided reduction of the lung V{sub 5} (relative volume receiving more than 50% of prescription dose) on the order of 30-40%, and a 80-90% reduction of the heart V{sub 5} for left-sided cancers. Corresponding pneumonitis probability of 28.1% (range, 0.7-95.6%) for FB could be reduced to 2.6% (range, 0.1-40.1%) for IG, and 4.3% (range, 0.1-59%) for DIBH. The cardiac mortality probability could be reduced from 4.8% (range, 0.1-23.4%) in FB to 0.5% (range, 0.1-2.6%) for IG and 0.1% (range, 0-3.0%) for DIBH. Conclusions: Remarkable potential is shown for simple voluntary DIBH and free breathing IG to reduce the risk of both cardiac mortality and pneumonitis for the common technique of adjuvant tangential breast irradiation.

  11. Kilovoltage Rotational External Beam Radiotherapy on a Breast Computed Tomography Platform: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Prionas, Nicolas D.; McKenney, Sarah E.; Stern, Robin L.; Boone, John M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of a dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) platform to deliver rotational kilovoltage (kV) external beam radiotherapy (RT) for partial breast irradiation, whole breast irradiation, and dose painting. Methods and Materials: Rotational kV-external beam RT using the geometry of a prototype bCT platform was evaluated using a Monte Carlo simulator. A point source emitting 178 keV photons (approximating a 320-kVp spectrum with 4-mm copper filtration) was rotated around a 14-cm voxelized polyethylene disk (0.1 cm tall) or cylinder (9 cm tall) to simulate primary and primary plus scattered photon interactions, respectively. Simulations were also performed using voxelized bCT patient images. Beam collimation was varied in the x-y plane (1-14 cm) and in the z-direction (0.1-10 cm). Dose painting for multiple foci, line, and ring distributions was demonstrated using multiple rotations with varying beam collimation. Simulations using the scanner's native hardware (120 kVp filtered by 0.2-mm copper) were validated experimentally. Results: As the x-y collimator was narrowed, the two-dimensional dose profiles shifted from a cupped profile with a high edge dose to an increasingly peaked central dose distribution with a sharp dose falloff. Using a 1-cm beam, the cylinder edge dose was <7% of the dose deposition at the cylinder center. Simulations using 120-kVp X-rays showed distributions similar to the experimental measurements. A homogeneous dose distribution (<2.5% dose fluctuation) with a 20% decrease in dose deposition at the cylinder edge (i.e., skin sparing) was demonstrated by weighted summation of four dose profiles using different collimation widths. Simulations using patient bCT images demonstrated the potential for treatment planning and image-guided RT. Conclusions: Rotational kV-external beam RT for partial breast irradiation, dose painting, and whole breast irradiation with skin sparing is feasible on a bCT platform with

  12. Unusual complication after radiotherapy for breast cancer bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Gabriella; Battista, Cleonice; Montesano, Marilena; Carino, Rita; Primavera, Angelo; Costantino, Sebastiano; Spoto, Silvia; D'Angelillo, Rolando Maria; Altomare, Vittorio

    2005-01-01

    Breast-conserving surgery and postoperative radiotherapy play an important role in the treatment of early breast cancer. Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is an uncommon syndrome reported to be one of the complications of adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman who developed cough, dyspnea and fever three weeks after radiation therapy to the left breast for breast carcinoma. Chest X-ray and computed tomography scan demonstrated alveolar opacities within both lungs. Antibiotic therapy against any probable septic pathology did not improve the symptoms, while corticosteroid treatment resulted in rapid clinical improvement together with regression of the pulmonary opacities. Irradiation was thought to be the cause of the migratory pneumonitis, hence this case was clinically diagnosed as radiation-induced migratory pneumonitis similar to BOOP, without lung biopsy. The present case suggests that one should be mindful of this disease when treating patients with a history of irradiation to the breast. BOOP promptly responds to systemic corticosteroid therapy with rapid improvement of symptoms and regression of the pulmonary opacities.

  13. Comparison of health utility weights among elderly patients receiving breast-conserving surgery plus hormonal therapy with or without radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Askal Ayalew; Xiao, Hong; Tawk, Rima; Campbell, Ellen; Semykina, Anastasia; Montero, Alberto J.; Diaby, Vakaramoko

    2017-01-01

    Background The selection of the most appropriate treatment combinations requires the balancing of benefits and harms of these treatment options as well as the patients’ preferences for the resulting outcomes. Objective This research aimed at estimating and comparing the utility weights between elderly women with early stage hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer receiving a combination of radiotherapy and hormonal therapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) and those receiving a combination of BCS and hormonal therapy. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) linked with Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was used as the data source. Health utility weights were derived from the VR-12 health-related quality of life instrument using a mapping algorithm. Descriptive statistics of the sample were provided. Two sample t-tests were performed to determine potential differences in mean health utility weights between the two groups after propensity score matching. Results The average age at diagnosis was 72 vs. 76 years for the treated and the untreated groups, respectively. The results showed an inverse relationship between the receipt of radiotherapy and age. Patients who received radiotherapy had, on average, a higher health utility weight (0.70; SD = 0.123) compared with those who did not receive radiotherapy (0.676; SD = 0.130). Only treated patients who had more than two comorbid conditions had significantly higher health utility weights compared with patients who were not treated. Conclusions The mean health utility weights estimated for the radiotherapy and no radiotherapy groups can be used to inform a comparative cost-effectiveness analysis of the treatment options. However, the results of this study may not be generalizable to those who are outside a managed care plan because MHOS data is collected on managed care beneficiaries. PMID:27819160

  14. Risk of secondary cancers in women with breast cancer and the influence of radiotherapy: A national cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Yao; Chen, Sih-Hao; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lee, Song-Tay; Guo, How-Ran; Kuo, Shu-Chun; Su, Shih-Bin

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide; thus, the prolongation of survival, and the incidence and risk factors, including radiotherapy, for developing secondary malignancies are important. We compared the incidence of secondary and new primary cancers in women with breast cancer (CA) and well-matched for age, geographic region, and monthly income cancer-free controls (CA). The risk for secondary cancers with and without radiotherapy was also compared in CA women. We enrolled 2422 CA patients and CA 12,110 controls. In a 4-year follow-up, the secondary cancers risk was significant in the CA group (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-2.18). Only the risk of uterine cancer was significant compared with the controls (AHR: 6.30; 95% CI: 2.28-17.38). CA patients and <50 years old had a higher risk for secondary cancers. Developing secondary cancers was significant in the first follow-up year (AHR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.11-2.06). Radiotherapy had no significant effect on the CA group, but it was significant (P = 0.0298) in women ≥60 years old (elderly). We recommend monitoring secondary cancers in CA women, especially those <50 years old, and during the first year of follow-up. Radiotherapy should be used more carefully in elderly CA women.

  15. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate ameliorates radiation-induced acute skin damage in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Hanxi; Sun, Xiaorong; Meng, Xiangjiao; Zhao, Xianguang; Xing, Ligang; Yu, Jinming; Zheng, Meizhu

    2016-01-01

    There are few effective treatment options for radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients. We conducted a single-arm trial to tested the hypothesis that topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is effective against radiation-induced dermatitis in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Forty-nine patients participated in this study. The patients underwent mastectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy. Topical EGCG was applied daily, starting when grade I dermatitis appeared and ending two weeks after radiotherapy. The maximum dermatitis observed during the EGCG treatment was as follows: Grade 1 toxicity, 71.4% (35 patients); grade 2 toxicity, 28.6% (14 patients); there were no patients with grade 3 or 4 toxicity. The majority of the radiation-induced dermatitis was observed 1 week after the end of radiotherapy. EGCG reduced the pain in 85.7% of patients, burning-feeling in 89.8%, itching in 87.8%, pulling in 71.4%, and tenderness in 79.6%. These findings suggest topical EGCG may be an effective treatment for radiation-induced dermatitis and has acceptable toxicity. PMID:27224910

  16. Using injectable hydrogel markers to assess resimulation for boost target volume definition in a patient undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Henal; Goyal, Sharad; Kim, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Several publications have recommended that patients undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy be resimulated for boost planning. The rationale for this is that the seroma may be smaller when compared with the initial simulation. However, the decision remains whether to use the earlier or later images to define an appropriate boost target volume. A patient undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy had new, injectable, temporary hydrogel fiducial markers placed 1 to 3 cm from the seroma at the time of initial simulation. The patient was resimulated 4.5 weeks later for conformal photon boost planning. Computed tomography (CT) scans acquired at the beginning and the end of whole-breast radiotherapy showed that shrinkage of the lumpectomy cavity was not matched by a corresponding reduction in the surrounding tissue volume, as demarcated by hydrogel markers. This observation called into question the usual interpretation of cavity shrinkage for boost target definition. For this patient, it was decided to define the boost target volume on the initial planning CT instead of the new CT.

  17. Breast dosimetry in transverse and longitudinal field MRI-Linac radiotherapy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, S. R.; Esmaeeli, A. D.; Pouladian, M.; Sardari, D.; Bagheri, S.; Monfared, A. S.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In the framework of developing the integration of a MRI-Linac system, configurations of MRI-Linac units were simulated in order to improve the dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using transverse and longitudinal magnetic field geometries of Lorentz force for both medial and lateral tangential fields. Methods: In this work, the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized to compare dose distributions in breast radiotherapy for Linac-MR systems in the transverse and longitudinal geometries within humanoid phantoms across a range of magnetic field strengths of 0.5 and 1.5 T. The dose increment due to scattering from the coils was investigated for both geometries as well. Computed tomography images of two patients were used for MC simulations. One patient had intact breast while the other was mastectomized. In the simulations, planning and methods of chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical planning. Results: In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the lateral spread of secondary electrons to the lung, heart, and contralateral organs, which reduced the mean dose of the ipsilateral lung and heart by means of 17.2% and 6% at 1.5 T, respectively. The transverse configuration exhibits a significant increase in tissue interface effects, which increased dose buildup in the entrance regions of the lateral and medial tangent beams to the planning target volume (PTV) and improved dose homogeneity within the PTV. The improved relative average homogeneity index for two patients to the PTV at magnetic field strength of 1.5 T with respect to no magnetic field case evaluated was 11.79% and 34.45% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. In both geometries, the simulations show significant mean dose reductions in the contralateral breast and chest wall skin, respectively, by a mean of 16.6% and 24.9% at 0.5 T and 17.2% and 28.1% at 1.5 T in the transverse geometry, and 10.56% and 14.6% at 0.5 T and 11.3% and

  18. Exclusive Alternating Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy in Nonmetastatic Inflammatory Breast Cancer: 20 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgier, Celine; Pessoa, Eduardo Lima; Dunant, Ariane; Heymann, Steve; Spielmann, Marc; Uzan, Catherine; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Arriagada, Rodrigo; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2012-02-01

    Background: Locoregional treatment of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is crucial because local relapses may be highly symptomatic and are commonly associated with distant metastasis. With a median follow-up of 20 years, we report here the long-term results of a monocentric clinical trial combining primary chemotherapy (CT) with a schedule of anthracycline-based CT and an alternating split-course of radiotherapy (RT Asterisk-Operator CT) without mastectomy. Methods and Materials: From September 1983 to December 1989, 124 women with nonmetastatic IBC (T4d M0) were treated with three cycles of primary AVCMF chemotherapy (anthracycline, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and then an alternating RT Asterisk-Operator CT schedule followed by three cycles of FAC. Hormonal therapy was systematically administered: ovarian irradiation (12 Gy in four fractions) or tamoxifen 20 mg daily. Results: Local control was achieved in 82% of patients. The 10- and 20-year local relapse rates were 26% and 33%, respectively, but only 10% of locally controlled cases were not associated with concurrent distant metastasis. The 10- and 20-year overall survival rates were 39% and 19%, respectively. Severe fibrosis occurred in 54% of patients, grade 3 brachial plexus neuropathy in 4%, grade 2 pneumonitis in 9%. Grade 1, 2 and 3 cardiac toxicity was observed in 3.8%, 3.8% and 1.2% of cases respectively. Conclusions: This combined regimen allowed good long-term local control without surgery. Survival rates were similar to those obtained with conventional regimens (primary chemotherapy, total mastectomy, and adjuvant radiotherapy). Since IBC continues to be an entity with a dismal prognosis, this approach, safely combining preoperative or postoperative radiation therapy and systemic treatments, should be reassessed when suitable targeted agents are available.

  19. Radiotherapy of early breast cancer in scleroderma patients: our experience with four cases and a short review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgias, George; Theodorou, Kiki; Zygogianni, Anna; Tsanadis, Konstantinos; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Tzitzikas, John; Koukourakis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Connective vascular diseases (CVD), including scleroderma, are reported to represent for some researchers a relative contraindication and for others absolute contraindication for radiotherapy. The purpose of our study is to add four new cases to the existing body of international literature and to determine whether women with pre-existing scleroderma who have been surgically treated for early breast cancer could undergo postsurgical radiotherapy without serious early and late complications. Patients and methods From May 1998 to November 2010, we irradiated for early breast cancer four patients suffering from pre-existing scleroderma; after conservative surgery, we performed whole breast postoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy total dose to the whole breast plus a 9 Gy boost to the tumor bed. We reviewed the records of all four patients and evaluated the early and late reactions using acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG], American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA) and late radiation morbidity scoring scheme (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC], Brussels, Belgium and RTOG). Results After a median follow-up of 105 months (range 12–155 months) the early and late toxicity concerning the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the lungs, and the heart have been acceptable and are in full accordance with what have been reported in international literature. Conclusion This study matches global experience, which shows that patients with scleroderma and breast cancer must be discussed by the multidisciplinary tumor board in order for a personalized treatment strategy to be formulated. Radiation therapy can be proposed as a postsurgical therapeutic option in selected cases. PMID:24367188

  20. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Miranda, Alberto; Arrieta, Oscar; Gamboa-Vignolle, Carlos; Saavedra-Perez, David; Morales-Barrera, Rafael; Bargallo-Rocha, Enrique; Zinser-Sierra, Juan; Perez-Sanchez, Victor; Ramirez-Ugalde, Teresa; Lara-Medina, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC), or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC) IV in four 21-day courses) followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg), and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Results Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR) in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5%) and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5%) if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%). No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04). Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%). The toxicity profile was acceptable. Conclusion This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted. PMID:19591689

  1. Germline TP53 alterations in Finnish breast cancer families are rare and occur at conserved mutation-prone sites

    PubMed Central

    Rapakko, K; Allinen, M; Syrjäkoski, K; Vahteristo, P; Huusko, P; Vähäkangas, K; Eerola, H; Kainu, T; Kallioniemi, O-P; Nevanlinna, H; Winqvist, R

    2001-01-01

    We have screened for germline TP53 mutations in Finnish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative families. This study represents the largest survey of the entire protein-encoding portion of TP53, and indicates that mutations are only found at conserved domains in breast cancer families also meeting the criteria for Li-Fraumeni/Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome, explaining only a very small additional fraction of the hereditary breast cancer cases. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11139324

  2. Clinical impact of IMPORT HIGH trial (CRUK/06/003) on breast radiotherapy practices in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Ciurlionis, Laura; Kirby, Anna M; Locke, Imogen; Venables, Karen; Yarnold, John R; Titley, Jenny; Bliss, Judith; Coles, Charlotte E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: IMPORT HIGH is a multicentre randomized UK trial testing dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after tumour excision in females with early breast cancer and higher than average local recurrence risk. A survey was carried out to investigate the impact of this trial on the adoption of advanced breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques in the UK. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 26 IMPORT HIGH recruiting RT centres to determine whether the trial has influenced non-trial breast RT techniques in terms of volume delineation, dosimetry, treatment delivery and verification. In order to compare the clinical practice of breast RT between IMPORT HIGH and non–IMPORT HIGH centres, parts of the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) breast RT audit result were used in this study. Results: 26/26 participating centres completed the questionnaire. After joining the trial, the number of centres routinely using tumour bed clips to guide whole-breast RT rose from 5 (19%) to 21 (81%). 20/26 (77%) centres now contour target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) in some or all patients compared with 14 (54%) before the trial. 14/26 (54%) centres offer inverse-planned IMRT for selected non-trial patients with breast cancer, and 10/14 (71%) have adopted the IMPORT HIGH trial protocol for target volume and OARs dose constraints. Only 2/26 (8%) centres used clip information routinely for breast treatment verification prior to IMPORT HIGH, a minority that has since risen to 7/26 (27%). Data on 1386 patients was included from the RCR audit. This suggested that more cases from IMPORT HIGH centres had surgical clips implanted (83 vs 67%), were treated using CT guided planning with full three-dimensional dose compensation (100 vs 75%), and were treated with photon boost RT (30 vs 8%). Conclusion: The study suggests that participation in the IMPORT HIGH trial has played an important part in providing the guidance and support networks needed for the safe integration of

  3. Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco Sacco, Mariano; Loi, Gianfranco; Masini, Laura; Ferrante, Daniela; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Ronco, Marco; Magnani, Corrado; Carriero, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose {>=}25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving {>=}25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity.

  4. Using Histopathology Breast Cancer Data to Reduce Clinical Target Volume Margins at Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, Joep Schlief, Angelique; Alderliesten, Tanja; Peterse, Hans; Bartelink, Harry; Gilhuijs, Kenneth

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the incidence and extension of microscopic disease around primary breast tumors in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT), focusing on a potential application to reduce radiotherapy boost volumes. Methods and Materials: An extensive pathology tumor-distribution study was performed using 38 wide local excision specimens of BCT patients. Specimen orientation was recorded and microscopic findings reconstructed to assess the incidence of microscopic disease around the macroscopic tumor. A model of disease spread was built, showing probability of disease extension outside a treated volume (P{sub out,vol}). The model was applied in 10 new BCT patients. Taking asymmetry of tumor excision into account, new asymmetric margins for the clinical target volume of the boost (CTV{sub boost}) were evaluated that minimize the volume without increasing P{sub out,TTV} (TTV being total treated volume: V{sub surgery} + CTV{sub boost}). Potential reductions in CTV{sub boost} and TTV were evaluated. Results: Microscopic disease beyond the tumor boundary occurred isotropically at distances > 1 cm (intended surgical margin) and > 1.5 cm (intended TTV margin) in 53% and 36% of the excision specimens, respectively. In the 10 prospective patients, the average P{sub out,TTV} was, however, only 16% due to larger surgical margins than intended in some directions. Asymmetric CTV{sub boost} margins reduced the CTV{sub boost} and TTV by 27% (20 cc) and 12% (21 cc) on average, without compromising tumor coverage. Conclusions: Microscopic disease extension may occur beyond the current CTV{sub boost} in approximately one sixth of patients. An asymmetric CTV{sub boost} that corrects for asymmetry of the surgical excision has the potential to reduce boost volumes while maintaining tumor coverage.

  5. Postoperative radiotherapy following mastectomy for patients with left-sided breast cancer: A comparative dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiahao; Li, Xiadong; Deng, Qinghua; Xia, Bing; Wu, Shixiu; Liu, Jian; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-10-01

    The purposes of this article were to compare the biophysical dosimetry for postmastectomy left-sided breast cancer using 4 different radiotherapy (RT) techniques. In total, 30 patients with left-sided breast cancer were randomly selected for this treatment planning study. They were planned using 4 RT techniques, including the following: (1) 3-dimensional conventional tangential fields (TFs), (2) tangential intensity-modulated therapy (T-IMRT), (3) 4 fields IMRT (4F-IMRT), and (4) single arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (S-VMAT). The planning target volume (PTV) dose was prescribed 50 Gy, the comparison of target dose distribution, conformity index, homogeneity index, dose to organs at risk (OARs), tumor control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and number of monitor units (MUs) between 4 plans were investigated for their biophysical dosimetric difference. The target conformity and homogeneity of S-VMAT were better than the other 3 kinds of plans, but increased the volume of OARs receiving low dose (V{sub 5}). TCP of PTV and NTCP of the left lung showed no statistically significant difference in 4 plans. 4F-IMRT plan was superior in terms of target coverage and protection of OARs and demonstrated significant advantages in decreasing the NTCP of heart by 0.07, 0.03, and 0.05 compared with TFs, T-IMRT, and S-VMAT plan. Compared with other 3 plans, TFs reduced the average number of MUs. Of the 4 techniques studied, this analysis supports 4F-IMRT as the most appropriate balance of target coverage and normal tissue sparing.

  6. Extended radical mastectomy versus simple mastectomy followed by radiotherapy in primary breast cancer. A fifty-year follow-up to the Copenhagen Breast Cancer randomised study.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Helge; Kaae, Sigvard; Jensen, Maj-Britt; Mouridsen, Henning T

    2008-01-01

    From November 1951 to December 1957, 666 consecutive patients with untreated primary breast cancer admitted to the Radium Center in Copenhagen were randomised before their operability was evaluated into two groups, simple mastectomy with postoperative radiotherapy or extended radical mastectomy. Following physical examination 241 of the patients were excluded, primarily due to tumours deemed inoperable due to clinical criteria (n =107) and due to poor general condition (n =69). Twenty-five years results of disease-free free survival and fifty years results of survival are presented, showing no difference between the two groups. Patients with clinical stage I did significantly better than patients with stage II-III tumours. Patients with grade I tumours had a better survival than patients with grade II-III. The breast cancer associated mortality was lower in premenopausal patients compared to postmenopausal patients. An excess mortality due to breast cancer was evident up to 20-25 years following the primary diagnosis.

  7. A phase III randomized study on the sequencing of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the conservative management of early-stage breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio . E-mail: arcangeli@ifo.it; Pinnaro, Paola; Rambone, Rita; Giannarelli, Diana; Benassi, Marcello

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two different timings of radiation treatment in patients with breast cancer who underwent conservative surgery and were candidates to receive adjuvant cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 206 patients who had quadrantectomy and axillary dissection for breast cancer and were planned to receive adjuvant CMF chemotherapy were randomized to concurrent or sequential radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered only to the whole breast through tangential fields to a dose of 50 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks, followed by an electron boost of 10-15 Gy in 4-6 fractions to the tumor bed. Results: No differences in 5-year breast recurrence-free, metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were observed in the two treatment groups. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. No evidence of an increased risk of toxicity was observed between the two arms. No difference in radiotherapy and in the chemotherapy dose intensity was observed in the two groups. Conclusions: In patients with negative surgical margins receiving adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy can be delayed to up to 7 months. Concurrent administration of CMF chemotherapy and radiotherapy is safe and might be reserved for patients at high risk of local recurrence, such as those with positive surgical margins or larger tumor diameters.

  8. Evaluation of the peripheral dose to uterus in breast carcinoma radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Martín Rincón, C; Jerez Sainz, I; Modolell Farré, I; España López, M L; López Franco, P; Muñiz, J L; Romero, A M; Rodríguez, R

    2002-01-01

    The absorbed dose outside of the direct fields of radiotherapy treatment (or peripheral dose, PD) is responsible for radiation exposure of the fetus in pregnant women. Because the radiological protection of the unborn child is of particular concern in the early period of the pregnancy, the aim of this study is to estimate the PD in order to assess the absorbed dose in the uterus in a pregnant patient irradiated for breast carcinoma therapy. The treatment was simulated on an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom, and the radiation dose to the fetus was measured using an ionisation chamber and thermoluminescence dosemeters. Two similar treatments plans with and without wedges were delivered, using a 6 MV photon beam with two isocentric opposite tangential fields with a total dose of 50 Gy, in accordance with common established procedures. Average field parameters for more than 300 patients were studied. Measurements showed the fetal dose to be slightly lower than 50 mGy, a level at which the risk to the fetus is uncertain, although several authors consider this value as the dose threshold for deterministic effects. The planning system (PS) underestimated PD values and no significant influence was found with the use of wedge filters.

  9. The expression level of HJURP has an independent prognostic impact and predicts the sensitivity to radiotherapy in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zhi; Huang, Ge; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Gu, Shenda; Lenburg, Marc E; Pai, Melody; Bayani, Nora; Blakely, Eleanor A; Gray, Joe W; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2010-06-25

    Introduction: HJURP (Holliday Junction Recognition Protein) is a newly discovered gene reported to function at centromeres and to interact with CENPA. However its role in tumor development remains largely unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of HJURP in breast cancer and its correlation with radiotherapeutic outcome. Methods: We measured HJURP expression level in human breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancers by Western blot and/or by Affymetrix Microarray; and determined its associations with clinical variables using standard statistical methods. Validation was performed with the use of published microarray data. We assessed cell growth and apoptosis of breast cancer cells after radiation using high-content image analysis. Results: HJURP was expressed at higher level in breast cancer than in normal breast tissue. HJURP mRNA levels were significantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Scarff-Bloom-Richardson (SBR) grade, age and Ki67 proliferation indices, but not with pathologic stage, ERBB2, tumor size, or lymph node status. Higher HJURP mRNA levels significantly decreased disease-free and overall survival. HJURP mRNA levels predicted the prognosis better than Ki67 proliferation indices. In a multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression, including clinical variables as covariates, HJURP mRNA levels remained an independent prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival. In addition HJURP mRNA levels were an independent prognostic factor over molecular subtypes (normal like, luminal, Erbb2 and basal). Poor clinical outcomes among patients with high HJURP expression werevalidated in five additional breast cancer cohorts. Furthermore, the patients with high HJURP levels were much more sensitive to radiotherapy. In vitro studies in breast cancer cell lines showed that cells with high HJURP levels were more sensitive to radiation treatment and had a higher rate of apoptosis

  10. Haplotype-Based Analysis of Genes Associated With Risk of Adverse Skin Reactions After Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, Tomo; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Kohda, Masakazu; Otsuka, Yoshimi; Yamada, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Naohito; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Kuninori; Sho, Keizen; Omura, Motoko; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kikuchi, Yuzo; Michikawa, Yuichi; Noda, Shuhei; Sagara, Masashi; Ohashi, Jun; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Mizoe, Junetsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To identify haplotypes of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with the risk of early adverse skin reactions (EASRs) after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: DNA was sampled from 399 Japanese breast cancer patients who qualified for breast-conserving radiotherapy. Using the National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria scoring system, version 2, the patients were grouped according to EASRs, defined as those occurring within 3 months of starting radiotherapy (Grade 1 or less, n = 290; Grade 2 or greater, n = 109). A total of 999 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 137 candidate genes for radiation susceptibility were genotyped, and the haplotype associations between groups were assessed. Results: The global haplotype association analysis (p < 0.05 and false discovery rate < 0.05) indicated that estimated haplotypes in six loci were associated with EASR risk. A comparison of the risk haplotype with the most frequent haplotype in each locus showed haplotype GGTT in CD44 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-4.43) resulted in a significantly greater EASR risk. Five haplotypes, CG in MAD2L2 (OR = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.35-0.87), GTTG in PTTG1 (OR = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24-0.96), TCC (OR = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26-0.89) and CCG (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92) in RAD9A, and GCT in LIG3 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.93) were associated with a reduced EASR risk. No significant risk haplotype was observed in REV3L. Conclusion: Individual radiosensitivity can be partly determined by these haplotypes in multiple loci. Our findings may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the genetic variation in radiation sensitivity and resistance among breast cancer patients.

  11. A pilot study to investigate the role of the 26S proteasome in radiotherapy resistance and loco-regional recurrence following breast conserving therapy for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfadl, Dalia; Hodgkinson, Victoria C; Long, Ervine D; Scaife, Lucy; Drew, Philip J; Lind, Michael J; Cawkwell, Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Breast conserving therapy is a currently accepted method for managing patients with early stage breast cancer. However, approximately 7% of patients may develop loco-regional tumour recurrence within 5 years. We previously reported that expression of the 26S proteasome may be associated with radio-resistance. Here we aimed to analyse the 26S proteasome in a pilot series of early breast cancers and correlate the findings with loco-regional recurrence. Fourteen patients with early breast cancer who developed loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of completing breast conserving therapy were selected according to strict criteria and compared with those from 14 patients who were disease-free at 10 years. Decreased expression of the 26S proteasome was significantly associated with radio-resistance, manifested as the development of a loco-regional recurrence within 4 years of breast conserving therapy (p = 0.018). This small pilot study provides further suggestion that the 26S proteasome may be associated with response to radiotherapy.

  12. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  13. Effect of intrafractional prostate motion on simultaneous boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate: A simulation study based on intrafractional motion in the prone position

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Itaru; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ono, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Monzen, Hajime; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Although the prostate displacement of patients in the prone position is affected by respiration-induced motion, the effect of intrafractional prostate motion in the prone position during “simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy” (SIB-IMRT) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects of intrafractional motion on SIB-IMRT to a dominant intraprostatic lesion (IPL) using measured motion data of patients in a prone position, fixed with a thermoplastic shell. We obtained 2 orthogonal x-ray fluoroscopic images at the same moment every 0.2 seconds for 30 seconds before and after treatment, once weekly, from 7 patients with localized prostate cancer with detectable prostatic calcification. Prostate displacements in the left-right (LR), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions were calculated using the prostatic calcification as a fiducial marker. We defined the displacement between pretreatment and posttreatment as baseline drift (BD). An SIB-IMRT plan was generated in which each IPL + 3 mm received a dose of 94.5 Gy, whereas the remainder of the prostate + 7 mm received a dose of 75.6 Gy in 9 fields. A simulated plan of dose blurring was generated by the convolution of isocenter-shifted plans using measured motion data in 30 seconds and motion in 30 seconds + distance between pretreatment and posttreatment position (BD) for each of the 7 patients. The motion in 30 seconds mainly reflected respiration-induced motion. The mean displacements of BD were 1.4 mm (− 3.1 to 8.2 mm), − 2.2 mm (− 9.1 to 1.5 mm), and − 0.3 mm (− 5.0 to 1.8 mm) in the AP, SI, and LR directions, respectively. The differences in the target coverage with V{sub 90%} of the IPL and V{sub 100%} of the prostate between the simulated plan and original plan were − 3.9% to − 0.3% and − 0.6% to 1.1% for respiration-induced motion and 3.1% to − 67.8% and 3.6% to − 13.3% for BD with respiration-induced motion

  14. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-08-02

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype.

  15. Early versus late distant metastasis and adjuvant chemotherapy alone versus both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in molecular apocrine breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaolong; Shen, Honghong; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xia; Niu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As a new subtype of breast cancer, molecular apocrine breast cancer (MABC) is estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negative expression, but androgen receptor (AR) positive expression. The prognostic significance and clinical biological behavior of MABC have remained unclear up to now. This study aimed to analysis the distant metastasis behavior and response to adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy of MABC subgroup. The report showed that there were significant differences between early and late distant metastasizing tumors with respect to Ki67, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expressions by a retrospective analysis consisting of 410 invasive breast cancer patients, which included 205 MABC and 205 nonMABC cases. MABC subgroup metastasized earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and MABC showed a tendency for a higher metastasis rate in lung, liver and brain, but lower in bone. HER2-positive or VEGF-positive tumors were more inclined to develop bone metastasis within MABC subgroup. The survival rate was superior for patients undergone both adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy than those undergone chemotherapy alone in nonMABC subgroup, but there was no significant difference in MABC subgroup. Our data suggested that MABC subgroup seemed to develop distant metastasis earlier than nonMABC subgroup, and patients with MABC indicated poor prognosis. This study might also provide a foundation for helping patients receive reasonable treatments according to molecular subtype. PMID:27340922

  16. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Lorraine; Cox, Jennifer; Morgia, Marita; Atyeo, John; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  17. Phase I study of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanxi; Zhu, Wanqi; Jia, Li; Sun, Xiaorong; Chen, Guanxuan; Zhao, Xianguang; Li, Xiaolin; Meng, Xiangjiao; Kong, Lingling; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety, tolerability and preliminary effectiveness of topical epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) for radiation dermatitis in patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: Patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy to the chest wall after mastectomy were enrolled. EGCG solution was sprayed to the radiation field from the initiation of Grade 1 radiation dermatitis until 2 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. EGCG concentration escalated from 40 to 660 μmol l−1 in 7 levels with 3–6 patients in each level. EGCG toxicity was graded using the NCI (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) v. 3.0. Any adverse event >Grade 1 attributed to EGCG was considered dose-limiting toxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was defined as the dose level that induced dose-limiting toxicity in more than one-third of patients at a given cohort. Radiation dermatitis was recorded weekly by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring and patient-reported symptoms. Results: From March 2012 to August 2013, 24 patients were enrolled. Acute skin redness was observed in 1 patient and considered to be associated with the EGCG treatment at 140 μmol l−1 level. Three more patients were enrolled at this level and did not experience toxicity to EGCG. The dose escalation stopped at 660 μmol l−1. No other reported acute toxicity was associated with EGCG. Grade 2 radiation dermatitis was observed in eight patients during or after radiotherapy, but all decreased to Grade 1 after EGCG treatments. Patient-reported symptom scores were significantly decreased at 2 weeks after the end of radiotherapy in pain, burning, itching and tenderness, p < 0.05. Conclusion: The topical administration of EGCG was well tolerated and the maximum tolerated dose was not found. EGCG may be effective in treating radiation dermatitis with preliminary investigation. Advances in

  18. Whole breast and excision cavity radiotherapy plan comparison: Conformal radiotherapy with sequential boost versus intensity-modulated radiation therapy with a simultaneously integrated boost

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Katherine; Kelly, Chris; Beldham-Collins, Rachael; Gebski, Val

    2013-03-15

    A comparative study was conducted comparing the difference between (1) conformal radiotherapy (CRT) to the whole breast with sequential boost excision cavity plans and (2) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the whole breast with simultaneously integrated boost to the excision cavity. The computed tomography (CT) data sets of 25 breast cancer patients were used and the results analysed to determine if either planning method produced superior plans. CT data sets from 25 past breast cancer patients were planned using (1) CRT prescribed to 50 Gy in 25 fractions (Fx) to the whole-breast planning target volume (PTV) and 10 Gy in 5Fx to the excision cavity and (2) IMRT prescribed to 60 Gy in 25Fx, with 60 Gy delivered to the excision cavity PTV and 50 Gy delivered to the whole-breast PTV, treated simultaneously. In total, 50 plans were created, with each plan evaluated by PTV coverage using conformity indices, plan maximum dose, lung dose, and heart maximum dose for patients with left-side lesions. CRT plans delivered the lowest plan maximum doses in 56% of cases (average CRT = 6314.34 cGy, IMRT = 6371.52 cGy). They also delivered the lowest mean lung dose in 68% of cases (average CRT = 1206.64 cGy, IMRT = 1288.37 cGy) and V20 in 88% of cases (average CRT = 20.03%, IMRT = 21.73%) and V30 doses in 92% of cases (average CRT = 16.82%, IMRT = 17.97%). IMRT created more conformal plans, using both conformity index and conformation number, in every instance, and lower heart maximum doses in 78.6% of cases (average CRT = 5295.26 cGy, IMRT = 5209.87 cGy). IMRT plans produced superior dose conformity and shorter treatment duration, but a slightly higher planning maximum and increased lung doses. IMRT plans are also faster to treat on a daily basis, with shorter fractionation.

  19. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max

  20. Evaluation of a Single-Isocenter Technique for Axillary Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beek, Suzanne van Jaeger, Katrien de; Mijnheer, Ben |; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a technique for axillary radiotherapy that minimizes the risk of radiation-induced damage to the surrounding normal tissue (i.e., arm, shoulder, lung, esophagus, and spinal cord) while keeping the risk of a nodal recurrence to a minimum. A planning study was performed in 20 breast cancer patients. The target volume of the axillary treatment encompassed the periclavicular and axillary lymph node areas. The 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) information in this study was used to outline the lymph node areas and the organs at risk (i.e., the esophagus, spinal cord, brachial plexus, and lung). A conventional AP-PA technique (with a transmission plate placed in the AP beam) was evaluated. In addition, a new single-isocenter technique consisting of AP/PA fields using a gantry rotation of {+-}20 deg. and a medial AP segment was developed. Both techniques were compared by evaluation of the calculated dose distributions and the dose-volume histograms of the target volume and surrounding organs at risk. The field borders and humeral shielding were redefined based on the 3D anatomical references. Adapting the humeral shielding reduced the irradiated volume by 19% and might contribute to a reduction of the incidence of arm edema and impairment of shoulder function. The maximum radiation dose in the esophagus and spinal cord was reduced by more than 50% using the single-isocenter technique. The difference between both techniques with respect to the mean doses in the target volume and lung, and the maximum dose in brachial plexus, was not statistically significant. Moreover, the single-isocenter technique allowed a fast and easy treatment preparation and reduced the execution time considerably (with approximately 10 minutes per fraction)

  1. High Mammographic Breast Density Is Independent Predictor of Local But Not Distant Recurrence After Lumpectomy and Radiotherapy for Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C. Rembert, James; Chew, Karen; Moore, Dan; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Biologically meaningful predictors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) are lacking. Tissue components, including extracellular matrix, could confer resistance to ionizing radiation. Fibroglandular and extracellular matrix components of breast tissue relative to adipose tissue can be quantified by the mammographic breast density (MBD), the proportion of dense area relative to the total breast area on mammography. We hypothesized that the MBD might be a predictor of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested case-control study of 136 women with invasive breast cancer who had undergone BCS and RT and had had the MBD ascertained before, or at, diagnosis. Women with known recurrence were matched to women without recurrence by year of diagnosis. The median follow-up was 7.7 years. The percentage of MBD was measured using a computer-based threshold method. Results: Patients with a high MBD ({>=}75% density) vs. low ({<=}25%) were at increased risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 4.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-021.0; p = 0.071) but not distant recurrence. In addition, we found a complete inverse correlation between high MBD and obesity (body mass index, {>=}30 kg/m{sup 2}). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, patients with MBD in the greatest quartile were at significantly greater risk of LRR (hazard ratio, 6.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-27.7; p = 0.01). Obesity without a high MBD also independently predicted for LRR (hazard ratio, 19.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.5-81.7; p < 0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that a high MBD and obesity are significant independent predictors of LRR after BCS and RT for invasive breast cancer. Additional studies are warranted to validate these findings.

  2. Randomized Controlled Trial of Forward-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Interim Results at 2 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Gillian C.; Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Moody, Anne M.; Wilson, Charles B.; Twyman, Nicola; Wishart, Gordon C.; Burnet, Neil G.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: This single-center randomized trial was designed to investigate whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The standard tangential plans of 1,145 nonselected patients were analyzed. The patients with inhomogeneous plans were randomized to a simple method of forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy (RT). The primary endpoint was serial photographic assessment of breast shrinkage. Results: At 2 years, no significant difference was found in the development of any photographically assessed breast shrinkage between the patients randomized to the interventional or control group (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.58; p = .41). The patients in the control group were more likely to develop telangiectasia than those in the IMRT group (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.13-2.40; p = .009). Poor baseline surgical cosmesis resulted in poor overall cosmesis at 2 years after RT. In patients who had good surgical cosmesis, those randomized to IMRT were less likely to deteriorate to a moderate or poor overall cosmesis than those in the control group (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.03, p = .061). Conclusions: IMRT can lead to a significant reduction in telangiectasia at comparatively early follow-up of only 2 years after RT completion. An important component of breast induration and shrinkage will actually result from the surgery and not from the RT. Surgical cosmesis is an important determinant of overall cosmesis and could partially mask the longer term benefits of IMRT at this early stage.

  3. SU-E-J-134: An Augmented-Reality Optical Imaging System for Accurate Breast Positioning During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nazareth, D; Malhotra, H; French, S; Hoffmann, K; Merrow, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Breast radiotherapy, particularly electronic compensation, may involve large dose gradients and difficult patient positioning problems. We have developed a simple self-calibrating augmented-reality system, which assists in accurately and reproducibly positioning the patient, by displaying her live image from a single camera superimposed on the correct perspective projection of her 3D CT data. Our method requires only a standard digital camera capable of live-view mode, installed in the treatment suite at an approximately-known orientation and position (rotation R; translation T). Methods: A 10-sphere calibration jig was constructed and CT imaged to provide a 3D model. The (R,T) relating the camera to the CT coordinate system were determined by acquiring a photograph of the jig and optimizing an objective function, which compares the true image points to points calculated with a given candidate R and T geometry. Using this geometric information, 3D CT patient data, viewed from the camera's perspective, is plotted using a Matlab routine. This image data is superimposed onto the real-time patient image, acquired by the camera, and displayed using standard live-view software. This enables the therapists to view both the patient's current and desired positions, and guide the patient into assuming the correct position. The method was evaluated using an in-house developed bolus-like breast phantom, mounted on a supporting platform, which could be tilted at various angles to simulate treatment-like geometries. Results: Our system allowed breast phantom alignment, with an accuracy of about 0.5 cm and 1 ± 0.5 degree. Better resolution could be possible using a camera with higher-zoom capabilities. Conclusion: We have developed an augmented-reality system, which combines a perspective projection of a CT image with a patient's real-time optical image. This system has the potential to improve patient setup accuracy during breast radiotherapy, and could possibly be

  4. Second malignancies following conventional or combined 252Cf neutron brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Kuzmickiene, Irena; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Liukpetryte, Sarune; Ostapenko, Valerijus

    2013-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the risk of second malignancies among 832 patients with inner or central breast cancer treated with conventional external beam schedule (CRT group), or neutron brachytherapy using Californium-252 (252Cf) sources and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (HRTC group), between 1987 and 1996 at the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. Patients were observed until the occurrences of death or development of a second malignancy, or until 31 December 2009, whichever was earlier. Median follow-up time was 10.4 years (range, 1.2–24.1 years). Risk of second primary cancers was quantified using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs). There was a significant increase in the risk of second primary cancers compared with the general population (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.5). The observed number of second primary cancers was also higher than expected for breast (SIR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3–2.4) and lung cancer (SIR 3.8, 95% CI 2.0–6.7). For second breast cancer, no raised relative risk was observed during the period ≥10 or more years after radiotherapy. Compared with the CRT group, HRTC patients had a not statistically significant higher risk of breast cancer. Increased relative risks were observed specifically for age at initial diagnosis of <50 years (HR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6–5.2) and for obesity (HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1–7.2). PMID:23397075

  5. Radiotherapy-induced miR-223 prevents relapse of breast cancer by targeting the EGF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, L; Berton, S; Citron, F; D'Andrea, S; Segatto, I; Nicoloso, M S; Massarut, S; Armenia, J; Zafarana, G; Rossi, S; Ivan, C; Perin, T; Vaidya, J S; Avanzo, M; Roncadin, M; Schiappacassi, M; Bristow, R G; Calin, G; Baldassarre, G; Belletti, B

    2016-01-01

    In breast cancer (BC) patients, local recurrences often arise in proximity of the surgical scar, suggesting that response to surgery may have a causative role. Radiotherapy (RT) after lumpectomy significantly reduces the risk of recurrence. We investigated the direct effects of surgery and of RT delivered intraoperatively (IORT), by collecting irradiated and non-irradiated breast tissues from BC patients, after tumor removal. These breast tissue specimens have been profiled for their microRNA (miR) expression, in search of differentially expressed miR among patients treated or not with IORT. Our results demonstrate that IORT elicits effects that go beyond the direct killing of residual tumor cells. IORT altered the wound response, inducing the expression of miR-223 in the peri-tumoral breast tissue. miR-223 downregulated the local expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), leading to decreased activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) on target cells and, eventually, dampening a positive EGF–EGFR autocrine/paracrine stimulation loop induced by the post-surgical wound-healing response. Accordingly, both RT-induced miR-223 and peri-operative inhibition of EGFR efficiently prevented BC cell growth and reduced recurrence formation in mouse models of BC. Our study uncovers unknown effects of RT delivered on a wounded tissue and prompts to the use of anti-EGFR treatments, in a peri-operative treatment schedule, aimed to timely treat BC patients and restrain recurrence formation. PMID:26876200

  6. Estimation of the risk of secondary cancer in the thyroid gland and the breast outside the treated volume in patients undergoing brain, mediastinum and breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulou, Vassiliki; Malatara, Georgia; Delis, Harry; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Panayiotakis, George

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the peripheral dose which is the absorbed dose in organs located outside the treatment volume such as the thyroid gland and the breast in patients undergoing radiotherapy, utilising the MOSFET dosemeters, as well as to estimate the probability of secondary cancer. The thyroid gland doses, expressed as a percentage of the prescribed dose (%TD), were measured to be 2.0±0.3 %, in whole brain irradiation, 10.0±8.0 % in mediastinum treatment and 8.0±2.0 and 2.0±0.8 % in breast treatment, with and without the supraclavicular irradiation, respectively, with a corresponding risk of 0.2, 2.0, 1.0 and 0.3 %. The dose to the breast was 7.0±2.0 %, in the mediastinum treatment, and 4.0±1.0 and 2.0±0.8 %, in the breast treatment, with and without supraclavicular irradiation, respectively, with a corresponding risk of 4.0, 2.0 and 1.0 %. Although the results indicate that the risk is not negligible, its significance should be considered in conjunction with the existing pathology and age of the patients.

  7. Breast Cancer Risk in Childhood Cancer Survivors Without a History of Chest Radiotherapy: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Chou, Joanne F.; Bradbury, Angela R.; Neglia, Joseph Phillip; Dang, Chau T.; Onel, Kenan; Novetsky Friedman, Danielle; Bhatia, Smita; Strong, Louise C.; Stovall, Marilyn; Kenney, Lisa B.; Barnea, Dana; Lorenzi, Elena; Hammond, Sue; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Diller, Lisa R.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the breast cancer risk among childhood cancer survivors who did not receive chest radiotherapy. We sought to determine the magnitude of risk and associated risk factors for breast cancer among these women. Patients and Methods We evaluated cumulative breast cancer risk in 3,768 female childhood cancer survivors without a history of chest radiotherapy who were participants in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. Results With median follow up of 25.5 years (range, 8 to 39 years), 47 women developed breast cancer at a median age of 38.0 years (range, 22 to 47 years) and median of 24.0 years (range, 10 to 34 years) from primary cancer to breast cancer. A four-fold increased breast cancer risk (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 4.0; 95% CI, 3.0 to 5.3) was observed when compared with the general population. Risk was highest among sarcoma and leukemia survivors (SIR = 5.3; 95% CI, 3.6 to 7.8 and SIR = 4.1; 95% CI, 2.4 to 6.9, respectively). By the age of 45 years, the cumulative incidence of breast cancer in sarcoma and leukemia survivors was 5.8% (95% CI, 3.7 to 8.4) and 6.3% (95% CI, 3.0 to 11.3), respectively. No other primary cancer diagnosis was associated with an elevated risk. Alkylators and anthracyclines were associated with an increased breast cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner (P values from test for trend were both < .01). Conclusions Women not exposed to chest radiotherapy who survive childhood sarcoma or leukemia have an increased risk of breast cancer at a young age. The data suggest high-dose alkylator and anthracycline chemotherapy increase the risk of breast cancer. This may suggest a possible underlying gene-environment interaction that warrants further study. PMID:26700127

  8. Outcomes of Node-Negative Breast Cancer 5 Centimeters and Larger Treated With and Without Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goulart, Jennifer; Truong, Pauline; Woods, Ryan; Speers, Caroline H.; Kennecke, Hagen; Nichol, Alan

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) remains controversial for the rare presentation of pT3pN0cM0 breast cancer. The present analysis examined locoregional recurrence (LRR) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) in pT2 = 5.0-cm and pT3 >5.0-cm tumors treated with mastectomy, stratified by PMRT use. Materials and Methods: Between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 2000, the British Columbia provincial database yielded 100 node-negative patients with tumors {>=}5 cm of 19,846 nonmetastatic breast cancer patients (0.5%). Of these 100 patients, 44 (44%) had received adjuvant PMRT. Results: The PMRT group contained significantly more pT3 >5-cm cases (p = 0.001) and margin-positive cases (p = .03). With a median follow-up of 10 years, the cumulative 10-year LRR rate was 2.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-10.5) in the PMRT group vs. 8.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.2-18.2) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). Regarding LRR in the no-PMRT group, all patients had Grade 3 histologic features (LRR 17%, 5 of 29) and had not received hormonal therapy (LRR 15%, 5 of 34). The 10-year breast cancer-specific survival rate was 85.8% (95% confidence interval 71.0-93.4) in the PMRT group vs. 74.6% (95% confidence interval 59.9-84.5) in the no-PMRT group (p = .2). On multivariate analysis, adjusted for the prognostic and predictive variables, PMRT did not significantly improve the LRR or breast cancer-specific survival rates. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a low LRR rate for node-negative breast cancer {>=}5 cm. Our results indicate that PMRT should be considered for Grade 3 histologic features and patients not undergoing hormonal therapy.

  9. Quality of life of women with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Muszalik, Marta; Kołucka-Pluta, Małgorzata; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Robaczewska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women, particularly among older women. This illness along with its treatment has a great impact on a woman’s subjective opinion of her quality of life and functioning in everyday life. The aim of this research was to assess the quality of life in women undergoing radiotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer. Patients and methods The research was carried out in 120 patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy in the Oncological Center in Bydgoszcz, Poland. Among the 120 examined patients, there were 30 women aged between 20–50 years and the remaining were over 50 years of age, including 42 women over the age of 60. Demographic and clinical data were collected and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue questionnaire (version 4) was used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of the patients. Statistical analyses were conducted using Statistica, version 10.0. Results Patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy rated their quality of life with an average of 113.83 points. Older patients above 71 years of age also displayed significantly higher HRQOL (122.70 points). A lower level of fatigue was noticed among patients ≤50 years and ≥71 years of age. Education and marital status also had an important impact on HRQOL. Educated women with a good financial situation had a significantly higher HRQOL, compared to those with a lower education and in poor living conditions. Conclusion HRQOL and state of fatigue in breast cancer patients treated with radiotherapy depended upon their age. Both were high among women aged 71 years and above, while younger patients (51–70 years of age) had slightly lower values. Results suggest that sociodemographic factors influence the conditions of life of women treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer in a significant way. Overall, patients tolerated this type of treatment well. PMID:27799754

  10. In vivo surface dose measurement using GafChromic film dosimetry in breast cancer radiotherapy: comparison of 7-field IMRT, tangential IMRT and tangential 3D-CRT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the surface dose of 7-field IMRT (7 F-IMRT), tangential beam IMRT (TB-IMRT), and tangential beam 3D-CRT (3D-CRT) of breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy by means of in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. Material and methods Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy of the whole breast or the chest wall were eligible for the study. Study patients were treated with a treatment plan using two different radiotherapy techniques (first patient series, 3D-CRT followed by TB-IMRT; second patient series, TB-IMRT followed by 7 F-IMRT). The surface dose was evaluated on three consecutive treatment fractions per radiotherapy technique using in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. The paired t-test was used to assess the difference of in vivo GafChromic film readings or calculated plan parameters of the compared pairs of radiation techniques for statistical significance. Results Forty-five unselected breast cancer patients were analysed in this study. 7 F-IMRT significantly reduced the surface dose compared to TB-IMRT. Differences were greatest in the central and lateral breast or chest wall region and amounted to a dose reduction of -11.8% to -18.8%. No significant difference of the surface dose was observed between TB-IMRT and 3D-CRT. A corresponding observation was obtained for the calculated skin dose derived from dose-volume histograms. Conclusions In adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy, 7 F-IMRT offers a significantly reduced surface dose compared to TB-IMRT or 3D-CRT. PMID:25022449

  11. TH-A-BRF-05: MRI of Individual Lymph Nodes to Guide Regional Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Heijst, T van; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J; Bongard, D van den; Philippens, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In regional radiotherapy (RT) for breast-cancer patients, direct visualization of individual lymph nodes (LNs) may reduce target volumes and Result in lower toxicity (i.e. reduced radiation pneumonitis, arm edema, arm morbidity), relative to standard CT-based delineations. To this end, newly designed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were optimized and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. Methods: In ten healthy female volunteers, a scanning protocol was developed and optimized. Coronal images were acquired in supine RT position positioned on a wedge board on a 1.5 T Ingenia (Philips) wide-bore MRI. In four volunteers the optimized MRI protocol was applied, including a 3-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted (T1w) fast-field-echo (FFE). T2w sequences, including 3D FFE, 3D and 2D fast spin echo (FSE), and diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar imaging (DWI) were also performed. Several fatsuppression techniques were used. Qualitative evaluation parameters included LN contrast, motion susceptibility, visibility of anatomical structures, and fat suppression. The number of visible axillary and supraclavicular LNs was also determined. Results: T1 FFE, insensitive to motion, lacked contrast of LNs, which often blended in with soft tissue and blood. T2 FFE showed high contrast, but some LNs were obscured due to motion. Both 2D and 3D FSE were motion-insensitive having high contrast, although some blood remained visible. 2D FSE showed more anatomical details, while in 3D FSE, some blurring occurred. DWI showed high LN contrast, but suffered from geometric distortions and low resolution. Fat suppression by mDixon was the most reliable in regions with magnetic-field inhomogeneities. The FSE sequences showed the highest sensitivity for LN detection. Conclusion: MRI of regional LNs was achieved in volunteers. The FSE techniques were robust and the most sensitive. Our optimized MRI sequences can facilitate direct delineation of individual LNs. This can Result

  12. Kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging dose during breast radiotherapy: A dose comparison between a left and right breast setup

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Begg, Jarrad; Nelson, Vinod; Metcalfe, Peter

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the delivered dose from a kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) acquired in breast treatment position for a left and right breast setup. The dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters positioned within a female anthropomorphic phantom at organ locations. Imaging was performed on an Elekta Synergy XVI system with the phantom setup on a breast board. The image protocol involved 120 kVp, 140 mAs, and a 270° arc rotation clockwise 0° to 270° for the left breast setup and 270° to 180° for the right breast setup (maximum arc rotations possible). The dose delivered to the left breast, right breast, and heart was 5.1 mGy, 3.9 mGy, and 4.0 mGy for the left breast setup kV-CBCT, and 6.4 mGy, 6.0 mGy, and 4.8 mGy for the right breast setup kV-CBCT, respectively. The rotation arc of the kV-CBCT influenced the dose delivered, with the right breast setup kV-CBCT found to deliver a dose of up to 4 mGy or 105% higher to the treated breast′s surface in comparison with the left breast setup. This is attributed to the kV-CBCT source being more proximal to the anterior of the phantom for a right breast setup, whereas the source is more proximal to the posterior of the patient for a left-side scan.

  13. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  14. Possession of ATM Sequence Variants as Predictor for Late Normal Tissue Responses in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Fan, Grace; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Iyengar, Preetha B.A.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The ATM gene product is a central component of cell cycle regulation and genomic surveillance. We hypothesized that DNA sequence alterations in ATM predict for adverse effects after external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 patients with a minimum of 2 years follow-up who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were screened for sequence alterations in ATM using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Genetic variants were identified using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring schemes for skin and subcutaneous tissues were applied to quantify the radiation-induced effects. Results: Of the 131 patients, 51 possessed ATM sequence alterations located within exons or in short intron regions flanking each exon that encompass putative splice site regions. Of these 51 patients, 21 (41%) exhibited a minimum of a Grade 2 late radiation response. In contrast, of the 80 patients without an ATM sequence variation, only 18 (23%) had radiation-induced adverse responses, for an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2). Fifteen patients were heterozygous for the G{yields}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which causes substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein. Of these 15 patients, 8 (53%) exhibited a Grade 2-4 late response compared with 31 (27%) of the 116 patients without this alteration, for an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). Conclusion: Sequence variants located in the ATM gene, in particular the 5557 G{yields}A polymorphism, may predict for late adverse radiation responses in breast cancer patients.

  15. Characterization of risk factors for adjuvant radiotherapy-associated pain in a tri-racial/ethnic breast cancer population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunkyung; Takita, Cristiane; Wright, Jean L; Reis, Isildinha M; Zhao, Wei; Nelson, Omar L; Hu, Jennifer J

    2016-05-01

    Pain related to cancer or treatment is a critical quality of life issue for breast cancer survivors. In a prospective study of 375 patients with breast cancer (enrolled during 2008-2014), we characterized the risk factors for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT)-associated pain. Pain score was assessed at pre-RT and post-RT as the mean of 4 pain severity items (ie, pain at its worst, least, average, and now) from the Brief Pain Inventory with 11-point numeric rating scale (0-10). Pain scores of 4 to 10 were considered clinically relevant pain. The study consists of 58 non-Hispanic whites (15%), 78 black or African Americans (AA; 21%), and 239 Hispanic whites (HW; 64%). Overall, the prevalence of pre-RT, post-RT, and RT-associated clinically relevant pain was 16%, 31% and 20%, respectively. In univariate analysis, AA and HW had significantly higher pre-RT and post-RT pain than non-Hispanic whites. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, pre-RT pain was significantly associated with HW and obesity; post-RT pain was significantly associated with AA, HW, younger age, ≥2 comorbid conditions, above-median hotspot volume receiving >105% prescribed dose, and pre-RT pain score ≥4. Radiotherapy-associated pain was significantly associated with AA (odds ratio [OR] = 3.27; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09-9.82), younger age (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.24-4.79), and 2 or ≥3 comorbid conditions (OR = 3.06, 95% CI = 1.32-7.08; OR = 4.61, 95% CI = 1.49-14.25, respectively). These risk factors may help to guide RT decision-making process, such as hypofractionated RT schedule. Furthermore, effective pain management strategies are needed to improve quality of life in patients with breast cancer with clinically relevant pain.

  16. Decreased DNA repair gene XRCC1 expression is associated with radiotherapy-induced acute side effects in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Batar, Bahadir; Guven, Gulgun; Eroz, Seda; Bese, Nuran Senel; Guven, Mehmet

    2016-05-10

    DNA repair plays a critical role in response to ionizing radiation (IR) and developing of radiotherapy induced normal tissue reactions. In our study, we investigated the association of radiotherapy related acute side effects, with X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) DNA repair gene expression levels, their changes in protein expression and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients. The study included 40 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer; an experimental case group (n=20) with acute side effects and the control group (n=20) without side effects. For gene and protein expression analysis, lymphocytes were cultured for 72 h and followed by in vitro 2 Gray (Gy) gamma-irradiation. For detection of DNA damage levels, lymphocytes were irradiated with in vitro 2 Gy gamma-rays and followed by incubation for 72 h. XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in controls than in experimental cases (P=0.020). In terms of DNA damage levels, an increased frequency of micronucleus (MN) was observed in experimental cases versus controls, but this association was not significant (P=0.206). We also observed a significant negative correlation between MN frequency and XRCC1 protein levels in experimental (r=-0.469, P=0.037) vs control (r=-0.734, P<0.001). Our results suggested that decreased XRCC1 expression levels might be associated with the increased risk of therapeutic IR-related acute side effects in patients with breast cancer.

  17. Economic consequence of local control with radiotherapy: Cost analysis of internal mammary and medial supraclavicular lymph node radiotherapy in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lievens, Yolande . E-mail: yolande.lievens@uz.kuleuven.ac.be; Kesteloot, Katrien; Bogaert, Walter van den

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the financial implications of radiotherapy (RT) to the internal mammary and medial supraclavicular lymph node chain (IM-MS) in postoperative breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis were performed, using Markov models, comparing the early and delayed costs and effects of IM-MS during a 20-year time span from a societal viewpoint. The outcome estimates were based on Level I evidence from postoperative RT literature and the cost estimates on the standard practice of the Leuven University Hospitals, with the RT costs derived from an activity-based costing program developed in the department. Results: On the basis of the assumptions of the model and seen during a 20-year time span, primary treatment including IM-MS RT results in a cost savings (approximately EURO 10,000) compared with a strategy without RT. Because IM-MS RT also results in better clinical effectiveness and greater quality of life, the treatment with IM-MS dominates the approach without IM-MS. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results in all tested circumstances. Although threshold values were found for the cost of IM-MS, the cost at relapse, and the quality of life after treatment, these were substantially different from the baseline estimates, indicating that it is very unlikely that omitting IM-MS would become superior. Conclusion: This ex-ante cost evaluation of IM-MS RT showed that the upfront costs of locoregional RT are easily compensated for by avoiding the costs of treating locoregional and distant relapse at a later stage. The cost-sparing effect of RT should, however, be evaluated for a sufficiently long time span and is most specifically found in tumors with a rather slow natural history and a multitude of available systemic treatments at relapse, such as breast cancer.

  18. Use of deodorants during adjuvant breast radiotherapy: a survey of compliance with standard advice, impact on patients and a literature review on safety.

    PubMed

    Graham, P H; Graham, J L

    2009-12-01

    Proscription of antiperspirant or deodorant use during adjuvant breast radiotherapy is common. The investigators were seeking an information base to facilitate design of an appropriate controlled trial of the use of deodorants during radiotherapy. The first component consisted of a survey of women after adjuvant breast radiotherapy seeking information about routine deodorant use and potential concern if deodorants were not permitted during radiotherapy. The second component comprised a literature search for any existing controlled evidence regarding harm from deodorant use during radiotherapy. Four hundred fourteen women completed surveys. Two hundred eighty recalled advice against deodorants. Two hundred ninety-nine women routinely used deodorants, 70% of whom used roll-on products. Forty-five continued deodorant use during radiation, 20 of these despite recalling advice not to wear a deodorant. Of the 233 women who routinely wore a deodorant but abstained during radiotherapy, 19% expressed a lot of concern about body odour and 45% were slightly concerned. Three controlled studies totalling 310 patients report specific deodorants versus no deodorant use which did not show statistically significantly increased skin reactions, but had only a small subset with axillary irradiation. The proscription of deodorant use during radiotherapy is of unproven benefit and causes body odour concern to the majority of women who are usual deodorant users. The next most appropriate trial would compare use of the usual deodorant versus no deodorant, would encompass a significant number of women with radiotherapy to the axilla or application of deodorant to irradiated skin areas, and include endpoints other than skin reaction alone.

  19. An international randomised controlled trial to compare TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (TARGIT) with conventional postoperative radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for women with early-stage breast cancer (the TARGIT-A trial).

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Joseph, David J; Saunders, Christobel; Brew-Graves, Chris; Potyka, Ingrid; Morris, Stephen; Vaidya, Hrisheekesh J; Williams, Norman R; Baum, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Based on our laboratory work and clinical trials we hypothesised that radiotherapy after lumpectomy for breast cancer could be restricted to the tumour bed. In collaboration with the industry we developed a new radiotherapy device and a new surgical operation for delivering single-dose radiation to the tumour bed - the tissues at highest risk of local recurrence. We named it TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy (TARGIT). From 1998 we confirmed its feasibility and safety in pilot studies. OBJECTIVE To compare TARGIT within a risk-adapted approach with whole-breast external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) over several weeks. DESIGN The TARGeted Intraoperative radioTherapy Alone (TARGIT-A) trial was a pragmatic, prospective, international, multicentre, non-inferiority, non-blinded, randomised (1 : 1 ratio) clinical trial. Originally, randomisation occurred before initial lumpectomy (prepathology) and, if allocated TARGIT, the patient received it during the lumpectomy. Subsequently, the postpathology stratum was added in which randomisation occurred after initial lumpectomy, allowing potentially easier logistics and a more stringent case selection, but which needed a reoperation to reopen the wound to give TARGIT as a delayed procedure. The risk-adapted approach meant that, in the experimental arm, if pre-specified unsuspected adverse factors were found postoperatively after receiving TARGIT, EBRT was recommended. Pragmatically, this reflected how TARGIT would be practised in the real world. SETTING Thirty-three centres in 11 countries. PARTICIPANTS Women who were aged ≥ 45 years with unifocal invasive ductal carcinoma preferably ≤ 3.5 cm in size. INTERVENTIONS TARGIT within a risk-adapted approach and whole-breast EBRT. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome measure was absolute difference in local recurrence, with a non-inferiority margin of 2.5%. Secondary outcome measures included toxicity and breast cancer-specific and non-breast

  20. Subsets of Women With Close or Positive Margins After Breast-Conserving Surgery With High Local Recurrence Risk Despite Breast Plus Boost Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Lesperance, Mary; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: (1) To examine the effect of surgical margin status on local recurrence (LR) and survival following breast-conserving therapy; (2) To identify subsets with close or positive margins with high LR risk despite whole breast radiotherapy (RT) plus boost. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 2,264 women with pT1-3, any N, M0 invasive breast cancer, treated with breast-conserving surgery and whole breast {+-} boost RT. Five-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LR, breast cancer-specific and overall survival (BCSS and OS) were compared between cohorts with negative (n = 1,980), close (n = 222), and positive (n = 62) margins. LR rates were analyzed according to clinicopathologic characteristics. Multivariable Cox regression modeling and matched analysis of close/positive margin cases and negative margin controls were performed. Results: Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Boost RT was used in 92% of patients with close or positive margins. Five-year KM LR rates in the negative, close and positive margin cohorts were 1.3%, 4.0%, and 5.2%, respectively (p = 0.001). BCSS and OS were similar in the three margin subgroups. In the close/positive margin cohort, LR rates were 10.2% with age <45 years, 11.8% with Grade III, 11.3% with lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and 26.3% with {>=}4 positive nodes. Corresponding rates in the negative margin cohort were 2.3%, 2.4%, 1.0%, and 2.4%, respectively. On Cox regression analysis of the entire cohort, close or positive margin, Grade III histology, {>=}4 positive nodes, and lack of systemic therapy were significantly associated with higher LR risk. When close/positive margin cases were matched to negative margin controls, the difference in 5-year LR remained significant (4.25% vs. 0.7%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: On univariable analysis, subsets with close or positive margins, in combination with age <45 years, Grade III, LVI, and {>=}4 positive nodes, have 5-year LR >10% despite whole breast plus boost RT. These patients should be considered for

  1. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  2. Use of Axillary Deodorant and Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Noninferiority Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Theberge, Valerie; Harel, Francois; Dagnault, Anne

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To prospectively determine the effect of deodorant use on acute skin toxicity and quality of life during breast radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Before breast RT, 84 patients were randomly assigned to the deodorant group (n = 40) or the no-deodorant group (n = 44). The patients were stratified by axillary RT and previous chemotherapy. Toxicity evaluations were always performed by the principal investigator, who was unaware of the group assignment, at the end of RT and 2 weeks after completion using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria. Symptoms of acute skin toxicity (i.e., discomfort, pain, pruritus, sweating) and quality of life were self-evaluated. For each criterion, the point estimate of rate difference with the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit was computed. To claim noninferiority owing to deodorant use, the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit had to be lower than the noninferiority margin, fixed to 12.8%. Results: In the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, Grade 2 axillary radiodermatitis occurred in 23% vs. 30%, respectively, satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .019). Grade 2 breast radiodermatitis occurred in 30% vs. 34% of the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, respectively, also satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .049). Similar results were observed for the self-reported evaluations. The deodorant group reported less sweating (18% vs. 39%, p = .032). No Grade 3 or 4 radiodermatitis was observed. Conclusion: According to our noninferiority margin definition, the occurrence of skin toxicity and its related symptoms were statistically equivalent in both groups. No evidence was found to prohibit deodorant use (notwithstanding the use of an antiperspirant with aluminum) during RT for breast cancer.

  3. Unacceptable Cosmesis in a Protocol Investigating Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Active Breathing Control for Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Ben-David, Merav A.; Moran, Jean M.; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To report interim cosmetic results and toxicity from a prospective study evaluating accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) administered using a highly conformal external beam approach. Methods and Materials: We enrolled breast cancer patients in an institutional review board-approved prospective study of APBI using beamlet intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at deep-inspiration breath-hold. Patients received 38.5 Gy in 3.85 Gy fractions twice daily. Dosimetric parameters in patients who maintained acceptable cosmesis were compared with those in patients developing unacceptable cosmesis in follow-up, using t-tests. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled; 2 were excluded from analysis because of fair baseline cosmesis. With a median follow-up of 2.5 years, new unacceptable cosmesis developed in 7 patients, leading to early study closure. We compared patients with new unacceptable cosmesis with those with consistently acceptable cosmesis. Retrospective analysis demonstrated that all but one plan adhered to the dosimetric requirements of the national APBI trial. The mean proportion of a whole-breast reference volume receiving 19.25 Gy (V50) was lower in patients with acceptable cosmesis than in those with unacceptable cosmesis (34.6% vs. 46.1%; p = 0.02). The mean percentage of this reference volume receiving 38.5 Gy (V100) was also lower in patients with acceptable cosmesis (15.5% vs. 23.0%; p = 0.02). Conclusions: The hypofractionated schedule and parameters commonly used for external beam APBI and prescribed by the ongoing national trial may be suboptimal, at least when highly conformal techniques such as IMRT with management of breathing motion are used. The V50 and V100 of the breast reference volume seem correlated with cosmetic outcome, and stricter limits may be appropriate in this setting.

  4. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced {>=}Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  5. Effects of Swedish Massage on the Improvement of Mood Disorders in Women with Breast Cancer undergoing Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Darabpour, Sara; Kheirkhah, Masoomeh; Ghasemi, Erfan

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second leading cause of cancer deaths. The detection and treatment of this cancer may create mental pressure and lower mood levels, causing anxiety, depression, stress, and pain for the patients. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Swedish massage on mood disorders in breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy at the cancer institute of the Imam Khomeini hospital at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This study consisted of a clinical trial including 100 patients with breast cancer. The participants were chosen randomly, with their consent, by the use of polling, to be included in the intervention group (which received a Swedish massage three times a week, for 30 minutes, over five weeks) and control group (which received routine care). At the beginning of the intervention and after 5 weeks, the mood disorders of the patients, including anger, anxiety, depression, and any positive affect, were assessed using the affective control scale (ACS) questionnaire. Results Before the intervention, there was no significant difference in the average of the overall scale between the intervention and control groups in the subscales of anger, anxiety, depression, and positive affect (P = 0.469). The average of the overall scale in the Swedish massage group decreased from 3.52 ± 0.65 to 2.42 ± 0.76 when compared to the pre-intervention conditions, and to (P < 0.001) after the intervention. Moreover, the values for the control group were 3.41 ± 0.94 for the pre-intervention and 3.38 ± 0.9 after the intervention (P = 0.620). Conclusions When compared to the control group, the Swedish massage showed an improvement in the mood disorders of women with breast cancer. PMID:28191337

  6. Predictive parameters for selection of electronic tissue compensation radiotherapy in early-stage breast cancer patients after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yanbo; Zhang, Miao; Gan, Lu; Chen, Xiaopin; Zhang, Tao; Yue, Ning J.; Goyal, Sharad; Haffty, Bruce; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Electronic tissue compensation (eComp) is an external beam planning technique allowing user to manually generate dynamic beam fluence to produce more uniform or modulated dose distribution. In this study, we compared the effectiveness between conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and eComp for whole breast irradiation. 3DCRT and eComp planning techniques were used to generate treatment plans for 60 whole breast patients, respectively. The planning goal was to cover 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) with 95% of the prescription dose while minimizing doses to lung, heart, and skin. Comparing to 3DCRT plans, on the average, eComp treatment planning process was about 7 minutes longer, but resulted in lower lung V20Gy, lower mean skin dose, with similar heart dose. The benefits were more pronounced for larger breast patients. Statistical analyses were performed between critical organ doses and patient anatomic features, i.e., central lung distance (CLD), maximal heart distance (MHD), maximal heart length (MHL) and breast separation (BS) to explore any correlations and planning method selection. It was found that to keep the lung V20Gy lower than 20% and mean skin dose lower than 85% of the prescription dose, eComp was the preferred method for patients with more than 2.3 cm CLD or larger than 22.5 cm BS. The study results may be useful in providing a handy criterion in clinical practice allowing us to easily choose between different planning techniques to satisfy the planning goal with minimal increase in complexity and cost. PMID:27147569

  7. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods/design The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. Discussion The BEST study is the first randomized

  8. SU-E-T-17: A Comparison of Forward and Field in Field Intensity Modulation Radiotherapy Planning for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Sun, T; Chen, J; Zhang, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric difference in forward intensity modulation radiotherapy(fIMRT) and field in field IMRT (FIF IMRT)planning for breast cancer. Methods: Ten patients received radiotherapy are selected.For each patient,two treatment plans(fIMRT and FIF IMRT) were designed with Varian Eclipse ver11.0 treatment planning system.Evaluate the dose parameters of targets, organs at risk (OAR), monitor units and treatment time, using dose-volume histogram (DVH). Results: There were no significant difference were found in conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI) of PTV,V5,V10,V20,V30,V40,V50 of heart, lung and monitor unit(MU)(P>0.05).The differences were significant in the treatment time(fIMRT=8.3min,FIF IMRT=2.5,p<0.05). Conclusion: FIF IMRT is equal to fIMRT in dosimetril evaluation. Due to much less delivery time,FIF IMRT is an efficient technique in treating patients by reduceing the uncomfortable influnce which could effect the treatment.

  9. Development and evaluation of an instrument to measure health-related quality of life in Cuban breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Josefina; Nápoles, Misleidy; Pérez, Inés; Ordaz, Niurka; Luzardo, Mario; Fernández, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although modern technology has extended the survival of breast cancer patients, treatment's adverse effects impact their health-related quality of life. Currently, no instrument exists capable of identifying the range of problems affecting breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Cuba's socioeconomic and cultural context. OBJECTIVES Construct and validate an instrument to measure the effects of breast cancer and radiotherapy on health-related quality of life in Cuban patients. METHODS The study was conducted at the Oncology and Radiobiology Institute, Havana, Cuba, from January 2010 through December 2011. Inclusion criteria were: adult female, histological diagnosis of breast cancer, treated with ambulatory radiotherapy, and written informed consent; patients unable to communicate orally or in writing, or who had neurologic or psychiatric conditions were excluded. Development phase: focus groups guided by a list of questions were carried out with 50 women. The patients reported 61 problems affecting their health-related quality-of-life. A nominal group (six oncologists and two nurses) identified the same problems. A syntactic analysis of the information was performed to create items for study and measurement scales. Content validity was determined by a nominal group of seven experts using professional judgment. Another 20 patients were selected to evaluate face validity. Validation phase: the instrument was applied to 230 patients at three different points: before radiotherapy, at the end of radiotherapy and four weeks after radiotherapy was concluded. Reliability, construct validity, discriminant validity, predictive validity, interpretability and response burden were evaluated. RESULTS The final instrument developed had 33 items distributed in 4 domains: physical functioning, psychological functioning, social and family relationships, and physical and emotional adverse effects of disease and treatment. There were two discrete items: perceived

  10. A transcriptome signature of endothelial lymphatic cells coexists with the chronic oxidative stress signature in radiation-induced post-radiotherapy breast angiosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Hamou, Nabila-Sandra; Laé, Marick; Almeida, Anna; de la Grange, Pierre; Kirova, Youlia; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Malfoy, Bernard

    2012-07-01

    Radiation-induced breast angiosarcomas are rare but recognized complication of breast cancer radiotherapy and are of poor prognosis. Little is known about the genetic abnormalities present in these secondary tumors. Herein, we investigated the differences in the genome and in the transcriptome that discriminate these tumors as a function of their etiology. Seven primary breast angiosarcomas and 18 secondary breast angiosarcomas arising in the irradiation field of a radiotherapy were analyzed. Copy number alterations and gene expression were analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Array and Affymetrix Exon Arrays, respectively. We showed that two transcriptome signatures of the radiation tumorigenesis coexisted in these tumors. One was histology specific and correctly discriminated 100% of the primary tumors from the radiation-induced tumors. The deregulation of marker genes, including podoplanin (PDPN), prospero homeobox 1 (PROX-1), vascular endothelial growth factor 3 (VEGFR3) and endothelin receptor A (EDNRA), suggests that the radiation-induced breast angiosarcomas developed from radiation-stimulated lymphatic endothelial cells. None of the genes of the histology-specific signature were present in our previously published signature of the radiation tumorigenesis which shows the presence of a chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced sarcomas of various histologies. Nevertheless, this oxidative stress signature classified correctly 88% of the breast angiosarcomas as a function of the etiology. In contrast, MYC amplification, which is observed in all radiation-induced tumors but also at a low rate in primary tumors, was not a marker of the radiation tumorigenesis.

  11. Prevention of Gynecomastia and Breast Pain Caused by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Tamoxifen or Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Bernardes da Silva, Lucas Godoi; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine, in a meta-analysis, whether gynecomastia and breast pain rates in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are reduced if treated with prophylactic radiotherapy (RT) or tamoxifen (TMX). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing RT or TMX with observation for men with prostate cancer using ADT. Results: Six RCTs (three RT trials and three TMX trials, N = 777 patients total) were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs comparing RT vs. observation showed a significant reduction in the incidence of gynecomastia and breast pain rates in patients treated with RT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.12-0.37, p < 0.0001, and OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.20-0.57, p < 0.0001, respectively). Use of RT resulted in an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 29.4% and 19.9%, with a number needed to treat (NNT) of 3.4 and 5 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Pooled results from trials comparing TMX vs. observation showed a statistical benefit for breast pain and gynecomastia in favor of TMX arms (OR = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.02-0.08, p < 0.0001 and OR = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.0-0.14, p < 0.00001). TMX resulted in an ARR = 64.1% and 47.6%, with an NNT of 1.56 and 2.1 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Considering adverse effects, TMX was 6 times more adverse effects than RT. Conclusions: Our data have shown that both TMX and RT prevented gynecomastia and breast pain in patients with prostate cancer receiving ADT for prostate cancer. Although TMX was two times more effective in preventing gynecomastia, RT should represent an effective and safe treatment option, to take into account mainly in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or thrombotic diathesis.

  12. An experimental attenuation plate to improve the dose distribution in intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Shimozato, T.; Sawaki, M.; Imai, T.; Ito, Y.; Obata, Y.; Tabushi, K.

    2009-06-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) is a technique in which a single-fraction high dose is intraoperatively delivered to subclinical tumour cells using an electron beam after breast-conserving surgery. In IOERT, an attenuation plate consisting of a pair of metal disks is commonly used to protect the normal tissues posterior to the breast. However, the dose in front of the plate is affected by backscatter, resulting in an unpredictable delivered dose to the tumour cells. In this study, an experimental attenuation plate, termed a shielding plate, was designed using Monte Carlo simulation, which significantly diminished the electron beam without introducing any backscatter radiation. The plate's performance was verified by measurements. It was made of two layers, a first layer (source side) of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a second layer of copper, which was selected from among other metals (aluminium, copper and lead) after testing for shielding capability and the range and magnitude of backscatter. The optimal thicknesses of the PMMA (0.71 cm) and copper (0.3 cm) layers were determined by changing their thicknesses during simulations. On the basis of these results, a shielding plate was prototyped and depth doses with and without the plate were measured by radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters using a conventional stationary linear accelerator and a mobile linear accelerator dedicated for IOERT. The trial shielding plate functioned as intended, indicating its applicability in clinical practice.

  13. Acellular Dermal Matrices and Radiotherapy in Breast Reconstruction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Valdatta, Luigi; Scamoni, Stefano; Minuti, Anna; Cherubino, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of commercially available acellular dermis matrices for postmastectomy breast reconstruction seems to have simplified the surgical procedure and enhanced the outcome. These materials, generally considered to be highly safe or with only minor contraindications due to the necessary manipulation in preparatory phases, allow an easier one-phase surgical procedure, in comparison with autologous flaps, offering a high patient satisfaction. Unfortunately, the claim for a higher rate of complications associated with irradiation at the implant site, especially when the radiation therapy was given before the reconstructive surgery, suggested a careful behaviour when this technique is preferred. However, this hypothesis was never submitted to a crucial test, and data supporting it are often discordant or incomplete. To provide a comprehensive analysis of the field, we searched and systematically reviewed papers published after year 2005 and registered clinical trials. On the basis of a meta-analysis of data, we conclude that the negative effect of the radiotherapy on the breast reconstruction seems to be evident even in the case of acellular dermis matrices aided surgery. However, more trials are needed to make solid conclusions and clarify the poor comprehension of all the factors negatively influencing outcome. PMID:24987526

  14. Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bollet, Marc A.; Dieras, Veronique; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

  15. Breast-Conserving Treatment in the Elderly: Long-Term Results of Adjuvant Hypofractionated and Normofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Savignoni, Alexia; Laki, Fatima; Muresan, Marius; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Salmon, Remy J.; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term cause-specific survival (CSS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) in elderly breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant normofractionated (NF) or hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 1999, 367 women aged {>=}70 years with nonmetastatic Stage T1 or T2 tumors were treated by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT at the Institut Curie. They underwent wide tumor excision with or without lymph node dissection followed by RT. They received either a NF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 50 Gy (25 fractions, 5 fractions weekly) to the whole breast, followed by a boost to the tumor bed when indicated, or a HF-RT schedule, which delivered a total dose of 32.5 Gy (five fractions of 6.5 Gy, once weekly) with no subsequent boost. The HF-RT schedule was indicated for the more elderly patients. Results: A total of 317 patients were in the NF-RT group, with 50 in the HF-RT group. The median follow-up was 93 months (range, 9-140). The 5- and 7-year CSS, LRFS, and MFS rates were similar in both groups. The 5-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 96% and 95% for CSS, 95% and 94% for LRFS, and 94% and 95% for MFS, respectively. The 7-year NF-RT and HF-RT rate was 93% and 87% for CSS, 93% and 91% for LRFS, and 92% and 93% for MFS, respectively. Conclusion: According to the findings from this retrospective study, the HF-RT schedule is an acceptable alternative to NF-RT for elderly patients. However, large-scale prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm these results.

  16. Impact of Radiotherapy on Psychological, Financial, and Sexual Aspects in Postmastectomy Carcinoma Breast Patients: A Prospective Study and Management

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neelam; Purkayastha, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of radiotherapy (RT) on psychological, financial, and sexual aspects in postmastectomy carcinoma breast patients affecting their quality of life (QOL) before, during, and after RT with a strong emphasis on their management and rehabilitation aspects. Methods: A cross-sectional study carried out in a specialized institution, comprising sixty women. Two standardized questionnaires European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 30-item Quality of Life Questionnaire and Quality of Life Questionnaire breast cancer-23 (QLQ-BR23) for health-related quality, translated and validated for the Hindi language were used. The scores’ manual of the EORTC was used to calculate the domain scores of the questionnaires. Results: According to the first questionnaire, the emotional function was most affected even at onset of RT treatment and it was worst at the completion of RT treatment with a mean score of 63.75. The global QOL score was also worst at the end of radiation treatment with a mean score of 32.36, while the score 3 months after completion of treatment was 68.16. The symptoms with the highest scores were insomnia with a worst scoring at completion of treatment (29.99), fatigue (26.57), and pain (23.05). According to the QLQ-BR23, the mean score for side effects such as sexual functioning was minimum 0.55 at the completion of RT, which improved to 11.66 on the first follow-up after 3 months. Mean future perspective score which was 57.22 before the start of RT which was reduced to 50.55 at completion, which means that many women experience side effects of RT and impaired sexual satisfaction. Conclusions: Women with breast cancer showed changes in the following domains: financial, emotional, sexual satisfaction, and future prospects. The most frequently mentioned symptoms were fatigue, insomnia, and pain. PMID:28217733

  17. Risk factors for locoregional recurrence after postmastectomy radiotherapy in breast cancer patients with four or more positive axillary lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q.; Wu, S.; Zhou, J.; Sun, J.; Li, F.; Lin, Q.; Guan, X.; Lin, H.; He, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated risk factors for locoregional recurrence (lrr) in breast cancer patients with 4 or more positive axillary lymph nodes receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy (pmrt). Methods Medical records (1998–2007) were retrospectively reviewed for the population of interest. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate; Cox regression models were used for univariate and multivariate analysis of predictors of breast cancer lrr. Results The study enrolled 439 patients. Median duration of follow-up was 54 months. The 5-year rates of locoregional recurrence-free survival (lrrfs), distant metastasis–free survival (dmfs), and breast cancer–specific survival (bcss) were 87.8%, 59.5%, and 70.7% respectively. In patients with lrr and no concomitant metastasis, and in those without lrr, the 5-year rates of dmfs were 21.1% and 65.7% respectively (p < 0.001), and the 5-year rates of bcss were 34.5% and 76.4% respectively (p < 0.001). Univariate analysis showed that menopausal status (p = 0.041), pN stage (p = 0.006), and positivity for her2 [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (p = 0.003)] or the triple-negative disease subtype (p < 0.001) were determinants of lrrfs. Multivariate analysis showed that pN3 stage [hazard ratio (hr): 2.241; 95% confidence interval (ci): 1.270 to 3.957; p = 0.005], her2 positivity (hr: 2.705; 95% ci: 1.371 to 5.335; p = 0.004), and triple-negative disease subtype (hr: 4.617; 95% ci: 2.192 to 9.723; p < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors of lrrfs. Conclusions In breast cancer patients with 4 or more positive axillary lymph nodes who undergo pmrt for breast cancer, lrr significantly influences survival. Patients who developed lrr carried a high risk for distant metastasis and death. Pathologic stage (pN3), her2 positivity, and the triple-negative disease subtype are risk factors that significantly influence lrrfs. PMID:25302039

  18. Low-Dose-Area-Constrained Helical TomoTherapy-Based Whole Breast Radiotherapy and Dosimetric Comparison with Tangential Field-in-Field IMRT

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jie; Yang, Bo; Hou, Xiaorong; Zhang, Fuquan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose. To present a novel helical TomoTherapy-based method for whole breast radiotherapy that has better dosimetry and also has acceptable low-dose regions for lungs, heart, and contralateral breast compared with tangential field-in-field IMRT (FIF-IMRT). Material and Methods. Ten patients with left-side breast cancer were planned with low-dose-area-constrained helical TomoTherapy (LDC-HT) and FIF-IMRT. Dosimetry was compared for all techniques. Results. Coverage of the whole breast was adequate with both techniques. Homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) were better with LDC-HT. LDC-HT showed dosimetry advantages over FIF-IMRT for ipsilateral lung and heart in not only high-dose levels but also in low-dose levels such as V10 Gy and V5 Gy. For contralateral lung, both techniques can provide good protection, although the mean dose of LDC-HT is higher than that of FIF-IMRT. Conclusions. With LDC-HT, we obtained adequate target coverage, better HI and CI of target volume, better sparing of organs at risk, and acceptably low-dose areas compared with FIF-IMRT. LDC-HT could be a feasible method in whole breast radiotherapy. Clinical benefits of LDC-HT need further investigation. PMID:24024197

  19. A phase III randomized trial comparing adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy versus standard adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in operable node-positive breast cancer: Final results

    SciTech Connect

    Rouesse, Jacques . E-mail: j.rouesse@stcloud-huguenin.org; Lande, Brigitte de la; Bertheault-Cvitkovic, Frederique; Serin, Daniel; Graic, Yvon; Combe, Martin; Leduc, Bernard; Lucas, Virginie; Demange, Liliane; Tan Dat Nguyen; Castera, Daniel; Krzisch, Claude; Villet, Richard; Mouret-Fourme, Emmanuelle; Garbay, Jean-Remy; Nogues, Catherine

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To compare concomitant and sequential adjuvant chemoradiotherapy regimens in node-positive, operable breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized, French, multicenter, phase III trial enrolling 638 eligible women with prior breast surgery and positive axillary dissection. Patients in Arm A received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 12 mg/m{sup 2} mitoxantrone, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with concomitant radiotherapy (50 Gy {+-} 10-20-Gy boost). Patients in Arm B received 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil, 60 mg/m{sup 2} epirubicin, and 500 mg/m{sup 2} cyclophosphamide, with subsequent radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was administered on Day 1 every 21 days for 4 cycles. Results: Median treatment durations were 64 and 126 days (Arms A and B, respectively), with no significant difference in overall or disease-free survival. Five-year locoregional relapse-free survival favored patients with conservative surgery (two thirds of the population), with less local and/or regional recurrence in Arm A than in Arm B (3% vs. 9%; p 0.01). Multivariate analysis in this subgroup showed a 2.8-fold increased risk of locoregional recurrence with sequential chemoradiotherapy, independent of other prognostic factors (p = 0.027). Febrile neutropenia and Grade 3-4 leukopenia were significantly more frequent in Arm A. Subclinical left ventricular ejection fraction events at 1 year were more frequent with concomitant radiotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Concomitant radiotherapy with adjuvant fluorouracil, mitoxantrone, and cyclophosphamide has significantly better locoregional control in node-positive breast cancer after conservative surgery and 50% shorter treatment, albeit with slightly more acute toxicity. With mitoxantrone no longer available for adjuvant breast cancer treatment, alternative concomitant chemoradiotherapy studies are needed.

  20. SU-E-T-450: How Important Is a Reproducible Breath Hold for DIBH Breast Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Wentworth, S; Sintay, B; Wiant, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) for left-sided breast cancer has been shown to reduce heart dose. Surface imaging helps to ensure accurate breast positioning, but does not guarantee a reproducible breath hold (BH) at DIBH treatments. We examine the effects of variable BH positions for DIBH treatments. Methods: Twenty-Five patients with free breathing (FB) and DIBH scans were reviewed. Four plans were created for each patient: 1) FB, 2) DIBH, 3) FB-DIBH – the DIBH plans were copied to the FB images and recalculated (image registration was based on breast tissue), and 4) P-DIBH – a partial BH with the heart shifted midway between the FB and DIBH positions. The FB-DIBH plans give “worst case” scenarios for surface imaging DIBH, where the breast is aligned by surface imaging but the patient is not holding their breath. Students t-tests were used to compare dose metrics. Results: The DIBH plans gave lower heart dose and comparable breast coverage versus FB in all cases. The FB-DIBH plans showed no significant difference versus FB plans for breast coverage, mean heart dose, or maximum heart dose (p >= 0.10). The mean heart dose differed between FB-DIBH and FB by < 2 Gy for all cases, the maximum heart dose differed by < 2 Gy for 21 cases. The P-DIBH plans showed significantly lower mean heart dose than FB (p = 0.01). The mean heart doses for the P-DIBH plans were < FB for 22 cases, the maximum dose < FB for 18 cases. Conclusions: A DIBH plan delivered to a FB patient set-up with surface imaging will yield similar dosimetry to a plan created and delivered FB. A DIBH plan delivered with even a partial BH can give reduced heart dose compared to FB techniques when the breast tissue is well aligned.

  1. Balloon-based adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer: comparison between 99mTc and HDR 192Ir*

    PubMed Central

    de Campos, Tarcísio Passos Ribeiro; de Lima, Carla Flavia; Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a comparative dosimetric analysis, based on computer simulations, of temporary balloon implants with 99mTc and balloon brachytherapy with high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir, as boosts to radiotherapy. We hypothesized that the two techniques would produce equivalent doses under pre-established conditions of activity and exposure time. Materials and Methods Simulations of implants with 99mTc-filled and HDR 192Ir-filled balloons were performed with the Siscodes/MCNP5, modeling in voxels a magnetic resonance imaging set related to a young female. Spatial dose rate distributions were determined. In the dosimetric analysis of the protocols, the exposure time and the level of activity required were specified. Results The 99mTc balloon presented a weighted dose rate in the tumor bed of 0.428 cGy.h-1.mCi-1 and 0.190 cGyh-1.mCi-1 at the balloon surface and at 8-10 mm from the surface, respectively, compared with 0.499 and 0.150 cGyh-1.mCi-1, respectively, for the HDR 192Ir balloon. An exposure time of 24 hours was required for the 99mTc balloon to produce a boost of 10.14 Gy with 1.0 Ci, whereas only 24 minutes with 10.0 Ci segments were required for the HDR 192Ir balloon to produce a boost of 5.14 Gy at the same reference point, or 10.28 Gy in two 24-minutes fractions. Conclusion Temporary 99mTc balloon implantation is an attractive option for adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer, because of its availability, economic viability, and similar dosimetry in comparison with the use of HDR 192Ir balloon implantation, which is the current standard in clinical practice. PMID:27141131

  2. Role of Systemic Therapy in the Development of Lung Sequelae After Conformal Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Cserhati, Adrienn; Kelemen, Gyoengyi; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzo, Laszlo; Kahan, Zsuzsanna

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the risk of radiogenic lung damage in breast cancer patients after conformal radiotherapy and different forms of systemic treatment. Methods and Materials: In 328 patients receiving sequential taxane-based chemotherapy, concomitant hormone therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors), or no adjuvant systemic therapy, symptomatic and asymptomatic lung sequelae were prospectively evaluated via the detection of visible CT abnormalities, 3 months or 1 year after the completion of the radiotherapy. Results: Significant positive associations were detected between the development of both pneumonitis and fibrosis of Grade 1 and patient age, ipsilateral mean lung dose, volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy, and irradiation of the regional lymph nodes. In multivariate analysis, age and mean lung dose proved to be independent predictors of early (odds ratio [OR] = 1.035, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.011-1.061 and OR = 1.113, 95% CI 1.049-1.181, respectively) and late (OR = 1.074, 95% CI 1.042-1.107 and OR = 1.207, 95% CI 1.124-1.295, respectively) radiogenic lung damage, whereas the role of systemic therapy was significant in the development of Grade 1 lung fibrosis (p = 0.01). Among the various forms of systemic therapy, tamoxifen increased the risk of late lung sequelae (OR = 2.442, 95% CI 1.120-5.326, p = 0.025). No interaction was demonstrated between the administration of systemic therapy and the other above-mentioned parameters as regards the risk of radiogenic lung damage. Conclusions: Our analyses demonstrate the independent role of concomitant tamoxifen therapy in the development of radiogenic lung fibrosis but do not suggest such an effect for the other modes of systemic treatment.

  3. A new method to deliver supraclavicular radiation in breast radiotherapy for lung sparing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Dong, Zhang; Lin, Mu-Han; Ma, C-M

    2011-04-18

    Due to the angulation of the breast board used for tangential breast irradiation, additional normal lung tissues are included in the supraclavicular field. This work investigates a method to reduce the lung volume and dose delivered during supraclavicular irradiation for breast cancer. Ten patients included for this retrospective study received chest wall and supraclavicular irradiation following radical surgery or breast-conserving surgery. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plans were generated using the CMS XiO treatment planning system. The clinical target volume (CTV) of the supraclavicular irradiation is defined as the subcutaneous tissues from 0.5 cm under the anterior skin surface to a 3 cm depth. Only the ipsilateral lung is defined as the organ at risk. In the new method, the couch is rotated 90° and the supraclavicular field is tilted to maintain a normal incident angle to the breast board rather than the couch surface to spare more normal lung tissues. The absolute volume of the ipsilateral lung irradiated, and the volumes of lung tissues receiving 5 Gy and 20 Gy (V5 and V20) are analyzed. The new method can reduce the lung volume irradiated by the supraclavicular field significantly. For the ten patients investigated, only 5.3% of the ipsilateral lung is irradiated with the new method, while 14.9% of the ipsilateral lung is irradiated using the conventional method. Compared with the conventional method, the new method reduces V5 by 53.6% and V20 by 59.0%. Our new method does not alter the patient positioning for breast treatment but rotates the couch to deliver a tilted supraclavicular field to maintain adequate CTV coverage and spare more normal lung tissues. The results of this study demonstrated that our new method is effective, and that the reduction of normal lung tissue volume in the field is significant.

  4. Can the risk of secondary cancer induction after breast conserving therapy be reduced using intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy x-rays?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Radiation induced secondary cancers are a rare but severe late effect after breast conserving therapy. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is increasingly used during breast conserving surgery. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate secondary cancer risks after IORT compared to other modalities of breast radiotherapy (APBI - accelerated partial breast irradiation, EBRT - external beam radiotherapy). Methods Computer-tomography scans of an anthropomorphic phantom were acquired with an INTRABEAM IORT applicator (diameter 4 cm) in the outer quadrant of the breast and transferred via DICOM to the treatment planning system. Ipsilateral breast, contralateral breast, ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, spine and heart were contoured. An INTRABEAM source (50 kV) was defined with the tip of the drift tube at the center of the spherical applicator. A dose of 20 Gy at 0 mm depth from the applicator surface was prescribed for IORT and 34 Gy (5 days × 2 × 3.4 Gy) at 10 mm depth for APBI. For EBRT a total dose of 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was planned using two tangential fields with wedges. The mean and maximal doses, DVHs and volumes receiving more than 0.1 Gy and 4 Gy of organs at risk (OAR) were calculated and compared. The life time risk for secondary cancers was estimated according to NCRP report 116. Results IORT delivered the lowest maximal doses to contralateral breast (< 0.3 Gy), ipsilateral (1.8 Gy) and contralateral lung (< 0.3 Gy), heart (1 Gy) and spine (< 0.3 Gy). In comparison, maximal doses for APBI were 2-5 times higher. EBRT delivered a maximal dose of 10.4 Gy to the contralateral breast and 53 Gy to the ipsilateral lung. OAR volumes receiving more than 4 Gy were 0% for IORT, < 2% for APBI and up to 10% for EBRT (ipsilateral lung). The estimated risk for secondary cancer in the respective OAR is considerably lower after IORT and/or APBI as compared to EBRT. Conclusions The calculations for maximal doses and volumes of OAR suggest that the risk

  5. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  6. Radiotherapy for Stage II and Stage III Breast Cancer Patients With Negative Lymph Nodes After Preoperative Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Selz, Jessica; Stevens, Denise; Bollet, Marc A.; Lande, Brigitte de la; Daveau, Caroline; Lerebours, Florence; Labib, Alain; Bruant, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in Stage II-III breast cancer patients with negative lymph nodes (pN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Patients and Materials: Of 1,054 breast cancer patients treated with NAC at our institution between 1990 and 2004, 134 had pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. The demographic data, tumor characteristics, metastatic sites, and treatments were prospectively recorded. The effect of PMRT on locoregional recurrence-free survival and overall survival (OS) was evaluated by multivariate analysis, including known prognostic factors. Results: Of the 134 eligible patients, 78 (58.2%) received PMRT and 56 (41.8%) did not. At a median follow-up time of 91.4 months, the 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival and OS rate was 96.2% and 88.3% with PMRT and 92.5% and 94.3% without PMRT, respectively (p = NS). The corresponding values at 10 years were 96.2% and 77.2% with PMRT and 86.8% and 87.7% without PMRT (p = NS). On multivariate analysis, PMRT had no effect on either locoregional recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-1.61; p = .18) or OS (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-6; p = .18). This remained true in the subgroups of patients with clinical Stage II or Stage III disease at diagnosis. A trend was seen toward poorer OS among patients who had not had a pathologic complete in-breast tumor response after NAC (hazard ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-54.12; p = .076). Conclusions: The results from the present retrospective study showed no increase in the risk of distant metastasis, locoregional recurrence, or death when PMRT was omitted in breast cancer patients with pN0 status after NAC and mastectomy. Whether the omission of PMRT is acceptable for these patients should be addressed prospectively.

  7. Genetically Targeted Radiotherapy Utilizing the Human Sodium Iodide Symporter in Human Breast Carcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    several histone deactylase inhibitors ( HDACi ), including sodium butyrate (SB), trichostatin A (TSA), in conjunction with the DNA methyltransferase...breast cancer cell lines and increase the tumor response, several ne deactylase inhibitors ( HDACi ), were tested. The HDACi including sodium butyrate (SB

  8. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  9. [Adjuvant treatment of breast cancer by concomitant hormonotherapy and radiotherapy: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Azria, D; Lemanski, C; Zouhair, A; Gutowski, M; Belkacémi, Y; Dubois, J B; Romieu, G; Ozsahin, M

    2004-06-01

    Combining radiation and hormone therapy has become common clinical practice in recent years for locally advanced prostate cancer. The use of such concomitant therapy in the treatment of breast disease has been very infrequently reported in the literature, but such an application seems justified given the common hormonal dependence of breast cancer and the potential synergetic effect of these two treatment modalities. As adjuvant therapy, tamoxifen is the key drug in the hormonal treatment arsenal, providing a significant improvement in both local control and global survival rates. Aromatase inhibitors are currently being evaluated in this setting, and initial results are promising. In vitro, tamoxifen does not seem to offer a protective effect against radiation. In clinical use, the few available published studies confirm the superiority of the association of radiation with tamoxifen as opposed to radiation therapy alone in decreasing local recurrences of surgically removed breast tumors. Toxicity associated with such concomitant therapy includes mainly subcutaneous and pulmonary fibroses. However, subcutaneous fibrosis and its cosmetic impact on the treated breast are frequently described side effects of radiation therapy, and their incidence may actually be reduced when tamoxifen is associated. The evidence is less controversial for pulmonary fibrosis, which is more common with the concomitant therapy. The association of radiation and aromatase inhibitors has as of yet rarely been reported. Letrozole (Femara) has a radiosensitizing effect on breast-cancer cell lines transfected with the aromatase gene. Clinical data assessing this effect in vivo are not available. The FEMTABIG study (letrozole vs. tamoxifen vs. sequential treatment) did not specify the sequence of radiation and hormonal therapy. The ATAC study comparing the adjuvant use of anastrozole (Arimidex) and tamoxifen does not provide any information on the number of patients receiving radiation

  10. Concurrent Cyclophosphamide, Methotrexate, and 5-Fluorouracil Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Early Breast Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Lorenzo Saieva, Calogero; Borghesi, Simona; Paoletti, Lisa; Meattini, Icro; Rampini, Andrea; Petrucci, Alessia; Scoccianti, Silvia; Paiar, Fabiola; Cataliotti, Luigi; Leonulli, Barbara Grilli; Bianchi, Simonetta; Biti, Gian Paolo

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal sequencing of adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with early-stage breast cancer remains unclear. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively compared 485 patients treated with conservative breast surgery and postoperative whole-breast RT and six courses of CMF (cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m{sup 2}, methotrexate 40 mg/m{sup 2}, and 5-fluorouracil 600 mg/m{sup 2}) with 300 patients who received postoperative CMF only and with 509 patients treated with postoperative whole-breast RT only. The mean radiation dose delivered was 50 Gy (range, 46-52 Gy) with standard fractionation. The boost dose was 6-16 Gy according to resection margins and at the discretion of the radiation oncologist. Acute and late RT toxicity were scored using respectively the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the Late Effects in Normal Tissues Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic scale. Results: A slightly higher Grade 2 acute skin toxicity was recorded in the concurrent group (21.2% vs. 11.2% of the RT only group, p < 0.0001). RT was interrupted more frequently in the CMF/RT group respective to the RT group (8.5% vs. 4.1%; p = 0.006). There was no difference in late toxicity between the two groups. All patients in the concurrent group successfully received the planned dose of RT and CT. Local recurrence rate was 7.6% in CT/RT group and 9.8% in RT group; this difference was not statistically significant at univariate analysis (log-rank test p = 0.98). However, at multivariate analysis adjusted also for pathological tumor, pathological nodes, and age, the CT/RT group showed a statistically lower rate of local recurrence (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Whole-breast RT and concurrent CMF are a safe adjuvant treatment in terms of toxicity.

  11. Rates and predictors of consideration for adjuvant radiotherapy among high-risk breast cancer patients: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Krotneva, Stanimira; Reidel, Kristen; Nassif, Mohammed; Trabulsi, Nora; Mayo, Nancy; Tamblyn, Robyn; Meguerditchian, Ari N

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS) represents the standard for local control of breast cancer (BC). However, variations in practice persist. We aimed to characterize the rate of RT consideration (or referral) after BCS and identify predictors in Quebec, Canada, where universal health insurance is in place. A historical prospective cohort study using the provincial hospital discharge and medical services databases was conducted. All women with incident, non-metastatic BC (stages I-III) undergoing BCS (1998-2005) were identified. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for RT consideration were estimated with a generalized estimating equations regression model, adjusting for clustering of patients within physicians. Of the 27,483 women selected, 90 % were considered for RT and 84 % subsequently received it. Relative to women 50-69 years old, younger and older women were less likely to be considered: ORs of 0.82 (95 % CI 0.73-0.93) and 0.10 (0.09-0.12), respectively. Emergency room visits and hospitalizations unrelated to BC were associated with decreased odds of RT consideration: 0.85 (0.76-0.94) and 0.83 (0.71-0.97). Women with regional BC considered for chemotherapy were more likely to be considered for RT: 3.41 (2.83-4.11). RT consideration odds increased by 7 % (OR of 1.07, 95 % CI 1.03-1.10) for every ten additional BCSs performed by the surgeon in the prior year. Social isolation, comorbidities, and greater distance to a referral center lowered the odds. Demographic and clinical patient-related risk factors, health service use, gaps in other aspects of BC management, and surgeon's experience predicted RT consideration.

  12. Concurrent or sequential letrozole with adjuvant breast radiotherapy: final results of the CO-HO-RT phase II randomized trial†

    PubMed Central

    Bourgier, C.; Kerns, S.; Gourgou, S.; Lemanski, C.; Gutowski, M.; Fenoglietto, P.; Romieu, G.; Crompton, N.; Lacombe, J.; Pèlegrin, A.; Ozsahin, M.; Rosenstein, B.; Azria, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background We present here final clinical results of the COHORT trial and both translational sub-studies aiming at identifying patients at risk of radiation-induced subcutaneous fibrosis (RISF): (i) radiation-induced lymphocyte apoptosis (RILA) and (ii) candidates of certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Patients and methods Post-menopausal patients with stage I–II breast cancer (n = 150) were enrolled and assigned to either concurrent (arm A) or sequential radiotherapy (RT)-letrozole (arm B). Among them, 121 were eligible for RILA and SNP assays. Grade ≥2 RISF were the primary end point. Secondary end points were lung and heart events and carcinologic outcome. RILA was performed to predict differences in RISF between individuals. A genome-wide association study was performed to identify SNPs associated with RILA and RISF. Analyses were done by intention to treat. Results After a median follow-up of 74 months, 5 patients developed a grade ≥2 RISF. No significant difference was observed between arms A and B. Neither grade ≥2 lung nor symptomatic cardiac toxicity was observed. Median RILA value of the five patients who had grade ≥2 RISF was significantly lower compared with those who developed grade ≤1 RISF (6.9% versus 13%, P = 0.02). Two SNPs were identified as being significantly associated with RILA: rs1182531 (P = 4.2 × 10−9) and rs1182532 (P = 3.6 × 10−8); both located within the PHACTR3 gene on chromosome 20q13.33. Conclusions With long-term follow-up, letrozole can safely be delivered concomitantly with adjuvant breast RT. Translational sub-studies showed that high RILA values were correlated with patients who did not develop RISF. Registered clinical trial NCT00208273. PMID:26681684

  13. One-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue, Cognitive Functions, and Quality of Life After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Noal, Sabine; Levy, Christelle; Hardouin, Agnes; Rieux, Chantal; Heutte, Natacha; Segura, Carine; Collet, Fabienne; Allouache, Djelila; Switsers, Odile; Delcambre, Corinne; Delozier, Thierry; Henry-Amar, Michel; Joly, Florence

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Most patients with localized breast cancer (LBC) who take adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) complain of fatigue and a decrease in quality of life during or after radiotherapy (RT). The aim of this longitudinal study was to compare the impact of RT alone with that occurring after previous CT on quality of life. Methods and Materials: Fatigue (the main endpoint) and cognitive impairment were assessed in 161 CT-RT and 141 RT patients during RT and 1 year later. Fatigue was assessed with Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires, including breast and fatigue modules. Results: At baseline, 60% of the CT-RT patients expressed fatigue vs. 33% of the RT patients (p <0.001). Corresponding values at the end of RT were statistically similar (61% and 53%), and fatigue was still reported at 1 year by more than 40% of patients in both groups. Risk factors for long-term fatigue included depression (odds ratio [OR] = 6), which was less frequent in the RT group at baseline (16% vs. 28 %, respectively, p = 0.01) but reached a similar value at the end of RT (25% in both groups). Initial mild cognitive impairments were reported by RT (34 %) patients and CT-RT (24 %) patients and were persistent at 1 year for half of them. No biological disorders were associated with fatigue or cognitive impairment. Conclusions: Fatigue was the main symptom in LBC patients treated with RT, whether they received CT previously or not. The correlation of persistent fatigue with initial depressive status favors administering medical and psychological programs for LBC patients treated with CT and/or RT, to identify and manage this main quality-of-life-related symptom.

  14. Topical Hyaluronic Acid vs. Standard of Care for the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis After Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Single-Blind Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy; Oh, Julia L.; Arriaga, Lisa; Munsell, Mark F.; Kelly, Patrick; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Yu, T. Kuan

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of an emulsion containing hyaluronic acid to reduce the development of {>=}Grade 2 radiation dermatitis after adjuvant breast radiation compared with best supportive care. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer who had undergone lumpectomy and were to receive whole-breast radiotherapy to 50 Gy with a 10- to 16-Gy surgical bed boost were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial to compare the effectiveness of a hyaluronic acid-based gel (RadiaPlex) and a petrolatum-based gel (Aquaphor) for preventing the development of dermatitis. Each patient was randomly assigned to use hyaluronic acid gel on the medial half or the lateral half of the irradiated breast and to use the control gel on the other half. Dermatitis was graded weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria v3.0 by the treating physician, who was blinded as to which gel was used on which area of the breast. The primary endpoint was development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis. Results: The study closed early on the basis of a recommendation from the Data and Safety Monitoring Board after 74 of the planned 92 patients were enrolled. Breast skin treated with the hyaluronic acid gel developed a significantly higher rate of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis than did skin treated with petrolatum gel: 61.5% (40/65) vs. 47.7% (31/65) (p = 0.027). Only 1ne patient developed Grade 3 dermatitis using either gel. A higher proportion of patients had worse dermatitis in the breast segment treated with hyaluronic acid gel than in that treated with petrolatum gel at the end of radiotherapy (42% vs. 14%, p = 0.003). Conclusion: We found no benefit from the use of a topical hyaluronic acid-based gel for reducing the development of {>=}Grade 2 dermatitis after adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of hyaluronic acid-based gel in controlling radiation dermatitis symptoms after they develop.

  15. Helical tomotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: New therapeutic arms in the breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Olivier; Kirova, Youlia M; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Costa, Emilie; Lemanski, Claire; Bourgier, Celine; Riou, Olivier; Tiberi, David; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse clinical and dosimetric results of helical tomotherapy (HT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in complex adjuvant breast and nodes irradiation. METHODS Seventy-three patients were included (31 HT and 42 VMAT). Dose were 63.8 Gy (HT) and 63.2 Gy (VMAT) in the tumour bed, 52.2 Gy in the breast, 50.4 Gy in supraclavicular nodes (SCN) and internal mammary chain (IMC) with HT and 52.2 Gy and 49.3 Gy in IMC and SCN with VMAT in 29 fractions. Margins to particle tracking velocimetry were greater in the VMAT cohort (7 mm vs 5 mm). RESULTS For the HT cohort, the coverage of clinical target volumes was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.4% ± 2.4%; breast: 98.4% ± 4.3%; SCN: 99.5% ± 1.2%; IMC: 96.5% ± 13.9%. For the VMAT cohort, the coverage was as follows: Tumour bed: 99.7% ± 0.5%, breast: 99.3% ± 0.7%; SCN: 99.6% ± 1.4%; IMC: 99.3% ± 3%. For ipsilateral lung, Dmean and V20 were 13.6 ± 1.2 Gy, 21.1% ± 5% (HT) and 13.6 ± 1.4 Gy, 20.1% ± 3.2% (VMAT). Dmean and V30 of the heart were 7.4 ± 1.4 Gy, 1% ± 1% (HT) and 10.3 ± 4.2 Gy, 2.5% ± 3.9% (VMAT). For controlateral breast Dmean was 3.6 ± 0.2 Gy (HT) and 4.6 ± 0.9 Gy (VMAT). Acute skin toxicity grade 3 was 5% in the two cohorts. CONCLUSION HT and VMAT in complex adjuvant breast irradiation allow a good coverage of target volumes with an acceptable acute tolerance. A longer follow-up is needed to assess the impact of low doses to healthy tissues. PMID:27648167

  16. Monitoring ABC-assisted deep inspiration breath hold for left-sided breast radiotherapy with an optical tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, Kathryn E.; Deraniyagala, Rohan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lu, Bo; Liu, Chihray; Samant, Sanjiv S.; Lightsey, Judith L.; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Recent knowledge on the effects of cardiac toxicity warrants greater precision for left-sided breast radiotherapy. Different breath-hold (BH) maneuvers (abdominal vs thoracic breathing) can lead to chest wall positional variations, even though the patient’s tidal volume remains consistent. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using optical tracking for real-time quality control of active breathing coordinator (ABC)-assisted deep inspiration BH (DIBH). Methods: An in-house optical tracking system (OTS) was used to monitor ABC-assisted DIBH. The stability and localization accuracy of the OTS were assessed with a ball-bearing phantom. Seven patients with left-sided breast cancer were included. A free-breathing (FB) computed tomography (CT) scan and an ABC-assisted BH CT scan were acquired for each patient. The OTS tracked an infrared (IR) marker affixed over the patient’s xiphoid process to measure the positional variation of each individual BH. Using the BH within which the CT scan was performed as the reference, the authors quantified intra- and interfraction BH variations for each patient. To estimate the dosimetric impact of BH variations, the authors studied the positional correlation between the marker and the left breast using the FB CT and BH CT scans. The positional variations of 860 BHs as measured by the OTS were retrospectively incorporated into the original treatment plans to evaluate their dosimetric impact on breast and cardiac organs [heart and left anterior descending (LAD) artery]. Results: The stability and localization accuracy of the OTS was within 0.2 mm along each direction. The mean intrafraction variation among treatment BHs was less than 2.8 mm in all directions. Up to 12.6 mm anteroposterior undershoot, where the patient’s chest wall displacement of a BH is less than that of a reference BH, was observed with averages of 4.4, 3.6, and 0.1 mm in the anteroposterior, craniocaudal, and mediolateral directions

  17. Dosimetric Comparison of Involved-Field Three-Dimensional Conformal Photon Radiotherapy and Breast-Sparing Proton Therapy for the Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma in Female Pediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Hoene, Ted; Xiao, Lu; Buchsbaum, Jeffrey; Chang, Andrew L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the potential reduction in breast dose for young girls with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) treated with breast-sparing proton therapy (BS-PT) as compared with three-dimensional conformal involved-field photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The Clarian Health Cancer Registry was queried for female pediatric patients with the diagnosis of HL who received radiotherapy at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center during 2006-2009. The original CT simulation images were obtained, and 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans delivering 21 Gy or cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 14 fractions were created for each patient. Dose-volume histogram data were collected for both 3D-CRT and BS-PT plans and compared by paired t test for correlated samples. Results: The cancer registry provided 10 female patients with Ann Arbor Stage II HL, aged 10-18 years at the time of treatment. Both mean and maximum breast dose were significantly less with BS-PT compared with 3D-CRT: 0.95 CGE vs. 4.70 Gy (p < 0.001) and 21.07 CGE vs. 23.11 Gy (p < 0.001), respectively. The volume of breast receiving 1.0 Gy/CGE and 5.0 Gy/CGE was also significantly less with BS-PT, 194 cm{sup 3} and 93 cm{sup 3}, respectively, compared with 790 cm{sup 3} and 360 cm{sup 3} with 3D-CRT (p = 0.009, 0.013). Conclusion: Breast-sparing proton therapy has the potential to reduce unnecessary breast dose in young girls with HL by as much as 80% relative to involved-field 3D-CRT.

  18. ATM Mutations and the Development of Severe Radiation-Induced Morbidity Following Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    micronucleus test as an alternative to the in vitro chromosomal aberration assay: position of the GUM Working Group on the in vitro micronucleus test ...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The hypothesis being tested in this project is that a greater proportion of patients who develop...breast conservation management should be tested for ATM heterozygosity using the relatively rapid and efficient mutation screening approach outlined in

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Overexpression as a Target for Auger Electron Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-08-01

    proportion of estrogen receptor-negative and hormone-resistant breast cancers. Our objective is to construct a human epidermal growth factor (hEGF...61 5 INTRODUCTION Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) occurs in a high proportion of estrogen receptor-negative and...Lac Iq promotor induced by isopropyl-b- D -thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The DNA sequence of the final hEGF-CH1 construct was confirmed (FUi. 2). BamHJ

  20. Skin-Sparing Radiation Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy After Conservative Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; MacKenzie, Marc A.; Severin, Diane; Mihai, Alina; Hanson, John M.Sc.; Daly, Helene; Fallone, Gino; Parliament, Matthew B.; Abdulkarim, Bassam S.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of skin-sparing by configuring it as an organ-at-risk (OAR) while delivering whole-breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Archival computed tomography scan images of 14 left-sided early-breast tumor patients who had undergone lumpectomy were selected for this study. Skin was contoured as a 4- to 5-mm strip extending from the patient outline to anterior margin of the breast planning target volume (PTV). Two IMRT plans were generated by the helical tomotherapy approach to deliver 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the breast alone: one with skin dose constraints (skin-sparing plan) and the other without (non-skin-sparing plan). Comparison of the plans was done using a two-sided paired Student t test. Results: The mean skin dose and volume of skin receiving 50 Gy were significantly less with the skin-sparing plan compared with non-skin-sparing plan (42.3 Gy vs. 47.7 Gy and 12.2% vs. 57.8% respectively; p < 0.001). The reduction in skin dose was confirmed by TLD measurements in anthropomorphic phantom using the same plans. Dose-volume analyses for other OARs were similar in both plans. Conclusions: By configuring the skin as an OAR, it is possible to achieve skin dose reduction while delivering whole-breast IMRT without compromising dose profiles to PTV and OARs.

  1. Development of Patients' Decision Aid for Older Women With Stage I Breast Cancer Considering Radiotherapy After Lumpectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer; D'Alimonte, Laura; Angus, Jan; Paszat, Larry; Metcalfe, Kelly; Whelan, Tim; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Warner, Eiran; Franssen, Edmee; Szumacher, Ewa

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a patient decision aid (PtDA) for older women with Stage I, pathologically node negative, estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer who are considering adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy and to examine its impact on patients' decision making. Methods and Materials: A PtDA was developed and evaluated in three steps according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework: (1) needs assessment (n = 16); (2) Pilot I to examine PtDA acceptability (n = 12); and (3) Pilot II, a pretest posttest (n = 38) with older women with estrogen receptor-positive progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer after lumpectomy who were receiving adjuvant radiation therapy. Measures included patients' satisfaction with the PtDA, self-reported decisional conflict, level of distress, treatment-related knowledge, and choice predisposition. Results: The PtDA is a booklet that details each adjuvant treatment option's benefits, risks, and side effects tailored to the patient's clinical profile; includes a values clarification exercise; and includes steps to guide patients towards their decision. On the basis of qualitative comments and satisfaction ratings, all women thought that the PtDA was helpful and informative. In comparison with their baseline scores, patients had a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in decisional conflict (adjusted mean difference [AMD], -7.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], -13.50 to 12.59); increased clarity of the benefits and risks (AMD, -10.86; CI, -20.33 to 21.49); and improved general treatment knowledge (AMD, 8.99; CI, 2.88-10.28) after using the PtDA. General trends were also reported in the patients' choice predisposition scores that suggested potential differences in treatment decision after PtDA use. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that this PtDA may be a helpful educational tool for this group of women. The quality of care for older breast cancer patients may be enhanced by the use of a

  2. Regional lymph node radiotherapy in breast cancer: single anterior supraclavicular field vs. two anterior and posterior opposed supraclavicular fields

    PubMed Central

    Houshyari, Mohammad; Kashi, Amir Shahram Yousefi; Varaki, Sakineh Soleimani; Rakhsha, Afshin; Blookat, Eftekhar Rajab

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of lymph nodes engaged in breast cancer with radiotherapy leads to improved locoregional control and enhanced survival rates in patients after surgery. The aim of this study was to compare two treatment techniques, namely single anterior posterior (AP) supraclavicular field with plan depth and two anterior and posterior opposed (AP/PA) supraclavicular fields. In the study, we also examined the relationships between the depth of supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs) and the diameter of the wall of the chest and body mass index (BMI). Methods: Forty patients with breast cancer were analyzed using computed tomography (CT) scans. In planning target volume (PTV), the SCLNs and axillary lymph nodes (AXLNs) were contoured, and, with the attention to PTV, supraclavicular (SC) depth was measured. The dosage that reached the aforementioned lymph nodes and the level of hot spots were investigated using two treatment methods, i.e., 1) AP/PA and 2) AP with three-dimensional (3D) planning. Each of these methods was analyzed using the program Isogray for the 6 MV compact accelerator, and the diameter of the wall of the chest was measured using the CT scan at the center of the SC field. Results: Placing the plan such that 95% of the target volume with 95% or greater of the prescribed dose of 50 Gy (V95) had ≥95% concordance in both treatment techniques. According to the PTV, the depth of SCLNs and the diameter of the wall of the chest were 3–7 and 12–21cm, respectively. Regression analysis showed that the mean SC depth (the mean Plan depth) and the mean diameter of the wall of the chest were related directly to BMI (p<0.0001, adjusted R2=0.67) and (p<0.0001, adjusted R2=0.71), respectively. Conclusion: The AP/PA treatment technique was a more suitable choice of treatment than the AP field, especially for overweight and obese breast cancer patients. However, in the AP/PA technique, the use of a single-photon, low energy (6 MV) caused more hot spots

  3. Quantification of intra-fraction motion in breast radiotherapy using supine magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; Philippens, Mariëlle E. P.; Charaghvandi, Ramona K.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2016-02-01

    In early-stage breast-cancer patients, accelerated partial-breast irradiation techniques (APBI) and hypofractionation are increasingly implemented after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). For a safe and effective radiation therapy (RT), the influence of intra-fraction motion during dose delivery becomes more important as associated fraction durations increase and targets become smaller. Current image-guidance techniques are insufficient to characterize local target movement in high temporal and spatial resolution for extended durations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high soft-tissue contrast, allow fast imaging, and acquire images during longer periods. The goal of this study was to quantify intra-fraction motion using MRI scans from 21 breast-cancer patients, before and after BCS, in supine RT position, on two time scales. High-temporal 2-dimensional (2D) MRI scans (cine-MRI), acquired every 0.3 s during 2 min, and three 3D MRI scans, acquired over 20 min, were performed. The tumor (bed) and whole breast were delineated on 3D scans and delineations were transferred to the cine-MRI series. Consecutive scans were rigidly registered and delineations were transformed accordingly. Motion in sub-second time-scale (derived from cine-MRI) was generally regular and limited to a median of 2 mm. Infrequently, large deviations were observed, induced by deep inspiration, but these were temporary. Movement on multi-minute scale (derived from 3D MRI) varied more, although medians were restricted to 2.2 mm or lower. Large whole-body displacements (up to 14 mm over 19 min) were sparsely observed. The impact of motion on standard RT techniques is likely small. However, in novel hypofractionated APBI techniques, whole-body shifts may affect adequate RT delivery, given the increasing fraction durations and smaller targets. Motion management may thus be required. For this, on-line MRI guidance could be provided by a hybrid MRI/RT modality, such as the

  4. Quantification of intra-fraction motion in breast radiotherapy using supine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    van Heijst, Tristan C F; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Charaghvandi, Ramona K; den Hartogh, Mariska D; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Bongard, H J G Desirée; van Asselen, Bram

    2016-02-07

    In early-stage breast-cancer patients, accelerated partial-breast irradiation techniques (APBI) and hypofractionation are increasingly implemented after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). For a safe and effective radiation therapy (RT), the influence of intra-fraction motion during dose delivery becomes more important as associated fraction durations increase and targets become smaller. Current image-guidance techniques are insufficient to characterize local target movement in high temporal and spatial resolution for extended durations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high soft-tissue contrast, allow fast imaging, and acquire images during longer periods. The goal of this study was to quantify intra-fraction motion using MRI scans from 21 breast-cancer patients, before and after BCS, in supine RT position, on two time scales. High-temporal 2-dimensional (2D) MRI scans (cine-MRI), acquired every 0.3 s during 2 min, and three 3D MRI scans, acquired over 20 min, were performed. The tumor (bed) and whole breast were delineated on 3D scans and delineations were transferred to the cine-MRI series. Consecutive scans were rigidly registered and delineations were transformed accordingly. Motion in sub-second time-scale (derived from cine-MRI) was generally regular and limited to a median of 2 mm. Infrequently, large deviations were observed, induced by deep inspiration, but these were temporary. Movement on multi-minute scale (derived from 3D MRI) varied more, although medians were restricted to 2.2 mm or lower. Large whole-body displacements (up to 14 mm over 19 min) were sparsely observed. The impact of motion on standard RT techniques is likely small. However, in novel hypofractionated APBI techniques, whole-body shifts may affect adequate RT delivery, given the increasing fraction durations and smaller targets. Motion management may thus be required. For this, on-line MRI guidance could be provided by a hybrid MRI/RT modality, such as the

  5. Prospective multicenter study of combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer women with the rare clinical scenario of ipsilateral supraclavicular node recurrence without distant metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pergolizzi, Stefano . E-mail: Stefano.Pergolizzi@unime.it; Adamo, Vincenzo; Russi, Elvio; Santacaterina, Anna; Maisano, Roberto; Numico, Gianmauro; Palazzolo, Carmela; Ferrau, Francesco; Settineri, Nicola; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Girlando, Andrea; Spadaro, Pietro; Cascinu, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of chemotherapy combined with curative radiotherapy in breast cancer patients who presented with recurrent ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastases (ISLM) without 'nonregional disease,' we designed an observational study performed prospectively. Patients and Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients with ISLM from breast cancer as part of recurrent regional disease without distant metastases were included in this study. All patients received chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based schema or paclitaxel for six courses and curative radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions of 2 Gy/5 days a week). An 'involved field' radiation was delivered during the interval between the third and fourth chemotherapy course; hormonal therapy was given based on receptor status. Results: The rate of overall clinical response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy was 94.9%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 28 and 40 months, respectively; the 5-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 35% (95% confidence interval, 19-51) and 20% (95% confidence interval, 6-34), respectively. Conclusion: A curative course of intravenous chemotherapy and radical irradiation is feasible in patients with ISLM. All patients presenting recurrence in supraclavicular nodes should be treated with definitive locoregional treatments and systemic therapy because the outcomes are better than might be historically assumed.

  6. Environmental and social benefits of the targeted intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer: data from UK TARGIT-A trial centres and two UK NHS hospitals offering TARGIT IORT

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Nathan J; Coombs, Joel M; Vaidya, Uma J; Singer, Julian; Bulsara, Max; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Wenz, Frederik; Joseph, David J; Brown, Douglas A; Rainsbury, Richard; Davidson, Tim; Adamson, Douglas J A; Massarut, Samuele; Morgan, David; Potyka, Ingrid; Corica, Tammy; Falzon, Mary; Williams, Norman; Baum, Michael; Vaidya, Jayant S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the journeys and CO2 emissions if women with breast cancer are treated with risk-adapted single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) rather than several weeks' course of external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) treatment. Setting (1) TARGIT-A randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN34086741) which compared TARGIT with traditional EBRT and found similar breast cancer control, particularly when TARGIT was given simultaneously with lumpectomy, (2) 2 additional UK centres offering TARGIT. Participants 485 UK patients (249 TARGIT, 236 EBRT) in the prepathology stratum of TARGIT-A trial (where randomisation occurred before lumpectomy and TARGIT was delivered simultaneously with lumpectomy) for whom geographical data were available and 22 patients treated with TARGIT after completion of the TARGIT-A trial in 2 additional UK breast centres. Outcome measures The shortest total journey distance, time and CO2 emissions from home to hospital to receive all the fractions of radiotherapy. Methods Distances, time and CO2 emissions were calculated using Google Maps and assuming a fuel efficiency of 40 mpg. The groups were compared using the Student t test with unequal variance and the non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Results TARGIT patients travelled significantly fewer miles: TARGIT 21 681, mean 87.1 (SE 19.1) versus EBRT 92 591, mean 392.3 (SE 30.2); had lower CO2 emissions 24.7 kg (SE 5.4) vs 111 kg (SE 8.6) and spent less time travelling: 3 h (SE 0.53) vs 14 h (SE 0.76), all p<0.0001. Patients treated with TARGIT in 2 hospitals in semirural locations were spared much longer journeys (753 miles, 30 h, 215 kg CO2 per patient). Conclusions The use of TARGIT intraoperative radiotherapy for eligible patients with breast cancer significantly reduces their journeys for treatment and has environmental benefits. If widely available, 5 million miles (8 000 000 km) of travel, 170 000 woman-hours and 1200

  7. Comparison of Chest Wall and Lymphatic Radiotherapy Techniques in Patients with Left Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Melis; Karabuğa, Mehmet; Yıldız, Ferah; Özyiğit, Gökhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Zorlu, Faruk; Akyol, Fadıl; Gürkaynak, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to find the most appropriate technique for postmastectomy chest wall (CW) and lymphatic irradiation. Materials and Methods Partially wide tangent, 30/70 photon/electron mix, 20/80 photon/electron mix and CW and internal mammary en face electron field, were studied on computerized tomography (CT) scans of 10 left breast carcinoma patients and dosimetric calculations have been studied. Dose volume histograms (DVH) obtained from treatment planning system (TPS) were used for minimal, maximal and mean doses received by the clinical target volumes and critical structures. Results Partially wide tangent field resulted in the most homogeneous dose distribution for the CW and a significantly lower lung and heart doses compared with all other techniques. However, right breast dose was significantly higher for partially wide tangent technique than that each of the other techniques. Approximately 0.6–7.9% differences were found between thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and treatment planning system (TPS). The daily surface doses calculating using Gafchromic® external beam therapy (EBT) dosimetry films were 161.8±2.7 cGy for the naked, 241.0±1.5 cGy when 0.5 cm bolus was used and 255.3±2.7 cGy when 1 cm bolus was used. Conclusion As a result of this study, partially wide tangent field was found to be the most appropriate technique in terms of the dose distribution, treatment planning and set-up procedure. The main disadvantage of this technique was the higher dose to the contralateral breast comparing the other techniques.

  8. Microdosimetric characteristics of 50 kV X rays at different depths for breast intraoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Sheu, Ren-Dih; Chen, Jing

    2015-09-01

    An intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) device with 50 kV X rays was designed to deliver a single dose to the tumour bed after local excision of breast cancer. The quality of a radiation can be determined by the microscopic distribution of energy transfers along and across the charged particle tracks. The lineal energy, y, serves as an accurate measure of local energy concentration. The dose mean lineal energy, yD, is an indicator of radiation quality. For low linear energy transfer radiation, the ratio of its dose mean lineal energy to that of (60)Co gamma rays can serve as a good indicator of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at low doses. In this study, microdosimetric simulations are performed for soft tissue irradiated by 50 kV X rays generated from the IORT device, with a 4-cm breast applicator attached. All energy transfers are recorded with the location coordinates in the tissue. Microdosimetric single events in a sphere of 1 µm in diameter are scored as a function of radial distances from the applicator surface. Single-event spectra are then constructed. From those single-event spectra, dose mean lineal energy is calculated. Compared with dose mean lineal energy of (60)Co gamma rays, the estimated RBEs at low doses are given for the X rays at different depths in the tissue. The RBEs at clinically relevant doses, as a function of depth, are also presented.

  9. A Nationwide Survey of UK Oncologists' Views on the Choice of Radiotherapy Regime for the Reconstructed Chest Wall in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jyothirmayi, Rema

    2017-01-01

    Aims. This paper describes a UK survey of the choice of radiotherapy regime for the reconstructed chest wall in breast cancer patients. Questions focused on which fractionation regime consultants choose, their reasons for this, whether the type of reconstruction influences their choice, and whether bolus is used in patients who have undergone immediate reconstructive surgery. Materials and Methods. Between July 2014 and July 2015 a survey was sent by email to UK consultant radiation oncologists treating breast cancer. Results. The response rate was 73%. 67% of respondents use 40 Gray (Gy) in 15 fractions, with 22% using 50 Gy in 25 fractions and 7% using other regimes. For 90% of consultants the type of reconstruction did not influence their decision regarding choice of fractionation. 83% of respondents do not usually use a bolus for chest wall radiotherapy in patients who have had immediate reconstructive surgery. Conclusions. This survey illustrates there is variation in practice in the management of patients with breast cancer who have undergone immediate reconstructive surgery in the UK. There is a need for further research to determine which fractionation regime is optimal, whether the type of surgery is relevant, and whether bolus should be added. PMID:28116166

  10. Anthracycline and concurrent radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment of operable breast cancer: a retrospective cohort study in a single institution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) after breast surgery was investigated by few authors and remains controversial, because of concerns of toxicity with taxanes/anthracyclines and radiation. This treatment is not standard and is more commonly used for locally advanced breast cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the concomitant use of anthracycline with radiotherapy (RT). Findings Four hundred women having operable breast cancer, treated by adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) and RT in concomitant way between January 2001 and December 2003, were included in this retrospective cohort study. The study compares 2 adjuvant treatments using CCRT, the first with anthracycline (group A) and the second with CMF (group B). The CT treatment was repeated every 21 days for 6 courses and the total delivered dose of RT was 50 Gy, divided as 2 Gy daily fractions. Locoregional recurrence free (LRFS), event free (EFS), and overall survivals (OS) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival events. Multivariate Cox-regression was used to evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics, treatment and survival. In the 2 groups (A+B) (n = 400; 249 in group A and 151 in group B), the median follow-up period was 74.5 months. At 5 years, the isolated LRFS was significantly higher in group A compared to group B (98.7% vs 95.3%; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.258; 95% CI, 0.067 to 0.997; log-rank P = .034). In addition, the use of anthracycline regimens was associated with a higher rate of 5 years EFS (80.4% vs 75.1%; HR = 0.665; 95% CI, 0.455 to 1.016; log-rank P = .057). The 5 years OS was 83.2% and 79.2% in the anthracycline and CMF groups, respectively (HR = 0.708; 95% CI, 0.455 to 1.128; log-rank P = .143). Multivariate analysis confirmed the positive effect of anthracycline regimens on LRFS (HR = 0.347; 95% CI, 0.114 to 1.053; log-rank P = .062), EFS (HR = 0.539; 95% CI, 0.344 to 0.846; P = 0.012), and

  11. Stewart-Treves Syndrome after Bilateral Mastectomy and Radiotherapy for Breast Carcinoma: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Taşdemir, Arzu; Karaman, Hatice; Ünal, Dilek; Mutlu, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Stewart-Treves syndrome is an angiosarcoma that occurs because of chronic lymphedema, which in most cases is a complication after mastectomy with axillary node dissection and postoperative radiation. Prognosis for this rare tumor is poor. The best therapy is early and radical excision. Chronic lymphedema seems to be an important pathogenic factor. We report a 59-year-old patient with chronic lymphedema and lymphangiosarcoma of the left upper limb who had a left modified radical mastectomy with axillary node dissection and postoperative radiation nine years ago. Additionally, the patient underwent a right modified radical mastectomy with axillary node dissection and postoperative radiation one year ago. In this report, we present a case of Stewart-Treves syndrome after the patient was operated for bilateral breast carcinoma, a review of literature, and principles of treatment.

  12. Radiotherapy associated with concurrent bevacizumab in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pernin, Victor; Belin, Lisa; Cottu, Paul; Bontemps, Patrick; Lemanski, Claire; De La Lande, Brigitte; Baumann, Pierre; Missohou, Fernand; Levy, Christelle; Peignaux, Karine; Bougnoux, Pierre; Denis, Fabrice; Bollet, Marc; Dendale, Rémi; Vago, Nora Ady; Campana, François; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this multicenter prospective and descriptive study was to determine late toxicities and outcomes among patients with non-metastatic breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab (BV) and radiation therapy (RT) in the clinical trials. Early and late toxicities were assessed and evaluation was available for 63 patients (pts) at 12 months. Acute radiation dermatitis was observed in 48 (76%): grade 1 for 27, grade 2 for 17 and grade 3 for 4 pts. Grade 2 acute oesophagitis was observed in one patient (2%). Little toxicity was described 1 year after the completion of RT: 7 pts (12%): grade 1-2 pain, 3 (5%) presented grade 1 fibrosis, and 2 pts (4%) - telangiectasia. One patient (2%) experienced grade 1 dyspnoea. Five grade 1-2 lymphoedema occurred. Only one patient experienced a LEVF value less than 50% one year after the end of RT. In conclusion, the concurrent BV with locoregional RT provides acceptable toxicities.

  13. Delay in initiating adjuvant radiotherapy following breast conservation surgery and its impact on survival

    SciTech Connect

    Hershman, Dawn L. . E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu; Wang Xiaoyan; McBride, Russell

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: Delays in the diagnosis of breast cancer are associated with advanced stage and poor survival, but the importance of the time interval between lumpectomy and initiation of radiation therapy (RT) has not been well studied. We investigated factors that influence the time interval between lumpectomy and RT, and the association between that interval and survival. Patients and Methods: We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database on women aged 65 years and older, diagnosed with Stages I-II breast cancer, between 1991 and 1999. Among patients who did not receive chemotherapy, we studied factors associated with the time interval between lumpectomy and the initiation of RT, and the association of delay with survival, using linear regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results: Among 24,833 women with who underwent lumpectomy, 13,907 (56%) underwent RT. Among those receiving RT, 97% started treatment within 3 months; older age, black race, advanced stage, more comorbidities, and being unmarried were associated with longer time intervals between surgery and RT. There was no benefit to earlier initiation of RT; however, delays >3 months were associated with higher overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-2.24) and cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio, 3.84; 95% confidence interval 3.01-4.91). Conclusions: Reassuringly, early initiation of RT was not associated with survival. Although delays of >3 months are uncommon, they are associated with poor survival. Whether this association is causal or due to confounding factors, such as poor health behaviors, is unknown; until it is better understood, efforts should be made to initiate RT in a timely fashion.

  14. Breast-conserving surgery with or without radiotherapy in women with ductal carcinoma in situ: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Viani, Gustavo A; Stefano, Eduardo J; Afonso, Sérgio L; De Fendi, Lígia I; Soares, Francisco V; Leon, Paola G; Guimarães, Flavio S

    2007-01-01

    Background To investigate whether Radiation therapy (RT) should follow breast conserving surgery in women with ductal carcinoma in situ from breast cancer (DCIS) with objective of decreased mortality, invasive or non invasive recurrence, distant metastases and contralateral breast cancer rates. We have done a meta-analysis of these results to give a more balanced view of the total evidence and to increase statistical precision. Methods A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCT) was performed comparing RT treatment for DCIS of breast cancer to observation. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, Cochrane Library databases, Trial registers, bibliographic databases, and recent issues of relevant journals were searched. Relevant reports were reviewed by two reviewers independently and the references from these reports were searched for additional trials, using guidelines set by QUOROM statement criteria. Results The reviewers identified four large RCTs, yielding 3665 patients. Pooled results from this four randomized trials of adjuvant radiotherapy showed a significant reduction of invasive and DCIS ipsilateral breast cancer with odds ratio (OR) of 0.40 (95% CI 0.33 – 0.60, p < 0.00001) and 0.40 (95% CI 0.31 – 0.53, p < 0.00001), respectively. There was not difference in distant metastases (OR = 1.04, 95% CI 0.57–1.91, p = 0.38) and death rates (OR = 1.08, 95%CI 0.65 – 1.78, p = 0.45) between the two arms. There was more contralateral breast cancer after adjuvant RT (66/1711 = 3.85%) versus observation (49/1954 = 2.5%). The likelihood of contralateral breast cancer was 1.53-fold higher (95% CI 1.05 – 2.24, p = 0.03) in radiotherapy arms. Conclusion The conclusion from our meta-analysis is that the addition of radiation therapy to lumpectomy results in an approximately 60% reduction in breast cancer recurrence, no benefit for survival or distant metastases compared to excision alone. Patients with high-grade DCIS lesions and positive margins benefited most

  15. Impact of Sequencing of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy and Breast Reconstruction on Timing and Rate of Complications and Patient Satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adesiyun, Tolulope A.; Lee, Bernard T.; Yueh, Janet H.; Chen, Chen; Colakoglu, Salih; Anderson, Katarina E.M.; Nguyen, Minh-Doan T.; Recht, Abram

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: There are few long-term studies of how the sequencing of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and breast reconstruction (BR) affects the time to development of complications or patient satisfaction with BR. We therefore studied this issue. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirteen women who underwent BR at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA) from 1999-2006 and also received PMRT were included. Complications requiring surgery were categorized as early (within 90 days of BR) or late. The median length of follow-up after BR was 46.5 months. Patients' general and esthetic satisfaction was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Complications occurred among 32% of 57 women receiving PMRT before BR and 44% of 57 patients having BR before PMRT (p = 0.176). Early complications were more frequent in patients who had PMRT first (18%) than for those with BR first (11%) (p = 0.210); conversely, late complication rates in the two groups were 14% and 33%, respectively (p = 0.009). General satisfaction was comparable between the PMRT-first and BR-first groups (68% and 68%, respectively; p = 0.995); esthetic satisfaction rates were also similar (50% and 62%, respectively; p = 0.238). Conclusions: The sequencing of PMRT and BR did not have a substantial impact on the total risk of complications or patients' general and esthetic satisfaction. However, early complications tended to develop in patients having PMRT first, whereas patients having BR first had a higher risk of late complications. Additional study of the effects of sequencing of PMRT on particular types of reconstructions may help devise strategies for reducing these risks.

  16. Adjuvant radiotherapy for primary breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and risk of contralateral breast cancer with special attention to patients irradiated at younger age.

    PubMed

    Drooger, Jan; Akdeniz, Delal; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Koppert, Linetta B; McCool, Danielle; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Hooning, Maartje J; Jager, Agnes

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the influence of adjuvant radiotherapy for primary breast cancer (BC) on the risk of contralateral BC (CBC) in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation carriers, with special attention to patients irradiated at age younger than 40 years. Additionally, tendencies in locoregional treatments and rates of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy over time were explored. In this retrospective cohort study, 691 BRCA1/2-associated BC patients treated between 1980 and 2013 were followed from diagnosis until CBC or censoring event including ipsilateral BC recurrence, distant metastasis, contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy, other invasive cancer diagnosis, death, or loss to follow up. Hazard ratios (HR) for CBC associated with radiotherapy were estimated using Cox regression. Median follow-up time was 8.6 years [range 0.3–34.3 years]. No association between radiotherapy for primary BC and risk of CBC was found, neither in the total population (HR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.45–1.49) nor in the subgroup of patients younger than 40 years at primary diagnosis (HR 1.36, 95 % CI 0.60–3.09). During follow-up, the number of patients at risk decreased substantially since a large proportion of patients were censored after contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy or BC recurrence. Over the years, increasing preference for mastectomy without radiotherapy compared to breast-conserving surgery with radiotherapy was found ranging from less than 30 % in 1995 to almost 50 % after 2010. The rate of contralateral risk-reducing mastectomy increased over the years from less than 40 % in 1995 to more than 60 % after 2010. In this cohort of BRCA1/2-associated BC patients, no association between radiotherapy for primary BC and risk of CBC was observed in the total group, nor in the patients irradiated before the age of 40 years. The number of patients at risk after 10 and 15 years of follow-up, however, was too small to definitively exclude harmful effects of adjuvant

  17. Tumor Location, Interval Between Surgery and Radiotherapy, and Boost Technique Influence Local Control After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation: Retrospective Analysis of Monoinstitutional Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Knauerhase, Hellen; Strietzel, Manfred; Gerber, Bernd; Reimer, Toralf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To obtain long-term data on local tumor control after treatment of invasive breast cancer by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), in consideration of the interstitial high-dose-rate boost technique. Patients and Methods: A total of 263 women with 268 mammary carcinomas (International Union Against Cancer Stage I-IIB) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT between 1990 and 1994 were included. The potential risk factors for local recurrence-free survival were investigated. Results: During a median follow-up period of 94 months, 27 locoregional recurrences, 25 of which were in breast, were diagnosed. The cumulative rate of in-breast recurrence was 4.1% {+-} 1.4% at 5 years of follow-up and 9.9% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis identified medial tumor location and delayed RT (defined as an interval of >2 months between surgery and the start of RT) as significant risk factors for in-breast recurrence in the overall study population. Medial tumor location vs. lateral/central location (hazard ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.84) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 22.5% {+-} 8.3% vs. 6.9% {+-} 2.3% at 10 years. Delayed RT (hazard ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-7.13) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 18.5% {+-} 6.2% vs. 6.8% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis also showed that the risk of in-breast recurrence was lower after high-dose-rate boost therapy than after external beam boost therapy in patients with laterally/centrally located tumors (hazard ratio, 3.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-11.65). Conclusion: Tumor location, interval between surgery and RT, and boost technique might influence local control of breast cancer treated by breast-conserving surgery and RT.

  18. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age {<=} 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  19. Implant breast reconstruction followed by radiotherapy: Can helical tomotherapy become a standard irradiation treatment?

    SciTech Connect

    Massabeau, Carole; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Wakil, Georges; Castro Pena, Pablo; Viard, Romain; Zefkili, Sofia; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the benefits and limitations of helical tomotherapy (HT) for loco-regional irradiation of patients after a mastectomy and immediate implant-based reconstruction. Ten breast cancer patients with retropectoral implants were randomly selected for this comparative study. Planning target volumes (PTVs) 1 (the volume between the skin and the implant, plus margin) and 2 (supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes, plus margin) were 50 Gy in 25 fractions using a standard technique and HT. The extracted dosimetric data were compared using a 2-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Doses for PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher with HT (V95 of 98.91 and 97.91%, respectively) compared with the standard technique (77.46 and 72.91%, respectively). Similarly, the indexes of homogeneity were significantly greater with HT (p = 0.002). HT reduced ipsilateral lung volume that received {>=}20 Gy (16.7 vs. 35%), and bilateral lungs (p = 0.01) and neighboring organs received doses that remained well below tolerance levels. The heart volume, which received 25 Gy, was negligible with both techniques. HT can achieve full target coverage while decreasing high doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung. However, the low doses to normal tissue volumes need to be reduced in future studies.

  20. Second malignancies following conventional or combined ²⁵²Cf neutron brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Kuzmickiene, Irena; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Liukpetryte, Sarune; Ostapenko, Valerijus

    2013-09-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the risk of second malignancies among 832 patients with inner or central breast cancer treated with conventional external beam schedule (CRT group), or neutron brachytherapy using Californium-252 (²⁵²Cf) sources and hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy (HRTC group), between 1987 and 1996 at the Institute of Oncology, Vilnius University. Patients were observed until the occurrences of death or development of a second malignancy, or until 31 December 2009, whichever was earlier. Median follow-up time was 10.4 years (range, 1.2-24.1 years). Risk of second primary cancers was quantified using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs). There was a significant increase in the risk of second primary cancers compared with the general population (SIR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.5). The observed number of second primary cancers was also higher than expected for breast (SIR 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.4) and lung cancer (SIR 3.8, 95% CI 2.0-6.7). For second breast cancer, no raised relative risk was observed during the period ≥10 or more years after radiotherapy. Compared with the CRT group, HRTC patients had a not statistically significant higher risk of breast cancer. Increased relative risks were observed specifically for age at initial diagnosis of <50 years (HR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.2) and for obesity (HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.2).

  1. Predictive Models for Pulmonary Function Changes After Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer and Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Goset, Karen C.; Caviedes, Ivan; Delgado, Iris O.; Cordova, Andres

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To propose multivariate predictive models for changes in pulmonary function tests ({Delta}PFTs) with respect to preradiotherapy (pre-RT) values in patients undergoing RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was designed to measure {Delta}PFTs of patients undergoing RT. Sixty-six patients were included. Spirometry, lung capacity (measured by helium dilution), and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide tests were used to measure lung function. Two lung definitions were considered: paired lung vs. irradiated lung (IL). Correlation analysis of dosimetric parameters (mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume receiving more than a threshold dose) and {Delta}PFTs was carried out to find the best dosimetric predictor. Chemotherapy, age, smoking, and the selected dose-volume parameter were considered as single and interaction terms in a multivariate analysis. Stability of results was checked by bootstrapping. Results: Both lung definitions proved to be similar. Modeling was carried out for IL. Acute and late damage showed the highest correlations with volumes irradiated above {approx}20 Gy (maximum R{sup 2} = 0.28) and {approx}40 Gy (maximum R{sup 2} = 0.21), respectively. RT alone induced a minor and transitory restrictive defect (p = 0.013). Doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel (Taxol), when administered pre-RT, induced a late, large restrictive effect, independent of RT (p = 0.031). Bootstrap values confirmed the results. Conclusions: None of the dose-volume parameters was a perfect predictor of outcome. Thus, different predictor models for {Delta}PFTs were derived for the IL, which incorporated other nondosimetric parameters mainly through interaction terms. Late {Delta}PFTs seem to behave more serially than early ones. Large restrictive defects were demonstrated in patients pretreated with doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide-paclitaxel.

  2. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast in 25 fractions, with 3D-CRT were selected. The FiF-FP-IMRT plans were created by combining two open fields with three to four segments in two tangential beam directions. Eight different beam directions were chosen to create IP-IMRT plans and were inversely optimized. The homogeneity of dose to planning target volume (PTV) and the dose delivered to heart and contralateral breast were compared among the techniques in all the 20 patients. All the three radiotherapy techniques achieved comparable radiation dose delivery to PTV-95% of the prescribed dose covering > 95% of the breast PTV. The mean volume of PTV receiving 105% (V105) of the prescribed dose was 1.7% (range 0-6.8%) for IP-IMRT, 1.9% for FP-IMRT, and 3.7% for 3D-CRT. The homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) were similar for 3D-CRT and FP-IMRT, whereas the IP-IMRT plans had better conformity index at the cost of less homogeneity. The 3D-CRT and FiF-FP-IMRT plans achieved similar sparing of critical organs. The low-dose volumes (V5Gy) in the heart and lungs were larger in IP-IMRT than in the other techniques. The value of the mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was higher for IP-IMRT than the values for with FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT. In the current study, the relative volume of contralateral breast receiving low doses (0.01, 0.6, 1, and 2Gy) was significantly lower for the FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT plans than for the IP-IMRT plan. Compared with 3D-CRT and IP-IMRT, FiF-FP-IMRT proved to be a

  4. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy isocentric field plans and field in field (FIF) forward plans in the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rahbi, Zakiya Salem; Al Mandhari, Zahid; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Al-Kindi, Fatma; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Anthony; Bhasi, Saju; Satyapal, Namrata; Rajan, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed at comparing the planning and delivery efficiency between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), field-in-field, forward planned, intensity modulated radiotherapy (FIF-FP-IMRT), and inverse planned intensity modulated radiotherapy (IP-IMRT). Treatment plans of 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer, 10 post-mastectomy treated to a prescribed dose of 45 Gy to the chest wall in 20 fractions, and 10 post-breast-conserving surgery to a prescribed dose of 50 Gy to the whole breast in 25 fractions, with 3D-CRT were selected. The FiF-FP-IMRT plans were created by combining two open fields with three to four segments in two tangential beam directions. Eight different beam directions were chosen to create IP-IMRT plans and were inversely optimized. The homogeneity of dose to planning target volume (PTV) and the dose delivered to heart and contralateral breast were compared among the techniques in all the 20 patients. All the three radiotherapy techniques achieved comparable radiation dose delivery to PTV-95% of the prescribed dose covering > 95% of the breast PTV. The mean volume of PTV receiving 105% (V105) of the prescribed dose was 1.7% (range 0-6.8%) for IP-IMRT, 1.9% for FP-IMRT, and 3.7% for 3D-CRT. The homogeneity and conformity indices (HI and CI) were similar for 3D-CRT and FP-IMRT, whereas the IP-IMRT plans had better conformity index at the cost of less homogeneity. The 3D-CRT and FiF-FP-IMRT plans achieved similar sparing of critical organs. The low-dose volumes (V5Gy) in the heart and lungs were larger in IP-IMRT than in the other techniques. The value of the mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was higher for IP-IMRT than the values for with FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT. In the current study, the relative volume of contralateral breast receiving low doses (0.01, 0.6, 1, and 2Gy) was significantly lower for the FiF-FP-IMRT and 3D-CRT plans than for the IP-IMRT plan. Compared with 3D-CRT and IP-IMRT, FiF-FP-IMRT proved to be a

  5. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  6. Automatic Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring on Radiotherapy Planning CT Scans of Breast Cancer Patients: Reproducibility and Association with Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gernaat, Sofie A. M.; Išgum, Ivana; de Vos, Bob D.; Takx, Richard A. P.; Young-Afat, Danny A.; Rijnberg, Noor; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Graaf, Yolanda; de Jong, Pim A.; Leiner, Tim; van den Bongard, Desiree H. J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Verkooijen, Helena M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This study assesses reproducibility of automatic CAC scoring on radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans of breast cancer patients, and examines its association with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods This study included 561 breast cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy between 2013 and 2015. CAC was automatically scored with an algorithm using supervised pattern recognition, expressed as Agatston scores and categorized into five categories (0, 1–10, 11–100, 101–400, >400). Reproducibility between automatic and manual expert scoring was assessed in 79 patients with automatically determined CAC above zero and 84 randomly selected patients without automatically determined CAC. Interscan reproducibility of automatic scoring was assessed in 294 patients having received two scans (82% on the same day). Association between CAC and CVD risk factors was assessed in 36 patients with CAC scores >100, 72 randomly selected patients with scores 1–100, and 72 randomly selected patients without CAC. Reliability was assessed with linearly weighted kappa and agreement with proportional agreement. Results 134 out of 561 (24%) patients had a CAC score above zero. Reliability of CVD risk categorization between automatic and manual scoring was 0.80 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.74–0.87), and slightly higher for scans with breath-hold. Agreement was 0.79 (95% CI: 0.72–0.85). Interscan reliability was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.50–0.72) with an agreement of 0.84 (95% CI: 0.80–0.89). Ten out of 36 (27.8%) patients with CAC scores above 100 did not have other cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Automatic CAC scoring on radiotherapy planning CT scans is a reliable method to assess CVD risk based on Agatston scores. One in four breast cancer patients planned for radiotherapy have elevated CAC score. One in three patients with high CAC

  7. An Îto stochastic differential equations model for the dynamics of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line treated by radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2016-10-21

    In this paper, a new mathematical model is proposed for studying the population dynamics of breast cancer cells treated by radiotherapy by using a system of stochastic differential equations. The novelty of the model is essentially in capturing the concept of the cell cycle in the modeling to be able to evaluate the tumor lifespan. According to the cell cycle, each cell belongs to one of three subpopulations G, S, or M, representing gap, synthesis and mitosis subpopulations. Cells in the M subpopulation are highly radio-sensitive, whereas cells in the S subpopulation are highly radio-resistant. Therefore, in the process of radiotherapy, cell death rates of different subpopulations are not equal. In addition, since flow cytometry is unable to detect apoptotic cells accurately, the small changes in cell death rate in each subpopulation during treatment are considered. Subsequently, the proposed model is calibrated using experimental data from previous experiments involving the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Consequently, the proposed model is able to predict tumor lifespan based on the number of initial carcinoma cells. The results show the effectiveness of the radiation under the condition of stability, which describes the decreasing trend of the tumor cells population.

  8. SU-E-P-56: Dosimetric Comparison of Three Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Radiotherapy Techniques for Locally Advanced Left-Sided Breast Cancer and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Zhang, W; Lu, J; Wu, L; Wu, F; Huang, B; Li, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetry of post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRMRT) for left-sided breast cancer using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: We created ten sets of PMRMRT plans for ten consecutive patients and utilized two tangential and one or two supraclavicular beams in 3DCRT, a total of 5 beams in IMRT and two optimized partial arcs in VMAT. The difference in results between any two of the three new plans, between new and previous 3DCRT plans were compared and analyzed by ANOVA (α =0.05) and paired-sample t-test respectively. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: Both IMRT and VMAT plans had similar PTV coverage, hotspot area and conformity (all p>0.05), and significantly higher PTV coverage compared with new 3DCRT (both p<0.001). IMRT plans had significantly less heart and left lung radiation exposure compared with VMAT (all p<0.05). The 3DCRT plans with larger estimated CTV displacement had better target coverage but worse OARs sparing compared to those with smaller one. Conclusion: IMRT has dosimetrical advantages over the other two techniques in PMRMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve dosage distribution. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  9. Prognostic Impact of the Tumor Marker CA 15-3 in Patients With Breast Cancer and Bone Metastases Treated With Palliative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nieder, Carsten; Dalhaug, Astrid; Haukland, Ellinor; Mannsaker, Bard; Pawinski, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to explore the prognostic impact of different abnormal blood tests and the tumor marker CA 15-3 as well as established parameters such as disease extent and receptor status in patients with bone metastases from breast cancer who received palliative radiotherapy in addition to contemporary systemic treatment. Methods This was a retrospective uni- and multivariate analysis of 118 female patients treated in the time period from 2007 to 2014 (median follow-up 28 months). Results The median age was 61 years and the median time interval from the initial diagnosis of breast cancer was 57 months (median time interval from metastatic disease to radiotherapy was 7 months). Only 16% of patients had normal serum CA 15-3. HER2 receptor status correlated with CA 15-3. The median survival was 17.6 months (lowest CA 15-3 quartile), 14.7 months (intermediate), and 6.9 months (highest quartile) (P = 0.002). However, multivariate analysis showed that survival was influenced by extent of extra-skeletal metastases, pleural metastases/effusion, lung metastases, estrogen receptor status, serum C-reactive protein, and anemia with need for blood transfusion (all P < 0.05) rather than CA 15-3. Conclusions Survival was highly variable. The tumor marker CA 15-3 did not provide independent prognostic information. Nevertheless, the results of simple blood tests contributed to the multivariate prognostic model. PMID:28179964

  10. Simultaneous radiotherapy and superficial hyperthermia for high-risk breast carcinoma: A randomised comparison of treatment sequelae in heated versus non-heated sectors of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sumeeta; Myerson, Robert; Moros, Eduardo; Taylor, Marie; Straube, William; Zoberi, Imran

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In vitro data demonstrate that heat-induced radiosensitisation is maximised if hyperthermia and radiotherapy are given simultaneously, with the radiation fraction delivered midway through a hyperthermia session, rather than sequentially. The long-term normal tissue toxicity of full-dose simultaneous thermoradiotherapy is unknown. Materials and methods Patients with locally advanced breast cancer (T3, T4 or more than three involved nodes or local recurrence), no prior radiotherapy, received between four and eight sessions of simultaneous thermoradiotherapy. Hyperthermia always included the primary tumour site. In addition an electively heated sector (EHS) was included. The EHS was randomised to either medial or lateral to the tumour site, with the other side an irradiated but unheated control. As per our usual practice, patients received surgery and/or chemotherapy prior to radiotherapy. Radiation doses were 46–50 Gy followed by a boost of ≤16 Gy at 1.8–2 Gy per fraction. EHS and control sectors received the same dose. Results A total of 57 evaluable cases with average follow-up of 79 months experienced two local and two nodal recurrences. There was no significant difference in ≥grade 2 toxicity for heated versus control sectors (LR χ2 = 0.78, p = 0.38) with no relationship between number of hyperthermia sessions and toxicity (LR χ2 = 2.90, p = 0.09). Conclusions Simultaneous full-dose thermoradiotherapy for breast cancer is feasible and well tolerated, with no significant difference in late toxicity between electively heated and unheated control sectors. All patients had hyperthermia to the primary tumour site with excellent local control. PMID:22946861

  11. SU-E-P-51: Dosimetric Comparison to Organs at Risk Sparing Using Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy Versus Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Radiotherapy of Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, L; Deng, G; Xie, J; Cheng, J; Liang, N; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Luo, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric characteristics of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for left-sided breast cancer patients with modified radical mastectomy. Methods: Twenty-four left-sided breast cancer patients treated with modified radical mastectomy were selected in this study. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated by using 7-mm uniform expansion of the clinical target volume (CTV) in all direction except the skin surface. The organs at risk (OARs) included heart, left lung, right lung, and right breast. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were utilized to evaluate the dose distribution in PTV and OARs. Results: Both VMAT and IMRT plans met the requirement of PTV coverage. VMAT was superior to IMRT in terms of conformity, with a statistically significant difference (p=0.024). Mean doses, V5 and V10 of heart and both lungs in VMAT plans were significantly decreased compared to IMRT plans (P<0.05), but in terms of heart volume irradiated by high doses (V30 and V45), no significant differences were observed (P>0.05). For right breast, VMAT showed the reduction of V5 in comparison with IMRT (P<0.05). Additionally, the mean number of monitor units (MU) and treatment time in VMAT (357.21, 3.62 min) were significantly less than those in IMRT (1132.85, 8.74 min). Conclusion: VMAT showed similar PTV coverage and significant advantage in OARs sparing compared with IMRT, especially in terms of decreased volumes irradiated by low doses, while significantly reducing the treatment time and MU number.

  12. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  13. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  14. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 01: Dosimetric Analysis of Respiratory Induced Cardiac Intrafraction Motion in Left-sided Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Patrick, J; Yu, E; Gaede, S

    2014-08-15

    Introduction: Long-term cardiac side effects in left-sided breast cancer patients (BREL) after post-operative radiotherapy has become one of the most debated issues in radiation oncology. Through breathing-adapted radiotherapy the volume of the heart exposed to radiation can be significantly reduced by delivering the radiation only at the end of inspiration phase of the respiratory cycle, this is referred to as inspiration gating (IG). The purpose of this study is to quantify the potential reduction in cardiac exposure during IG compared to conventional BREL radiotherapy and to assess the dosimetric impact of cardiac motion due to natural breathing. Methods: 24 BREL patients treated with tangential parallel opposed photon beams were included in this study. All patients received a standard fast helical planning CT (FH-CT) and a 4D-CT. Treatment plans were created on the FH-CT using a clinical treatment planning system. The original treatment plan was then superimposed onto the end of inspiration CT and all 10 phases of the 4D-CT to quantify the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion and IG through 4D dose accumulation. Results: Through IG the mean dose to the heart, left ventricle, and left anterior descending artery (LAD) can be reduced in comparison to the clinical standard BREL treatment by as much as 8.39%, 10.11%, and 13.71% respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Failure to account for respiratory motion can lead to under or overestimation in the calculated DVH for the heart, and it's sub-structures. IG can reduce cardiac exposure especially to the LAD during BREL radiotherapy.

  15. Clinical outcomes in patients with brain metastases from breast cancer treated with single-session radiosurgery or whole brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mix, Michael; Elmarzouky, Rania; O'Connor, Tracey; Plunkett, Robert; Prasad, Dheerendra

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is used to treat brain metastases from breast cancer (BMB) as the sole treatment or in conjunction with tumor resection and/or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). This study evaluates outcomes in BMB based on treatment techniques and tumor biological features. METHODS The authors reviewed all patients treated with BMB between 2004 and 2014. Patients were identified from a prospectively collected radiosurgery database and institutional tumor registry; 214 patients were identified. Data were collected from aforementioned sources and supplemented with chart review where needed. Independent radiological review was performed for all available brain imaging in those treated with GKRS. Survival analyses are reported using Kaplan-Meier estimates. RESULTS During the 10-year study period, 214 patients with BMB were treated; 23% underwent GKRS alone, 46% underwent a combination of GKRS and WBRT, and 31% underwent WBRT alone. Median survival after diagnosis of BMB in those treated with GKRS alone was 21 months, and in those who received WBRT alone it was 3 months. In those treated with GKRS plus WBRT, no significant difference in median survival was observed between those receiving WBRT upfront or in a salvage setting following GKRS (19 months vs 14 months, p = 0.63). The median survival of patients with total metastatic tumor volume of ≤ 7 cm(3) versus > 7 cm(3) was 20 months vs 7 months (p < 0.001). Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her-2) positively impacted survival after diagnosis of BMB (19 months vs 12 months, p = 0.03). Estrogen receptor status did not influence survival after diagnosis of BMB. No difference was observed in survival after diagnosis of BMB based on receptor status in those who received WBRT alone. CONCLUSIONS In this single-institution series of BMB, the addition of WBRT to GKRS did not significantly influence survival, nor did the number of lesions treated with GKRS. Survival after the diagnosis of BMB

  16. Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.S.; Chen, C.M.; Liu, M.C.; Jian, J.M.; Horng, C.F.; Liu, M.J.; Yu, B.L.; Lee, M.Y.; Chi, C.W.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

  17. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  18. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  19. Effect of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in Patients <35 Years Old With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Treated With Doxorubicin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Oh, Julia L. Oswald, Mary Jane; Huang, Eugene; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Yu, T. Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hahn, Karin; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) improves locoregional control (LRC) in patients with high-risk features after mastectomy. Young age continues to evolve as a potentially important risk factor. The objective of this study was to assess the benefits of PMRT in patients <35 years old treated with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Stage II-III breast cancer. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 107 consecutive breast cancer patients <35 years old with Stage IIA-IIIC disease treated at our institution with doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, with or without PMRT. The treatment groups were compared in terms of LRC and overall survival. Results: Despite more advanced disease stages, the patients who received PMRT (n = 80) had greater rates of LRC (5-year rate, 88% vs. 63%, p = 0.001) and better overall survival (5-year rate, 67% vs. 48%, p = 0.03) than patients who did not receive PMRT (n = 27). Conclusion: Among breast cancer patients <35 years old at diagnosis, the use of PMRT after doxorubicin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy led to a statistically greater rate of LRC and overall survival compared with patients without PMRT. The benefit seen for PMRT in young patients provides valuable data to better tailor adjuvant, age-specific treatment decisions after mastectomy.

  20. Comparison of acute skin reaction following morning versus late afternoon radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer who have undergone curative surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hyojung; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Seol, Seung Won; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between the time of radiotherapy (RT) and treatment outcomes in breast cancer. Patients with pathologic T1-2N0-1 breast cancer who received adjuvant RT in the morning (before 10:00 AM) or late afternoon (after 3:00 PM) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We retrospectively compared the clinicopathologic characteristics, acute skin reaction, and survival outcomes according to the time of RT. The median follow-up duration was 83 months (range, 10-131 months). From the 395 eligible patients, 190 (48.1%) and 205 (51.9%) patients were classified into the morning RT group and the afternoon RT group, respectively. The clinicopathologic characteristics were relatively well balanced between the treatment groups, except for pathologic N-stage (P = 0.0409). Grade 2 or higher acute skin reaction according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria was observed in 39 (9.9%) patients, with a higher frequency in the afternoon RT group than the morning RT group (13.7% vs 5.8%, respectively; P = 0.0088). There was no difference in the failure patterns or survival outcomes between the treatment groups. RT in late afternoon was associated with increased Grade 2 or more skin reaction after RT for breast cancer patients, but treatment outcomes did not differ according to the time of RT. Individualized considerations for treatment should be taken into account to reduce the risk of skin reactions.

  1. Should all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with postoperative radiotherapy? A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyong; Kong, Li; Zhang, Chenyue; Chen, Dawei; Zhu, Hui; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has become a standard adjuvant postoperative therapy for breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes. However, some studies have demonstrated that some subgroups of the breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes did not benefit substantially from PMRT. Therefore, it is of great necessity to identify whether all breast cancer patients with four or more positive lymph nodes who underwent modified radical mastectomy be treated with PMRT. In our study, we first established a prognostic model using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database between 1998 and 2001. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to assess the prognostic factors, and five risk factors individually associated with prognosis including AJCC stage, AJCC T, Grade, ER status, PR status. Prognostic index of PMRT were defined as the number of risk factor (NRF). The NRF scores correlated well with overall survival of PMRT even if the patients were in the sub-poor prognosis group. Then the prognostic model was validated using the SEER database between 2006 and 2009, and the same results were obtained. In conclusion, different from others studies, our study demonstrated that all patients with four or more positive lymph nodes after modified radical mastectomy need to be treated with PMRT ever if the patients belonged to AJCC T4 in a poor prognosis group. PMID:27690343

  2. External beam boost versus interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the adjuvant radiotherapy following breast-conserving therapy in early-stage breast cancer: a dosimetric comparison

    PubMed Central

    Melchert, Corinna; Kovács, György

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to compare the dosimetric data of local tumor's bed dose escalation (boost) with photon beams (external beam radiation therapy – EBRT) versus high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) after breast-conserving treatment in women with early-stage breast cancer. Material and methods We analyzed the treatment planning data of 136 irradiated patients, treated between 2006 and 2013, who underwent breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation (WBI; 50.4 Gy) and boost (HDR-BT: 10 Gy in one fraction [n = 36]; EBRT: 10 Gy in five fractions [n = 100]). Organs at risk (OAR; heart, ipsilateral lung, skin, most exposed rib segment) were delineated. Dosimetric parameters were calculated with the aid of dose-volume histograms (DVH). A non-parametric test was performed to compare the two different boost forms. Results There was no difference for left-sided cancers regarding the maximum dose to the heart (HDR-BT 29.8% vs. EBRT 29.95%, p = 0.34). The maximum doses to the other OAR were significantly lower for HDR-BT (Dmax lung 47.12% vs. 87.7%, p < 0.01; rib 61.17% vs. 98.5%, p < 0.01; skin 57.1% vs. 94.75%, p < 0.01; in the case of right-sided breast irradiation, dose of the heart 6.00% vs. 16.75%, p < 0.01). Conclusions Compared to EBRT, local dose escalation with HDR-BT presented a significant dose reduction to the investigated OAR. Only left-sided irradiation showed no difference regarding the maximum dose to the heart. Reducing irradiation exposure to OAR could result in a reduction of long-term side effects. Therefore, from a dosimetric point of view, an interstitial boost complementary to WBI via EBRT seems to be more advantageous in the adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:27648082

  3. The Incidence of Arm Edema in Women With Breast Cancer Randomized on the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Study B-04 to Radical Mastectomy Versus Total Mastectomy and Radiotherapy Versus Total Mastectomy Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, Melvin Land, Stephanie; Begovic, Mirsada; Sharif, Saima

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence and factors associated with the development of arm edema in women who participated in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) study B-04. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 1974, the NSABP protocol B-04 randomized 1,665 eligible patients with resectable breast cancer to either (1) the Halstead-type radical mastectomy; (2) total mastectomy and radiotherapy to the chest wall, axilla, supraclavicular region, and internal mammary nodes if by clinical examination axillary nodes were involved by tumor; and (3) for patients with a clinically uninvolved axilla, a third arm, total mastectomy alone. Measurements of the ipsilateral and contralateral arm circumferences were to be performed every 3 months. Results: There was at least one recorded measurement of arm circumferences for 1,457 patients (87.5% of eligible patients). There were 674 women (46.3%) who experienced arm edema at some point during the period of follow-up until February 1976. For radical mastectomy patients, total mastectomy and radiotherapy patients, and total mastectomy patients alone, arm edema was recorded at least once in 58.1%, 38.2%, and 39.1% of patients, respectively (p < .001) and at last recorded measurement in 30.7%, 14.8%, and 15.5%, respectively (p = <.001). Increasing body mass index (BMI) also showed a statistically significant correlation with arm edema at any time (p = .001) and at last assessment (p = .005). Conclusions: Patients who undergo mastectomy, including those whose treatment plans do not include axillary dissection or postoperative radiotherapy, suffer an appreciable incidence of arm edema.

  4. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign

    SciTech Connect

    Mutaf, Yildirim D.; Yi, Byong Yong; Prado, Karl; D'Souza, Warren D.; Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Zhang Jin; Yu, Cedric X.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: A dedicated stereotactic gamma irradiation device, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign from Xcision Medical Systems, was developed specifically to treat small breast cancers. This study presents the first evaluation of dosimetric and geometric characteristics from the initial prototype installed at University of Maryland Radiation Oncology Department. Methods: The GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign stereotactic radiotherapy device is an assembly of a hemi-spherical source carrier containing 36 {sup 60}Co sources, a tungsten collimator, a dynamically controlled patient support table, and the breast immobilization system which also functions as a stereotactic frame. The source carrier contains the sources in six columns spaced longitudinally at 60 Degree-Sign intervals and it rotates together with the variable-size collimator to form 36 noncoplanar, concentric arcs focused at the isocenter. The patient support table enables motion in three dimensions to position the patient tumor at the focal point of the irradiation. The table moves continuously in three cardinal dimensions during treatment to provide dynamic shaping of the dose distribution. The breast is immobilized using a breast cup applying a small negative pressure, where the immobilization cup is embedded with fiducials also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the breast. Geometric and dosimetric evaluations of the system as well as a protocol for absorbed dose calibration are provided. Dosimetric verifications of dynamically delivered patient plans are performed for seven patients using radiochromic films in hypothetical preop, postop, and target-in-target treatment scenarios. Results: Loaded with 36 {sup 60}Co sources with cumulative activity of 4320 Ci, the prototype GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign unit delivers 5.31 Gy/min at the isocenter using the largest 2.5 cm diameter collimator. Due to the noncoplanar beam arrangement and dynamic dose shaping features, the GammaPod Trade-Mark-Sign device is found to deliver

  5. Radiobiological evaluation of breast cancer radiotherapy accounting for the effects of patient positioning and breathing in dose delivery. A meta analysis.

    PubMed

    Tzikas, A; Komisopoulos, G; Ferreira, B C; Hyodynmaa, S; Axelsson, S; Papanikolaou, N; Lavdas, E; Lind, B K; Mavroidis, P

    2013-02-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, significant discrepancies in dose delivery can contribute to underdosage of the tumor or overdosage of normal tissue, which is potentially related to a reduction of local tumor control and an increase of side effects. To study the impact of these factors in breast cancer radiotherapy, a meta analysis of the clinical data reported by Mavroidis et al. (2002) in Acta Oncol (41:471-85), showing the patient setup and breathing uncertainties characterizing three different irradiation techniques, were employed. The uncertainties in dose delivery are simulated based on fifteen breast cancer patients (5 mastectomized, 5 resected with negative node involvement (R-) and 5 resected with positive node involvement (R1)), who were treated by three different irradiation techniques, respectively. The positioning and breathing effects were taken into consideration in the determination of the real dose distributions delivered to the CTV and lung in each patient. The combined frequency distributions of the positioning and breathing distributions were obtained by convolution. For each patient the effectiveness of the dose distribution applied is calculated by the Poisson and relative seriality models and a set of parameters that describe the dose-response relations of the target and lung. The three representative radiation techniques are compared based on radiobiological measures by using the complication-free tumor control probability, P(+) and the biologically effective uniform dose, (BEUD)concepts. For the Mastectomy case, the average P(+) values of the planned and delivered dose distributions are 93.8% for a (BEUD)(CTV) of 51.8 Gy and 85.0% for a (BEUD)(CTV) of 50.3 Gy, respectively. The respective total control probabilities, P(B) values are 94.8% and 92.5%, whereas the corresponding total complication probabilities, P(1) values are 0.9% and 7.4%. For the R- case, the average P(+) values are 89.4% for a (BEUD)(CTV) of 48.9 Gy and 88.6% for a

  6. Prognostic Factors of Survival in the Trastuzumab Era Among Women With Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases Who Receive Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Shaheenah; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Albarracin, Constance; Yu, Tse Kuan; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The objective of this study was to review the outcome of women with breast cancer with known receptor status who were treated with whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases and to determine factors that impact survival. METHODS A total of 223 women with breast cancer and brain metastases, who received whole brain radiotherapy, were identified. All women with HER-2–positive disease had received trastuzumab. Kaplan-Meier prodct limit method was used to determine overall survival (OS) estimates. Cox proportional hazards models were then fitted to explore the association of OS with various patient and tumor characteristics. RESULTS Median age at brain metastases diagnosis was 50 years. Sixty-seven (30.2%) patients had hormone receptor-positive/HER-2–negative disease, 101 (45.50%) had HER-2–positive disease, and 54 (24.3%) had triple receptor-negative disease. Median OS from brain metastases was 6 months, with 1-year survival of 30% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%). Women with hormone receptor-positive/HER-2–negative, HER-2–positive, and triple-negative tumors had median survivals of 5, 9, and 5 months, respectively (P =.0069). In the multivariate model, women with HER-2–positive disease had a significantly decreased risk of death compared with women with hormone receptor-positive/HER-2–negative disease (hazard ratio, 0.63; 95%CI, 0.42-0.94; P =.02). The risk of death among women with triple-negative disease compared with hormone receptor-positive/HER-2–negative disease was not significantly different (P =.54). Lower recursive partitioning analysis class and ≥30-gray brain radiation dose were also significantly associated with a decreased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS Breast tumor subtype has a significant prognostic role among women with breast cancer and brain metastases. In addition, in the trastuzumab era factors such as recursive partitioning analysis and adequate radiation dose continue to be important prognostic factors. PMID

  7. Patient Prognostic Score and Associations With Survival Improvement Offered by Radiotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Ductal Carcinoma In Situ: A Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Rachel A.; Vaz-Luis, Ines; Mallory, Melissa Anne; Wong, Stephanie M.; Aydogan, Fatih; DeSantis, Stephen; Barry, William T.; Golshan, Mehra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is a standard treatment option for the management of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We sought to determine the survival benefit of RT after BCS on the basis of risk factors for local recurrence. Patients and Methods A retrospective longitudinal cohort study was performed to identify patients with DCIS diagnosed between 1988 and 2007 and treated with BCS by using SEER data. Patients were divided into the following two groups: BCS+RT (RT group) and BCS alone (non-RT group). We used a patient prognostic scoring model to stratify patients on the basis of risk of local recurrence. We performed a Cox proportional hazards model with propensity score weighting to evaluate breast cancer mortality between the two groups. Results We identified 32,144 eligible patients with DCIS, 20,329 (63%) in the RT group and 11,815 (37%) in the non-RT group. Overall, 304 breast cancer–specific deaths occurred over a median follow-up of 96 months, with a cumulative incidence of breast cancer mortality at 10 years in the weighted cohorts of 1.8% (RT group) and 2.1% (non-RT group; hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.88). Significant improvements in survival in the RT group compared with the non-RT group were only observed in patients with higher nuclear grade, younger age, and larger tumor size. The magnitude of the survival difference with RT was significantly correlated with prognostic score (P < .001). Conclusion In this population-based study, the patient prognostic score for DCIS is associated with the magnitude of improvement in survival offered by RT after BCS, suggesting that decisions for RT could be tailored on the basis of patient factors, tumor biology, and the prognostic score. PMID:26834064

  8. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Feng; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuo-Hsin; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Pei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT); however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT) has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity developed during treatment or follow-up. Concurrent HT with or without systemic treatment could be a safe salvage therapy for chemorefractory locally advanced breast cancer patients with extensive cutaneous metastasis. PMID:27284253

  9. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Fujikane, Tomoko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  10. Using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to evaluate the location reliability of the highest–skin dose area detected by treatment planning in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Meng, Fan-Yun; Lu, Tsung-Hsien; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin reaction during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer is an inevitable process, and its severity is related to the skin dose. A high–skin dose area can be speculated based on the isodose distribution shown on a treatment planning. To determine whether treatment planning can reflect high–skin dose location, 80 patients were collected and their skin doses in different areas were measured using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to locate the highest–skin dose area in each patient. We determined whether the skin dose is consistent with the highest-dose area estimated by the treatment planning of the same patient. The χ{sup 2} and Fisher exact tests revealed that these 2 methods yielded more consistent results when the highest-dose spots were located in the axillary and breast areas but not in the inframammary area. We suggest that skin doses shown on the treatment planning might be a reliable and simple alternative method for estimating the highest skin doses in some areas.

  11. A comparison study between gross tumor volumes defined by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, postoperative specimens, and tumor bed for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiping; Li, Jianbin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yongsheng; Mu, Dianbin; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Shao, Qian; Li, Fengxiang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The identification and contouring of target volume is important for breast-conserving therapy. The aim of the study was to compare preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative pathology, excised specimens’ (ES) size, and tumor bed (TB) delineation as methods for determining the gross tumor volume (GTV) for radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods: Thirty-three patients with breast cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radiotherapy after BCS were enrolled. The GTVs determined by MRI, pathology, and the ES were defined as GTVMRI, GTVPAT, and GTVES, respectively. GTVMRI+1 was defined as a 1.0-cm margin around the GTVMRI. The radiation oncologist delineated GTV of the TB (GTVTB) using planning computed tomography according to ≥5 surgical clips placed in the lumpectomy cavity (LC). Results: The median GTVMRI, GTVMRI+1, GTVPAT, GTVES, and GTVTB were 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.88), 12.58 cm3 (range, 3.90–34.13), 0.97 cm3 (range, 0.01–6.36), 15.46 cm3 (range, 1.15–70.69), and 19.24 cm3 (range, 4.72–54.33), respectively. There were no significant differences between GTVMRI and GTVPAT, GTVMRI+1 and GTVES, GTVES and GTVTB (P = 0.188, 0.070, and 0.264, respectively). GTVMRI is positively related with GTVPAT. However, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI (P = 0.071 and 0.378, respectively). Furthermore, neither GTVES nor GTVTB correlated with GTVMRI+1 (P = 0.068 and 0.375, respectively). Conclusion: When ≥5 surgical clips were placed in the LC for BCS, the volume of TB was consistent with the volume of ES. Neither the volume of TB nor the volume of ES correlated significantly with the volume of tumor defined by preoperative MRI. PMID:28079816

  12. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase 3 Double-Blind, Randomized Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert C.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Stoffel, Thomas J.; Haselow, Robert E.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Bearden, James D.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Martenson, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose A 2-arm, double-blinded, randomized trial to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma receiving external beam radiotherapy to breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to daily apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream. Primary study end point was provider-assessed maximum grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 radiation dermatitis. Secondary end points included provider-assessed CTCAE grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse-event monitoring. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and quality of life self-assessment. Assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results In total, 176 patients were enrolled from September 21, 2007 through December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary end point showed no difference in mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs 1.3 for placebo; P=.18). CTCAE toxicity was greater in placebo group (P=.04), primarily from pruritus. For PRO measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for MMF group showed less itching (P=.008), less irritation (P=.01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (P=.02), and less annoyance with skin problems (P=.04); the group's maximum Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (P=.02) and less itching (P=.002). Conclusion Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy may experience reduced acute skin toxicity in comparison to placebo. PMID:20800381

  13. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase III Double-Blind, Randomized Trial From the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Stoffel, Thomas J.; Haselow, Robert E.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Bearden, James D.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Martenson, James A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: A two-arm, double-blind, randomized trial was performed to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma who were undergoing external beam radiotherapy to the breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream daily. The primary study endpoint was the provider-assessed maximal grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, radiation dermatitis. The secondary endpoints included provider-assessed Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse event monitoring. The patient-reported outcome measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and a quality-of-life self-assessment. An assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 176 patients were enrolled between September 21, 2007, and December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary endpoint showed no difference in the mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs. 1.3 for placebo; p = .18). Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity was greater in the placebo group (p = .04), primarily from pruritus. For the patient-reported outcome measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for the MMF group showed less itching (p = .008), less irritation (p = .01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (p = .02), and less annoyance with skin problems (p = .04). The group's maximal Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (p = .02) and less itching (p = .002). Conclusion: Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy might experience reduced acute skin toxicity compared with patients receiving placebo.

  14. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D'Errico, Maria P.; Grimaldi, Luca; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Tramacere, Francesco; Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto; Pili, Giorgio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small

  15. Randomized Control Trial: Evaluating Aluminum-Based Antiperspirant Use, Axilla Skin Toxicity, and Reported Quality of Life in Women Receiving External Beam Radiotherapy for Treatment of Stage 0, I, and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Linda C.; Gies, Donna; Thompson, Emmanuel; Thomas, Bejoy

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Standard skin care instructions regarding the use of antiperspirants during radiotherapy to the breast varies across North America. Women have articulated that when instructed to not use antiperspirant, the potential for body odor is distressing. Historical practices and individual opinions have often guided practice in this field. The present study had 2 purposes. To evaluate whether the use of aluminum-based antiperspirant while receiving external beam radiotherapy for stage 0, I, or II breast cancer will increase axilla skin toxicity and to evaluate whether the use of antiperspirant during external beam radiotherapy improves quality of life. Methods: A total of 198 participants were randomized to either the experimental group (antiperspirant) or control group (standard care-wash only). The skin reactions in both groups were measured weekly and 2 weeks after treatment using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 3, toxicity grading criteria. Both groups completed the Functional Assessment for Chronic Illness Therapy's questionnaire for the breast population quality of life assessment tool, with additional questions evaluating the effect of underarm antiperspirant use on quality of life before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 2 weeks after treatment during the study. Results: The skin reaction data were analyzed using the generalized estimating equation. No statistically significant difference was seen in the skin reaction between the 2 groups over time. The quality of life data also revealed no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups over time. Conclusions: Data analysis indicates that using antiperspirant routinely during external beam radiotherapy for Stage 0, I, or II breast cancer does not affect the intensity of the skin reaction or the self-reported quality of life. This evidence supports that in this particular population, there is no purpose to restrict these women from using

  16. Impact of High-Dose Chemotherapy on the Ability to Deliver Subsequent Local-Regional Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Cirrincione, Constance M.S.; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Laurie, Frances; Glicksman, Arvin S.; Vredenburgh, James; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Crump, Michael; Richardson, Paul G.; Schuster, Michael W.; Ma Jinli; Peterson, Bercedis L.; Norton, Larry; Seagren, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report, from Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082, the impact of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and BCNU (HD-CPB) vs. intermediate-dose CPB (ID-CPB) on the ability to start and complete the planned course of local-regional radiotherapy (RT) for women with breast cancer involving >=10 axillary nodes. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1998, 785 patients were randomized. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were balanced regarding patient characteristics. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were compared on the probability of RT initiation, interruption, modification, or incompleteness. The impact of clinical variables and interactions between variables were also assessed. Results: Radiotherapy was initiated in 82% (325 of 394) of HD-CPB vs. 92% (360 of 391) of ID-CPB patients (p = 0.001). On multivariate analyses, RT was less likely given to patients who were randomized to HD treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 0 .38, p < 0.001), older (p = 0.005), African American (p = 0.003), postmastectomy (p = 0.02), or estrogen receptor positive (p = 0.03). High-dose treatment had a higher rate of RT interruption (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.05), modification (29% vs. 14%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.46), and early termination of RT (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.0001, OR = 5.35), compared with ID. Conclusion: Treatment arm significantly related to initiation, interruption, modification, and early termination of RT. Patients randomized to HD-CPB were less likely to initiate RT, and of those who did, they were more likely to have RT interrupted, modified, and terminated earlier than those randomized to ID-CPB. The observed lower incidence of RT usage in African Americans vs. non-African Americans warrants further study.

  17. Fat Necrosis After Partial-Breast Irradiation With Brachytherapy or Electron Irradiation Versus Standard Whole-Breast Radiotherapy-4-Year Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Loevey, Katalin Fodor, Janos; Major, Tibor; Szabo, Eva; Orosz, Zsolt; Sulyok, Zoltan; Janvary, Levente; Froehlich, Georgina; Kasler, Miklos; Polgar, Csaba

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the incidence and clinical relevance of fat necrosis after accelerated partial-breast irradiation (PBI) using interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in comparison with partial-breast electron irradiation (ELE) and whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 early-stage breast cancer patients were randomized to receive 50 Gy WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 x 5.2 Gy HDR-BT (n = 88) or 50 Gy ELE (n = 40). The incidence of fat necrosis, its impact on cosmetic outcome, accompanying radiologic features, and clinical symptoms were evaluated. Results: The 4-year actuarial rate of fat necrosis was 31.1% for all patients, and 31.9%, 36.5%, and 17.7% after WBI, HDR-BT and ELE, respectively (p{sub WBI/HDR-BT} = 0.26; p{sub WBI/ELE} = 0.11; p{sub ELE/HDR-BT} = 0.025). The respective rate of asymptomatic fat necrosis was 20.2%, 25.3%, and 10% of patients. The incidence of symptomatic fat necrosis was not significantly different after WBI (8.5%), HDR-BT (11.4%), and ELE (7.5%). Symptomatic fat necrosis was significantly associated with a worse cosmetic outcome, whereas asymptomatic fat necrosis was not. Fat necrosis was detectable with mammography and/or ultrasound in each case. Additional imaging examinations were required in 21% of cases and aspiration cytology in 42%. Conclusions: Asymptomatic fat necrosis is a common adverse event of breast-conserving therapy, having no significant clinical relevance in the majority of the cases. The incidence of both symptomatic and asymptomatic fat necrosis is similar after conventional WBI and accelerated partial-breast HDR-BT.

  18. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated

  19. SU-C-BRF-01: Correlation of DIBH Breath Hold Amplitude with Dosimetric Sparing of Heart and Left Anterior Descending Artery in Left Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taeho; Reardon, Kelli; Sukovich, Kaitlyn; Crandley, Edwin; Read, Paul; Krishni, Wijesooriya

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A 7.4% increase in major coronary events per 1 Gy increase in mean heart dose has been reported from the population-based analysis of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity following treatment of left sided breast cancer. Deep inhalation breath-hold (DIBH) is clinically utilized to reduce radiation dose to heart and left anterior descending artery (LAD). We investigated the correlation of dose sparing in heart and LAD with internal DIBH amplitude to develop a quantitative predictive model for expected dose to heart and LAD based on internal breath hold amplitude. Methods: A treatment planning study (Prescription Dose = 50 Gy) was performed on 50 left breast cancer patients underwent DIBH whole breast radiotherapy. Two CT datasets, free breathing (FB) and DIBH, were utilized for treatment planning and for determination of the internal anatomy DIBH amplitude (difference between sternum position at FB and DIBH). The heart and LAD dose between FB and DIBH plans was compared and dose to the heart and LAD as a function of breath hold amplitude was determined. Results: Average DIBH amplitude using internal anatomy was 13.9±4.2 mm. The DIBH amplitude-mean dose reduction correlation is 20%/5mm (0.3 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 18%/5mm (1.1 Gy/5mm) for LAD. The correlation with max dose reduction is 12%/5mm (3.8 Gy/5mm) for the heart and 16%/5mm (3.2 Gy/5mm) for LAD. We found that average dose reductions to LAD from 6.0±6.5 Gy to 2.0±1.6 Gy with DIBH (4.0 Gy reduction: -67%, p < 0.001) and average dose reduction to the heart from 1.3±0.7 Gy to 0.7±0.2 Gy with DIBH (0.6 Gy reduction: -46%, p < 0.001). That suggests using DIBH may reduce the risk of the major coronary event for left sided breast cancer patients. Conclusion: The correlation between breath hold amplitude and dosimetric sparing suggests that dose sparing linearly increases with internal DIBH amplitude.

  20. SU-E-T-583: Operated Left Breast and Chest Wall Radiotherapy: A Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, B; Roy, S; Munshi, A; Pradhan, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative dosimetric efficacy between field and field 3DCRT(FnF), multiple field Intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) and, partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in case of post operative left side breast and chest wall irradiation. Methods: CT study set of fifteen post-operative left breast and chest wall patient was tested for a treatment plan of 50Gy in 25 fraction using partial arc VMAT, SnSIMRT and tangential beam 3DCRT . 3DCRT FnF gantry angle was ranging for left medial tangential 290±17{sup 0} and Lt lateral tangential l14°±12{sup 0}. For IMRT four fixed beam at gantry angle G130{sup 0} G110{sup 0} G300{sup 0} and G330{sup 0} was used, in case of insufficient dose another beam G150{sup 0} was added. In case of partial arc VMAT, lateral tangential arc G130{sup 0}-G100{sup 0} and medial tangential arc G280{sup 0}-G310{sup 0}. Inverse optimization was opted to cover at least 95%PTV by 95% prescription dose (RxD) and a strong weightage on reduction of heart and lung dose. PTV coverage was evaluated for it’s clinically acceptability depending on the tumor spatial location and its quadrant. Out of the three plans, any one was used for the actual patient treatment. Results: Dosimetric analysis done for breast PTV, left lung, heart and the opposite breast. PTV mean dose and maximum dose was 5129.8±214.8cGy, 4749.0±329.7cGy, 5024.6±73.4cGy and 5855.2±510.7cGy, 5340.7±146.1cGy, 5347.2±196.8cGy for FnF, VMAT and IMRT respectively. Ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20Gy and 5Gy was 23.6±9.5cGy and 32.7±10.3cGy for FnF, 18.6±8.7cGy and 38.8±15.2cGy for VMAT and 25.7±9.6cGy and 50.7±8.4cGy for IMRT respectively. Heart mean and 2cc dose was 867.9±456.7cGy and 5038.5±184.3cGy for FnF, 532.6±263cGy and 3632.1±990.6 for VMAT, 711±229.9cGy and 4421±463.7cGy for IMRT respectively. VMAT shows minimum contralateral breast dose 168±113.8cGy. Conclusion: VMAT shows a better tumor conformity, minimum heart

  1. Effect of surgical wound fluids after intraoperative electron radiotherapy on the cancer stem cell phenotype in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Karolina; Suchorska, Wiktoria Maria; Przybyła, Anna; Murawa, Dawid

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing process after surgery alters the area surrounding the original tumor and around the scar, and the modified microenvironment is more favorable for tumor recurrence. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is one of the more novel strategies in breast cancer (BC) treatment. Irradiation during surgery has effects on the tumor microenvironment, abrogating the proliferative cascade induced by surgical wound healing. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of surgical wound fluids from IOERT treatment (RT-WF) compared with wound fluids from conservative-breast surgery only (WF) on the cancer stem cell phenotype in a panel of BC cell lines. Post-operative wound fluids were derived from patients with BC who underwent a tumor resection (quadrantectomy) plus intraoperative electron radiotherapy using a single dose of ≤10 Gy on the tumor bed and surrounding tissues, or from those who underwent a tumor resection without IOERT. Cell lines were incubated with 10% wound fluids, and after 4 days, the cluster of differentiation (CD)44+/CD24−/low phenotype and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity were determined by flow cytometry. The two types of fluid each affected the CD44+/CD24−/low phenotype. The results varied markedly between each cell line, even for the same histological subtypes. RT-WF decreased the CD44+/CD24−/low populations in the basal-like BT-549 and MDA-MB-468 cell lines, whereas in the luminal type MCF7 cell line, the two fluids inhibited these populations. The HER-OE subtypes harbored a minimal CD44+/CD24−/low population, but the growth of SK-BR-3 was stimulated by the two post-operative fluids. WF exhibited a stronger effect on ALDH1 activity compared with RT-WF. The stimulatory effect was dependent on the histological subtype of the cell line and the strongest dependence was observed in luminal subtypes characterized by low dehydrogenase activity in the control group. The present results enable a better understanding of

  2. Evaluation of a Bromine-76 Labeled Progestin 16α,17α-dioxolane for Breast Tumor Imaging and Radiotherapy: in vivo Biodistribution and Metabolic Stability Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dong; Sharp, Terry L.; Fettig, Nicole M.; Lee, Hsiaoju; Lewis, Jason S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Welch, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Progesterone receptors (PRs) are present in many breast tumors, and their levels are increased by certain endocrine therapies. They can be used as targets for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy. Method 16α,17α-[(R)-1’-α-(5-[76Br]bromofurylmethylidene)dioxyl]-21-hydroxy-19-norpregn-4-ene-3,20-dione ([76Br]3), a PR ligand with relative binding affinity (RBA) = 65 and log Po/w = 5.09 ± 0.84, was synthesized via a two-step reaction and its tissue biodistri0bution and metabolic stability were evaluated in estrogen-primed immature female Sprague-Dawley rats. Results [76Br]3 was synthesized in 5% overall yield with specific activity being 200~1250 Ci/mmol. [76Br]3 demonstrated high PR-mediated uptake in the target tissue uterus (8.72 ± 1.84 %ID/g at 1 h) that was reduced by a blocking dose of unlabeled progestin R5020, but the non-specific uptake in blood and muscle (2.11 ± 0.14 and 0.89 ± 0.16 %ID/g at 1 h, respectively) was relatively high. [76Br]3 was stable in whole rat blood in vitro, but it was not stable in vivo due to the fast metabolism that occurred in the liver, resulting in the formation of a more polar radioactive metabolite and free [76Br]bromide. The level of free [76Br]bromide in blood remained high during the experiment (2.11 ± 0.14 %ID/g at 1 h and 1.52 ± 0.24 %ID/g at 24 h). The tissue distribution of [76Br]3 at 1 and 3 hours was compared with that of the 18F analogs, [18F]FFNP 1 and ketal 2. Conclusion [76Br]3 may have potential for imaging PR positive breast tumors at early time points, but it is not suitable for imaging at later times or for radiotherapy. PMID:18678350

  3. The Feasibility Study of a Hybrid Coplanar Arc Technique Versus Hybrid Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy in Treatment of Early-stage Left-sided Breast Cancer with Simultaneous-integrated Boost

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan-Gui; Li, An-Chuan; Li, Wen-Yao; Huang, Miao-Yun; Li, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Ming-Qiu; Zhang, Mutian; Xu, Ben-Hua

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility and advantages of a hybrid, volumetric arc therapy technique that used two 90° coplanar arcs and two three-dimensional conformal tangential beams in the simultaneous-integrated boost radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery. A total of nine patients with stage I, left-sided breast cancer who underwent breast-conserving surgery were selected for this retrospective study. For each patient, a hybrid arc plan was generated and then compared with two hybrid intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. All plans were optimized using the same objectives and dose constraints. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume with simultaneous boost to 60 Gy to the expanded gross target volume in 28 fractions. The differences among these hybrid plans were analyzed by the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test or the Wilcoxon rank sum test. The hybrid arc plans achieved the clinical requirements of target dose coverage and normal tissue (NT) dose constraints. It was found that the hybrid arc plans showed advantages in the conformity index of the expanded gross target volume, the V5 of the heart, the D2 of the left ventricle, and the D2 and V50.4 of NTs. The average beam-on time and monitor units of the hybrid arc plans were significantly lower (P < 0.001).

  4. Scapula alata in early breast cancer patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of post-surgery short-course image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scapula alata (SA) is a known complication of breast surgery associated with palsy of the serratus anterior, but it is seldom mentioned. We evaluated the risk factors associated with SA and the relationship of SA with ipsilateral shoulder/arm morbidity in a series of patients enrolled in a trial of post-surgery radiotherapy (RT). Methods The trial randomized women with completely resected stage I-II breast cancer to short-course image-guided RT, versus conventional RT. SA, arm volume and shoulder-arm mobility were measured prior to RT and at one to three months post-RT. Shoulder/arm morbidities were computed as a post-RT percentage change relative to pre-RT measurements. Results Of 119 evaluable patients, 13 (= 10.9%) had pre-RT SA. Age younger than 50 years old, a body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, and axillary lymph node dissection were significant risk factors, with odds ratios of 4.8 (P = 0.009), 6.1 (P = 0.016), and 6.1 (P = 0.005), respectively. Randomization group was not significant. At one to three months’ post-RT, mean arm volume increased by 4.1% (P = 0.036) and abduction decreased by 8.6% (P = 0.046) among SA patients, but not among non-SA patients. SA resolved in eight, persisted in five, and appeared in one patient. Conclusion The relationship of SA with lower body mass index suggests that SA might have been underestimated in overweight patients. Despite apparent resolution of SA in most patients, pre-RT SA portended an increased risk of shoulder/arm morbidity. We argue that SA warrants further investigation. Incidentally, the observation of SA occurring after RT in one patient represents the second case of post-RT SA reported in the literature. PMID:22591589

  5. Field-in-field plan does not improve the dosimetric outcome compared with the wedged beams plan for breast cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li-Min; Meng, Fan-Yun; Yang, Tsung-Han; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate and compare the dosimetry of field-in-field (FIF) and wedged beams (WB) techniques for patients with breast cancer receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after conservative surgery. A total of 89 patients with breast cancer participated in this study. Each patient received a computed tomography–based treatment plan with opposed tangential fields. Two planning techniques (FIF and WB) were generated for each patient by using the Pinnacle treatment-planning system. Three indices, the homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), and uniformity index (UI), as well as maximum dose (D{sub max}), median dose (D{sub 50}), number of portals, monitor unit (MU), and lung volume at 20 Gy (lung{sub 20}) were used for comparison. The mean values tested using a t-test indicated that the WB technique had a significantly lower HI (p < 0.0001), a significantly higher CI (p < 0.0001), and a significantly higher D{sub 50} (p = 0.0002) than did the FIF technique. The FIF technique had a significantly higher D{sub max} compared with the WB technique, but lung{sub 20} did not exhibit a significant difference. By contrast, the FIF technique had a significantly higher UI and a significantly lower MU compared with the WB technique, but a significantly higher number of portals were found in the FIF technique. The FIF technique did not demonstrate superior dosimetric results. The WB technique had a significantly lower HI, higher CI, lower D{sub max}, and lower number of portals; but the FIF technique had a significantly higher UI and lower MU.

  6. Phase II Study of Concurrent Capecitabine and External Beam Radiotherapy for Pain Control of Bone Metastases of Breast Cancer Origin

    PubMed Central

    Kundel, Yulia; Nasser, Nicola J.; Purim, Ofer; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Fenig, Eyal; Pfeffer, Raphael M.; Stemmer, Salomon M.; Rizel, Shulamith; Symon, Zvi; Kaufman, Bella; Sulkes, Aaron; Brenner, Baruch

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain from bone metastases of breast cancer origin is treated with localized radiation. Modulating doses and schedules has shown little efficacy in improving results. Given the synergistic therapeutic effect reported for combined systemic chemotherapy with local radiation in anal, rectal, and head and neck malignancies, we sought to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of combined capecitabine and radiation for palliation of pain due to bone metastases from breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-nine women with painful bone metastases from breast cancer were treated with external beam radiation in 10 fractions of 3 Gy, 5 fractions a week for 2 consecutive weeks. Oral capecitabine 700 mg/m2 twice daily was administered throughout radiation therapy. Rates of complete response, defined as a score of 0 on a 10-point pain scale and no increase in analgesic consumption, were 14% at 1 week, 38% at 2 weeks, 52% at 4 weeks, 52% at 8 weeks, and 48% at 12 weeks. Corresponding rates of partial response, defined as a reduction of at least 2 points in pain score without an increase in analgesics consumption, were 31%, 38%, 28%, 34% and 38%. The overall response rate (complete and partial) at 12 weeks was 86%. Side effects were of mild intensity (grade I or II) and included nausea (38% of patients), weakness (24%), diarrhea (24%), mucositis (10%), and hand and foot syndrome (7%). Conclusions/Significance External beam radiation with concurrent capecitabine is safe and tolerable for the treatment of pain from bone metastases of breast cancer origin. The overall and complete response rates in our study are unusually high compared to those reported for radiation alone. Further evaluation of this approach, in a randomized study, is warranted. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01784393NCT01784393 PMID:23874586

  7. SU-E-T-412: Evaluation of Tungsten-Based Functional Paper for Attenuation Device in Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kamomae, T; Monzen, H; Okudaira, K; Miyake, Y; Oguchi, H; Komori, M; Kawamura, M; Itoh, Y; Kikumori, T; Naganawa, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with an electron beam is one of the accelerated partial breast irradiation methods that have recently been used in early-stage breast cancer. A protective acrylic resin-copper disk is inserted between the breast tissue and the pectoralis muscle to minimize the dose received by the posterior structures. However, a problem with this protective disk is that the surgical incision must be larger than the field size because the disk is manufactured from stiff and unyielding materials. The purpose of this study was to assess the applicability of a new tungsten-based functional paper (TFP) as an alternative to the existing protective disk in IORT. Methods: The newly introduced TFP (Toppan Printing Co., Ltd., Tokyo, JP) is anticipated to become a useful device that is lead-free, light, flexible, and easily processed. The radiation shielding performance of TFP was verified by experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using PHITS code. The doses transmitted through the protective disk or TFP were measured on a Mobetron mobile accelerator. The same geometries were then reproduced, and the dose distributions were simulated by the MC method. Results: The percentages of transmitted dose relative to the absence of the existing protective disk were lower than 2% in both the measurements and MC simulations. In the experimental measurements, the percentages of transmitted dose for a 9 MeV electron beam were 48.1, 2.3, and 0.6% with TFP thicknesses of 1.9, 3.7, and 7.4 mm, respectively. The percentages for a 12 MeV were 76.0, 49.3, 20.0, and 5.5% with TFP thicknesses of 1.9, 3.7, 7.4, and 14.8 mm, respectively. The results of the MC simulation showed a slight dose increase at the incident surface of the TFP caused by backscattered radiation. Conclusion: The results indicate that a small-incision procedure may be possible by the use of TFP.

  8. 1998-1999 Patterns of Care Study process survey of national practice patterns using breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy in the management of Stage I-II breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu; Moughan, Jennifer; White, Julia; Winchester, David P.; Owen, Jean; Wilson, J. Frank

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: The Patterns of Care Study survey process evaluation has been an effective means of assessing the evaluation and treatment practices used by radiation oncologists in the United States for Stage I-II breast cancer. The current 1998-1999 report updates the previous 1989 and 1993-1994 analyses and reflects the recent changes in surgery and systemic therapy observed nationally in the management of early-stage disease. Methods and Materials: A weighted sample size of 71,877 patient records of women treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (RT) was obtained from a stratified two-stage sampling of 353 patient records. These cases were centrally reviewed from academic and private radiation oncology practices across the United States. The data collected included patient characteristics, clinical and pathologic factors, and surgical and RT details. The results were compared with those of previous Patterns of Care Study survey reports. Results: Of the patients in the current survey, 97% had undergone mammography before biopsy. A review of the primary tumor pathologic findings indicated improved quantification of an intraductal component from 7.0% in 1993-1994 to 20.4% in 1998-1999 (p = 0.01). The tumor characteristics were better defined, with estrogen and progesterone receptor measurement performed in 91.4% and 91.3% in the 1998-1999 survey vs. 83.7% and 80.3% in the 1989 survey, respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002, respectively). Axillary dissection was performed in 82.2% in the present survey compared with 93.6% in the 1993-1994 survey (p = 0.0004); sentinel node biopsy was performed in 20.1% of the present cases. The use of CT for planning was increased in the current survey, with 22.9% cases CT planned vs. 9% in 1993-1994 (p = 0.10). In the present survey, 100% had received whole breast RT. When a supraclavicular field was added, the dose was prescribed to a specified depth in 67.5% of cases, most commonly 3 cm. When an axillary field was added

  9. SU-E-J-33: Cardiac Movement in Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold for Left-Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Suh, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study was designed to investigate the displacement of heart using Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) CT data compared to free-breathing (FB) CT data and radiation exposure to heart. Methods: Treatment planning was performed on the computed tomography (CT) datasets of 20 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Heart, lung and both breasts were outlined. The prescribed dose was 50 Gy divided into 28 fractions. The dose distributions in all the plans were required to fulfill the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement specifications that include 100% coverage of the CTV with ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose and that the volume inside the CTV receiving > 107% of the prescribed dose should be minimized. Displacement of heart was measured by calculating the distance between center of heart and left breast. For the evaluation of radiation dose to heart, minimum, maximum and mean dose to heart were calculated. Results: The maximum and minimum left-right (LR) displacements of heart were 8.9 mm and 3 mm, respectively. The heart moved > 4 mm in the LR direction in 17 of the 20 patients. The distances between the heart and left breast ranged from 8.02–17.68 mm (mean, 12.23 mm) and 7.85–12.98 mm (mean, 8.97 mm) with DIBH CT and FB CT, respectively. The maximum doses to the heart were 3115 cGy and 4652 cGy for the DIBH and FB CT dataset, respectively. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the DIBH technique could help to reduce the risk of radiation dose-induced cardiac toxicity by using movement of cardiac; away from radiation field. The DIBH technique could be used in an actual treatment room for a few minutes and could effectively reduce the cardiac dose when used with a sub-device or image acquisition standard to maintain consistent respiratory motion.

  10. Estimate of the risk of radiation-induced cancers after linear-accelerator-based breast-cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Eui Kwan; Seo, Jungju; Baek, Tae Seong; Chung, Eun Ji; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Hyun-ho

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess and compare the excess absolute risks (EARs) of radiation-induced cancers following conformal (3D-CRT), fixed-field intensity-modulated (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc (RapidArc) radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer. 3D-CRT, IMRT and RapidArc were planned for 10 breast cancer patients. The organ-specific EAR for cancer induction was estimated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) based on computed dose volume histograms (DVHs) and the secondary doses measured at various points from the field edge. The average secondary dose per Gy treatment dose from 3D-CRT, measured 10 to 50 cm from the field edge, ranged from 8.27 to 1.04 mGy. The secondary doses per Gy from IMRT and RapidArc, however, ranged between 5.86 and 0.54 mGy, indicating that IMRT and RapidArc are associated with smaller doses of secondary radiation than 3D-CRT. The organ specific EARs for out-of-field organs, such as the thyroid, liver and colon, were higher with 3D-CRT than with IMRT or RapidArc. In contrast, EARs for in-field organs were much lower with 3D-CRT than with IMRT or RapidArc. The overall estimate of EAR indicated that the radiation-induced cancer risk was 1.8-2.0 times lower with 3D-CRT than with IMRT or RapidArc. Comparisons of EARs during breast irradiation suggested that the predicted risk of secondary cancers was lower with 3D-CRT than with IMRT or RapidArc.

  11. Predictors of Long-Term Toxicity Using Three-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Kim, Leonard H.; Grills, Inga S.; Chen, Peter Y.; Ye Hong; Kestin, Larry L.; Yan Di; Vicini, Frank A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We analyzed variables associated with long-term toxicity using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: One hundred patients treated with 3D-CRT accelerated partial breast irradiation were evaluated using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 scale. Cosmesis was scored using Harvard criteria. Multiple dosimetric and volumetric parameters were analyzed for their association with worst and last (W/L) toxicity outcomes. Results: Sixty-two patients had a minimum of 36 months of toxicity follow-up (median follow-up, 4.8 years). The W/L incidence of poor-fair cosmesis, any telangiectasia, and grade {>=}2 induration, volume reduction, and pain were 16.4%/11.5%, 24.2%/14.5%, 16.1%/9.7%, 17.7%/12.9%, and 11.3%/3.2%, respectively. Only the incidence of any telangiectasia was found to be predicted by any dosimetric parameter, with the absolute breast volume receiving 5% to 50% of the prescription dose (192.5 cGy-1925 cGy) being significant. No associations with maximum dose, volumes of lumpectomy cavity, breast, modified planning target volume, and PTV, dose homogeneity index, number of fields, and photon energy used were identified with any of the aforementioned toxicities. Non-upper outer quadrant location was associated with grade {>=}2 volume reduction (p = 0.02 W/p = 0.04 L). A small cavity-to-skin distance was associated with a grade {>=}2 induration (p = 0.03 W/p = 0.01 L), a borderline significant association with grade {>=}2 volume reduction (p = 0.06 W/p = 0.06 L) and poor-fair cosmesis (p = 0.08 W/p = 0.09 L), with threshold distances ranging from 5 to 8 mm. Conclusions: No dose--volume relationships associated with long-term toxicity were identified in this large patient cohort with extended follow-up. Cosmetic results were good-to-excellent in 88% of patients at 5 years.

  12. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study.

  13. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Evaluation of Textural Feature Extraction for Radiotherapy Response Assessment of Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Using Diffusion Weighted MRI and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y; Wang, C; Horton, J; Chang, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using classic textural feature extraction in radiotherapy response assessment, we studied a unique cohort of early stage breast cancer patients with paired pre - and post-radiation Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods: 15 female patients from our prospective phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Each patient received a single-fraction radiation treatment, and DWI and DCE scans were conducted before and after the radiotherapy. DWI scans were acquired using a spin-echo EPI sequence with diffusion weighting factors of b = 0 and b = 500 mm{sup 2} /s, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. DCE-MRI scans were acquired using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3D SPGR sequence with a temporal resolution of about 1 minute. The contrast agent (CA) was intravenously injected with a 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight dose at 2 ml/s. Two parameters, volume transfer constant (K{sup trans} ) and k{sub ep} were analyzed using the two-compartment Tofts kinetic model. For DCE parametric maps and ADC maps, 33 textural features were generated from the clinical target volume (CTV) in a 3D fashion using the classic gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) and gray level run length matrix (GLRLM). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine the significance of each texture feature’s change after the radiotherapy. The significance was set to 0.05 with Bonferroni correction. Results: For ADC maps calculated from DWI-MRI, 24 out of 33 CTV features changed significantly after the radiotherapy. For DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, all 33 CTV features of K{sup trans} and 33 features of k{sub ep} changed significantly. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that those significantly changed classic texture features are sensitive to radiation-induced changes and can be used for assessment of radiotherapy response in breast cancer.

  14. Residual position errors of lymph node surrogates in breast cancer adjuvant radiotherapy: Comparison of two arm fixation devices and the effect of arm position correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kapanen, Mika; Laaksomaa, Marko; Skyttä, Tanja; Haltamo, Mikko; Pehkonen, Jani; Lehtonen, Turkka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Hyödynmaa, Simo

    2016-04-01

    Residual position errors of the lymph node (LN) surrogates and humeral head (HH) were determined for 2 different arm fixation devices in radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer: a standard wrist-hold (WH) and a house-made rod-hold (RH). The effect of arm position correction (APC) based on setup images was also investigated. A total of 113 consecutive patients with early-stage breast cancer with LN irradiation were retrospectively analyzed (53 and 60 using the WH and RH, respectively). Residual position errors of the LN surrogates (Th1-2 and clavicle) and the HH were investigated to compare the 2 fixation devices. The position errors and setup margins were determined before and after the APC to investigate the efficacy of the APC in the treatment situation. A threshold of 5 mm was used for the residual errors of the clavicle and Th1-2 to perform the APC, and a threshold of 7 mm was used for the HH. The setup margins were calculated with the van Herk formula. Irradiated volumes of the HH were determined from RT treatment plans. With the WH and the RH, setup margins up to 8.1 and 6.7 mm should be used for the LN surrogates, and margins up to 4.6 and 3.6 mm should be used to spare the HH, respectively, without the APC. After the APC, the margins of the LN surrogates were equal to or less than 7.5/6.0 mm with the WH/RH, but margins up to 4.2/2.9 mm were required for the HH. The APC was needed at least once with both the devices for approximately 60% of the patients. With the RH, irradiated volume of the HH was approximately 2 times more than with the WH, without any dose constraints. Use of the RH together with the APC resulted in minimal residual position errors and setup margins for all the investigated bony landmarks. Based on the obtained results, we prefer the house-made RH. However, more attention should be given to minimize the irradiation of the HH with the RH than with the WH.

  15. Setup deviations for whole-breast radiotherapy with TomoDirect: A comparison of weekly and biweekly image-guided protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Hong; Jung, Joo-Young; Bae, Sun Hyun; Moon, Seong Kwon; Cho, Kwang Hwan

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient setup deviations for different image-guided protocols (weekly vs. biweekly) that are used in TomoDirect three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (TD-3DCRT) for whole-breast radiation therapy (WBRT). A total of 138 defined megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image sets from 46 breast cancer cases were divided into two groups based on the imaging acquisition times: weekly or biweekly. The mean error, three-dimensional setup displacement error (3D-error), systematic error (Σ), and random error (σ) were calculated for each group. The 3D-errors were 4.29 ± 1.11 mm and 5.02 ± 1.85 mm for the weekly and biweekly groups, respectively; the biweekly error was 14.6% higher than the weekly error. The systematic errors in the roll angle and the x, y, and z directions were 0.48°, 1.72 mm, 2.18 mm, and 1.85 mm for the weekly protocol and 0.21°, 1.24 mm, 1.39 mm, and 1.85 mm for the biweekly protocol. Random errors in the roll angle and the x, y, and z directions were 25.7%, 40.6%, 40.0%, and 40.8% higher in the biweekly group than in the weekly group. For the x, y, and z directions, the distributions of the treatment frequency at less than 5 mm were 98.6%, 91.3%, and 94.2% in the weekly group and 94.2%, 89.9%, and 82.6% in the biweekly group. Moreover, the roll angles with 0 - 1° were 79.7% and 89.9% in the weekly and the biweekly groups, respectively. Overall, the evaluation of setup deviations for the two protocols revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). Reducing the frequency of MVCT imaging could have promising effects on imaging doses and machine times during treatment. However, the biweekly protocol was associated with increased random setup deviations in the treatment. We have demonstrated a biweekly protocol of TD-3DCRT for WBRT, and we anticipate that our method may provide an alternative approach for considering the uncertainties in the patient setup.

  16. Effect of postoperative radiotherapy for squamous cell cancer of the breast in a surveillance epidemiology and end results population-based study.

    PubMed

    Wu, San-Gang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Liu, Wen-Ming; Li, Feng-Yan; Lin, Huan-Xin; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-03-01

    The therapeutic value of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for squamous cell cancer of the breast (SCCB) is unclear. This retrospective study used a population-based national registry to determine the impact of postoperative RT on survival of women with SCCB. The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was used to identify females with SCCB who underwent primary surgical resection from 1973 to 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression proportional hazard methods were used to determine the impact of RT following resection associated with cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 523 patients met the eligibility criteria. The median follow-up time was 55 months, the 10-year CSS and OS rates were 65.6%, and 46.0%, respectively. A total of 167 patients (31.9%) received postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis indicated that advanced pT and pN stage, and no postoperative RT were independently associated with poor OS; advanced pT and pN stage were independently associated with poor CSS. Postoperative RT was significantly associated with improved 10-year OS (54.5% vs. 42.0%, P =.001), but had no effect on CSS (P =.217). Analysis of patients with different stages of SCCB indicated that RT was associated with improved CSS (P =.047) and OS (P <.001) in those with stage II cancer and improved OS in patients with stage pN0 cancer (P <.001). Postoperative RT improved the survival of SCCB patients, especially in those with stage II and stage pN0 cancer.

  17. SU-E-J-201: Position Verification in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Tantalum Clips in the Lumpectomy Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Santvoort, J van; Van der Drift, M; Kuipers, J; Mast, M; Van Egmond, J; Struikmans, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To find out whether tantalum surgical clips can be used for online position verification in treatment of the lumpectomy cavity (LC) in breast cancer patients. Tantalum is a high density metal that could be visible on Electronic Portal Images (EPIs) and be an affordable alternative to gold markers. Clips are considered more representative for the LC position than nearby bony structures. Methods: In twelve patients the surgeon had placed 2 to 5 tantalum clips in the LC. The AP and lateral fields used for portal imaging, were adapted. In doing so, both bony structures and tantalum clips were visible on EPIs. The following analyses were performed:1. Image degradation, with respect to delineating the CTV, of the axial CT slices by artefacts because of the tantalum clips was evaluated by a radiation oncologist;2. The visibility of the tantalum clips on the EPIs was evaluated by four radiation therapists (RTTs);3. Bony anatomy and tantalum clip matches were performed on the same images independently by two observers. Results: 1. Delineation of the CTV by the radiation oncologist was not hampered by CT image artefacts because of the clips.2. The mean score for visibility of the clips on the EPIs, analysed by the four RTTs, was 5.6 on a scale of 10 (range 3.9 – 8.0).3. In total 12 patients with 16 fractions each were analysed. The differences between clip match and bone match are significant with a mean vector length of 5.2 mm (SD 1.9 mm) for the difference. Conclusion: Results of matches on tantalum clips as compared to matches on bony structures differ substantially. Therefore clip matches can result in smaller CTV to PTV margins than bone matches. Visibility of the clips on EPIs is sufficient, so they can be an alternative to gold markers.

  18. Polymeric micelles as a diagnostic tool for image-guided drug delivery and radiotherapy of HER2 overexpressing breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Nu Bryan

    Block copolymer micelles have emerged as a viable formulation strategy with several drugs relying on this technology in clinical evaluation. To date, information on the tumor penetration and intratumoral distribution of block copolymer micelles (BCM) has been quite limited. Thus, there is impetus to develop a radiolabeled formulation that can be used to gain invaluable insight into the intratumoral distribution of the BCMs. This information could then be used to direct formulation strategies as a means to optimize treatment outcomes. This thesis describes the synthesis and characterization of a targeted block copolymer micelle system based on poly(ethylene glycol)-block -poly(epsilon-caprolactone) labeled with the radionuclide Indium-111 (111In). The incorporation of the imageable component, 111In permits pursuit of image-guided drug delivery for real-time monitoring of tumor localization and intratumoral distribution. Intracellular trafficking of drugs and therapies such as Auger electron emitting radionuclides to perinuclear and nuclear regions of cells is critical to realizing their full therapeutic potential. HER2 specific antibodies (trastuzumab fab fragments) and nuclear localization signal peptides were conjugated to the surface of the BCMs to direct uptake in HER2 expressing cells and subsequent localization in the cell nucleus. Cell uptake was HER2 density dependent, confirming receptor-mediated internalization of the BCMs. Importantly, conjugation of NLS resulted in a significant increase in nuclear uptake of the radionuclide 111In. Successful nuclear targeting was shown to improve the antiproliferative effect of the Auger electrons. In addition, a significant radiation enhancement effect was observed by concurrent delivery of low-dose MTX and 111In in all breast cancer cell lines evaluated. Imaging enabled the accurate quantification of the specific tumor uptake of the micelles and visualization of their degree of tumor penetration in relation to

  19. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: an analysis from the NCDB

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuai; Jiang, Wen; Chen, Kai; Kim, Betty Y.S.; Liu, Qiang; Jacobs, Lisa K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with pathological negative nodes (ypN0) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) remains controversial. Methods A total of 1560 clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients treated with NAC and mastectomy who achieved ypN0 between 1998 and 2009 in the National Cancer Database were analyzed. The effects of PMRT on overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort and multiple subgroups were evaluated. Imputation and propensity score matching were used as sensitivity analyses to minimize biases. Results Of the entire 1560 eligible patients, 903 (57.9%) received PMRT and 657 (42.1%) didn’t. At a median follow-up of 56.0 months, no statistical difference was observed for OS between two groups by univariate and multivariate analyses (P = 0.120; HR 1.571, 95% CI 0.839-2.943). On subgroup analyses, PMRT significantly improved OS in patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast cancer after NAC (P < 0.05). This improvement in OS remained significant after sensitivity analyses for the propensity score-matched patients. Conclusions This study demonstrated that PMRT showed a heterogeneous effect in clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancer patients with ypN0 following NAC. PMRT improved OS for patients with clinical stage IIIB/IIIC disease, T3/T4 tumor, or residual invasive breast tumor after NAC. In the absence of definitive conclusions from prospective studies, including the ongoing NSABP B-51 trial, our findings may help identify specific groups of women with clinically node-positive, stage II-III breast cancers who could benefit from PMRT after NAC. PMID:26709538

  20. SU-E-T-596: Axillary Nodes Radiotherapy Boost Field Dosimetric Impact Study: Oblique Field and Field Optimization in 3D Conventional Breast Cancer Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Su, M; Sura, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric impact of two axillary nodes (AX) boost techniques: (1) posterior-oblique optimized field boost (POB), (2) traditional posterior-anterior boost (PAB) with field optimization (O-PAB), for a postmastectomy breast patient with positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods: Five patients, 3 left and 2 right chest walls, were included in this study. All patients were simulated in 5mm CT slice thickness. Supraclavicular (SC) and level I/II/III AX were contoured based on the RTOG atlas guideline. Five treatment plans, (1) tangential chest wall, (2) oblique SC including AX, (3) PAB, O-PAB and POB, were created for each patient. Three plan sums (PS) were generated by sum one of (3) plan with plan (1) and (2). The field optimization was done through PS dose distribution, which included a field adjustment, a fractional dose, a calculation location and a gantry angle selection for POB. A dosimetric impact was evaluated by comparing a SC and AX coverage, a PS maximum dose, an irradiated area percentage volume received dose over 105% prescription dose (V105), an ipsi-laterial mean lung dose (MLD), an ipsi-laterial mean humeral head dose (MHHD), a mean heart dose (MHD) (for left case only) and their DVH amount these three technique. Results: O-PAB, POB and PAB dosimetric results showed that there was no significant different on SC and AX coverage (p>0.43) and MHD (p>0.16). The benefit of sparing lung irradiation from PAB to O-PAB to POB was significant (p<0.004). PAB showed a highest PS maximum dose (p<0.005), V105 (p<0.023) and MLD (compared with OPAB, p=0.055). MHHD showed very sensitive to the patient arm positioning and anatomy. O-PAB convinced a lower MHHD than PAB (p=0.03). Conclusion: 3D CT contouring plays main role in accuracy radiotherapy. Dosimetric advantage of POB and O-PAB was observed for a better normal tissue irradiation sparing.

  1. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Sajo, E; Sinha, N; Bellon, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  2. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vicini, Frank A. Chen, Peter; Wallace, Michelle; Mitchell, Christina; Hasan, Yasmin; Grills, Inga; Kestin, Larry; Schell, Scott; Goldstein, Neal S.; Kunzman, Jonathan; Gilbert, Sam; Martinez, Alvaro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for {>=}4 years, 20 for {>=}3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for {>=}2.5 years, and 46 for {>=}2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at {>=} 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at {>=}3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic ({>=}6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI.

  3. Blisters - an unusual effect during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Höller, U; Schubert, T; Budach, V; Trefzer, U; Beyer, M

    2013-11-01

    The skin reaction to radiation is regularly monitored in order to detect enhanced radiosensitivity of the patient, unexpected interactions (e.g. with drugs) or any inadvertent overdosage. It is important to distinguish secondary disease from radiation reaction to provide adequate treatment and to avoid unnecessary discontinuation of radiotherapy. A case of bullous eruption or blisters during radiotherapy of the breast is presented. Differential diagnoses bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and bullous impetigo are discussed and treatment described.

  4. Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Plans, With or Without Anterior Myocardial Territory and Left Ventricle as Organs at Risk, in Early-Stage Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Wenyong; Wang Xiaohong; Qiu Dasheng; Liu Dong; Jia Shaohui; Zeng Fanyu; Chen Zhengwang; Li Beihui; Xu Jiaozhen; Wei Lai; Hu Desheng

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We evaluated heart sparing using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with the left ventricle (LV) and/or the anterior myocardial territory (AMT) as additional organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: A total of 10 patients with left-sided breast cancer were selected for dosimetric planning. Both lungs, the right breast, heart, LV, and AMT were defined as OARs. We generated one tangential field plan and four IMRT plans for each patient. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of the planning target volume and OARs. Results: Compared with the tangential field plan, the mean dose to the heart in the IMRT plans did not show significant differences; however, the dose to the AMT and LV decreased by 18.7-45.4% and 10.8-37.4%, respectively. The maximal dose to the heart decreased by 18.6-35.3%, to the AMT by 22.0-45.1%, and to the LV by 23.5-45.0%, And the relative volumes of the heart (V{sub {>=}12}), AMT (V{sub >11}) and LV (V{sub >10}) decreased significantly with different levels, respectively. The volume of the heart, AMT, LV, both lungs, and right breast receiving {>=}5 Gy showed a significant increase. Compared with the IMRT (H) plan, the mean dose to the heart, AMT, and LV decreased by 17.5-21.5%, 25.2-29.8%, and 22.8-29.8% and the maximal dose by 13.6-20.6%, 23.1-29.6%, and 17.3-29.1%, respectively. The IMRT plans for both lungs and the right breast showed no significant differences. Conclusions: The IMRT plans with the addition of the AMT and/or LV as OARs considerably increased heart sparing. We recommend including the LV as an additional OAR in such plans.

  5. Validation and Modification of a Prediction Model for Acute Cardiac Events in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy Based on Three-Dimensional Dose Distributions to Cardiac Substructures.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Veerle A B; Ta, Bastiaan D P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Bouma, Angelique B; Middag, Astrid M H; Bantema-Joppe, Enja J; van Dijk, Lisanne V; van Dijk-Peters, Femke B J; Marteijn, Laurens A W; de Bock, Gertruida H; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Gietema, Jourik A; Langendijk, Johannes A; Maduro, John H; Crijns, Anne P G

    2017-01-17

    Purpose A relationship between mean heart dose (MHD) and acute coronary event (ACE) rate was reported in a study of patients with breast cancer (BC). The main objective of our cohort study was to validate this relationship and investigate if other dose-distribution parameters are better predictors for ACEs than MHD. Patients and Methods The cohort consisted of 910 consecutive female patients with BC treated with radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery. The primary end point was cumulative incidence of ACEs within 9 years of follow-up. Both MHD and various dose-distribution parameters of the cardiac substructures were collected from three-dimensional computed tomography planning data. Results The median MHD was 2.37 Gy (range, 0.51 to 15.25 Gy). The median follow-up time was 7.6 years (range, 0.1 to 10.1 years), during which 30 patients experienced an ACE. The cumulative incidence of ACE increased by 16.5% per Gy (95% CI, 0.6 to 35.0; P = .042). Analysis showed that the volume of the left ventricle receiving 5 Gy (LV-V5) was the most important prognostic dose-volume parameter. The most optimal multivariable normal tissue complication probability model for ACEs consisted of LV-V5, age, and weighted ACE risk score per patient (c-statistic, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.91). Conclusion A significant dose-effect relationship was found for ACEs within 9 years after RT. Using MHD, the relative increase per Gy was similar to that reported in the previous study. In addition, LV-V5 seemed to be a better predictor for ACEs than MHD. This study confirms the importance of reducing exposure of the heart to radiation to avoid excess risk of ACEs after radiotherapy for BC.

  6. SU-D-18A-06: Variation of Controlled Breath Hold From CT Simulation to Treatment and Its Dosimetric Impact for Left-Sided Breast Radiotherapy with a Real-Time Optical Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Mittauer, K; Deraniyagala, R; Li, J; Lu, B; Liu, C; Lightsey, J; Yan, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Different breath-hold (BH) maneuvers (abdominal breathing vs. chest breathing) during CT simulation and treatment can lead to chest wall positional variation. The purpose of this study is to quantify the variation of active breathing control (ABC)-assisted BH and estimate its dosimetric impact for left-sided whole-breast radiotherapy with a real-time optical tracking system (OTS). Methods: Seven breast cancer patients were included. An in-house OTS tracked an infrared (IR) marker affixed over the xiphoid process of the patient at CT simulation and throughout the treatment course to measure BH variations. Correlation between the IR marker and the breast was studied for dosimetric purposes. The positional variations of 860 BHs were retrospectively incorporated into treatment plans to assess their dosimetric impact on breast and cardiac organs (heart and left anterior descending artery [LAD]). Results: The mean intrafraction variations were 2.8 mm, 2.7 mm, and 1.6 mm in the anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and mediolateral (ML) directions, respectively. Mean stability in any direction was within 1.5 mm. A general trend of BH undershoot at treatment relative to CT simulation was observed with an average of 4.4 mm, 3.6 mm, and 0.1 mm in the AP, CC, and ML directions, respectively. Undershoot up to 12.6 mm was observed for individual patients. The difference between the planned and delivered dose to breast targets was negligible. The average planned/delivered mean heart doses, mean LAD doses, and max LAD doses were 1.4/2.1, 7.4/15.7, and 18.6/31.0 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Systematic undershoot was observed in ABC-assisted BHs from CT simulation to treatment. Its dosimetric impact on breast coverage was minimized with image guidance, but the benefits of cardiac organ sparing were degraded. A real-time tracking system can be used in junction with the ABC device to improve BH reproducibility.

  7. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  8. Population-Based Study of Trends and Variations in Radiotherapy as Part of Primary Treatment of Cancer in the Southern Netherlands Between 1988 and 2006, With an Emphasis on Breast and Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vulto, Johanna C.M. Lybeert, Marnix L.M.; Louwman, Marieke W.J.; Poortmans, Philip M.P.; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To explore current variations in the use of primary radiotherapy (RT) in a region with two RT departments with adjacent referral areas, one in the eastern and one in the western sector of the southern region of the Netherlands. Methods and Materials: We calculated the proportion of 147,588 patients with newly diagnosed cancer between 1988 and 2006 in the southern Netherlands who received primary RT. Especially for breast and rectal cancer patients we studied primary RT use according to stage (breast cancer) and age and separately for the eastern and western sectors. Results: The number of patients with new diagnoses receiving primary RT increased from 1,668 patients in 1988 to 2,971 patients in 2006, with the proportion of the overall patients receiving RT remaining more or less unchanged ({+-}30%). However, only 20% of elderly patients (75+ years) received primary RT. Over time, more patients with prostate and rectal cancer, fewer patients with lung and bladder cancer or Hodgkin's lymphoma, and, recently, more patients with cervical or endometrial cancer received RT. The proportion of patients with most other tumor types treated with RT remained more or less unchanged. The total RT rate was slightly higher for patients in the eastern sector. Of particular note, patients with breast or rectal cancer in the eastern sector were significantly more likely to receive primary RT than were their counterparts in the western sector (odds ratio = 1.4, 95% confidence interval =1.4-1.5, and odds ratio = 1.4, 95% confidence interval = 1.3-1.6, respectively). Conclusions: Although the number of RT-treated patients increased substantially during 1988 to 2006, the proportion remained essentially unchanged. In addition, large variations were found in referral rates for RT, especially in later years, between the eastern and the western sectors of the region.

  9. Vegetation fire proneness in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mário; Aranha, José; Amraoui, Malik

    2015-04-01

    Fire selectivity has been studied for vegetation classes in terms of fire frequency and fire size in a few European regions. This analysis is often performed along with other landscape variables such as topography, distance to roads and towns. These studies aims to assess the landscape sensitivity to forest fires in peri-urban areas and land cover changes, to define landscape management guidelines and policies based on the relationships between landscape and fires in the Mediterranean region. Therefore, the objectives of this study includes the: (i) analysis of the spatial and temporal variability statistics within Europe; and, (ii) the identification and characterization of the vegetated land cover classes affected by fires; and, (iii) to propose a fire proneness index. The datasets used in the present study comprises: Corine Land Cover (CLC) maps for 2000 and 2006 (CLC2000, CLC2006) and burned area (BA) perimeters, from 2000 to 2013 in Europe, provided by the European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS). The CLC is a part of the European Commission programme to COoRdinate INformation on the Environment (Corine) and it provides consistent, reliable and comparable information on land cover across Europe. Both the CLC and EFFIS datasets were combined using geostatistics and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques to access the spatial and temporal evolution of the types of shrubs and forest affected by fires. Obtained results confirms the usefulness and efficiency of the land cover classification scheme and fire proneness index which allows to quantify and to compare the propensity of vegetation classes and countries to fire. As expected, differences between northern and southern Europe are notorious in what concern to land cover distribution, fire incidence and fire proneness of vegetation cover classes. This work was supported by national funds by FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, under the project PEst-OE/AGR/UI4033/2014 and by

  10. Breast cancer. Part 2: present and future treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the second article in a series of three on breast cancer. Part 1 discussed breast anatomy, the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging. In this article, treatment for breast cancer is discussed. The article will follow the usual order of modalities in the trajectory, starting with surgery, then chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment, finishing with a discussion of future and biological treatments.

  11. Prone and supine percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, G; Breda, A

    2013-06-01

    Since the first successful stone extraction through a nephrostomy in 1976, percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has became the preferred procedure especially for treatment of large, complex and staghorn calculi. For decades this method has been performed with the patient in the prone position. More recently, particular interest has been taken on supine PCNL due to less anestesiological risks and the possibility of simultaneous anterograde and retrograde access to the whole urinary tract. Although many retrospective studies have been published, only two prospective trials comparing the two positions are reported in the literature. The best access to PCNL represents still a controversial issue. The overall experience reported in literature indicates that each modality is equally feasible and safe. Therefore, to date the surgeon's preference is the prime indication to one access over the other.

  12. Concurrent administration of adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery enhances late toxicities: Long-term results of the ARCOSEIN multicenter randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Fourquet, Alain; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Breteau, Noel; Body, Gilles; Azria, David; Le Floch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: In 1996, a multicenter randomized study was initiated that compared sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy (CT) with radiation therapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery (ARCOSEIN study). After a median follow-up of 6.7 years (range, 4.3-9 years), we decided to prospectively evaluate the late effects of these 2 strategies. Methods and Materials: A total of 297 patients from the 5 larger participating institutions were asked to report for a follow-up examination. Seventy-two percent (214 patients) were eligible for evaluation of late toxicity. After breast-conserving surgery, patients were treated either with sequential treatment with CT first followed by RT (Arm A) or CT administered concurrently with RT (Arm B). In all patients, CT regimen consisted of mitoxantrone (12 mg/m{sup 2}), 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2}), and cyclophosphamide (500 mg/m{sup 2}), 6 cycles (Day 1 to Day 21). Conventional RT was delivered to the whole breast by administration of a 2 Gy per fraction protocol to a total dose of 50 Gy ({+-} boost to the primary tumor bed). The assessment of toxicity was blinded to treatment and was graded by the radiation oncologist, according to the LENT/SOMA scale. Skin pigmentation was also evaluated according to a personal 5-points scoring system (excellent, good, moderate, poor, very poor). Results: Among the 214 evaluable patients, 107 were treated in each arm. The 2 populations were homogeneous for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Subcutaneous fibrosis (SF), telangectasia (T), skin pigmentation (SP), and breast atrophy (BA) were significantly increased in Arm B. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 arms of the study concerning Grade 2 or higher pain, breast edema, or lymphedema. No deaths were caused by late toxicity. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of CT with RT is significantly associated with an increase incidence of Grade 2 or greater late side effects.

  13. Prone positioning in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Kristy; Dufault, Marlene; Bergeron, Kathy

    2015-08-12

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a condition with a high morbidity and mortality rate, and treatment is often long and costly. Prone positioning is a rarely used intervention for patients with this syndrome, although research suggests it may be effective. A literature search was undertaken to examine the effects of prone positioning on oxygenation, morbidity and mortality in patients with ARDS. It revealed that prone positioning, when used with low tidal volume ventilation over an extended period, may reduce mortality rates in selected patients with severe ARDS. The selection of patients with severe ARDS for prone positioning should be done on a case-by-case basis to maximise benefits and minimise complications. Further research is required on the use of prone positioning in patients with severe ARDS to support or disclaim the therapy's use in practice, and to compare confounding variables such as ideal prone duration and mechanical versus manual pronation.

  14. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  15. SU-E-T-59: A Novel Multi-Beam Dynamic IMRT with Fixed-Jaw Technique for Left Breast Cancer Patients with Regional Lymph Nodes Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study was to investigate the dosimetric benefit of a novel intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for irradiating the left breast and regional lymph node (RLN). Methods: The breast and RLN (internal mammary node and periclavicular node) and normal tissue were contoured for 16 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients previously treated with RT after lumpectomy. Nine equi-spaced fields IMRT (9 -field IMRT), tangential multi-beam IMRT (tangential-IMRT) and IMRT with fixed-jaw technique (FJT-IMRT) were developed and compared with three-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT). Prescribed dose was 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Dose distributions and dose volume histograms were used to evaluate plans. Results: All IMRTs achieved similar target coverage and substantially reduced heart V30 and V20 compared to the 3DCRT. The average heart mean dose had different changes, which were 9.0Gy for 9-field IMRT, 5.7Gy for tangential-IMRT and 4.2Gy for FJT-IMRT. For the contralateral lung and breast, the 9-field IMRT has the highest mean dose; and the FJT-IMRT and tangential-IMRT had similar lower value. For the thyroid, both 9-field IMRT and FJT-IMRT had similar V30 (20% and 22%) and were significantly lower than that of 3DCRT (34%) and tangential-IMRT (46%). Moreover, the thyroid mean dose of FJT-IMRT is the lowest. For cervical esophagus and humeral head, the FJT-IMRT also had the best sparing. Conclusion: All 9-field IMRT, tangential-IMRT and FJT-IMRT had superiority for targets coverage and substantially reduced the heart volume of high dose irradiation. The FJT-IMRT showed advantages of avoiding the contralateral breast and lung irradiation and decreasing the thyroid, humeral head and cervical esophagus radiation dose at the expense of a slight monitor units (MUs) increasing.

  16. Primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Farahat, A; Magdy, N; Elaffandi, A

    2014-01-01

    Primary breast chondrosarcoma has been rarely reported in the literature. Conservative breast surgery has never been part of the management of previously reported cases. Surgery remains the mainstay management of such a disease as it is resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this report, we present a case of rare primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast that was managed successfully with a conservative approach.

  17. Does Lymphovascular Invasion Predict Regional Nodal Failure in Breast Cancer Patients With Zero to Three Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy? Implications for Regional Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Boutrus, Rimoun; Abi-Raad, Rita; Niemierko, Andrzej; Brachtel, Elena F.; Rizk, Levi; Kelada, Alexandra; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and regional nodal failure (RNF) in breast cancer patients with zero to three positive nodes treated with breast-conservation therapy (BCT). Methods and Materials: The records of 1,257 breast cancer patients with zero to three positive lymph nodes were reviewed. All patients were treated with BCT at Massachusetts General Hospital from 1980 to December 2003. Lymphovascular invasion was diagnosed by hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and in some cases supported by immunohistochemical stains. Regional nodal failure was defined as recurrence in the ipsilateral supraclavicular, axillary, or internal mammary lymph nodes. Regional nodal failure was diagnosed by clinical and/or radiologic examination. Results: The median follow-up was 8 years (range, 0.1-21 years). Lymphovascular invasion was present in 211 patients (17%). In univariate analysis, patients with LVI had a higher rate of RNF (3.32% vs. 1.15%; p = 0.02). In multivariate analysis, only tumor size, grade, and local failure were significant predictors of RNF (p = 0.049, 0.013, and 0.0001, respectively), whereas LVI did not show a significant relationship with RNF (hazard ratio = 2.07; 95% CI, 0.8-5.5; p = 0.143). The presence of LVI in the T2/3 population did not increase the risk of RNF over that for those with no LVI (p = 0.15). In addition, patients with Grade 3 tumors and positive LVI did not have a higher risk of RNF than those without LVI (p = 0.96). Conclusion: These results suggest that LVI can not be used as a sole indicator for regional nodal irradiation in breast cancer patients with zero to three positive lymph nodes treated with BCT.

  18. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun; Wang Rui; Niemierko, Andrzej; Macdonald, Shannon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  19. Estimation of the risk of secondary malignancy arising from whole-breast irradiation: comparison of five radiotherapy modalities, including TomoHDA

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Young; Paudel, Nava; Sung, Jiwon; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2016-01-01

    The risk of secondary cancer from radiation treatment remains a concern for long-term breast cancer survivors, especially those treated with radiation at the age younger than 45 years. Treatment modalities optimally maximize the dose delivery to the tumor while minimizing radiation doses to neighboring organs, which can lead to secondary cancers. A new TomoTherapy treatment machine, TomoHDATM, can treat an entire breast with two static but intensity-modulated beams in a slice-by-slice fashion. This feature could reduce scattered and leakage radiation doses. We compared the plan quality and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of a second malignancy among five treatment modalities: three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, field-in-field forward-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy, inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy, and TomoDirect mode on the TomoHDA system. Ten breast cancer patients were selected for retrospective analysis. Organ equivalent doses, plan characteristics, and LARs were compared. Out-of-field organ doses were measured with radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters. Although the IMRT plan provided overall better plan quality, including the lowest probability of pneumonitis, it caused the second highest LAR. The TomoTherapy plan provided plan quality comparable to the IMRT plan and posed the lowest total LAR to neighboring organs. Therefore, it can be a better treatment modality for younger patients who have a longer life expectancy. PMID:27027239

  20. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p < 0.001 for reproducibility, p < 0.01 for stability). Significant changes (>2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  1. Meningioma after radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, M; Rosenstein, M; Figura, J H

    1999-08-01

    The most common second primary tumors after treatment of childhood Hodgkin's disease are leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and thyroid cancer. Although intracranial meningioma has been reported after radiotherapy to the scalp for benign conditions and for intracranial primary brain tumors, this appears to be an extremely rare sequelae of treatment for Hodgkin's disease. The authors describe a 15-year-old boy who underwent radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and in whom a meningioma developed in the posterior fossa 27 years later.

  2. The Concept of Accident Proneness: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Froggatt, Peter; Smiley, James A.

    1964-01-01

    The term accident proneness was coined by psychological research workers in 1926. Since then its concept—that certain individuals are always more likely than others to sustain accidents, even though exposed to equal risk—has been questioned but seldom seriously challenged. This article describes much of the work and theory on which this concept is based, details the difficulties encountered in obtaining valid information and the interpretative errors that can arise from the examination of imperfect data, and explains why accident proneness became so readily accepted as an explanation of the facts. A recent hypothesis of accident causation, namely that a person's accident liability may vary from time to time, is outlined, and the respective abilities of this and of accident proneness to accord with data from the more reliable literature are examined. The authors conclude that the hypothesis of individual variation in liability is more realistic and in better agreement with the data than is accident proneness. PMID:14106130

  3. Men More Prone to Severe Psoriasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164498.html Men More Prone to Severe Psoriasis: Study Researchers say this may explain why more ... 2017 THURSDAY, April 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Severe psoriasis is much more common in men than women, ...

  4. Smokers Prone to Problems After Joint Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164137.html Smokers Prone to Problems After Joint Replacement: Study Cessation programs help reduce the rate ... that smokers do worse than non-smokers after joint replacements, and now this research shows there's good ...

  5. Breast cancer. Part 3: advanced cancer and psychological implications.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Victoria

    This is the last article in this 3-part series on breast cancer. The previous two articles have outlined the principles behind breast awareness and breast health, detailing common benign breast diseases, types of breast cancer and staging, and treatment for breast cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and endocrine treatment. The series concludes by giving information on advanced disease, including when a patient presents late with a fungating breast lesion, or if the disease has metastasized from the breast to other organs. Lymphoedema is also described and discussed, and the latter half of this article discusses psychological implications of breast cancer, from diagnosis through the individual treatments.

  6. Prognostic factors predicting functional outcomes, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival after radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression in breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Schulte, Rainer; Hoskin, Peter J.; Poortmans, Philip; Schild, Steven E.; Rudat, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify significant prognostic factors after irradiation of metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) in 335 breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The potential prognostic factors investigated included involved vertebra, other bone metastases, visceral metastases, performance status, pretreatment ambulatory status, time until motor deficits developed before RT, radiation schedule (shorter-course RT [one fraction of 8 Gy/five fractions of 4 Gy] vs. longer-course RT [10 fractions of 3 Gy/15 fractions of 2.5 Gy/20 fractions of 2 Gy), and the response to RT. Results: On multivariate analysis, better functional outcome was associated with slower development of motor deficits (p <0.001) and being ambulatory before RT (p <0.001). The overall recurrence rate of MSCC was greater if other bone metastases were present (p <0.001) and if shorter-course RT was used (p <0.001). In-field recurrences alone were more frequent after shorter-course RT (p = 0.008). Survival was negatively affected by the presence of visceral metastases (p <0.001), deterioration of motor function after RT (p <0.001), reduced performance status (p <0.001), and the rapid development of motor deficits (p = 0.044). Conclusion: Outcomes and survival after RT for MSCC in breast cancer patients are associated with several prognostic factors. Patients with poor expected survival may be treated with shorter-course RT to keep the overall treatment time short. If survival is expected to be relatively favorable, longer-course RT appears preferable, because it is associated with fewer MSCC recurrences.

  7. [Radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Thureau, S; Vieillard, M-H; Supiot, S; Lagrange, J-L

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in palliative treatment of bone metastases. Recent developments of stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy give the possibility to treat oligometastatic diseases. The objective of this paper is to report indications and treatment modalities of radiotherapy in these situations.

  8. Effectiveness of virtual reality simulation software in radiotherapy treatment planning involving non-coplanar beams with partial breast irradiation as a model.

    PubMed

    Glaser, S; Warfel, B; Price, J; Sinacore, J; Albuquerque, K

    2012-10-01

    Virtual reality simulation software (VRS - FocalSim Version 4.40 with VRS prototype, Computerized Medical Systems, St. Louis, MO) is a new radiation dose planning tool that allows for 3D visualization of the patient and the machine couch (treatment table) in relationship to the linear accelerator. This allows the radiation treatment planner to have a "room's-eye-view" and enhances the process of virtual simulation. The aim of this study was to compare VRS to a standard planning program (XiO - Version 4.50, Computerized Medical Systems, St. Louis, MO) in regards to the time it took to use each program, the angles chosen in each, and to determine if there was a dosimetric benefit to using VRS. Ten patients who had undergone left-sided lumpectomies were chosen to have treatment plans generated. A partial breast irradiation (PBI) treatment plan by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was generated for each patient using two different methods. In the first method the full plan was generated using XiO software. In the second method beam angles were chosen using the VRS software, those angles were transferred to XiO, and the remaining part of the plan was completed using XiO (since VRS does not allow dose calculations). On average, using VRS to choose angles took about 10 minutes longer than XiO. None of the five gantry angles differed significantly between the two programs, but four of the five couch angles did. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data showed a significantly better conformality index, and trends toward decreased hot spots and increased coverage of the planed treatment volume (PTV) when using VRS. However, when angels were chosen in VRS a greater volume of the ipsilateral breast received a low dose of radiation (between 3% and 50% of the prescribed dose) (VRS = 23.06%, XiO = 19.57%, p < 0.0005). A significant advantage that VRS provided over XiO was the ability to detect potential collisions prior to actual treatment of the patient in three of the ten patients

  9. Lumpectomy Plus Tamoxifen or Anastrozole With or Without Whole Breast Irradiation in Women With Favorable Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poetter, Richard . E-mail: Richard.Poetter@meduniwien.ac.at; Gnant, Michael; Kwasny, Werner; Tausch, Christoph; Handl-Zeller, Leonore; Pakisch, Brigitte; Taucher, Susanne; Hammer, Josef; Luschin-Ebengreuth, Gero; Schmid, Marianne; Kapp, Karin; Sedlmayer, Felix; Stierer, Michael; Reiner, Georg; Hofbauer, Friedrich; Rottenfusser, Andrea; Poestlberger, Sabine; Haider, Karin; Draxler, Wolfgang; Jakesz, Raimund

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: In women with favorable early breast cancer treated by lumpectomy plus tamoxifen or anastrazole, it remains unclear whether whole breast radiotherapy is beneficial. Methods and Material: Between January 1996 and June 2004, the Austrian Breast and Colorectal Cancer Study Group (ABCSG) randomly assigned 869 women to receive breast radiotherapy {+-} boost (n 414) or not (n = 417) after breast-conserving surgery (ABCSG Study 8A). Favorable early breast cancer was specified as tumor size <3 cm, Grading 1 or 2, negative lymph nodes, positive estrogen and/or progesterone receptor status, and manageable by breast-conserving surgery. Breast radiotherapy was performed after lumpectomy with 2 tangential opposed breast fields with mean 50 Gy, plus boost in 71% of patients with mean 10 Gy, in a median of 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was local relapse-free survival; further endpoints were contralateral breast cancer, distant metastases, and disease-free and overall survival. The median follow-up was 53.8 months. Results: The mean age was 66 years. Overall, there were 21 local relapses, with 2 relapses in the radiotherapy group (5-y rate 0.4%) vs. 19 in the no-radiotherapy group (5.1%), respectively (p = 0.0001, hazard ratio 10.2). Overall relapses occurred in 30 patients, with 7 events in the radiotherapy group (5-y rate 2.1%) vs. 23 events in the no-radiotherapy group (6.1%) (p = 0.002, hazard ratio 3.5). No significant differences were found for distant metastases and overall survival. Conclusion: Breast radiotherapy {+-} boost in women with favorable early breast cancer after lumpectomy combined with tamoxifen/anastrazole leads to a significant reduction in local and overall relapse.

  10. Our intraoperative boost radiotherapy experience and applications

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Semra; Alan, Ömür; Yalçın, Orhan; Türkmen, Aygen; Dizdar, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience since November 2013, and case selection criteria for intraoperative boost radiotherapy (IObRT) that significantly reduces the local recurrence rate after breast conserving surgery in patients with breast cancer. Material and Methods: Patients who were suitable for IObRT were identified within the group of patients who were selected for breast conserving surgery at our breast council. A MOBETRON (mobile linear accelerator for IObRT) was used for IObRt during surgery. Results: Patients younger than 60 years old with <3 cm invasive ductal cancer in one focus (or two foci within 2 cm), with a histologic grade of 2–3, and a high possibility of local recurrence were admitted for IObRT application. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. Lumpectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed and advancement flaps were prepared according to the size and inclination of the conus following evaluation of tumor size and surgical margins by pathology. Distance to the thoracic wall was measured, and a radiation oncologist and radiation physicist calculated the required dose. Anesthesia was regulated with slower ventilation frequency, without causing hypoxia. The skin and incision edges were protected, the field was radiated (with 6 MeV electron beam of 10 Gy) and the incision was closed. In our cases, there were no major postoperative surgical or early radiotherapy related complications. Conclusion: The completion of another stage of local therapy with IObRT during surgery positively effects sequencing of other treatments like chemotherapy, hormonotherapy and radiotherapy, if required. IObRT increases disease free and overall survival, as well as quality of life in breast cancer patients. PMID:26985156

  11. HuR silencing elicits oxidative stress and DNA damage and sensitizes human triple-negative breast cancer cells to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, James N.; Andrade, Daniel; Babu, Anish; Amreddy, Narsireddy; Muralidharan, Ranganayaki; Gorospe, Myriam; Herman, Terence; Ding, Wei-Qun; Ramesh, Rajagopal; Munshi, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    HuR is an mRNA-binding protein whose overexpression in cancer cells has been associated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy. While reports on HuR overexpression contributing to chemoresistance exist, limited information is available on HuR and radioresistance especially in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In this study we investigated the role of HuR in radiation resistance in three TNBC (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and Hs578t) cell lines. Endogenous HuR expression was higher in TNBC cells compared to normal cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of HuR (siHuR) markedly reduced HuR mRNA and protein levels compared to scrambled siRNA (siScr) treatment. Further, siHuR treatment sensitized TNBC cells to ionizing radiation at 2 Gy compared to siScr treatment as evidenced by the significant reduction in clonogenic cell survival from 59%, 49%, and 65% in siScr-treated cells to 40%, 33%, and 46% in siHuR-treated MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468 and Hs578t cells, respectively. Molecular studies showed increased ROS production and inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in HuR knockdown cells contributed to radiosensitization. Associated with increased ROS production was evidence of increased DNA damage, demonstrated by a significant increase (p < 0.05) in γ-H2AX foci that persisted for up to 24 h in siHuR plus radiation treated cells compared to control cells. Further, comet assay revealed that HuR-silenced cells had larger and longer-lasting tails than control cells, indicating higher levels of DNA damage. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that HuR knockdown in TNBC cells elicits oxidative stress and DNA damage resulting in radiosensitization. PMID:27588488

  12. Ethnic and gender differences in boredom proneness

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, G.S.; Morales,

    1996-02-01

    Although boredom may exhibit many shared elements, culturally specific attitudes have also been found to exist. The present paper investigated boredom proneness among African-American college students. Data from 120 participants on the Boredom Proneness (BP) Scale was analyzed and compared to cross-cultural participants. African-American females scored significantly higher than African-American males. Scores were presented from two other studies to show a comparative look at boredom proneness in five other ethnic groups. African-American females are the only female ethnic group to score higher on the BP Scale than their male counterparts. Additionally, overall African-Americans, were found to have higher BP scores than their Western counterparts.

  13. Cancer of the breast. Radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Deutsch, M

    1979-01-01

    There are many questions that have to be answered concerning the role of radiotherapy in the management of primary breast cancer. Hopefully, prospective clinical trials will provide some answers, but more basic research into the biology of breast cancer and the host-tumor relationship will be needed. There are indications that radiotherapy alone, or following minimal extirpative surgery in selected cases, may be as effective for control of breast cancer as conventional mastectomies. The role of radiotherapy following segmental mastectomy, with or without axillary dissection, needs to be clarified. The possibility exists that high LET (linear energy transfer) radiation such as neutron or pi meson beams may provide better local control than conventional radiation. Thus, it may be possible to treat effectively all primary breast cancers with such radiations and obviate the need for any type of mastectomy. It remains to be demonstrated whether adjuvant chemotherapy is as effective as radiotherapy in preventing chest wall and regional node recurrences. If it is not, there may be a place for both adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of operable cancer of the breast. Likewise, effective chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy may increase the local and regional control achieved with radiotherapy alone and make more primary lesions suitable for treatment without mastectomy. Meyer (1970) recently called attention to the leukopenia and cellualr immune deficiency produced by irradiation to the thorax and mediastinum. Further study is necessary to define exactly how much immunosuppression results from radiotherapy, its clinical significance and what can be done to avoid or counter it. If Stjervsward's thesis (1974) concerning the deleterious effects of radiotherapy on survival is correct, then it is of great importance to identify those patients most likely to be adversely affected by radiotherapy. Conversely, it may be possible in the future to identify a

  14. Isometric elbow extensors strength in supine- and prone-lying positions.

    PubMed

    Abdelzaher, Ibrahim E; Ababneh, Anas F; Alzyoud, Jehad M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare isometric strength of elbow extensors measured in supine- and prone-lying positions at elbow flexion angles of 45 and 90 degrees. Twenty-two male subjects under single-blind procedures participated in the study. Each subject participated in both supine-lying and prone-lying measuring protocols. Calibrated cable tensiometer was used to measure isometric strength of the right elbow extensors and a biofeedback electromyography was used to assure no substitution movements from shoulder girdle muscles. The mean values of isometric strength of elbow extensors measured from supine-lying position at elbow flexion angles of 45 and 90 degrees were 11.1  ±  4.2 kg and 13.1  ±  4.6 kg, while those measured from prone-lying position were 9.9  ±  3.6 kg and 12  ±  4.2 kg, respectively. There is statistical significant difference between the isometric strength of elbow extensors measured from supine-lying position at elbow flexion angles of 45 and 90 degrees compared to that measured from prone-lying position (p  <  0.05). The results suggest that in manual muscle testing starting position can affect the isometric strength of elbow extensors since supine-lying starting position is better than prone-lying starting position.

  15. SU-E-J-55: End-To-End Effectiveness Analysis of 3D Surface Image Guided Voluntary Breath-Holding Radiotherapy for Left Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M; Feigenberg, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-surface-image to guide breath-holding (BH) left-side breast treatment. Methods Two 3D surface image guided BH procedures were implemented and evaluated: normal-BH, taking BH at a comfortable level, and deep-inspiration-breath-holding (DIBH). A total of 20 patients (10 Normal-BH and 10 DIBH) were recruited. Patients received a BH evaluation using a commercialized 3D-surface- tracking-system (VisionRT, London, UK) to quantify the reproducibility of BH positions prior to CT scan. Tangential 3D/IMRT plans were conducted. Patients were initially setup under free-breathing (FB) condition using the FB surface obtained from the untaged CT to ensure a correct patient position. Patients were then guided to reach the planned BH position using the BH surface obtained from the BH CT. Action-levels were set at each phase of treatment process based on the information provided by the 3D-surface-tracking-system for proper interventions (eliminate/re-setup/ re-coaching). We reviewed the frequency of interventions to evaluate its effectiveness. The FB-CBCT and port-film were utilized to evaluate the accuracy of 3D-surface-guided setups. Results 25% of BH candidates with BH positioning uncertainty > 2mm are eliminated prior to CT scan. For >90% of fractions, based on the setup deltas from3D-surface-trackingsystem, adjustments of patient setup are needed after the initial-setup using laser. 3D-surface-guided-setup accuracy is comparable as CBCT. For the BH guidance, frequency of interventions (a re-coaching/re-setup) is 40%(Normal-BH)/91%(DIBH) of treatments for the first 5-fractions and then drops to 16%(Normal-BH)/46%(DIBH). The necessity of re-setup is highly patient-specific for Normal-BH but highly random among patients for DIBH. Overall, a −0.8±2.4 mm accuracy of the anterior pericardial shadow position was achieved. Conclusion 3D-surface-image technology provides effective intervention to the treatment process and ensures

  16. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Buwenge, Milly; Cammelli, Silvia; Ammendolia, Ilario; Tolento, Giorgio; Zamagni, Alice; Arcelli, Alessandra; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Morganti, Alessio G

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to highly conformed dose distribution, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has the potential to improve treatment results of radiotherapy (RT). Postoperative RT is a standard adjuvant treatment in conservative treatment of breast cancer (BC). The aim of this review is to analyze available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on IMRT in BC, particularly in terms of reduction of side effects. Methods A literature search of the bibliographic database PubMed, from January 1990 through November 2016, was performed. Only RCTs published in English were included. Results Ten articles reporting data from 5 RCTs fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in our review. Three out of 5 studies enrolled only selected patients in terms of increased risk of toxicity. Three studies compared IMRT with standard tangential RT. One study compared the results of IMRT in the supine versus the prone position, and one study compared standard treatment with accelerated partial breast IMRT. Three studies reported reduced acute and/or late toxicity using IMRT compared with standard RT. No study reported improved quality of life. Conclusion IMRT seems able to reduce toxicity in selected patients treated with postoperative RT for BC. Further analyses are needed to better define patients who are candidates for this treatment modality. PMID:28293119

  17. [Radiotherapy of hypopharynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Trémolières, P; Legouté, F; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    The intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of hypopharynx cancers. Early T1 and T2 tumours could be treated by exclusive radiotherapy or surgery. For tumours requiring total pharyngolaryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy are possible. For T4 tumours, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, curative dose is 70Gy and prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used for locally advanced cancers with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation is based on guidelines.

  18. Heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Tatsuaki

    2000-11-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy using high-energy carbon beams has been performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan. The physical frame works for heavy-ion radiotherapy are established using physical understandings of radiation physics. In order to increase the accuracy of heavy-ion radiotherapy, many physical problems should be solved. Unsolved problems, such as the depth dose distributions, range of heavy-ion in patients and heavy-ion dosimetry in the radiation therapy, are discussed. .

  19. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed.

  20. Reasoning, delusion proneness and stress: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Kristy M; Warman, Debbie M

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have been inconsistent in demonstrating a relationship between delusion proneness and induced stress on reasoning biases. The present study was an experimental investigation of the role of stress in the form of feeling rushed, which has previously been shown to be related to the jumping-to-conclusions reasoning bias for delusion-prone individuals, on the reasoning of delusion-prone individuals. University students (n = 133) completed a measure of delusion proneness and were randomly assigned to either receive or not receive a stress induction in the form of a speeded subtraction task. All participants engaged in four trials of a probabilistic reasoning task. Delusion-prone and not delusion-prone participants performed similarly when there was no stress induction, but delusion-prone individuals demonstrated reasoning biases relative to not delusion-prone individuals when stress was induced. The reasoning of delusion-prone individuals may be particularly vulnerable when they feel rushed and in stressful conditions.

  1. Covariation bias in panic-prone individuals.

    PubMed

    Pauli, P; Montoya, P; Martz, G E

    1996-11-01

    Covariation estimates between fear-relevant (FR; emergency situations) or fear-irrelevant (FI; mushrooms and nudes) stimuli and an aversive outcome (electrical shock) were examined in 10 high-fear (panic-prone) and 10 low-fear respondents. When the relation between slide category and outcome was random (illusory correlation), only high-fear participants markedly overestimated the contingency between FR slides and shocks. However, when there was a high contingency of shocks following FR stimuli (83%) and a low contingency of shocks following FI stimuli (17%), the group difference vanished. Reversal of contingencies back to random induced a covariation bias for FR slides in high- and low-fear respondents. Results indicate that panic-prone respondents show a covariation bias for FR stimuli and that the experience of a high contingency between FR slides and aversive outcomes may foster such a covariation bias even in low-fear respondents.

  2. The Role of Oncoplastic Breast Surgery in Breast Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Sert, İsmail; İnal, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discuss indications, advantages, disadvantages, oncologic and aesthetic results of Oncoplastic Surgery (OBS). Pubmed and Medline database were searched for articles published between 1998 and 2014 for keywords: oncoplastic breast surgery, therapeutic mammoplasty, oncoplastic breast reduction, synchrenous reconstructions. Role of OBS in breast cancer surgery, its aspects to be considered, its value and results have been interpreted. This technique has advantages by providing more extensive tumourectomy, yielding better aesthetic results compared with breast conserving surgery, allowing oncoplastic reduction in breast cancer patients with macromastia, with higher patient satisfaction and quality of life and by being inexpensive due to single session practice. As for its disadvantages are: re-excision is more difficult, risk for mastectomy is higher, it is depent on the Surgeron’s experience, it has a risk for delay in adjuvant therapies and its requirement for additional imaging studies during management. Main indications are patients with small tumour/breast volume, macromastia, multifocality, procedures which can disrupt breast cosmesis such as surgeries for upper inner breas tquadrient tumours. Contraindications are positive margin problems after wide excision, diffuse malign microcalsifications, inflammatory breast cancer, history of radiotherapy and patients’ preferences. Despite low evidence level, Oncoplastic Breast Surgery seems to be both reliable and acceptable in terms of oncologic and aesthetic aspects. Oncoplastic Breast Surgery increase the application rate of breast conserving surgery by obviating practical limitations and improve the results of breast conserving surgery. Correct patient and technique choice in OBS is vital for optimization of post surgical

  3. The Benefits of Prone SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Reducing Both Artifact Defects and Patient Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Stathaki, Maria; Koukouraki, Sophia; Papadaki, Emmanouela; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Karkavitsas, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Background Prone imaging has been demonstrated to minimize diaphragmatic and breast tissue attenuation. Objectives To determine the role of prone imaging on the reduction of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed, thus decreasing investigation time and radiation exposure. Methods We examined 139 patients, 120 with an inferior wall and 19 with an anterior wall perfusion defect that might represented attenuation artifact. Post-stress images were acquired in both the supine and prone position. Coronary angiography was used as the “gold standard” for evaluating coronary artery patency. The study was terminated and rest imaging was obviated in the presence of complete improvement of the defect in the prone position. Quantitative interpretation was performed. Results were compared with clinical data and coronary angiographic findings. Results Prone acquisition correctly revealed defect improvement in 89 patients (89/120) with inferior wall and 12 patients (12/19) with anterior wall attenuation artifact. Quantitative analysis demonstrated statistically significant difference in the mean summed stress scores (SSS) of supine and mean SSS of prone studies in patients with disappearing inferior wall defect in the prone position and patent right coronary artery (true negative results). The mean difference between SSS in supine and in prone position was higher with disappearing than with remaining defects. Conclusion Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion imaging with the patient in the prone position overcomes soft tissue attenuation; moreover it provides an inexpensive, accurate approach to limit the number of unnecessary rest perfusion studies and coronary angiographies performed. PMID:26559981

  4. Paranormal belief and proneness to dissociation.

    PubMed

    Irwin, H J

    1994-12-01

    The study investigated the relationship between scores on paranormal belief and proneness to dissociation in a sample of 100 Australian students of psychology. Scores on dissociation were positively correlated with those on global paranormal belief and with belief in psi, precognition, spiritualism, and extraordinary life-forms. It is suggested that in some instances paranormal beliefs may be a component of a complex defensive framework constructed in the face of the perceived uncontrollability of life.

  5. Genetic Screen for PTSD-Prone Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    for determining genotypes at 8 loci in the calcyon gene which is strongly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and...associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could be useful as an unbiased screen for PTSD-prone soldiers. Subjects participating... deficit / hyperactivity disorder . Mol. Psychiatry 10, 1117-1125. Li,J.Z., Absher,D.M., Tang,H., Southwick,A.M., Casto,A.M., Ramachandran,S., Cann,H.M

  6. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules.

  7. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.E.

    1997-03-01

    The study of second cancer risk after radiotherapy provides a unique opportunity to study carcinogenesis since large groups of humans are deliberately exposed to substantial doses of radiation in order to cure disease. Detailed radiotherapy records for cancer patients allow precise quantification of organ dose, and population-based cancer registries are frequently available to provide access to large groups of patients who are closely followed for long periods. Moreover, cancer patients treated with surgery alone (no radiation) are frequently available to serve as a non-irradiated comparison group. New information can be provided on relatively insensitive organs, and low dose exposures in the range of scientific interest are received by organs outside the radiation treatment fields. This paper will review several recently completed studies that characterize the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Emphasis will be given to studies providing new information on the dose-response relationship of radiation-induced leukemia, breast cancer and lung cancer.

  8. Primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Magdy, N; Elaffandi, A

    2014-01-01

    Primary breast chondrosarcoma has been rarely reported in the literature. Conservative breast surgery has never been part of the management of previously reported cases. Surgery remains the mainstay management of such a disease as it is resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this report, we present a case of rare primary myxoid chondrosarcoma of the breast that was managed successfully with a conservative approach. PMID:24417859

  9. [Breast carcinoma: state of the art].

    PubMed

    Pestalozzi, B C

    1996-11-30

    Diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer are briefly reviewed for the general internist. He should know what triple diagnosis, breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy and adjuvant systemic therapy involve. He should know when to perform a screening mammography, what follow-up examinations after breast cancer are indicated and what dangers loom in metastatic breast cancer. He should know of new therapeutic avenues such as bisphosphonates, new aromatase inhibitors, taxanes, and high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support. Since advances in the treatment of breast cancer have been achieved mostly through randomized studies, a positive attitude toward such studies and a willingness to take part in them are desirable.

  10. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies. PMID:28085094

  11. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-12

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies.

  12. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  13. Pregnancy associated breast cancer and pregnancy after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Doğer, Emek; Calışkan, Eray; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and its frequency is increasing as more women postpone their pregnancies to their thirties and forties. Breast cancer diagnosis during pregnancy and lactation is difficult and complex both for the patient and doctors. Delay in diagnosis is frequent and treatment modalities are difficult to accept for the pregnant women. The common treatment approach is surgery after diagnosis, chemotherapy after the first trimester and radiotherapy after delivery. Even though early stage breast cancers have similar prognosis, advanced stage breast cancers diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation have poorer prognosis than similar stage breast cancers diagnosed in non-pregnant women. Women who desire to become pregnant after treatment of breast cancer will have many conflicts. Although the most common concern is recurrence of breast cancer due to pregnancy, the studies conducted showed that pregnancy has no negative effect on breast cancer prognosis. In this review we search for the frequency of breast cancer during pregnancy, the histopathological findings, risk factor, diagnostic and treatment modalities. We reviewed the literature for evidence based findings to help consult the patients on the outcome of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy and lactation, and also inform the patients who desire to become pregnant after breast cancer according to current evidences.

  14. CT scanning of the breast using a conventional CT scanner.

    PubMed

    Doust, B D; Milbrath, J R; Doust, V L

    1981-09-01

    Using a conventional body CT scanner, computed tomography of the breast was performed on 32 patients known to have or suspected of having breast masses. Xeromammograms were available for comparison in all cases. All mass lesions were histologically proved. Seven patients were examined prone, 25 supine. The prone position yielded pictures that resembled craniocaudal mammograms. Breast asymmetry, skin thickening, stranding from a mass to the chest wall, calcification, and axillary lymphadenopathy could be demonstrated by means of CT. The portion of the breast adjacent to the chest wall was more readily examined by means of CT than by conventional mammography. Internal mammary nodes could not be demonstrated.

  15. [Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD)].

    PubMed

    Concha L, Luciana; Durruty A, Pilar; García de Los Ríos A, Manuel

    2015-09-01

    Ketosis prone type 2 diabetes (KPD) is presently a well-defined clinical entity, characterized by a debut with severe hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis similar to the presenting form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). However, it appears in subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) phenotype. This situation is caused by an acute, reversible dysfunction of the beta cell in individuals with insulin resistance. Once the acute stage subsides, patients behave as having a DM2 and do not require insulin treatment. They should be kept on a diet and oral hypoglycemic drugs due to their susceptibility to have recurrent acute ketotic decompensations.

  16. Breast carcinoma after cancer therapy in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Corkery, J.; Vawter, G.; Fine, W.; Sallan, S.E.

    1983-02-01

    Among 910 survivors of childhood cancer, four developed infiltrating carcinoma of the breast and another had noninfiltrating breast tumor. Expected frequency was 0.3 cases of breast cancer in the series. The affected women developed breast carcinoma at ages 20, 25 and 38 years, and the men at ages 38 and 39 years, respectively. Each patient had received orthovoltage chest irradiation for treatment of Wilms' tumor or bone sarcoma between seven and 34 years previously, and estimated radiation dose to the breast exceeded 300 rad in each instance. Four patients also received diverse forms of chemotherapy. Survivors of childhood cancer have increased risk of developing breast cancer and should undergo periodic screening, particularly after breast tissue had been irradiated. Individualized radiotherapy planning can help exclude the breasts from treatment fields for some thoracic neoplasms.

  17. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  18. Extralevator abdominoperineal resection in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Flor-Lorente, Blas; Frasson, Matteo; Montilla, Erick

    2014-03-01

    The Miles operation is every day more in the limelight. The abdominoperineal resection compared to anterior resection results in increased rate of circumferential resection margin (CRM) infiltration, increased iatrogenic tumor perforation rate and poorer quality of the mesorectum. These worse results may be caused by excessive dissection between the distal mesorectum and the plane of the levator ani and the consequent "resection waist" or "cone" effect in the specimen. A wider excision of the pelvic floor muscles, known as extraelevator abdominoperineal resection (ELAPE), would provide a "cylindrical" specimen which would hypothetically reduce the risk of tumor perforation and CRM infiltration and local recurrence rate. However, there is insufficient evidence to conclude that the ELAPE is oncologically superior compared to standard abdominoperineal resection. Independently from the surgical technique adopted, another actual point of discussion is the position of the patient during the perineal part of the operation. The position on "prone" provides excellent pelvic exposure, a top-down dissection under direct vision and is very comfortable for the operating surgeons. However, there is no clear scientific evidence of the superiority of prone ELAPE over supine ELAPE in terms of oncologic results, morbidity and mortality. The laparoscopy seems to be the best surgical approach for the abdominal part of the operation, although it has not been validated so far by large prospective studies. Prospective, controlled and randomized trials are necessary to resolve all these issues. The current interest in a more accurate and standardized perineal surgery to obtain a cylindrical specimen, undoubtedly, will improve results.

  19. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  20. Results of radiotherapy in non round cell spinal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kraiwattanapong, Chaiwat; Buranapanitkit, Boonsin; Kiriratnikom, Theerasan

    2004-03-01

    Spinal metastases are commonly encountered by physicians in a variety of clinical fields. There are some controversies in choice of treatment between surgery and radiotherapy. This report is a study of the outcomes of radiotherapy for metastatic nonround cell tumors of the spine. Medical records and films of 31 patients who were treated with radiotherapy at Songklanakarind Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The most common primary tumors were prostate and breast. One patient had spinal metastases from malignant serous cystadenoma of the fallopian tube of which no previous report has been published. This patient had excellent results after radiotherapy. Back and neck pain were the primary symptoms of the patients, while motor or sensory deficits (or both) were found in 58 per cent of the cases. Seven patients had neurological recovery and 18 patients had pain relief after radiotherapy. Cause of compression is the only factor effecting the result from univariate and multivariate analysis. Spinal cord compressed by a tumor had a better recovery than those which were compressed by a bony fragment or intervertebral disc. The authors concluded that radiotherapy remains a good treatment for patient with non round cell spinal metastasis. Cause of spinal cord compression is the only factor predicting the result of treatment.