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Sample records for pronounced purine sequence

  1. Association of poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine sequences with meiotic recombination hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Andrew TM; Pitt, Joel PW; Gemmell, Neil J

    2006-01-01

    Background Meiotic recombination events have been found to concentrate in 1–2.5 kilo base regions, but these recombination hot spots do not share a consensus sequence and why they occur at specific sites is not fully understood. Some previous evidence suggests that poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine (poly-pu/py) tracts (PPTs), a class of sequence with distinctive biochemical properties, could be involved in recombination, but no general association of PPTs with meiotic recombination hot spots has previously been reported. Results We used computational methods to investigate in detail the relationship between PPTs and hot spots. We show statistical associations of PPT frequency with hot spots of meiotic recombination initiating lesions, double-strand breaks, in the genome of the yeast S. cerevisiae and with experimentally well characterized human meiotic recombination hot spots. Supporting a possible role of poly-pu/py-rich sequences in hot spot recombination, we also found that all three single nucleotide polymorphisms previously shown to be associated with human hot spot activity changes occur within sequence contexts of 14 bp or longer that are 85% or more poly-pu/py and at least 70% G/C. These polymorphisms are all close to the hot spot mid points. Comparing the sequences of experimentally characterized human hot spots with the orthologous regions of the chimpanzee genome previously shown not to contain hot spots, we found that in all five cases in which comparisons for the hot spot central regions are possible with publicly available sequence data, there are differences near the human hot spot mid points within sequences 14 bp or longer consisting of more than 80% poly-pu/py and at least 50% G/C. Conclusion Our results, along with previous evidence for the unique biochemical properties and recombination-stimulating potential of poly-pu/py-rich sequences, suggest that the possible functional involvement of this type of sequence in meiotic recombination hot spots

  2. Pronounced population genetic differentiation in the rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongshuang; Li, Jun; Ren, Guijing; Ma, Daoyuan; Wang, Yanfeng; Xiao, ZhiZhong; Xu, Shihong

    2016-05-01

    The population genetic structure of the rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) along the coastal waters of China was estimated based on three mtDNA fragments (D-loop, COI, and Cytb). A total of 112 polymorphic sites were checked, which defined 63 haplotypes. A pattern with high levels of haplotype diversity (hCOI = 0.886 ± 0.034, hCytb = 0.874 ± 0.023) and low levels of nucleotide diversity (лCOI = 0.009 ± 0.005, лCytb = 0.006 ± 0.003) was detected based on the COI and Cytb fragments, and high levels of genetic diversity (hD-loop = 0.995 ± 0.007, лD-loop = 0.021 ± 0.011) were detected from the mtDNA D-loop. The population genetic diversity of O. fasciatus in south China was significantly higher than those of north China. Three genealogical clades were checked in the O. fasciatus populations based on the NJ and MST analyses of mtDNA COI gene sequence, and the genetic distances among the clades ranged from 0.018 to 0.025. Significant population genetic differentiation was also checked based on the Fst (0.331, p = 0.000) and exact p (0.000) test analyses. No significant population differentiations were checked based on mtDNA D-loop and Cytb fragments. Using a variety of phylogenetic methods, coalescent reasoning, and molecular dating interpreted in conjunction with paleoclimatic and physiographic evidences, we inferred that the genetic make-up of extant populations of O. fasciatus was shaped by Pleistocene environmental impacts on the historical demography of this species. Coalescent analyses (neutrality tests, mismatch distribution analysis, and Bayesian skyline analyses) showed that the species along coastline of China has experienced population expansions originated in its most recent history at about 169-175 kya before present.

  3. Pur-1, a zinc-finger protein that binds to purine-rich sequences, transactivates an insulin promoter in heterologous cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, G C; Rutter, W J

    1992-01-01

    Purine-rich stretches of nucleotides (GAGA boxes) are often found just upstream of transcription start sites in many genes, including insulin. Mutational analysis suggests that the GAGA box plays an important role in transcription of the rat insulin I gene. We identify here at least four different proteins that bind specifically to the insulin GAGA box. Using a GAGA oligonucleotide, we have isolated a cDNA encoding a sequence-specific protein from a HIT (hamster insulinoma cell line) lambda gt11 library. This protein, which we designate Pur-1 (for purine binding), binds to the GAGA boxes of the rat insulin I and II genes and the human islet amyloid polypeptide gene. Pur-1 is a potent transactivator in both pancreatic and nonpancreatic cells. Furthermore, Pur-1 is able to activate an intact insulin promoter in HeLa cells, where it is normally inactive. Images PMID:1454839

  4. Escherichia coli gene purR encoding a repressor protein for purine nucleotide synthesis. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and interaction with the purF operator.

    PubMed

    Rolfes, R J; Zalkin, H

    1988-12-25

    The Escherichia coli gene purR, encoding a repressor protein, was cloned by complementation of a purR mutation. Gene purR on a multicopy plasmid repressed expression of purF and purF-lacZ and reduced the growth rate of host cells by limiting the rate of de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. The level of a 1.3-kilobase purR mRNA was higher in cells grown with excess adenine, suggesting that synthesis of the repressor may be regulated. The chromosomal locus of purR was mapped to coordinate 1755-kb on the E. coli restriction map (Kohara, Y., Akiyama, K., and Isono, K. (1987) Cell 50, 495-508). Pur repressor bound specifically to purF operator DNA as determined by gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays. The amino acid sequence of Pur repressor was derived from the nucleotide sequence. Pur repressor subunit contains 341 amino acids and has a calculated Mr of 38,179. Pur repressor is 31-35% identical with the galR and cytR repressors and 26% identical with the lacI repressor. These four repressors are likely homologous. Amino acid sequence similarity is greatest in an amino-terminal region presumed to contain a DNA-binding domain. A similarity is also noted in the operator sites for these repressors.

  5. Genomic evidence for complementary purine metabolism in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and its symbiotic bacterium Buchnera aphidicola.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, J S; MacDonald, S J; Jander, G; Nakabachi, A; Thomas, G H; Douglas, A E

    2010-03-01

    The purine salvage pathway recycles purines to nucleotides, promoting efficient utilization of purine nucleotides. Exceptionally among animals with completely sequenced genomes, the pea aphid lacks key purine recycling genes that code for purine nucleoside phosphorylase and adenosine deaminase, indicating that the aphid can neither metabolize nucleosides to the corresponding purines, nor adenosine to inosine. Purine metabolism genes in the symbiotic bacterium Buchnera complement aphid genes, and Buchnera can meet its nucleotide requirement from aphid-derived guanosine. Buchnera demand for nucleosides may have relaxed the selection for purine recycling in the aphid, leading to the loss of key aphid purine salvage genes. Further, the coupled purine metabolism of aphid and Buchnera could contribute to the dependence of the pea aphid on this symbiosis.

  6. [Purine nucleoside phosphorylase].

    PubMed

    Pogosian, L G; Akopian, Zh I

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is one of the most important enzymes of the purine metabolism, wich promotes the recycling of purine bases. Nowadays is the actual to search for effective inhibitors of this enzyme which is necessary for creation T-cell immunodeficient status of the organism in the organs and tissues transplantation, and chemotherapy of a number pathologies as well. For their successful practical application necessary to conduct in-depth and comprehensive study of the enzyme, namely a structure, functions, and an affinity of the reaction mechanism. In the review the contemporary achievements in the study of PNP from various biological objects are presented. New data describing the structure of PNP are summarised and analysed. The physiological role of the enzyme is discussed. The enzyme basic reaction mechanisms and actions are considered. The studies on enzyme physicochemical, kinetic, and catalytic research are presented. PMID:24479338

  7. Perspectives on purine analogues.

    PubMed

    Cheson, B D

    1996-12-01

    The purine analogs, fludarabine, 2-chlorodeoxy-adenosine, and 2'-deoxycoformycin, have revolutionized our approach to the treatment of a variety of indolent lymphoid malignancies. Because of their impressive single agent activity, they should be considered as an initial therapeutic option, not only for hairy cell leukemia, but also for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and Waldenström's macroglobulenemia. Combinations of purine analogs with alkylatng agents, topisomerase II inhibitors, and other new compounds are in development, and their role as radiation sensitizers is being explored in clinical trials. Substantial activity has also been noted in several of the rheumatologic and immunologic disorders, and in multiple sclerosis. Continued progress requires innovative strategies which can modulate the biology and immunology of these diseases toward the goal of curing these patients. PMID:9137964

  8. Pronounceability and the Visual Recognition of Nonsense Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Herbert; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Evidence supports the hypothesis that visual word recognition may involve recoding into phonemic form. Less pronounceable nonsense words are recognized as nonsense faster than those more pronounceable. Differences in pronounceability may produce their effects during sequencing of neural instructions of each phoneme. (CHK)

  9. The sequence and binding specificity of UaY, the specific regulator of the purine utilization pathway in Aspergillus nidulans, suggest an evolutionary relationship with the PPR1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, T; de Queiroz, M V; Oestreicher, N; Scazzocchio, C

    1995-01-01

    The uaY gene codes for a transcriptional activator mediating the induction of a number of unlinked genes involved in purine utilization in Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the complete genomic and cDNA nucleotide sequence of this gene. The gene contains two introns. The derived polypeptide of 1060 residues contains a typical zinc binuclear cluster domain and shows a number of similarities with the PPR1 regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These similarities are most striking in the putative linker and dimerization regions following the zinc cluster. Gel-shift and DNase I footprinting experiments have been carried out for three genes subject to UaY-mediated induction. The binding sequence is 5'-TCGG-6X-CCGA, which is identical to the proposed PPR1 binding sites. Nevertheless, the identity of the base immediately 3' of the 5'-TCGG sequence clearly affects the affinity of the site. The site upstream of the uapA gene has been shown to be active in vivo. Binding to this site has been analysed by a number of interference techniques. There is an interesting chemical similarity between the co-inducer of the purine utilization pathway (uric acid) and that of the genes of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway (dihydroorotic acid) and we show that dihydroorotic acid can act as a poor inducer of at least one activity under UaY control. These striking similarities, together with the unique pattern of regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae, suggest that PPR1 evolved through recruitment into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of an ancestral gene related to uaY. Images PMID:7729421

  10. Purine alkaloids in Paullinia.

    PubMed

    Weckerle, Caroline S; Stutz, Michael A; Baumann, Thomas W

    2003-10-01

    Among the few purine alkaloid-containing genera consumed as stimulants, Paullinia is the least investigated with respect to both chemotaxonomy and within-the-plant allocation of caffeine and its allies. Since purine alkaloids (PuA) have been proved to be valuable marker compounds in chemotaxonomy, 34 species of Paullinia and related genera were screened for them, but only one, P. pachycarpa, was positive in addition to the already known P. cupana and P. yoco. The PuA allocation in P. pachycarpa was examined and found to be restricted to theobromine in the stem, leaves and flowers. Moreover, the theobromine concentration in the stem cortex increased significantly towards the base of the plant. Since the stem cortex of P. yoco is traditionally used by the natives of Colombia and Ecuador to prepare a caffeine-rich beverage, we suspected that within the genus Paullinia the PuA are preferentially allocated to the older parts of the stem and not to young shoots like e.g., in the coffee plant (Coffea spp.). Indeed, the axis (greenhouse) of P. cupana (guaraná), known for its caffeine-rich seeds, exhibited a basipetal PuA gradient (0.005-0.145%). Moreover, the analysis of young cortex samples (herbarium) and of one piece of old stem (museum collection) revealed the same for P. yoco, even though we found much less (0.5 vs 2.5%) caffeine in the old cortex as compared to the only two analyses in 1926 of similar material. However, this discrepancy may be explained by the high variability of the PuA pattern we detected among yoco, the diversity of which the Indians take advantage.

  11. [Natural purine compounds as radioprotective agents].

    PubMed

    Popova, N R; Gudkov, S V; Bruskov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Purine compounds xanthosine, caffeine, inosine-5'-monophosphate and guanosine-5'-monophosphate in the concentration range of 0.02-1 mmol/L exhibit antioxidant properties in vitro, significantly reducing the formation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals induced by X-rays in aqueous solutions and preventing the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA solutions. These compounds neutralize the long-lived protein radicals in vitro induced by radiation. In vivo they exhibit pronounced radiotherapeutic properties, increasing the survival rate of mice up to 50% by intraperitoneal injection (45 mg/kg) after the exposure to a lethal dose of 7 Gy. The tested compounds stimulate hemopoiesis, increasing the number of white blood cells and platelets in the peripheral blood of animals in postradiation period, as well as radiation recovery of DNA damage when administered both before and after irradiation. These purine compounds can be considered as potentially promising preventive and therapeutic agents to reduce the risk of the pathological effects of ionizing radiation on the body of mammals. PMID:25764844

  12. Importance of purine and pyrimidine content of local nucleotide sequences (six bases long) for evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doi, H

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolves rapidly, and random base change is thought to act as a major factor in this evolution. However, segments of the viral genome differ in their variability: there is the highly variable env gene, particularly hypervariable regions located within env, and, in contrast, the conservative gag and pol genes. Computer analysis of the nucleotide sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates reveals that base substitution in this virus is nonrandom and affected by local nucleotide sequences. Certain local sequences 6 base pairs long are excessively frequent in the hypervariable regions. These sequences exhibit base-substitution hotspots at specific positions in their 6 bases. The hotspots tend to be nonsilent letters of codons in the hypervariable regions--thus leading to marked amino acid substitutions there. Conversely, in the conservative gag and pol genes the hotspots tend to be silent letters because of a difference in codon frame from the hypervariable regions. Furthermore, base substitutions in the local sequences that frequently appear in the conservative genes occurred at a low level, even within the variable env. Thus, despite the high variability of this virus, the conservative genes and their products could be conserved. These may be some of the strategies evolved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to allow for positive-selection pressures, such as the host immune system, and negative-selection pressures on the conservative gene products. Images PMID:1924392

  13. Purine Salvage Pathways among Borrelia Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Jonas; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Guyard, Cyril; Lawrence, Kevin; Gherardini, Frank C.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2007-01-01

    Genome sequencing projects on two relapsing fever spirochetes, Borrelia hermsii and Borrelia turicatae, revealed differences in genes involved in purine metabolism and salvage compared to those in the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. The relapsing fever spirochetes contained six open reading frames that are absent from the B. burgdorferi genome. These genes included those for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hpt), adenylosuccinate synthase (purA), adenylosuccinate lyase (purB), auxiliary protein (nrdI), the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase alpha subunit (nrdE), and the ribonucleotide-diphosphate reductase beta subunit (nrdF). Southern blot assays with multiple Borrelia species and isolates confirmed the presence of these genes in the relapsing fever group of spirochetes but not in B. burgdorferi and related species. TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the chromosomal genes (hpt, purA, and purB) were transcribed in vitro and in mice. Phosphoribosyltransferase assays revealed that, in general, B. hermsii exhibited significantly higher activity than did the B. burgdorferi cell lysate, and enzymatic activity was observed with adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanine as substrates. B. burgdorferi showed low but detectable phosphoribosyltransferase activity with hypoxanthine even though the genome lacks a discernible ortholog to the hpt gene in the relapsing fever spirochetes. B. hermsii incorporated radiolabeled hypoxanthine into RNA and DNA to a much greater extent than did B. burgdorferi. This complete pathway for purine salvage in the relapsing fever spirochetes may contribute, in part, to these spirochetes achieving high cell densities in blood. PMID:17502392

  14. Purine Metabolism During Neuronal Differentiation: The Relevance of Purine Synthesis and Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Göttle, Martin; Burhenne, Heike; Sutcliffe, Diane; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Purines are a class of small organic molecules that are essential for all cells. They play critical roles in neuronal differentiation and function. Their importance is highlighted by several inherited disorders of purine metabolism, such as the Lesch-Nyhan disease, which is caused by a deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt). Despite the known importance of purines in the nervous system, knowledge regarding their metabolism in neurons is limited. In the current studies, purine pools and their metabolism were examined in rat PC6-3 cells, a PC12 pheochromocytoma subclone that undergoes robust differentiation with nerve growth factor. The results were compared with five new independent PC6-3 subclones with defective purine recycling due to different mutations affecting HGprt enzyme activity. The results demonstrate an increase in most purines and in energy state following neuronal differentiation, as well as specific abnormalities when purine recycling is lost. The loss of HGprt-mediated purine recycling also is associated with significant loss of dopamine and related metabolites in the mutant PC6-3 lines, suggesting an important connection between purine and dopamine pathways. These results provide insights into how purine pools and metabolism change with neuronal differentiation, and how specific enzyme defects may cause neuronal dysfunction. PMID:23859490

  15. Evidence from CD spectra that d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrids are in different structural classes.

    PubMed Central

    Hung, S H; Yu, Q; Gray, D M; Ratliff, R L

    1994-01-01

    CD spectra and difference CD spectra of four d(oligopurine).r(oligopyrimidine) and four r(oligopurine).d(oligopyrimidine) hybrid duplexes containing mixed A.T(U) and G.C base pairs were compared with the spectra of four DNA.DNA and four RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes of similar repeating sequences. The 16 duplexes were formed by mixing oligomers that were 24 nucleotides long. The buffer was 0.05 M Na+ (phosphate), pH 7.0. DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes were used as reference B-form and A-form structures. We found that the CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from the CD spectra of either DNA.DNA or RNA.RNA duplexes. The data suggested that these hybrids have intermediate structures between A-form RNA and B-form DNA structures. The CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from each other, but the hybrids in each class had consistent CD spectra as indicated by nearest-neighbor comparisons. Thus, it appeared that the two types of hybrids belonged to different structural classes. The negative 210 nm band found in difference CD spectra was correlated with the presence of an r(purine) strand in the hybrid duplexes. The melting temperatures (Tm values) of these hybrids were compared with the Tm values of the DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA duplexes. The order of the thermal stability was: RNA.RNA duplex > r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid > DNA.DNA duplex > d(purine).r(pyrimidine) hybrid, when comparing analogous sequences. PMID:7937162

  16. Microwave-assisted synthesis of C-8 aryl and heteroaryl inosines and determination of their inhibitory activities against Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Alba; Priego, Eva-María; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Vande Voorde, Johan; Camarasa, María-José; Balzarini, Jan; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús

    2014-07-23

    8-Arylinosines have been scarcely studied for therapeutic purposes, probably due to difficulties in their synthesis. The recently described direct arylation reaction at position 8 of purine nucleosides has been employed to synthesize a series of 8-aryl and 8-pyridylinosines. These compounds have been studied for hydrolytic stability and subjected to biological evaluation. Three compounds have shown a pronounced specific inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum-encoded purine nucleoside phosphorylase, an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy. PMID:24929343

  17. Stages in Learning to Pronounce Chinese Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xi; Shu, Hua; Wu, Ningning; Anderson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews research examining whether children can use information in the Chinese writing system to pronounce characters. Argues that the overarching graphophonological insight in reading Chinese characters is the phonetic principle --the principle that the phonetic components of compound characters provide information about character pronunciation.…

  18. Inhibition of gene transcription by purine rich triplex forming oligodeoxyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, C

    1993-01-01

    Several oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) were designed in order to interact with the purine rich element of the IRE (Interferon Responsive Element) of the 6-16 gene by triplex formation. An ODN of 21 bases, the sequence being identical to that of the purine strand of the IRE (48% G), but in reverse orientation, was able to interact with the IRE (KD: 20 nM). The binding was Mg2+ dependent. The two purine strands of the triplex were oriented antiparallel as confirmed by DNAase I and copper-phenanthroline footprinting experiments. An ODN in which A were replaced by T, also interacted with the same target, but with a lower affinity. Exonuclease III action indicated that the two IRE repeats of the 6-16 promoter interacted with each other through Hoogsteen base pairing, the third strand being parallel to the paired Watson-Crick strand. This led to a potential H-DNA structure which could be destabilized by adding ODNs able to form a triplex structure. 6-16 IRE driven-reporter gene constructs lost their interferon stimulability when co-transfected with triplex forming ODNs. The range of effective ODN concentrations was compatible with the affinity determined when measuring their direct interactions with the DNA. Images PMID:7687346

  19. Specific and non-specific purine trap in the T-loop of normal and suppressor tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Félix R; Zagryadskaya, Ekaterina I; Chen, Jianhong; Steinberg, Sergey V

    2004-10-01

    To elucidate the general constraints imposed on the structure of the D and T-loops in functional tRNAs, active suppressor tRNAs were selected in vivo from a combinatorial tRNA gene library in which several nucleotide positions in these loops were randomized. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the selected clones demonstrates that most of them contain combination U54-A58 allowing the formation of the standard reverse-Hoogsteen base-pair 54-58 in the T-loop. With only one exception, all these clones fall into two groups, each characterized by a distinct sequence pattern. Analysis of these two groups has allowed us to suggest two different types of nucleotide arrangement in the DT region. The first type, the so-called specific purine trap, is found in 12 individual tRNA clones and represents a generalized version of the standard D-T loop interaction. It consists of purine 18 sandwiched between the reverse-Hoogsteen base-pair U54-A58 and purine 57. The identity of purine 18 is restricted by the specific base-pairing with nucleotide 55. Depending on whether nucleotide 55 is U or G, purine 18 should be, respectively, G or A. The second structural type, the so-called non-specific purine trap, corresponds to the nucleotide sequence pattern found in 16 individual tRNA clones and is described here for the first time. It consists of purine 18 sandwiched between two reverse-Hoogsteen base-pairs U54-A58 and A55-C57 and, unlike the specific purine trap, requires the T-loop to contain an extra eighth nucleotide. Since purine 18 does not form a base-pair in the non-specific purine trap, both purines, G18 and A18, fit to the structure equally well. The important role of both the specific and non-specific purine traps in the formation of the tRNA L-shape is discussed.

  20. Riboswitch structure: an internal residue mimicking the purine ligand

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Bouchard, Patricia; Bonneau, Eric; Dagenais, Pierre; Lemay, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Daniel A.; Legault, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson–Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39–C65 and A39–U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation. PMID:20022916

  1. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food

    PubMed Central

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  2. Prebiotic syntheses of purines and pyrimidines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basile, B.; Oro, J.; Lazcano, A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the prebiotic synthesis of purines and pyramidines are surveyed. Topics examined include the synthesis of purines from HCN via 4,5-disubstituted imidazole derivatives in aqueous solutions or liquid NH3, simultaneous formation of amino acids and purines by electron irradiation of CH4-NH3-H2O mixtures, synthesis of pyrimadines from cynoacetylene, energetics, formation of bases under anhydrous or concentrated conditions, formation of bases under dilute conditions, Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, and the role of activated intermediates. It is pointed out that the precursor compounds have been detected in the interstellar medium, on Titan, and in other solar-system bodies, and that solar-nebula HCN concentrations of the order of 1-10 mM have been estimated on the basis of meteorite measurements.

  3. Characterization of purine catabolic pathway genes in coelacanths.

    PubMed

    Forconi, Mariko; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco; Buonocore, Francesco; De Moro, Gianluca; Fausto, Anna Maria; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Schartl, Manfred; Olmo, Ettore; Canapa, Adriana

    2014-09-01

    Coelacanths are a critically valuable species to explore the gene changes that took place in the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. One interesting and biologically relevant feature of the genus Latimeria is ureotelism. However not all urea is excreted from the body; in fact high concentrations are retained in plasma and seem to be involved in osmoregulation. The purine catabolic pathway, which leads to urea production in Latimeria, has progressively lost some steps, reflecting an enzyme loss during diversification of terrestrial species. We report the results of analyses of the liver and testis transcriptomes of the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis and of the genome of Latimeria chalumnae, which has recently been fully sequenced in the framework of the coelacanth genome project. We describe five genes, uricase, 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase, parahox neighbor B, allantoinase, and allantoicase, each coding for one of the five enzymes involved in urate degradation to urea, and report the identification of a putative second form of 5-hydroxyisourate hydrolase that is characteristic of the genus Latimeria. The present data also highlight the activity of the complete purine pathway in the coelacanth liver and suggest its involvement in the maintenance of high plasma urea concentrations.

  4. Modulation of AMP deaminase in rat hearts subjected to ischemia and reperfusion by purine riboside.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, T; Lipinski, M; Kaminski, R; Krzyminska-Stasiuk, E; Langowska, M; Raczak, G; Slominska, E M; Smolenski, R T

    2008-06-01

    Changes in AMP deaminase (AMPD) activity influence heart function and progression of heart disease, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We evaluated the effect of purine riboside (Purr) on the activity of AMPD in perfused rat hearts and in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. Brief perfusion of the pre-ischemic heart with 200 micro M Purr resulted in activation of AMPD, more pronounced degradation of the adenine nucleotides, and reduced recovery of the adenine nucleotide pool during reperfusion. Brief incubation of rat cardiomyocytes with 200 micro M Purr also activated AMPD, while prolonged exposure resulted in enzyme inhibition. We conclude that Purr activates AMPD, whereas metabolites of this compound may inhibit the enzyme.

  5. Purine and pyrimidine excretion in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H. A.; Bowyer, A.

    1974-01-01

    1 Urinary purine excretion has been investigated in two healthy controls and two patients with psoriasis, one a hyperuricaemic, one a normouricaemic. No difference was detected between the patients and controls. Therapy with allopurinol effectively lowered blood and urinary uric acid levels and produced a deficit in total urinary oxypurine excretion in both controls and patients with psoriasis. The concomitant increase in xanthine excretion was greater than the increase in hypoxanthine excretion and xanthine/hypoxanthine ratios (average 0.70 and 1.0 prior to therapy) were increased by allopurinol to an average of 3.0 and 3.8 respectively in the two groups. Allopurinol also reduced the excretion of 8-hydroxy-7-methyl guanine but no effect on the excretion levels of other minor purine bases was noted. 2 Allopurinol was metabolized similarly by both patients and controls, 84% of the administered allopurinol being accounted for as urinary metabolites. 74% of the drug in the urine was excreted as oxipurinol, 26% as unchanged allopurinol plus allopurinol riboside, the remainder being oxipurinol riboside. 3 Pseudouridine excretion in 25 healthy controls was 86.5 ± 17.8 mg/24 hours. Pseudouridine excretion was not excessive in the patients with psoriasis and was not altered by allopurinol therapy. 4 No abnormality or difference in purine or pyrimidine excretion in either patient was detected prior to or during therapy which could be related to the epidermal lesion. PMID:22454896

  6. Purine synthesis de novo and salvage in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Allsop, J; Watts, R W

    1990-01-01

    Extreme degrees of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency in man are associated with gross sex-linked neurological dysfunction, gout and urinary stones (the Lesch-Nyhan or 'complete HPRT-deficiency' syndrome). The less severe degrees of enzyme deficiency (sex-linked recessive gout and/or urolithiasis or the 'partial HPRT-deficiency' syndrome) may be associated with minor neurological manifestations. Whole body purine synthesis de novo is accelerated in both these groups of patients. A strain of mice with an experimentally produced mutation at the HPRT locus showed some residual 'apparent HPRT activity' in brain, liver, testicular, splenic, kidney and ovarian tissues but not in erythrocyte haemolysates. The mutation removes exons 1 and 2 of the coding region of the gene together with the promotor and about 10 kb of upstream sequence from the gene. It is therefore possible that the observed 'apparent HPRT activity' in these mice is due to the operation of an alternative metabolic pathway. Purine synthesis de novo was markedly accelerated in their brain, testicular, splenic and kidney tissues. It was not accelerated in the liver tissue of male mice hemizygous for the mutation and the degree of acceleration in the female homozygotes only just reached statistical significance at the p = 0.02 level. This observation casts doubt on the importance of modulations in the rate of hepatic purine synthesis de novo as a mechanism for maintaining a steady supply of purines for translocation to other organs.

  7. Purine and pyrimidine-specific repression of the Escherichia coli carAB operon are functionally and structurally coupled.

    PubMed

    Devroede, Neel; Thia-Toong, Thia-Lin; Gigot, Daniel; Maes, Dominique; Charlier, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    Transcription of the carAB operon encoding the sole carbamoylphosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli proceeds from a tandem pair of promoters. P2, downstream, is repressed by arginine and the ArgR protein, whereas P1 is submitted to pyrimidine-specific regulation and as shown here to purine-specific control exerted by binding of the PurR protein to a PUR box sequence centered around nucleotide -128.5 with respect to the start of P1 transcription. In vivo analyses of the effects of trans and cis-acting mutations on the regulatory responses and single round in vitro transcription assays indicated that ligand-bound PurR is by itself unable to inhibit P1 promoter activity. To exert its effect PurR relies on the elaborated nucleoprotein complex that governs P1 activity in a pyrimidine-specific manner. Thus we reveal the existence of an unprecedented functional and structural coupling between the modulation of P1 activity by purine and pyrimidine residues that appears to result from the unique position of the PUR box in the carAB control region, far upstream of the promoter. Missing contact and premethylation binding interference studies revealed the importance of base-specific groups and of structural aspects of the PUR box sequence in complex formation. Permutation assays indicated that the overall PurR-induced bending of the carAB control region is slightly less pronounced than that of the purF operator. The PUR boxes of the carAB operon of E.coli and Salmonella typhimurium are unique in that they have a guanine residue at position eight. Interestingly, guanine at this position has been proposed to be extremely unfavorable on the basis of modeling and binding studies, as its exocyclic amino group would enter into a steric clash with the side-chain of lysine 55. To analyze the effect of guanine at position eight in the upstream half-site of the carAB operator we constructed the adenine derivative and assayed in vivo repressibility of P1 promoter activity and in vitro

  8. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  9. Distinct Purine Distribution in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are known to contain a diverse suite of organic compounds, many of which are essential components of biochemistry. Amino acids, which are the monomers of proteins, have been extensively studied in such meteorites (e.g. Botta and Bada 2002; Pizzarello et aI., 2006). The origin of amino acids in meteorites has been firmly established as extraterrestrial based on their detection typically as racemic mixtures of amino acids, the presence of many non-protein amino acids, and non-terrestrial values for compound-specific deuterium, carbon, and nitrogen isotopic measurements. In contrast to amino acids, nucleobases in meteorites have been far less studied. Nucleobases are substituted one-ring (pyrimidine) or two-ring (purine) nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and serve as the information carriers of nucleic acids and in numerous coenzymes. All of the purines (adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine) and pyrimidines (uracil) previously reported in meteorites are biologically common and could be interpreted as the result of terrestrial contamination (e.g. van del' Velden and Schwartz, 1974.) Unlike other meteoritic organics, there have been no observations of stochastic molecular diversity of purines and pyrimidines in meteorites, which has been a criterion for establishing extraterrestrial origin. Maltins et al. (2008) performed compound-specific stable carbon isotope measurements for uracil and xanthine in the Murchison meteorite. They assigned a non-terrestrial origin for these nucleobases; however, the possibility that interfering indigenous molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) contributed to the 13C-enriched isotope values for these nucleobases cannot be completely ruled out. Thus, the origin of these meteoritic nucleobases has never been established unequivocally. Here we report on our investigation of extracts of II different carbonaceous chondrites covering various petrographic types (Cl, CM, and CR) and degrees of aqueous alteration

  10. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  11. Purine and glycine metabolism by purinolytic clostridia.

    PubMed Central

    Dürre, P; Andreesen, J R

    1983-01-01

    Cell extracts of Clostridium acidiurici, C. cylindrosporum, and C. purinolyticum converted purine, hypoxanthine, 2-hydroxypurine, 6,8-dihydroxypurine, and uric acid into xanthine by the shortest possible route. Adenine was transformed to xanthine only by C. purinolyticum, whereas the other two species formed 6-amino-8-hydroxypurine, which was neither deaminated nor hydroxylated further. 8-Hydroxypurine was formed from purine by all three species. Xanthine dehydrogenase activity was constitutively expressed by C. purinolyticum. Due to the lability of the enzyme activity, comparative studies could not be done with a purified preparation. All enzymes reported to be involved in formiminoglycine metabolism of C. acidiurici and C. cylindrosporum were present in C. purinolyticum. However, glycine was reduced directly to acetate in all three species, as indicated by radiochemical data and by the detection of glycine reductase in cell extracts of C. cylindrosporum and C. purinolyticum. The expression of glycine reductase and the high ratio of glycine fermented to uric acid present points to an energetic advantage for the glycine reductase system, which is expressed when selenium compounds are added to the growth media. PMID:6833177

  12. Allosteric Modulation of Purine and Pyrimidine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Göblyös, Anikó; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2011-01-01

    Among the purine and pyrimidine receptors, the discovery of small molecular allosteric modulators has been most highly advanced for the A1 and A3 ARs. These AR modulators have allosteric effects that are structurally separated from the orthosteric effects in SAR studies. The benzoylthiophene derivatives tend to act as allosteric agonists, as well as selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the A1 AR. A 2-amino-3-aroylthiophene derivative T-62 has been under development as a PAM of the A1 AR for the treatment of chronic pain. Several structurally distinct classes of allosteric modulators of the human A3 AR have been reported: 3-(2-pyridinyl)isoquinolines, 2,4-disubstituted quinolines, 1H-imidazo-[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amines, endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol and the food dye Brilliant Black BN. Site-directed mutagenesis of A1 and A3 ARs has identified residues associated with the allosteric effect, distinct from those that affect orthosteric binding. A few small molecular allosteric modulators have been reported for several of the P2X ligand-gated ion channels and the G protein-coupled P2Y receptor nucleotides. Metal ion modulation of the P2X receptors has been extensively explored. The allosteric approach to modulation of purine and pyrimidine receptors looks promising for development of drugs that are event-specific and site-specific in action. PMID:21586360

  13. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  14. Acceleration of purine degradation by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Teles, R; Trivedi, H M; Devizio, W; Xu, T; Mitchell, M W; Milburn, M V; Guo, L

    2009-09-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are characterized by bacterial plaque accumulation around the gingival crevice and the subsequent inflammation and destruction of host tissues. To test the hypothesis that cellular metabolism is altered as a result of host-bacteria interaction, we performed an unbiased metabolomic profiling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites in humans, by liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The purine degradation pathway, a major biochemical source for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was significantly accelerated at the disease sites. This suggests that periodontal-disease-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are mediated through this pathway. The complex host-bacterial interaction was further highlighted by depletion of anti-oxidants, degradation of host cellular components, and accumulation of bacterial products in GCF. These findings provide new mechanistic insights and a panel of comprehensive biomarkers for periodontal disease progression. PMID:19767584

  15. Acceleration of purine degradation by periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Barnes, V M; Teles, R; Trivedi, H M; Devizio, W; Xu, T; Mitchell, M W; Milburn, M V; Guo, L

    2009-09-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as gingivitis and periodontitis, are characterized by bacterial plaque accumulation around the gingival crevice and the subsequent inflammation and destruction of host tissues. To test the hypothesis that cellular metabolism is altered as a result of host-bacteria interaction, we performed an unbiased metabolomic profiling of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collected from healthy, gingivitis, and periodontitis sites in humans, by liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The purine degradation pathway, a major biochemical source for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was significantly accelerated at the disease sites. This suggests that periodontal-disease-induced oxidative stress and inflammation are mediated through this pathway. The complex host-bacterial interaction was further highlighted by depletion of anti-oxidants, degradation of host cellular components, and accumulation of bacterial products in GCF. These findings provide new mechanistic insights and a panel of comprehensive biomarkers for periodontal disease progression.

  16. If it's difficult to pronounce, it must be risky.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunjin; Schwarz, Norbert

    2009-02-01

    Low processing fluency fosters the impression that a stimulus is unfamiliar, which in turn results in perceptions of higher risk, independent of whether the risk is desirable or undesirable. In Studies 1 and 2, ostensible food additives were rated as more harmful when their names were difficult to pronounce than when their names were easy to pronounce; mediation analyses indicated that this effect was mediated by the perceived novelty of the substance. In Study 3, amusement-park rides were rated as more likely to make one sick (an undesirable risk) and also as more exciting and adventurous (a desirable risk) when their names were difficult to pronounce than when their names were easy to pronounce.

  17. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

    PubMed

    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite.

  18. Determination and profiling of purines in foods by using HPLC and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Inazawa, K; Sato, A; Kato, Y; Yamaoka, N; Fukuuchi, T; Yasuda, M; Mawatari, K; Nakagomi, K; Kaneko, K

    2014-01-01

    Purines in food are known to raise serum uric acid levels. We determined the purine content of sweet potato and beef by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The purine content of the samples was 118-1,034 μmol/100 g. The total purine content was also divided into purine bases, nucleosides, nucleotides, and nucleic acids. Our results suggest that differences in total purine content and in the ratio of purine types between vegetables and beef cause a difference in elevation of serum uric acid levels.

  19. Determination and profiling of purines in foods by using HPLC and LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Inazawa, K; Sato, A; Kato, Y; Yamaoka, N; Fukuuchi, T; Yasuda, M; Mawatari, K; Nakagomi, K; Kaneko, K

    2014-01-01

    Purines in food are known to raise serum uric acid levels. We determined the purine content of sweet potato and beef by high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The purine content of the samples was 118-1,034 μmol/100 g. The total purine content was also divided into purine bases, nucleosides, nucleotides, and nucleic acids. Our results suggest that differences in total purine content and in the ratio of purine types between vegetables and beef cause a difference in elevation of serum uric acid levels. PMID:24940702

  20. Thermodynamic examination of 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA constructs

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Shane; Shiskova, Evgenia; Hahm, Yaeeun

    2015-01-01

    Bulge loops are common features of RNA structures that are involved in the formation of RNA tertiary structures and are often sites for interactions with proteins and ions. Minimal thermodynamic data currently exist on the bulge size and sequence effects. Using thermal denaturation methods, thermodynamic properties of 1- to 5-nt adenine and guanine bulge loop constructs were examined in 10 mM MgCl2 or 1 M KCl. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA constructs were between 3.07 and 5.31 kcal/mol in 1 M KCl buffer. In 10 mM magnesium ions, the ΔΔG° values relative to 1 M KCl were 0.47–2.06 kcal/mol more favorable for the RNA bulge loops. The ΔG37∘ loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in DNA constructs were between 4.54 and 5.89 kcal/mol. Only 4- and 5-nt guanine constructs showed significant change in stability for the DNA constructs in magnesium ions. A linear correlation is seen between the size of the bulge loop and its stability. New prediction models are proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA in 1 M KCl. We show that a significant stabilization is seen for small bulge loops in RNA in the presence of magnesium ions. A prediction model is also proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loop RNA constructs in 10 mM magnesium chloride. PMID:26022248

  1. Thermodynamic examination of 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Strom, Shane; Shiskova, Evgenia; Hahm, Yaeeun; Grover, Neena

    2015-07-01

    Bulge loops are common features of RNA structures that are involved in the formation of RNA tertiary structures and are often sites for interactions with proteins and ions. Minimal thermodynamic data currently exist on the bulge size and sequence effects. Using thermal denaturation methods, thermodynamic properties of 1- to 5-nt adenine and guanine bulge loop constructs were examined in 10 mM MgCl(2) or 1 M KCl. The [Formula: see text] loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA constructs were between 3.07 and 5.31 kcal/mol in 1 M KCl buffer. In 10 mM magnesium ions, the ΔΔG° values relative to 1 M KCl were 0.47-2.06 kcal/mol more favorable for the RNA bulge loops. The [Formula: see text] loop parameters for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in DNA constructs were between 4.54 and 5.89 kcal/mol. Only 4- and 5-nt guanine constructs showed significant change in stability for the DNA constructs in magnesium ions. A linear correlation is seen between the size of the bulge loop and its stability. New prediction models are proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loops in RNA and DNA in 1 M KCl. We show that a significant stabilization is seen for small bulge loops in RNA in the presence of magnesium ions. A prediction model is also proposed for 1- to 5-nt purine bulge loop RNA constructs in 10 mM magnesium chloride.

  2. The biochemistry of nitrogen mobilization: purine ring catabolism.

    PubMed

    Werner, Andrea K; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2011-07-01

    The enzymatic route of purine ring catabolism has recently been completed by the discovery of several novel enzymes identified through comparative genome analyses. Here, we review these recent discoveries and present an overview of purine ring catabolism in plants. Xanthine is oxidized to urate in the cytosol, followed by three enzymatic steps taking place in the peroxisome and four reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum releasing the four ring nitrogen as ammonia. Although the main physiological function of purine degradation might lie in the remobilization of nitrogen resources, it has also emerged that catabolic intermediates, the ureides allantoin and allantoate, are likely to be involved in protecting plants against abiotic stress. Conserved alternative splicing mediating the peroxisomal as well as cytosolic localization of allantoin synthase potentially links purine ring catabolism to brassinosteroid signaling.

  3. Purine alkaloids from the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Si; Huang, Hui

    2008-04-01

    Four new purine alkaloids, namely, 6-(1'-purine-6',8'-dionyl)suberosanone ( 1), 3,9-(2-imino-1-methyl-4-imidazolidinone-5-yl)isopropenylpurine-6,8-dione ( 2), 1-(3'-carbonylbutyl)purine-6,8-dione ( 3), and 9-(3'-carbonylbutyl)purine-6,8-dione ( 4), together with three known compounds, guanosine ( 5), thymidine ( 6), and adenosine ( 7), were isolated from the EtOH/CH 2Cl 2 extracts of the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa. The structures of 1- 4 were determined on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR data. Compounds 1- 4 all showed weak cytotoxicity toward human cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and A435.

  4. Interaction of Bacillus subtilis purine repressor with DNA.

    PubMed

    Shin, B S; Stein, A; Zalkin, H

    1997-12-01

    A purine repressor (PurR) mediates adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of transcription initiation of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon. This repressor has been purified for the first time, and binding to control site DNA was characterized. PurR binds in vitro to four operons. Apparent Kd values for binding were 7 nM for the pur operon, 8 nM for purA, 13 nM for purR, and 44 nM for the pyr operon. In each case, DNase I footprints exhibited a pattern of protected and hypersensitive sites that extended over more than 60 bp. A GAAC-N24-GTTC sequence in the pur operon was necessary but not sufficient for the PurR-DNA interaction. However, this motif, which is conserved in the four binding sites, was not required for binding of PurR to purA. Thus, the common DNA recognition element for binding of PurR to the four operons is not known. Multiple PurR-pur operon DNA complexes having a binding stoichiometry that was either approximately two or six repressor molecules per DNA fragment were detected. The results of a torsional constraint experiment suggest that control site DNA forms one right-handed turn around PurR.

  5. Metabolic Reprogramming During Purine Stress in the Protozoan Pathogen Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jessica L.; Yates, Phillip A.; Soysa, Radika; Alfaro, Joshua F.; Yang, Feng; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Weitz, Karl K.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; David, Larry L.; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J.; Carter, Nicola S.

    2014-02-27

    The ability of Leishmania to survive in their insect or mammalian host is dependent upon an ability to sense and adapt to changes in the microenvironment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the parasite response to environmental changes, such as nutrient availability. To elucidate nutrient stress response pathways in Leishmania donovani, we have used purine starvation as the paradigm. The salvage of purines from the host milieu is obligatory for parasite replication; nevertheless, purine-starved parasites can persist in culture without supplementary purine for over 3 months, indicating that the response to purine starvation is robust and engenders parasite survival under conditions of extreme scarcity. To understand metabolic reprogramming during purine starvation we have employed global approaches. Whole proteome comparisons between purine-starved and purine-replete parasites over a 6-48 h span have revealed a temporal and coordinated response to purine starvation. Purine transporters and enzymes involved in acquisition at the cell surface are upregulated within a few hours of purine removal from the media, while other key purine salvage components are upregulated later in the time-course and more modestly. After 48 h, the proteome of purine-starved parasites is extensively remodeled and adaptations to purine stress appear tailored to deal with both purine deprivation and general stress. To probe the molecular mechanisms affecting proteome remodeling in response to purine starvation, comparative RNA-seq analyses, qRT-PCR, and luciferase reporter assays were performed on purine-starved versus purine-replete parasites. While the regulation of a minority of proteins tracked with changes at the mRNA level, for many regulated proteins it appears that proteome remodeling during purine stress occurs primarily via translational and/or post-translational mechanisms.

  6. Metabolic reprogramming during purine stress in the protozoan pathogen Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Yates, Phillip A; Soysa, Radika; Alfaro, Joshua F; Yang, Feng; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Wilmarth, Phillip A; David, Larry L; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Myler, Peter J; Carter, Nicola S

    2014-02-01

    The ability of Leishmania to survive in their insect or mammalian host is dependent upon an ability to sense and adapt to changes in the microenvironment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the parasite response to environmental changes, such as nutrient availability. To elucidate nutrient stress response pathways in Leishmania donovani, we have used purine starvation as the paradigm. The salvage of purines from the host milieu is obligatory for parasite replication; nevertheless, purine-starved parasites can persist in culture without supplementary purine for over three months, indicating that the response to purine starvation is robust and engenders parasite survival under conditions of extreme scarcity. To understand metabolic reprogramming during purine starvation we have employed global approaches. Whole proteome comparisons between purine-starved and purine-replete parasites over a 6-48 h span have revealed a temporal and coordinated response to purine starvation. Purine transporters and enzymes involved in acquisition at the cell surface are upregulated within a few hours of purine removal from the media, while other key purine salvage components are upregulated later in the time-course and more modestly. After 48 h, the proteome of purine-starved parasites is extensively remodeled and adaptations to purine stress appear tailored to deal with both purine deprivation and general stress. To probe the molecular mechanisms affecting proteome remodeling in response to purine starvation, comparative RNA-seq analyses, qRT-PCR, and luciferase reporter assays were performed on purine-starved versus purine-replete parasites. While the regulation of a minority of proteins tracked with changes at the mRNA level, for many regulated proteins it appears that proteome remodeling during purine stress occurs primarily via translational and/or post-translational mechanisms.

  7. Purine Salvage Pathway in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ducati, R G; Breda, A; Basso, L A; Santos, D S

    2011-01-01

    Millions of deaths worldwide are caused by the aetiological agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The increasing prevalence of this disease, the emergence of drug-resistant strains, and the devastating effect of human immunodeficiency virus coinfection have led to an urgent need for the development of new and more efficient antimycobacterial drugs. The modern approach to the development of new chemical compounds against complex diseases, especially the neglected endemic ones, such as tuberculosis, is based on the use of defined molecular targets. Among the advantages, this approach allows (i) the search and identification of lead compounds with defined molecular mechanisms against a specific target (e.g. enzymes from defined pathways), (ii) the analysis of a great number of compounds with a favorable cost/benefit ratio, and (iii) the development of compounds with selective toxicity. The present review describes the enzymes of the purine salvage pathway in M. tuberculosis as attractive targets for the development of new antimycobacterial agents. Enzyme kinetics and structural data have been included to provide a thorough knowledge on which to base the search for compounds with biological activity. We have focused on the mycobacterial homologues of this pathway as potential targets for the development of new antitubercular agents.

  8. The purine repressor of Bacillus subtilis: a novel combination of domains adapted for transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sangita C; Krahn, Joseph; Shin, Byung Sik; Tomchick, Diana R; Zalkin, Howard; Smith, Janet L

    2003-07-01

    The purine repressor from Bacillus subtilis, PurR, represses transcription from a number of genes with functions in the synthesis, transport, and metabolism of purines. The 2.2-A crystal structure of PurR reveals a two-domain protein organized as a dimer. The larger C-terminal domain belongs to the PRT structural family, in accord with a sequence motif for binding the inducer phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The PRT domain is fused to a smaller N-terminal domain that belongs to the winged-helix family of DNA binding proteins. A positively charged surface on the winged-helix domain likely binds specific DNA sequences in the recognition site. A second positively charged surface surrounds the PRPP site at the opposite end of the PurR dimer. Conserved amino acids in the sequences of PurR homologs in 21 gram-positive bacteria cluster on the proposed recognition surface of the winged-helix domain and around the PRPP binding site at the opposite end of the molecule, supporting a common function of DNA and PRPP binding for all of the proteins. The structure supports a binding mechanism in which extended regions of DNA interact with extensive protein surface. Unlike most PRT proteins, which are phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTases), PurR lacks catalytic activity. This is explained by a tyrosine side chain that blocks the site for a nucleophile cosubstrate in PRTases. Thus, B. subtilis has adapted an enzyme fold to serve as an effector-binding domain and has used it in a novel combination with the DNA-binding winged-helix domain as a repressor of purine genes.

  9. Targeting a Novel Plasmodium falciparum Purine Recycling Pathway with Specific Immucillins

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, L; Shi, W; Lewandowicz, A; Singh, V; Mwakingwe, A; Birck, M R; Taylor Ringia, E A; Bench, G; Madrid, D C; Tyler, P C; Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Schramm, V L; Kim, K

    2004-05-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is unable to synthesize purine bases and relies upon purine salvage and purine recycling to meet its purine needs. We report that purines formed as products of the polyamine pathway are recycled in a novel pathway in which 5'-methylthioinosine is generated by adenosine deaminase. The action of P. falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a convergent step of purine salvage, converting both 5'-methylthioinosine and inosine to hypoxanthine. We used accelerator mass spectrometry to verify that 5'-methylthioinosine is an active nucleic acid precursor in P. falciparum. Prior studies have shown that inhibitors of purine salvage enzymes kill malaria, but potent malaria-specific inhibitors of these enzymes have not previously been described. 5'-methylthio-Immucillin-H, a transition state analogue inhibitor that is selective for malarial over human purine nucleoside phosphorylase, kills P. falciparum in culture. Immucillins are currently in clinical trials for other indications and may have application as antimalarials.

  10. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth's prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines'. These compounds play a major role in terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. In this study we developed a new extraction technique using sublimation in order to isolate purines and pyrimidines from Murchison2, which is cleaner and more time efficient that traditional methods3. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine and xanthine were positively identified by high performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet absorption detection in our Murchison extracts. The purines detected in Murchison do not correlate with the distribution of nucleobases found in geological environments on Earth4. Moreover, the abundance of extraterrestrial amino acids and the low level of terrestrial amino acid contaminants found in Murchison', support the idea that the purines in t h s meteorite are extraterrestrial in origin.

  11. People with Easier to Pronounce Names Promote Truthiness of Claims

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Eryn J.; Sanson, Mevagh; Miller, Emily K.; Quigley-McBride, Adele; Foster, Jeffrey L.; Bernstein, Daniel M.; Garry, Maryanne

    2014-01-01

    When people make judgments about the truth of a claim, related but nonprobative information rapidly leads them to believe the claim–an effect called “truthiness” [1]. Would the pronounceability of others’ names also influence the truthiness of claims attributed to them? We replicated previous work by asking subjects to evaluate people’s names on a positive dimension, and extended that work by asking subjects to rate those names on negative dimensions. Then we addressed a novel theoretical issue by asking subjects to read that same list of names, and judge the truth of claims attributed to them. Across all experiments, easily pronounced names trumped difficult names. Moreover, the effect of pronounceability produced truthiness for claims attributed to those names. Our findings are a new instantiation of truthiness, and extend research on the truth effect as well as persuasion by showing that subjective, tangential properties such as ease of processing can matter when people evaluate information attributed to a source. PMID:24586368

  12. Double functionalization of carbon nanotubes with purine and pyrimidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Battigelli, Alessia; Toma, Francesca Maria; Raya, Jesus; Kumar, Jitendra; Nidamanuri, Nagapradeep; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-07-01

    Herein, we have developed a synthetic strategy for the covalent double functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a combination of purine-pyrimidine and purine-purine nucleobase systems. The nucleobases were introduced on the sidewall of oxidized SWCNTs through 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and by amidation of the carboxylic acids located at the tips and defect sites of the nanotubes. The new nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, and Kaiser test. The nucleobase/SWCNT conjugates can be envisaged for the modulation of the interactions with nucleic acids by means of base pairing, thereby opening new possibilities in the development of DNA/CNT nanobioconjugates. PMID:23703975

  13. Computational studies of the purine-functionalized graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Yousefi, Mohammad

    2012-10-01

    We performed a computational work to investigate the properties of functionalized graphene sheets (S) by adenine (A) and guanine (G) purine nucleobases. To achieve the purpose of this work, we examined the functionalization of armchair and zigzag tips of the S model by each of the A and G purines. The results indicated that the optimized properties for the investigated hybrid structures are different depending on the tip of functionalization and the used purine nucleobase. Moreover, the atomic level properties of the investigated structures were investigated by evaluating quadrupole coupling constants (CQ) for the atoms of the optimized structures. The remarkable trend of the CQ parameters is that the changes of atomic properties are many more significant for the functionalization of the zigzag-tip by the G nucleobase, which is in agreement with the results of the optimized properties.

  14. Plasticity in the purine-thiamine metabolic network of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Bazurto, Jannell V; Downs, Diana M

    2011-02-01

    In Salmonella enterica, 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) is the precursor of the 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP) pyrophosphate moiety of thiamine and the last intermediate in the common HMP/purine biosynthetic pathway. AIR is synthesized de novo via five reactions catalyzed by the purF, -D, -T, -G, and -I gene products. In vivo genetic analysis demonstrated that in the absence of these gene products AIR can be generated if (i) methionine and lysine are in the growth medium, (ii) PurC is functional, and (iii) 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) has accumulated. This study provides evidence that the five steps of the common HMP/purine biosynthetic pathway can be bypassed in the synthesis of AIR and thus demonstrates that thiamine synthesis can be uncoupled from the early purine biosynthetic pathway in bacteria.

  15. Purine metabolism in mesophyll protoplasts of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Barankiewicz, J; Paszkowski, J

    1980-01-01

    The overall metabolism of purines was studied in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mesophyll protoplasts. Metabolic pathways were studied by measuring the conversion of radioactive adenine, adenosine, hypoxanthine and guanine into purine ribonucleotides, ribonucleosides, bases and nucleic acid constituents. Adenine was extensively deaminated to hypoxanthine, whereupon it was also converted into AMP and incorporated into nucleic acids. Adenosine was mainly hydrolysed to adenine. Inosinate formed from hypoxanthine was converted into AMP and GMP, which were then catabolized to adenine and guanosine respectively. Guanine was mainly deaminated to xanthine and also incorporated into nucleic acids via GTP. Increased RNA synthesis in the protoplasts resulted in enhanced incorporation of adenine and guanine, but not of hypoxanthine and adenosine, into the nucleic acid fraction. The overall pattern of purine-nucleotide metabolic pathways in protoplasts of tobacco leaf mesophyll is proposed. PMID:6154458

  16. [Purine regulon of gamma-proteobacteria: a detailed description].

    PubMed

    Ravcheev, D A; Gel'fand, M S; Mironov, A A; Rakhmaninova, A B

    2002-09-01

    The structure of the purine regulon was studied by a comparative genomic approach in seven genomes of gamma-proteobacteria: Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Yersinia pestis, Haemophilus influenzae, Pasteurella multocida, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Vibrio cholerae. The palindromic binding site of the purine repressor (consensus ACGCAAACGTTTGCGT) is fairly well retained of genes encoding enzymes that participate in the synthesis of inosinemonophosphate from phosphoribozylpyrophosphate and in transfer of unicarbon groups, and also upstream of some transport protein genes. These genes may be regarded as the main part of the purine regulon. In terms of physiology, the regulation of the purC and gcvTHP/folD genes seems to be especially important, because the PurR site was found upstream of nonorthologous but functionally replaceable genes. However, the PurR site is poorly retained in front of orthologs of some genes belonging to the E. coli purine regulon, such as genes involved in general nitrogen metabolism, biosynthesis of pyrimidines, and synthesis of AMP and GMP from IMP, and also upstream of the purine repressor gene. It is predicted that purine regulons of the examined bacteria include the following genes: upp participating in synthesis of pyrimidines; uraA encoding an uracil transporter gene; serA involved in serine biosynthesis; folD responsible for the conversion of N5,N10-methenyl tetrahydrofolate into N10-formyltetrahydrofolate; rpiA involved in ribose metabolism; and protein genes with an unknown function (yhhQ and ydiK). The PurR site was shown to have different structure in different genomes. Thus, the tendency for a decline of the conservatism of site positions 2 and 15 was observed in genomes of bacteria belonging to the Pasteurellaceae and Vibrionaceae groups.

  17. Purine analog substitution of the HIV-1 polypurine tract primer defines regions controlling initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Jason W.; Le Grice, Stuart F. J.

    2007-01-01

    Despite extensive study, the mechanism by which retroviral reverse transciptases (RTs) specifically utilize polypurine tract (PPT) RNA for initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis remains unclear. Three sequence motifs within or adjacent to the purine-rich elements are highly conserved, namely, a rU:dA tract region immediately 5′ to the PPT, an rA:dT-rich sequence constituting the upstream portion of the PPT and a downstream rG:dC tract. Using an in vitro HIV-1 model system, we determined that the former two elements define the 5′ terminus of the (+)-strand primer, whereas the rG:dC tract serves as the primary determinant of initiation specificity. Subsequent analysis demonstrated that G→A or A→G substitution at PPT positions −2, −4 and +1 (relative to the scissile phosphate) substantially reduces (+)-strand priming. We explored this observation further using PPT substrates substituted with a variety of nucleoside analogs [inosine (I), purine riboside (PR), 2-aminopurine (2-AP), 2,6-diaminopurine (2,6-DAP), isoguanine (iG)], or one of the naturally occurring bases at these positions. Our results demonstrate that for PPT positions −2 or +1, substituting position 2 of the purine was an important determinant of cleavage specificity. In addition, cleavage specificity was greatly affected by substituting −4G with an analog containing a 6-NH2 moiety. PMID:17164285

  18. A purine nucleoside phosphorylase in Solanum tuberosum L. (potato) with specificity for cytokinins contributes to the duration of tuber endodormancy.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Jennifer R; Warnes, Barbara J; Newell, Christine A; Thomson, Jamie C P; James, Celia M; Turnbull, Colin G N; Hanke, David E

    2014-03-01

    StCKP1 (Solanum tuberosum cytokinin riboside phosphorylase) catalyses the interconversion of the N9-riboside form of the plant hormone CK (cytokinin), a subset of purines, with its most active free base form. StCKP1 prefers CK to unsubstituted aminopurines. The protein was discovered as a CK-binding activity in extracts of tuberizing potato stolon tips, from which it was isolated by affinity chromatography. The N-terminal amino acid sequence matched the translation product of a set of ESTs, enabling a complete mRNA sequence to be obtained by RACE-PCR. The predicted polypeptide includes a cleavable signal peptide and motifs for purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity. The expressed protein was assayed for purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity against CKs and adenine/adenosine. Isopentenyladenine, trans-zeatin, dihydrozeatin and adenine were converted into ribosides in the presence of ribose 1-phosphate. In the opposite direction, isopentenyladenosine, trans-zeatin riboside, dihydrozeatin riboside and adenosine were converted into their free bases in the presence of Pi. StCKP1 had no detectable ribohydrolase activity. Evidence is presented that StCKP1 is active in tubers as a negative regulator of CKs, prolonging endodormancy by a chill-reversible mechanism.

  19. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. Conformational properties of purine-pyrimidine and pyrimidine-purine dinucleoside monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Ezra, F S; Lee, C H; Kondo, N S; Danyluk, S S; Sarma, R H

    1977-05-01

    The detailed conformational features and dynamics of heterodinucleoside monophosphates ApU, ApC, GpU, GpC, UpA, CpA, UpG, and CpG have been studied in aqueous solution by high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Analysis of the resultant NMR parameters leads to a number of discernible trends throughout the series. Thus the ribose rings of the dimers exist as equilibrium mixtures of C(2')-endo(2E) in equilibrium C(3')-endo(3E) conformers with a proclivity for the 3E pucker in most cases; the C(4')-C(5') bonds of both nucleotidyl units show significant preference (74-96%) for a gg conformation and the dominant conformer (85-89%) about C(5')-O(5') is g'g'. Orientation about the C(3')-O(3') bond is coupled to the ribose conformational equilibrium and the system exists with a bias for the 3Eg- coupled conformation in which the H(3')-C(3')-O(3')-P dihedral angle occupies the narrow range of 33-35 degrees. Dimerization, on the average, causes about 10% increase in gg and g'g' populations and the g-domain becomes increasingly populated about the C(3')-O(3') bond. The ribose equilibrium 2E in equilibrium 3E shifts in favor of 3E upon dimerization, the effect being very conspicuous for the pu-py series (similar to 40 yields 60%) and less noticeable for the py-pu systems (similar to 47 yields 58%), clearly suggesting a correlation between sequence and ribose conformational equilibrium. The temperature and dimerization data for the heterodinucleoside monophosphates show that the transition 2E yields 3E is directly related to XCN changes induced by dimerization and stacking. Analysis of the ribose coupling data shows that the percentage populations of stacked species vary from dimer to dimer with GpC displaying a maximum of 45% stacked population and UpG about 10%. However, in general, the pu-py dimers show a higher preference (27-45%) for stacked conformations than py-pu dimers (10-25%). It is proposed that the pronounced deshielding of H(5') of the 5

  5. Purines and neuronal excitability: links to the ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Masino, S A; Kawamura, M; Ruskin, D N; Geiger, J D; Boison, D

    2012-07-01

    ATP and adenosine are purines that play dual roles in cell metabolism and neuronal signaling. Acting at the A(1) receptor (A(1)R) subtype, adenosine acts directly on neurons to inhibit excitability and is a powerful endogenous neuroprotective and anticonvulsant molecule. Previous research showed an increase in ATP and other cell energy parameters when an animal is administered a ketogenic diet, an established metabolic therapy to reduce epileptic seizures, but the relationship among purines, neuronal excitability and the ketogenic diet was unclear. Recent work in vivo and in vitro tested the specific hypothesis that adenosine acting at A(1)Rs is a key mechanism underlying the success of ketogenic diet therapy and yielded direct evidence linking A(1)Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Specifically, an in vitro mimic of a ketogenic diet revealed an A(1)R-dependent metabolic autocrine hyperpolarization of hippocampal neurons. In parallel, applying the ketogenic diet in vivo to transgenic mouse models with spontaneous electrographic seizures revealed that intact A(1)Rs are necessary for the seizure-suppressing effects of the diet. This is the first direct in vivo evidence linking A(1)Rs to the antiepileptic effects of a ketogenic diet. Other predictions of the relationship between purines and the ketogenic diet are discussed. Taken together, recent research on the role of purines may offer new opportunities for metabolic therapy and insight into its underlying mechanisms. PMID:21880467

  6. Inhibition and Structure of Toxoplasma gondii Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Teraya M.; Cassera, María B.; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zhan, Chenyang; Merino, Emilio F.; Evans, Gary B.; Tyler, Peter C.; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is a purine auxotroph that relies on purine salvage for proliferation. We have optimized T. gondii purine nucleoside phosphorylase (TgPNP) stability and crystallized TgPNP with phosphate and immucillin-H, a transition-state analogue that has high affinity for the enzyme. Immucillin-H bound to TgPNP with a dissociation constant of 370 pM, the highest affinity of 11 immucillins selected to probe the catalytic site. The specificity for transition-state analogues indicated an early dissociative transition state for TgPNP. Compared to Plasmodium falciparum PNP, large substituents surrounding the 5′-hydroxyl group of inhibitors demonstrate reduced capacity for TgPNP inhibition. Catalytic discrimination against large 5′ groups is consistent with the inability of TgPNP to catalyze the phosphorolysis of 5′-methylthioinosine to hypoxanthine. In contrast to mammalian PNP, the 2′-hydroxyl group is crucial for inhibitor binding in the catalytic site of TgPNP. This first crystal structure of TgPNP describes the basis for discrimination against 5′-methylthioinosine and similarly 5′-hydroxy-substituted immucillins; structural differences reflect the unique adaptations of purine salvage pathways of Apicomplexa. PMID:24585883

  7. Distinct Distribution of Purines in CM and CR Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Smith, Karen E.; Martin, Mildred G.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of organic molecules and delivered pre biotic organic compounds, including purines and pyrimidines, to the early Earth (and other planetary bodies), seeding it with the ingredients likely required for the first genetic material. We have investigated the distribution of nucleobases in six different CM and CR type carbonaceous chondrites, including fivc Antarctic meteorites never before analyzed for nucleobases. We employed a traditional formic acid extraction protocol and a recently developed solid phase extraction method to isolate nucleobases. We analyzed these extracts by high performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV -MS/MS) targeting the five canonical RNAIDNA bases and hypoxanthine and xanthine. We detected parts-per-billion levels of nucleobases in both CM and CR meteorites. The relative abundances of the purines found in Antarctic CM and CR meteorites were clearly distinct from each other suggesting that these compounds are not terrestrial contaminants. One likely source of these purines is formation by HCN oligomerization (with other small molecules) during aqueous alteration inside the meteorite parent body. The detection of the purines adenine (A), guanine (0), hypoxanthine (HX), and xanthine (X) in carbonaceous meteorites indicates that these compounds should have been available on the early Earth prior to the origin of the first genetic material.

  8. Acquired Hemochromatosis with Pronounced Pigment Deposition of the Upper Eyelids

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Brian; Hu, Shasa

    2013-01-01

    Hemochromatosis may be classified into two groups: primary (hereditary) or secondary (acquired). The acquired type most commonly occurs after massive intake of iron supplements or blood transfusions and is also known as transfusional iron overload. In the past, hemochromatosis was usually recognized at an advanced stage by the classic triad of hyperpigmentation, diabetes mellitus (“bronze diabetes”), and hepatic cirrhosis. Cutaneous hyperpigmentation is present in 70 percent of patients due to two different mechanisms: (1) hemosiderin deposition resulting in diffuse, slate-gray darkening and (2) increased production of melanin in the epidermis. A 47-year-old woman who receives regular transfusions due to low iron and chronic, unresolving anemia and who subsequently developed pronounced hyperpigmentation of the upper eyelids is described. The presentation, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment options of hyperpigmentation due to secondary hemochromatosis are discussed. PMID:24155994

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of caffeine synthase and purine alkaloid concentration in guarana fruit.

    PubMed

    Schimpl, Flávia Camila; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Gonçalves, José Francisco de Carvalho; da Silva, José Ferreira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Guarana seeds have the highest caffeine concentration among plants accumulating purine alkaloids, but in contrast with coffee and tea, practically nothing is known about caffeine metabolism in this Amazonian plant. In this study, the levels of purine alkaloids in tissues of five guarana cultivars were determined. Theobromine was the main alkaloid that accumulated in leaves, stems, inflorescences and pericarps of fruit, while caffeine accumulated in the seeds and reached levels from 3.3% to 5.8%. In all tissues analysed, the alkaloid concentration, whether theobromine or caffeine, was higher in young/immature tissues, then decreasing with plant development/maturation. Caffeine synthase activity was highest in seeds of immature fruit. A nucleotide sequence (PcCS) was assembled with sequences retrieved from the EST database REALGENE using sequences of caffeine synthase from coffee and tea, whose expression was also highest in seeds from immature fruit. The PcCS has 1083bp and the protein sequence has greater similarity and identity with the caffeine synthase from cocoa (BTS1) and tea (TCS1). A recombinant PcCS allowed functional characterization of the enzyme as a bifunctional CS, able to catalyse the methylation of 7-methylxanthine to theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine), and theobromine to caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), respectively. Among several substrates tested, PcCS showed higher affinity for theobromine, differing from all other caffeine synthases described so far, which have higher affinity for paraxanthine. When compared to previous knowledge on the protein structure of coffee caffeine synthase, the unique substrate affinity of PcCS is probably explained by the amino acid residues found in the active site of the predicted protein. PMID:24856135

  10. Molecular and biochemical characterization of caffeine synthase and purine alkaloid concentration in guarana fruit.

    PubMed

    Schimpl, Flávia Camila; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Gonçalves, José Francisco de Carvalho; da Silva, José Ferreira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Guarana seeds have the highest caffeine concentration among plants accumulating purine alkaloids, but in contrast with coffee and tea, practically nothing is known about caffeine metabolism in this Amazonian plant. In this study, the levels of purine alkaloids in tissues of five guarana cultivars were determined. Theobromine was the main alkaloid that accumulated in leaves, stems, inflorescences and pericarps of fruit, while caffeine accumulated in the seeds and reached levels from 3.3% to 5.8%. In all tissues analysed, the alkaloid concentration, whether theobromine or caffeine, was higher in young/immature tissues, then decreasing with plant development/maturation. Caffeine synthase activity was highest in seeds of immature fruit. A nucleotide sequence (PcCS) was assembled with sequences retrieved from the EST database REALGENE using sequences of caffeine synthase from coffee and tea, whose expression was also highest in seeds from immature fruit. The PcCS has 1083bp and the protein sequence has greater similarity and identity with the caffeine synthase from cocoa (BTS1) and tea (TCS1). A recombinant PcCS allowed functional characterization of the enzyme as a bifunctional CS, able to catalyse the methylation of 7-methylxanthine to theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine), and theobromine to caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), respectively. Among several substrates tested, PcCS showed higher affinity for theobromine, differing from all other caffeine synthases described so far, which have higher affinity for paraxanthine. When compared to previous knowledge on the protein structure of coffee caffeine synthase, the unique substrate affinity of PcCS is probably explained by the amino acid residues found in the active site of the predicted protein.

  11. Role and regulation of coordinately expressed de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes PPAT and PAICS in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Moloy T; Chen, Guoan; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Pathi, Satya S; Anand, Sharath K; Carskadon, Shannon L; Giordano, Thomas J; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Beer, David G; Varambally, Sooryanarayana

    2015-09-15

    Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolism including aerobic glycolysis that channels several glycolytic intermediates into de novo purine biosynthetic pathway. We discovered increased expression of phosphoribosyl amidotransferase (PPAT) and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase (PAICS) enzymes of de novo purine biosynthetic pathway in lung adenocarcinomas. Transcript analyses from next-generation RNA sequencing and gene expression profiling studies suggested that PPAT and PAICS can serve as prognostic biomarkers for aggressive lung adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of PAICS performed on tissue microarrays showed increased expression with disease progression and was significantly associated with poor prognosis. Through gene knockdown and over-expression studies we demonstrate that altering PPAT and PAICS expression modulates pyruvate kinase activity, cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore we identified genomic amplification and aneuploidy of the divergently transcribed PPAT-PAICS genomic region in a subset of lung cancers. We also present evidence for regulation of both PPAT and PAICS and pyruvate kinase activity by L-glutamine, a co-substrate for PPAT. A glutamine antagonist, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) blocked glutamine mediated induction of PPAT and PAICS as well as reduced pyruvate kinase activity. In summary, this study reveals the regulatory mechanisms by which purine biosynthetic pathway enzymes PPAT and PAICS, and pyruvate kinase activity is increased and exposes an existing metabolic vulnerability in lung cancer cells that can be explored for pharmacological intervention. PMID:26140362

  12. Role and regulation of coordinately expressed de novo purine biosynthetic enzymes PPAT and PAICS in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, Satya S.; Anand, Sharath K.; Carskadon, Shannon L.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Beer, David G.; Varambally, Sooryanarayana

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolism including aerobic glycolysis that channels several glycolytic intermediates into de novo purine biosynthetic pathway. We discovered increased expression of phosphoribosyl amidotransferase (PPAT) and phosphoribosylaminoimidazole carboxylase, phosphoribosylaminoimidazole succinocarboxamide synthetase (PAICS) enzymes of de novo purine biosynthetic pathway in lung adenocarcinomas. Transcript analyses from next-generation RNA sequencing and gene expression profiling studies suggested that PPAT and PAICS can serve as prognostic biomarkers for aggressive lung adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of PAICS performed on tissue microarrays showed increased expression with disease progression and was significantly associated with poor prognosis. Through gene knockdown and over-expression studies we demonstrate that altering PPAT and PAICS expression modulates pyruvate kinase activity, cell proliferation and invasion. Furthermore we identified genomic amplification and aneuploidy of the divergently transcribed PPAT-PAICS genomic region in a subset of lung cancers. We also present evidence for regulation of both PPAT and PAICS and pyruvate kinase activity by L-glutamine, a co-substrate for PPAT. A glutamine antagonist, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) blocked glutamine mediated induction of PPAT and PAICS as well as reduced pyruvate kinase activity. In summary, this study reveals the regulatory mechanisms by which purine biosynthetic pathway enzymes PPAT and PAICS, and pyruvate kinase activity is increased and exposes an existing metabolic vulnerability in lung cancer cells that can be explored for pharmacological intervention. PMID:26140362

  13. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel purine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Ben; Jin, Peng; Li, Fu-Nan; Quan, Zhe-Shan

    2014-09-12

    A series of new purines containing triazole and other heterocycle substituents was synthesized and evaluated for their preliminary anticonvulsant activity and neurotoxicity by using the maximal electroshock (MES), subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) and rotarod neurotoxicity (TOX) tests. Among the compounds studied, 9-decyl-6-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-9H-purine (5e) was the most potent compound, with a median effective dose of 23.4 mg/kg and a high protective index of more than 25.6 after intraperitoneal administration in mice. Compound 5e showed significant oral activity against MES-induced seizures in mice, with an ED50 of 39.4 mg/kg and a PI above 31.6. These results demonstrate that compound 5e possesses better anticonvulsant activity and is safer than the commercially available drugs carbamazepine and valproate in MES, scPTZ and TOX models.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of Charge Transfer Complexes of Purines and Pyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Pravinsinh I.; Oza, A. T.

    2011-10-20

    The FTIR spectra of charge transfer complexes of purines and pyrimidines with organic acceptors such as TCNQ, TCNE, DDQ, chloranil and iodine are obtained and studied in the present work. Adenine, guanine, thymine, cytosine and uracil are the purines and pyrimidines which are found as constituent of DNA and RNA. Charge transfer induced hydrogen bonding is concluded on the basis of indirect transitions observed in the infrared range in these CTCs. Some CTCs show gaussian bands revealing delocalization of charge carriers. The CTCs show interband transition in three-dimensions rather than two-dimensions unlike CTCs of amino acids. There is no extended hydrogen bonded network spanning the whole crystal. This leads to indirect transition due to locally deformed lattice furnishing a phonon-assisted transition.

  15. Biosynthesis of purines by a proplastid fraction from soybean nodules.

    PubMed

    Boland, M J; Schubert, K R

    1983-01-01

    A proplastid-containing fraction was rapidly prepared from soybean nodules by a combination of differential and step gradient centrifugation. This fraction was capable of incorporating [U-14C]glycine into purines in the presence of added phosphoribosylpyrophosphate or ribose 5-phosphate, glutamine, aspartate, ATP, bicarbonate, methenyl tetrahydrofolate, MgCl2, and KCl. The primary product was IMP; some inosine was also formed. Soluble and bacteroid fractions from soybean nodules gave considerably lower rates of incorporation. Labeled carbon from both [U-14C]serine and [3-14C]serine was incorporated into purines when tetrahydrofolate and NADP+ were substituted for methenyl tetrahydrofolate. In this case, small amounts of label were also found in AMP and xanthine monophosphate (XMP). Labeled bicarbonate was incorporated into IMP and inosine by the proplastid fraction. Labeled formate, however, was not a competent substrate for purine synthesis, indicating the absence of formyl tetrahydrofolate synthetase activity in this fraction. When labeled IMP was incubated with a proplastid preparation, most of the label appeared in inosine. XMP and xanthosine were also formed if NAD+ or NADP+ was added to the incubation mixture indicating the presence of IMP dehydrogenase activity in the proplastid fraction.

  16. Polypurine sequences within a downstream exon function as a splicing enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kenji; Watakabe, Akiya; Shimura, Yoshiro

    1994-02-01

    We have previously shown that a purine-rich sequence located within exon M2 of the mouse immunoglobulin {mu} gene functions as a splicing enhancer, as judged by its ability to stimulate splicing of a distant upstream intron. This sequence element has been designated ERS (exon recognition sequence). In this study, we investigated the stimulatory effects of various ERS-like sequences, using the in vitro splicing system with HeLa cell nuclear extracts. Here, we show that purine-rich sequences of several natural exons that have previously been shown to be required for splicing function as a splicing enhancer like the ERS of the immunoglobulin {mu} gene. Moreover, even synthetic polypurine sequences had stimulatory effects on the upstream splicing. Evaluation of the data obtained from the analyses of both natural and synthetic purine-rich sequences shows that (i) alternating purine sequences can stimulate splicing, while poly(A) or poly(G) sequences cannot, and (ii) the presence of U residues within the polypurine sequence greatly reduces the level of stimulation. Competition experiments strongly suggest that the stimulatory effects of various purine-rich sequences are mediated by the same trans-acting factor(s). We conclude from these results that the purine-rich sequences that we examined in this study also represent examples of ERS. Thus, ERS is considered a general splicing element that is present in various exons and plays an important role in splice site selection. 50 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Experimental and theoretical dipole moments of purines in their ground and lowest excited singlet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jean-Jacques; Diabou Gaye, Mame; Párkányi, Cyril; Cho, Nam Sook; Von Szentpály, László

    1987-01-01

    The ground-state dipole moments of seven biologically important purines (purine, 6-chloropurine, 6-mercaptopurine, hypoxanthine, theobromine, theophylline and caffeine) were determined at 25°C in acetic acid (all the above compounds with the exception of purine) and in ethyl acetate (purine, theophylline and caffeine). Because of its low solubility, it was not possible to measure the dipole moment of uric acid. The first excited singlet-state dipole moments were obtained on the basis of the Bakhshiev and Chamma—Viallet equations using the variation of the Stokes shift with the solvent dielectric constant-refractive index term. The theoretical dipole moments for all the purines listed above and including uric acid were calculated by combining the use of the PPP (π-LCI-SCF-MO) method for the π-contribution to the overall dipole moment with the σ-contribution obtained as a vector sum of the σbond moments and group moments. The experimental and theoretical values were compared with the data available in the literature for some of the purines under study. For several purines, the calculations were carried out for different tautomeric forms. Excited singlet-state dipole moments are smaller than the ground-state values by 0.8 to 2.2 Debye units for all purines under study with the exception of 6-chloropurine. The effects of the structure upon the ground- and excited-state dipole moments of the purines are discussed.

  18. Homochiral Selectivity in RNA Synthesis: Montmorillonite-catalyzed Quaternary Reactions of D, L-Purine with D, L- Pyrimidine Nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash C.; Aldersley, Michael F.; Ferris, James P.

    2011-06-01

    Selective adsorption of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on the platelets of montmorillonite demonstrates an important reaction pathway for the origin of homochirality in RNA synthesis. Our earlier studies have shown that the individual reactions of D, L-ImpA or D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite catalyst produced oligomers which were only partially inhibited by the incorporation of both D- and L-enantiomers. Homochirality in these reactions was largely due to the formation of cyclic dimers that cannot elongate. We investigated the quaternary reactions of D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU on montmorillonite. The chain length of these oligomers increased from 9-mer to 11-mer as observed by HPLC, with a concominant increase in the yield of linear dimers and higher oligomers in the reactions involving D, L-ImpA with D, L-ImpU as compared to the similar reactions carried out with D-enantiomers only. The formation of cyclic dimers of U was completely inhibited in the quaternary reactions. The yield of cyclic dimers of A was reduced from 60% to 10% within the dimer fraction. 12 linear dimers and 3 cyclic dimers were isolated and characterized from the quaternary reaction. The homochirality and regioselectivity of dimers were 64.1% and 71.7%, respectively. Their sequence selectivity was shown by the formation of purine-pyrimidine (54-59%) linkages, followed by purine-purine (29-32%) linkages and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (9-13%) linkages. Of the 16 trimers detected, 10 were homochiral with an overall homochirality of 73-76%. In view of the greater homochirality, sequence- and regio- selectivity, the quaternary reactions on montmorillonite demonstrate an unexpectedly favorable route for the prebiotic synthesis of homochiral RNA compared with the separate reactions of enantiomeric activated mononucleotides.

  19. [Identification and quantitation of purine derivatives in urinary calculi as markers of abnormal purine metabolism by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)].

    PubMed

    Safranow, K

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a practical method for the analysis of purine derivatives in urinary calculi using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The method presented herein includes extraction of purine derivatives from urinary stones, followed by chromatography on a reversed-phase column with UV detection. A simpler isocratic method was applied to quantitate 6 purines known to be components of urinary stones, namely uric acid, xanthine, hypoxanthine, 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, oxypurinol and allopurinol. Gradient method separated 10 additional peaks representing methyl derivatives of uric acid or xanthine (1-, 3-, 7-, and 9-methyluric acid, 1,3-,1,7-, and 3,7-dimethyluric acid, and 1-, 3-, and 7-methylxanthine) (Fig. 1). Detection limits for individual compounds ranged from 25 to 140 micrograms purine per g stone weight and precision (RSD%) was 0.5-2.4%. Both methods were next used to analyze purine derivatives in urinary calculi from 48 residents of Western Pomerania. Uric acid was the main component of 9 stones. All of the uric acid stones showed admixtures of 9 other purine derivatives: natural metabolites (hypoxanthine, xanthine, 2,8-dihydroxyadenine) and methyl derivatives of uric acid (1-,3-, and 7-methyluric acid, 1,3-dimethyluric acid, 3-, and 7-methylxanthine) originating from the metabolism of exogenous methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline and theobromine) (Tab. 1,2). Methyl derivatives of uric acid and xanthine, with a maximal content in stones of 1.7%, have hitherto not been considered constituents of urinary calculi. Statistical analysis of the results revealed strong positive correlations between the level of uric acid and of other purine derivatives in stones (Fig. 2). Correlations were also found between levels of some purines and inorganic compounds (Tab. 3). The sensitivity and specificity of HPLC with UV detection satisfy the requirements of a reference method for the analysis of purines in urinary stones. Isocratic

  20. Controlled transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes by a novel transcription factor derived from Escherichia coli purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Eun-Hee; Noh, Ju-Young; Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Min-Young; Yoon, Sarah; Park, Sang-Kyu; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2004-06-25

    Unlike the DNA-binding domains (DBD) of most eukaryotic transcription factors, Escherichia coli LacI family transcription factors are unable to bind to specific target DNA sequences without a cofactor-binding domain. In the present study, we reconstructed a novel DBD designated as PurHG, which binds constitutively to a 16bp purine repressor operator, by fusion of the purine repressor (PurR) DBD (residues 1-57) and the GAL4 dimerization domain (DD, residues 42-148). Binding of PurHG to DNA requires the dimerization and a hinge helix of PurR DBD. When the PurHG was expressed as a fusion protein in a form of a transcription activator (PurAD) or an artificial nuclear receptor (PurAPR or PurAER) responding to ligand, such as RU486 or beta-estradiol, it could regulate the expression of the reporter genes in NIH3T3 cells. The prerequisite region of the GAL4 DD for DNA-binding was amino acid residues from 42 to 98 in the form of PurAD, while the amino acid residues from 42 to 75 were sufficient for ligand-dependent regulation in the form of PurAPR. These results suggest that the dimerization function of the progesterone ligand-binding domain could be substituted for region 76-98 of the GAL4 DD. In summary, the fusion of the PurR DBD and the GAL4 DD generates fully active DNA-binding protein, PurHG, in vitro and in vivo, and these results provide the direct evidence of structural predictions that the proximate positioning of PurR hinge helical regions is critical for DNA-binding.

  1. Computer-generated Model of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) is an important target enzyme for the design of anti-cancer and immunosuppressive drugs. Bacterial PNP, which is slightly different from the human enzyme, is used to synthesize chemotherapuautic agents. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the bacterial PNP molecule is useful in efforts to engineer different types of PNP enzymes, that can be used to produce new chemotherapeutic agents. This picture shows a computer model of bacterial PNP, which looks a lot like a display of colorful ribbons. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  2. The electrochemical properties of the purine bases : at the interface between biological conjugates to inorganic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C.

    2003-01-01

    The study of the charge transfer and interfacial reactions of the purine bases in physiological solutions provides valuable knowledge, as these processes are relevant to the origins of life. It has been proposed that the adsorption of the adsorption of the purine bases on an inorganic surface could serve as a template for specifying the arrangement of amino acids in peptides.

  3. Morphine enhances the release of /sup 3/H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-10-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that /sup 3/H-purines can be released from /sup 3/H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of /sup 3/H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of /sup 3/H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of /sup 3/H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked /sup 3/H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine.

  4. Lie Markov models with purine/pyrimidine symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, Jesús; Sumner, Jeremy G; Jarvis, Peter D; Woodhams, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Continuous-time Markov chains are a standard tool in phylogenetic inference. If homogeneity is assumed, the chain is formulated by specifying time-independent rates of substitutions between states in the chain. In applications, there are usually extra constraints on the rates, depending on the situation. If a model is formulated in this way, it is possible to generalise it and allow for an inhomogeneous process, with time-dependent rates satisfying the same constraints. It is then useful to require that, under some time restrictions, there exists a homogeneous average of this inhomogeneous process within the same model. This leads to the definition of "Lie Markov models" which, as we will show, are precisely the class of models where such an average exists. These models form Lie algebras and hence concepts from Lie group theory are central to their derivation. In this paper, we concentrate on applications to phylogenetics and nucleotide evolution, and derive the complete hierarchy of Lie Markov models that respect the grouping of nucleotides into purines and pyrimidines-that is, models with purine/pyrimidine symmetry. We also discuss how to handle the subtleties of applying Lie group methods, most naturally defined over the complex field, to the stochastic case of a Markov process, where parameter values are restricted to be real and positive. In particular, we explore the geometric embedding of the cone of stochastic rate matrices within the ambient space of the associated complex Lie algebra.

  5. Antiparasitic chemotherapy: tinkering with the purine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Datta, Alok Kumar; Datta, Rupak; Sen, Banibrata

    2008-01-01

    Distinguishable differences between infectine organisms and their respective hosts with respect to metabolism and macromolecular structure provide scopes for detailed characterization of target proteins and/or macromolecules as the focus for the development of selective inhibitors. In order to develop a rational approach to antiparasitic chemotherapy, finding differences in the biochemical pathways of the parasite with respect to the host it infects is therefore of primary importance. Like most parasitic protozoan, the genus Leishmania is an obligate auxotroph of purines and hence for requirement of purine bases depends on its own purine salvage pathways. Among various purine acquisition routes used by the parasite, the pathway involved in assimilation of adenosine nucleotide is unique and differs significantly in the extracellular form of the parasite (promastigotes) from its corresponding intracellular form (amastigotes). Adenosine kinase (AdK) is the gateway enzyme of this pathway and displays stage-specific activity pattern. Therefore, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme, its structural complexities and mode of its regulation have emerged as one of the major areas of investigation. This review, in general, discusses possible strategies to validate several purine salvage enzymes as targets for chemotherapeutic manipulation with special reference to adenosine kinase of Leishmania donovani. Systemic endotheliosis, commonly known as Kala-azar in India, is caused by the parasitic protozoon Leishmania donovani. The spread of leishmaniases follows the distribution of these vectors in the temperate, tropical and subtropical regions of the world leading to loss of thousands of human lives.' WHO has declared leishmaniasis among one of the six major diseases namely leishmaniasis, malaria, amoebiasis, filariasis, Chagas disease and schistosomiasis in its Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases. Strategies for better prophylaxis and

  6. Leishmania Metacyclogenesis Is Promoted in the Absence of Purines

    PubMed Central

    Serafim, Tiago Donatelli; Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Costa, Pedro Augusto Carvalho; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo Almeida; Gonçalves, Ricardo; de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; da Silva, Sydnei Magno; Michalick, Marilene Suzan Marques; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto; de Carvalho, Roberto Paes; Uliana, Silvia Reni Bortolin; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, are transmitted through the bite of an infected sand fly. Leishmania parasites present two basic forms known as promastigote and amastigote which, respectively, parasitizes the vector and the mammalian hosts. Infection of the vertebrate host is dependent on the development, in the vector, of metacyclic promastigotes, however, little is known about the factors that trigger metacyclogenesis in Leishmania parasites. It has been generally stated that “stressful conditions” will lead to development of metacyclic forms, and with the exception of a few studies no detailed analysis of the molecular nature of the stress factor has been performed. Here we show that presence/absence of nucleosides, especially adenosine, controls metacyclogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We found that addition of an adenosine-receptor antagonist to in vitro cultures of Leishmania amazonensis significantly increases metacyclogenesis, an effect that can be reversed by the presence of specific purine nucleosides or nucleobases. Furthermore, our results show that proliferation and metacyclogenesis are independently regulated and that addition of adenosine to culture medium is sufficient to recover proliferative characteristics for purified metacyclic promastigotes. More importantly, we show that metacyclogenesis was inhibited in sand flies infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi that were fed a mixture of sucrose and adenosine. Our results fill a gap in the life cycle of Leishmania parasites by demonstrating how metacyclogenesis, a key point in the propagation of the parasite to the mammalian host, can be controlled by the presence of specific purines. PMID:23050028

  7. Leishmania metacyclogenesis is promoted in the absence of purines.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Tiago Donatelli; Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Costa, Pedro Augusto Carvalho; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo Almeida; Gonçalves, Ricardo; de Moura, Sandra Aparecida Lima; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo; da Silva, Sydnei Magno; Michalick, Marilene Suzan Marques; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto; de Carvalho, Roberto Paes; Uliana, Silvia Reni Bortolin; Fietto, Juliana Lopes Rangel; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites, the causative agent of leishmaniasis, are transmitted through the bite of an infected sand fly. Leishmania parasites present two basic forms known as promastigote and amastigote which, respectively, parasitizes the vector and the mammalian hosts. Infection of the vertebrate host is dependent on the development, in the vector, of metacyclic promastigotes, however, little is known about the factors that trigger metacyclogenesis in Leishmania parasites. It has been generally stated that "stressful conditions" will lead to development of metacyclic forms, and with the exception of a few studies no detailed analysis of the molecular nature of the stress factor has been performed. Here we show that presence/absence of nucleosides, especially adenosine, controls metacyclogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We found that addition of an adenosine-receptor antagonist to in vitro cultures of Leishmania amazonensis significantly increases metacyclogenesis, an effect that can be reversed by the presence of specific purine nucleosides or nucleobases. Furthermore, our results show that proliferation and metacyclogenesis are independently regulated and that addition of adenosine to culture medium is sufficient to recover proliferative characteristics for purified metacyclic promastigotes. More importantly, we show that metacyclogenesis was inhibited in sand flies infected with Leishmania infantum chagasi that were fed a mixture of sucrose and adenosine. Our results fill a gap in the life cycle of Leishmania parasites by demonstrating how metacyclogenesis, a key point in the propagation of the parasite to the mammalian host, can be controlled by the presence of specific purines.

  8. Pathway Engineered Enzymatic de novo Purine Nucleotide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schultheisz, Heather L.; Szymczyna, Blair R.; Scott, Lincoln G.; Williamson, James R.

    2009-01-01

    A general method for isotopic labeling of the purine base moiety of nucleotides and RNA has been developed through biochemical pathway engineering in vitro. A synthetic scheme was designed and implemented utilizing recombinant enzymes from the pentose phosphate and de novo purine synthesis pathways, with regeneration of folate, aspartate, glutamine, ATP, and NADPH cofactors, in a single-pot reaction. Syntheses proceeded quickly and efficiently in comparison to chemical methods with isolated yields up to 66% for 13C, 15N enriched ATP and GTP. The scheme is robust and flexible, requiring only serine, NH4+, glucose and CO2 as stoichiometric precursors in labeled form. Using this approach, U-13C- GTP, U-13C,15N- GTP, 13C2,8- ATP and U-15N- GTP were synthesized on a millimole scale, and the utility of the isotope labeling is illustrated in NMR spectra of HIV-2 transactivation region (TAR) RNA containing 13C 2,8-adenosine and 15N-1,3,7,9,2-guanosine. Pathway engineering in vitro permits complex synthetic cascades to be effected expanding the applicability of enzymatic synthesis. PMID:18707057

  9. Deregulation of purine pathway in Bacillus subtilis and its use in riboflavin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides are essential metabolites for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and biosynthesis of several amino acids and riboflavin. Owing to the pivotal roles of purines in cell physiology, the pool of intracellular purine nucleotides must be maintained under strict control, and hence the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway is tightly regulated by transcription repression and inhibition mechanism. Deregulation of purine pathway is essential for this pathway engineering in Bacillus subtilis. Results Deregulation of purine pathway was attempted to improve purine nucleotides supply, based on a riboflavin producer B. subtilis strain with modification of its rib operon. To eliminate transcription repression, the pur operon repressor PurR and the 5’-UTR of pur operon containing a guanine-sensing riboswitch were disrupted. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the relative transcription levels of purine genes were up-regulated about 380 times. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis was successfully introduced into PRPP amidotransferase (encoded by purF) to remove feedback inhibition by homologous alignment and analysis. Overexpression of the novel mutant PurF (D293V, K316Q and S400W) significantly increased PRPP amidotransferase activity and triggered a strong refractory effect on purine nucleotides mediated inhibition. Intracellular metabolite target analysis indicated that the purine nucleotides supply in engineered strains was facilitated by a stepwise gene-targeted deregulation. With these genetic manipulations, we managed to enhance the metabolic flow through purine pathway and consequently increased riboflavin production 3-fold (826.52 mg/L) in the purF-VQW mutant strain. Conclusions A sequential optimization strategy was applied to deregulate the rib operon and purine pathway of B. subtilis to create genetic diversities and to improve riboflavin production

  10. Purine and pyrimidine derivatives from the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shu-Hua; Zhang, Si; Gao, Cheng-Hai; Li, Qin-Xing

    2008-07-01

    Three new purine derivatives, namely, 4-caryboxy-5,6-dihydro-4H,8H-pyrimido[1,2,3-cd]purine-8,10(9H)-dione (1), 7,9-dihydro-1-(3-oxobutyl)-1H-purine-6,8-dione (2), and 7-hydro-9-(3-oxobutyl)-1H-purine-6,8-dione (3) together with six known purine and pyrimidine derivatives were isolated from the EtOH/CH(2)Cl(2) extracts of the South China Sea gorgonian Subergorgia suberosa. The structures of 1-3 were determined on the bases of extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR data.

  11. A transcriptional activator, homologous to the Bacillus subtilis PurR repressor, is required for expression of purine biosynthetic genes in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Kilstrup, M; Martinussen, J

    1998-08-01

    A purR::pGh9:ISS1 mutant of Lactococcus lactis was obtained following transposon mutagenesis of strain MG1363 and selection for purine auxotrophs. After determination of the nucleotide sequence and deduction of the purR reading frame, the PurR product was found to be highly similar to the purR-encoded repressor from Bacillus subtilis. The wild-type purR gene complemented the purine auxotrophy of a purR::ISS1 mutant, and it was shown that the purR::ISS1 mutation lowered the level of transcription from the purine-regulated L. lactis purD promoter. In a parallel study on the regulation of purC and purD expression in L. lactis (M. Kilstrup, S. G. Jessing, S. B. Wichmand-Jorgensen, M. Madsen, and D. Nilsson, J. Bacteriol. 180:3900-3906, 1998), we identified regions (PurBox sequences: AWWWCCGAACWWT) upstream of the promoters with a central G residue at exactly position -76 relative to the transcriptional start site. The PurBox sequences were found to be required for high-level promoter activity and purine regulation. We identified a PurBox sequence overlapping the -35 region of the L. lactis purR promoter and found, by studies of a purR-lacLM fusion plasmid, that purR is autoregulated. Because of the high degree of similarity of the PurR proteins from B. subtilis and L. lactis, we looked for PurBox sequences in the promoter regions of the PurR-regulated genes in B. subtilis and identified a perfectly matching PurBox sequence in the purA promoter region and slightly degenerate PurBox-like sequences in the promoter regions for the pur operon and the purR gene. Interestingly, the PurBox in the pur operon of B. subtilis is located almost identically, with respect to the promoter, to the PurBox sequences located in front of purC and purD in L. lactis. We present a hypothesis to explain how an ancestral PurR protein in B. subtilis could have evolved from an activator of the pur operon into a repressor which regulates transcription initiation from the same pur promoter by using

  12. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  13. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid–base catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Eric P.; Vasquez, Ernesto E.; Scott, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid–base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK a of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK a and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the

  14. [Metformin impact on purine metabolism in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Shatova, O P; Butenko, Eu V; Khomutov, Eu V; Kaplun, D S; Sedakov, I Eu; Zinkovych, I I

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of metformin in oncology practice. However, the mechanisms of implementation of the anti-tumor effect of this drug there is still need understanding. In this study we have investigated the effect of metformin on the activity of adenosine deaminase and respectively adenosinergic immunosuppression in tumors and their microenvironment. The material of the study was taken during surgery of breast cacer patients receiveing metformin, and also patients which did not take this drug. The adenosine deaminase activity and substrate (adenosine) and products (inosine, hypoxanthine) concentrations were determined by HPLC. Results of this study suggest that metformin significantly alters catabolism of purine nucleotides in the node breast adenocarcinoma tisue. However, the metformin-induced increase in the adenosine deaminase activity is not sufficient to reduce the level of adenosine in cancer tissue. Thus, in metformin treated patients the adenosine concentration remained unchanged, and inosine and hypoxanthine concentration significantly increased. PMID:27420623

  15. [Metformin impact on purine metabolism in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Shatova, O P; Butenko, Eu V; Khomutov, Eu V; Kaplun, D S; Sedakov, I Eu; Zinkovych, I I

    2016-03-01

    Large-scale epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of metformin in oncology practice. However, the mechanisms of implementation of the anti-tumor effect of this drug there is still need understanding. In this study we have investigated the effect of metformin on the activity of adenosine deaminase and respectively adenosinergic immunosuppression in tumors and their microenvironment. The material of the study was taken during surgery of breast cacer patients receiveing metformin, and also patients which did not take this drug. The adenosine deaminase activity and substrate (adenosine) and products (inosine, hypoxanthine) concentrations were determined by HPLC. Results of this study suggest that metformin significantly alters catabolism of purine nucleotides in the node breast adenocarcinoma tisue. However, the metformin-induced increase in the adenosine deaminase activity is not sufficient to reduce the level of adenosine in cancer tissue. Thus, in metformin treated patients the adenosine concentration remained unchanged, and inosine and hypoxanthine concentration significantly increased.

  16. Folate-Dependent Purine Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Humans1

    PubMed Central

    Baggott, Joseph E; Tamura, Tsunenobu

    2015-01-01

    Purine nucleotide biosynthesis de novo (PNB) requires 2 folate-dependent transformylases—5′-phosphoribosyl-glycinamide (GAR) and 5′-phosphoribosyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR) transformylases—to introduce carbon 8 (C8) and carbon 2 (C2) into the purine ring. Both transformylases utilize 10-formyltetrahydrofolate (10-formyl-H4folate), where the formyl-carbon sources include ring-2-C of histidine, 3-C of serine, 2-C of glycine, and formate. Our findings in human studies indicate that glycine provides the carbon for GAR transformylase (exclusively C8), whereas histidine and formate are the predominant carbon sources for AICAR transformylase (C2). Contrary to the previous notion, these carbon sources may not supply a general 10-formyl-H4folate pool, which was believed to equally provide carbons to C8 and C2. To explain these phenomena, we postulate that GAR transformylase is in a complex with the trifunctional folate-metabolizing enzyme (TFM) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase to channel carbons of glycine and serine to C8. There is no evidence for channeling carbons of histidine and formate to AICAR transformylase (C2). GAR transformylase may require the TFM to furnish 10-formyl-H4folate immediately after its production from serine to protect its oxidation to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-formyl-H2folate), whereas AICAR transformylase can utilize both 10-formyl-H2folate and 10-formyl-H4folate. Human liver may supply AICAR to AICAR transformylase in erythrocytes/erythroblasts. Incorporation of ring-2-C of histidine and formate into C2 of urinary uric acid presented a circadian rhythm with a peak in the morning, which corresponds to the maximum DNA synthesis in the bone marrow, and it may be useful in the timing of the administration of drugs that block PNB for the treatment of cancer and autoimmune disease. PMID:26374178

  17. Folate-Dependent Purine Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Joseph E; Tamura, Tsunenobu

    2015-09-01

    Purine nucleotide biosynthesis de novo (PNB) requires 2 folate-dependent transformylases-5'-phosphoribosyl-glycinamide (GAR) and 5'-phosphoribosyl-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICAR) transformylases-to introduce carbon 8 (C8) and carbon 2 (C2) into the purine ring. Both transformylases utilize 10-formyltetrahydrofolate (10-formyl-H4folate), where the formyl-carbon sources include ring-2-C of histidine, 3-C of serine, 2-C of glycine, and formate. Our findings in human studies indicate that glycine provides the carbon for GAR transformylase (exclusively C8), whereas histidine and formate are the predominant carbon sources for AICAR transformylase (C2). Contrary to the previous notion, these carbon sources may not supply a general 10-formyl-H4folate pool, which was believed to equally provide carbons to C8 and C2. To explain these phenomena, we postulate that GAR transformylase is in a complex with the trifunctional folate-metabolizing enzyme (TFM) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase to channel carbons of glycine and serine to C8. There is no evidence for channeling carbons of histidine and formate to AICAR transformylase (C2). GAR transformylase may require the TFM to furnish 10-formyl-H4folate immediately after its production from serine to protect its oxidation to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-formyl-H2folate), whereas AICAR transformylase can utilize both 10-formyl-H2folate and 10-formyl-H4folate. Human liver may supply AICAR to AICAR transformylase in erythrocytes/erythroblasts. Incorporation of ring-2-C of histidine and formate into C2 of urinary uric acid presented a circadian rhythm with a peak in the morning, which corresponds to the maximum DNA synthesis in the bone marrow, and it may be useful in the timing of the administration of drugs that block PNB for the treatment of cancer and autoimmune disease. PMID:26374178

  18. High-Frequency Variation of Purine Biosynthesis Genes Is a Mechanism of Success in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Andrew; Huynh, Steven; Scott, Nichollas E.; Frirdich, Emilisa; Apel, Dmitry; Foster, Leonard J.; Parker, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phenotypic variation is prevalent in the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni, the leading agent of enterocolitis in the developed world. Heterogeneity enhances the survival and adaptive malleability of bacterial populations because variable phenotypes may allow some cells to be protected against future stress. Exposure to hyperosmotic stress previously revealed prevalent differences in growth between C. jejuni strain 81-176 colonies due to resistant or sensitive phenotypes, and these isolated colonies continued to produce progeny with differential phenotypes. In this study, whole-genome sequencing of isolated colonies identified allelic variants of two purine biosynthesis genes, purF and apt, encoding phosphoribosyltransferases that utilize a shared substrate. Genetic analyses determined that purF was essential for fitness, while apt was critical. Traditional and high-depth amplicon-sequencing analyses confirmed extensive intrapopulation genetic variation of purF and apt that resulted in viable strains bearing alleles with in-frame insertion duplications, deletions, or missense polymorphisms. Different purF and apt alleles were associated with various stress survival capabilities under several niche-relevant conditions and contributed to differential intracellular survival in an epithelial cell infection model. Amplicon sequencing revealed that intracellular survival selected for stress-fit purF and apt alleles, as did exposure to oxygen and hyperosmotic stress. Putative protein recognition direct repeat sequences were identified in purF and apt, and a DNA-protein affinity screen captured a predicted exonuclease that promoted the global spontaneous mutation rate. This work illustrates the adaptive properties of high-frequency genetic variation in two housekeeping genes, which influences C. jejuni survival under stress and promotes its success as a pathogen. PMID:26419875

  19. The role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii

    SciTech Connect

    DeMoll, E.

    1990-10-22

    Research continues on the role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii. This report summarizes current progress of the research. Topics include: A survey of other methanogens for the purine degradation pathway; isolate and characterize the enzyme and products of formiminoglycine cleavage; ascertain the fate of glycine from the formiminoglycine cleavage; elucidate the route of incorporation of the formyl moiety of formiminoglycine into methane biosynthesis; determine the percent methane and amino acid synthesis from purine degradation; and related studies on xanthine dehydrogenase and pyrimidine degradation of M. Vannielii. (SM)

  20. Placental Hypomethylation Is More Pronounced in Genomic Loci Devoid of Retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Macaulay, Erin C.; Rodger, Euan J.; Stockwell, Peter A.; Parry, Matthew F.; Roberts, Hester E.; Slatter, Tania L.; Hung, Noelyn A.; Devenish, Celia J.; Morison, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    The human placenta is hypomethylated compared to somatic tissues. However, the degree and specificity of placental hypomethylation across the genome is unclear. We assessed genome-wide methylation of the human placenta and compared it to that of the neutrophil, a representative homogeneous somatic cell. We observed global hypomethylation in placenta (relative reduction of 22%) compared to neutrophils. Placental hypomethylation was pronounced in intergenic regions and gene bodies, while the unmethylated state of the promoter remained conserved in both tissues. For every class of repeat elements, the placenta showed lower methylation but the degree of hypomethylation differed substantially between these classes. However, some retroelements, especially the evolutionarily younger Alu elements, retained high levels of placental methylation. Surprisingly, nonretrotransposon-containing sequences showed a greater degree of placental hypomethylation than retrotransposons in every genomic element (intergenic, introns, and exons) except promoters. The differentially methylated fragments (DMFs) in placenta and neutrophils were enriched in gene-poor and CpG-poor regions. The placentally hypomethylated DMFs were enriched in genomic regions that are usually inactive, whereas hypermethylated DMFs were enriched in active regions. Hypomethylation of the human placenta is not specific to retroelements, indicating that the evolutionary advantages of placental hypomethylation go beyond those provided by expression of retrotransposons and retrogenes. PMID:27172225

  1. The PurR regulon in Lactococcus lactis - transcriptional regulation of the purine nucleotide metabolism and translational machinery.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2012-08-01

    Purine nucleotides are either synthesized de novo from 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) or salvaged from the environment. In Lactococcus lactis, transcription of the de novo synthesis operons, purCSQLF and purDEK, has genetically been shown to be activated by the PurR protein when bound to a conserved PurBox motif present on the DNA at a fixed distance from the promoter -10 element. PurR contains a PRPP-binding site, and activation occurs when the intracellular PRPP pool is high as a consequence of low exogenous purine nucleotide pools. By an iterative approach of bioinformatics searches and motif optimization, 21 PurR-regulated genes were identified and used in a redefinition of the PurBox consensus sequence. In the process a new motif, the double-PurBox, which is present in a number of promoters and contains two partly overlapping PurBox motifs, was established. Transcriptional fusions were used to analyse wild-type promoters and promoters with inactivating PurBox mutations to confirm the relevance of the PurBox motifs as PurR-binding sites. The promoters of several operons were shown to be devoid of any -35 sequence, and found to be completely dependent on PurR-mediated activation. This suggests that binding of the PurR protein to the PurBox takes over the role of the -35 sequence. The study has expanded the PurR regulon to include promoters in nucleotide metabolism, C(1) compound metabolism, phosphonate transport, pyrophosphatase activity, (p)ppGpp metabolism, and translation-related functions. Of special interest is the presence of PurBox motifs in rrn promoters, suggesting a novel connection between nucleotide availability and the translational machinery.

  2. Versatile synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 3’-fluorinated purine nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hang; Hatala, Paul J; Stevens, William C; He, Baicheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary A unified synthetic strategy accessing novel 3'-fluorinated purine nucleoside derivatives and their biological evaluation were achieved. Novel 3’-fluorinated analogues were constructed from a common 3’-deoxy-3’-fluororibofuranose intermediate. Employing Suzuki and Stille cross-coupling reactions, fifteen 3’-fluororibose purine nucleosides 1–15 and eight 3’-fluororibose 2-chloro/2-aminopurine nucleosides 16–23 with various substituents at position 6 of the purine ring were efficiently synthesized. Furthermore, 3’-fluorine analogs of natural products nebularine and 6-methylpurine riboside were constructed via our convergent synthetic strategy. Synthesized nucleosides were tested against HT116 (colon cancer) and 143B (osteosarcoma cancer) tumor cell lines. We have demonstrated 3’-fluorine purine nucleoside analogues display potent tumor cell growth inhibition activity at sub- or low micromolar concentration. PMID:26734098

  3. mTORC1 Induces Purine Synthesis Through Control of the Mitochondrial Tetrahydrofolate Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Ricoult, Stéphane J.H.; Asara, John M.; Manning, Brendan D.

    2016-01-01

    In response to growth signals, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) stimulates anabolic processes underlying cell growth. We found that mTORC1 increases metabolic flux through the de novo purine synthesis pathway in various mouse and human cells, thereby influencing the nucleotide pool available for nucleic acid synthesis. mTORC1 had transcriptional effects on multiple enzymes contributing to purine synthesis, with expression of the mitochondrial tetrahydrofolate (mTHF) cycle enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 2 (MTHFD2) being closely associated with mTORC1 signaling in both normal and cancer cells. MTHFD2 expression and purine synthesis were stimulated by ATF4, which was activated by mTORC1 independent of its canonical induction downstream of eIF2α phosphorylation. Thus, mTORC1 stimulates the mTHF cycle, which contributes one-carbon units to enhance production of purine nucleotides in response to growth signals. PMID:26912861

  4. Biosynthesis of the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine. A new route of pyrimidine biosynthesis involving purine intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Newell, P. C.; Tucker, R. G.

    1968-01-01

    1. The pattern of distribution on the purine pathway of mutants of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 that had the double growth requirement for a purine plus the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine (ath mutants) indicated that purines and the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine share the early part of their biosynthetic pathways, and that 4-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) is the last common intermediate. Two mutants that at first appeared anomalous were further investigated and found not to affect this deduction. 2. The ribonucleoside form of AIR (AIRs) satisfied the requirements both for a purine and for the pyrimidine moiety of thiamine of an ath mutant. 3. Methionine was required for the conversion of AIR into the pyrimidine moiety. 4. Radioactive AIRs was converted into radioactive pyrimidine moiety by an ath mutant without significant dilution of specific radioactivity. 5. Possible mechanisms for pyrimidine-moiety biosynthesis from AIR are discussed. PMID:4889364

  5. Effect of purine alkaloids on the proliferation of lettuce cells derived from protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Hamako; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the ecological role of caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and paraxanthine, which are released from purine alkaloid forming plants, the effects of these purine alkaloids on the division and colony formation of lettuce cells were assessed at concentrations up to 1 mM. Five days after treatment with 500 μM caffeine, theophylline and paraxanthine, division of isolated protoplasts was significantly inhibited. Thirteen days treatment with > 250 μM caffeine had a marked inhibitory effect on the colony formation of cells derived from the protoplasts. Other purine alkaloids also acted as inhibitors. The order of the inhibition was caffeine > theophylline > paraxanthine > theobromine. These observations suggest that a relatively low concentration of caffeine is toxic for proliferation of plant cells. In contrast, theobromine is a weak inhibitor of proliferation. Possible allelopathic roles of purine alkaloids in natural ecosystems are discussed.

  6. Structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Grenha, Rosa; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Fogg, Mark J.; Blagova, Elena V.; Brannigan, James A. Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2005-05-01

    The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis was solved by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement and refined at a resolution of 2.24 Å. Protein structures from the causative agent of anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) are being determined as part of a structural genomics programme. Amongst initial candidates for crystallographic analysis are enzymes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, since these are recognized as potential targets in antibacterial therapy. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway. The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis has been solved by molecular replacement at 2.24 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 18.4%. This is the first report of a DeoD structure from a Gram-positive bacterium.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of purine repressor binding to corepressor and operator DNA.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Moraitis, M; Reedstrom, R J; Matthews, K S

    1998-04-10

    The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for purine repressor (PurR)-operator and PurR-guanine binding were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy and nitrocellulose filter binding. Operator binding affinity was increased by the presence of guanine as demonstrated previously (Choi, K. Y., Lu, F., and Zalkin, H. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 24066-24072; Rolfes, R. J., and Zalkin, H. (1990) J. Bacteriol. 172, 5637-5642), and conversely guanine binding affinity was increased by the presence of operator. Guanine enhanced operator affinity by increasing the association rate constant and decreasing the dissociation rate constant for binding. Operator had minimal effect on the association rate constant for guanine binding; however, this DNA decreased the dissociation rate constant for corepressor by approximately 10-fold. Despite significant sequence and structural similarity between PurR and LacI proteins, PurR binds to its corepressor ligand with a lower association rate constant than LacI binds to its inducer ligand. However, the rate constant for PurR-guanine binding to operator is approximately 3-fold higher than for LacI binding to its cognate operator under the same solution conditions. The distinct metabolic roles of the enzymes under regulation by these two repressor proteins provide a rationale for the observed functional differences.

  8. Solvent effects on the photochemistry of 4-aminoimidazole-5-carbonitrile, a prebiotically plausible precursor of purines.

    PubMed

    Szabla, Rafał; Sponer, Judit E; Sponer, Jiří; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Góra, Robert W

    2014-09-01

    4-Aminoimidazole-5-carbonitrile (AICN) was suggested as a prebiotically plausible precursor of purine nucleobases and nucleotides. Although it can be formed in a sequence of photoreactions, AICN is immune to further irradiation with UV-light. We present state-of-the-art multi-reference quantum-chemical calculations of potential energy surface cuts and conical intersection optimizations to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the photostability of this compound. We have identified the N-H bond stretching and ring-puckering mechanisms that should be responsible for the photochemistry of AICN in the gas phase. We have further considered the photochemistry of AICN-water clusters, while including up to six explicit water molecules. The calculations reveal charge transfer to solvent followed by formation of an H3O(+) cation, both of which occur on the (1)πσ* hypersurface. Interestingly, a second proton transfer to an adjacent water molecule leads to a (1)πσ*/S0 conical intersection. We suggest that this electron-driven proton relay might be characteristic of low-lying (1)πσ* states in chromophore-water clusters. Owing to its nature, this mechanism might also be responsible for the photostability of analogous organic molecules in bulk water.

  9. Extracellular-purine metabolism in blood vessels (part I). Extracellular-purine level in blood of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lecka, Joanna; Molski, Stanislaw; Komoszynski, Michal

    2010-09-01

    Adenosine and adenosine derivatives are the main regulators of purinoceptors (P1 and P2) mediated hemostasis and blood pressure. Since impaired hemostasis and high blood pressure lead to atherosclerosis and to the development of aneurysm, in this study we tested and compared the concentration of extracellular purines (e-purines) in the blood in of patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm with that from healthy volunteers. Whereas adenine nucleosides and nucleotides level in human blood plasma was analysed using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), cholesterol concentration was estimated by an enzymatic assay. We did not find any correlation between e-purines concentration and the age of healthy volunteers. Furthermore, the sum level of e-purines (ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine, and inosine) in the control group did not exceed 70 microM, while it was nearly two-fold higher in the blood of patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm, (123 microM). In a special case of people with Leriche Syndrome, a disease characterized by deep atherosclerotic changes, the e-purines level had further increased. Additionally, we also report typical atherosclerotic changes in the aorta using histological assays as well as total cholesterol rise. The significant rise in cholesterol concentration in the blood of the patients with abdominal aortas aneurysm, compared with the control groups, was not unique since 23% of the healthy people also exceeded the normal level of cholesterol. Therefore, our results strongly indicate that the estimation of e-purines concentration in the blood may serve as another indicator of atherosclerosis and warrant further consideration as a futuristic diagnostic tool.

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi Harbors a Transport System Essential for Purine Salvage and Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sunny; Sutchu, Selina; Rosa, Patricia A.; Byram, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the tick-borne bacterium that causes the multistage inflammatory disease Lyme disease. B. burgdorferi has a reduced genome and lacks the enzymes required for de novo synthesis of purines for synthesis of RNA and DNA. Therefore, this obligate pathogen is dependent upon the tick vector and mammalian host environments for salvage of purine bases for nucleic acid biosynthesis. This pathway is vital for B. burgdorferi survival throughout its infectious cycle, as key enzymes in the purine salvage pathway are essential for the ability of the spirochete to infect mice and critical for spirochete replication in the tick. The transport of preformed purines into the spirochete is the first step in the purine salvage pathway and may represent a novel therapeutic target and/or means to deliver antispirochete molecules to the pathogen. However, the transport systems critical for purine salvage by B. burgdorferi have yet to be identified. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes bbb22 and bbb23, present on B. burgdorferi's essential plasmid circular plasmid 26 (cp26), encode key purine transport proteins. BBB22 and/or BBB23 is essential for hypoxanthine transport and contributes to the transport of adenine and guanine. Furthermore, B. burgdorferi lacking bbb22-23 was noninfectious in mice up to a dose of 1 × 107 spirochetes. Together, our data establish that bbb22-23 encode purine permeases critical for B. burgdorferi mammalian infectivity, suggesting that this transport system may serve as a novel antimicrobial target for the treatment of Lyme disease. PMID:22710875

  11. Regional differences in the electrically stimulated release of endogenous and radioactive adenosine and purine derivatives from rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    Pedata, F; Pazzagli, M; Tilli, S; Pepeu, G

    1990-10-01

    The release of both radioactive and endogenous purines was investigated in rat brain cortical, hippocampal and striatal slices at rest and following stimulation with electrical fields. Purines were labelled by incubating the slices with 3H-adenine. The purine efflux at rest and that evoked by electrical stimulation (10 Hz. 5 min) was analyzed by HPLC with ultraviolet absorbance detection. Both radioactive and endogenous purines in the effluent consisted mainly of hypoxanthine, xanthine, inosine and adenosine. No qualitative differences in the composition of the released purines were found in the three areas investigated. Electrical stimulation evoked a net increase in both radioactive and endogenous purine release. However the increase in 3H-adenosine following electrical stimulation was twice as large as that of endogenous adenosine. The electrically evoked release of both radioactive and endogenous purines was greatest in hippocampal slices and progressively smaller in cortical and striatal slices. In the three areas the addition of 0.5 microM tetrodotoxin to the superfusing Krebs solution brought about a similar (83-100%) reduction in evoked 3H-purine and endogenous purine release. Superfusion of the slices with calcium-free Krebs solution containing 0.5 mM EGTA reduced evoked release of 3H-purines by 58-60% and that of endogenous purine components by 54-89%. The results demonstrate similar characteristics for both radioactive and endogenous purine release but indicate that the most recently synthetized adenosine is the most readily available for release. The features of the electrically evoked purine release support a neuronal origin of adenosine and derivatives and are consistent with the hypothesis of discrete regional differences in adenosine neuromodulation. PMID:2255336

  12. Pronounced cytostatic activity and bystander effect of a novel series of fluorescent tricyclic acyclovir and ganciclovir derivatives in herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene-transduced tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, J; Ostrowski, T; Goslinski, T; De Clercq, E; Golankiewicz, B

    2002-09-01

    A number of tricyclic acyclovir (ACV) and ganciclovir (GCV) derivatives substituted with bulky lipophilic groups have been identified as potent and highly selective cytostatic agents against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-thymidine kinase (TK) gene-transduced human osteosarcoma and murine mammary carcinoma tumor cells. Although their affinity for HSV-1 TK was inferior to that of ACV or GCV, their cytostatic potency and selectivity was at least as high as observed for the parental ACV and GCV compounds. The tricyclic ACV and GCV derivatives were also endowed with a very pronounced bystander effect in cell culture, albeit at relatively high drug concentrations. Unlike ACV and GCV, the tricyclic purine derivatives are endowed with intrinsically strong fluorescent properties, which allow simple and sensitive monitoring of drug concentrations in biological fluids and tissues. Also, the lipophilicity of the tricyclic purine derivatives is much higher than that of ACV and GCV, and this may allow better uptake of these derivatives from the blood into the central nervous system.

  13. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase polymorphism in the genus Littorina (Prosobranchia: Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Knight, A J; Ward, R D

    1986-06-01

    Examination of eight Atlantic species of the genus Littorina by starch gel electrophoresis of purine nucleoside phosphorylase revealed extensive polymorphism within the L. saxatilis complex. In this group, four alleles have been identified. Heterozygotes are four banded, and thus, as in vertebrates, the enzyme is likely to be a trimer. Breeding experiments confirmed the genetic interpretation of the phenotype patterns. Where species of the saxatilis complex [L. saxatilis (=L. rudis), L. arcana, L. nigrolineata, L. neglecta] are sympatric, there are sometimes significant allele frequency differences between them. A fifth allele was present at a high frequency in L. obtusata and L. mariae, and L. littorea and L. neritoides each possessed unique alleles. A total of eight alleles was identified. Densitometric scanning of heterozygote patterns pointed to activity differences between alleles and also showed that, while the heterotrimeric bands were never less intense than the homotrimeric bands, the heterotrimeric bands were sometimes less intense than expected. It is not clear whether this represents nonrandom association of subunits, decreased stability of heterotrimers, or simply an artifact of the staining and quantifying process. PMID:3091000

  14. Deprotonated purine dissociation: experiments, computations, and astrobiological implications.

    PubMed

    Cole, Callie A; Wang, Zhe-Chen; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2015-01-15

    A central focus of astrobiology is the determination of abiotic formation routes to important biomolecules. The dissociation mechanisms of these molecules lend valuable insights into their synthesis pathways. Because of the detection of organic anions in the interstellar medium (ISM), it is imperative to study their role in these syntheses. This work aims to experimentally and computationally examine deprotonated adenine and guanine dissociation in an effort to illuminate potential anionic precursors to purine formation. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) products and their branching fractions are experimentally measured using an ion trap mass spectrometer. Deprotonated guanine dissociates primarily by deammoniation (97%) with minor losses of carbodiimide (HNCNH) and/or cyanamide (NH2CN), and isocyanic acid (HNCO). Deprotonated adenine fragments by loss of hydrogen cyanide and/or isocyanide (HCN/HNC; 90%) and carbodiimide (HNCNH) and/or cyanamide (NH2CN; 10%). Tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) experiments reveal that deprotonated guanine fragments lose additional HCN and CO, while deprotonated adenine fragments successively lose HNC and HCN. Every neutral fragment observed in this study has been detected in the ISM, highlighting the potential for nucleobases such as these to form in such environments. Lastly, the acidity of abundant fragment ions is experimentally bracketed. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory are performed to delineate the mechanisms of dissociation and analyze the energies of reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products of these CID processes. PMID:25559322

  15. 6-(2-Methoxy­benzyl­amino)purine

    PubMed Central

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Matiková-Maľarová, Miroslava; Mikulík, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, C13H13N5O, consists of discrete mol­ecules connected by N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds to form infinite chains, with N⋯N separations of 3.0379 (15) and 2.8853 (15) Å. The benzene and purine ring systems make a dihedral angle of 77.58 (3)°. The crystal structure is further stabilized by intra­molecular N⋯O inter­actions [2.9541 (12) Å] and inter­molecular C—H⋯C and C⋯C contacts [3.304 (2), 3.368 (2), 3.667 (2), 3.618 (2) and 3.512 (2) Å] which arrange the mol­ecules into graphite-like layers. The inter­layer separations are 3.248 and 3.256 Å. PMID:21202313

  16. Universal full-length nucleosome mapping sequence probe.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Salih, Bilal; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    For the computational sequence-directed mapping of the nucleosomes, the knowledge of the nucleosome positioning motifs - 10-11 base long sequences - and respective matrices of bendability, is not sufficient, since there is no justified way to fuse these motifs in one continuous nucleosome DNA sequence. Discovery of the strong nucleosome (SN) DNA sequences, with visible sequence periodicity allows derivation of the full-length nucleosome DNA bendability pattern as matrix or consensus sequence. The SN sequences of three species (A. thaliana, C. elegans, and H. sapiens) are aligned (512 sequences for each species), and long (115 dinucleotides) matrices of bendability derived for the species. The matrices have strong common property - alternation of runs of purine-purine (RR) and pyrimidine-pyrimidine (YY) dinucleotides, with average period 10.4 bases. On this basis the universal [R,Y] consensus of the nucleosome DNA sequence is derived, with exactly defined positions of respective penta- and hexamers RRRRR, RRRRRR, YYYYY, and YYYYYY.

  17. Entendre, lire et prononcer les voyelles nasales (Hearing, Reading, and Pronouncing Nasal Vowels).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noir, Pascal; Peifer, Michel

    1996-01-01

    Describes techniques used for teaching French language students to recognize, discriminate between, and pronounce the four French nasal vowels. Includes twenty tongue-twisting sentences exemplifying the different vowels. (MSE)

  18. Which Electronic and Structural Factors Control the Photostability of DNA and RNA Purine Nucleobases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollum, Marvin; Reichardt, Christian; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E.; Martínez-Fernández, Lara; Corral, Inés; Rauer, Clemens; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia

    2015-06-01

    Following ultraviolet excitation, the canonical purine nucleobases, guanine and adenine, are able to efficiently dissipate the absorbed energy within hundreds of femtoseconds. This property affords these nucleobases with great photostability. Conversely, non-canonical purine nucleobases exhibit high fluorescence quantum yields or efficiently populate long-lived triplet excited states from which chemistry can occur. Using femtosecond broadband transient absorption spectroscopy in combination with ab initio static and surface hopping dynamics simulations we have determined the electronic and structural factors that regulate the excited state dynamics of the purine nucleobase derivatives. Importantly, we have uncovered that the photostability of the guanine and adenine nucleobases is not due to the structure of the purine core itself and that the substituent at the C6 position of the purine nucleobase plays a more important role than that at the C2 position in the ultrafast relaxation of deleterious electronic energy. [The authors acknowledge the CAREER program of the National Science Foundation (Grant No. CHE-1255084) for financial support.

  19. Identification of a chemoreceptor that specifically mediates chemotaxis toward metabolizable purine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is an essential mechanism that enables bacteria to move toward favorable ecological niches. Escherichia coli, the historical model organism for studying chemotaxis, has five well-studied chemoreceptors. However, many bacteria with different lifestyle have more chemoreceptors, most of unknown function. Using a high throughput screening approach, we identified a chemoreceptor from Pseudomonas putida KT2440, named McpH, which specifically recognizes purine and its derivatives, adenine, guanine, xanthine, hypoxanthine and uric acid. The latter five compounds form part of the purine degradation pathway, permitting their use as sole nitrogen sources. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show that these six compounds bind McpH-Ligand Binding Domain (LBD) with very similar affinity. In contrast, non-metabolizable purine derivatives (caffeine, theophylline, theobromine), nucleotides, nucleosides or pyrimidines are unable to bind McpH-LBD. Mutation of mcpH abolished chemotaxis toward the McpH ligands identified - a phenotype that is restored by complementation. This is the first report on bacterial chemotaxis to purine derivatives and McpH the first chemoreceptor described that responds exclusively to intermediates of a catabolic pathway, illustrating a clear link between metabolism and chemotaxis. The evolution of McpH may reflect a saprophytic lifestyle, which would have exposed the studied bacterium to high concentrations of purines produced by nucleic acid degradation.

  20. Structural determinants of the 5'-methylthioinosine specificity of Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Teraya M; Ting, Li-Min; Zhan, Chenyang; Shi, Wuxian; Zheng, Renjian; Almo, Steven C; Kim, Kami

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites rely upon purine salvage for survival. Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase is part of the streamlined Plasmodium purine salvage pathway that leads to the phosphorylysis of both purines and 5'-methylthiopurines, byproducts of polyamine synthesis. We have explored structural features in Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PfPNP) that affect efficiency of catalysis as well as those that make it suitable for dual specificity. We used site directed mutagenesis to identify residues critical for PfPNP catalytic activity as well as critical residues within a hydrophobic pocket required for accommodation of the 5'-methylthio group. Kinetic analysis data shows that several mutants had disrupted binding of the 5'-methylthio group while retaining activity for inosine. A triple PfPNP mutant that mimics Toxoplasma gondii PNP had significant loss of 5'-methylthio activity with retention of inosine activity. Crystallographic investigation of the triple mutant PfPNP with Tyr160Phe, Val66Ile, andVal73Ile in complex with the transition state inhibitor immucillin H reveals fewer hydrogen bond interactions for the inhibitor in the hydrophobic pocket. PMID:24416224

  1. Structural determinants of the 5'-methylthioinosine specificity of Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Teraya M; Ting, Li-Min; Zhan, Chenyang; Shi, Wuxian; Zheng, Renjian; Almo, Steven C; Kim, Kami

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites rely upon purine salvage for survival. Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase is part of the streamlined Plasmodium purine salvage pathway that leads to the phosphorylysis of both purines and 5'-methylthiopurines, byproducts of polyamine synthesis. We have explored structural features in Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PfPNP) that affect efficiency of catalysis as well as those that make it suitable for dual specificity. We used site directed mutagenesis to identify residues critical for PfPNP catalytic activity as well as critical residues within a hydrophobic pocket required for accommodation of the 5'-methylthio group. Kinetic analysis data shows that several mutants had disrupted binding of the 5'-methylthio group while retaining activity for inosine. A triple PfPNP mutant that mimics Toxoplasma gondii PNP had significant loss of 5'-methylthio activity with retention of inosine activity. Crystallographic investigation of the triple mutant PfPNP with Tyr160Phe, Val66Ile, andVal73Ile in complex with the transition state inhibitor immucillin H reveals fewer hydrogen bond interactions for the inhibitor in the hydrophobic pocket.

  2. Metabolic Engineering of the Purine Pathway for Riboflavin Production in Ashbya gossypii†

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Alberto; Santos, María A.; Pompejus, Markus; Revuelta, José L.

    2005-01-01

    Purine nucleotides are essential precursors for living organisms because they are involved in many important processes, such as nucleic acid synthesis, energy supply, and the biosynthesis of several amino acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. GTP is the immediate precursor for riboflavin biosynthesis, and its formation through the purine pathway is subject to several regulatory mechanisms in different steps. Extracellular purines repress the transcription of most genes required for de novo ATP and GTP synthesis. Additionally, three enzymes of the pathway, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) amidotransferase, adenylosuccinate synthetase, and IMP dehydrogenase, are subject to feedback inhibition by their end products. Here we report the characterization and manipulation of the committed step in the purine pathway of the riboflavin overproducer Ashbya gossypii. We report that phosphoribosylamine biosynthesis in A. gossypii is negatively regulated at the transcriptional level by extracellular adenine. Furthermore, we show that ATP and GTP exert a strong inhibitory effect on the PRPP amidotransferase from A. gossypii. We constitutively overexpressed the AgADE4 gene encoding PRPP amidotransferase in A. gossypii, thereby abolishing the adenine-mediated transcriptional repression. In addition, we replaced the corresponding residues (aspartic acid310, lysine333, and alanine417) that have been described to be important for PRPP amidotransferase feedback inhibition in other organisms by site-directed mutagenesis. With these manipulations, we managed to enhance metabolic flow through the purine pathway and to increase the production of riboflavin in the triple mutant strain 10-fold (228 mg/liter). PMID:16204483

  3. Functionalized Solid Electrodes for Electrochemical Biosensing of Purine Nucleobases and Their Analogues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vimal Kumar; Jelen, Frantisek; Trnkova, Libuse

    2015-01-01

    Interest in electrochemical analysis of purine nucleobases and few other important purine derivatives has been growing rapidly. Over the period of the past decade, the design of electrochemical biosensors has been focused on achieving high sensitivity and efficiency. The range of existing electrochemical methods with carbon electrode displays the highest rate in the development of biosensors. Moreover, modification of electrode surfaces based on nanomaterials is frequently used due to their extraordinary conductivity and surface to volume ratio. Different strategies for modifying electrode surfaces facilitate electron transport between the electrode surface and biomolecules, including DNA, oligonucleotides and their components. This review aims to summarize recent developments in the electrochemical analysis of purine derivatives, as well as discuss different applications. PMID:25594595

  4. Three-dimensional structure of E. Coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase at 0.99 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-03-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) catalyze the reversible phosphorolysis of nucleosides and are key enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. They are essential for normal cell function and can catalyze the transglycosylation. Crystals of E. coli PNP were grown in microgravity by the capillary counterdiffusion method through a gel layer. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined by the molecular-replacement method at 0.99 Å resolution. The structural features are considered, and the structure of E. coli PNP is compared with the structures of the free enzyme and its complexes with purine base derivatives established earlier. A comparison of the environment of the purine base in the complex of PNP with formycin A and of the pyrimidine base in the complex of uridine phosphorylase with thymidine revealed the main structural features of the base-binding sites. Coordinates of the atomic model determined with high accuracy were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB_ID: 4RJ2).

  5. Adaptive ligand binding by the purine riboswitch in the recognition of guanine and adenine analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Sunny D.; Reyes, Francis E.; Edwards, Andrea L.; Batey, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Purine riboswitches discriminate between guanine and adenine by at least 10,000-fold based on the identity of a single pyrimidine (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base pair with the ligand. To understand how this high degree of specificity for closely related compounds is achieved through simple pairing, we investigated their interaction with purine analogs with varying functional groups at the 2- and 6-positions that have the potential to alter interactions with Y74. Using a combination of crystallographic and calorimetric approaches, we find that binding these purines is often facilitated by either small structural changes in the RNA or tautomeric changes in the ligand. This work also reveals that, along with base pairing, conformational restriction of Y74 significantly contributes to nucleobase selectivity. These results reveal that compounds that exploit the inherent local flexibility within riboswitch binding pockets can alter their ligand specificity. PMID:19523903

  6. Purine biosynthesis-deficient Burkholderia mutants are incapable of symbiotic accommodation in the stinkbug.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Jang, Ho Am; Won, Yeo Jin; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Han, Sang Heum; Kim, Chan-Hee; Nikoh, Naruo; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2014-03-01

    The Riptortus-Burkholderia symbiotic system represents a promising experimental model to study the molecular mechanisms involved in insect-bacterium symbiosis due to the availability of genetically manipulated Burkholderia symbiont. Using transposon mutagenesis screening, we found a symbiosis-deficient mutant that was able to colonize the host insect but failed to induce normal development of host's symbiotic organ. The disrupted gene was identified as purL involved in purine biosynthesis. In vitro growth impairment of the purL mutant and its growth dependency on adenine and adenosine confirmed the functional disruption of the purine synthesis gene. The purL mutant also showed defects in biofilm formation, and this defect was not rescued by supplementation of purine derivatives. When inoculated to host insects, the purL mutant was initially able to colonize the symbiotic organ but failed to attain a normal infection density. The low level of infection density of the purL mutant attenuated the development of the host's symbiotic organ at early instar stages and reduced the host's fitness throughout the nymphal stages. Another symbiont mutant-deficient in a purine biosynthesis gene, purM, showed phenotypes similar to those of the purL mutant both in vitro and in vivo, confirming that the purL phenotypes are due to disrupted purine biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that the purine biosynthesis genes of the Burkholderia symbiont are critical for the successful accommodation of symbiont within the host, thereby facilitating the development of the host's symbiotic organ and enhancing the host's fitness values.

  7. Selective DNA purine base photooxidation by bis-terdentate iridium(III) polypyridyl and cyclometalated complexes.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Alexandre; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Elias, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Two bis-terdentate iridium(III) complexes with polypyridyl and cyclometalated ligands have been prepared and characterized. Their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties have been studied, and a photophysical scheme addressing their properties is proposed. Different types of excited states have been considered to account for the deactivation processes in each complex. Interestingly, in the presence of mono- or polynucleotides, a photoinduced electron-transfer process from a DNA purine base (i.e., guanine or adenine) to the excited complex is shown through luminescence quenching experiments. For the first time, this work reports evidence for selective DNA purine bases oxidation by excited iridium(III) bis-terdentate complexes.

  8. Anti‐flavivirus Activity of Different Tritylated Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleoside Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Serpi, Michaela; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Ferrari, Valentina; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Meneghesso, Silvia; Derudas, Marco; Farleigh, Laura; Zanetta, Paola; Bugert, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A series of tritylated and dimethoxytritylated analogues of selected pyrimidine and purine nucleosides were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against two important members of the genus Flavivirus in the Flaviviridae family, the yellow fever (YFV) and dengue viruses (DENV). Among all compounds tested, the 5′‐O‐tritylated and the 5′‐O‐dimethoxytritylated 5‐fluorouridine derivatives exerted potency against YFV. Interestingly in the series of purine analogues, the 5′O, N‐bis‐tritylated fludarabine derivative revealed strong inhibitory activity against DENV at μm concentrations, however significantly weaker potency against YFV. PMID:27551659

  9. Anti-flavivirus Activity of Different Tritylated Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleoside Analogues.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Serpi, Michaela; Slusarczyk, Magdalena; Ferrari, Valentina; Pertusati, Fabrizio; Meneghesso, Silvia; Derudas, Marco; Farleigh, Laura; Zanetta, Paola; Bugert, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    A series of tritylated and dimethoxytritylated analogues of selected pyrimidine and purine nucleosides were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro inhibitory activity against two important members of the genus Flavivirus in the Flaviviridae family, the yellow fever (YFV) and dengue viruses (DENV). Among all compounds tested, the 5'-O-tritylated and the 5'-O-dimethoxytritylated 5-fluorouridine derivatives exerted potency against YFV. Interestingly in the series of purine analogues, the 5'O, N-bis-tritylated fludarabine derivative revealed strong inhibitory activity against DENV at μm concentrations, however significantly weaker potency against YFV. PMID:27551659

  10. The role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DeMoll, E.

    1998-11-01

    Firstly, characterization of a purine degrading pathway in Methanococcus vannielii was determined. The pathway is similar to that described for Clostridia. The M. vannielli pathway differs in a few respects from the Clostridial pathway. The pathway of Clostridia uses tetrahydrofolic acid (THF), whereas the pathway of M. vannielii uses tetrahydromethanopterin (H{sub 4}MPt) as a cofactor in the transfer of both the formimino moiety of formiminoglycine and apparently in the cleavage of glycine by a glycin decarboxylase type mechanism that is dependent upon at least H{sub 4}MPt and either NAD{sup +} or NADP{sup +}. Secondly, the relationship of purine degradation to methanogenesis was investigated.

  11. Copper-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine: synthesis of purine-fused tricyclics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ren-Long; Liang, Lei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Qu, Gui-Rong; Niu, Hong-Ying; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2014-04-18

    A novel protocol to construct fluorescent purine-fused tricyclic products via intramolecular cyclization of N-propargyl-adenine has been developed. With CuBr as the catalyst, a series of purine-fused tricyclic products were obtained in good to excellent yields (19 examples, 75-89% yields). When R2 was a hydrogen atom in N-propargyl-adenines, the reactions only afforded the endocyclic double bond products. When R2 was an aryl group, the electron-donating groups favored the endocyclic double bond products, while the electron-withdrawing groups favored the exocyclic double bond products. PMID:24678722

  12. Electrostatic and Hydrophobic Interactions Mediate Single-Stranded DNA Recognition and Acta2 Repression by Purine-Rich Element-Binding Protein B.

    PubMed

    Rumora, Amy E; Ferris, Lauren A; Wheeler, Tamar R; Kelm, Robert J

    2016-05-17

    Myofibroblast differentiation is characterized by an increased level of expression of cytoskeletal smooth muscle α-actin. In human and murine fibroblasts, the gene encoding smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors that either activate or repress the 5' promoter-enhancer in response to environmental cues signaling tissue repair and remodeling. Purine-rich element-binding protein B (Purβ) suppresses the expression of Acta2 by cooperatively interacting with the sense strand of a 5' polypurine sequence containing an inverted MCAT cis element required for gene activation. In this study, we evaluated the chemical basis of nucleoprotein complex formation between the Purβ repressor and the purine-rich strand of the MCAT element in the mouse Acta2 promoter. Quantitative single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding assays conducted in the presence of increasing concentrations of monovalent salt or anionic detergent suggested that the assembly of a high-affinity nucleoprotein complex is driven by a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Consistent with the results of pH titration analysis, site-directed mutagenesis revealed several basic amino acid residues in the intermolecular (R267) and intramolecular (K82 and R159) subdomains that are essential for Purβ transcriptional repressor function in Acta2 promoter-reporter assays. In keeping with their diminished Acta2 repressor activity in fibroblasts, purified Purβ variants containing an R267A mutation exhibited reduced binding affinity for purine-rich ssDNA. Moreover, certain double and triple-point mutants were also defective in binding to the Acta2 corepressor protein, Y-box-binding protein 1. Collectively, these findings establish the repertoire of noncovalent interactions that account for the unique structural and functional properties of Purβ. PMID:27064749

  13. Infection of soybean and pea nodules by Rhizobium spp. purine auxotrophs in the presence of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, J D; Diebold, R J; Schultz, B W; Noel, K D

    1994-01-01

    Purine auxotrophs of various Rhizobium species are symbiotically defective, usually unable to initiate or complete the infection process. Earlier studies demonstrated that, in the Rhizobium etli-bean symbiosis, infection by purine auxotrophs is partially restored by supplementation of the plant medium with 5-amino-imidazole-4-carboxamide (AICA) riboside, the unphosphorylated form of the purine biosynthetic intermediate AICAR. The addition of purine to the root environment does not have this effect. In this study, purine auxotrophs of Rhizobium fredii HH303 and Rhizobium leguminosarum 128C56 (bv. viciae) were examined. Nutritional and genetic characterization indicated that each mutant was blocked in purine biosynthesis prior to the production of AICAR. R. fredii HH303 and R. leguminosarum 128C56 appeared to be deficient in AICA riboside transport and/or conversion into AICAR, and the auxotrophs derived from them grew very poorly with AICA riboside as a purine source. All of the auxotrophs elicited poorly developed, uninfected nodules on their appropriate hosts. On peas, addition of AICA riboside or purine to the root environment led to enhanced nodulation; however, infection threads were observed only in the presence of AICA riboside. On soybeans, only AICA riboside was effective in enhancing nodulation and promoting infection. Although AICA riboside supplementation of the auxotrophs led to infection thread development on both hosts, the numbers of bacteria recovered from the nodules were still 2 or more orders of magnitude lower than in fully developed nodules populated by wild-type bacteria. The ability to AICA riboside to promote infection by purine auxotrophs, despite serving as a very poor purine source for these strains, supports the hypothesis that AICAR plays a role in infection other than merely promoting bacterial growth. Images PMID:8195084

  14. In vivo effect of mutations at the PRPP binding site of the Bacillus subtilis purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Rappu, Pekka; Pullinen, Terhi; Mäntsälä, Pekka

    2003-11-01

    The Bacillus subtilis PurR mediates adenine repression and guanosine induction of purA. PRPP inhibits binding of PurR to DNA in vitro. Mutations in the PRPP binding motif of PurR caused strong repression regardless of purine exclusions or additions, establishing the role of PRPP as regulator of PurR.

  15. 76 FR 80955 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Methanocarba Analogues of Purine and Pyrimidine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... treat and/or prevent cardiac diseases in humans.'' Upon the expiration or termination of the exclusive... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of Methanocarba Analogues of Purine and Pyrimidine Nucleosides and Nucleotides to Treat or Prevent Cardiac Diseases...

  16. A First Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of a New Class of Purine and Guanine Thioglycoside Analogs.

    PubMed

    Elgemeie, Galal; Abu-Zaied, Mamdouh; Hebishy, Ali; Abbas, Nermen; Hamed, Mai

    2016-09-01

    A first microwave-assisted synthesis of a new class of novel purine thioglycoside analogs from readily available starting materials has been described. The key step of this protocol is the formation of sodium pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-7-thiolate and 7-mercaptopyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives via condensation of 5-amino-1H-pyrazoles with sodium 2,2-dicyanoethene-1,1-bis(thiolate) salts or 2-(dimercaptomethylene)malononitrile, respectively, under microwave irradiation, followed by coupling with halo sugars to give the corresponding purine thioglycoside analogs. The obtained purines and purines thioglycosides derivatives were evaluated in vitro against lung (A549), colon (HCT116), liver (HEPG2), and prostate (PC3) cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (5b, 5d, 5f, and 9a-d) exhibited little potency toward the four cell lines. On the other hand, compound 5a elicited higher cytotoxicity on both prostate (PC3) and colon (HCT116), respectively, while it was found moderate on lung (A549), and inactive on liver (HEPG2). Moreover, compound 5c was found moderate with LC50 values 52.0-88.9 μM for almost all the cell lines. PMID:27556784

  17. Changes in Purines Concentration in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Pregnant Women Experiencing Pain During Active Labor.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André P; Böhmer, Ana E; Hansel, Gisele; Soares, Félix A; Oses, Jean P; Giordani, Alex T; Posso, Irimar P; Auler, José Otávio C; Mendes, Florentino F; Félix, Elaine A; Portela, Luís V; Souza, Diogo O

    2015-11-01

    Labor pain has been reported as a severe pain and can be considered as a model of acute visceral pain. It is well known that extracellular purines have an important role in pain signaling in the central nervous system. This study analyzes the relationship between extracellular purines and pain perception during active labor. A prospective observational study was performed. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the purines and their metabolites were compared between women at term pregnancy with labor pain (n = 49) and without labor pain (Caesarian section; n = 47). Control groups (healthy men and women without chronic or acute pain-n = 40 and 32, respectively) were also investigated. The CSF levels of adenosine were significantly lower in the labor pain group (P = 0.026) and negatively correlated with pain intensity measured by a visual analogue scale (r = -0.48, P = 0.0005). Interestingly, CSF levels of uric acid were significantly higher in healthy men as compared to women. Additionally, pregnant women showed increased CSF levels of ADP, GDP, adenosine and guanosine and reduced CSF levels of AMP, GTP, and uric acid as compared to non-pregnant women (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that purines, in special the nucleoside adenosine, are associated with pregnancy and labor pain.

  18. Structure and Electronic Spectra of Purine-Methyl Viologen Charge Transfer Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jalilov, Almaz S.; Patwardhan, Sameer; Singh, Arunoday; Simeon, Tomekia; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Schatz, George C.; Lewis, Frederick D.

    2014-01-01

    The structure and properties of the electron donor-acceptor complexes formed between methyl viologen (MV) and purine nucleosides and nucleotides in water and the solid state have been investigated using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Solution studies were performed using UV-vis and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Theoretical calculations were performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Energy decomposition analysis indicates that dispersion and induction (charge-transfer) interactions dominate the total binding energy, whereas electrostatic interactions are largely repulsive. The appearance of charge transfer bands in the absorption spectra of the complexes are well described by time-dependent (TD) DFT and are further explained in terms of the redox properties of purine monomers and solvation effects. Crystal structures are reported for complexes of methyl viologen with the purines 2′-deoxyguanosine 3′-monophosphate GMP (DAD′DAD′ type) and 7-deazaguanosine zG (DAD′ADAD′ type). Comparison of the structures determined in the solid state and by theoretical methods in solution provides valuable insights into the nature of charge-transfer interactions involving purine bases as electron donors. PMID:24294996

  19. Structure and electronic spectra of purine-methyl viologen charge transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Patwardhan, Sameer; Singh, Arunoday; Simeon, Tomekia; Sarjeant, Amy A; Schatz, George C; Lewis, Frederick D

    2014-01-01

    The structure and properties of the electron donor-acceptor complexes formed between methyl viologen and purine nucleosides and nucleotides in water and the solid state have been investigated using a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. Solution studies were performed using UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Theoretical calculations were performed within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Energy decomposition analysis indicates that dispersion and induction (charge-transfer) interactions dominate the total binding energy, whereas electrostatic interactions are largely repulsive. The appearance of charge transfer bands in the absorption spectra of the complexes are well-described by time-dependent DFT and are further explained in terms of the redox properties of purine monomers and solvation effects. Crystal structures are reported for complexes of methyl viologen with the purines 2'-deoxyguanosine 3'-monophosphate (DAD'DAD' type) and 7-deazaguanosine (DAD'ADAD' type). Comparison of the structures determined in the solid state and by theoretical methods in solution provides valuable insights into the nature of charge-transfer interactions involving purine bases as electron donors.

  20. mTORC1 induces purine synthesis through control of the mitochondrial tetrahydrofolate cycle.

    PubMed

    Ben-Sahra, Issam; Hoxhaj, Gerta; Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-02-12

    In response to growth signals, mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) stimulates anabolic processes underlying cell growth. We found that mTORC1 increases metabolic flux through the de novo purine synthesis pathway in various mouse and human cells, thereby influencing the nucleotide pool available for nucleic acid synthesis. mTORC1 had transcriptional effects on multiple enzymes contributing to purine synthesis, with expression of the mitochondrial tetrahydrofolate (mTHF) cycle enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 2 (MTHFD2) being closely associated with mTORC1 signaling in both normal and cancer cells. MTHFD2 expression and purine synthesis were stimulated by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), which was activated by mTORC1 independent of its canonical induction downstream of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α eIF2α phosphorylation. Thus, mTORC1 stimulates the mTHF cycle, which contributes one-carbon units to enhance production of purine nucleotides in response to growth signals. PMID:26912861

  1. From Purines to Basic Biochemical Concepts: Experiments for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Isabella; Ipata, Piero Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Many high school biology courses address mainly the molecular and cellular basis of life. The complexity that underlies the most essential processes is often difficult for the students to understand; possibly, in part, because of the inability to see and explore them. Six simple practical experiments on purine catabolism as a part of a…

  2. The purine efflux pump PbuE in Bacillus subtilis modulates expression of the PurR and G-box (XptR) regulons by adjusting the purine base pool size.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Per; Saxild, Hans H

    2005-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the expression of genes encoding enzymes and other proteins involved in purine de novo synthesis and salvage is affected by purine bases and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The transcription of the genes belonging to the PurR regulon is negatively regulated by the PurR protein and PRPP. The expression of the genes belonging to the G-box (XptR) regulon, including the pbuE gene, is negatively regulated by a riboswitch-controlled transcription termination mechanism. The G-box regulon effector molecules are hypoxanthine and guanine. pbuE encodes a purine base efflux pump and is now recognized as belonging to a third purine regulon. The expression of the pbuE gene is positively regulated by a riboswitch that recognizes adenine. Here we show that the expression of pbuE'-lacZ transcriptional fusions are induced by adenine to the highest extent in mutants which do not express a functional PbuE pump. In a mutant defective in the metabolism of adenine, the ade apt mutant, we found a high intracellular level of adenine and constitutive high levels of PbuE. A growth test using a purine auxotroph provided further evidence for the role of PbuE in lowering the intracellular concentration of purine bases, including adenine. Purine analogs also affect the expression of pbuE, which might be of importance for the protection against toxic analogs. In a mutant that overexpresses PbuE, the expression of genes belonging to the PurR regulon was increased. Our findings provide further evidence for important functions of the PbuE protein, such as acting as a pump that lowers the purine base pool and affects the expression of the G-box and PurR regulons, including pbuE itself, and as a pump involved in protection against toxic purine base analogs.

  3. Prosthetic improvement of pronounced buccally positioned zygomatic implants: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Ataís; Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes dos; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Nóbilo, Mauro Antonio de Arruda; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2014-08-01

    This report presents a prosthetic technique for the improvement of surgically positioned, buccally placed zygomatic implants with the use of custom abutments for improved retention screw position and an esthetic implant reconstruction. The patient presented four zygomatic implants with pronounced buccal inclination. The anterior implants were inclined toward the location where the anterior artificial teeth should be placed during rehabilitation. As the manufacturer does not provide angulated abutments, we attempted the waxing and overcasting of a prosthetic abutment, repositioning the access holes of the prosthetic screws to a more palatal position. This clinical report demonstrates that abutment customization could be an interesting way to relocate the access holes of the prosthetic screws in cases of zygomatic implants with pronounced buccal inclination.

  4. Molecular Dissection of a Borrelia burgdorferi In Vivo Essential Purine Transport System

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sunny; Showman, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is dependent on purine salvage from the host environment for survival. The genes bbb22 and bbb23 encode purine permeases that are essential for B. burgdorferi mouse infectivity. We now demonstrate the unique contributions of each of these genes to purine transport and murine infection. The affinities of spirochetes carrying bbb22 alone for hypoxanthine and adenine were similar to those of spirochetes carrying both genes. Spirochetes carrying bbb22 alone were able to achieve wild-type levels of adenine saturation but not hypoxanthine saturation, suggesting that maximal hypoxanthine uptake requires the presence of bbb23. Moreover, the purine transport activity conferred by bbb22 was dependent on an additional distal transcriptional start site located within the bbb23 open reading frame. The initial rates of uptake of hypoxanthine and adenine by spirochetes carrying bbb23 alone were below the level of detection. However, these spirochetes demonstrated a measurable increase in hypoxanthine uptake over a 30-min time course. Our findings indicate that bbb22-dependent adenine transport is essential for B. burgdorferi survival in mice. The bbb23 gene was dispensable for B. burgdorferi mouse infectivity, yet its presence was required along with that of bbb22 for B. burgdorferi to achieve maximal spirochete loads in infected mouse tissues. These data demonstrate that both genes, bbb22 and bbb23, are critical for B. burgdorferi to achieve wild-type infection of mice and that the differences in the capabilities of the two transporters may reflect distinct purine salvage needs that the spirochete encounters throughout its natural infectious cycle. PMID:25776752

  5. Influence of prime lexicality, frequency, and pronounceability on the masked onset priming effect.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulou, Maria; Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Carreiras, Manuel

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigates the origins of the masked onset priming effect (MOPE). There are two alternative interpretations that account for most of the evidence reported on the MOPE, so far. The speech planning account (SP) identifies the locus of the MOPE in the preparation of the speech response. In contrast, the dual-route theory proposes that the effect arises as a result of the processing of the prime by the nonlexical route. In a series of masked onset priming word naming experiments we test the validity of these accounts by manipulating the primes' frequency, their lexical status, and pronounceability. We found consistent MOPEs of similar magnitude with high- and low-frequency prime words as well as with pronounceable nonwords. Contrarily, when primes consisted of unpronounceable consonantal strings the effect disappeared, suggesting that pronounceability of the prime is a prerequisite for the emergence of the MOPE. These results are in accordance with the predictions of the SP account. The pattern of effects obtained in the present study further defines the origins of the MOPE. PMID:20221948

  6. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  7. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements.

  8. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  9. A role for a highly conserved protein of unknown function in regulation of Bacillus subtilis purA by the purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Rappu, P; Shin, B S; Zalkin, H; Mäntsälä, P

    1999-06-01

    Regulation of the purine biosynthetic gene purA was examined by using a transcriptional fusion to a luciferase reporter gene. Transcription was repressed about 10-fold by the addition of adenine and increased approximately 4.5-fold by the addition of guanosine. This regulation is mediated by a purine repressor (PurR). In a purR mutant, basal expression was increased 10-fold, and there was no further stimulation by guanosine or repression by adenine. An open reading frame, yabJ, immediately downstream from purR was found to have a role in the repression of purA by adenine. Repression by adenine was perturbed in a purR+ yabJ mutant, although guanosine regulation was retained. Mutations in the PurR PRPP binding motif abolished guanosine regulation in the yabJ mutant. Thus, PRPP appears to be required for upregulation by guanosine. The amino acid sequence of YabJ is homologous to the YER057c/YjgF protein family of unknown function.

  10. Lack of relationship between purine biosynthesis and vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus: a cautionary tale for microarray interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Paige M; Climo, Michael W; Archer, Gordon L

    2007-04-01

    Previous microarray data (E. Mongodin, J. Finan, M. W. Climo, A. Rosato, S. Gill, and G. L. Archer, J. Bacteriol. 185:4638-4643, 2003) noted an association in two vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) strains between high-level, passage-induced vancomycin resistance, a marked increase in the transcription of purine biosynthetic genes, and mutation of the putative purine regulator purR. Initial studies to report on the possible association between vancomycin resistance and alterations in purine metabolism in one of these strains (VP-32) confirmed, by Western analysis, an increase in the translation of PurH and PurM, two purine pathway enzymes. In addition, PurR was identified, by knockout and complementation in a vancomycin-susceptible strain, as a repressor of the purine biosynthetic operon in S. aureus, and the PurR missense mutation was shown to inactivate the repressor. However, despite the apparent relationship between increased purine biosynthesis and increased vancomycin resistance in VP-32, neither the addition of exogenous purines to a defined growth medium nor the truncation or inactivation of purR improved the growth of vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus in the presence of vancomycin. Furthermore, the passage of additional vancomycin-susceptible and VISA strains to high-level vancomycin resistance occurred without changes in cellular purine metabolism or mutation of purR despite the development of thickened cell walls in passaged strains. Thus, we could confirm neither a role for altered purine metabolism in the development of vancomycin resistance nor its requirement for the maintenance of a thickened cell wall. The failure of biochemical and physiological studies to support the association between transcription and phenotype initially found in careful microarray studies emphasizes the importance of follow-up investigations to confirm microarray observations.

  11. Synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) and N-(purin-6-yl) amino acids and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Victor P; Vigorov, Alexey Yu; Musiyak, Vera V; Nizova, Irina A; Gruzdev, Dmitry A; Matveeva, Tatyana V; Levit, Galina L; Kravchenko, Marionella A; Skornyakov, Sergey N; Bekker, Olga B; Danilenko, Valery N; Charushin, Valery N

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic routes to novel N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates with amino acids and glycine-containing dipeptides were developed. In vitro testing of 42 new and known compounds made it possible to reveal a series of N-(purin-6-yl)- and N-(2-aminopurin-6-yl) conjugates exhibiting significant antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium terrae, and multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strain isolated from tuberculosis patients in the Ural region (Russia). N-(2-Aminopurin-6-yl)- and N-(purin-6-yl)-glycyl-(S)-glutamic acids were the most active compounds. PMID:27107949

  12. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the formation of triple helices between purine-rich deoxyribo-oligonucleotides and the promoter region of the human c-src proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Aich, P; Ritchie, S; Bonham, K; Lee, J S

    1998-01-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of triplex formation between four purine-rich oligonucleotides and a 22 bp pyrimidine. purine tract in the promoter region of the c-src gene were determined by fluorescence polarization studies. Three of these four oligonucleotides were 11 nt in length, corresponding to the left, central or right portion of the tract, while the fourth was a 22mer covering the whole tract. Binding constants ( Ka) were measured as a function of Mg2+ concentration (0-10 mM) and temperature (0-41 degrees C). In 10 mM Mg2+, K a for the left, central and right 11mers were 0.26, 0.75 and 1.4 x 10(8)/M, respectively, while for the 22mer the value was 1.8 x 10(8)/M at 22 degrees C. Under the same conditions, Ka was estimated by an electrophoretic band shift technique. The agreement between the two methods was acceptable for the 22mer but not for the 11mers. Kinetic measurements demonstrated that the rate of dissociation of the 22mer from the triplex was significantly slower than that of the 11mers, providing an explanation for the observed discrepancy. The entropy and enthalpy of triplex formation were calculated from van't Hoff plots. In all cases the entropy was favourable, especially for the 22mer and for the 11mer with the lowest guanine content. The enthalpy was unfavourable for the 22mer and most favourable for the 11mer with the highest guanine content. These results provide a thermodynamic explanation for length and sequence effects on the formation of purine.pyrimidine.purine triplexes. PMID:9722637

  13. A Dual-Route Model that Learns to Pronounce English Words

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W.; Miller, Craig S.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a model that learns to pronounce English words. Learning occurs in two modules: 1) a rule-based module that constructs pronunciations by phonetic analysis of the letter string, and 2) a whole-word module that learns to associate subsets of letters to the pronunciation, without phonetic analysis. In a simulation on a corpus of over 300 words the model produced pronunciation latencies consistent with the effects of word frequency and orthographic regularity observed in human data. Implications of the model for theories of visual word processing and reading instruction are discussed.

  14. Pronouncing the names of the moons of Saturn, or pulling teeth from Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, G.; Reiche, H.

    The moons of Saturn, so Woody Allen recently observed [Allen, 1979], do not come up in conversation very often. This may be one reason why most people, planetary scientists included, have trouble pronouncing their names.Our troubles, however, stem not merely from the fact that these names are unfamiliar, or even that they are of non-English origin. After all, the same is true of many terms in technology and medicine [cf. Nybakken, 1959; Reiche, 1959]. They stem from the fact that they are drawn from Greco-Roman mythology and so possess the three chief difficulties troubling those who strive for ‘correct’ pronunciation anywhere in this area.

  15. Sequence-dependent dynamics of duplex DNA: the applicability of a dinucleotide model.

    PubMed Central

    Okonogi, T M; Alley, S C; Reese, A W; Hopkins, P B; Robinson, B H

    2002-01-01

    The short-time (submicrosecond) bending dynamics of duplex DNA were measured to determine the effect of sequence on dynamics. All measurements were obtained from a single site on duplex DNA, using a single, site-specific modified base containing a rigidly tethered, electron paramagnetic resonance active spin probe. The observed dynamics are interpreted in terms of single-step sequence-dependent bending force constants, determined from the mean squared amplitude of bending relative to the end-to-end vector using the modified weakly bending rod model. The bending dynamics at a single site are a function of the sequence of the nucleotides constituting the duplex DNA. We developed and examined several dinucleotide-based models for flexibility. The models indicate that the dominant feature of the dynamics is best explained in terms of purine- and pyrimidine-type steps, although distinction is made among all 10 unique steps: It was found that purine-purine steps (which are the same as pyrimidine-pyrimidine steps) were near average in flexibility, but the pyrimidine-purine steps (5' to 3') were nearly twice as flexible, whereas purine-pyrimidine steps were more than half as flexible as average DNA. Therefore, the range of stepwise flexibility is approximately fourfold and is characterized by both the type of base pair step (pyrimidine/purine combination) and the identity of the bases within the pair (G, A, T, or C). All of the four models considered here underscore the complexity of the dependence of dynamics on DNA sequence with certain sequences not satisfactorily explainable in terms of any dinucleotide model. These findings provide a quantitative basis for interpreting the dynamics and kinetics of DNA-sequence-dependent biological processes, including protein recognition and chromatin packaging. PMID:12496111

  16. Bis-intercalation of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye in DNA in symmetrical pyrimidine-pyrimidine-purine-purine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, L F; Jensen, L K; Jacobsen, J P

    1996-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the binding of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye, 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-(3 -methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo- 1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene)-quinolinium tetraiodide (TOTO), to various double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing symmetric (5'-pyr-pyr-pu-pu-3')2 or (5'-pu-pu-pyr-pyr-3')2 sequences. It was found that TOTO binds preferentially to oligonucleotides containing a (5'-CTAG-3')2 or a (5'-CCGG-3')2 sequence. Binding to the (5'-CCGG-3')2 sequence is less favored than to the (5'-CTAG-3')2 sequence. The complexes of TOTO with d(CGCTAGCGCTAGCG)2 (10) and d(CGCTAGCCGGCG):d(CGCCGGCTAGCG) (11) oligonucleotides, each containing two preferential binding sites, was also examined. In both cases TOTO forms mixtures of 1:1 and 1:2 dsDNA-TOTO complexes in ratios dependent on the relative amount of TOTO and the oligonucleotides in the sample. Binding of TOTO to the two oligonucleotides is sequence selective at the (5'-CTAG-3')2 and (5'-CCGG-3')2 sites. The 1H NMR spectra of both the 1:2 complexes and the three different 1:1 complexes have been assigned. A slight negative cooperativity is observed in formation of the 1:2 complexes. The ratio between the two different 1:1 complexes formed with oligonucleotide 11 is 2.4 in favor of binding to the (5'-CTAG-3')2 site. This is very similar to results obtained when the two sites are in different oligonucleotides. Thus the distribution of TOTO among the (5'-CTAG-3')2 and (5'-CCGG-3')2 sites is independent of whether the two sites are in the same or two different oligonucleotides. PMID:8600453

  17. Bis-intercalation of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye in DNA in symmetrical pyrimidine-pyrimidine-purine-purine oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hansen, L F; Jensen, L K; Jacobsen, J P

    1996-03-01

    One- and two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the binding of a homodimeric thiazole orange dye, 1,1'-(4,4,8,8-tetramethyl-4,8-diazaundecamethylene)-bis-4-(3 -methyl-2,3-dihydro-(benzo- 1,3-thiazole)-2-methylidene)-quinolinium tetraiodide (TOTO), to various double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing symmetric (5'-pyr-pyr-pu-pu-3')2 or (5'-pu-pu-pyr-pyr-3')2 sequences. It was found that TOTO binds preferentially to oligonucleotides containing a (5'-CTAG-3')2 or a (5'-CCGG-3')2 sequence. Binding to the (5'-CCGG-3')2 sequence is less favored than to the (5'-CTAG-3')2 sequence. The complexes of TOTO with d(CGCTAGCGCTAGCG)2 (10) and d(CGCTAGCCGGCG):d(CGCCGGCTAGCG) (11) oligonucleotides, each containing two preferential binding sites, was also examined. In both cases TOTO forms mixtures of 1:1 and 1:2 dsDNA-TOTO complexes in ratios dependent on the relative amount of TOTO and the oligonucleotides in the sample. Binding of TOTO to the two oligonucleotides is sequence selective at the (5'-CTAG-3')2 and (5'-CCGG-3')2 sites. The 1H NMR spectra of both the 1:2 complexes and the three different 1:1 complexes have been assigned. A slight negative cooperativity is observed in formation of the 1:2 complexes. The ratio between the two different 1:1 complexes formed with oligonucleotide 11 is 2.4 in favor of binding to the (5'-CTAG-3')2 site. This is very similar to results obtained when the two sites are in different oligonucleotides. Thus the distribution of TOTO among the (5'-CTAG-3')2 and (5'-CCGG-3')2 sites is independent of whether the two sites are in the same or two different oligonucleotides.

  18. Study on the activity of non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitor by 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peizhen; Tian, Yueli; Zhai, Honglin; Deng, Fangfang; Xie, Meihong; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2013-11-01

    Non-purine derivatives have been shown to be promising novel drug candidates as xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Based on three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) methods including comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), two 3D-QSAR models for a series of non-purine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors were established, and their reliability was supported by statistical parameters. Combined 3D-QSAR modeling and the results of molecular docking between non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors and XO, the main factors that influenced activity of inhibitors were investigated, and the obtained results could explain known experimental facts. Furthermore, several new potential inhibitors with higher activity predicted were designed, which based on our analyses, and were supported by the simulation of molecular docking. This study provided some useful information for the development of non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors with novel structures.

  19. Amide-controlled, one-pot synthesis of tri-substituted purines generates structural diversity and analogues with trypanocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Pineda de las Infantas y Villatoro, Maria J; Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Contreras-Montoya, Rafael; Garcia-Salcedo, Jose A; Gallo Mezo, Miguel A; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Diaz-Mochon, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    A novel one-pot synthesis of tri-substituted purines and the discovery of purine analogues with trypanocidal activity are reported. The reaction is initiated by a metal-free oxidative coupling of primary alkoxides and diaminopyrimidines with Schiff base formation and subsequent annulation in the presence of large N,N-dimethylamides (e.g. N,N-dimethylpropanamide or larger). This synthetic route is in competition with a reaction previously-reported by our group, allowing the generation of a combinatorial library of tri-substituted purines by the simple modification of the amide and the alkoxide employed. Among the variety of structures generated, two purine analogues displayed trypanocidal activity against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei with IC50 < 5 μM, being each of those compounds obtained through each of the synthetic pathways.

  20. [Effect of 5-FU on the utilization of purine and pyrimidine by human gastric cancer cells (KATO III)].

    PubMed

    Usami, M; Wang, J; Yasuda, I; Saitoh, Y; Yumisashi, T; Abe, K

    1995-05-01

    Effect of utilization of purine and pyrimidine in the culture medium by human gastric cancer cells (KATO III) was evaluated. Nucleosides mixture solution (OG-VI), consisting of inosine, guanosine 5' monophosphate (5'GMP), cytidine, uridine and thymidine (4: 4: 4: 3: 1 in molar ratio) was used and their levels in the culture medium was measured by HPLC after 3 day culture. Purine, inosine and 5' GMP, in the medium almost decreased and purine base, xanthine and hypoxanthine levels increased, but changes in pyrimidine level were minimal. 5-FU decreased purine and increased pyrimidine consumption. Addition of nucleosides mixture did not enhance the cellular proliferation, but inhibited growth when given in higher concentrations. Nucleoside mixture solution enhanced growth inhibition by 5-FU and it is a potential biochemical modulator of 5-FU metabolism in human cancer cells. PMID:7755382

  1. Characterization of a purine permease family gene OsPUP7 involved in growth and development control in rice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhuyun; Xiong, Lizhong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, PUP-type cytokinin transporter genes were identified in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The Oryza sativa purine permease (OsPUP) family has 12 members that show similar predicted protein sequences with AtPUPs. To reveal the functions of OsPUP genes, we searched the T-DNA mutant library of rice and found one mutant for the member OsPUP7. The T-DNA insertion caused a new transcript that encodes a protein with 26 amino acids different from the native OsPUP7 at the C-terminus. The mutant showed multiple phenotypic changes including increased plant height, big seeds, and delayed flowering. The mutant also showed increased sensitivity to drought and salt stresses and treatments with kinetin and abscisic acid. OsPUP7 is expressed mainly in the vascular bundle, pistil, and stamens. The measurement of cytokinins (CKs) showed that CK content in the mutant spikelets accumulated higher than that in the wild type. Moreover, uptake experiment in the yeast fcy2 mutant suggested that OsPUP7 has the ability to transport caffeine, a CK derivative. Our results indicate that the PUP transport system also exists in rice, and OsPUP7 has an important role in the transport of CK, thus affecting developmental process and stress responses.

  2. Pronounced effects of acute endurance exercise on gene expression in resting and exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Catoire, Milène; Mensink, Marco; Boekschoten, Mark V; Hangelbroek, Roland; Müller, Michael; Schrauwen, Patrick; Kersten, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity positively influences whole body energy metabolism and substrate handling in exercising muscle. While it is recognized that the effects of exercise extend beyond exercising muscle, it is unclear to what extent exercise impacts non-exercising muscles. Here we investigated the effects of an acute endurance exercise bouts on gene expression in exercising and non-exercising human muscle. To that end, 12 male subjects aged 44-56 performed one hour of one-legged cycling at 50% W(max). Muscle biopsies were taken from the exercising and non-exercising leg before and immediately after exercise and analyzed by microarray. One-legged cycling raised plasma lactate, free fatty acids, cortisol, noradrenalin, and adrenalin levels. Surprisingly, acute endurance exercise not only caused pronounced gene expression changes in exercising muscle but also in non-exercising muscle. In the exercising leg the three most highly induced genes were all part of the NR4A family. Remarkably, many genes induced in non-exercising muscle were PPAR targets or related to PPAR signalling, including PDK4, ANGPTL4 and SLC22A5. Pathway analysis confirmed this finding. In conclusion, our data indicate that acute endurance exercise elicits pronounced changes in gene expression in non-exercising muscle, which are likely mediated by changes in circulating factors such as free fatty acids. The study points to a major influence of exercise beyond the contracting muscle.

  3. [Correction of pronounced plagiocephaly with orthosis : results of a prospective follow-up control].

    PubMed

    Yacoub, A; von Salis-Soglio, G; Heyde, C-E

    2013-11-01

    For the treatment of pronounced deformational plagiocephaly in infants different therapeutic options are under discussion in the literature. This article presents a prospective observational study of 45 infants enrolled with distinct plagiocephaly and treated with a custom-made helmet orthosis. Treatment with the helmet orthosis was indicated by a difference in the skull diagonals of more than 0.5 cm or a cranial vault asymmetry (CVA) index > 3.5. The follow-up results were controlled with the help of a mobile spatial laser scanner and the CVA index and the skull deformity were measured. The average duration of treatment was 131 days. The CVA index improved from 9.95 to a normal value of 3.35 (median) and the skull deformity improved from 1.3 cm to 0.5 cm (median). The only side effects observed were easily treatable pressure marks. The results of this study reveal that pronounced deformational plagiocephaly can be successfully treated with a custom-made helmet orthosis and closely controlled monitoring.

  4. 2,3-Dicyclohexylsuccinimide as a directing/protecting group for the regioselective glycosylation or alkylation of purines.

    PubMed

    Pal, Ayan; Salandria, Kerry J; Arico, Joseph W; Schlegel, Mark K; McLaughlin, Larry W

    2013-04-11

    Here we describe the synthesis and application of a novel 2,3-dicyclohexylsuccinimide (Cy2SI) protecting group towards regioselective purine glycosylation and alkylation reactions. This bulky protecting group promotes high regioselectivity during the glycosylation (as well as diastereoselectivity) or alkylation of purines using Hoffer's chlorosugar or tert-butyl bromoacetate, respectively. Cy2SI offers the additional synthetic advantage that other base-labile protecting groups, such as toluoyl esters, can be selectively removed in its presence without affecting the imide.

  5. [Mutation analysis of the purine operon leader region in Bacillus subtilis].

    PubMed

    Lobanov, K V; korol'kova, N V; Eremina, S Iu; Érrais Lopes, L; Mironov, A S

    2011-07-01

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis purine (purE) operon is a subject of double negative control involving repressor protein PurR and a transcription terminator located in the operon leader region. We have performed site-directed mutagenesis of the specific motives, which are involved in formation of alternative hairpin structures, one of which produces transcription termination at the leader region ofpurEoperon. In vivo and in vitro analyses of the generated mutants have shown that purine bases, guanine and hypoxantine, serve as effector metabolites capable of increasing stability of terminating hairpin within the leader mRNA. Therefore, the leader RNA of purE operon serves as a sensor towards these metabolites and a riboswitch that provides premature termination of the operon transcription. The synergistic effect of the PurR repressor protein and a transcription terminator located at the leader region on the expression of purE operon was also revealed.

  6. Abiotic synthesis of purines and other heterocyclic compounds by the action of electrical discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    The synthesis of purines and pyrimidines using Oparin-Urey-type primitive earth atmospheres has been demonstrated by reacting methane, ethane, and ammonia in electrical discharges. Adenine, guaine, 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide (AICA), and isocytosine have been identified by UV spectrometry and paper chromatography as the products of the reaction. The total yields of the identified heterocyclic compounds are 0.0023 percent. It is concluded that adenine synthesis occurs at a much lower concentration of hydrogen cyanide than has been shown by earlier studies. Pathways for the synthesis of purines from hydrogen cyanide are discussed, and a comparison of the heterocyclic compounds that have been identified in meteorites and in prebiotic reactions is presented.

  7. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abramchik, Yu. A. Timofeev, V. I. Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  8. A high-yielding, strictly regioselective prebiotic purine nucleoside formation pathway.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sidney; Thoma, Ines; Deutsch, Amrei; Gehrke, Tim; Mayer, Peter; Zipse, Hendrik; Carell, Thomas

    2016-05-13

    The origin of life is believed to have started with prebiotic molecules reacting along unidentified pathways to produce key molecules such as nucleosides. To date, a single prebiotic pathway to purine nucleosides had been proposed. It is considered to be inefficient due to missing regioselectivity and low yields. We report that the condensation of formamidopyrimidines (FaPys) with sugars provides the natural N-9 nucleosides with extreme regioselectivity and in good yields (60%). The FaPys are available from formic acid and aminopyrimidines, which are in turn available from prebiotic molecules that were also detected during the Rosetta comet mission. This nucleoside formation pathway can be fused to sugar-forming reactions to produce pentosides, providing a plausible scenario of how purine nucleosides may have formed under prebiotic conditions. PMID:27174989

  9. Direct Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from Nucleic Acids Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Schubert, Michael; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    A sublimation technique was developed to isolate purines and pyrimidines directly from lambda-deoxyribonucleic acid (lambda-DNA) and Escherichia coli cells. The sublimation of adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine from lambda-DNA was tested under reduced pressure (approx. 0.5 Torr) at temperatures of >150 C. With the exception of guanine, approximately 60 -75% of each base was sublimed directly from the lambda-DNA and recovered on a coldfinger of the sublimation apparatus after heating to 450 C. Several nucleobases including adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil were also recovered from E. coli bacteria after heating the cells to the same temperature, although some thermal decomposition of the bases also occurred. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from native E. coli DNA and RNA without any chemical treatment of the cells.

  10. The prebiotic synthesis of modified purines and their potential role in the RNA world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, M.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Modified purines are found in all organisms in the tRNA, rRNA, and even DNA, raising the possibility of an early role for these compounds in the evolution of life. These include N6-methyladenine, 1-methyladenine, N6,N6-dimethyladenine, 1-methylhypoxanthine, 1-methylguanine, and N2-methylguanine. We find that these bases as well as a number of nonbiological modified purines can be synthesized from adenine and guanine by the simple reaction of an amine or an amino group with adenine and guanine under the concentrated conditions of the drying-lagoon or drying-beach model of prebiotic synthesis with yields as high as 50%. These compounds are therefore as prebiotic as adenine and guanine and could have played an important role in the RNA world by providing additional functional groups in ribozymes, especially for the construction of hydrophobic binding pockets.

  11. Purine pathway implicated in mechanism of resistance to aspirin therapy: pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Yerges-Armstrong, L M; Ellero-Simatos, S; Georgiades, A; Zhu, H; Lewis, J P; Horenstein, R B; Beitelshees, A L; Dane, A; Reijmers, T; Hankemeier, T; Fiehn, O; Shuldiner, A R; Kaddurah-Daouk, R

    2013-10-01

    Although aspirin is a well-established antiplatelet agent, the mechanisms of aspirin resistance remain poorly understood. Metabolomics allows for measurement of hundreds of small molecules in biological samples, enabling detailed mapping of pathways involved in drug response. We defined the metabolic signature of aspirin exposure in subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Many metabolites, including known aspirin catabolites, changed on exposure to aspirin, and pathway enrichment analysis identified purine metabolism as significantly affected by drug exposure. Furthermore, purines were associated with aspirin response, and poor responders had higher postaspirin adenosine and inosine levels than did good responders (n = 76; both P < 4 × 10(-3)). Using our established "pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics" approach, we identified genetic variants in adenosine kinase associated with aspirin response. Combining metabolomics and genomics allowed for more comprehensive interrogation of mechanisms of variation in aspirin response--an important step toward personalized treatment approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:23839601

  12. Coexpression of two closely linked avian genes for purine nucleotide synthesis from a bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Gavalas, A; Dixon, J E; Brayton, K A; Zalkin, H

    1993-01-01

    Two avian genes encoding essential steps in the purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway are transcribed divergently from a bidirectional promoter element. The bidirectional promoter, embedded in a CpG island, directs coexpression of GPAT and AIRC genes from distinct transcriptional start sites 229 bp apart. The bidirectional promoter can be divided in half, with each half retaining partial activity towards the cognate gene. GPAT and AIRC genes encode the enzymes that catalyze step 1 and steps 6 plus 7, respectively, in the de novo purine biosynthetic pathway. This is the first report of genes coding for structurally unrelated enzymes of the same pathway that are tightly linked and transcribed divergently from a bidirectional promoter. This arrangement has the potential to provide for regulated coexpression comparable to that in a prokaryotic operon. Images PMID:8336716

  13. Determination of Caffeine and Other Purine Compounds in Food and Pharmaceuitcals by Micellar Electrokinetic Chrmoatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Carla; Contradi, S.; Rohde, E.

    1997-09-01

    Capillary elctrophoresis is a modern separation technique, especially the extremely high efficiencies and minimal requirements with regard to buffers, samples and solvents lead to a dramatic increase of applications in the last few years. This paper offers an introduction to the technique of micellar elektrokinetic chromatography as a special kind of capillary electrophoresis. Caffeine and other purine compounds have been determined in foodstuff (tea, coffee, cocoa) as well as in pharmaceutical formulations. Different sample preparation procedures which have been developed with regard to the special properties of the sample matrices are discussed in the paper.This preparation facilitates the separation in many cases. So students have to solve a relatively simple separation problem by variation of buffer pH, buffer components and separation parameters. By doing a calibration for the analyzed purine compounds they will learn about reproducibility in capillary electrophoresis.

  14. Extraction of purine alkaloids from maté (Ilex paraguariensis) using supercritical CO(2).

    PubMed

    Saldaña, M D; Mohamed, R S; Baer, M G; Mazzafera, P

    1999-09-01

    Experimental data for the supercritical CO(2) extraction of purine alkaloids (caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline) from ground herbal maté tea (Ilex paraguaryensis) using a high-pressure apparatus are presented. Caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine were identified in the extracted fractions using HPLC. Results indicated a much higher CO(2) selectivity for caffeine in comparison with those for theophylline and theobromine. Solubilities of pure compounds in carbon dioxide were also determined at 313.2, 323.2, 338.2, and 343.2 K, and pressures ranging from 14 to 24 MPa. Caffeine solubility exhibited a retrograde behavior with temperature while theophylline and theobromine manifested a normal behavior at conditions explored in this study. Solubilities in binary CO(2)/purine alkaloid model systems were much higher than those obtained during extraction of maté tea, demonstrating the difficulty of using binary data in predicting complex multicomponent behavior.

  15. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas.

  16. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas. PMID:24530799

  17. Stacking of purines in water: the role of dipolar interactions in caffeine.

    PubMed

    Tavagnacco, L; Di Fonzo, S; D'Amico, F; Masciovecchio, C; Brady, J W; Cesàro, A

    2016-05-11

    During the last few decades it has been ascertained that base stacking is one of the major contributions stabilizing nucleic acid conformations. However, the understanding of the nature of the interactions involved in the stacking process remains under debate and it is a subject of theoretical and experimental studies. Structural similarity between purine bases (guanine and adenine) in DNA and the caffeine molecule makes caffeine an excellent model for the purine bases. The present study clearly shows that dipolar interactions play a fundamental role in determining stacking of purine molecules in solution. In order to reach this achievement, polarized ultraviolet Raman resonant scattering experiments have been carried out on caffeine aqueous solutions as a function of concentration and temperature. The investigation pointed out at the aggregation and solvation properties, particularly at elevated temperatures. Kubo-Anderson theory was used as a framework to investigate the non-coincidence effect (NCE) occurring in the totally symmetric breathing modes of the purine rings, and in the bending modes of the methyl groups of caffeine. The NCE concentration dependence shows that caffeine aggregation at 80 °C occurs by planar stacking of the hydrophobic faces. The data clearly indicate that dipolar interactions determine the reorientational motion of the molecules in solution and are the driving force for the stacking of caffeine. In parallel, the observed dephasing times imply a change in caffeine interactions as a function of temperature and concentration. A decrease, at low water content, of the dephasing time for the ring breathing vibration mode indicates that self-association alters the solvation structure that is detectable at low concentration. These results are in agreement with simulation predictions and serve as an important validation of the models used in those calculations. PMID:27127808

  18. Stacking of purines in water: the role of dipolar interactions in caffeine.

    PubMed

    Tavagnacco, L; Di Fonzo, S; D'Amico, F; Masciovecchio, C; Brady, J W; Cesàro, A

    2016-05-11

    During the last few decades it has been ascertained that base stacking is one of the major contributions stabilizing nucleic acid conformations. However, the understanding of the nature of the interactions involved in the stacking process remains under debate and it is a subject of theoretical and experimental studies. Structural similarity between purine bases (guanine and adenine) in DNA and the caffeine molecule makes caffeine an excellent model for the purine bases. The present study clearly shows that dipolar interactions play a fundamental role in determining stacking of purine molecules in solution. In order to reach this achievement, polarized ultraviolet Raman resonant scattering experiments have been carried out on caffeine aqueous solutions as a function of concentration and temperature. The investigation pointed out at the aggregation and solvation properties, particularly at elevated temperatures. Kubo-Anderson theory was used as a framework to investigate the non-coincidence effect (NCE) occurring in the totally symmetric breathing modes of the purine rings, and in the bending modes of the methyl groups of caffeine. The NCE concentration dependence shows that caffeine aggregation at 80 °C occurs by planar stacking of the hydrophobic faces. The data clearly indicate that dipolar interactions determine the reorientational motion of the molecules in solution and are the driving force for the stacking of caffeine. In parallel, the observed dephasing times imply a change in caffeine interactions as a function of temperature and concentration. A decrease, at low water content, of the dephasing time for the ring breathing vibration mode indicates that self-association alters the solvation structure that is detectable at low concentration. These results are in agreement with simulation predictions and serve as an important validation of the models used in those calculations.

  19. Endonucleolytic activity directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Z; Elad, D; Sperling, J

    1979-11-01

    Photoalkylation of circular covalently closed DNA from phage PM2 with isopropyl alcohol by using a free radical photoinitiator and UV light of lambda greater than 305 nm led to the specific 8-substitution of purine moieties in the DNA, yielding 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)adenine and 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)guanine as the only detectable damage in the DNA. Using this specifically photoalkylated DNA as a substrate, we discovered in extracts of Micrococcus luteus an endonucleolytic activity that is directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in DNA. The activity is not a combination of a DNA-glycosylase and an apurinic site endonuclease. It is not inhibited by single-stranded DNA, by UV- or gamma-irradiated single-stranded DNA, or by normal or depurinated double-stranded DNA. however, gamma- or UV-(254 nm) irradiated double-stranded DNAs to inhibit the activity, hinting at the possibility of a common type of lesion in these damaged DNAs. Divalent cations are not required for the incising activity, and it is fully active in 1 mM EDTA, whereas caffeine and ATP cause inhibition. Extracts of mutant M. luteus lacking pyrimidine-dimer-directed endonucleases were found to contain the endonucleolytic activity in levels comparable to those present in the wild type. After the incision, we could demonstrate the specific excision of the 8-alkylated purines from the damaged DNA. The special conformational consequences of the 8-alkylation of purines, at the nucleotide level, namely their nonregular syn conformation, suggest that it is the distortion in the DNA that is recognized by the endonuclease. PMID:293658

  20. [Glutathione redox system, immune status, antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides in hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Tapbergenov, S O; Sovetov, B S; Bekbosynova, R B; Bolysbekova, S M

    2015-01-01

    The immune status, components of the glutathione redox system, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides have been investigated in animals with experimental hypothyroidism. On day 8 after an increase in the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-helpers and T-suppressors as well as increased number of B-lymphocytes was found in blood of thyroidectomized rats. This was accompanied by decreased activity of adenosine deaminase (AD), AMP-deaminase (AMPD), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'N) in blood, but the ratio of enzyme activity AD/AMPD increased. These changes in the activity of enzymes, involved in purine catabolism can be regarded as increased functional relationships between T and B lymphocytes in hypothyroidism. The functional changes of immune system cells were accompanied by increased activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and the ratio GH/GPx. Thyroidectomized rats had increased amounts of total, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH), but the ratio GSH/GSSG decerased as compared with control animals. In the liver, hypothyroidism resulted in activation of SOD, GPx, decreased activity of GR and decreased ratio GR/GPx. At the same time, the levels of total, oxidized, and reduced glutathione increased, but the ratio GSH/GSSG as well as activities of enzymes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism ratio (and their ratio 5'N/AD + AMPD) decreased. All these data suggest a functional relationship of the glutathione redox system not only with antioxidant enzymes, but also activity of enzymes involved purine nucleotide metabolism and immune status.

  1. L-Enantiomers of Transition State Analogue Inhibitors Bound to Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo-Matthis,A.; Murkin, A.; Ramagopal, U.; Clinch, K.; Mee, S.; Evans, G.; Tyler, P.; Furneaux, R.; Almo, S.; Schramm, v.

    2008-01-01

    Human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) was crystallized with transition-state analogue inhibitors Immucillin-H and DADMe-Immucillin-H synthesized with ribosyl mimics of l-stereochemistry. The inhibitors demonstrate that major driving forces for tight binding of these analogues are the leaving group interaction and the cationic mimicry of the transition state, even though large geometric changes occur with d-Immucillins and l-Immucillins bound to human PNP.

  2. Electronic and Structural Elements That Regulate the Excited-State Dynamics in Purine Nucleobase Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the purine free base and 9-methylpurine are investigated using experimental and theoretical methods. Femtosecond broadband transient absorption experiments reveal that excitation of these purine derivatives in aqueous solution at 266 nm results primarily in ultrafast conversion of the S2(ππ*) state to the vibrationally excited 1nπ* state. Following vibrational and conformational relaxation, the 1nπ* state acts as a doorway state in the efficient population of the triplet manifold with an intersystem crossing lifetime of hundreds of picoseconds. Experiments show an almost 2-fold increase in the intersystem crossing rate on going from polar aprotic to nonpolar solvents, suggesting that a solvent-dependent energy barrier must be surmounted to access the singlet-to-triplet crossing region. Ab initio static and surface-hopping dynamics simulations lend strong support to the proposed relaxation mechanism. Collectively, the experimental and computational results demonstrate that the accessibility of the nπ* states and the topology of the potential energy surfaces in the vicinity of conical intersections are key elements in controlling the excited-state dynamics of the purine derivatives. From a structural perspective, it is shown that the purine chromophore is not responsible for the ultrafast internal conversion in the adenine and guanine monomers. Instead, C6 functionalization plays an important role in regulating the rates of radiative and nonradiative relaxation. C6 functionalization inhibits access to the 1nπ* state while simultaneously facilitating access to the 1ππ*(La)/S0 conical intersection, such that population of the 1nπ* state cannot compete with the relaxation pathways to the ground state involving ring puckering at the C2 position. PMID:25763596

  3. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by asteroids, comets, and carbonaceous meteorites could have contributed to the early Earth s prebiotic inventory by seeding the planet with biologically important organic compounds. A wide variety of prebiotic organic compounds have previously been detected in the Murchison CM type carbonaceous chondrite including amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. These compounds dominate terrestrial biochemistry and are integral components of proteins, DNA and RNA. Several purines including adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine, as well as the pyrimidine uracil, have previously been detected in water or formic acid extracts of Murchison using ion-exclusion chromatography and ultraviolet spectroscopy. However, even after purification of these extracts, the accurate identification and quantification of nucleobases is difficult due to interfering UV absorbing compounds. In order to reduce these effects, we have developed an extraction technique using sublimation to isolate purines and pyrimidines from other non-volatile organic compounds in Murchison acid extracts.

  4. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  5. Purine biosynthetic genes are required for cadmium tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Speiser, D.M.; Ortiz, D.F.; Kreppel, L.; Scheel, G.; McDonald, G.; Ow, D.W. Univ. of California, Berkeley )

    1992-12-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are metal-chelating peptides produced in plants and some fungi in response to heavy metal exposure. A Cd-sensitive mutant of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defective in production of a PC-Cd-sulfide complex essential for metal tolerance, was found to harbor mutations in specific genes of the purine biosynthetic pathway. Genetic analysis of the link between metal complex accumulation and purine biosynthesis enzymes revealed that genetic lesions blocking two segments of the pathway, before and after the IMP branchpoint, are required to produce the Cd-sensitive phenotype. The biochemical functions of these two segments of the pathway are similar, and a model based on the alternate use of a sulfur analog substrate is presented. The novel participation of purine biosynthesis enzymes in the conversion of the PC-Cd complex to the PC-Cd-sulfide complex in the fission yeast raises an intriguing possibility that these same enzymes might have a role in sulfur metabolism in the fission yeast S. pombe, and perhaps in other biological systems. 41 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Purine biosynthetic genes are required for cadmium tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, D M; Ortiz, D F; Kreppel, L; Scheel, G; McDonald, G; Ow, D W

    1992-01-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are metal-chelating peptides produced in plants and some fungi in response to heavy metal exposure. A Cd-sensitive mutant of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defective in production of a PC-Cd-sulfide complex essential for metal tolerance, was found to harbor mutations in specific genes of the purine biosynthetic pathway. Genetic analysis of the link between metal complex accumulation and purine biosynthesis enzymes revealed that genetic lesions blocking two segments of the pathway, before and after the IMP branchpoint, are required to produce the Cd-sensitive phenotype. The biochemical functions of these two segments of the pathway are similar, and a model based on the alternate use of a sulfur analog substrate is presented. The novel participation of purine biosynthesis enzymes in the conversion of the PC-Cd complex to the PC-Cd-sulfide complex in the fission yeast raises an intriguing possibility that these same enzymes might have a role in sulfur metabolism in the fission yeast S. pombe, and perhaps in other biological systems. Images PMID:1448066

  7. Purine catabolic pathway revealed by transcriptomics in the model marine bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3.

    PubMed

    Cunliffe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purines are nitrogen-rich compounds that are widely distributed in the marine environment and are an important component of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool. Even though purines have been shown to be degraded by bacterioplankton, the identities of marine bacteria capable of purine degradation and their underlying catabolic mechanisms are currently unknown. This study shows that Ruegeria pomeroyi, a model marine bacterium and Marine Roseobacter Clade (MRC) representative, utilizes xanthine as a source of carbon and nitrogen. The R. pomeroyi genome contains putative genes that encode xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), which is expressed during growth with xanthine. RNAseq-based analysis of the R. pomeroyi transcriptome revealed that the transcription of an XDH-initiated catabolic pathway is up-regulated during growth with xanthine, with transcription greatest when xanthine was the only available carbon source. The RNAseq-deduced pathway indicates that glyoxylate and ammonia are the key intermediates from xanthine degradation. Utilising a laboratory model, this study has identified the potential genes and catabolic pathway active during xanthine degradation. The ability of R. pomeroyi to utilize xanthine provides novel insights into the capabilities of the MRC that may contribute to their success in marine ecosystems and the potential biogeochemical importance of the group in processing DON.

  8. [Degradation of purine nucleotides in patients with chronic obstruction to airflow].

    PubMed

    Mateos Antón, F; García Puig, J; Gómez Fernández, P; Ramos Hernández, T; López Jiménez, M

    1989-03-11

    The increase in hypoxanthine (Hx), xanthine (X), uric acid (VA) and total purines (TP) that may be found in several clinical conditions associated with tissue hypoxia has been attributed to an increase in adenine nucleotides degradation by a reduced ATP synthesis caused by oxygen deprivation. To test this hypothesis we have investigated the urinary excretion of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity elimination after labeling the adenine nucleotides with adenine (8-14C) in 5 patients with chronic airflow obstruction (CAFO), in the basal state and after oxygen therapy (FiO2, 24%). The results were compared with those from 4 normal individuals. Patients with COFA showed an increase of the renal elimination of Hx, X, VA, TP and radioactivity, which was significantly different from the control group (p less than 0.05). Oxygen administration was associated with a significant reduction in the excretion of purines and radioactivity (p less than 0.01), which decreased to values similar to those found in normal individuals. These findings suggest that in patients with COFA and severe hypoxemia there is a marked increase in the degradation of adenine nucleotides. The normalization of the purine and radioactivity excretion after oxygen therapy points to a basic role of oxygen in the catabolism of adenine nucleotides. PMID:2716427

  9. The Formation of Nucleobases from the Irradiation of Purine in Astophysical Ices and Comparisons with Meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Materese, C. K.; Nuevo, M.

    2016-01-01

    N-heterocycles have been identified in meteorites and their extraterrestrial origins are suggested by isotopic ratio measurements. Although small N- heterocycles have not been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), recent experiments in our lab have shown that the irradiation of the aromatic molecules like benzene (C6H6) and naphthalene (C10H8) in mixed molecular ices leads to the formation of O- and N-heterocyclic molecules. Among the class of N-heterocycles are the nucleobases, which are of astrobiological interest because they are the information bearing units of DNA and RNA. Nucleobases have been detected in meteorites [3-5], with isotopic signatures that are also consistent with an extraterrestrial origin. Three of the biologically relevant nucleobases (uracil, cytosine, and guanine) have a pyrimidine core structure while the remaining two (adenine and guanine) possess a purine core. Previous experiments in our lab have demonstrated that all of the bio-logical nucleobases (and numerous other molecules) with a pyrimidine core structure can be produced by irradiating pyrimidine in mixed molecular ices of several compositions [6-8]. In this work, we study the formation of purine-based molecules, including the nucleobases adenine, and guanine, from the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of purine in ices consisting mixtures of H2O and NH3 at low temperature. The experiments are designed to simulate the astrophysical conditions under which these species may be formed in dense molecular clouds, protoplanetary disks, or on the surfaces of icy bodies in planetary systems.

  10. Ab initio molecular orbital study of the structures of purine hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, A.O.; Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-03-14

    The structures of the isomers of purine hydrates [4(5)-hydroxy-5(4)-hydropurines] have been geometry optimized with ab initio quantum chemical methods at the 6-31G{sup *} basis set and with the semiempirical method PM3. These hydrates which can result from reduction of radical species formed by attack of hydroxyl radical at the 4,5 double bond in the purines, show significant geometrical distortion when compared to the natural bases. More specifically, the cis isomers adopt a `butterfly` conformation, while in the trans isomers, the pyrimidine and imidazole rings tilt opposite to each other. Our results predict the cis purine hydrate isomers are far more stable than the trans isomers by 10-18 kcal/mol at the 6-31G{sup *} level, whereas the 4-hydroxy-5-hydropurines are found to be slightly more energetically stable than the 5-hydroxy-4-hydropurines. The `butterfly` conformation of the cis isomers constitutes a bulky lesion which will result in a significant distortion of the DNA helix. 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Pronounced increase in breathing rate in the "hair dryer model" of experimental febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Tolner, Else A; Marshall, Pepin; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Kaila, Kai

    2008-05-01

    In a study using a heated chamber for induction of experimental febrile seizures (eFS) in rat pups, ictal activity was shown to be precipitated by a respiratory alkalosis (Schuchmann et al., 2006). In sharp contrast to this, in a recent review Dubé et al., (2007) suggest that the respiratory alkalosis is model specific, and that no increase in respiratory rate is observed in the widely used "hair dryer model" of eFS. The data in the present work, based on well-established techniques for measuring respiratory rates in rat pups, show a pronounced increase in the "hair dryer model" with values that are slightly higher than those recorded in the heated chamber model. Hence, a temperature-evoked increase in respiration is a common feature of these two models of eFS.

  12. The Fiber Contractility and Cytoskeleton Losses in Space are Less Pronounced in Mongolian Gerbils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipets, E. N.; Ponomareva, E. V.; Ogneva, I. V.; Vikhliantsev, I. M.; Karaduleva, E. V.; Kartashkina, N. L.; Kuznetsov, S. L.; Podlubnaia, Z. A.; Shenkman, B. S.

    2008-06-01

    This work was purposed on the comparison of space flight effects on m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior of Mongolian gerbils. The animals have been flown onboard biosatellite Foton-M3 for 12 days. Contractile properties of single skinned muscle fibers were studied. It was revealed that diameter of m. soleus skinned fibers and maximal isometric tension were decreased by 19.7% and 21.8% respectively. The Ca-sensitivity reduction wasn't significant, that was in accordance with absence of changes of titin and nebulin relative content in soleus and minor manifestations in slow-to-fast fiber ratio (9%, p<0.05). There weren't observed significant changes of the same parameters in m. tibialis anterior. Ultimately the fiber contractility and cytoskeleton losses in space are less pronounced in Mongolian gerbils than in rats.

  13. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  14. Muscle carnosine loading by beta-alanine supplementation is more pronounced in trained vs. untrained muscles.

    PubMed

    Bex, T; Chung, W; Baguet, A; Stegen, S; Stautemas, J; Achten, E; Derave, W

    2014-01-15

    Carnosine occurs in high concentrations in human skeletal muscle and assists working capacity during high-intensity exercise. Chronic beta-alanine (BA) supplementation has consistently been shown to augment muscle carnosine concentration, but the effect of training on the carnosine loading efficiency is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare muscle carnosine loading between trained and untrained arm and leg muscles. In a first study (n = 17), reliability of carnosine quantification by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was evaluated in deltoid and triceps brachii muscles. In a second study, participants (n = 35; 10 nonathletes, 10 cyclists, 10 swimmers, and 5 kayakers) were supplemented with 6.4 g/day of slow-release BA for 23 days. Carnosine content was evaluated in soleus, gastrocnemius medialis, and deltoid muscles by (1)H-MRS. All the results are reported as arbitrary units. In the nonathletes, BA supplementation increased carnosine content by 47% in the arm and 33% in the leg muscles (not significant). In kayakers, the increase was more pronounced in arm (deltoid) vs. leg (soleus + gastrocnemius) muscles (0.089 vs. 0.049), whereas the reverse pattern was observed in cyclists (0.065 vs. 0.084). Swimmers had significantly higher increase in carnosine in both deltoid (0.107 vs. 0.065) and gastrocnemius muscle (0.082 vs. 0.051) compared with nonathletes. We showed that 1) carnosine content can be reliably measured by (1)H-MRS in deltoid muscle, 2) carnosine loading is equally effective in arm vs. leg muscles of nonathletes, and 3) carnosine loading is more pronounced in trained vs. untrained muscles.

  15. Emergence of representations through repeated training on pronouncing novel letter combinations leads to efficient reading.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Atsuko; Hulzink, Iris; Wagensveld, Barbara; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-08-01

    Printed text can be decoded by utilizing different processing routes depending on the familiarity of the script. A predominant use of word-level decoding strategies can be expected in the case of a familiar script, and an almost exclusive use of letter-level decoding strategies for unfamiliar scripts. Behavioural studies have revealed that frequently occurring words are read more efficiently, suggesting that these words are read in a more holistic way at the word-level, than infrequent and unfamiliar words. To test whether repeated exposure to specific letter combinations leads to holistic reading, we monitored both behavioural and neural responses during novel script decoding and examined changes related to repeated exposure. We trained a group of Dutch university students to decode pseudowords written in an unfamiliar script, i.e., Korean Hangul characters. We compared behavioural and neural responses to pronouncing trained versus untrained two-character pseudowords (equivalent to two-syllable pseudowords). We tested once shortly after the initial training and again after a four days' delay that included another training session. We found that trained pseudowords were pronounced faster and more accurately than novel combinations of radicals (equivalent to letters). Imaging data revealed that pronunciation of trained pseudowords engaged the posterior temporo-parietal region, and engagement of this network was predictive of reading efficiency a month later. The results imply that repeated exposure to specific combinations of graphemes can lead to emergence of holistic representations that result in efficient reading. Furthermore, inter-individual differences revealed that good learners retained efficiency more than bad learners one month later.

  16. Role of ATP and related purines in inhibitory neurotransmission to the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Knight, Gillian E; Wildman, Scott SP; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: As adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is one of the inhibitory mediators of the bladder outflow region, this study investigates the possible release of ATP or related purines in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) and the purinoceptor(s) involved in nerve-mediated relaxations of the pig urinary bladder neck. Experimental approach: Urothelium-denuded and intact phenylephrine-precontracted strips were mounted in organ baths containing physiological saline solution at 37°C and gassed with 95% O2 and 5% CO2 for isometric force recordings. Key results: EFS, in the presence of atropine, guanethidine and NG-nitro-L-arginine, and exogenous purines, produced frequency- and concentration-dependent relaxations respectively. Adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine were more potent than ATP in producing relaxation, while uridine 5′-triphosphate, uridine 5′-diphosphate and α,β-methylene ATP were less effective. The non-selective P2 antagonist suramin, and the P2Y1 and P1 receptor blockers 2′-deoxy-N6-methyladenosine 3′,5′-bisphosphate tetrasodium and 8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline, respectively, inhibited the responses to EFS and ATP. The P1 agonist's potency was: 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA)>4-2[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-b-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzene propanoic acid hydrochloride>2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine>-2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-b-D-ribofuranuronamide = adenosine. 4-(-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl) phenol, an A2A antagonist, reduced the relaxations to EFS, adenosine and NECA. In urothelium-intact samples, relaxations to EFS and purines were smaller than in urothelium-denuded preparations. Neuronal voltage-gated Na+ channels blockade failed to modify ATP relaxations. At basal tension, EFS- and ATP-induced contractions were resistant to desensitization or blockade of P2X1 and P2X3 receptors

  17. The purine degradation pathway: possible role in paralytic shellfish toxin metabolism in the cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1.

    PubMed

    Pomati, F; Manarolla, G; Rossi, O; Vigetti, D; Rossetti, C

    2001-12-01

    The paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are potent neurotoxic alkaloids and their major biological effect is due to the blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels in excitable cells. They have been recognised as an important health risk for humans, animals, and ecosystems worldwide. The metabolic pathways that lead to the production and the degradation of these toxic metabolites are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the possible link between PST accumulation and the activation of the metabolism that leads to purine degradation in the filamentous freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1. The purine catabolic pathway is related to the nitrogen microcycle in water environments, in which cyanobacteria use traces of purines and ureides as a nitrogen source for growth. Thus, the activity of allantoicase, a key inducible enzyme of this metabolism, was used as tool for assaying the activation of the purine degradation pathway. The enzyme and the pathway were induced by allantoic acid, the direct substrate of allantoicase, as well as by adenine and, to a lower degree, by urea, one of the main products of purine catabolism. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli was also employed and showed the best induction of allantoicase activity. In culture, Planktothrix sp. FP1 showed a differential accumulation of PST in consequence of the induction with different substrates. The cyanobacterial culture induced with allantoic acid accumulated 61.7% more toxins in comparison with the control. On the other hand, the cultures induced with adenine, urea, and the E. coli extract showed low PST accumulation, respectively, 1%, 38%, and 5% of the total toxins content detected in the noninduced culture. A degradation pathway for the PSTs can be hypothesised: as suggested for purine alkaloids in higher plants, saxitoxin (STX) and derivatives may also be converted into xanthine, urea, and further to CO2 and NH4+ or recycled in the primary metabolism through the purine degradation

  18. The genomes of the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) encode a more complete purine catabolic pathway than placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Keebaugh, Alaine C.; Thomas, James W.

    2009-01-01

    The end product of purine catabolism varies amongst vertebrates and is a consequence of independent gene inactivation events that have truncated the purine catabolic pathway. Mammals have traditionally been grouped into two classes based on their end product of purine catabolism: most mammals, whose end product is allantoin due to an ancient loss of allantoinase (ALLN), and the hominoids, whose end product is uric acid due to recent inactivations of urate oxidase (UOX). However little is known about purine catabolism in marsupials and monotremes. Here we report the results of a comparative genomics study designed to characterize the purine catabolic pathway in a marsupial, the South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica), and a monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). We found that both genomes encode a more complete set of genes for purine catabolism than do eutherians and conclude that a near complete purine catabolic pathway was present in the common ancestor of all mammals, and that the loss of ALLN is specific to placental mammals. Our results therefore provide a revised history for gene loss in the purine catabolic pathway and suggest that marsupials and monotremes represent a third class of mammals with respect to their end products of purine catabolism. PMID:20161190

  19. Pronounced fixation, strong population differentiation and complex population history in the Canary Islands blue tit subspecies complex.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Ljungqvist, Marcus; Illera, Juan-Carlos; Kvist, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary molecular studies of island radiations may lead to insights in the role of vicariance, founder events, population size and drift in the processes of population differentiation. We evaluate the degree of population genetic differentiation and fixation of the Canary Islands blue tit subspecies complex using microsatellite markers and aim to get insights in the population history using coalescence based methods. The Canary Island populations were strongly genetically differentiated and had reduced diversity with pronounced fixation including many private alleles. In population structure models, the relationship between the central island populations (La Gomera, Tenerife and Gran Canaria) and El Hierro was difficult to disentangle whereas the two European populations showed consistent clustering, the two eastern islands (Fuerteventura and Lanzarote) and Morocco weak clustering, and La Palma a consistent unique lineage. Coalescence based models suggested that the European mainland forms an outgroup to the Afrocanarian population, a split between the western island group (La Palma and El Hierro) and the central island group, and recent splits between the three central islands, and between the two eastern islands and Morocco, respectively. It is clear that strong genetic drift and low level of concurrent gene flow among populations have shaped complex allelic patterns of fixation and skewed frequencies over the archipelago. However, understanding the population history remains challenging; in particular, the pattern of extreme divergence with low genetic diversity and yet unique genetic material in the Canary Island system requires an explanation. A potential scenario is population contractions of a historically large and genetically variable Afrocanarian population, with vicariance and drift following in the wake. The suggestion from sequence-based analyses of a Pleistocene extinction of a substantial part of North Africa and a Pleistocene/Holocene eastward

  20. A Source Area Approach Demonstrates Moderate Predictive Ability but Pronounced Variability of Invasive Species Traits.

    PubMed

    Klonner, Günther; Fischer, Stefan; Essl, Franz; Dullinger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The search for traits that make alien species invasive has mostly concentrated on comparing successful invaders and different comparison groups with respect to average trait values. By contrast, little attention has been paid to trait variability among invaders. Here, we combine an analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive species with a comparison of multidimensional trait variability within these two species groups. We collected data on biological and distributional traits for 1402 species of the native, non-woody vascular plant flora of Austria. We then compared the subsets of species recorded and not recorded as invasive aliens anywhere in the world, respectively, first, with respect to the sampled traits using univariate and multiple regression models; and, second, with respect to their multidimensional trait diversity by calculating functional richness and dispersion metrics. Attributes related to competitiveness (strategy type, nitrogen indicator value), habitat use (agricultural and ruderal habitats, occurrence under the montane belt), and propagule pressure (frequency) were most closely associated with invasiveness. However, even the best multiple model, including interactions, only explained a moderate fraction of the differences in invasive success. In addition, multidimensional variability in trait space was even larger among invasive than among non-invasive species. This pronounced variability suggests that invasive success has a considerable idiosyncratic component and is probably highly context specific. We conclude that basing risk assessment protocols on species trait profiles will probably face hardly reducible uncertainties.

  1. Resolution of pronounced painless weakness arising from radiculopathy and disk extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lipetz, Jason S; Misra, Neelam; Silber, Jeff S

    2005-07-01

    In this retrospective, consecutive case series, we report the nonsurgical and rehabilitation outcomes of consecutive patients who presented with pronounced painless weakness arising from disk extrusion. Seven consecutive patients who chose physiatric care were followed clinically, and strength return was monitored. Each presented with predominantly painless radiculopathy, functionally significant strength loss, and radiographic evidence of disk extrusion or sequestration. Each patient participated in a targeted strengthening program, and in some cases, transforaminal injection therapy was employed. Each patient demonstrated an eventual full functional recovery. In most cases, electrodiagnostic studies were performed and included a needle examination of the affected limb and compound muscle action potentials from the most clinically relevant and weakened limb muscle. The electrodiagnostic findings and, in particular, the quantitative compound muscle action potential data seemed to correlate with the timing of motor recovery. Patients with predominantly painless and significant weakness arising from disk extrusion can demonstrate successful rehabilitation outcomes. Despite a relative absence of pain, such patients can present with a more rapidly reversible neurapraxic type of weakness. The more quantitative compound muscle action potential data obtained through electrodiagnostic studies may offer the treating physician an additional means of characterizing the type of neuronal injury at play and the likelihood and timing of strength return. PMID:15973090

  2. A Source Area Approach Demonstrates Moderate Predictive Ability but Pronounced Variability of Invasive Species Traits

    PubMed Central

    Essl, Franz; Dullinger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The search for traits that make alien species invasive has mostly concentrated on comparing successful invaders and different comparison groups with respect to average trait values. By contrast, little attention has been paid to trait variability among invaders. Here, we combine an analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive species with a comparison of multidimensional trait variability within these two species groups. We collected data on biological and distributional traits for 1402 species of the native, non-woody vascular plant flora of Austria. We then compared the subsets of species recorded and not recorded as invasive aliens anywhere in the world, respectively, first, with respect to the sampled traits using univariate and multiple regression models; and, second, with respect to their multidimensional trait diversity by calculating functional richness and dispersion metrics. Attributes related to competitiveness (strategy type, nitrogen indicator value), habitat use (agricultural and ruderal habitats, occurrence under the montane belt), and propagule pressure (frequency) were most closely associated with invasiveness. However, even the best multiple model, including interactions, only explained a moderate fraction of the differences in invasive success. In addition, multidimensional variability in trait space was even larger among invasive than among non-invasive species. This pronounced variability suggests that invasive success has a considerable idiosyncratic component and is probably highly context specific. We conclude that basing risk assessment protocols on species trait profiles will probably face hardly reducible uncertainties. PMID:27187616

  3. Pronounced multiferroicity in oleic acid stabilized BiFeO3 nanocrystals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Dabbugalla; Mandal, Swapan K; Mahato, Bipul K; Rana, Bivas; Barman, Anjan

    2013-06-01

    We report on the experimental observation of pronounced multiferroicity in BiFeO3 nanocrystals (size approximately 40 nm) at room temperature. Large scale BiFeO3 nanocrystals are synthesized using a low temperature chemical route and further stabilized with oleic acid. The nanocrystals exhibit a significant distortion in lattice parameter c compared to the bulk. Oleic acid plays an important role in reducing oxygen vacancies and Fe2+ ions at the nanocrystal surface giving rise to a high resistivity (approximately 10(10) omega-cm at 300 K) of the sample. The direct band gap of nanocrystals is measured to be approximately 4.2 eV (about 1.5 times the bulk value) suggesting a strong quantum confinement effect. The nanocrystals show a remarkably high spontaneous saturation magnetization approximately 4.39 emu/g along with a prominent ferroelectric hysteresis loop at room temperature. Particle size effect leading to the appearance of large number of uncompensated spins and suppression of modulated spin structure have resulted a strong spontaneous magnetization in such nanoscale multiferroic materials. PMID:23862453

  4. A Source Area Approach Demonstrates Moderate Predictive Ability but Pronounced Variability of Invasive Species Traits.

    PubMed

    Klonner, Günther; Fischer, Stefan; Essl, Franz; Dullinger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The search for traits that make alien species invasive has mostly concentrated on comparing successful invaders and different comparison groups with respect to average trait values. By contrast, little attention has been paid to trait variability among invaders. Here, we combine an analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive species with a comparison of multidimensional trait variability within these two species groups. We collected data on biological and distributional traits for 1402 species of the native, non-woody vascular plant flora of Austria. We then compared the subsets of species recorded and not recorded as invasive aliens anywhere in the world, respectively, first, with respect to the sampled traits using univariate and multiple regression models; and, second, with respect to their multidimensional trait diversity by calculating functional richness and dispersion metrics. Attributes related to competitiveness (strategy type, nitrogen indicator value), habitat use (agricultural and ruderal habitats, occurrence under the montane belt), and propagule pressure (frequency) were most closely associated with invasiveness. However, even the best multiple model, including interactions, only explained a moderate fraction of the differences in invasive success. In addition, multidimensional variability in trait space was even larger among invasive than among non-invasive species. This pronounced variability suggests that invasive success has a considerable idiosyncratic component and is probably highly context specific. We conclude that basing risk assessment protocols on species trait profiles will probably face hardly reducible uncertainties. PMID:27187616

  5. Oxytocin improves mentalizing - pronounced effects for individuals with attenuated ability to empathize.

    PubMed

    Feeser, Melanie; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Hahn, Adam; Gärtner, Matti; Böker, Heinz; Grimm, Simone; Bajbouj, Malek

    2015-03-01

    The ability to predict the behavior of others based on their mental states is crucial for social functioning. Previous studies have provided evidence for the role of Oxytocin (OXT) in enhancing the ability to mentalize. It has also been demonstrated that the effect of OXT seems to strongly depend on socio-cognitive skills with more pronounced effects in individuals with lower socio-cognitive skills. Although recent studies indicate that mentalizing is related to empathy, no study has yet examined whether the effects of OXT on mentalizing depend on the ability to empathize. 71 male participants participated in a double-blind, between-subjects, placebo-controlled experiment. The Reading the Mind in the Eye Test (RMET) was used to investigate mentalizing abilities. We analyzed the effect of OXT on easy and difficult items of the RMET depending on differential empathy scores of the participants as assessed with the Empathy Quotient (EQ). Our results showed that OXT improves mentalizing for difficult but not for easy items. We generally observed increased mentalizing accuracy in participants with higher empathy scores. Importantly, however, whereas the performance in participants with higher empathy scores was comparable in both OXT and placebo condition, OXT specifically enhanced mentalizing accuracy in participants with lower empathy scores. Our findings suggest that OXT enhances mentalizing abilities. However, we also demonstrate that not all participants benefited from OXT application. It seems that the effects of OXT strongly depend on baseline social-cognitive skills such as empathy. PMID:25638480

  6. Triterpenoids of sour jujube show pronounced inhibitory effect on human tumor cells and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Aimin; Wang, Yihai; Xiang, Limin; Zhang, Zhenxue; He, Xiangjiu

    2014-10-01

    Sour jujube is a common fruit and traditional medicine in China. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of sour jujube was used to determine the chemical identity of potent antiproliferative and antioxidant constituents. Four novel ursane-type triterpenoids, together with 8 known were isolated and identified. The new triterpenoids were elucidated to be 2α,3β,13β,23-tetrahydroxy-urs-11-en-28-oic acid (3), 2α,3β-dihydroxy-urs-20(30)-en-28-oic acid (9), 2α,3β,28-trihydroxy-urs-20(30)-ene (10), and 3β,12β,13β-trihydroxy-ursan-28-oic acid (11). Among the triterpenoids isolated, 2α,3β,19α-trihydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid (7), 9 and 10 showed high potent inhibitory activity toward the proliferation of HepG2 cells, which the IC50 values were lower than 5 μM. Compounds 9 and 10 also exhibited pronounced activity against MCF-7 cells, with IC50 value of 0.8 ± 0.03 and 1.5 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. Compound 10 showed high antioxidant activity with an EC50 of 0.8 ± 0.02 μM, which was 18.9 times higher than ascorbic acid in antioxidant capacity.

  7. Strenuous exercise induces a hyperreactive rebalanced haemostatic state that is more pronounced in men.

    PubMed

    Huskens, Dana; Roest, Mark; Remijn, Jasper A; Konings, Joke; Kremers, Romy M W; Bloemen, Saartje; Schurgers, Evelien; Selmeczi, Anna; Kelchtermans, Hilde; van Meel, Rinaldo; Meex, Steven J; Kleinegris, Marie-Claire; de Groot, Philip G; Urbanus, Rolf T; Ninivaggi, Marisa; de Laat, Bas

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise is recommended for a healthy lifestyle. Strenuous exercise, however, may trigger the haemostatic system, increasing the risk of vascular thrombotic events and the incidence of primary cardiac arrest. Our goal was to study the effects of strenuous exercise on risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Blood was collected from 92 healthy volunteers who participated in the amateur version of the pro-tour Amstel Gold cycling race, before and directly after the race. Thrombin generation showed a shortening of the lag time and time to peak and an increase of the velocity index. Interestingly, the endogenous thrombin potential measured in plasma decreased due to reduced prothrombin conversion. Platelet reactivity increased and this effect was stronger in men than in women. Lower fibrinogen and higher D-dimer levels after exercise indicated higher fibrin formation. On the other hand, fibrinolysis was also elevated as indicated by a shortening of the clot lysis time. Exercise activated the endothelium (von Willebrand factor (VWF) and active VWF levels were elevated) and the immune system (concentrations IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES and PDGF increased). Additionally, an increased cardiac troponin T level was measured post-exercise. Strenuous exercise induces a temporary hyperreactive state in the body with enhanced pro- and anticoagulant responses. As strenuous exercise has a more pronounced effect on platelet function in male subjects, this gives a possible explanation for the higher incidence of sudden cardiac death during exercise compared to women. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02048462. PMID:26864794

  8. Functional identification of SLC43A3 as an equilibrative nucleobase transporter involved in purine salvage in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Junji; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Maeda, Junya; Yasujima, Tomoya; Ohta, Kinya; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Takada, Tappei; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway plays a major role in the nucleotide production, relying on the supply of nucleobases and nucleosides from extracellular sources. Although specific transporters have been suggested to be involved in facilitating their transport across the plasma membrane in mammals, those which are specifically responsible for utilization of extracellular nucleobases remain unknown. Here we present the molecular and functional characterization of SLC43A3, an orphan transporter belonging to an amino acid transporter family, as a purine-selective nucleobase transporter. SLC43A3 was highly expressed in the liver, where it was localized to the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes, and the lung. In addition, SLC43A3 expressed in MDCKII cells mediated the uptake of purine nucleobases such as adenine, guanine, and hypoxanthine without requiring typical driving ions such as Na+ and H+, but it did not mediate the uptake of nucleosides. When SLC43A3 was expressed in APRT/HPRT1-deficient A9 cells, adenine uptake was found to be low. However, it was markedly enhanced by the introduction of SLC43A3 with APRT. In HeLa cells, knock-down of SLC43A3 markedly decreased adenine uptake. These data suggest that SLC43A3 is a facilitative and purine-selective nucleobase transporter that mediates the cellular uptake of extracellular purine nucleobases in cooperation with salvage enzymes. PMID:26455426

  9. [High-sensitivity analysis of purines in alcoholic beverages using hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Kakigi, Yasuhiro; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Nagatomi, Yasushi; Uyama, Atsuo; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we established a high-sensitivity analytical method for purines in alcoholic beverages using hydrophilic interaction chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The alcoholic beverages were hydrolyzed with perchloric acid (60%) and subjected to strong cation exchange solid-phase extraction (Bond Elut SCX). The four purine bases (hypoxanthine, adenine, xanthine, guanine) in the extracted solution were separated by hydrophilic interaction chromatography with TSKgel Amide-80 as a separation column, 10 mM ammonium formate (pH 2.0) as mobile phase A, and acetonitrile/100 mM ammonium formate (pH 2.0) (90/10) as mobile phase B. The detection of purine bases was performed by tandem mass spectrometry with ESI. The linearity of this analytical method was not less than 0.996, and the repeatability was not more than 8.4% for each purine base. The recovery was in the range of 60-105%, and the detection limit was not more than 0.005 mg/100 mL. This established method is expected to be useful for quality control and surveillance of purines in alcoholic beverages.

  10. Structure and function of nucleoside hydrolases from Physcomitrella patens and maize catalyzing the hydrolysis of purine, pyrimidine, and cytokinin ribosides.

    PubMed

    Kopecná, Martina; Blaschke, Hanna; Kopecny, David; Vigouroux, Armelle; Koncitíková, Radka; Novák, Ondrej; Kotland, Ondrej; Strnad, Miroslav; Moréra, Solange; von Schwartzenberg, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    We present a comprehensive characterization of the nucleoside N-ribohydrolase (NRH) family in two model plants, Physcomitrella patens (PpNRH) and maize (Zea mays; ZmNRH), using in vitro and in planta approaches. We identified two NRH subclasses in the plant kingdom; one preferentially targets the purine ribosides inosine and xanthosine, while the other is more active toward uridine and xanthosine. Both subclasses can hydrolyze plant hormones such as cytokinin ribosides. We also solved the crystal structures of two purine NRHs, PpNRH1 and ZmNRH3. Structural analyses, site-directed mutagenesis experiments, and phylogenetic studies were conducted to identify the residues responsible for the observed differences in substrate specificity between the NRH isoforms. The presence of a tyrosine at position 249 (PpNRH1 numbering) confers high hydrolase activity for purine ribosides, while an aspartate residue in this position confers high activity for uridine. Bud formation is delayed by knocking out single NRH genes in P. patens, and under conditions of nitrogen shortage, PpNRH1-deficient plants cannot salvage adenosine-bound nitrogen. All PpNRH knockout plants display elevated levels of certain purine and pyrimidine ribosides and cytokinins that reflect the substrate preferences of the knocked out enzymes. NRH enzymes thus have functions in cytokinin conversion and activation as well as in purine and pyrimidine metabolism.

  11. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5′-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5′-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of HAT. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  12. [open quotes]Cryptic[close quotes] repeating triplets of purines and pyrimidines (cRRY(i)) are frequent and polymorphic: Analysis of coding cRRY(i) in the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and TATA-binding protein (TBP) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Gostout, B.; Qiang Liu; Sommer, S.S. )

    1993-06-01

    Triplets of the form of purine, purine, pyrimidine (RRY(i)) are enhanced in frequency in the genomes of primates, rodents, and bacteria. Some RRY(i) are [open quotes]cryptic[close quotes] repeats (cRRY(i)) in which no one tandem run of a trinucleotide predominates. A search of human GenBank sequence revealed that the sequences of cRRY(i) are highly nonrandom. Three randomly chosen human cRRY(i) were sequenced in search of polymorphic alleles. Multiple polymorphic alleles were found in cRRY(i) in the coding regions of the genes for proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and TATA-binding protein (TBP). The highly polymorphic TBP cRRY(i) was characterized in detail. Direct sequencing of 157 unrelated human alleles demonstrated the presence of 20 different alleles which resulted in 29--40 consecutive glutamines in the amino-terminal region of TBP. These alleles are differently distributed among the races. PCR was used to screen 1,846 additional alleles in order to characterize more fully the range of variation in the population. Three additional alleles were discovered, but there was no example of a substantial sequence amplification as is seen in the repeat sequences associated with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, myotonic dystrophy, or the fragile-X syndrome. The structure of the TBP cRRY(i) is conserved in the five monkey species examined. In the chimpanzee, examination of four individuals revealed that the cRRY(i) was highly polymorphic, but the pattern of polymorphism differed from that in humans. The TBP cRRY(i) displays both similarities with and differences from the previously described RRY(i) in the coding sequence of the androgen receptor. The data suggest how simple tandem repeats could evolve from cryptic repeats. 18 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. 31P NMR and Genetic Analysis Establish hinT as the only E. coli Purine Nucleoside Phosphoramidase and as Essential for Growth under High Salt Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Tsui-Fen; Bieganowski, Pawel; Shilinski, Kara; Cheng, Jilin; Brenner, Charles; Wagner, Carston R.

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells encode AMP-lysine hydrolases related to the rabbit histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (Hint1) sequence. Bacterial and archaeal cells have Hint homologs annotated in a variety of ways but the enzymes have not been characterized, nor have phenotypes been described due to loss of enzymatic activity. We developed a quantitative 31P NMR assay to determine whether Escherichia coli possesses an adenosine phosphoramidase activity. Indeed, soluble lysates prepared from wild-type laboratory Escherichia coli exhibited activity on the model substrate adenosine monophosphoramidate (AMP-NH2). The Escherichia coli Hint homolog, which had been comprehensively designated ycfF and is here named hinT, was cloned, over-expressed, purified and characterized with respect to purine nucleoside phosphoramidate substrates. Bacterial hinT was several times more active than mammalian Hint on three model substrates. In addition, bacterial and mammalian enzymes preferred guanosine versus adenosine phosphoramidates as substrates. Analysis of the lysates from a constructed hinT knockout strain of Escherichia coli demonstrated that all of the cellular purine nucleoside phosphoramidase activity is due to hinT. Physiological analysis of this mutant revealed that the loss of hinT enzymatic activity results in failure to grow in media containing 0.75 KCl, 0.9 M NaCl, 0.5 M NaOAc and 10 mM MnCl2. Thus, bacteria may possess nucleotidylylated phosphoramidate substrates that must be hydrolyzed to support growth under certain high salt conditions. PMID:15703176

  14. ATP and related purines stimulate motility, spatial congregation, and coalescence in red algal spores.

    PubMed

    Huidobro-Toro, Juan P; Donoso, Verónica; Flores, Verónica; Santelices, Bernabé

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile extracellular signal along the tree of life, whereas cAMP plays a major role in vertebrates as an intracellular messenger for hormones, transmitters, tastants, and odorants. Since red algal spore coalescence may be considered analogous to the congregation process of social amoeba, which is stimulated by cAMP, we ascertained whether exogenous applications of ATP, cAMP, adenine, or adenosine modified spore survival and motility, spore settlement and coalescence. Concentration-response studies were performed with carpospores of Mazzaella laminarioides (Gigartinales), incubated with and without added purines. Stirring of algal blades released ADP/ATP to the cell media in a time-dependent manner. 10-300 μM ATP significantly increased spore survival; however, 1,500 μM ATP, cAMP or adenine induced 100% mortality within less than 24 h; the exception was adenosine, which up to 3,000 μM, did not alter spore survival. ATP exposure elicited spore movement with speeds of 2.2-2.5 μm · s(-1) . 14 d after 1,000 μM ATP addition, spore abundance in the central zone of the plaques was increased 2.7-fold as compared with parallel controls. Likewise, 1-10 μM cAMP or 30-100 μM adenine also increased central zone spore abundance, albeit these purines were less efficacious than ATP; adenosine up to 3,000 μM did not influence settlement. Moreover, 1,000 μM ATP markedly accelerated coalescence, the other purines caused a variable effect. We conclude that exogenous cAMP, adenine, but particularly ATP, markedly influence red algal spore physiology; effects are compatible with the expression of one or more membrane purinoceptor(s), discarding adenosine receptor participation. PMID:26986520

  15. Enhancement of Peripheral Nerve Regrowth by the Purine Nucleoside Analog and Cell Cycle Inhibitor, Roscovitine

    PubMed Central

    Law, Vincent; Dong, Sophie; Rosales, Jesusa L.; Jeong, Myung-Yung; Zochodne, Douglas; Lee, Ki-Young

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a slow process that can be associated with limited outcomes and thus a search for novel and effective therapy for peripheral nerve injury and disease is crucial. Here, we found that roscovitine, a synthetic purine nucleoside analog, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal-like PC12 cells. Furthermore, ex vivo analysis of pre-injured adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons showed that roscovitine enhances neurite regrowth in these cells. Likewise, in vivo transected sciatic nerves in rats locally perfused with roscovitine had augmented repopulation of new myelinated axons beyond the transection zone. By mass spectrometry, we found that roscovitine interacts with tubulin and actin. It interacts directly with tubulin and causes a dose-dependent induction of tubulin polymerization as well as enhances Guanosine-5′-triphosphate (GTP)-dependent tubulin polymerization. Conversely, roscovitine interacts indirectly with actin and counteracts the inhibitory effect of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 (Cdk5) on Actin-Related Proteins 2/3 (Arp2/3)-dependent actin polymerization, and thus, causes actin polymerization. Moreover, in the presence of neurotrophic factors such as nerve growth factor (NGF), roscovitine-enhanced neurite outgrowth is mediated by increased activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Since microtubule and F-actin dynamics are critical for axonal regrowth, the ability of roscovitine to activate the ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK pathways and support polymerization of tubulin and actin indicate a major role for this purine nucleoside analog in the promotion of axonal regeneration. Together, our findings demonstrate a therapeutic potential for the purine nucleoside analog, roscovitine, in peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27799897

  16. ATP and related purines stimulate motility, spatial congregation, and coalescence in red algal spores.

    PubMed

    Huidobro-Toro, Juan P; Donoso, Verónica; Flores, Verónica; Santelices, Bernabé

    2015-04-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a versatile extracellular signal along the tree of life, whereas cAMP plays a major role in vertebrates as an intracellular messenger for hormones, transmitters, tastants, and odorants. Since red algal spore coalescence may be considered analogous to the congregation process of social amoeba, which is stimulated by cAMP, we ascertained whether exogenous applications of ATP, cAMP, adenine, or adenosine modified spore survival and motility, spore settlement and coalescence. Concentration-response studies were performed with carpospores of Mazzaella laminarioides (Gigartinales), incubated with and without added purines. Stirring of algal blades released ADP/ATP to the cell media in a time-dependent manner. 10-300 μM ATP significantly increased spore survival; however, 1,500 μM ATP, cAMP or adenine induced 100% mortality within less than 24 h; the exception was adenosine, which up to 3,000 μM, did not alter spore survival. ATP exposure elicited spore movement with speeds of 2.2-2.5 μm · s(-1) . 14 d after 1,000 μM ATP addition, spore abundance in the central zone of the plaques was increased 2.7-fold as compared with parallel controls. Likewise, 1-10 μM cAMP or 30-100 μM adenine also increased central zone spore abundance, albeit these purines were less efficacious than ATP; adenosine up to 3,000 μM did not influence settlement. Moreover, 1,000 μM ATP markedly accelerated coalescence, the other purines caused a variable effect. We conclude that exogenous cAMP, adenine, but particularly ATP, markedly influence red algal spore physiology; effects are compatible with the expression of one or more membrane purinoceptor(s), discarding adenosine receptor participation.

  17. Targeting the Parasite's DNA with Methyltriazenyl Purine Analogs Is a Safe, Selective, and Efficacious Antitrypanosomal Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Martin J.; Alkhaldi, Abdulsalam A. M.; Ebiloma, Godwin U.; Barnes, Rebecca L.; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; McCulloch, Richard; Koomen, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The human and veterinary disease complex known as African trypanosomiasis continues to inflict significant global morbidity, mortality, and economic hardship. Drug resistance and toxic side effects of old drugs call for novel and unorthodox strategies for new and safe treatment options. We designed methyltriazenyl purine prodrugs to be rapidly and selectively internalized by the parasite, after which they disintegrate into a nontoxic and naturally occurring purine nucleobase, a simple triazene-stabilizing group, and the active toxin: a methyldiazonium cation capable of damaging DNA by alkylation. We identified 2-(3-acetyl-3-methyltriazen-1-yl)-6-hydroxypurine (compound 1) as a new lead compound, which showed submicromolar potency against Trypanosoma brucei, with a selectivity index of >500, and it demonstrated a curative effect in animal models of acute trypanosomiasis. We investigated the mechanism of action of this lead compound and showed that this molecule has significantly higher affinity for parasites over mammalian nucleobase transporters, and it does not show cross-resistance with current first-line drugs. Once selectively accumulated inside the parasite, the prodrug releases a DNA-damaging methyldiazonium cation. We propose that ensuing futile cycles of attempted mismatch repair then lead to G2/M phase arrest and eventually cell death, as evidenced by the reduced efficacy of this purine analog against a mismatch repair-deficient (MSH2−/−) trypanosome cell line. The observed absence of genotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and cytotoxicity against mammalian cells revitalizes the idea of pursuing parasite-selective DNA alkylators as a safe chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of human and animal trypanosomiasis. PMID:26282430

  18. HCN - A plausible source of purines, pyrimidines and amino acids on the primitive earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J.-P.; Joshi, P. C.; Edelson, E. H.; Lawless, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Dilute (0.1 M) solutions of HCN condense to oligomers at pH 9.2, and hydrolysis of these oligomers yields 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine, orotic acid, 5-hydroxyuracil, adenine, 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide, and amino acids. It is suggested that the three main classes of nitrogen-containing biomolecules - purines, pyrimidines, and amino acids may have originated from HCN on the primitive earth. It is also suggested that the presence of orotic acid and 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide might indicate that contemporary biosynthetic pathways for nucleotides evolved from the compounds released on hydrolysis of HCN oligomers.

  19. Crystallographic and docking studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Rodrigo G; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S; de Azevedo, Walter F

    2010-07-01

    This work describes for the first time the structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtPNP) in complex with sulfate and its natural substrate, 2'-deoxyguanosine, and its application to virtual screening. We report docking studies of a set of molecules against this structure. Application of polynomial empirical scoring function was able to rank docking solutions with good predicting power which opens the possibility to apply this new criterion to analyze docking solutions and screen small-molecule databases for new chemical entities to inhibit MtPNP.

  20. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Peter M J; Affek, Hagit P; Ivany, Linda C; Houben, Alexander J P; Sijp, Willem P; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10-17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands.

  1. Pronounced prefronto-temporal cortical thinning in schizophrenia: Neuroanatomical correlate of suicidal behavior?

    PubMed

    Besteher, Bianca; Wagner, Gerd; Koch, Kathrin; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Schlösser, Ralf; Sauer, Heinrich; Schultz, C Christoph

    2016-10-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by increased mortality for which suicidality is the decisive factor. An analysis of cortical thickness and folding to further elucidate neuroanatomical correlates of suicidality in schizophrenia has not yet been performed. We searched for relevant brain regions with such differences between patients with suicide-attempts, patients without any suicidal thoughts and healthy controls. 37 schizophrenia patients (14 suicide-attempters and 23 non-suicidal) and 50 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included. Suicidality was documented through clinical interview and chart review. All participants underwent T1-weighted MRI scans. Whole brain node-by-node cortical thickness and folding were estimated (FreeSurfer Software) and compared. Additionally a three group comparison for prefrontal regions-of-interest was performed in SPSS using a multifactorial GLM. Compared with the healthy controls patients showed a typical pattern of cortical thinning in prefronto-temporal regions and altered cortical folding in the right medial temporal cortex. Patients with suicidal behavior compared with non-suicidal patients demonstrated pronounced (p<0.05) cortical thinning in the right DLPFC and the superior temporal cortex. Comparing cortical thickness in suicidal patients with non-suicidal patients significant (p<0.05) cortical thinning was additionally found in the right superior and middle temporal, temporopolar and insular cortex. Our findings extend the evidence for neuroanatomical underpinnings of suicidal behaviour in schizophrenia. We identified cortical thinning in a network strongly involved in regulation of impulsivity, emotions and planning of behaviour in suicide attempters, which might lead to neuronal dysregulation in this network and consequently to a higher risk of suicidal behavior. PMID:27567290

  2. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Peter M. J.; Affek, Hagit P.; Ivany, Linda C.; Houben, Alexander J. P.; Sijp, Willem P.; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10–17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  3. Pronounced zonal heterogeneity in Eocene southern high-latitude sea surface temperatures.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Peter M J; Affek, Hagit P; Ivany, Linda C; Houben, Alexander J P; Sijp, Willem P; Sluijs, Appy; Schouten, Stefan; Pagani, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Paleoclimate studies suggest that increased global warmth during the Eocene epoch was greatly amplified at high latitudes, a state that climate models cannot fully reproduce. However, proxy estimates of Eocene near-Antarctic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) have produced widely divergent results at similar latitudes, with SSTs above 20 °C in the southwest Pacific contrasting with SSTs between 5 and 15 °C in the South Atlantic. Validation of this zonal temperature difference has been impeded by uncertainties inherent to the individual paleotemperature proxies applied at these sites. Here, we present multiproxy data from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, that provides well-constrained evidence for annual SSTs of 10-17 °C (1σ SD) during the middle and late Eocene. Comparison of the same paleotemperature proxy at Seymour Island and at the East Tasman Plateau indicate the presence of a large and consistent middle-to-late Eocene SST gradient of ∼7 °C between these two sites located at similar paleolatitudes. Intermediate-complexity climate model simulations suggest that enhanced oceanic heat transport in the South Pacific, driven by deep-water formation in the Ross Sea, was largely responsible for the observed SST gradient. These results indicate that very warm SSTs, in excess of 18 °C, did not extend uniformly across the Eocene southern high latitudes, and suggest that thermohaline circulation may partially control the distribution of high-latitude ocean temperatures in greenhouse climates. The pronounced zonal SST heterogeneity evident in the Eocene cautions against inferring past meridional temperature gradients using spatially limited data within given latitudinal bands. PMID:24753570

  4. Pronounced and prevalent intersexuality does not impede the ‘Demon Shrimp’ invasion

    PubMed Central

    Green Etxabe, Amaia; Short, Stephen; Flood, Tim; Johns, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Crustacean intersexuality is widespread and often linked to infection by sex-distorting parasites. However, unlike vertebrate intersexuality, its association with sexual dysfunction is unclear and remains a matter of debate. The ‘Demon Shrimp,’ Dikerogammarus haemobaphes, an amphipod that has invaded continental waterways, has recently become widespread in Britain. Intersexuality has been noted in D. haemobaphes but not investigated further. We hypothesise that a successful invasive population should not display a high prevalence of intersexuality if this condition represents a truly dysfunctional phenotype. In addition, experiments have indicated that particular parasite burdens in amphipods may facilitate invasions. The rapid and ongoing invasion of British waterways represents an opportunity to determine whether these hypotheses are consistent with field observations. This study investigates the parasites and sexual phenotypes of D. haemobaphes in British waterways, characterising parasite burdens using molecular screening, and makes comparisons with the threatened Gammarus pulex natives. We reveal that invasive and native populations have distinct parasitic profiles, suggesting the loss of G. pulex may have parasite-mediated eco-system impacts. Furthermore, the parasite burdens are consistent with those previously proposed to facilitate biological invasions. Our study also indicates that while no intersexuality occurs in the native G. pulex, approximately 50% of D. haemobaphes males present pronounced intersexuality associated with infection by the microsporidian Dictyocoela berillonum. This unambiguously successful invasive population presents, to our knowledge, the highest reported prevalence of male intersexuality. This is the clearest evidence to date that such intersexuality does not represent a form of debilitating sexual dysfunction that negatively impacts amphipod populations. PMID:25699206

  5. On the origin of pronounced O3 gradients in the thunderstorm outflow region during DC3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Lichtenstern, M.; Scheibe, M.; Aufmhoff, H.; Schlager, H.; Pucik, T.; Minikin, A.; Weinzierl, B.; Heimerl, K.; Fütterer, D.; Rappenglück, B.; Ackermann, L.; Pickering, K. E.; Cummings, K. A.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Betten, D. P.; Honomichl, S.; Barth, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Unique in situ measurements of CO, O3, SO2, CH4, NO, NOx, NOy, VOC, CN, and rBC were carried out with the German Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)-Falcon aircraft in the central U.S. thunderstorms during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry experiment in summer 2012. Fresh and aged anvil outflow (9-12 km) from supercells, mesoscale convective systems, mesoscale convective complexes, and squall lines were probed over Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. For three case studies (30 May and 8 and 12 June) a combination of trace species, radar, lightning, and satellite information, as well as model results, were used to analyze and design schematics of major trace gas transport pathways within and in the vicinity of the probed thunderstorms. The impact of thunderstorms on the O3 composition in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (LS) region was analyzed. Overshooting cloud tops injected high amounts of biomass burning and lightning-produced NOx emissions into the LS, in addition to low O3 mixing ratios from the lower troposphere. As a dynamical response, O3-rich air from the LS was transported downward into the anvil and also surrounded the outflow. The ΔO3/ΔCO ratio was determined in the anvil outflow region. A pronounced in-mixing of O3-rich stratospheric air masses was observed in the outflow indicated by highly positive or even negative ΔO3/ΔCO ratios (+1.4 down to -3.9). Photochemical O3 production (ΔO3/ΔCO = +0.1) was found to be minor in the recently lofted pollution plumes. O3 mixing ratios within the aged anvil outflow were mainly enhanced due to dynamical processes.

  6. Validation and steady-state analysis of a power-law model of purine metabolism in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curto, R; Voit, E O; Sorribas, A; Cascante, M

    1997-01-01

    The paper introduces a model of human purine metabolism in situ. Chosen from among several alternative system descriptions, the model is formulated as a Generalized Mass Action system within Biochemical Systems Theory and validated with analyses of steady-state and dynamic characteristics. Eigenvalue and sensitivity analyses indicate that the model has a stable and robust steady-state. The model quite accurately reproduces numerous biochemical and clinical observations in healthy subjects as well as in patients with disorders of purine metabolism. These results suggest that the model can be used to assess biochemical and clinical aspects of human purine metabolism. It provides a means of exploring effects of enzyme deficiencies and is a potential tool for identifying steps of the pathway that could be the target of therapeutical intervention. Numerous quantitative comparisons with data are given. The model can be used for biomathematical exploration of relationships between enzymic deficiencies and clinically manifested diseases. PMID:9210399

  7. Stereoselective synthesis of 9-beta-d-arabianofuranosyl guanine and 2-amino-9-(beta-d-arabianofuranosyl)purine.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue-Jun; Li, Gai-Xia; Qi, Xiou-Xiang; Deng, You-Quan

    2005-02-01

    9-beta-d-Arabianofuranosyl guanine (6) and 2-amino-9-(beta-d-arabianofuranosyl)purine (8) were prepared from 2-amino-6-chloro-9-(2,3,5-triphenylmethoxyl-beta-d-arabianofuranosyl)purine (4), a key intermediate which was stereoselectively prepared from 2,3,5-triphenylmethoxyl-d-arabianofuranose and 2-amino-6-chloro-purine. The yield of the intermediate was obviously improved and only beta-isomer was formed by using the activated molecular sieve as environmental friendly catalyst, overcoming the defect that a 1:1 mixture of alpha- and beta-isomers was formed, which was difficult to separate, when toxic mercury cyanide was previously used as catalyst.

  8. Pronounced microheterogeneity in a sorbitol-water mixture observed through variable temperature neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shin G; Soper, Alan K; Khodadadi, Sheila; Curtis, Joseph E; Krueger, Susan; Cicerone, Marcus T; Fitch, Andrew N; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the structure of concentrated d-sorbitol-water mixtures is studied by wide- and small-angle neutron scattering (WANS and SANS) as a function of temperature. The mixtures are prepared using both deuterated and regular sorbitol and water at a molar fraction of sorbitol of 0.19 (equivalent to 70% by weight of regular sorbitol in water). Retention of an amorphous structure (i.e., absence of crystallinity) is confirmed for this system over the entire temperature range, 100-298 K. The glass transition temperature, Tg, is found from differential scanning calorimetry to be approximately 200 K. WANS data are analyzed using empirical potential structure refinement, to obtain the site-site radial distribution functions (RDFs) and coordination numbers. This analysis reveals the presence of nanoscaled water clusters surrounded by (and interacting with) sorbitol molecules. The water clusters appear more structured compared to bulk water and, especially at the lowest temperatures, resemble the structure of low-density amorphous ice (LDA). Upon cooling to 100 K the peaks in the water RDFs become markedly sharper, with increased coordination number, indicating enhanced local (nanometer-scale) ordering, with changes taking place both above and well below the Tg. On the mesoscopic (submicrometer) scale, although there are no changes between 298 and 213 K, cooling the sample to 100 K results in a significant increase in the SANS signal, which is indicative of pronounced inhomogeneities. This increase in the scattering is partly reversed during heating, although some hysteresis is observed. Furthermore, a power law analysis of the SANS data indicates the existence of domains with well-defined interfaces on the submicrometer length scale, probably as a result of the appearance and growth of microscopic voids in the glassy matrix. Because of the unusual combination of small and wide scattering data used here, the present results provide new physical insight into the

  9. Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome after Myoma Enucleation by Minilaparotomy under Microsurgical Conditions in Pronounced Uterus Myomatosus

    PubMed Central

    Floss, K.; Garcia-Rocha, G.-J.; Kundu, S.; von Kaisenberg, C. S.; Hillemanns, P.; Schippert, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Besides the typical complaints and symptoms, myomas can cause sterility, infertility and complications during pregnancy. Laparoscopic interventions reach their limits with regard to organ preservation and the simultaneous desire to have children in the removal of multiple and larger intramural myoma nodes. The aim of this study is to examine fertility status and pregnancy outcome after myoma removal by minilaparotomy (skin incision maximal 8 cm) in women with pronounced uterus myomatosus. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study makes use of the data from 160 patients with an average age of 34.6 years. Factors analysed include number, size and localisation of the myomas, complaints due to the myoma, pre- and postoperative gravidity, mode of delivery, and complications of birth. Results: Indications for organ-sparing myoma enucleation were the desire to have children (72.5 %), bleeding disorders (60 %) and pressure discomfort (36.5 %). On average 4.95 (SD ± 0.41), maximally 46 myomas were removed. The largest myoma had a diameter of 6.64 cm (SD ± 2.74). 82.5 % of the patients had transmural myomas, in 17.5 % the uterine cavity was inadvertently opened. On average the operating time was 163 minutes (SD ± 45.47), the blood loss 1.59 g/dL (SD ± 0.955). 60.3 % of the patients with the desire to have children became pregnant postoperatively. 75.3 % of the pregnancies were on average carried through to the 38th week (28.4 % vaginal deliveries, 71.6 % Caesarean sections). In the postoperative period there was one case of uterine rupture in the vicinity of a previous scar. Discussion: By means of the microsurgical “mini-laparotomy” even extensive myomatous uterine changes can, in the majority of cases, be operated in an organ-sparing manner with retention of the ability to conceive and to carry a pregnancy through to maturity of the infant. The risk for a postoperative uterine rupture in a subsequent pregnancy and

  10. A peripherally selective diphenyl purine antagonist of the CB1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Zhang, Yanan; Mathews, James; Snyder, Rodney; Fennell, Tim; Marusich, Julie A.; Wiley, Jenny L.; Seltzman, Herbert; Maitra, Rangan

    2014-01-01

    Antagonists of the CB1 receptor can be useful in the treatment of several diseases including obesity, diabetes, and liver disease. However, to date, the only clinically approved CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant, was withdrawn due to adverse CNS related side effects such as depression and suicidal ideation. Since rimonabant’s withdrawal, several groups have begun pursuing peripherally selective CB1 antagonists. These compounds are expected to be devoid of undesirable CNS related effects but maintain efficacy through antagonism of peripherally expressed CB1 receptors within target tissues. Reported here are our latest results toward development of a peripherally selective analog of the diphenyl purine CB1 antagonist otenabant 1. Compound 9 (N-{1-[8-(2-Chlorophenyl)-9-(4-chlorophenyl)-9H-purin-6-yl]piperidin-4-yl}pentanamide) is a potent, orally absorbed antagonist of the CB1 receptor that is >50-fold selective for CB1 over CB2, highly selective for the periphery in a rodent model, and without efficacy in a series of in vivo assays designed to evaluate its ability to mitigate the central effects of Δ9-THC through the CB1 receptor. PMID:24041123

  11. The purine nucleotide cycle. A pathway for ammonia production in the rat kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Bogusky, R T; Lowenstein, L M; Lowenstein, J M

    1976-01-01

    Particle-free extracts prepared from kidney cortex of rat catalyze the formation of ammonia via the purine nucleotide cycle. The cycle generates ammonia and fumarate from aspartate, using catalytic amounts of inosine monophosphate, adenylosuccinate, and adenosine monophosphate. The specific activities of the enzymes of the cycle are 1.27+/-0.27 nmol/mg protein per min (SE) for adenoylosuccinate synthetase, 1.38+/-0.16 for adenylosuccinase, and 44.0+/-3.3 for AMP deaminase. Compared with controls, extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed ammonium chloride for 2 days show a 60% increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity, and a greater and more rapid synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate. Extracts prepared from kidneys of rats fed a potassium-deficient diet show a twofold increase in adenylosuccinate synthetase and a threefold increase in adenylosuccinase activity. In such extracts the rate of synthesis of ammonia and adenine nucleotide from aspartate and inosine monophosphate is also increased. These results show that the reactions of the purine nucleotide cycle are present and can operate in extracts of kidney cortex. The operational capacity of the cycle is accelerated by ammonium chloride feeding and potassium depletion, conditions known to increase renal ammonia excretion. Extracts of kidney cortex convert inosine monophosphate to uric acid. This is prevented by addition of allopurinol of 1-pyrophosphoryl ribose 5-phosphate to the reaction mixture. PMID:821968

  12. Purification and characterization of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from developing embryos of Hyalomma dromedarii.

    PubMed

    Kamel, M Y; Fahmy, A S; Ghazy, A H; Mohamed, M A

    1991-04-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Hyalomma dromedarii, the camel tick, was purified to apparent homogeneity. A molecular weight of 56,000 - 58,000 was estimated for both the native and denatured enzyme, suggesting that the enzyme is monomeric. Unlike purine nucleoside phosphorylase preparations from other tissues, the H. dromedarii enzyme was unstable in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme had a sharp pH optimum at pH 6.5. It catalyzed the phosphorolysis and arsenolysis of ribo- and deoxyribo-nucleosides of hypoxanthine and guanine, but not of adenine or pyrimidine nucleosides. The Km values of the enzyme at the optimal pH for inosine, deoxyinosine, guanosine, and deoxyguanosine were 0.31, 0.67, 0.55, and 0.33 mM, respectively. Inactivation and kinetic studies suggested that histidine and cysteine residues were essential for activity. The pKa values determined for catalytic ionizable groups were 6-7 and 8-9. The enzyme was completely inactivated by thiol reagents and reactivated by excess beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme was also susceptible to pH-dependent photooxidation in the presence of methylene blue, implicating histidine. Initial velocity studies showed an intersecting pattern of double-reciprocal plots of the data, consistent with a sequential mechanism. PMID:1905141

  13. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase: a key player connecting purine, folate and methionine metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Saint-Marc, Christelle; Hürlimann, Hans C; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Previous genetic analyses showed phenotypic interactions between 5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide 5'-phosphate (AICAR) produced from the purine and histidine pathways and methionine biosynthesis. Here, we revisited the effect of AICAR on methionine requirement due to AICAR accumulation in the presence of the fau1 mutation invalidating folinic acid remobilization. We found that this methionine auxotrophy could be suppressed by overexpression of the methionine synthase Met6 or by deletion of the serine hydroxymethyltransferase gene SHM2. We propose that in a fau1 background, AICAR, by stimulating the transcriptional expression of SHM2, leads to a folinic acid accumulation inhibiting methionine synthesis by Met6. In addition, we uncovered a new methionine auxotrophy for the ade3 bas1 double mutant that can be rescued by overexpressing the SHM2 gene. We propose that methionine auxotrophy in this mutant is the result of a competition for 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate between methionine and deoxythymidine monophosphate synthesis. Altogether, our data show intricate genetic interactions between one-carbon units, purine and methionine metabolism through fine-tuning of serine hydroxymethyltransferase by AICAR and the transcription factor Bas1.

  14. Genetic Screen Reveals the Role of Purine Metabolism in Staphylococcus aureus Persistence to Rifampicin

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Rebecca; Cui, Peng; Shi, Wanliang; Feng, Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infections with Staphylococcus aureus such as septicemia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and biofilm infections are difficult to treat because of persisters. Despite many efforts in understanding bacterial persistence, the mechanisms of persister formation in S. aureus remain elusive. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen of a transposon mutant library to study the molecular mechanisms involved in persistence of community-acquired S. aureus. Screening of the library for mutants defective in persistence or tolerance to rifampicin revealed many genes involved in metabolic pathways that are important for antibiotic persistence. In particular, the identified mutants belonged to metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, vitamin and purine biosynthesis. Five mutants played a role in purine biosynthesis and two mutants, purB, an adenylosuccinate lyase, and purM, a phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, were selected for further confirmation. Mutants purB and purM showed defective persistence compared to the parental strain USA300 in multiple stress conditions including various antibiotics, low pH, and heat stress. The defect in persistence was restored by complementation with the wildtype purB and purM gene in the respective mutants. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of persistence in S. aureus and provide novel therapeutic targets for developing more effective treatment for persistent infections due to S. aureus. PMID:27025643

  15. An Ancient Riboswitch Class in Bacteria Regulates Purine Biosynthesis and One-carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter B.; Nelson, James W.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Over thirty years ago, ZTP (5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide riboside 5'-triphosphate), a modified purine biosynthetic intermediate, was proposed to signal 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (10f-THF) deficiency in bacteria. However, the mechanisms by which this putative alarmone or its precursor ZMP (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide, also known as AICAR) brings about any metabolic changes remain unexplained. Herein we report the existence of a widespread riboswitch class that is most commonly associated with genes related to de novo purine biosynthesis and one carbon metabolism. Biochemical data confirms that members of this riboswitch class selectively bind ZMP and ZTP with nanomolar affinity, while strongly rejecting numerous natural analogs. Indeed, increases in the ZMP/ZTP pool, caused by folate stress in bacterial cells, trigger changes in the expression of a reporter gene fused to representative ZTP riboswitches in vivo. The wide distribution of this riboswitch class suggests that ZMP/ZTP signaling is important for species in numerous bacterial lineages. PMID:25616067

  16. Crystal structure and molecular dynamics studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Rafael A; Timmers, Luís F S M; Ducati, Rodrigo G; da Silva, Diego O N; Basso, Luiz A; de Azevedo, Walter F; Santos, Diógenes S

    2012-01-01

    Consumption has been a scourge of mankind since ancient times. This illness has charged a high price to human lives. Many efforts have been made to defeat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt). The M. tuberculosis purine nucleoside phosphorylase (MtPNP) is considered an interesting target to pursuit new potential inhibitors, inasmuch it belongs to the purine salvage pathway and its activity might be involved in the mycobacterial latency process. Here we present the MtPNP crystallographic structure associated with acyclovir and phosphate (MtPNP:ACY:PO(4)) at 2.10 Å resolution. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to dissect MtPNP:ACY:PO(4) structural features, and the influence of the ligand in the binding pocket stability. Our results revealed that the ligand leads to active site lost of stability, in agreement with experimental results, which demonstrate a considerable inhibitory activity against MtPNP (K(i) = 150 nM). Furthermore, we observed that some residues which are important in the proper ligand's anchor into the human homologous enzyme do not present the same importance to MtPNP. Therewithal, these findings contribute to the search of new specific inhibitors for MtPNP, since peculiarities between the mycobacterial and human enzyme binding sites have been identified, making a structural-based drug design feasible.

  17. [THE DIAGNOSTICS OF HEREDITARY DISORDERS OF METABOLISM OF PURINES AND PYRIMIDINES IN CHILDREN USING HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY OF ELECTRO-SPRAY TANDEM MASS-SPECTROMETRY].

    PubMed

    Mamedov, I S; Zolkina, I V; Sukhorukov, V S

    2015-06-01

    The article presents data concerning new technique of diagnostic of diseases of metabolism of purines and pyrimidines using high performance liquid chromatography combined with electro-spray mass-spectrometry. The procedure of analysis is described in detail: from pre-analytical stage to interpretation of data of liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry, control of quality of data analysis, mass-spectrometry parameters and chromatographic conditions of analysis of purines, pyrimidines and their metabolites. The reference values are presented for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and bases in urine of healthy individuals. The chemical structure of purines, pyrimidines and their metabolites and examples of chromato-mass-spectrograms under various hereditary disorders of metabolism of purines and pyrimidines are presented as well. The article is targeted to pediatricians of all profiles, medical geneticists and physicians of laboratory diagnostic. PMID:26466447

  18. Improved seismic velocity structure in southwestern Japan using pronounced sP phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashida, T.; Tajima, F. C.; Mori, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    In southwestern Japan the Philippine Sea plate (PHSP) subducts along the Nankai trough and this subduction causes the megathrust earthquakes in the Nankai seismic zone as well as large intraslab and inland earthquakes in the vicinity. The dip angle of the PHSP varies significantly along strike. In this region the sP phase is widely observed and its amplitude sometimes becomes larger than that of the direct S wave. This suggests that the phase could control the peak ground velocities and be a significant factor in evaluating regional seismic hazards. We previously showed that the arrivals of this strong phase are explained by incorporating the structure with shallow bedrock depths in the velocity model, and presented consistent 2D seismic velocity models. The 2D models derived for profiles between earthquake hypocenters and observation stations represent the configuration of the subducting PHSP and the depth variation of the Conrad and Moho discontinuities (Hayashida et al., 2010). Here, we present a 3D seismic velocity model that accounts for observed waveforms at a number of local stations where the pronounced sP phase was recorded. We present the results of finite difference modeling of the observed seismograms for an intraslab earthquake (2001/3/26 Mw5.1, h = 46 km) using the e3d code (e3d; Larsen and Schultz, 1995). First we calculated synthetics using a simple layered structure (Asano et al., 1986) to fit the arrival times and amplitudes of sP phases, and then matched the P- and S-wave arrivals by tuning the slab configurations and the Conrad and Moho depths. At an early stage of the 3D modeling we referred to the travel time tomography model (Nakajima and Hasegawa, 2007) and receiver function images (e.g. Shiomi et al., 2006; Ueno et al., 2008). The results show that the dip angle of the PHSP beneath the region varies significantly along the trench strike, and the agreement between data and synthetics varies among the models. At stations located to the north

  19. Does pronounceability modulate the letter string deficit of children with dyslexia? A study with the rate and amount model.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Chiara V; Traficante, Daniela; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    The locus of the deficit of children with dyslexia in dealing with strings of letters may be a deficit at a pre-lexical graphemic level or an inability to bind orthographic and phonological information. We evaluate these alternative hypotheses in two experiments by examining the role of stimulus pronounceability in a lexical decision task (LDT) and in a forced-choice letter discrimination task (Reicher-Wheeler paradigm). Seventeen fourth grade children with dyslexia and 24 peer control readers participated to two experiments. In the LDT children were presented with high-, low-frequency words, pronounceable pseudowords (such as DASU) and unpronounceable non-words (such as RNGM) of 4-, 5-, or 6- letters. No sign of group by pronounceability interaction was found when over-additivity was taken into account. Children with dyslexia were impaired when they had to process strings, not only of pronounceable stimuli but also of unpronounceable stimuli, a deficit well accounted for by a single global factor. Complementary results were obtained with the Reicher-Wheeler paradigm: both groups of children gained in accuracy in letter discrimination in the context of pronounceable primes (words and pseudowords) compared to unpronounceable primes (non-words). No global factor was detected in this task which requires the discrimination between a target letter and a competitor but does not involve simultaneous letter string processing. Overall, children with dyslexia show a selective difficulty in simultaneously processing a letter string as a whole, independent of its pronounceability; however, when the task involves isolated letter processing, also these children can make use of the ortho-phono-tactic information derived from a previously seen letter string. This pattern of findings is in keeping with the idea that an impairment in pre-lexical graphemic analysis may be a core deficit in developmental dyslexia.

  20. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  1. Computer Simulations Reveal Substrate Specificity of Glycosidic Bond Cleavage in Native and Mutant Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Hopmann, Kathrin Helen; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-04-12

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of purine ribonucleosides and 2'-deoxyribonucleosides, yielding the purine base and (2'-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate as products. While this enzyme has been extensively studied, several questions with respect to the catalytic mechanism have remained largely unanswered. The role of the phosphate and key amino acid residues in the catalytic reaction as well as the purine ring protonation state is elucidated using density functional theory calculations and extensive empirical valence bond (EVB) simulations. Free energy surfaces for adenosine, inosine, and guanosine are fitted to ab initio data and yield quantitative agreement with experimental data when the surfaces are used to model the corresponding enzymatic reactions. The cognate substrates 6-aminopurines (inosine and guanosine) interact with PNP through extensive hydrogen bonding, but the substrate specificity is found to be a direct result of the electrostatic preorganization energy along the reaction coordinate. Asn243 has previously been identified as a key residue providing substrate specificity. Mutation of Asn243 to Asp has dramatic effects on the substrate specificity, making 6-amino- and 6-oxopurines equally good as substrates. The principal effect of this particular mutation is the change in the electrostatic preorganization energy between the native enzyme and the Asn243Asp mutant, clearly favoring adenosine over inosine and guanosine. Thus, the EVB simulations show that this particular mutation affects the electrostatic preorganization of the active site, which in turn can explain the substrate specificity. PMID:26985580

  2. TD-DFT investigation of the magnetic circular dichroism spectra of some purine and pyrimidine bases of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Fahleson, Tobias; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Santoro, Fabrizio; Improta, Roberto; Coriani, Sonia

    2015-05-28

    We present a computational study of the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra in the 200-300 nm wavelength region of purine and its derivative hypoxanthine, as well as of the pyrimidine bases of nucleic acids uracil, thymine, and cytosine, using the B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP functionals. Solvent effects are investigated within the polarizable continuum model and by inclusion of explicit water molecules. In general, the computed spectra are found to be in good agreement with the experimental ones, apart from some overall blue shifts. Both the pseudo-A term shape of the MCD spectra of the purines and the B term shape of the spectra of pyrimidine bases are reproduced. Our calculations also correctly reproduce the reversed phase of the MCD bands in purine compared to that of its derivatives present in nucleic acids. Solvent effects are sizable and system specific, but they do not in general alter the qualitative shape of the spectra. The bands are dominated by the bright π → π* transitions, and our calculations in solution nicely reproduce their energy differences, improving the estimates obtained in the gas phase. Shoulders are predicted for purine and uracil due to n → π* excitations, but they are too weak to be observed in the experiment.

  3. Increasing Occurrences and Functional Roles for High Energy Purine-Pyrimidine Base-Pairs in Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Kimsey, Isaac; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    There are a growing number of studies reporting the observation of purine-pyrimidine base-pairs that are seldom observed in unmodified nucleic acids because they entail the loss of energetically favorable interactions or require energetically costly base ionization or tautomerization. These high energy purine-pyrimidine base-pairs include G•C+ and A•T Hoogsteen base-pairs, which entail ~180° rotation of the purine base in a Watson-Crick base-pair, protonation of cytosine N3, and constriction of the C1′–C1′ distance by ~2.5 Å. Other high energy pure-pyrimidine base-pairs include G•T, G•U, and A•C mispairs that adopt Watson-Crick like geometry through either base ionization or tautomerization. Although difficult to detect and characterize using biophysical methods, high energy purine-pyrimidine base-pairs appear to be more common than once thought. They further expand the structural and functional diversity of canonical and noncanonical nucleic acid base-pairs. PMID:24721455

  4. Determination of the recognition site for adenine-specific methylase of Shigella sonnei 47 by hydazinolysis of DNA, followed by separation of the purine oligonucleotides by thin-layer chromatography on DEAE-cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatina, N.G.; Kirnos, M.D.; Suchkov, S.V.; Vanyushin, B.F.; Nikol'skaya, I.I.; Debov, S.S.

    1985-09-20

    A method has been developed for the separation of oligopurine units according to length and composition by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography on plates with DEAE-cellulose, permitting a comparative analysis of the content of various purine isopliths in DNA of different origin. In the case of the analysis of methylated DNA, the method permits a comparison of the substrate specificity of various enzymes of methylation of the adenine residues in DNA. In conjunction with enzymatic treatment of labeled methylated isopliths, the method permits determination of the methylatable sequence and in a number of cases an ascertainment of the recognition site for adenine-specific methylase as a whole. The proposed method was used to establish the fact that the methylase Ssol recognizes the sequence 5'...G-A-A-T-T-C...3' and methylates the adenine residue closest to its 5'-end.

  5. Human UP1 as a model for understanding purine recognition in the family of proteins containing the RNA recognition motif (RRM).

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeffrey C; Shamoo, Yousif

    2004-09-17

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a prototype for the family of eukaryotic RNA processing proteins containing the common RNA recognition motif (RRM). The region consisting of residues 1-195 of hnRNP A1 is referred to as UP1. This region has two RRMs and has a high affinity for both single-stranded RNA and the human telomeric repeat sequence d(TTAGGG)(n). We have used UP1's novel DNA binding to investigate how RRMs bind nucleic acid bases through their highly conserved RNP consensus sequences. Nine complexes of UP1 bound to modified telomeric repeats were investigated using equilibrium fluorescence binding and X-ray crystallography. In two of the complexes, alteration of a guanine to either 2-aminopurine or nebularine resulted in an increase in K(d) from 88nM to 209nM and 316nM, respectively. The loss of these orienting interactions between UP1 and the substituted base allows it to flip between syn and anti conformations. Substitution of the same base with 7-deaza-guanine preserves the O6/N1 contacts but still increases the K(d) to 296nM and suggests that it is not simply the loss of affinity that gives rise to the base mobility, but also the stereochemistry of the specific contact to O6. Although these studies provide details of UP1 interactions to nucleic acids, three general observations about RRMs are also evident: (1) as suggested by informatic studies, main-chain to base hydrogen bonding makes up an important aspect of ligand recognition (2) steric clashes generated by modification of a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair to a donor-donor pair are poorly tolerated and (3) a conserved lysine position proximal to RNP-2 (K(106)-IFVGGI) orients the purine to allow stereochemical discrimination between adenine and guanine based on the 6-position. This single interaction is well-conserved in known RRM structures and appears to be a broad indicator for purine preference in the larger family of RRM proteins. PMID:15342234

  6. Purification and Properties of a Protein Which Binds Cytokinin-active 6-Substituted Purines 1

    PubMed Central

    Erion, Jack L.; Fox, J. Eugene

    1981-01-01

    A protein which binds 6-substituted purines of the cytokinin type with relatively high affinity has been extensively purified from wheat germ. Conventional chromatographic techniques, as well as an affinity matrix to which a cytokinin was covalently coupled, were used in the purification. The wheat germ cytokinin-binding protein (CBF-1) has four unlike subunits and an apparent molecular weight of 183,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CBF-1 is saturated at one cytokinin molecule per tetramer with a Kd for 6-benzylaminopurine of 5 × 10−7 molar. The protein exists both on the native wheat germ ribosome (1 molecule CBF-1 per 80S ribosome) and free in the cytosol with approximately three copies of the latter for each of the former. Data from affinity chromatography studies and cross-linking experiments strongly suggest that a specific binding site for CBF-1 occurs on the wheat germ ribosome. Images PMID:16661618

  7. Modification of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides by direct C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F

    2015-03-17

    Transition metal-catalyzed modifications of the activated heterocyclic bases of nucleosides as well as DNA or RNA fragments employing traditional cross-coupling methods have been well-established in nucleic acid chemistry. This review covers advances in the area of cross-coupling reactions in which nucleosides are functionalized via direct activation of the C8-H bond in purine and the C5-H or C6-H bond in uracil bases. The review focuses on Pd/Cu-catalyzed couplings between unactivated nucleoside bases with aryl halides. It also discusses cross-dehydrogenative arylations and alkenylations as well as other reactions used for modification of nucleoside bases that avoid the use of organometallic precursors and involve direct C-H bond activation in at least one substrate. The scope and efficiency of these coupling reactions along with some mechanistic considerations are discussed.

  8. The ligand binding mechanism to purine nucleoside phosphorylase elucidated via molecular dynamics and machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Berteotti, Anna; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Rocchia, Walter; Cavalli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The study of biomolecular interactions between a drug and its biological target is of paramount importance for the design of novel bioactive compounds. In this paper, we report on the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and machine learning to study the binding mechanism of a transition state analogue (DADMe–immucillin-H) to the purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) enzyme. Microsecond-long MD simulations allow us to observe several binding events, following different dynamical routes and reaching diverse binding configurations. These simulations are used to estimate kinetic and thermodynamic quantities, such as kon and binding free energy, obtaining a good agreement with available experimental data. In addition, we advance a hypothesis for the slow-onset inhibition mechanism of DADMe–immucillin-H against PNP. Combining extensive MD simulations with machine learning algorithms could therefore be a fruitful approach for capturing key aspects of drug–target recognition and binding. PMID:25625196

  9. Inhibition and Structure of Trichomonas vaginalis Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase with Picomolar Transition State Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo-Matthis,A.; Wing, C.; Ghanem, M.; Deng, H.; Wu, P.; Gupta, A.; Tyler, P.; Evans, G.; Furneaux, R.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan purine auxotroph possessing a unique purine salvage pathway consisting of a bacterial type purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and a purine nucleoside kinase. Thus, T. vaginalis PNP (TvPNP) functions in the reverse direction relative to the PNPs in other organisms. Immucillin-A (ImmA) and DADMe-Immucillin-A (DADMe-ImmA) are transition stte mimics of adenosine with geometric and electrostatic features that resemble early and late transition states of adenosine at the transition state stabilized by TvPNP. ImmA demonstrates slow-onset tight-binding inhibition with TvPNP, to give an equilibrium dissociation constant of 87 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 17.2 min, and a K{sub m}/K{sub d} ratio of 70,100. DADMe-ImmA resembles a late ribooxacarbenium ion transition state for TvPNP to give a dissociation constant of 30 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 64 min, and a K{sub m}/K{sub d} ratio of 203,300. The tight binding of DADMe-ImmA supports a late S{sub N}1 transition state. Despite their tight binding to TvPNP, ImmA and DADMe-ImmA are weak inhibitors of human and P. falciparum PNPs. The crystal structures of the TvPNP-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} and TvPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} ternary complexes differ from previous structures with substrate anologues. The tight binding with DADMe-ImmA is in part due to a 2.7 {angstrom} ionic interaction between a PO{sub 4} oxygen and the N1 cation of the hydroxypyrrolidine and is weaker in the TvPNP{center_dot}ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} structure at 3.5 {angstrom}. However, the TvPNP{center_dot}ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} structure includes hydrogen bonds between the 2'-hydroxyl and the protein that are not present in TvPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4}. These structures explain why DADMe-ImmA binds tighter than ImmA. Immucillin-H is a 12 nM inhibitor of TvPNP but a 56 pM inhibitor of human PNP. And this difference is explained by isotope

  10. Evaluation of capillary chromatographic supports for immobilized human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in frontal affinity chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Temporini, Caterina; Calleri, Enrica; Bruni, Giovanna; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Massolini, Gabriella

    2014-04-18

    The aim of this work was to optimize the preparation of a capillary human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for characterization and affinity screening studies of new inhibitors by frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS). For this purpose two monolithic supports, a Chromolith Speed Rod (0.1mm I.D.×5cm) and a methacrylate-based monolithic epoxy polymeric capillary column (0.25mm I.D.×5cm) with epoxy reactive groups were considered and compared to an IMER previously developed using an open fused silica capillary. Each HsPNP-IMER was characterized in terms of catalytic activity using Inosine as standard substrate. Furthermore, they were also explored for affinity ranking experiments. Kd determination was carried out with the based fused silica HsPNP-IMER and the results are herein discussed.

  11. Novel skeleton compound Allomyrinanoid A and two purine alkaloids from the adult of Allomyrina dichotoma L.

    PubMed

    Niu, Lanlan; Gao, Jiayu; Li, Haidi; Liu, Junna; Yin, Weiping

    2016-01-15

    Three new compounds were isolated from the adult insect of Allomyrina dichotoma L. for the first time. A new skeleton compound is named as Allomyrinanoid A (1) originated from the familiar norbornane derivatives and two new compounds of purine alkaloid are named as adenine-9-methylaldehyde oxime B (2) and 6-N-methyleneimine-adenine-9-methylaldehyde oxime B (3). The compounds (2) and (3) are the tautomers of imine-enamine and creatively separated form the solvent using column chromatography method. The structures of all isolated compounds were established by spectroscopic methods including analyses of their 1D, 2D NMR and HRESI-MS data, and confirmed by comparison of the literature data. These new components displayed antibacterial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative strain.

  12. Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency. Functional and metabolic abnormalities associated with disruption of the purine nucleotide cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Sabina, R L; Swain, J L; Olanow, C W; Bradley, W G; Fishbein, W N; DiMauro, S; Holmes, E W

    1984-01-01

    To assess the role of the purine nucleotide cycle in human skeletal muscle function, we evaluated 10 patients with AMP deaminase deficiency (myoadenylate deaminase deficiency; MDD). 4 MDD and 19 non-MDD controls participated in an exercise protocol. The latter group was composed of a patient cohort (n = 8) exhibiting a constellation of symptoms similar to those of the MDD patients, i.e., postexertional aches, cramps, and pains; as well as a cohort of normal, unconditioned volunteers (n = 11). The individuals with MDD fatigued after performing only 28% as much work as their non-MDD counterparts. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the four MDD patients and the eight non-MDD patients at rest and following exercise to the point of fatigue. Creatine phosphate content fell to a comparable extent in the MDD (69%) and non-MDD (52%) patients at the onset of fatigue. Following exercise the 34% decrease in ATP content of muscle from the non-MDD subjects was significantly greater than the 6% decrease in ATP noted in muscle from the MDD patients (P = 0.048). Only one of four MDD patients had a measurable drop in ATP compared with seven of eight non-MDD patients. At end-exercise the muscle content of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), a product of AMP deaminase, was 13-fold greater in the non-MDD patients than that observed in the MDD group (P = 0.008). Adenosine content of muscle from the MDD patients increased 16-fold following exercise, while there was only a twofold increase in adenosine content of muscle from the non-MDD patients (P = 0.028). Those non-MDD patients in whom the decrease in ATP content following exercise was measurable exhibited a stoichiometric increase in IMP, and total purine content of the muscle did not change significantly. The one MDD patient in whom the decrease in ATP was measurable, did not exhibit a stoichiometric increase in IMP. Although the adenosine content increased 13-fold in this patient, only 48% of the ATP catabolized could be accounted for

  13. N-Benzyl-9-isopropyl-9H-purin-6-amine

    PubMed Central

    Gergela, David; Rouchal, Michal; Bartoš, Peter; Vícha, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C15H17N5, consists of two mol­ecules in which the dihedral angles between the best planes of the purine ring system (r.m.s. deviations = 0.0060 and 0.0190 Å) and the benzene ring are 89.21 (3) and 82.14 (4)°. The mol­ecules within the asymmetric unit are linked into dimers by pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds. Weak C—H⋯π contacts and π–π inter­actions [centroid–centroid = 3.3071 (1) Å] further connect the mol­ecules into a three-dimensional network. PMID:23795114

  14. An analysis of 5'-noncoding sequences from 699 vertebrate messenger RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, M

    1987-01-01

    5'-Noncoding sequences have been compiled from 699 vertebrate mRNAs. (GCC) GCCA/GCCATGG emerges as the consensus sequence for initiation of translation in vertebrates. The most highly conserved position in that motif is the purine in position -3 (three nucleotides upstream from the ATG codon); 97% of vertebrate mRNAs have a purine, most often A, in that position. The periodical occurrence of G (in positions -3, -6, -9) is discussed. Upstream ATG codons occur in fewer than 10% of vertebrate mRNAs-at-large; a notable exception are oncogene transcripts, two-thirds of which have ATG codons preceding the start of the major open reading frame. The leader sequences of most vertebrate mRNAs fall in the size range of 20 to 100 nucleotides. The significance of shorter and longer 5'-noncoding sequences is discussed. PMID:3313277

  15. Transition Path Sampling Study of the Reaction Catalyzed by Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Saen-oon, Suwipa; Schramm, Vern L.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    The Transition Path Sampling (TPS) method is a powerful technique for studying rare events in complex systems, that allows description of reactive events in atomic detail without prior knowledge of reaction coordinates and transition states. We have applied TPS in combination with a hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) method to study the enzyme human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (hPNP). This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of 6-oxypurine (deoxy)nucleosides to generate the corresponding purine base and (deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Hundreds of reactive trajectories were generated. Analysis of this transition path ensembles provides insight into the detailed mechanistic dynamics of reaction in the enzyme. Our studies have indicated a reaction mechanism involving the cleavage of the N-ribosidic bond to form transition states with substantial ribooxacarbenium ion character, that is then followed by conformational changes in the enzyme and the ribosyl group leading to migration of the anomeric carbon of the ribosyl group toward phosphate to form the product ribose 1-phosphate. This latter process is crucial in PNP, because several strong H-bonds form between active site residues in order to capture and align the phosphate nucleophile. Calculations of the commitment probability along reactive paths demonstrated the presence of a broad energy barrier at the transition state. Analysis of these transition state structures showed that bond-breaking and bond-forming distances are not a good choice for the reaction coordinate, but that the pseudorotational phase of the ribose ring is also a significant variable. PMID:20664707

  16. Vascular actions of purines in the foetal circulation of the human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Read, M. A.; Boura, A. L.; Walters, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The vasoactive effects of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine and other purines in the foetal circulation of the human placenta were examined. Single lobules of the placenta were bilaterally perfused in vitro with Krebs buffer (maternal and foetal sides 5 ml min-1 each, 95% O2:5% CO2, 37 degrees C). Changes in foetal vascular tone were assessed by recording perfusion pressure during constant infusion of each purine. To allow recording of the vasodilator effects, submaximal vasoconstriction was induced by concomitant infusion of prostaglandin F2 alpha (0.7-2.0 mumol l-1). 2. ATP (1.0-100 mumol l-1) usually caused concentration-dependent reductions in perfusion pressure. However, biphasic with initial transient increases, or only increases in pressure were sometimes observed. Falls in pressure caused by ATP were significantly reduced by addition to the perfusate of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG) (100 mumol l-1) but not NG-nitro-D-arginine (D-NOARG) (100 mumol l-1). They were not influenced by addition of indomethacin (10 mumol l-1) or L-arginine (100 mumol l-1). 3. Adenosine (0.01-1.0 mmol l-1) consistently caused concentration-dependent reductions in perfusion pressure, this effect not being influenced by indomethacin. L-NOARG, but not D-NOARG, reduced the potency of adenosine approximately three fold. L-Arginine, but not D-arginine enhanced its potency by a similar amount. 4. 2-Methylthio-ATP, a selective P2 gamma agonist was approximately 50 times more potent than ATP as a vasodilator agent, always causing decreases in perfusion pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220907

  17. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise.

  18. The PurR mutation of Drosophila melanogaster confers resistance to purine and 2,6-diaminopurine by elevating adenosine deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Dutton, F L; Chovnick, A

    1990-01-01

    Media supplemented with purine (7H-imidazo[4,5-d]pyrimidine) or the purine analogue 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) can be employed to select several classes of purine-resistant variants from mutagenized cultures of Drosophila. One class results in elevated resistance to purine and diaminopurine which is correlated with elevated activity of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase = EC 3.5.4.4). The first member of this class, Pur R, maps to position 82 +/- in the right arm of the second chromosome. The Pur R mutation causes an elevation of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme activity, apparently by altering a thermolabile, ADA-specific repressor. Pur R may thus encode a negative regulator of adenosine deaminase activity similar to the ADA-binding protein found in mammalian systems.

  19. The role of lysine 55 in determining the specificity of the purine repressor for its operators through minor groove interactions.

    PubMed

    Glasfeld, A; Koehler, A N; Schumacher, M A; Brennan, R G

    1999-08-13

    The interaction of the dimeric Escherichia coli purine repressor (PurR) with its cognate sequences leads to a 45 degrees to 50 degrees kink at a central CpG base step towards the major groove, as dyad-related leucine side-chains interdigitate between these bases from the minor groove. The resulting broadening of the minor groove increases the accessibility of the six central base-pairs towards minor groove interactions with residues from PurR. It has been shown that lysine 55 of PurR makes a direct contact with the adenine base (Ade8) directly 5' to the central CpG base-pair step in the high-affinity purF operator sequence. We have investigated the importance of this interaction in the specificity and affinity of wild-type PurR (WT) for its operators and we have studied a mutant of PurR in which Lys55 is replaced with alanine (K55A). Complexes of WT and K55A with duplex DNA containing pur operator sequences varied at position 8 were investigated crystallographically, and binding studies were performed using fluorescence anisotropy. The structures of the protein-DNA complexes reveal a relatively unperturbed global conformation regardless of the identity of the base-pair at position 8 or residue 55. In all structures the combination of higher resolution and a palindromic purF operator site allowed several new PurR.DNA interactions to be observed, including contacts by Thr15, Thr16 and His20. The side-chain of Lys55 makes productive, though varying, interactions with the adenine, thymine or cytosine base at position 8 that result in equilibrium dissociation constants of 2.6 nM, 10 nM and 35 nM, respectively. However, the bulk of the lysine side-chain apparently blocks high-affinity binding of operators with guanine at position 8 (Kd620 nM). Also, the high-affinity binding conformation appears blocked, as crystals of WT bound to DNA with guanine at position 8 could not be grown. In complexes containing K55A, the alanine side-chain is too far removed to engage in van

  20. Identification of unprecedented purine-containing compounds, the zingerines, from ginger rhizomes (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) using a phase-trafficking approach.

    PubMed

    Araya, Juan J; Zhang, Huaping; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Mitscher, Lester A; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2011-06-01

    Three unprecedented purine-containing compounds, named [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-zingerines as they are 5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl) analogs of [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols, respectively, were isolated from a methanolic extract of ginger rhizomes using a phase trafficking-based method that utilizes solid phase reagents allowing for fast and selective simultaneous separation of basic, acidic, and neutral components of natural products extracts.

  1. Identification of unprecedented purine-containing compounds, the zingerines, from ginger rhizomes (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) using a phase-trafficking approach.

    PubMed

    Araya, Juan J; Zhang, Huaping; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Mitscher, Lester A; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2011-06-01

    Three unprecedented purine-containing compounds, named [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-zingerines as they are 5-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl) analogs of [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols, respectively, were isolated from a methanolic extract of ginger rhizomes using a phase trafficking-based method that utilizes solid phase reagents allowing for fast and selective simultaneous separation of basic, acidic, and neutral components of natural products extracts. PMID:21497863

  2. Regulation of Escherichia coli purA by purine repressor, one component of a dual control mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, B; Zalkin, H

    1994-02-01

    Escherichia coli purA encodes adenylosuccinate synthetase, one of two enzymes required for synthesis of AMP from IMP. purA is subject to two- to threefold regulation by purR and about twofold regulation by a purR-independent mechanism. The 5'-flanking region of purA confers purR-dependent transcriptional regulation of purA but not the purR-independent regulation. Two operator sites in the 5'-flanking region which bind purine repressor in vitro and are required for in vivo regulation were identified. The purR-independent regulation may be posttranscriptional. It is now established that all transcription units involved in de novo synthesis of purine nucleotides, nine pur operons, as well as purR itself and guaBA, are subject to purR control.

  3. Kinetic properties of Cellulomonas sp. purine nucleoside phosphorylase with typical and non-typical substrates: implications for the reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorolysis catalyzed by Cellulomonas sp. PNP with typical nucleoside substrate, inosine (Ino), and non-typical 7-methylguanosine (m7Guo), with either nucleoside or phosphate (Pd) as the varied substrate, kinetics of the reverse synthetic reaction with guanine (Gua) and ribose-1-phosphate (R1P) as the varied substrates, and product inhibition patterns of synthetic and phosphorolytic reaction pathways were studied by steady-state kinetic methods. It is concluded that, like for mammalian trimeric PNP, complex kinetic characteristics observed for Cellulomonas enzyme results from simultaneous occurrence of three phenomena. These are sequential but random, not ordered binding of substrates, tight binding of one substrate purine bases, leading to the circumstances that for such substrates (products) rapid-equilibrium assumptions do not hold, and a dual role of Pi, a substrate, and also a reaction modifier that helps to release a tightly bound purine base.

  4. N-(2-Meth­oxy­benz­yl)-9-(oxolan-2-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine

    PubMed Central

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Popa, Igor; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Štarha, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C17H19N5O2, features an almost planar purine skeleton (r.m.s. deviation = 0.009 Å) substituted by a tetra­hydro­furan ring, which adopts an envelope conformation. The purine and benzene rings subtend a dihedral angle of 66.70 (3)°. In the crystal, pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds connect adjacent mol­ecules into inversion dimers. C—H⋯N, C—H⋯O, C—H⋯π and π–π inter­actions [pyrimidine ring centroid–centroid distance = 3.3909 (1) Å] connect the dimers into a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:23634119

  5. N-(2-Meth-oxy-benz-yl)-9-(oxolan-2-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine.

    PubMed

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Popa, Igor; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Starha, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    The title compound, C17H19N5O2, features an almost planar purine skeleton (r.m.s. deviation = 0.009 Å) substituted by a tetra-hydro-furan ring, which adopts an envelope conformation. The purine and benzene rings subtend a dihedral angle of 66.70 (3)°. In the crystal, pairs of N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds connect adjacent mol-ecules into inversion dimers. C-H⋯N, C-H⋯O, C-H⋯π and π-π inter-actions [pyrimidine ring centroid-centroid distance = 3.3909 (1) Å] connect the dimers into a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:23634119

  6. Effects of different lipid sources on intake, digestibility and purine derivatives in hair lambs.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E S; Pereira, M W F; Arruda, P C L; Cabral, L S; Oliveira, R L; Mizubuti, I Y; Pinto, A P; Campos, A C N; Gadelha, C R F; Carneiro, M S S

    2016-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different lipid sources on the nutrient intake, digestibility and purine derivative excretion of lambs. Thirty-five 60-day-old, male, non-castrated Santa Ines lambs with an initial average body weight (BW) of 13.00 ± 1.80 kg were used in a randomized complete block design with seven blocks and five treatments. The experimental treatments consisted of a control diet without supplemental lipids and four test diets with different lipid supplements, selected according to the degree of ruminal protection from hydrogenation: supplementation, being supplementation with whole cottonseed (WC), supplementation with cashew nut meal (CNM), supplementation with both cottonseed and cashew nut meal (WC-CNM) and supplementation with calcium salts of long-chain fatty acids (Ca-LCFA). The lambs were slaughtered after reaching 28 kg average BW for each treatment. The ether extract intake (EEI) was higher (p < 0.01) for the lipid supplemented compared to control diet lambs. Supplementation with WC decreased the digestibility of dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and total carbohydrate (TC) (p < 0.01), whereas supplementation with CNM, WC-CNM and Ca-LCFA reduced non-fibrous carbohydrate (NFC) digestibility (p < 0.01). The ether extract (EE) digestibility coefficient was higher with CNM, followed by Ca-LCFA and WC, when compared to WC-CNM and control diets. Nitrogen balance (NB) was not influenced (p > 0.05) by the different lipid sources. A lower purine derivative (PD) excretion and thus lower microbial protein supply (MPS) was observed for animals supplemented with Ca-LCFA (p < 0.01) compared to the WC-CNM and control diets. In conclusion, WC, CNM and WC-CNM supplementation did not have negative effects on MPS, although negative effects have been observed on nutrient digestibility. PMID:26854276

  7. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of α-Purine Nucleobase-Substituted Acrylates with Rhodium Diphosphine Complexes: Access to Tenofovir Analogues.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huan-Li; Chen, Fei; Xie, Ming-Sheng; Guo, Hai-Ming; Qu, Gui-Rong; He, Yan-Mei; Fan, Qing-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The first asymmetric hydrogenation of α-purine nucleobase-substituted α,β-unsaturated esters, catalyzed by a chiral rhodium (R)-Synphos catalyst, has been developed. A wide range of mono- and disubstituted acrylates were successfully hydrogenated under very mild conditions in high yields with good to excellent enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee). This method provides a convenient approach to the synthesis of a new kind of optically pure acyclic nucleoside and Tenofovir analogues. PMID:27112983

  8. Distribution coefficients of purine alkaloids in water-ammonium sulfate-alkyl acetate-dialkyl phthalate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Krivosheeva, O. A.; Mokshina, N. Ya.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of purine alkaloids (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline) was studied in the systems: alkyl acetates-dialkyl phtalate-salting-out agent (ammonium sulfate). The quantitative characteristics of the extraction-distribution coefficients ( D) and the degree of extraction ( R, %) are calculated. The relationships between the distribution coefficients of alkaloids and the length of the hydrocarbon radical in the molecule of alkyl acetate (dialkyl phtalate) are determined. The possibility of predicting the distribution coefficients is demonstrated.

  9. Synthesis of some glycoside analogs and related compounds from 9-amino-6-(methylthio)-9H-purine.

    PubMed

    Temple, C; Kussner, C L; Montgomery, J A

    1975-12-01

    Additional information on the anticancer activity of 9-amino-9H-purine-6(1H)-thione and its derivatives was sought by the synthesis of some 9-(substituted amino)-6-(methylthio)-9H-purines in which the 9-substituent contained functional groups capable of either reversible or irreversible binding with an enzymatic site. Condensation of 9-amino-6-(methylthio)-9H-purine (1) with some carbonyl compounds followed by hydride reduction of the azomethine linkage in the intermediates leads to the 2-pyrrolylmethyl (8), 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyl (10), and the 1,5-dihydroxy-2- and 3-pentyl (11 and 12) compounds. A 4-hydroxybutyl derivative (13) was obtained by alkylation of 18, the 9-acetyl derivative of 1, with 4-chlorobutyl acetate followed by saponification. The cyclization of 13 and 11 with a sulfonyl chloride gave the 9-pyrrolidin-1-yl (27) and the 9-[2-(tosyloxymethyl)pyrrolidin-1-yl] (28), respectively. Acylation of 1 with ethyl L-2-pyrrolidine-5-carboxylate and ethyl 1-methyl-5-pyrrolidone-3-carboxylate, respectively, in Me2SO containing NaH gave the corresponding amides 15 and 17. Alkylation of 18 with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane and epichlorohydrin gave the N-(2-chloroethyl) and N-(1,2-epoxy-3-propyl) derivatives 19 and 20. The chloro group of the chlorobutyl derivative of 18 was displaced with KSCN and NaN3, respectively, to give the thiocyanate and azido derivatives 23 and 24. Hydrogenation of the latter gave the amine (25), which was acylated with ethyl chloroformate to give the (ethoxycarbonyl)amino compound 26. None of these compounds showed activity against L1210 leukemia cells implanted ip in mice on a single-dose schedule, suggesting that the activity observed in the simpler 9-aminopurines resulted from cleavage of the hydrazino linkage to give pH-purine-6(1H)-thione. PMID:1195279

  10. CuBr catalyzed C-N cross coupling reaction of purines and diaryliodonium salts to 9-arylpurines.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hong-Ying; Xia, Chao; Qu, Gui-Rong; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Yi; Mao, Run-Ze; Li, De-Yang; Guo, Hai-Ming

    2011-07-21

    CuBr was found to be an efficient catalyst for the C-N cross coupling reaction of purine and diaryliodonium salts. 9-Arylpurines were synthesized in excellent yields with short reaction times (2.5 h). The method represents an alternative to the synthesis of 9-arylpurines via Cu(II) catalyzed C-N coupling reaction with arylboronic acids as arylating agents. PMID:21660365

  11. 2-Chloro-6-[(2,4-dimeth-oxy-benz-yl)amino]-9-isopropyl-9H-purine.

    PubMed

    Novotná, Radka; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-03-01

    In the title compound, C17H20ClN5O2, the benzene ring and the purine ring system make a dihedral angle of 78.56 (4)°. In the crystal, mol-ecules are linked by pairs of N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers. C-H⋯O and C-H⋯Cl contacts further link the mol-ecules, forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:23476575

  12. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  13. Profiles of phenolic compounds and purine alkaloids during the development of seeds of Theobroma cacao cv. Trinitario.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Caro, Gema; Borges, Gina; Nagai, Chifumi; Jackson, Mel C; Yokota, Takao; Crozier, Alan; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-16

    Changes occurring in phenolic compounds and purine alkaloids, during the growth of seeds of cacao (Theobroma cacao) cv. Trinitario, were investigated using HPLC-MS/MS. Extracts of seeds with a fresh weight of 125, 700, 1550, and 2050 mg (stages 1-4, respectively) were analyzed. The phenolic compounds present in highest concentrations in developing and mature seeds (stages 3 and 4) were flavonols and flavan-3-ols. Flavan-3-ols existed as monomers of epicatechin and catechin and as procyanidins. Type B procyanidins were major components and varied from dimers to pentadecamer. Two anthocyanins, cyanidin-3-O-arabinoside and cyanidin-3-O-galactoside, along with the N-phenylpropernoyl-l-amino acids, N-caffeoyl-l-aspartate, N-coumaroyl-l-aspartate, N-coumaroyl-3-hydroxytyrosine (clovamide), and N-coumaroyltyrosine (deoxyclovamide), and the purine alkaloids theobromine and caffeine, were present in stage 3 and 4 seeds. Other purine alkaloids, such as theophylline and additional methylxanthines, did not occur in detectable quantities. Flavan-3-ols were the only components to accumulate in detectable quantities in young seeds at developmental stages 1 and 2.

  14. Dependence of gamma-aminobutyric acid modulation of cholinergic transmission on nitric oxide and purines in cat terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, N

    1997-11-27

    The possible involvement of purines and/or nitric oxide (NO) in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor-mediated effects on the spontaneous activity of isolated preparations from longitudinal and circular muscles of cat terminal ileum was investigated. GABA had biphasic effects, which were neurogenic and muscarinic. ATP and adenosine dose dependently inhibited the activity of the muscles. A contractile response evoked by the nucleotide only was also observed. The effects of the purines were equipotent and resistant to Nomega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), tetrodotoxin and to desensitization by alpha,beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta-meATP), except for the contractile effect of ATP, which was abolished by alpha,beta-meATP. Pretreatment of the preparations with ATP or adenosine produced: (i) desensitization to the effects of the respective purinoceptor agonist only; and (ii) suppression of the GABA-induced responses of longitudinal and circular muscles. Hemoglobin and L-NNA greatly reduced or completely blocked the GABA(A)-induced relaxation and decreased the GABA(A)-induced contraction. Our results indicate that purines and NO, to a different extent, mediate the relaxant phase of the GABA effects in both layers. Interactions between muscarinic cholinoceptors and GABA-nitrergic pathway and a concomitant activation of postjunctional P1 and P2y purinoceptors are suggested to explain the prejunctional biphasic effects of GABA.

  15. Plant Purine Nucleoside Catabolism Employs a Guanosine Deaminase Required for the Generation of Xanthosine in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleotide catabolism is common to most organisms and involves a guanine deaminase to convert guanine to xanthine in animals, invertebrates, and microorganisms. Using metabolomic analysis of mutants, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses an alternative catabolic route employing a highly specific guanosine deaminase (GSDA) not reported from any organism so far. The enzyme is ubiquitously expressed and deaminates exclusively guanosine and 2’-deoxyguanosine but no other aminated purines, pyrimidines, or pterines. GSDA belongs to the cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminase family of proteins together with a deaminase involved in riboflavin biosynthesis, the chloroplastic tRNA adenosine deaminase Arg and a predicted tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase 2 in A. thaliana. GSDA is conserved in plants, including the moss Physcomitrella patens, but is absent in the algae and outside the plant kingdom. Our data show that xanthosine is exclusively generated through the deamination of guanosine by GSDA in A. thaliana, excluding other possible sources like the dephosphorylation of xanthosine monophosphate. Like the nucleoside hydrolases NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) and NSH2, GSDA is located in the cytosol, indicating that GMP catabolism to xanthine proceeds in a mostly cytosolic pathway via guanosine and xanthosine. Possible implications for the biosynthetic route of purine alkaloids (caffeine and theobromine) and ureides in other plants are discussed. PMID:24130159

  16. A 90-Day Oral Toxicological Evaluation of the Methylurate Purine Alkaloid Theacrine

    PubMed Central

    Hirka, Gábor; Glávits, Róbert; Palmer, Philip A.; Endres, John R.; Pasics Szakonyiné, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    A 90-day repeated-dose oral toxicological evaluation was conducted according to GLP and OECD guidelines on the methylurate purine alkaloid theacrine, which is found naturally in certain plants. Four groups of Hsd.Brl.Han Wistar rats (ten/sex/group) were administered theacrine by gavage doses of 0 (vehicle only), 180, 300, and 375 mg/kg bw/day. Two females and one male in the 300 and 375 mg/kg bw/day groups, respectively, died during the study. Histological examination revealed centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis as the probable cause of death. In 375 mg/kg bw/day males, slight reductions in body weight development, food consumption, and feed efficiency, decreased weight of the testes and epididymides and decreased intensity of spermatogenesis in the testes, lack or decreased amount of mature spermatozoa in the epididymides, and decreased amount of prostatic secretions were detected at the end of the three months. At 300 mg/kg bw/day, slight decreases in the weights of the testes and epididymides, along with decreased intensity of spermatogenesis in the testes, and lack or decreased amount of mature spermatozoa in the epididymides were detected in male animals. The NOAEL was considered to be 180 mg/kg bw/day, as at this dose there were no toxicologically relevant treatment-related findings in male or female animals. PMID:27635133

  17. Purine nucleoside metabolism in the erythrocytes of patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency and severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, R P; Crabtree, G W; Parks, R E; Nelson, J A; Keightley, R; Parkman, R; Rosen, F S; Stern, R C; Polmar, S H

    1976-01-01

    Deficiency of erythrocytic and lymphocytic adenosine deaminase (ADA) occurs in some patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). SCID with ADA deficiency is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. ADA is markedly reduced or undetectable in affected patients (homozygotes), and approximately one-half normal levels are found in individuals heterozygous for ADA deficiency. The metabolism of purine nucleosides was studied in erythrocytes from normal individuals, four ADA-deficiency patients, and two heterozygous individuals. ADA deficiency in intake erythrocytes was confirmed by a very sensitive ammonia-liberation technique. Erythrocytic ADA activity in three heterozygous individuals (0.07,0.08, and 0.14 mumolar units/ml of packed cells) was between that of the four normal controls (0.20-0.37 mumol/ml) and the ADA-deficient patients (no activity). In vitro, adenosine was incorporated principally into IMP in the heterozygous and normal individuals but into the adenosine nucleotides in the ADa-deficient patients. Coformycin (3-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-6,7,8-trihydroimidazo[4,5-4] [1,3] diazepin-8 (R)-ol), a potent inhibitor of ADA, made possible incorporation of adenosine nucleotides in the ADA-deficient patients... PMID:947948

  18. Analysis of abnormalities in purine metabolism leading to gout and to neurological dysfunctions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Curto, R; Voit, E O; Cascante, M

    1998-01-01

    A modelling approach is used to analyse diseases associated with purine metabolism in man. The specific focus is on deficiencies in two enzymes, hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and adenylosuccinate lyase. These deficiencies can lead to a number of symptoms, including neurological dysfunctions and mental retardation. Although the biochemical mechanisms of dysfunctions associated with adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency are not completely understood, there is at least general agreement in the literature about possible causes. Simulations with our model confirm that accumulation of the two substrates of the enzyme can lead to significant biochemical imbalance. In hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency the biochemical mechanisms associated with neurological dysfunctions are less clear. Model analyses support some old hypotheses but also suggest new indicators for possible causes of neurological dysfunctions associated with this deficiency. Hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is known to cause hyperuricaemia and gout. We compare the relative importance of this deficiency with other known causes of gout in humans. The analysis suggests that defects in the excretion of uric acid are more consequential than defects in uric acid synthesis such as hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency. PMID:9445373

  19. Oscillating response to a purine nucleotide disrupted by mutation in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed Central

    Mimikakis, J L; Nelson, D L; Preston, R R

    1998-01-01

    The purine nucleotide GTP, when added extracellularly, induces oscillations in the swimming behaviour of the protist Paramecium tetraurelia. For periods as long as 10 min the cell swims backwards and forwards repetitively. The oscillations in swimming behaviour are driven by changes in membrane potential of the cell, which in turn are caused by periodic activation of inward Mg2+- and Na+-specific currents. We screened for and isolated mutants that are defective in this response, exploiting the fact that the net result of GTP on a population of cells is repulsion. One mutant, GTP-insensitive (gin A), is not repelled by GTP. In addition, GTP fails to induce repetitive backwards swimming in gin A mutants, although they swim backwards normally in response to other stimuli. GTP fails to evoke oscillations in membrane potential or Mg2+ and Na+ currents in the mutant, although the Mg2+ and Na+ conductances are not themselves measurably affected. A small, oscillating Ca2+ current induced by GTP in the wild type, which might be part of the mechanism that generates oscillations, is also missing from gin A cells. To our knowledge, gin A is the first example of a mutant defective in a purinergic response. We discuss the possibility that the gin A lesion affects the oscillator itself. PMID:9461502

  20. A 90-Day Oral Toxicological Evaluation of the Methylurate Purine Alkaloid Theacrine.

    PubMed

    Clewell, Amy; Hirka, Gábor; Glávits, Róbert; Palmer, Philip A; Endres, John R; Murbach, Timothy S; Marx, Tennille; Pasics Szakonyiné, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    A 90-day repeated-dose oral toxicological evaluation was conducted according to GLP and OECD guidelines on the methylurate purine alkaloid theacrine, which is found naturally in certain plants. Four groups of Hsd.Brl.Han Wistar rats (ten/sex/group) were administered theacrine by gavage doses of 0 (vehicle only), 180, 300, and 375 mg/kg bw/day. Two females and one male in the 300 and 375 mg/kg bw/day groups, respectively, died during the study. Histological examination revealed centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis as the probable cause of death. In 375 mg/kg bw/day males, slight reductions in body weight development, food consumption, and feed efficiency, decreased weight of the testes and epididymides and decreased intensity of spermatogenesis in the testes, lack or decreased amount of mature spermatozoa in the epididymides, and decreased amount of prostatic secretions were detected at the end of the three months. At 300 mg/kg bw/day, slight decreases in the weights of the testes and epididymides, along with decreased intensity of spermatogenesis in the testes, and lack or decreased amount of mature spermatozoa in the epididymides were detected in male animals. The NOAEL was considered to be 180 mg/kg bw/day, as at this dose there were no toxicologically relevant treatment-related findings in male or female animals. PMID:27635133

  1. A defect in the p53 response pathway induced by de novo purine synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bronder, Julie L; Moran, Richard G

    2003-12-01

    p53 is believed to sense cellular ribonucleotide depletion in the absence of DNA strand breaks and to respond by imposition of a p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. We now report that the p53-dependent G1 checkpoint is blocked in human carcinoma cell lines after inhibition of de novo purine synthesis by folate analogs inhibitory to glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GART). p53 accumulated in HCT116, MCF7, or A549 carcinoma cells upon GART inhibition, but, surprisingly, transcription of several p53 targets, including p21cip1/waf1, was impaired. The mechanism of this defect was examined. The p53 accumulating in these cells was nuclear but was not phosphorylated at serines 6, 15, and 20, nor was it acetylated at lysines 373 or 382. The DDATHF-stabilized p53 bound to the p21 promoter in vitro and in vivo but did not activate histone acetylation over the p53 binding sites in the p21 promoter that is an integral part of the transcriptional response mediated by the DNA damage pathway. We concluded that the robust initial response of the p53 pathway to GART inhibitors is not transcriptionally propagated to target genes due to a defect in p53 post-translational modifications and a failure to open chromatin structure despite promoter binding of this unmodified p53. PMID:14517211

  2. Solution-Phase Parallel Synthesis of Acyclic Nucleoside Libraries of Purine, Pyrimidine, and Triazole Acetamides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diversity plays a pivotal role in modern drug discovery against phenotypic or enzyme-based targets using high throughput screening technology. Under the auspices of the Pilot Scale Library Program of the NIH Roadmap Initiative, we produced and report herein a diverse library of 181 purine, pyrimidine, and 1,2,4-triazole-N-acetamide analogues which were prepared in a parallel high throughput solution-phase reaction format. A set of assorted amines were reacted with several nucleic acid N-acetic acids utilizing HATU as the coupling reagent to produce diverse acyclic nucleoside N-acetamide analogues. These reactions were performed using 24 well reaction blocks and an automatic reagent-dispensing platform under inert atmosphere. The targeted compounds were purified on an automated purification system using solid sample loading prepacked cartridges and prepacked silica gel columns. All compounds were characterized by NMR and HRMS, and were analyzed for purity by HPLC before submission to the Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) at NIH. Initial screening through the Molecular Libraries Probe Production Centers Network (MLPCN) program, indicates that several analogues showed diverse and interesting biological activities. PMID:24933643

  3. Central nervous system dysfunction and erythrocyte guanosine triphosphate depletion in purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H A; Fairbanks, L D; Morris, G S; Morgan, G; Watson, A R; Timms, P; Singh, B

    1987-01-01

    Developmental retardation was a prominent clinical feature in six infants from three kindreds deficient in the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and was present before development of T cell immunodeficiency. Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) depletion was noted in the erythrocytes of all surviving homozygotes and was of equivalent magnitude to that found in the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (complete hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) deficiency). The similarity between the neurological complications in both disorders indicates that the two major clinical consequences of complete PNP deficiency have differing aetiologies: neurological effects resulting from deficiency of the PNP enzyme products, which are the substrates for HGPRT, leading to functional deficiency of this enzyme. immunodeficiency caused by accumulation of the PNP enzyme substrates, one of which, deoxyguanosine, is toxic to T cells. These studies show the need to consider PNP deficiency (suggested by the finding of hypouricaemia) in patients with neurological dysfunction, as well as in T cell immunodeficiency. They suggest an important role for GTP in normal central nervous system function. PMID:2439024

  4. Effect of root application of 6-benzylamine purine on auxin transport in Malus domestica

    SciTech Connect

    Stutte, G.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of 6-benzylamine purine (BA) on movement of napthalene acetic acid (NAA) applied to the shoot was investigated. Three-month-old York apple seedlings in sand culture were placed under mercury halide lamps (285 ..mu..mol m/sup -2/ s/sup -1/) at 22/sup 0/C for 24 hours; then 13.8, 27.5 or 55 ..mu..Mol of BA was applied as a soil drench. (/sup 14/C)-NAA was injected into the shoot at petiole base of 4th mature leaf. After 24 hours plants were harvested and movement of label acropetally to new shoot growth and basipetally to old shoot growth or roots determined. Seventeen (S.E. 3.3) percent of applied label was recovered away from application site. In controls, 67% of /sup 14/C that moved was recovered from new shoot growth, 9% in roots and 24% in old shoot tissue. The 13.8 ..mu..Mol treatment resulted in 37% of label being recovered in root tissue and 48% in new growth. The 27.5 and 55 ..mu..Mol applications increased the amount recovered in old shoot tissue but did not increase labelling of root tissues.

  5. A 90-Day Oral Toxicological Evaluation of the Methylurate Purine Alkaloid Theacrine

    PubMed Central

    Hirka, Gábor; Glávits, Róbert; Palmer, Philip A.; Endres, John R.; Pasics Szakonyiné, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    A 90-day repeated-dose oral toxicological evaluation was conducted according to GLP and OECD guidelines on the methylurate purine alkaloid theacrine, which is found naturally in certain plants. Four groups of Hsd.Brl.Han Wistar rats (ten/sex/group) were administered theacrine by gavage doses of 0 (vehicle only), 180, 300, and 375 mg/kg bw/day. Two females and one male in the 300 and 375 mg/kg bw/day groups, respectively, died during the study. Histological examination revealed centrilobular hepatocellular necrosis as the probable cause of death. In 375 mg/kg bw/day males, slight reductions in body weight development, food consumption, and feed efficiency, decreased weight of the testes and epididymides and decreased intensity of spermatogenesis in the testes, lack or decreased amount of mature spermatozoa in the epididymides, and decreased amount of prostatic secretions were detected at the end of the three months. At 300 mg/kg bw/day, slight decreases in the weights of the testes and epididymides, along with decreased intensity of spermatogenesis in the testes, and lack or decreased amount of mature spermatozoa in the epididymides were detected in male animals. The NOAEL was considered to be 180 mg/kg bw/day, as at this dose there were no toxicologically relevant treatment-related findings in male or female animals.

  6. The antibacterial activity and toxicity of enrofloxacin are decreased by nanocellulose conjugated with aminobenzyl purin.

    PubMed

    Yasini, Seyed Ali; Zadeh, Mohammad Hossein Balal; Shahdadi, Hossein

    2015-11-01

    The first aim of this study was to synthesize nanocellulose conjugated with aminobenzyl purin (NCABP), and the second aim was to evaluate the effect of NCABP on both toxicity and antibacterial activity of enrofloxacin. Here, the adsorption of enrofloxacin by NCABP was first modeled by molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In the next step, NCABP was synthesized, and was exposed to enrofloxacin, 1000 μg mL(-1), at various conditions. Then, the quantity of adsorption and release was separately measured. Furthermore, both toxicity and antibacterial activity of NCABP, enrofloxacin, and (NCABP+enrofloxacin) were separately evaluated. In this study, MD simulation clearly showed the adsorption after 50 picoseconds. The adsorption tests revealed that the increase of incubation time and NCABP concentration, at range of 50-200 μg mL(-1), led to increase of adsorption. Moreover, the decrease of pH led to increase of adsorption. Interestingly, NCABP could adsorb enrofloxacin, up to 1000 μg mL(-1), in different types of meat. Moreover, the increase of incubation time and temperature did not release enrofloxacin, but the increase of pH increased release. This study showed that both toxicity and antibacterial activity of enrofloxacin were decreased when exposed together with NCABP. PMID:26295691

  7. Elucidation of Different Binding Modes of Purine Nucleosides to Human Deoxycytidine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Sabini, Elisabetta; Hazra, Saugata; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2008-07-30

    Purine nucleoside analogues of medicinal importance, such as cladribine, require phosphorylation by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) for pharmacological activity. Structural studies of ternary complexes of human dCK show that the enzyme conformation adjusts to the different hydrogen-bonding properties between dA and dG and to the presence of substituent at the 2-position present in dG and cladribine. Specifically, the carbonyl group in dG elicits a previously unseen conformational adjustment of the active site residues Arg104 and Asp133. In addition, dG and cladribine adopt the anti conformation, in contrast to the syn conformation observed with dA. Kinetic analysis reveals that cladribine is phosphorylated at the highest efficiency with UTP as donor. We attribute this to the ability of cladribine to combine advantageous properties from dA (favorable hydrogen-bonding pattern) and dG (propensity to bind to the enzyme in its anti conformation), suggesting that dA analogues with a substituent at the 2-position are likely to be better activated by human dCK.

  8. Crystal structure and molecular dynamics studies of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase complexed with 7-deazaguanine.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Rafael Andrade; Timmers, Luis Fernando Saraiva Macedo; Pauli, Ivani; Gava, Lisandra Marques; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2010-03-01

    In humans, purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) is responsible for degradation of deoxyguanosine, and genetic deficiency of this enzyme leads to profound T-cell mediated immunosuppression. HsPNP is a target for inhibitor development aiming at T-cell immune response modulation. Here we report the crystal structure of HsPNP in complex with 7-deazaguanine (HsPNP:7DG) at 2.75 A. Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to assess the structural features of HsPNP in both free form and in complex with 7DG. Our results show that some regions, responsible for entrance and exit of substrate, present a conformational variability, which is dissected by dynamics simulation analysis. Enzymatic assays were also carried out and revealed that 7-deazaguanine presents a lower inhibitory activity against HsPNP (K(i)=200 microM). The present structure may be employed in both structure-based design of PNP inhibitors and in development of specific empirical scoring functions.

  9. Substrate specificity and kinetic mechanism of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Rodrigo G; Santos, Diógenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2009-06-15

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtPNP) is numbered among targets for persistence of the causative agent of tuberculosis. Here, it is shown that MtPNP is more specific to natural 6-oxopurine nucleosides and synthetic compounds, and does not catalyze the phosphorolysis of adenosine. Initial velocity, product inhibition and equilibrium binding data suggest that MtPNP catalyzes 2'-deoxyguanosine (2dGuo) phosphorolysis by a steady-state ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism, in which inorganic phosphate (P(i)) binds first followed by 2dGuo, and ribose 1-phosphate dissociates first followed by guanine. pH-rate profiles indicated a general acid as being essential for both catalysis and 2dGuo binding, and that deprotonation of a group abolishes P(i) binding. Proton inventory and solvent deuterium isotope effects indicate that a single solvent proton transfer makes a modest contribution to the rate-limiting step. Pre-steady-state kinetic data indicate that product release appears to contribute to the rate-limiting step for MtPNP-catalyzed reaction.

  10. Capillary bioreactors based on human purine nucleoside phosphorylase: a new approach for ligands identification and characterization.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Donato, Augusto José; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2012-04-01

    The enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the discovery of new lead compounds employed on the treatment severe T-cell mediated disorders. Within this context, the development of new, direct, and reliable methods for ligands screening is an important task. This paper describes the preparation of fused silica capillaries human PNP (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). The activity of the obtained IMER is monitored on line in a multidimensional liquid chromatography system, by the quantification of the product formed throughout the enzymatic reaction. The K(M) value for the immobilized enzyme was about twofold higher than that measured for the enzyme in solution (255 ± 29.2 μM and 133 ± 14.9 μM, respectively). A new fourth-generation immucillin derivative (DI4G; IC(50)=40.6 ± 0.36 nM), previously identified and characterized in HsPNP free enzyme assays, was used to validate the IMER as a screening method for HsPNP ligands. The validated method was also used for mechanistic studies with this inhibitor. This new approach is a valuable tool to PNP ligand screening, since it directly measures the hypoxanthine released by inosine phosphorolysis, thus furnishing more reliable results than those one used in a coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assay.

  11. Structural studies of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase: towards a new specific empirical scoring function.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Luis Fernando Saraiva Macedo; Caceres, Rafael Andrade; Vivan, Ana Luiza; Gava, Lisandra Marques; Dias, Raquel; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2008-11-01

    Human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) is a target for inhibitor development aiming at T-cell immune response modulation. In this work, we report the development of a new set of empirical scoring functions and its application to evaluate binding affinities and docking results. To test these new functions, we solved the structure of HsPNP and 2-mercapto-4(3H)-quinazolinone (HsPNP:MQU) binary complex at 2.7A resolution using synchrotron radiation, and used these functions to predict ligand position obtained in docking simulations. We also employed molecular dynamics simulations to analyze HsPNP in two conditions, as apoenzyme and in the binary complex form, in order to assess the structural features responsible for stability. Analysis of the structural differences between systems provides explanation for inhibitor binding. The use of these scoring functions to evaluate binding affinities and molecular docking results may be used to guide future efforts on virtual screening focused on HsPNP.

  12. A novel bis(pinacolato)diboron-mediated N-O bond deoxygenative route to C6 benzotriazolyl purine nucleoside derivatives.

    PubMed

    Basava, Vikram; Yang, Lijia; Pradhan, Padmanava; Lakshman, Mahesh K

    2016-08-01

    Reaction of amide bonds in t-butyldimethylsilyl-protected inosine, 2'-deoxyinosine, guanosine, 2'-deoxyguanosine, and 2-phenylinosine with commercially available peptide-coupling agents (benzotriazol-1H-yloxy)tris(dimethylaminophosphonium) hexafluorophosphate (BOP), (6-chloro-benzotriazol-1H-yloxy)trispyrrolidinophosphonium hexafluorophosphate (PyClocK), and (7-azabenzotriazol-1H-yloxy)trispyrrolidinophosphonium hexafluorophospate (PyAOP) gave the corresponding O(6)-(benzotriazol-1-yl) nucleoside analogues containing a C-O-N bond. Upon exposure to bis(pinacolato)diboron and base, the O(6)-(benzotriazol-1-yl) and O(6)-(6-chlorobenzotriazol-1-yl) purine nucleoside derivatives obtained from BOP and PyClocK, respectively, underwent N-O bond reduction and C-N bond formation, leading to the corresponding C6 benzotriazolyl purine nucleoside analogues. In contrast, the 7-azabenzotriazolyloxy purine nucleoside derivatives did not undergo efficient deoxygenation, but gave unsymmetrical nucleoside dimers instead. This is consistent with a prior report on the slow reduction of 1-hydroxy-1H-4-aza and 1-hydroxy-1H-7-azabenzotriazoles. Because of the limited number of commercial benzotriazole-based peptide coupling agents, and to show the applicability of the method when such coupling agents are unavailable, 1-hydroxy-1H-5,6-dichlorobenzotriazole was synthesized. Using this compound, silyl-protected inosine and 2'-deoxyinosine were converted to the O(6)-(5,6-dichlorobenzotriazol-1-yl) derivatives via in situ amide activation with PyBroP. The O(6)-(5,6-dichlorobenzotriazol-1-yl) purine nucleosides so obtained also underwent smooth reduction to afford the corresponding C6 5,6-dichlorobenzotriazolyl purine nucleoside derivatives. A total of 13 examples were studied with successful reactions occurring in 11 cases (the azabenzotriazole derivatives, mentioned above, being the only unreactive entities). To understand whether these reactions are intra or intermolecular processes, a

  13. Escherichia coli purB gene: cloning, nucleotide sequence, and regulation by purR.

    PubMed

    He, B; Smith, J M; Zalkin, H

    1992-01-01

    Escherichia coli purB encodes adenylosuccinate lyase (ASL), the enzyme that catalyzes step 8 in the pathway for de novo synthesis of IMP and also the final reaction in the two-step sequence from IMP to AMP. Gene purB was cloned and found to encode an ASL protein of 435 amino acids having a calculated molecular weight of 49,225. E. coli ASL is homologous to the corresponding enzymes from Bacillus subtilis and chickens and also to fumarase from B. subtilis. Gene phoP is 232 bp downstream of purB. Gene purB is regulated threefold by the purine pool and purR. Transcriptional regulation of purB involves binding of the purine repressor to the 16-bp conserved pur regulon operator. The purB operator is 224 bp downstream of the transcription start site and overlaps codons 62 to 67 in the protein-coding sequence.

  14. Four Generations of Transition State Analogues for Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Shi, W; Rinaldo-Mathis, A; Tyler, P; Evans, G; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) stops growth of activated T-cells and the formation of 6-oxypurine bases, making it a target for leukemia, autoimmune disorders, and gout. Four generations of ribocation transition-state mimics bound to PNP are structurally characterized. Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 58 pM, first-generation) contains an iminoribitol cation with four asymmetric carbons. DADMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, second-generation), uses a methylene-bridged dihydroxypyrrolidine cation with two asymmetric centers. DATMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, third-generation) contains an open-chain amino alcohol cation with two asymmetric carbons. SerMe-ImmH (K*{sub i} = 5 pM, fourth-generation) uses achiral dihydroxyaminoalcohol seramide as the ribocation mimic. Crystal structures of PNPs establish features of tight binding to be; (1) ion-pair formation between bound phosphate (or its mimic) and inhibitor cation, (2) leaving-group interactions to N1, O6, and N7 of 9-deazahypoxanthine, (3) interaction between phosphate and inhibitor hydroxyl groups, and (4) His257 interacting with the 5{prime}-hydroxyl group. The first generation analogue is an imperfect fit to the catalytic site with a long ion pair distance between the iminoribitol and bound phosphate and weaker interactions to the leaving group. Increasing the ribocation to leaving-group distance in the second- to fourth-generation analogues provides powerful binding interactions and a facile synthetic route to powerful inhibitors. Despite chemical diversity in the four generations of transition-state analogues, the catalytic site geometry is almost the same for all analogues. Multiple solutions in transition-state analogue design are available to convert the energy of catalytic rate enhancement to binding energy in human PNP.

  15. Conformational States of Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase at Rest, at Work and with Transition State Analogues†

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Achelle A.; Tipton, Jeremiah D.; Brenowitz, Michael D.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.; Evans, Gary B.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    Human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a homotrimer binding tightly to the transition state analogues Immucillin-H (ImmH, Kd = 56 pM) and DATMe-ImmH-Immucillin-H (DATMe-ImmH, Kd = 8.6 pM). ImmH binds with a larger entropic penalty than DATMe-ImmH, a chemically more flexible inhibitor. The testable hypothesis is that PNP conformational states are more relaxed (dynamic) with DATMe-ImmH, despite tighter binding than with ImmH. PNP conformations are probed by peptide amide deuterium exchange (HDX) using liquid chromatography high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and by sedimentation rates. Catalytically equilibrating Michaelis complexes (PNP•PO4•Inosine ↔ PNP•Hx•R-1-P) and inhibited complexes (PNP•PO4•DATMe-ImmH and PNP•PO4•ImmH) show protection from HDX at 9, 13 and 15 sites per subunit relative to resting PNP (PNP•PO4) in extended incubations. The PNP•PO4•ImmH complex is more compact (by sedimentation rate) than the other complexes. HDX kinetic analysis of ligand-protected sites corresponds to peptides near the catalytic sites. HDX and sedimentation results establish that PNP protein conformation (dynamic motion) correlates more closely to entropy of binding than to affinity. Catalytically active turnover with saturated substrate sites causes less change in HDX and sedimentation rates than binding of transition state analogues. DATMe-ImmH more closely mimics the transition of human PNP than does ImmH, and achieves strong binding interactions at the catalytic site while causing relatively modest alterations of the protein dynamic motion. Transition state analogues causing the most rigid, closed protein conformation are therefore not necessarily the most tightly bound. Close mimics of the transition state are hypothesized to retain enzymatic dynamic motions related to transition state formation. PMID:20108972

  16. Hydrogen bond donors accelerate vibrational cooling of hot purine derivatives in heavy water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyuan; Chen, Jinquan; Kohler, Bern

    2013-08-01

    Natural nucleobases and many of their derivatives have ultrashort excited state lifetimes that make them excellent model systems for studying intermolecular energy flow from a hot solute molecule to the solvent. UV-pump/broadband-mid-IR-probe transient absorption spectra of canonical purine nucleobases and several xanthine derivatives were acquired in D2O and acetonitrile in the probe frequency range of 1500-1750 cm(-1). The spectra reveal that vibrationally hot ground state molecules created by ultrafast internal conversion return to thermal equilibrium in several picoseconds by dissipating their excess energy to solvent molecules. In acetonitrile solution, where hydrogen bonding is minimal, vibrational cooling (VC) occurs with the same time constant of 10 ± 3 ps for paraxanthine, theophylline, and caffeine within experimental uncertainty. In D2O, VC by these molecules occurs more rapidly and at different rates that are correlated with the number of N-D bonds. Hypoxanthine has a VC time constant of 3 ± 1 ps, while similar lifetimes of 2.3 ± 0.8 ps and 3.1 ± 0.3 ps are seen for 5'-adenosine monophosphate and 5'-guanosine monophosphate, respectively. All three molecules have at least two N-D bonds. Slightly slower VC time constants are measured for paraxanthine (4 ± 1 ps) and theophylline (5.1 ± 0.8 ps), dimethylated xanthines that have only one N-D bond. Caffeine, a trimethylated xanthine with no N-D bonds, has a VC time constant of 7.7 ± 0.9 ps, the longest ever observed for any nucleobase in aqueous solution. Hydrogen bond donation by solute molecules is proposed to enable rapid energy disposal to water via direct coupling of high frequency solute-solvent modes.

  17. Catalytic inhibition of topoisomerase II by a novel rationally designed ATP-competitive purine analogue

    PubMed Central

    Chène, Patrick; Rudloff, Joëlle; Schoepfer, Joseph; Furet, Pascal; Meier, Peter; Qian, Zhiyan; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc; Schmitz, Rita; Radimerski, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Topoisomerase II poisons are in clinical use as anti-cancer therapy for decades and work by stabilizing the enzyme-induced DNA breaks. In contrast, catalytic inhibitors block the enzyme before DNA scission. Although several catalytic inhibitors of topoisomerase II have been described, preclinical concepts for exploiting their anti-proliferative activity based on molecular characteristics of the tumor cell have only recently started to emerge. Topoisomerase II is an ATPase and uses the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to orchestrate the movement of the DNA double strands along the enzyme. Thus, interfering with ATPase function with low molecular weight inhibitors that target the nucleotide binding pocket should profoundly affect cells that are committed to undergo mitosis. Results Here we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel purine diamine analogue as a potent ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Quinoline aminopurine compound 1 (QAP 1) inhibited topoisomerase II ATPase activity and decatenation reaction at sub-micromolar concentrations, targeted both topoisomerase II alpha and beta in cell free assays and, using a quantitative cell-based assay and a chromosome segregation assay, displayed catalytic enzyme inhibition in cells. In agreement with recent hypothesis, we show that BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to QAP 1. Conclusion The results obtained with QAP 1 demonstrate that potent and selective catalytic inhibition of human topoisomerase II function with an ATP-competitive inhibitor is feasible. Our data suggest that further drug discovery efforts on ATP-competitive catalytic inhibitors are warranted and that such drugs could potentially be developed as anti-cancer therapy for tumors that bear the appropriate combination of molecular alterations. PMID:19128485

  18. Effect of thrombin on purine metabolism in the guinea pig heart

    SciTech Connect

    Whelton, B.K.; Thompson, C.I.; Sparks, H.V.

    1986-03-01

    In vitro coronary endothelial cells (EC) release adenosine (ADO) in response to thrombin (THR). The authors tested the hypothesis that THR causes the release of ADO from in situ EC of isolated guinea pig hearts. The authors preferentially labelled the EC by infusing 2,8-/sup 3/H-ADO (ADO; 5 x 10/sup -8/ M) into the heart for 30 minutes. Then THR (1 U/ml) or THR plus allopurinol (2.4 x 10-/sup 4M) was infused into the heart. Venous effluent samples analyzed for ADO, ADO and /sup 3/H-H/sub 2/O. THR increased the release of ADO from 32 +/- 11 pm/min/g to 175 +/- 47 after 4 minutes (p < 0.02, n = 5). Despite the increase in total ADO release, ADO did not increase. Release of H/sub 2/O increased from 10.1 +/- 10/sup 3/ dpm/min/g to 23.5 +/- 5.7 x 10/sup 3/ at 4 minutes. In the presence of the xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase inhibitor allopurinol, H/sub 2/O release in response to THR fell to 3.6 +/- 1.2 x 10 dpm/min/gm. The authors conclude that the labelled EC are not the source of ADO released in response to THR. Instead the ADO released by THR comes from an unlabelled compartment, most likely the myocytes. This suggests that ADO release from myocytes may be a mechanism to regulate thrombogenesis. The THR-induced increase in H/sub 2/O release and it's inhibition by allopurinol indicates that THR enhances purine catabolism in EC.

  19. Role of low melting point element Ga in pronounced β-relaxation behaviors in LaGa-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, R. J.; Zhao, L. Z.; Zhang, B.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.; Pan, M. X.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to most metallic glasses (MGs) which exhibit weak β-relaxation peak in their dynamic mechanical spectra, the LaGa-based MGs we report here show a distinct β-relaxation peak with the ratio of β/α-relaxation peaks up to ˜0.32 in the mechanical relaxation measurements. Moreover, the β-relaxation behavior can be tuned by modification of the chemical composition and the concentration of flow units. The effects of gallium and structural origin of the β-relaxation in the MGs have been discussed. The LaGa-based MGs with pronounced slow β-relaxation could provide a model system to investigate some underlying issues of the relaxation and plastic mechanism of MGs.

  20. Pronounced cohabitation of active immunoglobulin genes from three different chromosomes in transcription factories during maximal antibody synthesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Kyun; Xiang, Yougui; Feng, Xin; Garrard, William T

    2014-06-01

    To understand the relationships between nuclear organization and gene expression in a model system, we employed three-dimensional imaging and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chromosome conformation capture (3C) techniques to investigate the topographies of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and transcripts during B-cell development. Remarkably, in plasma cells, when antibody synthesis peaks, active Ig genes residing on three different chromosomes exhibit pronounced colocalizations in transcription factories, often near the nuclear periphery, and display trans-chromosomal enhancer interactions, and their transcripts frequently share interchromatin trafficking channels. Conceptually, these features of nuclear organization maximize coordinated transcriptional and transcript trafficking control for potentiating the optimal cytoplasmic assembly of the resulting translation products into protein multimers.

  1. Purines in the eye: recent evidence for the physiological and pathological role of purines in the RPE, retinal neurons, astrocytes, Müller cells, lens, trabecular meshwork, cornea and lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Julie; Dartt, Darlene A; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Pintor, Jesus; Civan, Mortimer M; Delamere, Nicholas A; Fletcher, Erica L; Salt, Thomas E; Grosche, Antje; Mitchell, Claire H

    2014-10-01

    This review highlights recent findings that describ how purines modulate the physiological and pathophysiological responses of ocular tissues. For example, in lacrimal glands the cross-talk between P2X7 receptors and both M3 muscarinic receptors and α1D-adrenergic receptors can influence tear secretion. In the cornea, purines lead to post-translational modification of EGFR and structural proteins that participate in wound repair in the epithelium and influence the expression of matrix proteins in the stroma. Purines act at receptors on both the trabecular meshwork and ciliary epithelium to modulate intraocular pressure (IOP); ATP-release pathways of inflow and outflow cells differ, possibly permitting differential modulation of adenosine delivery. Modulators of trabecular meshwork cell ATP release include cell volume, stretch, extracellular Ca(2+) concentration, oxidation state, actin remodeling and possibly endogenous cardiotonic steroids. In the lens, osmotic stress leads to ATP release following TRPV4 activation upstream of hemichannel opening. In the anterior eye, diadenosine polyphosphates such as Ap4A act at P2 receptors to modulate the rate and composition of tear secretion, impact corneal wound healing and lower IOP. The Gq11-coupled P2Y1-receptor contributes to volume control in Müller cells and thus the retina. P2X receptors are expressed in neurons in the inner and outer retina and contribute to visual processing as well as the demise of retinal ganglion cells. In RPE cells, the balance between extracellular ATP and adenosine may modulate lysosomal pH and the rate of lipofuscin formation. In optic nerve head astrocytes, mechanosensitive ATP release via pannexin hemichannels, coupled with stretch-dependent upregulation of pannexins, provides a mechanism for ATP signaling in chronic glaucoma. With so many receptors linked to divergent functions throughout the eye, ensuring the transmitters remain local and stimulation is restricted to the intended target

  2. Purines in the eye: recent evidence for the physiological and pathological role of purines in the RPE, retinal neurons, astrocytes, Müller cells, lens, trabecular meshwork, cornea and lacrimal gland

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Julie; Dartt, Darlene A.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Pintor, Jesus; Civan, Mortimer M.; Delamere, Nicholas A.; Fletcher, Erica L.; Salt, Thomas E.; Grosche, Antje; Mitchell, Claire H.

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights recent findings that describe how purines modulate the physiological and pathophysiological responses of ocular tissues. For example, in lacrimal glands the cross-talk between P2X7 receptors and both M3 muscarinic receptors and α1D-adrenergic receptors can influence tear secretion. In the cornea, purines lead to post-translational modification of EGFR and structural proteins that participate in wound repair in the epithelium and influence the expression of matrix proteins in the stroma. Purines act at receptors on both the trabecular meshwork and ciliary epithelium to modulate intraocular pressure (IOP); ATP-release pathways of inflow and outflow cells differ, possibly permitting differential modulation of adenosine delivery. Modulators of trabecular meshwork cell ATP release include cell volume, stretch, extracellular Ca2+ concentration, oxidation state, actin remodeling and possibly endogenous cardiotonic steroids. In the lens, osmotic stress leads to ATP release following TRPV4 activation upstream of hemichannel opening. In the anterior eye, diadenosine polyphosphates such as Ap4A act at P2 receptors to modulate the rate and composition of tear secretion, impact corneal wound healing and lower IOP. The Gq11-coupled P2Y1-receptor contributes to volume control in Müller cells and thus the retina. P2X receptors are expressed in neurons in the inner and outer retina and contribute to visual processing as well as the demise of retinal ganglion cells. In RPE cells, the balance between extracellular ATP and adenosine may modulate lysosomal pH and the rate of lipofuscin formation. In optic nerve head astrocytes, mechanosensitive ATP release via pannexin hemichannels, coupled with stretch-dependent upregulation of pannexins, provides a mechanism for ATP signaling in chronic glaucoma. With so many receptors linked to divergent functions throughout the eye, ensuring the transmitters remain local and stimulation is restricted to the intended target

  3. Pronounced Climatic and Environmental Changes in the South West Pacific Ocean Following the End-Cretaceous Extinction Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, E. M.; Taylor, K. W.; Willumsen, P. S.; Hollis, C. J.; Pancost, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary sections in eastern New Zealand record an alternating succession of pronounced abundance changes in two peridinioid (primarily heterotrophic) genera following the K/Pg boundary event. In Canterbury and East Coast Basin sections, two phases of abundant Trithyrodinium evittii, the first immediately following the K/Pg boundary, are interposed by two acme intervals of Palaeoperidinium pyrophorum. While several lines of evidence suggest T. evittii was a warm-water species and P. pyrophorum flourished in cooler oceanic conditions, robust temperature records have not been available from these K/Pg boundary sections. We have completed sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions, based on glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) distributions, at mid-Waipara River, North Canterbury, from ~1 m below to 20 m above the K/Pg boundary. Changes in GDGT distribution across the K/Pg boundary indicates warming of 2-3°C, regardless of which TEX86-based proxy is used, coincident with the interval of abundant T. evittii. Detailed climatic records at the K/Pg boundary layer are hampered by intense bioturbation. Above an unconformity (at 23 cm) notable shifts in GDGT distribution indicates pronounced cooling, yielding SST estimates that are 7°C lower than the uppermost Cretaceous. The acme of P. pyrophorum corresponds with these cooler SSTs, and an unusual increase in the proportion of GDGT-2 in this interval can be attributed to cool water upwelling. The P. pyrophorum acme is also documented in distal diatom-rich siliceous sediments in Marlborough, where siliceous microfossils and element geochemistry indicate cool-water upwelling in the basal Paleocene. The second phase of abundant T. evittii, at ~2 m in Waipara, coincides with an interval of more stable SSTs that are comparable to the uppermost Cretaceous. Further discussion of the TEX86-based SST proxy and GDGT distributions will be provided in the

  4. Diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats display pronounced hyperglycemia and longer-lasting cognitive impairments following ischemia induced by cortical compression.

    PubMed

    Moreira, T; Cebers, G; Pickering, C; Ostenson, C-G; Efendic, S; Liljequist, S

    2007-02-23

    Hyperglycemia has been shown to worsen the outcome of brain ischemia in several animal models but few experimental studies have investigated impairments in cognition induced by ischemic brain lesions in hyperglycemic animals. The Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat naturally develops type 2 diabetes characterized by mild hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. We hypothesized that GK rats would display more severe cerebral damage due to hyperglycemia-aggravated brain injury and, accordingly, more severe cognitive impairments. In this study, recovery of motor and cognitive functions of GK and healthy Wistar rats was examined following extradural compression (EC) of the sensorimotor cortex. For this purpose, tests of vestibulomotor function (beam-walking) and combined tests of motor function and learning (locomotor activity from day (D) 1 to D5, operant lever-pressing from D14 to D25) were used. EC consistently reduced cerebral blood flow in both strains. Anesthesia-challenge and EC resulted in pronounced hyperglycemia in GK but not in Wistar rats. Lower beam-walking scores, increased locomotor activity, impairments in long-term habituation and learning of operant lever-pressing were more pronounced and observed at later time-points in GK rats. Fluoro-Jade, a marker of irreversible neuronal degeneration, revealed consistent degeneration in the ipsilateral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus at 2, 7 and 14 days post-compression. The amount of degeneration in these structures was considerably higher in GK rats. Thus, GK rats exhibited marked hyperglycemia during EC, as well as longer-lasting behavioral deficits and increased neurodegeneration during recovery. The GK rat is thus an attractive model for neuropathologic and cognitive studies after ischemic brain injury in hyperglycemic rats. PMID:17175109

  5. Negatively supercoiled simian virus 40 DNA contains Z-DNA segments within transcriptional enhancer sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordheim, A.; Rich, A.

    1983-01-01

    Three 8-base pair (bp) segments of alternating purine-pyrimidine from the simian virus 40 enhancer region form Z-DNA on negative supercoiling; minichromosome DNase I-hypersensitive sites determined by others bracket these three segments. A survey of transcriptional enhancer sequences reveals a pattern of potential Z-DNA-forming regions which occur in pairs 50-80 bp apart. This may influence local chromatin structure and may be related to transcriptional activation.

  6. [Separation of purines, pyrimidines, pterins and flavonoids on magnolol-bonded silica gel stationary phase by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Laishen; Zhang, Yang; Zhou, Rendan

    2012-10-01

    A new magnolol-bonded silica gel stationary phase (MSP) was used to separate the basic drugs including four purines, eight pyrimidines, four pterins and five flavonoids as polar representative samples by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To clarify the separation mechanism, a commercial ODS column was also tested under the same chromatographic conditions. The high selectivities and fast baseline separations of the above drugs were achieved by using simple mobile phases on MSP. Although there is no end-caped treatment, the peak shapes of basic drugs containing nitrogen such as purines, pyrimidines and pterins were rather symmetrical on MSP, which indicated the the magnolol as ligand with multi-sites could shield the side effect of residual silanol groups on the surface of silica gel. Although somewhat different in the separation resolution, it was found that the elution orders of some drugs were generally similar on both MSP and ODS. The hydrophobic interaction should play a significant role in the separations of the above basic drugs, which was attributed to their reversed-phase property in the nature. However, MSP could provide the additional sites for many polar solutes, which was a rational explanation for the high selectivity of MSP. For example, in the separation of purines, pyrimidines and pterins on MSP, hydrogen-bonding and dipole-dipole interactions played leading roles besides hydrophobic interaction. Some solute molecules (such as mercaptopurine, vitexicarpin) and MSP can form the strong pi-pi stacking in the separation process. All enhanced the retention and improved the separation selectivity of MSP, which facilitated the separation of the basic drugs.

  7. Sequence dependence of isothermal DNA amplification via EXPAR

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jifeng; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Ramírez-Borrero, Alissa J.; Hintze, Arend; Adami, Christoph; Niemz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification is becoming increasingly important for molecular diagnostics. Therefore, new computational tools are needed to facilitate assay design. In the isothermal EXPonential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), template sequences with similar thermodynamic characteristics perform very differently. To understand what causes this variability, we characterized the performance of 384 template sequences, and used this data to develop two computational methods to predict EXPAR template performance based on sequence: a position weight matrix approach with support vector machine classifier, and RELIEF attribute evaluation with Naïve Bayes classification. The methods identified well and poorly performing EXPAR templates with 67–70% sensitivity and 77–80% specificity. We combined these methods into a computational tool that can accelerate new assay design by ruling out likely poor performers. Furthermore, our data suggest that variability in template performance is linked to specific sequence motifs. Cytidine, a pyrimidine base, is over-represented in certain positions of well-performing templates. Guanosine and adenosine, both purine bases, are over-represented in similar regions of poorly performing templates, frequently as GA or AG dimers. Since polymerases have a higher affinity for purine oligonucleotides, polymerase binding to GA-rich regions of a single-stranded DNA template may promote non-specific amplification in EXPAR and other nucleic acid amplification reactions. PMID:22416064

  8. Methanocarba ring as a ribose modification in ligands of G protein-coupled purine and pyrimidine receptors: synthetic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, Dilip K.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) and P2Y receptors for purine and pyrimidine nucleotides have widespread distribution and regulate countless physiological processes. Various synthetic ligands are in clinical trials for treatment of inflammatory diseases, pain, cancer, thrombosis, ischemia, and other conditions. The methanocarba (bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring system as a rigid substitution for ribose, which maintains either a North (N) or South (S) conformation, tends to preserve or enhance the potency and/or selectivity for certain receptor subtypes. This review summarizes recent developments in the synthetic approaches to these biologically important nucleoside and nucleotide analogues. PMID:26161251

  9. Exploring human adenosine A3 receptor complementarity and activity for adenosine analogues modified in the ribose and purine moiety

    PubMed Central

    Van Rompaey, Philippe; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gross, Ariel S.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigated the influence on affinity, selectivity and intrinsic activity upon modification of the adenosine agonist scaffold at the 3′- and 5′-positions of the ribofuranosyl moiety and the 2- and N6-positions of the purine base. This resulted in the synthesis of various analogues, that is, 3–12 and 24–33, with good hA3AR selectivity and moderate-to-high affinities (as in 32, Ki = 27 nM). Interesting was the ability to tune the intrinsic activity depending on the substituent introduced at the 3′-position. PMID:15670905

  10. New synthetic routes to protected purine 2'-O-methylriboside-3'-O-phosphoramidites using a novel alkylation procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Sproat, B S; Beijer, B; Iribarren, A

    1990-01-01

    A highly selective alkylation procedure has been developed enabling new synthetic routes to be established for protected purine 2'-O-methylriboside-3'-O-phosphoramidites; building blocks for the assembly of 2'-O-methyloligoribonucleotides. The new procedure avoids the use of the highly toxic and potentially explosive reagent diazomethane and is far superior to the use of silver oxide/methyl iodide. Moreover, the use of highly versatile key intermediates will enable the synthesis of a wide variety of base modified analogues as well as other 2'-O-alkylriboside derivatives. PMID:2308835

  11. 4-(1-Adamantylmeth­yl)-N-(2-chloro-9-isopropyl-9H-purin-6-yl)aniline

    PubMed Central

    Rouchal, Michal; Nečas, Marek; Vícha, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C25H30ClN5, consists of two mol­ecules with slightly different geometrical parameters. The dihedral angles between the purine and benzene rings are 39.54 (5) and 23.69 (5)° in the two mol­ecules. The adamantane cages consist of three fused cyclo­hexane rings in classical chair conformations, with C—C—C angles in the range 108 (2)–111 (2)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked into dimers via two N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds. PMID:21582935

  12. Efficacy of 2-amino-7-(1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxymethyl)purine for treatment of vaccinia virus (orthopoxvirus) infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Neyts, J; De Clercq, E

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that the N-7 substituted acyclic nucleoside analog 2-amino-7-[1,3-dihydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]purine (compound S2242) is, both in vitro and in animal models, a potent inhibitor of the replication of several herpesviruses (Neyts et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 39:56-60, 1995). Here we report on the potent and selective antiviral activity of S2242 against vaccinia virus (VV), an orthopoxvirus. The 50% effective concentrations for inhibition of VV-induced cytopathic effect and viral DNA synthesis in cell culture were 2.4 and 0.2 microg/ml, respectively. We next studied the efficacy of S2242 in VV-infected mice. Immunocompetent NMRI mice that had been inoculated intravenously with VV developed tail lesions. Mice that had been treated for 5 consecutive days via the subcutaneous (s.c.) route with 100 mg of the diacetate ester prodrug of S2242 (compound H961) per kg of body weight did not develop any lesions and demonstrated no adverse effects. Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice that had been inoculated intraperitoneally with VV became sick and died within 1 month after infection. Following treatment with H961 at 100 mg/kg for 10 consecutive days (either via oral gavage or s.c. injection) VV-inoculated SCID mice were completely protected, for at least 3 months, against virus-induced morbidity and mortality. At that time, no virus could be recovered from the organs of these mice (as assessed by titration for infectious virus, a DNA hybridization assay, and a PCR for VV-specific sequences). Compound S2242 and its oral prodrug H961 could be useful in treatment of orthopoxvirus infections.

  13. Structure and function of an archaeal homolog of survival protein E (SurEalpha): an acid phosphatase with purine nucleotide specificity.

    PubMed

    Mura, Cameron; Katz, Jonathan E; Clarke, Steven G; Eisenberg, David

    2003-03-01

    The survival protein E (SurE) family was discovered by its correlation to stationary phase survival of Escherichia coli and various repair proteins involved in sustaining this and other stress-response phenotypes. In order to better understand this ancient and well-conserved protein family, we have determined the 2.0A resolution crystal structure of SurEalpha from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum (Pae). This first structure of an archaeal SurE reveals significant similarities to and differences from the only other known SurE structure, that from the eubacterium Thermatoga maritima (Tma). Both SurE monomers adopt similar folds; however, unlike the Tma SurE dimer, crystalline Pae SurEalpha is predominantly non-domain swapped. Comparative structural analyses of Tma and Pae SurE suggest conformationally variant regions, such as a hinge loop that may be involved in domain swapping. The putative SurE active site is highly conserved, and implies a model for SurE bound to a potential substrate, guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP). Pae SurEalpha has optimal acid phosphatase activity at temperatures above 90 degrees C, and is less specific than Tma SurE in terms of metal ion requirements. Substrate specificity also differs between Pae and Tma SurE, with a more specific recognition of purine nucleotides by the archaeal enzyme. Analyses of the sequences, phylogenetic distribution, and genomic organization of the SurE family reveal examples of genomes encoding multiple surE genes, and suggest that SurE homologs constitute a broad family of enzymes with phosphatase-like activities.

  14. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose

    PubMed Central

    Hibbs, John B.; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces. PMID:26895212

  15. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, John B; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E

    2016-08-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces.

  16. Nitrogen K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of purine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Fukao, Taishi; Minami, Hirotake; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2014-08-01

    The N K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the purine-containing nucleotide, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP), in aqueous solution are measured under various pH conditions. The spectra show characteristic peaks, which originate from resonant excitations of N 1s electrons to π* orbitals inside the guanine moiety of GMP. The relative intensities of these peaks depend on the pH values of the solution. The pH dependence is explained by the core-level shift of N atoms at specific sites caused by protonation and deprotonation. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical spectra calculated by using density functional theory for GMP and the other purine-containing nucleotides, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, and adenosine 5'-triphosphate. The N K-edge XANES spectra for all of these nucleotides are classified by the numbers of N atoms with particular chemical bonding characteristics in the purine moiety.

  17. Unexpected pronounced heating in the uppermost layer of the Dead Sea after a sharp drop in noon surface solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Starobinets, Boris; Gertman, Isaac; Ozer, Tal; Alpert, Pinhas

    2016-04-01

    A passage of frontal cloudiness accompanied by dust pollution over the Judean Mountains and the Dead Sea valley, which occurred on March 22, 2013, led to a sharp drop in noon solar radiation under weak winds (from 860 W m-2 to 50 W m-2). Solar radiation measurements showed that the transition from clear-sky to overcast conditions was sharper over the Dead Sea than over the Israel Mediterranean coast. The maximal rate of decrease in noon solar radiation at the Dead Sea almost doubled that near the Mediterranean coast (17 W m-2 min-1 vs. 10 W m-2 min-1). The temperature stratification was observed in the uppermost layer of the Dead Sea before the aforementioned drop in noon solar radiation. This temperature stratification was evidence that the weak winds were incapable of producing significant mixing in the Dead Sea. Buoy measurements showed that, unexpectedly, a sharp decrease in noon solar radiation caused pronounced heating in the uppermost layer of the Dead Sea. Evaporation from the Dead Sea surface leads to an increase in salinity in the surface layer. In the presence of significant solar radiation, this increased salinity in the surface layer did not lead to an increase in water density. The gravitational stability and temperature stratification in the uppermost layer were observed. By contrast, after the drop in solar radiation, the increased salinity in the surface layer led to an increase in water density and, consequently, to gravitational instability, because of higher density of surface seawater compared to the density in the layers below. The gravitational instability switched on a pronounced heating process in the 2-m uppermost layer of the Dead Sea. This temperature increase took place under weak winds, which were incapable of creating significant mechanical mixing in the Dead Sea. The heating of seawater in the 2-m uppermost layer was switched off later by the sharp influx of hot foehn winds up to 20 m/s from the lee side of the Judean Mts. into the

  18. The Formamidopyrimidines: Purine Lesions Formed in Competition With 8-Oxopurines From Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus DNA is constantly exposed to agents that induce structural damage, from sources both internal and external to an organism. Endogenous species, such as oxidizing chemicals, and exogenous agents, such as ultraviolet rays in sunlight, together produce more than 70 distinct chemical modifications of native nucleotides. Of these, about 15 of the lesions have been detected in cellular DNA. This kind of structural DNA damage can be cytotoxic, carcinogenic, or both, and is being linked to an increasingly lengthy list of diseases. The formamidopyrimidine (Fapy) lesions are a family of DNA lesions that result after purines undergo oxidative stress. The Fapy lesions are produced in yields comparable to the 8-oxopurines, which, owing in part to a perception of mutagenicity in some quarters, have been subjected to intense research scrutiny. But despite the comparable abundance of the formamidopyrimidines and the 8-oxopurines, until recently very little was known about the effects of Fapy lesions on biochemical processes involving DNA or on the structure and stability of the genomic material. In this Account, we discuss the detection of Fapy lesions in DNA and the mechanism proposed for their formation. We also describe methods for the chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides containing Fapy•dA or Fapy•dG and the outcomes of chemical and biochemical studies utilizing these compounds. These experiments reveal that the formamidopyrimidines decrease the fidelity of polymerases and are substrates for DNA repair enzymes. The mutation frequency of Fapy•dG in mammals is even greater than that of 8-oxodGuo (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, one of the 8-oxopurines), suggesting that this lesion could be a useful biomarker and biologically significant. Despite clear similarities, the formamidopyrimidines have lived in the shadow of the corresponding 8-oxopurine lesions. But the recent development of methods for synthesizing oligonucleotides containing Fapy•dA or

  19. Octupole excitations in 141,144Cs and the pronounced decrease of dipole moments with neutron number in odd- Z neutron-rich 141,143,144Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. X.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Hamilton, J. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Liu, S. H.; Jones, E. F.; Gore, P. M.; Goodin, C.; Stone, N. J.; Zhu, S. J.; Hwang, J. K.; Li, Ke; Crowell, H. L.; Lee, I. Y.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Daniel, A. V.; Stoyer, M. A.; Donangelo, R.; Ma, W. C.; Cole, J. D.

    2010-07-01

    The level scheme of odd- Z neutron-rich 141Cs ( Z=55, N=86) was extended and expanded and that of 144Cs ( N=89) was identified for the first time by means of γ-γ-γ coincidence measurements of prompt γ rays in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf with Gammasphere. Spin/parity was assigned to the levels based on angular correlations and level systematics in 141,143Cs. Parity doublets characteristic of both simplex quantum number s=+i and s=-i were proposed in 141Cs. The tests by using rotational frequency ratio ω(I)/ω(I) imply octupole vibrations in 141Cs and 143Cs. B(E1)/B(E2) values and electric dipole moments D were calculated for 141Cs, and re-determined for 143Cs. It was found that B(E1)/B(E2) values of 141Cs are simplex-dependent and the average value is one order of magnitude larger than that of 143Cs, and the deduced dipole moment D of 141Cs is considerably larger than that of 143Cs, and comparable to the N=86 isotone 142Ba. For 144Cs the yrast sequence looks like a well-deformed rotational band, but no octupole band structure was identified in this nucleus. The overall variations of D in 141,143,144Cs exhibit a pronounced drop of dipole moment with increasing neutron number in this odd- Z isotopic chain, which may be analogous in nature to the quenching of D observed in even-even 146Ba ( Z=56, N=90) and 224Ra ( Z=88, N=136), and to the drop of D in the odd- Z neutron-rich 147La ( Z=57, N=90) reported by our collaboration.

  20. Pronounced genetic differentiation and recent secondary contact in the mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa revealed by population genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianfang; Yang, Yuchen; Chen, Qipian; Fang, Lu; He, Ziwen; Guo, Wuxia; Qiao, Sitan; Wang, Zhengzhen; Guo, Miaomiao; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Systematically investigating the impacts of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove plants may provide a better understanding of their demographic history and useful information for their conservation. Therefore, we conducted population genomic analyses of 88 nuclear genes to explore the population dynamics of a mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa across the Indo-West Pacific region. Our results revealed pronounced genetic differentiation in this species between the populations from the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, which may be attributable to the long-term isolation between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during sea-level drops in the Pleistocene glacial periods. The mixing of haplotypes from the two highly divergent groups was identified in a Cambodian population at almost all 88 nuclear genes, suggesting genetic admixture of the two lineages at the boundary region. Similar genetic admixture was also found in other populations from Southeast Asia based on the Bayesian clustering analysis of six nuclear genes, which suggests extensive and recent secondary contact of the two divergent lineages in Southeast Asia. Computer simulations indicated substantial migration from the Indian Ocean towards the South China Sea, which likely results in the genetic admixture in Southeast Asia. PMID:27380895

  1. Acute non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus infection induces pronounced type I interferon response in pregnant cows and fetuses.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Austin, Kathleen J; Han, Hyungchul; Montgomery, Donald L; Shoemaker, Megan L; van Olphen, Alberto L; Hansen, Thomas R

    2008-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection occurs in the cattle population worldwide. Non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV strains cause transient infection (TI) or persistent infection (PI) depending on the host's immune status. Immunocompetent adult animals and fetuses in late gestation resolve the infection. Fetal infection in early gestation results in PI with chronic viremia and life-long viral shedding, ensuring virus perpetuation in the population. Eighteen pregnant heifers, divided into three groups, were intranasally inoculated with ncp BVDV2 virus early (day 75) and late (day 175) in gestation, or kept BVDV-naïve. Fetuses were retrieved on day 190. Antiviral activity in blood of dams and fetuses, maternal expression of interferon (IFN) stimulated gene 15kDa (ISG15), virological and serological status of heifers and fetuses, and fetal growth were studied. A pronounced antiviral activity in blood of heifers and TI fetuses during acute BVDV infection was accompanied by drastic up-regulation of ISG15 mRNA in maternal blood. Only one PI fetus expressed low IFN response 115 days post inoculation despite high BVDV antigen and RNA levels. PI fetuses presented with growth retardation. Infection of pregnant heifers with ncp BVDV2 early in gestation adversely affects fetal development and antiviral responses, despite protective immune responses in the dam.

  2. Acute non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus infection induces pronounced type I interferon response in pregnant cows and fetuses.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Natalia P; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Van Campen, Hana; Austin, Kathleen J; Han, Hyungchul; Montgomery, Donald L; Shoemaker, Megan L; van Olphen, Alberto L; Hansen, Thomas R

    2008-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection occurs in the cattle population worldwide. Non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV strains cause transient infection (TI) or persistent infection (PI) depending on the host's immune status. Immunocompetent adult animals and fetuses in late gestation resolve the infection. Fetal infection in early gestation results in PI with chronic viremia and life-long viral shedding, ensuring virus perpetuation in the population. Eighteen pregnant heifers, divided into three groups, were intranasally inoculated with ncp BVDV2 virus early (day 75) and late (day 175) in gestation, or kept BVDV-naïve. Fetuses were retrieved on day 190. Antiviral activity in blood of dams and fetuses, maternal expression of interferon (IFN) stimulated gene 15kDa (ISG15), virological and serological status of heifers and fetuses, and fetal growth were studied. A pronounced antiviral activity in blood of heifers and TI fetuses during acute BVDV infection was accompanied by drastic up-regulation of ISG15 mRNA in maternal blood. Only one PI fetus expressed low IFN response 115 days post inoculation despite high BVDV antigen and RNA levels. PI fetuses presented with growth retardation. Infection of pregnant heifers with ncp BVDV2 early in gestation adversely affects fetal development and antiviral responses, despite protective immune responses in the dam. PMID:18053605

  3. Functional traits variation explains the distribution of Aextoxicon punctatum (Aextoxicaceae) in pronounced moisture gradients within fog-dependent forest fragments.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Negret, Beatriz; Canessa, Rafaella; Valladares, Fernando; Armesto, Juan J; Pérez, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and fragmentation are major threats to world forests. Understanding how functional traits related to drought tolerance change across small-scale, pronounced moisture gradients in fragmented forests is important to predict species' responses to these threats. In the case of Aextoxicon punctatum, a dominant canopy tree in fog-dependent rain forest patches in semiarid Chile, we explored how the magnitude, variability and correlation patterns of leaf and xylem vessel traits and hydraulic conductivity varied across soil moisture (SM) gradients established within and among forest patches of different size, which are associated with differences in tree establishment and mortality patterns. Leaf traits varied across soil-moisture gradients produced by fog interception. Trees growing at drier leeward edges showed higher leaf mass per area, trichome and stomatal density than trees from the wetter core and windward zones. In contrast, xylem vessel traits (vessels diameter and density) did not vary producing loss of hydraulic conductivity at drier leeward edges. We also detected higher levels of phenotypic integration and variability at leeward edges. The ability of A. punctatum to modify leaf traits in response to differences in SM availability established over short distances (<500 m) facilitates its persistence in contrasting microhabitats within forest patches. However, xylem anatomy showed limited plasticity, which increases cavitation risk at leeward edges. Greater patch fragmentation, together with fluctuations in irradiance and SM in small patches, could result in higher risk of drought-related tree mortality, with profound impacts on hydrological balances at the ecosystem scale.

  4. Functional traits variation explains the distribution of Aextoxicon punctatum (Aextoxicaceae) in pronounced moisture gradients within fog-dependent forest fragments

    PubMed Central

    Salgado-Negret, Beatriz; Canessa, Rafaella; Valladares, Fernando; Armesto, Juan J.; Pérez, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and fragmentation are major threats to world forests. Understanding how functional traits related to drought tolerance change across small-scale, pronounced moisture gradients in fragmented forests is important to predict species’ responses to these threats. In the case of Aextoxicon punctatum, a dominant canopy tree in fog-dependent rain forest patches in semiarid Chile, we explored how the magnitude, variability and correlation patterns of leaf and xylem vessel traits and hydraulic conductivity varied across soil moisture (SM) gradients established within and among forest patches of different size, which are associated with differences in tree establishment and mortality patterns. Leaf traits varied across soil-moisture gradients produced by fog interception. Trees growing at drier leeward edges showed higher leaf mass per area, trichome and stomatal density than trees from the wetter core and windward zones. In contrast, xylem vessel traits (vessels diameter and density) did not vary producing loss of hydraulic conductivity at drier leeward edges. We also detected higher levels of phenotypic integration and variability at leeward edges. The ability of A. punctatum to modify leaf traits in response to differences in SM availability established over short distances (<500 m) facilitates its persistence in contrasting microhabitats within forest patches. However, xylem anatomy showed limited plasticity, which increases cavitation risk at leeward edges. Greater patch fragmentation, together with fluctuations in irradiance and SM in small patches, could result in higher risk of drought-related tree mortality, with profound impacts on hydrological balances at the ecosystem scale. PMID:26257746

  5. Pronounced genetic differentiation and recent secondary contact in the mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa revealed by population genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfang; Yang, Yuchen; Chen, Qipian; Fang, Lu; He, Ziwen; Guo, Wuxia; Qiao, Sitan; Wang, Zhengzhen; Guo, Miaomiao; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Systematically investigating the impacts of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove plants may provide a better understanding of their demographic history and useful information for their conservation. Therefore, we conducted population genomic analyses of 88 nuclear genes to explore the population dynamics of a mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa across the Indo-West Pacific region. Our results revealed pronounced genetic differentiation in this species between the populations from the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, which may be attributable to the long-term isolation between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during sea-level drops in the Pleistocene glacial periods. The mixing of haplotypes from the two highly divergent groups was identified in a Cambodian population at almost all 88 nuclear genes, suggesting genetic admixture of the two lineages at the boundary region. Similar genetic admixture was also found in other populations from Southeast Asia based on the Bayesian clustering analysis of six nuclear genes, which suggests extensive and recent secondary contact of the two divergent lineages in Southeast Asia. Computer simulations indicated substantial migration from the Indian Ocean towards the South China Sea, which likely results in the genetic admixture in Southeast Asia. PMID:27380895

  6. Root Growth Reacts Rapidly and More Pronounced Than Shoot Growth Towards Increasing Light Intensity in Tobacco Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Kerstin A

    2006-01-01

    Light intensity is crucial for plant growth and often fluctuates on a small time scale due to altering climate conditions or sunflecks. Recently, we performed a study that looked into the growth effect of a sudden elevation of light intensity on Nicotiana tabacum seedlings.1 It was shown that an increase in light intensity leads to a pronounced increase of root-shoot-ratio as root growth reacts strongly and rapidly to an increase of light intensity. In transition experiments from low (60 µmol m−2 s−1) to high (300 µmol m−2 s−1) light intensity, root growth increased by a factor of four within four days, reaching the steady-state level measured in plants that were cultivated in high-light conditions. During the first three hours after light increase, strong fluctuations of the velocity of the root tip were observed that were putatively caused by a superposition of hydraulic and photosynthetic acclimation to the altered conditions. Experiments with externally applied sucrose and with transgenic plants having reduced capacity for sucrose synthesis indicated clearly that increasing light intensity rapidly enhanced root growth by elevating sucrose export from shoot to root. PMID:19704663

  7. Pronounced genetic differentiation and recent secondary contact in the mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa revealed by population genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfang; Yang, Yuchen; Chen, Qipian; Fang, Lu; He, Ziwen; Guo, Wuxia; Qiao, Sitan; Wang, Zhengzhen; Guo, Miaomiao; Zhong, Cairong; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2016-01-01

    Systematically investigating the impacts of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on mangrove plants may provide a better understanding of their demographic history and useful information for their conservation. Therefore, we conducted population genomic analyses of 88 nuclear genes to explore the population dynamics of a mangrove tree Lumnitzera racemosa across the Indo-West Pacific region. Our results revealed pronounced genetic differentiation in this species between the populations from the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean, which may be attributable to the long-term isolation between the western and eastern coasts of the Malay Peninsula during sea-level drops in the Pleistocene glacial periods. The mixing of haplotypes from the two highly divergent groups was identified in a Cambodian population at almost all 88 nuclear genes, suggesting genetic admixture of the two lineages at the boundary region. Similar genetic admixture was also found in other populations from Southeast Asia based on the Bayesian clustering analysis of six nuclear genes, which suggests extensive and recent secondary contact of the two divergent lineages in Southeast Asia. Computer simulations indicated substantial migration from the Indian Ocean towards the South China Sea, which likely results in the genetic admixture in Southeast Asia.

  8. Characterization of Immunostimulatory CpG-Rich Sequences from Different Bifidobacterium Species ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Odile; Gafa, Valérie; Kapel, Nathalie; Rodriguez, Bertrand; Butel, Marie-José; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effects of Bifidobacterium are partly due to its immunostimulatory properties. These immunostimulatory properties may be linked to the presence of unmethylated CpG motifs specific to bacterial DNA, which may induce a TH1 response by activating Toll-like receptors (TLR). Using in silico analyses, PCR amplification, and dot blotting, we characterized the CpG content of various bifidobacterial strains and evaluated the immunostimulatory properties and genomic heterogeneity of these motifs in the genus. Our in silico study, based on entire genome sequences from five bifidobacterial strains, showed that Bifidobacterium genomes contain numerous CpG motifs, including 5′-purine-purine-CG-pyrimidine-pyrimidine-3′ and 5′-purine-TCG-pyrimidine-pyrimidine-3′ motifs, and biologically active sequences previously identified in lactic acid bacteria. We identified four CpG-rich sequences with Bifidobacterium longum NCC2705. Two sequences with a percent G+C of about 68% included 14 and 16 CpG motifs. Two sequences with a percent G+C of about 60% included 16 and 6 CpG motifs. These sequences induce the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) through a pattern of TLR9 stimulation on RAW 264.7 macrophages. No link could be established between their immunostimulatory properties, the number of CpG motifs, and percent G+C. We investigated inter- and intraspecies heterogeneity in 71 strains of various origins. These sequences were highly conserved in the genus. No link was found between the presence of the CpG-rich sequence and the origin of the strains (healthy, allergic, or preterm infants). The high frequency of CpG motifs in the DNA of Bifidobacterium may play an important role in the immunostimulatory properties of commensal or probiotic bifidobacterial strains. PMID:20208019

  9. Nanopores and nucleic acids: prospects for ultrarapid sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.; Akeson, M.

    2000-01-01

    DNA and RNA molecules can be detected as they are driven through a nanopore by an applied electric field at rates ranging from several hundred microseconds to a few milliseconds per molecule. The nanopore can rapidly discriminate between pyrimidine and purine segments along a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule. Nanopore detection and characterization of single molecules represents a new method for directly reading information encoded in linear polymers. If single-nucleotide resolution can be achieved, it is possible that nucleic acid sequences can be determined at rates exceeding a thousand bases per second.

  10. Identification of potential inhibitors for AIRS from de novo purine biosynthesis pathway through molecular modeling studies - a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Guru Raj; Biswal, Jayashree; Dhamodharan, Prabhu; Kanagarajan, Surekha; Jeyaraman, Jeyakanthan

    2016-10-01

    In cancer, de novo pathway plays an important role in cell proliferation by supplying huge demand of purine nucleotides. Aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase (AIRS) catalyzes the fifth step of de novo purine biosynthesis facilitating in the conversion of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide to aminoimidazole ribonucleotide. Hence, inhibiting AIRS is crucial due to its involvement in the regulation of uncontrollable cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of AIRS from P. horikoshii OT3 was constructed based on the crystal structure from E. coli and the modeled protein is verified for stability using molecular dynamics for a time frame of 100 ns. Virtual screening and induced fit docking were performed to identify the best antagonists based on their binding mode and affinity. Through mutational studies, the residues necessary for catalytic activity of AIRS were identified and among which the following residues Lys35, Asp103, Glu137, and Thr138 are important in determination of AIRS function. The mutational studies help to understand the structural and energetic characteristics of the specified residues. In addition to Molecular Dynamics, ADME properties, binding free-energy, and density functional theory calculations of the compounds were carried out to find the best lead molecule. Based on these analyses, the compound from the NCI database, NCI_121957 was adjudged as the best molecule and could be suggested as the suitable inhibitor of AIRS. In future studies, experimental validation of these ligands as AIRS inhibitors will be carried out.

  11. Short-term effect of caffeine on purine, pyrimidine and pyridine metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei-Wei; Katahira, Riko; Ashihara, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    As part of our studies on the physiological and ecological function of caffeine, we investigated the effect of exogenously supplied caffeine on purine, pyrimidine and pyridine metabolism in rice seedlings. We examined the effect of 1 mM caffeine on the in situ metabolism of 14C-labelled adenine, guanine, inosine, uridine, uracil, nicotinamide and nicotinic acid. The segments of 4-day-old dark-grown seedlings were incubated with these labelled compounds for 6 h. For purines, the incorporation of radioactivity from [8-(14)C]adenine and [8-(14)C]guanine into nucleotides was enhanced by caffeine; in contrast, incorporation into CO2 were reduced. The radioactivity in ureides (allantoin and allantoic acid) from [8-(14)C]guanine and [8-(14)C]inosine was increased by caffeine. For pyrimidines, caffeine enhanced the incorporation of radioactivity from [2-(14)C]uridine into nucleotides, which was accompanied by a decrease in pyrimidine catabolism. Such difference was not found in the metabolism of [2-(14)C]uracil. Caffeine did not influence the pyridine metabolism of [carbonyl-14C]- nicotinamide and [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid. The possible control steps of caffeine on nucleotide metabolism in rice are discussed.

  12. Structure of nucleoside diphosphate kinase from pacific shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) in binary complexes with purine and pyrimidine nucleoside diphosphates.

    PubMed

    López-Zavala, Alonso A; Quintero-Reyes, Idania E; Carrasco-Miranda, Jesús S; Stojanoff, Vivian; Weichsel, Andrzej; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R

    2014-09-01

    Nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK; EC 2.7.4.6) is an enzyme that catalyzes the third phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates, leading to nucleoside triphosphates for DNA replication. Expression of the NDK from Litopenaeus vannamei (LvNDK) is known to be regulated under viral infection. Also, as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, LvNDK binds both purine and pyrimidine deoxynucleoside diphosphates with high binding affinity for dGDP and dADP and with no heat of binding interaction for dCDP [Quintero-Reyes et al. (2012), J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 44, 325-331]. In order to investigate the differences in selectivity, LvNDK was crystallized as binary complexes with both acceptor (dADP and dCDP) and donor (ADP) phosphate-group nucleoside diphosphate substrates and their structures were determined. The three structures with purine or pyrimidine nucleotide ligands are all hexameric. Also, the binding of deoxy or ribonucleotides is similar, as in the former a water molecule replaces the hydrogen bond made by Lys11 to the 2'-hydroxyl group of the ribose moiety. This allows Lys11 to maintain a catalytically favourable conformation independently of the kind of sugar found in the nucleotide. Because of this, shrimp NDK may phosphorylate nucleotide analogues to inhibit the viral infections that attack this organism.

  13. Consortium analysis of gene and gene-folate interactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathways with ovarian carcinoma risk

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Webb, Penelope M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; McGuire, Valerie; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wang, Qinggang; Dicks, Ed; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Song, Honglin; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Timorek, Agnieszka; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Narod, Steven A.; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John R.; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Glasspool, Rosalind; Paul, James; Carty, Karen; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubiński, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Cybulski, Cezary; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K. H.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Cramer, Daniel W.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjær, Susanne Krüger; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Høgdall, Claus K.; Lundvall, Lene; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Leminen, Arto; Thompson, Pamela J.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Vergote, Ignace; Beesley, Jonathan; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Stram, Daniel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Odunsi, Kunle; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Iversen, Edwin S.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie; Kellar, Melissa; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Goode, Ellen L.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Le, Nhu D.

    2014-01-01

    Scope We re-evaluated previously reported associations between variants in pathways of one-carbon (folate) transfer genes and ovarian carcinoma (OC) risk, and in related pathways of purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and assessed interactions with folate intake. Methods and Results Odds ratios (OR) for 446 genetic variants were estimated among 13,410 OC cases and 22,635 controls and among 2,281 cases and 3,444 controls with folate information. Following multiple testing correction, the most significant main effect associations were for DPYD variants rs11587873 (OR=0.92, P=6x10−5) and rs828054 (OR=1.06, P=1x10−4). Thirteen variants in the pyrimidine metabolism genes, DPYD, DPYS, PPAT and TYMS, also interacted significantly with folate in a multi-variant analysis (corrected P=9.9x10−6) but collectively explained only 0.2% of OC risk. Although no other associations were significant after multiple testing correction, variants in SHMT1 in one-carbon transfer, previously reported with OC, suggested lower risk at higher folate (Pinteraction=0.03-0.006). Conclusions Variation in pyrimidine metabolism genes, particularly DPYD, which was previously reported to be associated with OC, may influence risk; however, stratification by folate intake is unlikely to modify disease risk appreciably in these women. SHMT1 SNP-byfolate interactions are plausible but require further validation. Polymorphisms in selected genes in purine metabolism were not associated with OC. PMID:25066213

  14. Loss of DNA polymerase beta stacking interactions with templating purines, but not pyrimidines, alters catalytic efficiency and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Beard, William A; Shock, David D; Yang, Xiao-Ping; DeLauder, Saundra F; Wilson, Samuel H

    2002-03-01

    Structures of DNA polymerases bound with DNA reveal that the 5'-trajectory of the template strand is dramatically altered as it exits the polymerase active site. This distortion provides the polymerase access to the nascent base pair to interrogate proper Watson-Crick geometry. Upon binding a correct deoxynucleoside triphosphate, alpha-helix N of DNA polymerase beta is observed to form one face of the binding pocket for the new base pair. Asp-276 and Lys-280 stack with the bases of the incoming nucleotide and template, respectively. To determine the role of Lys-280, site-directed mutants were constructed at this position, and the proteins were expressed and purified, and their catalytic efficiency and fidelity were assessed. The catalytic efficiency for single-nucleotide gap filling with the glycine mutant (K280G) was strongly diminished relative to wild type for templating purines (>15-fold) due to a decreased binding affinity for the incoming nucleotide. In contrast, catalytic efficiency was hardly affected by glycine substitution for templating pyrimidines (<4-fold). The fidelity of the glycine mutant was identical to the wild type enzyme for misinsertion opposite a template thymidine, whereas the fidelity of misinsertion opposite a template guanine was modestly altered. The nature of the Lys-280 side-chain substitution for thymidine triphosphate insertion (templating adenine) indicates that Lys-280 "stabilizes" templating purines through van der Waals interactions. PMID:11756435

  15. Disturbance of Antioxidant Enzymes and Purine Metabolism in the Ejaculate of Men Living in Disadvantaged Areas of Kyzylorda Region

    PubMed Central

    Kislitskaya, Valentihna N.; Kenzhin, Zhandos D.; Kultanov, Berikbay Zh.; Dosmagambetova, Raushan S.; Turmuhambetova, Anar A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Objective of the study was to evaluate the state of the main indicators of antioxidant status and enzymes of purine metabolism in the germ cells of men living in the zone of ecological catastrophe Aral Sea region. METHODS: The criterion for inclusion is the stay of an adult in the Aral Sea area is not less than 5 years, employment in occupations with no more than 2 hazard class. Determination of the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) was conducted in semen by the method of Nemechek et al., 1993. Determination of the activity of catalase (CAT) was performed according by the method of Korolyuk et al., 1988. RESULTS: Results of the study indicate a change in the activity of catalase and adenosine deaminase, due to increased levels of oxidative stress and the development of the pathological process. CONCLUSIONS: According to the results of study, it was put the influence of negative factors of the Aral Sea region in men’s sperm of reproductive age gives to disability free-radical processes, that proves changing of ferments of ant oxidative protection Catalase and adenosine deaminase (ADA). This disturbance in men’s sperm of reproductive age leading to increased level of oxidative stress and impaired activity of antioxidant enzymes and purine metabolism, responsible for the abnormal transmembrane and intracellular processes, reflecting the degree of imbalance of enzymes. PMID:27275276

  16. Excretion of purine derivatives by ruminants: recycling of allantoin into the rumen via saliva and its fate in the gut.

    PubMed

    Chen, X B; Hovell, F D; Orskov, E R

    1990-03-01

    The saliva of sheep was shown to contain significant concentrations of uric acid (16(SD 4.5) mumol/l) and allantoin (120(SD 16.4) mumol/l), sufficient to recycle purine derivatives equivalent to about 0.10 of the normal urinary excretion. When allantoin was incubated in vitro in rumen fluid, it was degraded at a rate sufficient to ensure complete destruction of recycled allantoin. In a series of experiments in which allantoin was infused into the rumen of sheep fed normally, or into the rumen or abomasum of sheep and the rumen of cattle completely nourished by intragastric infusion of volatile fatty acids and casein, no additional allantoin was recovered in the urine. These losses were probably due to the degradation of allantoin by micro-organisms associated with the digestive tract. It is concluded that all allantion and uric acid recycled to the rumen via saliva will be similarly degraded. Therefore, the use of urinary excretion of purine derivatives as an estimator of the rumen microbial biomass available to ruminants will need to be corrected for such losses.

  17. Effects of Pronounced Drying and Rewetting on Redox Dynamics and C-Turnover in a Northern Temperate fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, K.; Oosterwoud, M.; Blodau, C.

    2006-12-01

    Covering about 450 million ha of the earth's surface and storing substantial amounts of carbon, peatlands play an important role in the global carbon cycle. In the context of climate change and greenhouse gases, peatlands have gained increasing attention. According to future climate scenarios for temperate regions, higher temperatures and an increasing frequency of extreme weather events causing more frequent drying/rewetting cycles may be expected. However, the effects on carbon turnover in peatlands are not well known. To evaluate the effect of pronounced drying/rewetting, three intact cores (60 cm diam., 60 cm depth) from a northern temperate fen were incubated in a climate chamber (15°C; 12h/12h day/night cycle) for 9 months. The plants of one core had been removed, while they were kept on the other two cores (grasses and sedges, few mosses). The water table of all cores was adjusted and kept at 10 cm below surface (70 days, artificial precipitation). Subsequently, two cores were dried out (with and without vegetation) by stopping precipitation, while the third core (with vegetation) was kept at high water table as a control. Within 50 days, the water table dropped ~45 cm. Thereafter, we rewetted (>30 mm d-1) till the water table was back up at 10 cm within 2 days. Pronounced drying and rewetting had a substantial effect on internal C-turnover and electron acceptor pools. Profiles in CO2/CO32- followed closely the water table rise and drop (2-5 mmol L-1 below, 1-2 mmol L-1 above the water table), whereas methanogenesis lagged behind. While the electron acceptor pool (NO3-, Fe(III), SO42-) was renewed in the upper profile during drying out, there was still some methane detectable above the water table in the main root zone of the vegetated core, indicating anoxic micro-environments. After the rapid rewetting, thermodynamically preferred electron acceptors were consumed first. In the upper layers sulfate was present (>100 mmol L-1) for about 50-70 days before

  18. Near-surface mixing and pronounced deep-water stratification in a compartmentalised, human-disturbed atoll lagoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. P. A.; Garton, D. W.; Collen, J. D.

    2011-03-01

    Palmyra Atoll has four partially isolated lagoons up to 50 m in depth, each with complex and variable bottom topographies. Measurements of depth, temperature, salinity, turbidity and dissolved oxygen (DO) revealed a well-mixed shallow surface layer (0-10 m depth) and below that pronounced stratification of DO in the absence of a pycnocline. Turbidity increased in a step-like manner at ~25 m depth, at the oxycline. For all deep sections of the lagoon (>30 m), DO declined uniformly to 0% saturation. As determined from filtration, mass of particulates was independent of depth. Surface mixing and deep-water stratification are both stable at different temporal scales, including day versus night, daily, weekly and annually. We suggest that lagoon circulation is represented by a shallow, westward-moving surface layer of well-to-partially mixed water with high DO and low turbidity, underlain by a relatively static and temporally stable layer with low to zero DO and elevated turbidity. This is the first report of such conditions within a deep lagoon system, and only the second report of anoxic conditions in any such system. In deep-water, stable euxinic conditions reflect bottom topography, with dysoxic and anoxic water being constrained within silled basins. The occurrence and depth of large volumes of sediment-laden and dysoxic/anoxic water need to be considered in management proposals designed to increase water flow through the lagoon. These novel water column conditions most probably arose as a consequence of military construction work, consistent with published reports of profound changes to the atoll during 1940-1945. If so, they highlight the need to better understand the possible consequences of cutting channels and modification of lagoon flow at many atolls across the central Pacific Ocean.

  19. Prioritized Expression of BTN2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Pronounced Translation Repression Induced by Severe Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yukina; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Severe ethanol stress (>9% ethanol, v/v) as well as glucose deprivation rapidly induces a pronounced repression of overall protein synthesis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, transcriptional activation in yeast cells under severe ethanol stress does not always indicate the production of expected protein levels. Messenger RNAs of genes containing heat shock elements can be intensively translated under glucose deprivation, suggesting that some mRNAs are preferentially translated even under severe ethanol stress. In the present study, we tried to identify the mRNA that can be preferentially translated under severe ethanol stress. BTN2 encodes a v-SNARE binding protein, and its null mutant shows hypersensitivity to ethanol. We found that BTN2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe ethanol stress but not under mild ethanol stress. Moreover, the increased Btn2 protein levels caused by severe ethanol stress were smoothly decreased with the elimination of ethanol stress. These findings suggested that severe ethanol stress extensively induced BTN2 expression. Further, the BTN2 promoter induced protein synthesis of non-native genes such as CUR1, GIC2, and YUR1 in the presence of high ethanol concentrations, indicating that this promoter overcame severe ethanol stress-induced translation repression. Thus, our findings provide an important clue about yeast response to severe ethanol stress and suggest that the BTN2 promoter can be used to improve the efficiency of ethanol production and stress tolerance of yeast cells by modifying gene expression in the presence of high ethanol concentration. PMID:27602028

  20. Prioritized Expression of BTN2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Pronounced Translation Repression Induced by Severe Ethanol Stress.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yukina; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Severe ethanol stress (>9% ethanol, v/v) as well as glucose deprivation rapidly induces a pronounced repression of overall protein synthesis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, transcriptional activation in yeast cells under severe ethanol stress does not always indicate the production of expected protein levels. Messenger RNAs of genes containing heat shock elements can be intensively translated under glucose deprivation, suggesting that some mRNAs are preferentially translated even under severe ethanol stress. In the present study, we tried to identify the mRNA that can be preferentially translated under severe ethanol stress. BTN2 encodes a v-SNARE binding protein, and its null mutant shows hypersensitivity to ethanol. We found that BTN2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe ethanol stress but not under mild ethanol stress. Moreover, the increased Btn2 protein levels caused by severe ethanol stress were smoothly decreased with the elimination of ethanol stress. These findings suggested that severe ethanol stress extensively induced BTN2 expression. Further, the BTN2 promoter induced protein synthesis of non-native genes such as CUR1, GIC2, and YUR1 in the presence of high ethanol concentrations, indicating that this promoter overcame severe ethanol stress-induced translation repression. Thus, our findings provide an important clue about yeast response to severe ethanol stress and suggest that the BTN2 promoter can be used to improve the efficiency of ethanol production and stress tolerance of yeast cells by modifying gene expression in the presence of high ethanol concentration.

  1. Pronounced Dielectric and Hydration/Dehydration Behaviors of Monopolar Poly(N-alkylglycine)s in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kengo; Sagawa, Naoya; Shikata, Toshiyuki; Sternhagen, Garrett L; Li, Xin; Guo, Li; Do, Changwoo; Zhang, Donghui

    2016-09-22

    Poly(N-methylglycine) (NMGn) and poly(N-ethylglycine) (NEGn) obtained by polymerization reactions initiated by benzylamine have no carboxy termini, such as those in normal polyamides, but have only amino termini, which exist primarily as cations in aqueous media at a pH value of ca. 9.5, observed in aqueous solutions without any buffer reagents. Therefore, polypeptoids, such as NMGn and NEGn, possessing a degree of polymerization (DP) higher than a certain value behave as cationic monopolar polymeric chain molecules in aqueous solution. It has not been clarified so far whether such a monopolar chain molecule exhibits dielectric relaxation (DR) behavior resulting from its molecular motions in aqueous media as dipolar chain molecules. DR measurements revealed that NMG19 and NEG17, possessing DPs of 19 and 17, respectively, dissolved in pure water clearly demonstrated pronounced DR behavior caused by fluctuating molecular motions of cationic termini at relaxation times of ca. 4 and 9 ns at 10 °C (283 K). The hydration numbers of NMG19 and NEG17 per monomeric residue (nm) in aqueous solution were also evaluated via DR data as functions of temperature, and the nm value of ca. 4.5 at 10 °C showed a remarkable reduction to ca. 2.0 around 40 °C (313 K) and 30 °C (303 K), depending on differences in the substituted group: methyl and ethyl groups. This temperature-dependent hydration/dehydration behavior found in NMG19 and NEG17 slightly influenced the sizes and molecular dynamics of the monopolar chain molecules in aqueous solution. PMID:27559988

  2. Prioritized Expression of BTN2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Pronounced Translation Repression Induced by Severe Ethanol Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yukina; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Severe ethanol stress (>9% ethanol, v/v) as well as glucose deprivation rapidly induces a pronounced repression of overall protein synthesis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, transcriptional activation in yeast cells under severe ethanol stress does not always indicate the production of expected protein levels. Messenger RNAs of genes containing heat shock elements can be intensively translated under glucose deprivation, suggesting that some mRNAs are preferentially translated even under severe ethanol stress. In the present study, we tried to identify the mRNA that can be preferentially translated under severe ethanol stress. BTN2 encodes a v-SNARE binding protein, and its null mutant shows hypersensitivity to ethanol. We found that BTN2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe ethanol stress but not under mild ethanol stress. Moreover, the increased Btn2 protein levels caused by severe ethanol stress were smoothly decreased with the elimination of ethanol stress. These findings suggested that severe ethanol stress extensively induced BTN2 expression. Further, the BTN2 promoter induced protein synthesis of non-native genes such as CUR1, GIC2, and YUR1 in the presence of high ethanol concentrations, indicating that this promoter overcame severe ethanol stress-induced translation repression. Thus, our findings provide an important clue about yeast response to severe ethanol stress and suggest that the BTN2 promoter can be used to improve the efficiency of ethanol production and stress tolerance of yeast cells by modifying gene expression in the presence of high ethanol concentration.

  3. Prioritized Expression of BTN2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Pronounced Translation Repression Induced by Severe Ethanol Stress.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yukina; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Severe ethanol stress (>9% ethanol, v/v) as well as glucose deprivation rapidly induces a pronounced repression of overall protein synthesis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, transcriptional activation in yeast cells under severe ethanol stress does not always indicate the production of expected protein levels. Messenger RNAs of genes containing heat shock elements can be intensively translated under glucose deprivation, suggesting that some mRNAs are preferentially translated even under severe ethanol stress. In the present study, we tried to identify the mRNA that can be preferentially translated under severe ethanol stress. BTN2 encodes a v-SNARE binding protein, and its null mutant shows hypersensitivity to ethanol. We found that BTN2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe ethanol stress but not under mild ethanol stress. Moreover, the increased Btn2 protein levels caused by severe ethanol stress were smoothly decreased with the elimination of ethanol stress. These findings suggested that severe ethanol stress extensively induced BTN2 expression. Further, the BTN2 promoter induced protein synthesis of non-native genes such as CUR1, GIC2, and YUR1 in the presence of high ethanol concentrations, indicating that this promoter overcame severe ethanol stress-induced translation repression. Thus, our findings provide an important clue about yeast response to severe ethanol stress and suggest that the BTN2 promoter can be used to improve the efficiency of ethanol production and stress tolerance of yeast cells by modifying gene expression in the presence of high ethanol concentration. PMID:27602028

  4. The genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of the anti-tumour drug bleomycin in human cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Tanaka, Mark M

    2016-07-01

    The cancer chemotherapeutic agent, bleomycin, cleaves DNA at specific sites. For the first time, the genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin breakage was determined in human cells. Utilising Illumina next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, over 200 million bleomycin cleavage sites were examined to elucidate the bleomycin genome-wide DNA selectivity. The genome-wide bleomycin cleavage data were analysed by four different methods to determine the cellular DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin strand breakage. For the most highly cleaved DNA sequences, the preferred site of bleomycin breakage was at 5'-GT* dinucleotide sequences (where the asterisk indicates the bleomycin cleavage site), with lesser cleavage at 5'-GC* dinucleotides. This investigation also determined longer bleomycin cleavage sequences, with preferred cleavage at 5'-GT*A and 5'- TGT* trinucleotide sequences, and 5'-TGT*A tetranucleotides. For cellular DNA, the hexanucleotide DNA sequence 5'-RTGT*AY (where R is a purine and Y is a pyrimidine) was the most highly cleaved DNA sequence. It was striking that alternating purine-pyrimidine sequences were highly cleaved by bleomycin. The highest intensity cleavage sites in cellular and purified DNA were very similar although there were some minor differences. Statistical nucleotide frequency analysis indicated a G nucleotide was present at the -3 position (relative to the cleavage site) in cellular DNA but was absent in purified DNA.

  5. The genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of the anti-tumour drug bleomycin in human cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Vincent; Chen, Jon K; Tanaka, Mark M

    2016-07-01

    The cancer chemotherapeutic agent, bleomycin, cleaves DNA at specific sites. For the first time, the genome-wide DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin breakage was determined in human cells. Utilising Illumina next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, over 200 million bleomycin cleavage sites were examined to elucidate the bleomycin genome-wide DNA selectivity. The genome-wide bleomycin cleavage data were analysed by four different methods to determine the cellular DNA sequence specificity of bleomycin strand breakage. For the most highly cleaved DNA sequences, the preferred site of bleomycin breakage was at 5'-GT* dinucleotide sequences (where the asterisk indicates the bleomycin cleavage site), with lesser cleavage at 5'-GC* dinucleotides. This investigation also determined longer bleomycin cleavage sequences, with preferred cleavage at 5'-GT*A and 5'- TGT* trinucleotide sequences, and 5'-TGT*A tetranucleotides. For cellular DNA, the hexanucleotide DNA sequence 5'-RTGT*AY (where R is a purine and Y is a pyrimidine) was the most highly cleaved DNA sequence. It was striking that alternating purine-pyrimidine sequences were highly cleaved by bleomycin. The highest intensity cleavage sites in cellular and purified DNA were very similar although there were some minor differences. Statistical nucleotide frequency analysis indicated a G nucleotide was present at the -3 position (relative to the cleavage site) in cellular DNA but was absent in purified DNA. PMID:27188426

  6. Integrative Analysis of Circadian Transcriptome and Metabolic Network Reveals the Role of De Novo Purine Synthesis in Circadian Control of Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Guang; Görling, Benjamin; Luy, Burkhard; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an intermediate metabolite in de novo purine synthesis, showed significant circadian oscillation in larval zebrafish. We focused on IMP dehydrogenase (impdh), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo purine synthesis, with three circadian oscillating gene homologs: impdh1a, impdh1b and impdh2. Functional analysis revealed that impdh2 contributes to the daily rhythm of S phase in the cell cycle while impdh1a contributes to ocular development and pigment synthesis. The three zebrafish homologs of impdh are likely regulated by different circadian transcription factors. We propose that the circadian regulation of de novo purine synthesis that supplies crucial building blocks for DNA replication is an important mechanism conferring circadian rhythmicity on the cell cycle. Our method is widely applicable to study the impact of circadian transcriptome on metabolism in complex organisms. PMID:25714999

  7. Anti-proliferative activity of 2,6-dichloro-9- or 7-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-9H- or 7H-purines against several human solid tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Morales, Fátima; Ramírez, Alberto; Conejo-García, Ana; Morata, Cynthia; Marchal, Juan A; Campos, Joaquín M

    2014-04-01

    As leads we took several benzo-fused seven- and six-membered scaffolds linked to the pyrimidine or purine moieties with notable anti-proliferative activity against human breast, colon and melanoma cancerous cell lines. We then decided to maintain the double-ringed nitrogenous bases and change the other components to the ethyl acetate moiety. This way six purine and two 5-fluorouracil derivatives were obtained and evaluated against the MCF-7, HCT-116, A-375 and G-361 cancer cell lines. Two QSARs are obtained between the anti-proliferative IC₅₀ values for compounds 26-33 and the clog P against the melanoma cell lines A-375 and G-361. Our results show that two of the analogues [ethyl 2-(2,6-dichloro-9H- or 7H-purine-9- or 7-yl)acetates (30 and 33, respectively)] are potent cytotoxic agents against all the tumour cell lines assayed, showing single-digit micromolar IC₅₀ values. This exemplifies the potential of our previously reported purine compounds to qualify as lead structures for medicinal chemistry campaigns, affording simplified analogues easy to synthesize and with a noteworthy bioactivity. The selective activity of 30 and 33 against the melanoma cell line A-375, via apoptosis, supposes a great advantage for a future therapeutic use.

  8. Wobble↔Watson-Crick tautomeric transitions in the homo-purine DNA mismatches: a key to the intimate mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic capability of the homo-purine DNA base mispairs to perform wobble↔Watson-Crick/Topal-Fresco tautomeric transitions via the sequential intrapair double proton transfer was discovered for the first time using QM (MP2/DFT) and QTAIM methodologies that are crucial for understanding the microstructural mechanisms of the spontaneous transversions. PMID:26237090

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of electron transfer between purines and pyrimidines, their dinucleotides and polynucleotides after reaction with hydrated electrons; a pulse radiolysis study.

    PubMed

    Visscher, K J; Spoelder, H J; Loman, H; Hummel, A; Hom, M L

    1988-11-01

    The radical spectra of mixtures of thymidine 5'-monophosphate (TMP) or uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) with adenine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) after hydrated electron attack, measured from 5 to 3000 microsecond after pulse radiolysis, can only be described in terms of the radical spectra of the nucleotides if an electron transfer is taken into account from the purine radical anion to the pyrimidine, resulting in the formation of a pyrimidine radical anion. From analysis of the spectra of the dinucleoside phosphates ApU, dApT and dCpdA after eaq- attack it follows that the electron-donating species is the purine radical anion (A-.) rather than the protonated purine radical. The electron transfer competes with the fast protonation of the purine radical anion: A-. + py----A + py.- and A-. + H2O in equilibrium AH. respectively. The electron transfer is found to have a diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant of approximately 1.2 X 10(10) for TMP and 3.5 X 10(9) dm3 mol-1 s-1 for UMP.

  10. Metabolic physiology of the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas: Implications for vertical migration in a pronounced oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Rui; Seibel, Brad A.

    2010-07-01

    The Humboldt (or jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is an active predator endemic to the Eastern Pacific that undergoes diel vertical migrations into a pronounced oxygen minimum layer (OML). Here, we investigate the physiological mechanisms that facilitate these migrations and assess the associated costs and benefits. Exposure to hypoxic conditions equivalent to those found in the OML (∼10 μM O 2 at 10 °C) led to a significant reduction in the squid’s routine metabolic rate (RMR), from 8.9 to 1.6 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 ( p < 0.05), and a concomitant increase in mantle muscle octopine levels (from 0.50 to 5.24 μmol g -1 tissue, p < 0.05). Enhanced glycolitic ATP production accounted for only 7.0% and 2.8% at 10 °C and 20 °C, respectively, of the energy deficit that resulted from the decline in aerobic respiration. The observed metabolic suppression presumably extends survival time in the OML by conserving the finite stores of fermentable substrate and avoiding the accumulation of the deleterious anaerobic end products in the tissues. RMR increased significantly with temperature ( p < 0.05), from 8.9 (at 10 °C) to 49.85 μmol O 2 g -1 h -1 (at 25 °C) which yielded a Q10 of 2.0 between 10 and 20 °C and 7.9 between 20 and 25 °C ( p < 0.05). These results suggest that 25 °C, although within the normal surface temperature range in the Gulf of California, is outside this species’ normal temperature range. By following the scattering layer into oxygen-enriched shallow water at night, D. gigas may repay any oxygen debt accumulated during the daytime. The dive to deeper water may minimize exposure to stressful surface temperatures when most prey have migrated to depth during the daytime. The physiological and ecological strategies demonstrated here may have facilitated the recent range expansion of this species into northern waters where expanding hypoxic zones prohibit competing top predators.

  11. Temperature-dependent effects of cadmium and purine nucleotides on mitochondrial aconitase from a marine ectotherm, Crassostrea virginica: a role of temperature in oxidative stress and allosteric enzyme regulation.

    PubMed

    Cherkasov, Anton A; Overton, Robert A; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2007-01-01

    Temperature and heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd) are important environmental stressors that can strongly affect mitochondrial function of marine poikilotherms. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of temperature (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C) and Cd stress on production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in a marine poikilotherm Crassostrea virginica (the eastern oyster) using mitochondrial aconitase as a sensitive biomarker of oxidative damage. We also assessed potential involvement of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in antioxidant protection in oyster mitochondria using purine nucleotides (GDP, ATP and ADP) as specific inhibitors, and free fatty acids as stimulators, of UCPs. Our results show that exposure to Cd results in elevated ROS production and oxidative damage as indicated by aconitase inactivation which is particularly pronounced at elevated temperature. Unexpectedly, oyster mitochondrial aconitase was inhibited by physiologically relevant levels of ATP (IC(50)=1.93 and 3.04 mmol l(-1) at 20 degrees C and 30 degrees C, respectively), suggesting that allosteric regulation of aconitase by this nucleotide may be involved in regulation of the tricarboxylic acid flux in oysters. Aconitase was less sensitive to ATP inhibition at 30 degrees C than at 20 degrees C, consistent with the elevated metabolic flux at higher temperatures. ADP and GDP also inhibited mitochondrial aconitase but at the levels well above the physiological concentrations of these nucleotides (6-11 mmol l(-1)). Our study shows expression of at least three UCP isoforms in C. virginica gill tissues but provides no indication that UCPs protect mitochondrial aconitase from oxidative inactivation in oysters. Overall, the results of this study indicate that temperature stress exaggerates toxicity of Cd leading to elevated oxidative stress in mitochondria, which may have important implications for survival of poikilotherms in polluted environments during

  12. Selective liquid CO2 extraction of purine alkaloids in different Ilex paraguariensis progenies grown under environmental influences.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Euclides Lara; Cardozo-Filho, Lucio; Filho, Osvaldo Ferrarese; Zanoelo, Everton Fernando

    2007-08-22

    In this investigation, liquid carbon dioxide at 20 degrees C and 150 bar was used for the selective extraction of caffeine and theobromine from dry leaves of mate. A comparison between the chromatograms from CO2 extraction and traditional solvent extraction supports the selectivity of carbon dioxide for these purine alkaloids. The advantages of selective liquid CO2 extraction in terms of speed and resolution of UV/HPLC is also evidenced. A randomized block design of experiments was proposed to investigate the influence of 16 progenies of Ilex paraguariensis grown in 3 diverse sites on the contents of caffeine and theobromine in liquors of mate leaves obtained by extraction with compressed CO2. A significant effect of both these factors on the parameters investigated was observed by involving the F distribution in the statistical analysis. A cluster analysis based on the experimental uncertainties in the contents of these two methylxanthines has identified from four to six different groups of mate progenies.

  13. 6-(3,5-Dimeth-oxy-benzyl-amino)-9-(oxan-2-yl)-9H-purine.

    PubMed

    Starha, Pavel; Popa, Igor; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-04-01

    The mol-ecule of the title compound, C19H23N5O3, contains six-membered pyrimidine and five-membered imidazole rings merged into the essentially planar purine skeleton (r.m.s. deviation = 0.01 Å). In the crystal, pairs of N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds link mol-ecules into inversion dimers. The dimers are linked via C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming double-stranded chains propagating along [001]. These chains are linked via C-H⋯π and parallel slipped π-π inter-actions [centroid-centroid distance = 3.467 (1) Å; slippage 0.519 Å], forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:23634074

  14. 6-(3,5-Dimeth­oxy­benzyl­amino)-9-(oxan-2-yl)-9H-purine

    PubMed Central

    Štarha, Pavel; Popa, Igor; Dvořák, Zdeněk; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    The mol­ecule of the title compound, C19H23N5O3, contains six-membered pyrimidine and five-membered imidazole rings merged into the essentially planar purine skeleton (r.m.s. deviation = 0.01 Å). In the crystal, pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds link mol­ecules into inversion dimers. The dimers are linked via C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming double-stranded chains propagating along [001]. These chains are linked via C—H⋯π and parallel slipped π–π inter­actions [centroid–centroid distance = 3.467 (1) Å; slippage 0.519 Å], forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:23634074

  15. A Canonical Correlation Analysis of AIDS Restriction Genes and Metabolic Pathways Identifies Purine Metabolism as a Key Cooperator

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hanhui; Yuan, Jinjin; Wang, Zhengwu; Huang, Aiqiong; Liu, Xiaolong; Han, Xiao; Chen, Yahong

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus causes a severe disease in humans, referred to as immune deficiency syndrome. Studies on the interaction between host genetic factors and the virus have revealed dozens of genes that impact diverse processes in the AIDS disease. To resolve more genetic factors related to AIDS, a canonical correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between AIDS restriction and metabolic pathway gene expression. The results show that HIV-1 postentry cellular viral cofactors from AIDS restriction genes are coexpressed in human transcriptome microarray datasets. Further, the purine metabolism pathway comprises novel host factors that are coexpressed with AIDS restriction genes. Using a canonical correlation analysis for expression is a reliable approach to exploring the mechanism underlying AIDS. PMID:27462363

  16. Purine biosynthesis in L1210 leukemia cells is inhibited by 7-hydroxymethotrexate (7-OH-MTX) polyglutamates (PGS)

    SciTech Connect

    Seither, R.L.; Matherly, L.H.; Goldman, I.D.

    1986-05-01

    The biochemical basis for 7-OH-MTX cytotoxicity was examined in L1210 tumor cells. Cells were exposed to 100 ..mu..M 7-OH-MTX (approx. 50% growth inhibition) or 10 ..mu..M methotrexate (MTX) (approx. 95% growth inhibition) for 6 hrs to allow high levels of PGS to accumulate. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) activity was assessed by dihydrofolate (FH/sub 2/) pools labeled with 5-formyl-(/sup 3/H)-tetrahydrofolate (5..mu..M) or /sup 3/H-folic acid (1 ..mu..M). FH/sub 2/ was not elevated above control levels in 7-OH-MTX treated cells, in contrast to MTX treated cells in which FH/sub 2/ increased 4- to 7-fold. /sup 3/H-Deoxyuridine incorporation into DNA was not inhibited in cells containing high levels (11.5 nmol/g dry wt.) of 7-OH-MTX tetraglutamate (7-OH-4-NH/sub 2/-10-CH/sub 3/-PteGlu/sub 4/), well in excess of the DHFR-binding capacity (7.3 +/- 0.9 nmol/g), indicating a normal rate of thymidylate synthesis. Although small amounts of 7-OH-MTX and its PGS were bound to DHFR in L1210 cells, as assessed by gel filtration, there was evidence for the preferential binding of 7-OH-MTX tetraglutamate. In all cases this was well below the DHFR binding capacity, consistent with normal rates of deoxyuridine metabolism and FH/sub 2/ levels in the cell. Incorporation of /sup 14/C-formate (60 min) into thymidylate and amino acids was unaffected by 7-OH-MTX, yet incorporation into purines was inhibited over 50%, supporting a block(s) in de novo purine biosynthesis.

  17. Alterations in purine metabolism in middle-aged elite, amateur, and recreational runners across a 1-year training cycle.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Jacek; Kusy, Krzysztof; Słomińska, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Changes in purine derivatives may be considered as signs of training-induced metabolic adaptations. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a 1-year training cycle on the response of hypoxanthine (Hx) concentration and Hx-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) activity. Three groups of middle-aged male runners were examined: 11 elite master runners (EL; 46.0 ± 3.8 years), 9 amateur runners (AM; 45.1 ± 4.7 years), and 10 recreational runners (RE; 45.9 ± 6.1 years). Plasma Hx concentration and erythrocyte HGPRT activity were measured in three characteristic training phases of the annual cycle. Significant differences in post-exercise Hx concentration and resting HGPRT activity were demonstrated between the EL, AM, and RE groups across consecutive training phases. The EL group showed lowest Hx concentration and highest HGPRT activity compared to the AM and RE groups. Analogous differences were observed between the AM and RE groups during specific preparation. For the EL group, the changes were observed across all examinations and the lowest Hx concentration and highest HGPRT activity were found in the competition phase. Significant change was also revealed in the AM group between the general and specific preparation, but not in the competition phase. No significant changes were found in the RE runners who did not use anaerobic exercise in their training. In conclusion, a long-lasting endurance training, incorporating high-intensity exercise, results in significant changes in purine metabolism, whereas training characterized by constant low-intensity exercise does not. Plasma Hx concentration and erythrocyte HGPRT activity may be sensitive indicators of training adaptation and training status in middle-aged athletes.

  18. Calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase: structure of its ternary complex with an N(7)-acycloguanosine inhibitor and a phosphate anion.

    PubMed

    Luić, M; Koellner, G; Shugar, D; Saenger, W; Bzowska, A

    2001-01-01

    The calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) ternary complex with an N(7)-acycloguanosine inhibitor and a phosphate ion has been crystallized in the cubic space group P2(1)3, with unit-cell parameter a = 94.11 A and one monomer per asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data were collected using synchrotron radiation (Station X31, EMBL Outstation, DESY, Hamburg). The crystal structure was refined to a resolution of 2.2 A and R and R(free) values of 17.5 and 24.5%, respectively. The acyclonucleoside inhibitor is bound in the active site in an inverted ('upside-down') orientation of the purine base compared with natural substrates. The side chain of Asp243 forms two hydrogen bonds with the base ring: N(delta) donates a hydrogen to N(3) and O(delta) accepts a hydrogen from the guanine N(2)-amino group. N(1)--H of the base is hydrogen bonded to O(epsilon) of Glu201, while N(9) accepts a hydrogen bond from Thr242 O(gamma). In addition, a water molecule (W417) bridges the N(2)-amino group of the base and O(epsilon) of Glu201. In the phosphate-binding site, a phosphate ion is bound to Ser33, His64, Arg84, His86, Ala116 and Ser220. The acyclic chain of the N(7)-acycloguanosine inhibitor is in a folded conformation and together with a water molecule (W388) occupies the pentose-binding site, with possible hydrogen bonds to Tyr88 O(eta) and His257 N(delta 1). This new binding mode fully accounts for the previously observed substrate properties of 7-beta-D-ribofuranosides of hypoxanthine and guanine. It also provides a new starting point for the design of inhibitors of PNP for therapeutic and other applications.

  19. Locations and contexts of sequences that hybridize to poly(dG-dT).(dC-dA) in mammalian ribosomal DNAs and two X-linked genes.

    PubMed Central

    Braaten, D C; Thomas, J R; Little, R D; Dickson, K R; Goldberg, I; Schlessinger, D; Ciccodicola, A; D'Urso, M

    1988-01-01

    Sequences located several kilobases both 5' and 3' of the stably transcribed portion of several genes hybridize to radio-labeled pure fragments of the alternating sequence poly (dG-dT) (dC-dA) ["poly(GT)"]. The genes include the ribosomal DNA of mouse, rat, and human, and also human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and mouse hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT). HPRT has additional hybridizing sequences in introns. Fragments that include the hybridizing sequences and up to 300 bp of adjoining DNA show perfect runs of poly(GT) (greater than 30bp) in all but the human 5' region of rDNA, which shows a somewhat different alternating purine:pyrimidine sequence, poly(GTAT) (36bp). Within 150 bp of these sequences in various instances are found a number of other sequences reported to affect DNA conformation in model systems. Most marked is an enhancement of sequences matching at least 67% to the consensus binding sequence for topoisomerase II. Two to ten-fold less of such sequences were found in other sequenced portions of the nontranscribed spacer or in the transcribed portion of rDNA. The conservation of the locations of tracts of alternating purine:pyrimidine between evolutionarily diverse species is consistent with a possible functional role for these sequences. Images PMID:3267216

  20. How Pronounced Is Income Inequality around the World--and How Can Education Help Reduce It? Education Indicators in Focus. No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    How pronounced is income inequality around the world--and how can education help reduce it? This paper reports the following: (1) Across OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, the average income of the richest 10% of the population was about nine times that of the poorest 10% before the onset of the global economic…

  1. Calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase: complex kinetic mechanism, hydrolysis of 7-methylguanosine, and oligomeric state in solution.

    PubMed

    Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2002-04-29

    The active enzyme form was found to be a homotrimer, no active monomers were observed. Only in the presence of an extremely high orthophosphate concentration (0.5 M) or at a low enzyme concentration (0.2 microg/ml) with no ligands present a small fraction of the enzyme is probably in a dissociated and/or non-active form. The specific activity is invariant over a broad enzyme concentration range (0.017 microg/ml-0.29 mg/ml). At concentrations below 0.9 microg/ml and in the absence of ligands the enzyme tends to loose its catalytic activity, while in the presence of any substrate or at higher concentrations it was found to be active as a trimer. In the absence of phosphate the enzyme catalyses the hydrolysis of 7-methylguanosine (m7Guo) with a catalytic rate constant 1.3x10(-3) x s(-1) as compared with the rate of 38 s(-1) for the phosphorolysis of this nucleoside. The initial pre-steady-state phase of the phosphorolysis of m7Guo, 70 s(-1), is almost twice faster than the steady-state rate and indicates that the rate-limiting step is subsequent to the glycosidic bond cleavage. Complex kinetic behaviour with substrates of phosphorolytic direction (various nucleosides and orthophosphate) was observed; data for phosphate as the variable substrate with inosine and guanosine, but not with their 7-methyl counterparts, might be interpreted as two binding sites with different affinities, or as a negative cooperativity. However, the titration of the enzyme intrinsic fluorescence with 0.2 microM-30 mM phosphate is consistent with only one dissociation constant for phosphate, K(d)=220+/-120 microM. Protective effects of ligands on the thermal inactivation of the enzyme indicate that all substrates of the phosphorolytic and the synthetic reactions are able to form binary complexes with the calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The purine bases, guanine and hypoxanthine, bind strongly with dissociation constants of about 0.1 microM, while all other ligands studied

  2. X-ray structure, NMR and stability-in-solution study of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine - A new active compound for cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walla, Jan; Szüčová, Lucie; Císařová, Ivana; Gucký, Tomáš; Zatloukal, Marek; Doležal, Karel; Greplová, Jarmila; Massino, Frank J.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2010-06-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 6-(furfurylamino)-9-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)purine ( 1) was determined at 150(2) K. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic P2 1/ c space group with a = 10.5642(2), b = 13.6174(3), c = 10.3742(2) Å, V = 1460.78(5) Å 3, Z = 4, R( F) = for 3344 unique reflections. The purine moiety and furfuryl ring are planar and the tetrahydropyran-2-yl is disordered in the ratio 1:3, probably due to the chiral carbon atom C(17). The individual 1H and 13C NMR signals were assigned by 2D correlation experiments such as 1H- 1H COSY and ge-2D HSQC. Stability-in-solution was determined in methanol/water in acidic pH (3-7).

  3. 2,6-Di-chloro-9-(2',3',5'-tri-O-acetyl-β-d-ribo-furanos-yl)-9H-purine.

    PubMed

    Novosjolova, Irina; Stepanovs, Dmitrijs; Bizdēna, Erika; Mishnev, Anatoly; Turks, Māris

    2014-02-01

    The title synthetic analog of purine nucleosides, C16H16Cl2N4O7, has its acetyl-ated β-furan-ose ring in a 3'β-envelope conformation, with the corresponding C atom deviating by 0.602 (5) Å from the rest of the ring. The planar part of the furan-ose ring forms a dihedral angle of 65.0 (1)° with the mean plane of the purine bicycle. In the crystal, mol-ecules form a three-dimensional network through multiple C-H⋯O and C-H⋯N hydrogen bonds and C-H⋯π interactions.

  4. trans-Dichloridobis{2-chloro-6-[(3-fluoro-benz-yl)amino]-9-isopropyl-9H-purine-κN (7)}platinum(II).

    PubMed

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Starha, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    In the title compound, trans-[PtCl2(C15H15ClFN5)2], the Pt(II) atom, located on an inversion centre, is coordinated by the purine N atoms of the 2-chloro-6-[(3-fluoro-benz-yl)amino]-9-isopropyl-9H-purine ligands and two Cl atoms in a slightly distorted trans-square-planar coordination geometry [N-Pt-Cl angles = 89.91 (5) and 90.09 (5)°]. Weak intra-molecular N-H⋯Cl contacts occur. In the crystal, C-H⋯Cl and C-H⋯F contacts, as well as weak π-π stacking inter-actions [centroid-centroid distances = 3.5000 (11) and 3.6495 (12) Å] connect the mol-ecules into a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:23794993

  5. trans-Dichloridobis{2-chloro-6-[(3-fluoro­benz­yl)amino]-9-isopropyl-9H-purine-κN 7}platinum(II)

    PubMed Central

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Štarha, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, trans-[PtCl2(C15H15ClFN5)2], the PtII atom, located on an inversion centre, is coordinated by the purine N atoms of the 2-chloro-6-[(3-fluoro­benz­yl)amino]-9-isopropyl-9H-purine ligands and two Cl atoms in a slightly distorted trans-square-planar coordination geometry [N—Pt—Cl angles = 89.91 (5) and 90.09 (5)°]. Weak intra­molecular N—H⋯Cl contacts occur. In the crystal, C—H⋯Cl and C—H⋯F contacts, as well as weak π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid distances = 3.5000 (11) and 3.6495 (12) Å] connect the mol­ecules into a three-dimensional architecture. PMID:23794993

  6. An Interpretation of the Ancestral Codon from Miller’s Amino Acids and Nucleotide Correlations in Modern Coding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Carels, Nicolas; de Leon, Miguel Ponce

    2015-01-01

    Purine bias, which is usually referred to as an “ancestral codon”, is known to result in short-range correlations between nucleotides in coding sequences, and it is common in all species. We demonstrate that RWY is a more appropriate pattern than the classical RNY, and purine bias (Rrr) is the product of a network of nucleotide compensations induced by functional constraints on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Through deductions from universal correlation properties, we also demonstrate that amino acids from Miller’s spark discharge experiment are compatible with functional primeval proteins at the dawn of living cell radiation on earth. These amino acids match the hydropathy and secondary structures of modern proteins. PMID:25922573

  7. Effects of salicylic acid on post-ischaemic ventricular function and purine efflux in isolated mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Don; Gehr, Lynne; Karnes, H Thomas; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Xi, Lei

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Various plasma concentrations of aspirin and its predominant metabolite, salicylic acid, are required for its antiarthritic (1.5-2.5 mM), anti-inflammatory (0.5-5.0 mM) or antiplatelet (0.18-0.36 mM) actions. A recent study demonstrated the inhibitory effects of both aspirin and salicylic acid on oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis in isolated rat cardiac mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner (0-10 mM concentration range). In this context, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of salicylic acid on inosine efflux (a potential biomarker of acute cardiac ischaemia) as well as cardiac contractile function in the isolated mouse heart following 20 min of zero-flow global ischaemia. Inosine efflux was found at significantly higher concentrations in ischaemic hearts perfused with Krebs buffer fortified with 1.0 mM salicylic acid compared with those without salicylic acid (12575+/-3319 vs. 1437+/-348 ng ml(-1) min(-1), mean+/-SEM, n=6 per group, p<0.01). These results indicate that 1.0 mM salicylic acid potentiates 8.8-fold ATP nucleotide purine catabolism into its metabolites (e.g. inosine, hypoxanthine). Salicylic acid (0.1 or 1.0 mM) did not appreciably inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (the enzyme converts inosine to hypoxanthine) suggesting the augmented inosine efflux was due to the salicylic acid effect on upstream elements of cellular respiration. Whereas post-ischaemic cardiac function was further depressed by 1.0 mM salicylic acid, perfusion with 0.1 mM salicylic acid led to a remarkable functional improvement despite moderately increased inosine efflux (2.7-fold). We conclude that inosine is a sensitive biomarker for detecting cardiac ischaemia and salicylic acid-induced effects on cellular respiration. However, the inosine efflux level appears to be a poor predictor of the individual post-ischaemic cardiac functional recovery in this ex vivo

  8. Effects of salicylic acid on post-ischaemic ventricular function and purine efflux in isolated mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Don; Gehr, Lynne; Karnes, H Thomas; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Xi, Lei

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Various plasma concentrations of aspirin and its predominant metabolite, salicylic acid, are required for its antiarthritic (1.5-2.5 mM), anti-inflammatory (0.5-5.0 mM) or antiplatelet (0.18-0.36 mM) actions. A recent study demonstrated the inhibitory effects of both aspirin and salicylic acid on oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis in isolated rat cardiac mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner (0-10 mM concentration range). In this context, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of salicylic acid on inosine efflux (a potential biomarker of acute cardiac ischaemia) as well as cardiac contractile function in the isolated mouse heart following 20 min of zero-flow global ischaemia. Inosine efflux was found at significantly higher concentrations in ischaemic hearts perfused with Krebs buffer fortified with 1.0 mM salicylic acid compared with those without salicylic acid (12575+/-3319 vs. 1437+/-348 ng ml(-1) min(-1), mean+/-SEM, n=6 per group, p<0.01). These results indicate that 1.0 mM salicylic acid potentiates 8.8-fold ATP nucleotide purine catabolism into its metabolites (e.g. inosine, hypoxanthine). Salicylic acid (0.1 or 1.0 mM) did not appreciably inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (the enzyme converts inosine to hypoxanthine) suggesting the augmented inosine efflux was due to the salicylic acid effect on upstream elements of cellular respiration. Whereas post-ischaemic cardiac function was further depressed by 1.0 mM salicylic acid, perfusion with 0.1 mM salicylic acid led to a remarkable functional improvement despite moderately increased inosine efflux (2.7-fold). We conclude that inosine is a sensitive biomarker for detecting cardiac ischaemia and salicylic acid-induced effects on cellular respiration. However, the inosine efflux level appears to be a poor predictor of the individual post-ischaemic cardiac functional recovery in this ex vivo

  9. Theoretical and experimental studies on the corrosion inhibition potentials of some purines for aluminum in 0.1 M HCl

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Nnabuk O.; Momoh-Yahaya, H.; Oguzie, Emeka E.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental aspect of the corrosion inhibition potential of adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and, hypoxanthine (HYP) was carried out using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods while the theoretical aspect of the work was carried out by calculations of semi-empirical parameters (for AM1, MNDO, CNDO, PM3 and RM1 Hamiltonians), Fukui functions and inhibitor–metal interaction energies. Results obtained from the experimental studies were in good agreement and indicated that adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and hypoxanthine (HYP) are good adsorption inhibitors for the corrosion of aluminum in solutions of HCl. Data obtained from electrochemical experiment revealed that the studied purines functioned by adsorption on the aluminum/HCl interface and inhibited the cathodic half reaction to a greater extent and anodic half reaction to a lesser extent. The adsorption of the purines on the metal surface was found to be exothermic and spontaneous. Deviation of the adsorption characteristics of the studied purines from the Langmuir adsorption model was compensated by the fitness of Flory Huggins and El Awardy et al. adsorption models. Quantum chemical studies revealed that the experimental inhibition efficiencies of the studied purines are functions of some quantum chemical parameters including total energy of the molecules (TE), energy gap (EL–H), electronic energy of the molecule (EE), dipole moment and core–core repulsion energy (CCR). Fukui functions analysis through DFT and MP2 theories indicated slight complications and unphysical results. However, results obtained from calculated Huckel charges, molecular orbital and interaction energies, the adsorption of the inhibitors proceeded through the imine nitrogen (N5) in GU, emanine nitrogen (N7) in AD and the pyridine nitrogen (N5) in HPY. PMID:25750754

  10. Theoretical and experimental studies on the corrosion inhibition potentials of some purines for aluminum in 0.1 M HCl.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk O; Momoh-Yahaya, H; Oguzie, Emeka E

    2015-03-01

    Experimental aspect of the corrosion inhibition potential of adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and, hypoxanthine (HYP) was carried out using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods while the theoretical aspect of the work was carried out by calculations of semi-empirical parameters (for AM1, MNDO, CNDO, PM3 and RM1 Hamiltonians), Fukui functions and inhibitor-metal interaction energies. Results obtained from the experimental studies were in good agreement and indicated that adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and hypoxanthine (HYP) are good adsorption inhibitors for the corrosion of aluminum in solutions of HCl. Data obtained from electrochemical experiment revealed that the studied purines functioned by adsorption on the aluminum/HCl interface and inhibited the cathodic half reaction to a greater extent and anodic half reaction to a lesser extent. The adsorption of the purines on the metal surface was found to be exothermic and spontaneous. Deviation of the adsorption characteristics of the studied purines from the Langmuir adsorption model was compensated by the fitness of Flory Huggins and El Awardy et al. adsorption models. Quantum chemical studies revealed that the experimental inhibition efficiencies of the studied purines are functions of some quantum chemical parameters including total energy of the molecules (TE), energy gap (E L-H), electronic energy of the molecule (EE), dipole moment and core-core repulsion energy (CCR). Fukui functions analysis through DFT and MP2 theories indicated slight complications and unphysical results. However, results obtained from calculated Huckel charges, molecular orbital and interaction energies, the adsorption of the inhibitors proceeded through the imine nitrogen (N5) in GU, emanine nitrogen (N7) in AD and the pyridine nitrogen (N5) in HPY.

  11. 2-Chloro-6-[(2,4-dimeth­oxy­benz­yl)amino]-9-isopropyl-9H-purine

    PubMed Central

    Novotná, Radka; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C17H20ClN5O2, the benzene ring and the purine ring system make a dihedral angle of 78.56 (4)°. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by pairs of N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds, forming inversion dimers. C—H⋯O and C—H⋯Cl contacts further link the mol­ecules, forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:23476575

  12. Conserved sequence elements associated with exon skipping

    PubMed Central

    Miriami, Elana; Margalit, Hanah; Sperling, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    One of the major forms of alternative splicing, which generates multiple mRNA isoforms differing in the precise combinations of their exon sequences, is exon skipping. While in constitutive splicing all exons are included, in the skipped pattern(s) one or more exons are skipped. The regulation of this process is still not well understood; so far, cis- regulatory elements (such as exonic splicing enhancers) were identified in individual cases. We therefore set to investigate the possibility that exon skipping is controlled by sequences in the adjacent introns. We employed a computer analysis on 54 sequences documented as undergoing exon skipping, and identified two motifs both in the upstream and downstream introns of the skipped exons. One motif is highly enriched in pyrimidines (mostly C residues), and the other motif is highly enriched in purines (mostly G residues). The two motifs differ from the known cis-elements present at the 5′ and 3′ splice site. Interestingly, the two motifs are complementary, and their relative positional order is conserved in the flanking introns. These suggest that base pairing interactions can underlie a mechanism that involves secondary structure to regulate exon skipping. Remarkably, the two motifs are conserved in mouse orthologous genes that undergo exon skipping. PMID:12655015

  13. Nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside salvage in fungi and mammals. Quantitative basis for Urh1 and purine nucleoside phosphorylase function in NAD+ metabolism.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Christensen, Kathryn C; Gazzaniga, Francesca; Pletnev, Alexandre A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-01-01

    NAD+ is a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and an essential substrate of ADP-ribose transfer enzymes and sirtuins, the type III protein lysine deacetylases related to yeast Sir2. Supplementation of yeast cells with nicotinamide riboside extends replicative lifespan and increases Sir2-dependent gene silencing by virtue of increasing net NAD+ synthesis. Nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD+ levels via the nicotinamide riboside kinase pathway and by a pathway initiated by splitting the nucleoside into a nicotinamide base followed by nicotinamide salvage. Genetic evidence has established that uridine hydrolase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and methylthioadenosine phosphorylase are required for Nrk-independent utilization of nicotinamide riboside in yeast. Here we show that mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase but not methylthioadenosine phosphorylase is responsible for mammalian nicotinamide riboside kinase-independent nicotinamide riboside utilization. We demonstrate that so-called uridine hydrolase is 100-fold more active as a nicotinamide riboside hydrolase than as a uridine hydrolase and that uridine hydrolase and mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase cleave nicotinic acid riboside, whereas the yeast phosphorylase has little activity on nicotinic acid riboside. Finally, we show that yeast nicotinic acid riboside utilization largely depends on uridine hydrolase and nicotinamide riboside kinase and that nicotinic acid riboside bioavailability is increased by ester modification. PMID:19001417

  14. Nitrogen K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of purine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Fukao, Taishi; Minami, Hirotake; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2014-08-07

    The N K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the purine-containing nucleotide, guanosine 5{sup ′}-monophosphate (GMP), in aqueous solution are measured under various pH conditions. The spectra show characteristic peaks, which originate from resonant excitations of N 1s electrons to π* orbitals inside the guanine moiety of GMP. The relative intensities of these peaks depend on the pH values of the solution. The pH dependence is explained by the core-level shift of N atoms at specific sites caused by protonation and deprotonation. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical spectra calculated by using density functional theory for GMP and the other purine-containing nucleotides, adenosine 5{sup ′}-monophosphate, and adenosine 5{sup ′}-triphosphate. The N K-edge XANES spectra for all of these nucleotides are classified by the numbers of N atoms with particular chemical bonding characteristics in the purine moiety.

  15. The transition state analog inhibitor of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) Immucillin-H arrests bone loss in rat periodontal disease models.

    PubMed

    Deves, Candida; de Assunção, Thiago Milech; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Campos, Maria Martha; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Batista, Eraldo L

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a purine-metabolizing enzyme that catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of 6-oxypurine (deoxy)nucleosides to their respective bases and (deoxy)ribose-1-phosphate. It is a key enzyme in the purine salvage pathway of mammalian cells. The present investigation sought to determine whether the PNP transition state analog inhibitor (Immucillin-H) arrests bone loss in two models of induced periodontal disease in rats. Periodontal disease was induced in rats using ligature or LPS injection followed by administration of Immucillin-H for direct analysis of bone loss, histology and TRAP staining. In vitro osteoclast differentiation and activation of T CD4+ cells in the presence of Immucillin-H were carried out for assessment of RANKL expression, PNP and Cathepsin K activity. Immucillin-H inhibited bone loss induced by ligatures and LPS, leading to a reduced number of infiltrating osteoclasts and inflammatory cells. In vitro assays revealed that Immucillin-H could not directly abrogate differentiation of osteoclast precursor cells, but affected lymphocyte-mediated osteoclastogenesis. On the other hand, incubation of pre-activated T CD4+ with Immucillin-H decreased RANKL secretion with no compromise of cell viability. The PNP transition state analog Immucillin-H arrests bone loss mediated by T CD4+ cells with no direct effect on osteoclasts. PNP inhibitor may have an impact in the treatment of diseases characterized by the presence of pathogens and imbalances of bone metabolism.

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Bacterium Pseudomonas putida CBB5, Which Can Utilize Caffeine as a Sole Carbon and Nitrogen Source

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Erik M.; Summers, Ryan M.; Subramanian, Mani V.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBB5 was isolated from soil by enriching for growth on caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine). The draft genome of this strain is 6.9 Mb, with 5,941 predicted coding sequences. It includes the previously studied Alx gene cluster encoding alkylxanthine N-demethylase enzymes and other genes that enable the degradation of purine alkaloids. PMID:26067973

  17. The Cipher Code of Simple Sequence Repeats in "Vampire Pathogens".

    PubMed

    Zou, Geng; Bello-Orti, Bernardo; Aragon, Virginia; Tucker, Alexander W; Luo, Rui; Ren, Pinxing; Bi, Dingren; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Hui

    2015-07-28

    Blood inside mammals is a forbidden area for the majority of prokaryotic microbes; however, red blood cells tropism microbes, like "vampire pathogens" (VP), succeed in matching scarce nutrients and surviving strong immunity reactions. Here, we found VP of Mycoplasma, Rhizobiales, and Rickettsiales showed significantly higher counts of (AG)n dimeric simple sequence repeats (Di-SSRs) in the genomes, coding and non-coding regions than non Vampire Pathogens (N_VP). Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between GC content and the span of (AG)n-Di-SSR variation. Gene Ontology (GO) terms with abundance of (AG)3-Di-SSRs shared by the VP strains were associated with purine nucleotide metabolism (FDR < 0.01), indicating an adaptation to the limited availability of purine and nucleotide precursors in blood. Di-amino acids coded by (AG)n-Di-SSRs included all three six-fold code amino acids (Arg, Leu and Ser) and significantly higher counts of Di-amino acids coded by (AG)3, (GA)3, and (TC)3 in VP than N_VP. Furthermore, significant differences (P < 0.001) on the numbers of triplexes formed from (AG)n-Di-SSRs between VP and N_VP in Mycoplasma suggested the potential role of (AG)n-Di-SSRs in gene regulation.

  18. Structure of eukaryotic purine/H(+) symporter UapA suggests a role for homodimerization in transport activity.

    PubMed

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Amillis, Sotiris; Leung, James; Lambrinidis, George; Capaldi, Stefano; Scull, Nicola J; Craven, Gregory; Iwata, So; Armstrong, Alan; Mikros, Emmanuel; Diallinas, George; Cameron, Alexander D; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-04-18

    The uric acid/xanthine H(+) symporter, UapA, is a high-affinity purine transporter from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the crystal structure of a genetically stabilized version of UapA (UapA-G411VΔ1-11) in complex with xanthine. UapA is formed from two domains, a core domain and a gate domain, similar to the previously solved uracil transporter UraA, which belongs to the same family. The structure shows UapA in an inward-facing conformation with xanthine bound to residues in the core domain. Unlike UraA, which was observed to be a monomer, UapA forms a dimer in the crystals with dimer interactions formed exclusively through the gate domain. Analysis of dominant negative mutants is consistent with dimerization playing a key role in transport. We postulate that UapA uses an elevator transport mechanism likely to be shared with other structurally homologous transporters including anion exchangers and prestin.

  19. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method for analyzing adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase and its application in inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanfei; Li, Youxin; Bao, James J

    2016-08-01

    A novel capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for simultaneous analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) in red blood cells (RBCs). The developed method considered and took advantage of the natural conversion from the ADA product, inosine to hypoxanthine. The transformation ratio was introduced for ADA and PNP analysis to obtain more reliable results. After optimizing the enzymatic incubation and electrophoresis separation conditions, the determined activities of ADA and PNP in 12 human RBCs were 0.237-0.833 U/ml and 9.013-10.453 U/ml packed cells, respectively. The analysis of ADA in mice RBCs indicated that there was an apparent activity difference between healthy and hepatoma mice. In addition, the proposed method was also successfully applied in the inhibitor screening from nine traditional Chinese medicines, and data showed that ADA activities were strongly inhibited by Rhizoma Chuanxiong and Angelica sinensis. The inhibition effect of Angelica sinensis on ADA is first reported here and could also inhibit PNP activity. PMID:27173606

  20. Isotope-specific and amino acid-specific heavy atom substitutions alter barrier crossing in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Javier; Schramm, Vern L

    2015-09-01

    Computational chemistry predicts that atomic motions on the femtosecond timescale are coupled to transition-state formation (barrier-crossing) in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). The prediction is experimentally supported by slowed catalytic site chemistry in isotopically labeled PNP (13C, 15N, and 2H). However, other explanations are possible, including altered volume or bond polarization from carbon-deuterium bonds or propagation of the femtosecond bond motions into slower (nanoseconds to milliseconds) motions of the larger protein architecture to alter catalytic site chemistry. We address these possibilities by analysis of chemistry rates in isotope-specific labeled PNPs. Catalytic site chemistry was slowed for both [2H]PNP and [13C, 15N]PNP in proportion to their altered protein masses. Secondary effects emanating from carbon-deuterium bond properties can therefore be eliminated. Heavy-enzyme mass effects were probed for local or global contributions to catalytic site chemistry by generating [15N, 2H]His8-PNP. Of the eight His per subunit, three participate in contacts to the bound reactants and five are remote from the catalytic sites. [15N, 2H]His8-PNP had reduced catalytic site chemistry larger than proportional to the enzymatic mass difference. Altered barrier crossing when only His are heavy supports local catalytic site femtosecond perturbations coupled to transition-state formation. Isotope-specific and amino acid specific labels extend the use of heavy enzyme methods to distinguish global from local isotope effects.

  1. Isotope-specific and amino acid-specific heavy atom substitutions alter barrier crossing in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Javier; Schramm, Vern L

    2015-09-01

    Computational chemistry predicts that atomic motions on the femtosecond timescale are coupled to transition-state formation (barrier-crossing) in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). The prediction is experimentally supported by slowed catalytic site chemistry in isotopically labeled PNP (13C, 15N, and 2H). However, other explanations are possible, including altered volume or bond polarization from carbon-deuterium bonds or propagation of the femtosecond bond motions into slower (nanoseconds to milliseconds) motions of the larger protein architecture to alter catalytic site chemistry. We address these possibilities by analysis of chemistry rates in isotope-specific labeled PNPs. Catalytic site chemistry was slowed for both [2H]PNP and [13C, 15N]PNP in proportion to their altered protein masses. Secondary effects emanating from carbon-deuterium bond properties can therefore be eliminated. Heavy-enzyme mass effects were probed for local or global contributions to catalytic site chemistry by generating [15N, 2H]His8-PNP. Of the eight His per subunit, three participate in contacts to the bound reactants and five are remote from the catalytic sites. [15N, 2H]His8-PNP had reduced catalytic site chemistry larger than proportional to the enzymatic mass difference. Altered barrier crossing when only His are heavy supports local catalytic site femtosecond perturbations coupled to transition-state formation. Isotope-specific and amino acid specific labels extend the use of heavy enzyme methods to distinguish global from local isotope effects. PMID:26305965

  2. Structure of eukaryotic purine/H+ symporter UapA suggests a role for homodimerization in transport activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Amillis, Sotiris; Leung, James; Lambrinidis, George; Capaldi, Stefano; Scull, Nicola J.; Craven, Gregory; Iwata, So; Armstrong, Alan; Mikros, Emmanuel; Diallinas, George; Cameron, Alexander D.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-04-01

    The uric acid/xanthine H+ symporter, UapA, is a high-affinity purine transporter from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the crystal structure of a genetically stabilized version of UapA (UapA-G411VΔ1-11) in complex with xanthine. UapA is formed from two domains, a core domain and a gate domain, similar to the previously solved uracil transporter UraA, which belongs to the same family. The structure shows UapA in an inward-facing conformation with xanthine bound to residues in the core domain. Unlike UraA, which was observed to be a monomer, UapA forms a dimer in the crystals with dimer interactions formed exclusively through the gate domain. Analysis of dominant negative mutants is consistent with dimerization playing a key role in transport. We postulate that UapA uses an elevator transport mechanism likely to be shared with other structurally homologous transporters including anion exchangers and prestin.

  3. Antifolates targeting purine synthesis allow entry of tumor cells into S phase regardless of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Bronder, Julie L; Moran, Richard G

    2002-09-15

    The class of folate antimetabolites typified by (6R)-dideazatetrahydrofolate (lometrexol, DDATHF) are specific inhibitors of de novo purine synthesis because of potent inhibition of glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GART) but do not induce detectable levels of DNA strand breaks. As such, they are a test case of the concept that ribonucleotide depletion can be sensed by p53, resulting in a G(1) cell cycle block. The GART inhibitors have been proposed previously to be cytotoxic in tumor cells lacking p53 function but only cytostatic in p53 wild-type tumor cells. We have investigated this concept. Cell cycle progression into and through S phase was slowed by DDATHF, but both p53 +/+ and -/- human colon carcinoma cells entered and completed one S phase in the presence of drug. This inability of p53 to initiate a G(1) arrest after DDATHF treatment was mirrored by an independence of the cytotoxicity of DDATHF on p53 function. We conclude that carcinoma cells are killed equally well by DDATHF and related compounds whether or not the p53 pathway is intact and that the utility of GART inhibitors would not be limited to p53-negative tumors. PMID:12234990

  4. Structure of eukaryotic purine/H+ symporter UapA suggests a role for homodimerization in transport activity

    PubMed Central

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Amillis, Sotiris; Leung, James; Lambrinidis, George; Capaldi, Stefano; Scull, Nicola J.; Craven, Gregory; Iwata, So; Armstrong, Alan; Mikros, Emmanuel; Diallinas, George; Cameron, Alexander D.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    The uric acid/xanthine H+ symporter, UapA, is a high-affinity purine transporter from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Here we present the crystal structure of a genetically stabilized version of UapA (UapA-G411VΔ1–11) in complex with xanthine. UapA is formed from two domains, a core domain and a gate domain, similar to the previously solved uracil transporter UraA, which belongs to the same family. The structure shows UapA in an inward-facing conformation with xanthine bound to residues in the core domain. Unlike UraA, which was observed to be a monomer, UapA forms a dimer in the crystals with dimer interactions formed exclusively through the gate domain. Analysis of dominant negative mutants is consistent with dimerization playing a key role in transport. We postulate that UapA uses an elevator transport mechanism likely to be shared with other structurally homologous transporters including anion exchangers and prestin. PMID:27088252

  5. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and the enzymatic antioxidant defense system in breast milk from women with different levels of arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar Kurt; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina

    2015-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is an ubiquitous enzyme which plays an important role in arsenic (As) detoxification. As is a toxic metalloid present in air, soil and water; is abundant in the environment and is readily transferred along the trophic chain, being found even in human breast milk. Milk is the main nutrient source for the growth and development of neonates. Information on breast milk synthesis and its potential defense mechanism against As toxicity is scarce. In this study, PNP and antioxidant enzymes activities, as well as glutathione (GSH) and total arsenic (TAs) concentrations, were quantified in breast milk samples. PNP, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) activities and GSH concentration were determined spectrophotometrically; TAs concentration ([TAs]) was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Data suggest an increase in PNP activity (median = 0.034 U mg protein-1) in the presence of TAs (median = 1.16 g L(-1)). To explain the possible association of PNP activity in breast milk with the activity of the antioxidant enzymes as well as with GSH and TAs concentrations, generalized linear models were built. In the adjusted model, GPx and GR activities showed a statistically significant (p<0.01) association with PNP activity. These results may suggest that PNP activity increases in the presence of TAs as part of the detoxification mechanism in breast milk.

  6. Contribution of intravascular versus interstitial purines and nitric oxide in the regulation of exercise hyperaemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hellsten, Y; Nyberg, M; Mortensen, S P

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of blood flow to skeletal muscle involves a complex interaction between several locally formed vasodilators that are produced both in the skeletal muscle interstitium and intravascularly. The gas nitric oxide (NO) and the purines ATP and adenosine, are potent vasodilators that are formed by multiple cell types and released into the skeletal muscle interstitium and in plasma in response to muscle contraction. Cellular sources of ATP and NO in plasma are erythrocytes and endothelial cells, whereas interstitial sources are skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells. Adenosine originates primarily from extracellular degradation of ATP. During exercise the concentrations of ATP and adenosine increase markedly in the interstitium with smaller increases occurring in plasma, and thus the interstitial concentration during exercise is severalfold higher than in plasma. The concentration of NO metabolites (NOx) in interstitium and plasma does not change during exercise and is similar in the two compartments. Adenosine and NO have been shown to contribute to exercise hyperaemia whereas the role of ATP remains unclear due to lack of specific purinergic receptor blockers. The relative role of intravascular versus interstitial vasodilators is not known but evidence suggests that both compartments are important. In cardiovascular disease, a reduced capacity to form adenosine in the muscle interstitium may be a contributing factor in increased peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:22733661

  7. Design of vectors for efficient expression of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in skin fibroblasts from enzyme-deficient humans

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, W.R.A.; Miller, A.D.

    1988-09-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency is an inherited disorder associated with a severe immune defect that is fatal. Enzyme replacement therapy is an attractive approach to treatment of this disease. To this aim the authors constructed retroviral vectors containing a human PNP cDNA and a selectable gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase. PNP expression was controlled by either the early promoter from simian virus 40, the immediate early promoter from human cytomegalovirus, or the retroviral promoter. Cultured skin fibroblasts from two unrelated PNP-deficient patients that were infected with these vectors expressed mean PNP activities of 0.03, 0.74, and 5.9 /mu/mol/hr per mg of protein, respectively. The latter infectants had PNP activities eight times the level of 0.74 /mu/mol/hr per mg of protein observed in normal skin fibroblasts, enabling rapid metabolism of exogenous deoxyguanosine, the cytotoxic metabolite that accumulates in the plasma of PNP-deficient patients. These experiments indicate that viral long terminal repeat was the strongest promoter for expression of PNP and suggest the potential of human skin fibroblasts as vehicles for therapeutic gene expression.

  8. Isotope-specific and amino acid-specific heavy atom substitutions alter barrier crossing in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Javier; Schramm, Vern L.

    2015-01-01

    Computational chemistry predicts that atomic motions on the femtosecond timescale are coupled to transition-state formation (barrier-crossing) in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). The prediction is experimentally supported by slowed catalytic site chemistry in isotopically labeled PNP (13C, 15N, and 2H). However, other explanations are possible, including altered volume or bond polarization from carbon-deuterium bonds or propagation of the femtosecond bond motions into slower (nanoseconds to milliseconds) motions of the larger protein architecture to alter catalytic site chemistry. We address these possibilities by analysis of chemistry rates in isotope-specific labeled PNPs. Catalytic site chemistry was slowed for both [2H]PNP and [13C, 15N]PNP in proportion to their altered protein masses. Secondary effects emanating from carbon–deuterium bond properties can therefore be eliminated. Heavy-enzyme mass effects were probed for local or global contributions to catalytic site chemistry by generating [15N, 2H]His8-PNP. Of the eight His per subunit, three participate in contacts to the bound reactants and five are remote from the catalytic sites. [15N, 2H]His8-PNP had reduced catalytic site chemistry larger than proportional to the enzymatic mass difference. Altered barrier crossing when only His are heavy supports local catalytic site femtosecond perturbations coupled to transition-state formation. Isotope-specific and amino acid specific labels extend the use of heavy enzyme methods to distinguish global from local isotope effects. PMID:26305965

  9. Molecular mechanism of diaminomaleonitrile to diaminofumaronitrile photoisomerization: an intermediate step in the prebiotic formation of purine nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Szabla, Rafał; Góra, Robert W; Sponer, Jiří; Sponer, Judit E

    2014-02-24

    The photoinduced isomerization of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) to diaminofumaronitrile (DAFN) was suggested to play a key role in the prebiotically plausible formation of purine nucleobases and nucleotides. In this work we analyze two competitive photoisomerization mechanisms on the basis of state-of-the-art quantum-chemical calculations. Even though it was suggested that this process might occur on the triplet potential-energy surface, our results indicate that the singlet reaction channel should not be disregarded either. In fact, the peaked topography of the S1 /S0 conical intersection suggests that the deexcitation should most likely occur on a sub-picosecond timescale and the singlet photoisomerization mechanism might effectively compete even with a very efficient intersystem crossing. Such a scenario is further supported by the relatively small spin-orbit coupling of the S1 and T2 states in the Franck-Condon region, which does not indicate a very effective triplet bypass for this photoreaction. Therefore, we conclude that the triplet reaction channel in DAMN might not be as prominent as was previously thought.

  10. Site-Selective Ribosylation of Fluorescent Nucleobase Analogs Using Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase as a Catalyst: Effects of Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Stachelska-Wierzchowska, Alicja; Wierzchowski, Jacek; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata

    2015-12-28

    Enzymatic ribosylation of fluorescent 8-azapurine derivatives, like 8-azaguanine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, with purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) as a catalyst, leads to N9, N8, and N7-ribosides. The final proportion of the products may be modulated by point mutations in the enzyme active site. As an example, ribosylation of the latter substrate by wild-type calf PNP gives N7- and N8-ribosides, while the N243D mutant directs the ribosyl substitution at N9- and N7-positions. The same mutant allows synthesis of the fluorescent N7-β-d-ribosyl-8-azaguanine. The mutated form of the E. coli PNP, D204N, can be utilized to obtain non-typical ribosides of 8-azaadenine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine as well. The N7- and N8-ribosides of the 8-azapurines can be analytically useful, as illustrated by N7-β-d-ribosyl-2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, which is a good fluorogenic substrate for mammalian forms of PNP, including human blood PNP, while the N8-riboside is selective to the E. coli enzyme.

  11. Brain purine metabolism and xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase conversion in hyperammonemia are under control of NMDA receptors and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Yury; Kosenko, Elena

    2009-10-19

    In hyperammonemia, a decrease in brain ATP can be a result of adenine nucleotide catabolism. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are the end steps in the purine catabolic pathway and directly involved in depletion of the adenylate pool in the cell. Besides, XD can easily be converted to XO to produce reactive oxygen species in the cell. In this study, the effects of acute ammonia intoxication in vivo on brain adenine nucleotide pool and xanthine and hypoxanthine, the end degradation products of adenine nucleotides, during the conversion of XD to XO were studied. Injection of rats with ammonium acetate was shown to lead to the dramatic decrease in the ATP level, adenine nucleotide pool size and adenylate energy charge and to the great increase in hypoxanthine and xanthine 11 min after the lethal dose indicating rapid degradation of adenylates. Conversion of XD to XO in hyperammonemic rat brain was evidenced by elevated XO/XD activity ratio. Injection of MK-801, a NMDA receptor blocker, prevented ammonia-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides and conversion of XD to XO suggesting that in vivo these processes are mediated by activation of NMDA receptors. The in vitro dose-dependent effects of sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, on XD and XO activities are indicative of the direct modification of the enzymes by nitric oxide. This is the first report evidencing the increase in brain xanthine and hypoxanthine levels and adenine nucleotide breakdown in acute ammonia intoxication and NMDA receptor-mediated prevention of these alterations.

  12. p38α Activates Purine Metabolism to Initiate Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Cycling in Response to Stress.

    PubMed

    Karigane, Daiki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Takayuki; Ootomo, Yukako; Sakai, Mashito; Nagamatsu, Go; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Goda, Nobuhito; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Nishimura, Emi K; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Otsu, Kinya; Suematsu, Makoto; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Suda, Toshio; Takubo, Keiyo

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain quiescence by activating specific metabolic pathways, including glycolysis. We do not yet have a clear understanding of how this metabolic activity changes during stress hematopoiesis, such as bone marrow transplantation. Here, we report a critical role for the p38MAPK family isoform p38α in initiating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation during stress hematopoiesis in mice. We found that p38MAPK is immediately phosphorylated in HSPCs after a hematological stress, preceding increased HSPC cycling. Conditional deletion of p38α led to defective recovery from hematological stress and a delay in initiation of HSPC proliferation. Mechanistically, p38α signaling increases expression of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase 2 in HSPCs, leading to altered levels of amino acids and purine-related metabolites and changes in cell-cycle progression in vitro and in vivo. Our studies have therefore uncovered a p38α-mediated pathway that alters HSPC metabolism to respond to stress and promote recovery. PMID:27345838

  13. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  14. Escherichia coli purine repressor: key residues for the allosteric transition between active and inactive conformations and for interdomain signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, F; Brennan, R G; Zalkin, H

    1998-11-10

    The Escherichia coli purine repressor, PurR, exists in an equilibrium between open and closed conformations. Binding of a corepressor, hypoxanthine or guanine, shifts the allosteric equilibrium in favor of the closed conformation and increases the operator DNA binding affinity by 40-fold compared to aporepressor. Glu70 and Trp147 PurR mutations were isolated which perturb the allosteric equilibrium. Three lines of evidence indicate that the allosteric equilibrium of E70A and W147A aporepressors was shifted toward the closed conformation. First, compared to wild-type PurR, these mutant repressors had a 10-30-fold higher corepressor binding affinity. Second, the mutant aporepressors bound to operator DNA with an affinity that is characteristic of the wild-type PurR holorepressor. Third, binding of guanine to wild-type PurR resulted in a near-UV circular dichroism spectral change at 297-305 nm that is attributed to the closed conformation. The circular dichroism spectrum of the E70A aporepressor at 297-305 nm was that expected for the closed conformation, and it was not appreciably altered by corepressor binding. Mutational analysis was used to identify an Arg115-Ser46' interdomain intersubunit hydrogen bond that is necessary for transmitting the allosteric transition in the corepressor binding domain to the DNA binding domain. R115A and S46G PurR mutants were defective in DNA binding in vitro and repressor function in vivo although corepressor binding was identical to the wild type. These results establish that the hydrogen bond between the side chain NH2 of Arg115 and the main chain CO of Ser46' plays a critical role in interdomain signaling.

  15. High-dose folate and dietary purines promote scavenging of peroxynitrite-derived radicals--clinical potential in inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; Barroso-Aranda, Jorge; Contreras, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Reduced folates have been shown to reconstitute the proper activity of "uncoupled" endothelial nitric oxide synthase in inflamed endothlelium. There is recent evidence that this phenomenon may reflect an ability of reduced folates to scavenge peroxynitrite - or, more likely, nitrogen dioxide and carbonate radicals derived from carbonate-induced decomposition of peroxynitrite. This suggests that, at least in those tissues capable of achieving high intracellular levels of reduced folates following high-dose folate administration, high-dose folate may have important anti-inflammatory potential. It would be of interest to examine the impact of high-dose folate in rodent models of disorders in which peroxynitrite plays a key pathogenic role - including diabetes, septic or hemorrhagic shock, ischemia-reperfusion, congestive heart failure, and inflammatory mutagenesis. In particular, this strategy may be useful in many pathologies in which oxidant-mediated PARP activation leads to cell death or dysfunction. Recent evidence that high-dose folate administration preserves myocyte viability following cardiac ischemia-reperfusion likely reflects folate's impact on the cytotoxicity of peroxynitrite. For use in medical emergencies, parenteral leucovorin (racemic 5-formyltetrahydrofolate) is already clinically available. Since uric acid can also function physiologically as a scavenger of peroxynitrite-derived radicals, supplemental inosine or dietary nucleic acids - which raise tissue levels of urate more effectively than does oral uric acid - may usefully complement the protective impact of high-dose folate on nitroxidative stress. Epidemiological associations of high urate levels with low risk for Parkinson's disease may reflect urate's radical scavenging activity, and suggest the possible utility of dietary purines in prevention or treatment of CNS inflammatory disorders. PMID:19409716

  16. Efficient electrogene therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma treatment using the bacterial purine nucleoside phosphorylase suicide gene with fludarabine.

    PubMed

    Deharvengt, Sophie; Rejiba, Soukaina; Wack, Séverine; Aprahamian, Marc; Hajri, Amor

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of electrogene therapy with the bacterial purine nucleoside phosphorylase gene (ePNP), on pancreatic carcinoma (PC) large tumors. The in vivo electroporation (EP) conditions and efficacy were investigated on both subcutaneous xenografts of human PC cells in immunocompromised mice and orthotopic intrapancreatic grafts of rat PC cells in syngenic rats. After intratumoral injection of naked plasmid DNA, EP was performed using a two-needle array with 25-msec pulses and either a 300 V/cm field strength for subcutaneous or a 500 V/cm field strength for orthotopic PC, parameters providing the best electrotransfer as reflected by the measurements of both luciferase activity and ePNP mRNA. As expected, tumors developed sensitivity to prodrug treatment (6-methylpurine deoxyribose or fludarabine phosphate). We observed both significant inhibition of tumor growth and extended survival of treated mice. In fact, after prodrug treatment, PC growth in the subcutaneous model was delayed by 50-70% for ePNP-expressing tumors. In an orthotopic pancreatic tumor model, the animal survival was significantly prolonged after ePNP electrogene transfer followed by fludarabine treatment, with one animal out of 10 being tumor-free 6 months thereafter. The current study demonstrates for the first time on PC the in vivo feasibility of electrogene transfer and its therapeutic efficiency using the suicide gene/prodrug system, ePNP/fludarabine. These findings suggest that electrogene therapy strategy must be considered for pancreatic cancer treatment, particularly at advanced stages of the disease. PMID:17487360

  17. Solving the Tautomeric Equilibrium of Purine Through the Analysis of the Complex Hyperfine Structure of the Four 14N Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Uriarte, Iciar; Ecija, Patricia; Favero, Laura B.; Spada, Lorenzo; Calabrese, Camilla; Caminati, Walther

    2016-06-01

    Microwave spectroscopy has been restricted to the investigation of small molecules in the last years. However, with the advent of FTMW and CP-FTMW spectroscopies coupled with laser vaporization techniques it has turned into a very competitive methodology in the studies of moderate-size biomolecules. Here, we present the study of purine, characterized by two aromatic rings, one six- and one five-membered, fused together to give a planar aromatic bicycle. Biologically, it is the mainframe of two of the five nucleobases of DNA and RNA. Two tautomers were observed by FTMW spectroscopy coupled to UV ultrafast laser vaporization system. The population ratio of the two main tautomers [N(7)H]/[N(9)H] is about 1/40 in the gas phase. It contrasts with the solid state where only the N(7)H species is present, or in solution where a mixture of both tautomers is observed. For both species, a full quadrupolar hyperfine analysis has been performed. This has led to the determination of the full sets of diagonal quadrupole coupling constants of the four 14N atoms, which have provided crucial information for the unambiguous identification of both species. T. J. Balle and W. H. Flygare Rev. Sci. Instrum. 52, 33-45, 1981 J.-U. Grabow, W. Stahl and H. Dreizler Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 4072-4084, 1996 G. G. Brown, B. D. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman and B. H. Pate Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 0531031/1-053103/13, 2008 E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 51, 3119-3124, 2012

  18. Purine N7 groups that are crucial to the interaction of Escherichia coli rnase P RNA with tRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Heide, C; Feltens, R; Hartmann, R K

    2001-01-01

    We have detected by nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) purine N7 functional groups in Escherichia coli RNase P RNA that are important for tRNA binding under moderate salt conditions (0.1 M Mg2+, 0.1 M NH4+). The majority of identified positions represent highly or universally conserved nucleotides. Our assay system allowed us, for the first time, to identify c7-deaza interference effects at two G residues (G292, G306). Several c7-deazaadenine interference effects (A62, A65, A136, A249, A334, A351) have also been identified in other studies performed at very different salt concentrations, either selecting for substrate binding in the presence of 0.025 M Ca2+ and 1 M NH4+ or self-cleavage of a ptRNA-RNase P RNA conjugate in the presence of 3 M NH4+ or Na+. This indicates that these N7 functional groups play a key role in the structural organization of ribozyme-substrate and -product complexes. We further observed that a c7-deaza modification at A76 of tRNA interferes with tRNA binding to and ptRNA processing by E. coli RNase P RNA. This finding combined with the strong c7-deaza interference at G292 of RNase P RNA supports a model in which substrate and product binding to E. coli RNase P RNA involves the formation of intermolecular base triples (A258-G292-C75 and G291-G259-A76). PMID:11453068

  19. Phosphoribosylamidotransferase, the first enzyme for purine de novo synthesis, is required for conidiation in the sclerotial mycoparasite Coniothyrium minitans.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Gong, Xiaoyan; Xie, Jiatao; Jiang, Daohong; Cheng, Jiasen; Li, Guoqing; Huang, Junbin; Fu, Yanping

    2011-10-01

    Coniothyrium minitans is an important sclerotial parasite of the fungal phytopathogen, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Previously, we constructed a T-DNA insertional library, and screened for many conidiation-deficient mutants from this library. Here, we report a T-DNA insertional mutant ZS-1T21882 that completely lost conidiation. In mutant ZS-1T21882, the T-DNA was integrated into a gene (CmPrat-1) which encodes phosphoribosylamidotransferase (PRAT, EC 2.4.2.14), an enzyme catalyzing the first committed step in de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. Gene replacement and complementation experiments confirmed that phosphoribosylamidotransferase is essential for conidiation of C. minitans. Mutant ZS-1T21882 did not grow on modified Czapek-Dox broth (MCD), but it grew well on MCD amended with IMP or AMP. The conidial production of this mutant was dependent on the dosage of IMP amended. At low concentrations, such as 0.1 mM and 0.25 mM, the mutant produced very few pycnidia, while up to 0.75 mM or higher, the conidiation of this mutant was restored completely. cAMP could not restore the conidiation of mutant ZS-1T21882 when amended into MCD, but could when amended into PDA. Neither GMP nor cGMP could restore the conidiation in MCD or in PDA. Our findings suggest that phosphoribosylamidotransferase is essential for conidiation of C. minitans via adenosine related molecules. Furthermore, when dual cultured with its host, this mutant produced conidia in the host mycelium and on the sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum, but not in dead mycelium or on dead sclerotia, suggesting that C. minitans is likely to able to obtain adenosine or related components from its host during parasitization. PMID:21763446

  20. Ultrafast time resolved spectroscopic studies on the generation of the ketyl-sugar biradical by intramolecular hydrogen abstraction among ketoprofen and purine nucleoside dyads.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-De; Dang, Li; Liu, Mingyue; Du, Lili; Zheng, Xuming; Phillips, David Lee

    2015-04-01

    Intramolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions among ketoprofen (KP) and purine nucleoside dyads have been proposed to form ketyl-sugar biradical intermediates in acetonitrile. Femtosecond transient absorption studies on KP and purine nucleoside dyads reveal that the triplet state of the KP moiety of the dyads with cisoid structure decay faster (due to an intramolecular hydrogen abstraction reaction to produce a ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate) than the triplet state of the KP moiety of the dyads with transoid structure detected in acetonitrile solvent. For the cisoid 5-KP-dG dyad, the triplet state of the KP moiety decays too fast to be observed by ns-TR(3); only the ketyl-sugar biradical intermediates are detected by ns-TR(3) in acetonitrile. For the cisoid 5-KP-dA dyad, the triplet states of the KP moiety could be observed at early nanosecond delay times, and then it quickly undergoes intramolecular hydrogen abstraction to produce a ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate. For the cisoid 5-KPGly-dA and transoid 3-KP-dA dyads, the triplet state of the KP moiety had a longer lifetime due to the long distance chain between the KP moiety and the purine nucleoside (5-KPGly-dA) and the transoid structure (3-KP-dA). The experimental and computational results suggest that the ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate is generated with a higher efficiency for the cisoid dyad. However, the transoid dyad exhibits similar photochemistry behavior as the KP molecule, and no ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate was observed in the ns-TR(3) experiments for the transoid 3-KP-dA dyad.

  1. Effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid, lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quails induced by purine-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a group of dietary fibers, is reported to improve the metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid (UA), lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quail model induced by a purine-rich diet. In this study, 60 male French quails were randomly allocated to five groups: CON (control group), MOD (model group), BEN (benzbromarone-treated group), CHI-H (high-dosage chicory inulin-treated group), and CHI-L (low-dosage chicory inulin-treated group). The serum UA level was significantly increased in the model group from days 7 to 28, as well as triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) increased later in the experimental period. The abdominal fat ratio was increased on day 28. Benzbromarone can decrease UA levels on days 14 and 28. The high and low dosage of chicory inulin also decreased serum UA levels on days 7, 14, and 28. The abdominal fat ratio, activity, and protein of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were decreased in chicory inulin-treated groups. The activities of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the model group and decreased in the benzbromarone and chicory inulin groups. This study evaluated a quail model of induced hyperuricemia with other metabolic disorders caused by a high-purine diet. The results indicated that a purine-rich diet might contribute to the development of hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and abdominal obesity. Chicory inulin decreased serum UA, TG, and abdominal fat deposition in a quail model of hyperuricemia by altering the ACC protein expression and FAS and XOD activities.

  2. Ultrafast time resolved spectroscopic studies on the generation of the ketyl-sugar biradical by intramolecular hydrogen abstraction among ketoprofen and purine nucleoside dyads.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming-De; Dang, Li; Liu, Mingyue; Du, Lili; Zheng, Xuming; Phillips, David Lee

    2015-04-01

    Intramolecular hydrogen abstraction reactions among ketoprofen (KP) and purine nucleoside dyads have been proposed to form ketyl-sugar biradical intermediates in acetonitrile. Femtosecond transient absorption studies on KP and purine nucleoside dyads reveal that the triplet state of the KP moiety of the dyads with cisoid structure decay faster (due to an intramolecular hydrogen abstraction reaction to produce a ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate) than the triplet state of the KP moiety of the dyads with transoid structure detected in acetonitrile solvent. For the cisoid 5-KP-dG dyad, the triplet state of the KP moiety decays too fast to be observed by ns-TR(3); only the ketyl-sugar biradical intermediates are detected by ns-TR(3) in acetonitrile. For the cisoid 5-KP-dA dyad, the triplet states of the KP moiety could be observed at early nanosecond delay times, and then it quickly undergoes intramolecular hydrogen abstraction to produce a ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate. For the cisoid 5-KPGly-dA and transoid 3-KP-dA dyads, the triplet state of the KP moiety had a longer lifetime due to the long distance chain between the KP moiety and the purine nucleoside (5-KPGly-dA) and the transoid structure (3-KP-dA). The experimental and computational results suggest that the ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate is generated with a higher efficiency for the cisoid dyad. However, the transoid dyad exhibits similar photochemistry behavior as the KP molecule, and no ketyl-sugar biradical intermediate was observed in the ns-TR(3) experiments for the transoid 3-KP-dA dyad. PMID:25734665

  3. Purine biosynthesis, riboflavin production, and trophic-phase span are controlled by a Myb-related transcription factor in the fungus Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Laura; Jiménez, Alberto; Revuelta, José L; Santos, María A

    2006-07-01

    Ashbya gossypii is a natural riboflavin overproducer used in the industrial production of the vitamin. We have isolated an insertional mutant exhibiting higher levels of riboflavin production than the wild type. DNA analysis of the targeted locus in the mutant strain revealed that a syntenic homolog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae BAS1 gene, a member of the Myb family of transcription factors, was inactivated. Directed gene disruption of AgBAS1 confirmed the phenotype observed for the insertional mutant, and the Deltabas1 mutant also showed auxotrophy for adenine and several growth defects, such as a delay in the germination of the spores and an abnormally prolonged trophic phase. Additionally, we demonstrate that the DNA-binding domain of AgBas1p is able to bind to the Bas1-binding motifs in the AgADE4 promoter; we also show a clear nuclear localization of a green fluorescent protein-Bas1 fusion protein. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses comparing the wild type and the Deltabas1 mutant revealed that AgBAS1 was responsible for the adenine-mediated regulation of the purine and glycine pathways, since the transcription of the ADE4 and SHM2 genes was virtually abolished in the Deltabas1 mutant. Furthermore, the transcription of ADE4 and SHM2 in the Deltabas1 mutant did not diminish during the transition from the trophic to the productive phase did not diminish, in contrast to what occurred in the wild-type strain. A C-terminal deletion in the AgBAS1 gene, comprising a hypothetical regulatory domain, caused constitutive activation of the purine and glycine pathways, enhanced riboflavin overproduction, and prolonged the trophic phase. Taking these results together, we propose that in A. gossypii, AgBAS1 is an important transcription factor that is involved in the regulation of different physiological processes, such as purine and glycine biosynthesis, riboflavin overproduction, and growth. PMID:16820505

  4. Allantoin, a stress-related purine metabolite, can activate jasmonate signaling in a MYC2-regulated and abscisic acid-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Konishi, Tomokazu; Egusa, Mayumi; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Hirayama, Takashi; Kaminaka, Hironori; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Allantoin is a metabolic intermediate of purine catabolism that often accumulates in stressed plants. Recently, we used Arabidopsis knockout mutants (aln) of ALLANTOINASE to show that this purine metabolite activates abscisic acid (ABA) production, thereby stimulating stress-related gene expression and enhancing seedling tolerance to abiotic stress. A detailed re-examination of the microarray data of an aln mutant (aln-1) confirmed the increased expression of ABA-related genes and also revealed altered expression of genes involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, probably under the control of MYC2, a master switch in the JA signaling pathway. Consistent with the transcriptome profiles, the aln-1 mutant displayed increased JA levels and enhanced responses to mechanical wounding and exogenous JA. Moreover, aln mutants demonstrated modestly increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum, probably reflecting the antagonistic action of MYC2 on the defense against these bacterial phytopathogens. Exogenously administered allantoin elicited the expression of JA-responsive genes, including MYC2, in wild-type plants, supporting the idea that allantoin might be responsible for the observed JA-related phenotypes of aln mutants. However, mutants deficient in bioactive JA (jar1-1), insensitive to JA (myc2-3), or deficient in ABA (aba2-1 and bglu18) suppressed the effect of exogenous allantoin. The suppression was further confirmed in aln-1 jar1-1 and aln-1 bglu18 double mutants. These results indicate that allantoin can activate the MYC2-regulated JA signaling pathway through ABA production. Overall, this study suggests a possible connection of purine catabolism with stress hormone homeostasis and signaling, and highlights the potential importance of allantoin in these interactions. PMID:26931169

  5. Structural Analysis of DFG-in and DFG-out Dual Src-Abl Inhibitors Sharing a Common Vinyl Purine Template

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Tianjun; Commodore, Lois; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Wang, Yihan; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Shakespeare, William C.; Clackson, Tim; Zhu, Xiaotian; Dalgarno, David C.

    2010-09-30

    Bcr-Abl is the oncogenic protein tyrosine kinase responsible for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Treatment of the disease with imatinib (Gleevec) often results in drug resistance via kinase mutations at the advanced phases of the disease, which has necessitated the development of new mutation-resistant inhibitors, notably against the T315I gatekeeper mutation. As part of our efforts to discover such mutation resistant Abl inhibitors, we have focused on optimizing purine template kinase inhibitors, leading to the discovery of potent DFG-in and DFG-out series of Abl inhibitors that are also potent Src inhibitors. Here we present crystal structures of Abl bound by two such inhibitors, based on a common N9-arenyl purine, and that represent both DFG-in and -out binding modes. In each structure the purine template is bound deeply in the adenine pocket and the novel vinyl linker forms a non-classical hydrogen bond to the gatekeeper residue, Thr315. Specific template substitutions promote either a DFG-in or -out binding mode, with the kinase binding site adjusting to optimize molecular recognition. Bcr-Abl T315I mutant kinase is resistant to all currently marketed Abl inhibitors, and is the focus of intense drug discovery efforts. Notably, our DFG-out inhibitor, AP24163, exhibits modest activity against this mutant, illustrating that this kinase mutant can be inhibited by DFG-out class inhibitors. Furthermore our DFG-out inhibitor exhibits dual Src-Abl activity, absent from the prototypical DFG-out inhibitor, imatinib as well as its analog, nilotinib. The data presented here provides structural guidance for the further design of novel potent DFG-out class inhibitors against Src, Abl and Abl T315I mutant kinases.

  6. Computational Methods for De novo Protein Design and its Applications to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1, Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase, Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7, and Histone Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, M.L.; Floudas, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of computational de novo protein design methods, highlighting recent advances and successes. Four protein systems are described that are important targets for drug design: human immunodeficiency virus 1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, ubiquitin specific protease 7, and histone demethylases. Target areas for drug design for each protein are described, along with known inhibitors, focusing on peptidic inhibitors, but also describing some small-molecule inhibitors. Computational design methods that have been employed in elucidating these inhibitors for each protein are outlined, along with steps that can be taken in order to apply computational protein design to a system that has mainly used experimental methods to date. PMID:20210752

  7. Discovery, synthesis and biochemical profiling of purine-2,6-dione derivatives as inhibitors of the human poly(A)-selective ribonuclease Caf1

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Gopal P.; Kaur, Ishwinder; Maryati, Maryati; Airhihen, Blessing; Fischer, Peter M.; Winkler, G. Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA contains a 3′ poly(A) tail, which plays important roles in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation. Well-characterized enzymes involved in the shortening of the poly(A) tail include the multi-subunit Ccr4-Not deadenylase, which contains the Caf1 (Pop2) and Ccr4 catalytic components, and poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN). Two Mg2+ ions present in the active sites of these ribonucleases are required for RNA cleavage. Here, we report the discovery, synthesis and biochemical profiling of purine-2,6-dione derivatives as (sub)micromolar inhibitors of Caf1. PMID:26299350

  8. Discovery, synthesis and biochemical profiling of purine-2,6-dione derivatives as inhibitors of the human poly(A)-selective ribonuclease Caf1.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Gopal P; Kaur, Ishwinder; Maryati, Maryati; Airhihen, Blessing; Fischer, Peter M; Winkler, G Sebastiaan

    2015-10-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA contains a 3' poly(A) tail, which plays important roles in the regulation of mRNA stability and translation. Well-characterized enzymes involved in the shortening of the poly(A) tail include the multi-subunit Ccr4-Not deadenylase, which contains the Caf1 (Pop2) and Ccr4 catalytic components, and poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN). Two Mg(2+) ions present in the active sites of these ribonucleases are required for RNA cleavage. Here, we report the discovery, synthesis and biochemical profiling of purine-2,6-dione derivatives as (sub)micromolar inhibitors of Caf1. PMID:26299350

  9. Concurrent profiling of indole-3-acetic acid, abscisic acid, and cytokinins and structurally related purines by high-performance-liquid-chromatography tandem electrospray mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytokinins (CKs) are a group of plant growth regulators that are involved in several plant developmental processes. Despite the breadth of knowledge surrounding CKs and their diverse functions, much remains to be discovered about the full potential of CKs, including their relationship with the purine salvage pathway, and other phytohormones. The most widely used approach to query unknown facets of CK biology utilized functional genomics coupled with CK metabolite assays and screening of CK associated phenotypes. There are numerous different types of assays for determining CK quantity, however, none of these methods screen for the compendium of metabolites that are necessary for elucidating all roles, including purine salvage pathway enzymes in CK metabolism, and CK cross-talk with other phytohormones. Furthermore, all published analytical methods have drawbacks ranging from the required use of radiolabelled compounds, or hazardous derivatization reagents, poor sensitivity, lack of resolution between CK isomers and lengthy run times. Results In this paper, a method is described for the concurrent extraction, purification and analysis of several CKs (freebases, ribosides, glucosides, nucleotides), purines (adenosine monophosphate, inosine, adenosine, and adenine), indole-3-acetic acid, and abscisic acid from hundred-milligram (mg) quantities of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue. This method utilizes conventional Bieleski solvents extraction, solid phase purification, and is unique because of its diverse range of detectable analytes, and implementation of a conventional HPLC system with a fused core column that enables good sensitivity without the requirement of a UHPLC system. Using this method we were able to resolve CKs about twice as fast as our previous method. Similarly, analysis of adenosine, indole-3-acetic acid, and abscisic acid, was comparatively rapid. A further enhancement of the method was the utilization of a QTRAP 5500 mass analyzer, which

  10. Anticancer activity and cDNA microarray studies of a (RS)-1,2,3,5-tetrahydro-4,1-benzoxazepine-3-yl]-6-chloro-9H-purine, and an acyclic (RS)-O,N-acetalic 6-chloro-7H-purine.

    PubMed

    Caba, Octavio; Díaz-Gavilán, Mónica; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Boulaiz, Houria; Aránega, Antonia; Gallo, Miguel A; Marchal, Juan A; Campos, Joaquín M

    2011-09-01

    Completing a SAR study, a series of (RS)-6-substituted-7- or 9-(1,2,3,5-tetrahydro-4,1-benzoxazepine-3-yl)-7H or 9H-purines was previously prepared. The most potent antiproliferative agent against the MCF-7 adenocarcinoma cell line that belongs to the benzoxazepine O,N-acetalic family is (RS)-9-[1-(9H-fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl)-1,2,3,5-tetrahydro-4,1-benzoxazepine-3-yl]-6-chloro-9H-purine (16, IC(50) = 0.67 ± 0.18 μM), whilst (RS)-7-{2-(N-hydroxymethylphenyl)-2-nitrobenzenesulfonamido]-1-methoxyethyl}-6-chloro-7H-purine (37) shows the lowest IC(50) value between the family of acyclic O,N-acetals (IC(50) = 3.25 ± 0.23 μM). Moreover, 16 showed the better in vitro Therapeutic Index in breast cell lines (3.19), whilst 37 was found to be 3.69-fold more active against HT-29 human colon cancer cell line than versus IEC-6 normal rat intestinal epithelial cell line. The global apoptotic cells caused by 16 and 37 against MCF-7 were 80.08% and 54.85% of cell population after 48 h, respectively. cDNA microarray technology reveals potential drug targets, which are mainly centred on positive apoptosis regulatory pathway genes, and the repression of genes involved in carcinogenesis, proliferation and tumour invasion.

  11. Pyrimidine, purine and nitrogen control of cytosine deaminase synthesis in Escherichia coli K 12. Involvement of the glnLG and purR genes in the regulation of codA expression.

    PubMed

    Andersen, L; Kilstrup, M; Neuhard, J

    1989-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase, encoded by the codA gene in Escherichia coli catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to uracil and ammonia. Regulation of codA expression was studied by determining the level of cytosine deaminase in E. coli K12 grown in various defined media. Addition of either pyrimidine or purine nucleobases to the growth medium caused repressed enzyme levels, whereas growth on a poor nitrogen source such as proline resulted in derepression of cytosine deaminase synthesis. Derepression of codA expression was induced by starvation for either uracil or cytosine nucleotides. Nitrogen control was found to be mediated by the glnLG gene products, and purine repression required a functional purR gene product. Studies with strains harbouring multiple mutations affecting both pyrimidine, purine and nitrogen control revealed that the overall regulation of cytosine deaminase synthesis by the different metabolites is cumulative.

  12. Search for New Purine- and Ribose-Modified Adenosine Analogues as Selective Agonists and Antagonists at Adenosine Receptors†

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Suhaib M.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Esker, John L.; Olah, Mark E.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Melman, Neli; Tiwari, Kamal N.; Secrist, John A.; Schneller, Stewart W.; Cristalli, Gloria; Stiles, Gary L.; Johnson, Carl R.; IJzerman, Ad P.

    2012-01-01

    The binding affinities at rat A1, A2a, and A3 adenosine receptors of a wide range of derivatives of adenosine have been determined. Sites of modification include the purine moiety (1-, 3-, and 7-deaza; halo, alkyne, and amino substitutions at the 2- and 8-positions; and N6-CH2-ring, -hydrazino, and -hydroxylamino) and the ribose moiety (2′-, 3′-, and 5′-deoxy; 2′- and 3′-O-methyl; 2′-deoxy 2′-fluoro; 6′-thio; 5′-uronamide; carbocyclic; 4′- or 3′-methyl; and inversion of configuration). (−)- and (+)-5′-Noraristeromycin were 48- and 21-fold selective, respectively, for A2a vs A1 receptors. 2-Chloro-6′-thioadenosine displayed a Ki value of 20 nM at A2a receptors (15-fold selective vs A1). 2-Chloroadenin-9-yl(β-L-2′-deoxy-6′-thiolyxofuranoside) displayed a Ki value of 8 μM at A1 receptors and appeared to be an antagonist, on the basis of the absence of a GTP-induced shift in binding vs a radiolabeled antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine). 2-Chloro-2′-deoxyadenosine and 2-chloroadenin-9-yl(β-D-6′-thioarabinoside) were putative partial agonists at A1 receptors, with Ki values of 7.4 and 5.4 μM, respectively. The A2a selective agonist 2-(1-hexynyl)-5′-(N-ethylcarbamoyl)adenosine displayed a Ki value of 26 nM at A3 receptors. The 4′-methyl substitution of adenosine was poorly tolerated, yet when combined with other favorable modifications, potency was restored. Thus, N6-benzyl-4′-methyladenosine-5′-(N-methyluronamide) displayed a Ki value of 604 nM at A3 receptors and was 103- and 88-fold selective vs A1 and A2a receptors, respectively. This compound was a full agonist in the A3-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in transfected CHO cells. The carbocyclic analogue of N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5′-(N-methyluronamide) was 2-fold selective for A3 vs A1 receptors and was nearly inactive at A2a receptors. PMID:7707320

  13. Eaf1 Links the NuA4 Histone Acetyltransferase Complex to Htz1 Incorporation and Regulation of Purine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xue; Auger, Andréanne; Altaf, Mohammed; Drouin, Simon; Paquet, Eric; Utley, Rhea T.; Robert, François

    2015-01-01

    Proper modulation of promoter chromatin architecture is crucial for gene regulation in order to precisely and efficiently orchestrate various cellular activities. Previous studies have identified the stimulatory effect of the histone-modifying complex NuA4 on the incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z (Htz1) at the PHO5 promoter (A. Auger, L. Galarneau, M. Altaf, A. Nourani, Y. Doyon, R. T. Utley, D. Cronier, S. Allard, and J. Côté, Mol Cell Biol 28:2257–2270, 2008, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MCB.01755-07). In vitro studies with a reconstituted system also indicated an intriguing cross talk between NuA4 and the H2A.Z-loading complex, SWR-C (M. Altaf, A. Auger, J. Monnet-Saksouk, J. Brodeur, S. Piquet, M. Cramet, N. Bouchard, N. Lacoste, R. T. Utley, L. Gaudreau, J. Côté, J Biol Chem 285:15966–15977, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.117069). In this work, we investigated the role of the NuA4 scaffold subunit Eaf1 in global gene expression and genome-wide incorporation of Htz1. We found that loss of Eaf1 affects Htz1 levels mostly at the promoters that are normally highly enriched in the histone variant. Analysis of eaf1 mutant cells by expression array unveiled a relationship between NuA4 and the gene network implicated in the purine biosynthesis pathway, as EAF1 deletion cripples induction of several ADE genes. NuA4 directly interacts with Bas1 activation domain, a key transcription factor of adenine genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments demonstrate that nucleosomes on the inactive ADE17 promoter are acetylated already by NuA4 and enriched in Htz1. Upon derepression, these poised nucleosomes respond rapidly to activate ADE gene expression in a mechanism likely reminiscent of the PHO5 promoter, leading to nucleosome disassembly. These detailed molecular events depict a specific case of cross talk between NuA4-dependent acetylation and incorporation of histone variant Htz1, presetting the chromatin structure over ADE promoters for

  14. Mutational analysis of intervening sequences connecting the binding sites for integration host factor, PepA, PurR, and RNA polymerase in the control region of the Escherichia coli carAB operon, encoding carbamoylphosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Devroede, Neel; Huysveld, Nadine; Charlier, Daniel

    2006-05-01

    Transcription of the carAB operon encoding the unique carbamoylphosphate synthase of Escherichia coli reflects the dual function of carbamoylphosphate in the biosynthesis of arginine and pyrimidine nucleotides. The tandem pair of promoters is regulated by various mechanisms depending on the needs of both pathways and the maintenance of a pyrimidine/purine nucleotide balance. Here we focus on the linker regions that impose the distribution of target sites for DNA-binding proteins involved in pyrimidine- and purine-specific repression of the upstream promoter P1. We introduced deletions and insertions, and combinations thereof, in four linkers connecting the binding sites for integration host factor (IHF), PepA, PurR, and RNA polymerase and studied the importance of phasing and spacing of the targets and the importance of the nucleotide sequence of the linkers. The two PepA binding sites must be properly aligned and separated with respect to each other and to the promoter for both pyrimidine- and purine-mediated repression. Similarly, the phasing and spacing of the IHF and PEPA2 sites are strictly constrained but only for pyrimidine-specific repression. The IHF target is even dispensable for purine-mediated regulation. Thus, a correct localization of PepA within the higher-order nucleoprotein complex is a prerequisite for the establishment of pyrimidine-mediated repression and for the coupling between purine- and pyrimidine-dependent regulation. Our data also suggest the existence of a novel cis-acting pyrimidine-specific regulatory target located around position -60. Finally, the analysis of a P1 derivative devoid of its control region has led to a reappraisal of the effect of excess adenine on P1 and has revealed that P1 has no need for a UP element.

  15. Statistical analysis of nucleotide runs in coding and noncoding DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sprizhitsky YuA; Nechipurenko YuD; Alexandrov, A A; Volkenstein, M V

    1988-10-01

    A statistical analysis of the occurrence of particular nucleotide runs in DNA sequences of different species has been carried out. There are considerable differences of run distributions in DNA sequences of procaryotes, invertebrates and vertebrates. There is an abundance of short runs (1-2 nucleotides long) in the coding sequences and there is a deficiency of such runs in the noncoding regions. However, some interesting exceptions from this rule exist for the run distribution of adenine in procaryotes and for the arrangement of purine-pyrimidine runs in eucaryotes. The similarity in the distributions of such runs in the coding and noncoding regions may be due to some structural features of the DNA molecule as a whole. Runs of guanine (or cytosine) of three to six nucleotides occur predominantly in noncoding DNA regions in eucaryotes, especially in vertebrates.

  16. Abrupt transition to heightened poliomyelitis epidemicity in England and Wales, 1947-1957, associated with a pronounced increase in the geographical rate of disease propagation.

    PubMed

    Smallman-Raynor, M R; Cliff, A D

    2014-03-01

    The abrupt transition to heightened poliomyelitis epidemicity in England and Wales, 1947-1957, was associated with a profound change in the spatial dynamics of the disease. Drawing on the complete record of poliomyelitis notifications in England and Wales, we use a robust method of spatial epidemiological analysis (swash-backwash model) to evaluate the geographical rate of disease propagation in successive poliomyelitis seasons, 1940-1964. Comparisons with earlier and later time periods show that the period of heightened poliomyelitis epidemicity corresponded with a sudden and pronounced increase in the spatial rate of disease propagation. This change was observed for both urban and rural areas and points to an abrupt enhancement in the propensity for the geographical spread of polioviruses. Competing theories of the epidemic emergence of poliomyelitis in England and Wales should be assessed in the light of this evidence.

  17. [Typing of STR locus in biological objects with pronounced degeneration: analysis of DNA in exhumed remains of victims of war actions].

    PubMed

    Isaenko, M V; Ivanov, P L

    2000-01-01

    The authors describe some specific features of enzymatic amplification typing of DNA preparations obtained from degraded tissues of remains of humans, which were brought from regions of war actions in the Chechen Republic. Special attention is paid to the specific artefact of polymerase chain reaction, for the first time detected by the authors in examinations of the above-mentioned objects. This so-called "ladder" effect manifesting by simultaneous nonspecific amplification of many variants of allele fragments of the STR locus on the individual DNA matrix, which can be erroneously interpreted as an evidence of mixed DNA preparation, is apparently characteristic of individual objects with pronounced degradation of biological material. Such phenomena were observed in typing of STR locuses in biological tissues subjected to biological, thermal, and physicohemical degradation. The phenomenon was studied in detail.

  18. Transformation of humus substances in the long-drained surface-gleyed soddy-podzolic soils under conditions of pronounced microrelief and different agrogenic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikova, M. F.

    2016-08-01

    The transformation of humus substances resulting from artificial drainage of the surface-gleyed soddy-podzolic soils under conditions of pronounced microtopography and different agrogenic loads was studied. The studied soil characteristics included acid-base conditions, the content and group composition of humus, the ratios between the fractions of humus acids, and optical density of humic acids. The features attesting to humus degradation were found in the soils of microdepressions periodically subjected to excessive surface moistening, in the soils of different landforms upon the construction of drainage trenches, and in the plowed non-fertilized soils. The response of humus characteristics to the changes in the ecological situation in the period of active application of agrochemicals for reclamation of the agrotechnogenically disturbed soils was traced. It was shown that the long-term dynamics of the particular parameters of the biological productivity of the soil depend on the hydrological and agrogenic factors, as well as on the weather conditions.

  19. Learning to pronounce first words in three languages: an investigation of caregiver and infant behavior using a computational model of an infant.

    PubMed

    Howard, Ian S; Messum, Piers

    2014-01-01

    Words are made up of speech sounds. Almost all accounts of child speech development assume that children learn the pronunciation of first language (L1) speech sounds by imitation, most claiming that the child performs some kind of auditory matching to the elements of ambient speech. However, there is evidence to support an alternative account and we investigate the non-imitative child behavior and well-attested caregiver behavior that this account posits using Elija, a computational model of an infant. Through unsupervised active learning, Elija began by discovering motor patterns, which produced sounds. In separate interaction experiments, native speakers of English, French and German then played the role of his caregiver. In their first interactions with Elija, they were allowed to respond to his sounds if they felt this was natural. We analyzed the interactions through phonemic transcriptions of the caregivers' utterances and found that they interpreted his output within the framework of their native languages. Their form of response was almost always a reformulation of Elija's utterance into well-formed sounds of L1. Elija retained those motor patterns to which a caregiver responded and formed associations between his motor pattern and the response it provoked. Thus in a second phase of interaction, he was able to parse input utterances in terms of the caregiver responses he had heard previously, and respond using his associated motor patterns. This capacity enabled the caregivers to teach Elija to pronounce some simple words in their native languages, by his serial imitation of the words' component speech sounds. Overall, our results demonstrate that the natural responses and behaviors of human subjects to infant-like vocalizations can take a computational model from a biologically plausible initial state through to word pronunciation. This provides support for an alternative to current auditory matching hypotheses for how children learn to pronounce.

  20. Learning to Pronounce First Words in Three Languages: An Investigation of Caregiver and Infant Behavior Using a Computational Model of an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Ian S.; Messum, Piers

    2014-01-01

    Words are made up of speech sounds. Almost all accounts of child speech development assume that children learn the pronunciation of first language (L1) speech sounds by imitation, most claiming that the child performs some kind of auditory matching to the elements of ambient speech. However, there is evidence to support an alternative account and we investigate the non-imitative child behavior and well-attested caregiver behavior that this account posits using Elija, a computational model of an infant. Through unsupervised active learning, Elija began by discovering motor patterns, which produced sounds. In separate interaction experiments, native speakers of English, French and German then played the role of his caregiver. In their first interactions with Elija, they were allowed to respond to his sounds if they felt this was natural. We analyzed the interactions through phonemic transcriptions of the caregivers' utterances and found that they interpreted his output within the framework of their native languages. Their form of response was almost always a reformulation of Elija's utterance into well-formed sounds of L1. Elija retained those motor patterns to which a caregiver responded and formed associations between his motor pattern and the response it provoked. Thus in a second phase of interaction, he was able to parse input utterances in terms of the caregiver responses he had heard previously, and respond using his associated motor patterns. This capacity enabled the caregivers to teach Elija to pronounce some simple words in their native languages, by his serial imitation of the words' component speech sounds. Overall, our results demonstrate that the natural responses and behaviors of human subjects to infant-like vocalizations can take a computational model from a biologically plausible initial state through to word pronunciation. This provides support for an alternative to current auditory matching hypotheses for how children learn to pronounce. PMID

  1. Nucleolipids of Canonical Purine ß-d-Ribo-Nucleosides: Synthesis and Cytostatic/Cytotoxic Activities Toward Human and Rat Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Knies, Christine; Hammerbacher, Katharina; Bonaterra, Gabriel A; Kinscherf, Ralf; Rosemeyer, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    We report on the synthesis of two series of canonical purine ß-d-ribonucleoside nucleolipids derived from inosine and adenosine, which have been characterized by elemental analyses, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) as well as by (1)H and (13)C NMR, and pH-dependent UV/Vis spectroscopy. A selection of the novel nucleolipids with different lipophilic moieties were first tested on their cytotoxic effect toward human macrophages. Compounds without a significant inhibitory effect on the viability of the macrophages were tested on their cytostatic/cytotoxic effect toward human astrocytoma/oligodendroglioma GOS-3 cells as well as against the rat malignant neuroectodermal BT4Ca cell line. In order to additionally investigate the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the cytotoxic effects of the derivatives on GOS-3 or BT4Ca cells, we evaluated the induction of apoptosis and observed the particular activity of the nucleolipid ethyl 3-{4-hydroxymethyl-2-methyl-6-[6-oxo-1-(3,7,11-trimethyl-dodeca-2,6,10-trienyl)-1,6-dihydro-purin-9-yl]-tetrahydro-furo[3,4-d][1,3]dioxol-2-yl}propionate (8 c) toward both human and rat glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. PMID:27308225

  2. 9-[(2RS)-3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl] derivatives of purines: a class of highly selective antiretroviral agents in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Holy, A; Jindrich, J; Dvorakova, H; Hao, Z; Snoeck, R; Herdewijn, P; Johns, D G; De Clercq, E

    1991-01-01

    A new class of compounds, 9-[(2RS)-3-fluoro-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl] [(RS)-FPMP] derivatives of purines, is described that has selective activity against a broad spectrum of retroviruses [including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2)] but not other RNA or DNA viruses. This activity spectrum is completely different from that of the parental compounds, 9-[(2S)-3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl] [(S)-HPMP] derivatives of purines, which are active against a broad range of DNA viruses. The racemic (RS)-FPMP derivatives of adenine and 2,6-diaminopurine, termed (RS)-FPMPA and (RS)-FPMPDAP, respectively, are markedly more selective as in vitro antiretroviral agents than their 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl) (PME) counterparts, PMEA and PMEDAP. Also, (RS)-FPMPA and (RS)-FPMPDAP have a substantially higher therapeutic index in mice in inhibiting Moloney murine sarcoma virus-induced tumor formation and associated death and are markedly less inhibitory to human bone marrow cells than PMEA and PMEDAP. The diphosphate derivative of (RS)-FPMPA [(RS)-FPMPApp] is a potent and selective inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase but not of HSV-1 DNA polymerase or DNA polymerase alpha. (RS)-FPMPApp, akin to PMEA diphosphate (PMEApp), acts as a DNA chain terminator. The DNA chain-terminating properties of PMEApp and (RS)-FPMPApp seem to be a prerequisite for acyclic nucleoside phosphonates to exhibit antiretrovirus (i.e., anti-HIV) activity. Images PMID:1711214

  3. Disparate actions of hydroxyurea in potentiation of purine and pyrimidine 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside activities against replication of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, W Y; Johns, D G; Chokekuchai, S; Mitsuya, H

    1995-01-01

    We and other groups have recently reported the potentiation by ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors such as hydroxyurea of the anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity of purine and pyrimidine 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides in both resting and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Little agreement prevails, however, as to the mechanism of the synergistic effects described. We report here that in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, two mechanisms exist for the potentiation of the anti-HIV-1 activity by low-dose hydroxyurea of the purine-based dideoxynucleoside 2',3'-dideoxyinosine and the pyrimidine-based dideoxynucleosides 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine. For 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, the enhancement arises from a specific depletion of dATP by hydroxyurea, resulting in a favorable shift of the 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate/dATP ratio. For the pyrimidine dideoxynucleosides 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, the more modest anti-HIV enhancement results from hydroxyurea-induced increases of pyrimidine kinase activities in the salvage pathway and, hence, increased 5'-phosphorylation of these drugs, while depletion of the corresponding deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates (dTTP and dCTP) plays no significant role. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7667290

  4. Streptomyces coelicolor XdhR is a direct target of (p)ppGpp that controls expression of genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase to promote purine salvage.

    PubMed

    Sivapragasam, Smitha; Grove, Anne

    2016-05-01

    The gene encoding Streptomyces coelicolor xanthine dehydrogenase regulator (XdhR) is divergently oriented from xdhABC, which encodes xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh). Xdh is required for purine salvage pathways. XdhR was previously shown to repress xdhABC expression. We show that XdhR binds the xdhABC-xdhR intergenic region with high affinity (Kd ∼ 0.5 nM). DNaseI footprinting reveals that this complex formation corresponds to XdhR binding the xdhR gene promoter at two adjacent sites; at higher protein concentrations, protection expands to a region that overlaps the transcriptional and translational start sites of xdhABC. While substrates for Xdh have little effect on DNA binding, GTP and ppGpp dissociate the DNA-XdhR complex. Progression of cells to stationary phase, a condition associated with increased (p)ppGpp production, leads to elevated xdhB expression; in contrast, inhibition of Xdh by allopurinol results in xdhB repression. We propose that XdhR is a direct target of (p)ppGpp, and that expression of xdhABC is upregulated during the stringent response to promote purine salvage pathways, maintain GTP homeostasis and ensure continued (p)ppGpp synthesis. During exponential phase growth, basal levels of xdhABC expression may be achieved by GTP serving as a lower-affinity XdhR ligand.

  5. Solution structure of a purine rich hexaloop hairpin belonging to PGY/MDR1 mRNA and targeted by antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Joli, Flore; Bouchemal, Nadia; Laigle, Alain; Hartmann, Brigitte; Hantz, Edith

    2006-01-01

    A preferential target of antisense oligonucleotides directed against human PGY/MDR1 mRNA is a hairpin containing a stem with a G•U wobble pair, capped by the purine-rich 5′r(GGGAUG)3′ hexaloop. This hairpin is studied by multidimensional NMR and restrained molecular dynamics, with special emphasis on the conformation of south sugars and non-standard phosphate linkages evidenced in both the stem and the loop. The hairpin is found to be highly structured. The G•U wobble pair, a strong counterion binding site, displays structural particularities that are characteristic of this type of mismatch. The upper part of the stem undergoes distortions that optimize its interactions with the beginning of the loop. The loop adopts a new fold in which the single-stranded GGGA purine tract is structured in A-like conformation stacked in continuity of the stem and displays an extensive hydrogen bonding surface for recognition. The remarkable hairpin stability results from classical inter- and intra-strand interactions reinforced by numerous hydrogen bonds involving unusual backbone conformations and ribose 2′-hydroxyl groups. Overall, this work emphasizes numerous features that account for the well-ordered structure of the whole hairpin and highlights the loop properties that facilitate interaction with antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:17041234

  6. DNA sequence-dependent ionic currents in ultra-small solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of ionic currents through nanopores partially blocked by DNA have emerged as a powerful method for characterization of the DNA nucleotide sequence. Although the effect of the nucleotide sequence on the nanopore blockade current has been experimentally demonstrated, prediction and interpretation of such measurements remain a formidable challenge. Using atomic resolution computational approaches, here we show how the sequence, molecular conformation, and pore geometry affect the blockade ionic current in model solid-state nanopores. We demonstrate that the blockade current from a DNA molecule is determined by the chemical identities and conformations of at least three consecutive nucleotides. We find the blockade currents produced by the nucleotide triplets to vary considerably with their nucleotide sequences despite having nearly identical molecular conformations. Encouragingly, we find blockade current differences as large as 25% for single-base substitutions in ultra small (1.6 nm × 1.1 nm cross section; 2 nm length) solid-state nanopores. Despite the complex dependence of the blockade current on the sequence and conformation of the DNA triplets, we find that, under many conditions, the number of thymine bases is positively correlated with the current, whereas the number of purine bases and the presence of both purines and pyrimidines in the triplet are negatively correlated with the current. Based on these observations, we construct a simple theoretical model that relates the ion current to the base content of a solid-state nanopore. Furthermore, we show that compact conformations of DNA in narrow pores provide the greatest signal-to-noise ratio for single base detection, whereas reduction of the nanopore length increases the ionic current noise. Thus, the sequence dependence of the nanopore blockade current can be theoretically rationalized, although the predictions will likely need to be customized for each nanopore type.

  7. MicroRNAs Form Triplexes with Double Stranded DNA at Sequence-Specific Binding Sites; a Eukaryotic Mechanism via which microRNAs Could Directly Alter Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Christy R.; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Waddell, M. Brett; Ridout, Granger; Naeve, Deanna; Leuze, Michael; LoCascio, Philip F.; Panetta, John C.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Naeve, Clayton W.; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Bonten, Erik J.; Evans, William E.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are important regulators of gene expression, acting primarily by binding to sequence-specific locations on already transcribed messenger RNAs (mRNA) and typically down-regulating their stability or translation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs may also play a role in up-regulating mRNA transcription levels, although a definitive mechanism has not been established. Double-helical DNA is capable of forming triple-helical structures through Hoogsteen and reverse Hoogsteen interactions in the major groove of the duplex, and we show physical evidence (i.e., NMR, FRET, SPR) that purine or pyrimidine-rich microRNAs of appropriate length and sequence form triple-helical structures with purine-rich sequences of duplex DNA, and identify microRNA sequences that favor triplex formation. We developed an algorithm (Trident) to search genome-wide for potential triplex-forming sites and show that several mammalian and non-mammalian genomes are enriched for strong microRNA triplex binding sites. We show that those genes containing sequences favoring microRNA triplex formation are markedly enriched (3.3 fold, p<2.2 × 10−16) for genes whose expression is positively correlated with expression of microRNAs targeting triplex binding sequences. This work has thus revealed a new mechanism by which microRNAs could interact with gene promoter regions to modify gene transcription. PMID:26844769

  8. MSLICE Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Morris, John R.

    2011-01-01

    MSLICE Sequencing is a graphical tool for writing sequences and integrating them into RML files, as well as for producing SCMF files for uplink. When operated in a testbed environment, it also supports uplinking these SCMF files to the testbed via Chill. This software features a free-form textural sequence editor featuring syntax coloring, automatic content assistance (including command and argument completion proposals), complete with types, value ranges, unites, and descriptions from the command dictionary that appear as they are typed. The sequence editor also has a "field mode" that allows tabbing between arguments and displays type/range/units/description for each argument as it is edited. Color-coded error and warning annotations on problematic tokens are included, as well as indications of problems that are not visible in the current scroll range. "Quick Fix" suggestions are made for resolving problems, and all the features afforded by modern source editors are also included such as copy/cut/paste, undo/redo, and a sophisticated find-and-replace system optionally using regular expressions. The software offers a full XML editor for RML files, which features syntax coloring, content assistance and problem annotations as above. There is a form-based, "detail view" that allows structured editing of command arguments and sequence parameters when preferred. The "project view" shows the user s "workspace" as a tree of "resources" (projects, folders, and files) that can subsequently be opened in editors by double-clicking. Files can be added, deleted, dragged-dropped/copied-pasted between folders or projects, and these operations are undoable and redoable. A "problems view" contains a tabular list of all problems in the current workspace. Double-clicking on any row in the table opens an editor for the appropriate sequence, scrolling to the specific line with the problem, and highlighting the problematic characters. From there, one can invoke "quick fix" as described

  9. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  10. Sequence-Dependent Fluorescence of Cy3- and Cy5-Labeled Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fluorescent intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 dyes is strongly dependent on the nucleobase sequence of the labeled oligonucleotides. Sequence-dependent fluorescence may significantly influence the data obtained from many common experimental methods based on fluorescence detection of nucleic acids, such as sequencing, PCR, FRET, and FISH. To quantify sequence dependent fluorescence, we have measured the fluorescence intensity of Cy3 and Cy5 bound to the 5′ end of all 1024 possible double-stranded DNA 5mers. The fluorescence intensity was also determined for these dyes bound to the 5′ end of fixed-sequence double-stranded DNA with a variable sequence 3′ overhang adjacent to the dye. The labeled DNA oligonucleotides were made using light-directed, in situ microarray synthesis. The results indicate that the fluorescence intensity of both dyes is sensitive to all five bases or base pairs, that the sequence dependence is stronger for double- (vs single-) stranded DNA, and that the dyes are sensitive to both the adjacent dsDNA sequence and the 3′-ssDNA overhang. Purine-rich sequences result in higher fluorescence. The results can be used to estimate measurement error in experiments with fluorescent-labeled DNA, as well as to optimize the fluorescent signal by considering the nucleobase environment of the labeling cyanine dye. PMID:26895222

  11. The effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine in two slow release formulations: pronounced lag-time after a high fat breakfast

    PubMed Central

    Schug, B S; Brendel, E; Chantraine, E; Wolf, D; Martin, W; Schall, R; Blume, H H

    2002-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of concomitant food intake on the bioavailability of two nifedipine containing modified release dosage forms for once daily administration. The clinical study was performed to investigate the in vivo relevance of pH-dependent differences in the in vitro release properties of the two dosage forms. Methods This was a randomized, open, 4-way crossover study in 24 healthy, male subjects. Following an overnight fast of 12 h single doses of Adalat® OROS or Slofedipine® XL were administered either in the fasted state or immediately after a high fat American breakfast. Nifedipine plasma concentrations in samples obtained until 48 h after drug administration were determined using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Calculation of pharmacokinetic parameters was conducted model-independently. The two dosage forms as well as the two administration conditions were compared by calculating point estimates and 90% confidence intervals for the relevant pharmacokinetic parameters. In vitro dissolution tests were performed using a paddle apparatus 3 acc. USP, a pharmacopoeial dissolution system consisting of reciprocating cylinders in flat-bottomed glass vessels, with various buffer systems covering the entire physiological pH-range of the gastrointestinal tract. Results After fasted administration the extent of bioavailability of nifedipine as characterized by AUC(0,∞) was slightly lower for Slofedipine® XL compared with Adalat® OROS with a point estimate of 82.3% primarily resulting from pronounced differences in nifedipine concentrations during the first 15 h after administration. Accordingly, maximum plasma concentrations were lower after administration of Slofedipine® XL compared with Adalat® OROS (point estimate: 84.3%). Under fed conditions the differences in bioavailability between the two products as characterized by the pharmacokinetic parameters AUC(0,tn) and Cmax were greater than after fasting conditions with

  12. Metagenomic analysis of the stool microbiome in patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation: loss of diversity is associated with use of systemic antibiotics and more pronounced in gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Holler, Ernst; Butzhammer, Peter; Schmid, Karin; Hundsrucker, Christian; Koestler, Josef; Peter, Katrin; Zhu, Wentao; Sporrer, Daniela; Hehlgans, Thomas; Kreutz, Marina; Holler, Barbara; Wolff, Daniel; Edinger, Matthias; Andreesen, Reinhard; Levine, John E; Ferrara, James L; Gessner, Andre; Spang, Rainer; Oefner, Peter J

    2014-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing of the hypervariable V3 region of the 16s rRNA gene isolated from serial stool specimens collected from 31 patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) was performed to elucidate variations in the composition of the intestinal microbiome in the course of allogeneic SCT. Metagenomic analysis was complemented by strain-specific enterococcal PCR and indirect assessment of bacterial load by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of urinary indoxyl sulfate. At the time of admission, patients showed a predominance of commensal bacteria. After transplantation, a relative shift toward enterococci was observed, which was more pronounced under antibiotic prophylaxis and treatment of neutropenic infections. The shift was particularly prominent in patients that developed subsequently or suffered from active gastrointestinal (GI) graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The mean proportion of enterococci in post-transplant stool specimens was 21% in patients who did not develop GI GVHD as compared with 46% in those that subsequently developed GI GVHD and 74% at the time of active GVHD. Enterococcal PCR confirmed predominance of Enterococcus faecium or both E. faecium and Enterococcus faecalis in these specimens. As a consequence of the loss of bacterial diversity, mean urinary indoxyl sulfate levels dropped from 42.5 ± 11 μmol/L to 11.8 ± 2.8 μmol/L in all post-transplant samples and to 3.5 ± 3 μmol/L in samples from patients with active GVHD. Our study reveals major microbiome shifts in the course of allogeneic SCT that occur in the period of antibiotic treatment but are more prominent in association with GI GVHD. Our data indicate early microbiome shifts and a loss of diversity of the intestinal microbiome that may affect intestinal inflammation in the setting of allogeneic SCT.

  13. Surface modification for patterned cell growth on substrates with pronounced topographies using sacrificial photoresist and parylene-C peel-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larramendy, Florian; Yoshida, Shotaro; Jalabert, Laurent; Takeuchi, Shoji; Paul, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    A range of methods including soft lithography are available for patterning protein layers for cell adhesion on quasi-planar substrates. Suitably structured, these layers favor the geometrically constrained, controlled growth of cells and the development of cellular extensions on them. For this purpose, the ability to control the shape and dimension of cell-adhesive areas with high precision is crucial. For more advanced studies of cell interactions, the surface modification or functionalization of substrates with complex topographies is desirable. This paper describes a simple technique allowing to produce surface modification patterns using delicate molecules such as laminin on substrates exhibiting pronounced topographies with recessed and protruding microstructures. The technique is based on the combination of sacrificial photoresist structures with a connected parylene-C layer. This layer locally adheres to the substrate wherever the substrate needs to be protected against the surface modification. After surface modification, the parylene-C layer is peeled off. Patterns comprising arbitrary networks of modified and unmodified substrate areas can thus be realized. We demonstrate the technique with the guided growth of neuron-like PC12 cells on networks of laminin lines on substrates structured with micropillars and microwells.

  14. The big ban on bituminous coal sales revisited: Serious epidemics and pronounced trends feign excess mortality previously attributed to heavy black-smoke exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmaack, K.

    2007-07-01

    The effect of banning bituminous coal sales on the black-smoke concentration and the mortality rates in Dublin, Ireland, has been analyzed recently. Based on the application of standard epidemiological procedures, the authors concluded that, as a result of the ban, the total nontrauma death rate was reduced strongly (-8.0% unadjusted, -5.7% adjusted). The purpose of this study was to reanalyze the original data with the aim of clarifying the three most important aspects of the study, (a) the effect of epidemics, (b) the trends in mortality rates due to advances in public health care, and (c) the correlation between mortality rates and black-smoke concentrations. Particular attention has been devoted to a detailed evaluation of the time dependence of mortality rates, stratified by season. Death rates were found to be strongly enhanced during three severe pre-ban winter-spring epidemics. The cardiovascular mortality rates exhibited a continuous decrease over the whole study period, in general accordance with trends in the rest of Ireland. These two effects can fully account for the previously identified apparent correlation between reduced mortality and the very pronounced ban-related lowering of the black-smoke concentration. The third important finding was that in nonepidemic pre-ban seasons even large changes in the concentration of black smoke had no detectable effect on mortality rates. The reanalysis suggests that epidemiological studies exploring the effect of ambient particulate matter on mortality require improved tools allowing proper adjustment for epidemics and trends.

  15. Novel thiosemicarbazones of the ApT and DpT series and their copper complexes: identification of pronounced redox activity and characterization of their antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Patric J; Sharpe, Philip C; Bernhardt, Paul V; Richardson, Des R

    2010-08-12

    The novel chelators 2-acetylpyridine-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (HAp44mT) and di-2-pyridylketone-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (HDp44mT) have been examined to elucidate the structure-activity relationships necessary to form copper (Cu) complexes with pronounced antitumor activity. Electrochemical studies demonstrated that the Cu complexes of these ligands had lower redox potentials than their iron complexes. Moreover, the Cu complexes where the ligand/metal ratio was 1:1 rather than 2:1 had significantly higher intracellular oxidative properties and antitumor efficacy. Interestingly, the 2:1 complex was shown to dissociate to give significant amounts of the 1:1 complex that could be the major cytotoxic effector. Both types of Cu complex showed significantly more antiproliferative activity than the ligand alone. We also demonstrate the importance of the inductive effects of substituents on the carbonyl group of the parent ketone, which influence the Cu(II/I) redox potentials because of their proximity to the metal center. The structure-activity relationships described are important for the design of potent thiosemicarbazone Cu complexes.

  16. Photosynthetic temperature responses of tree species in Rwanda: evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in montane rainforest climax species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vårhammar, Angelica; Wallin, Göran; McLean, Christopher M.; Dusenge, Mirindi Eric; Medlyn, Belinda E.; Hasper, Thomas B.; Nsabimana, Donat; Uddling, Johan

    2015-04-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthetic metabolism to temperature has been identified as a key uncertainty for projecting the magnitude of the terrestrial feedback on future climate change. While temperature responses of photosynthetic capacities have been comparatively well investigated in temperate species, the responses of tropical tree species remain unexplored. We compared the responses of seedlings of native cold-adapted tropical montane rainforest tree species to exotic warm-adapted plantation species, all growing in an intermediate temperature common garden in Rwanda. Leaf gas exchange responses to CO2 at different temperatures (20 - 40 C) were used to assess the temperature responses of biochemical photosynthetic capacities. Analyses revealed a lower optimum temperature for photosynthetic electron transport rates than for Rubisco carboxylation rates, along with lower electron transport optima in the native cold-adapted than in the exotic warm-adapted species. The photosynthetic optimum temperatures were generally exceeded by daytime peak leaf temperatures, in particular in the native montane rainforest climax species. This study thus provides evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in tropical trees and indicates high susceptibility of montane rainforest climax species to future global warming. (Reference: New Phytologist, in press)

  17. Quantum spin Hall insulators in functionalized arsenene (AsX, X = F, OH and CH3) monolayers with pronounced light absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Yanle; Ma, Jing

    2016-05-14

    The search for new two-dimensional topological insulators (2D-TIs) with large band gaps is of great interest and importance. Our first-principles calculations predicted three candidates for 2D-TIs, arsenene functionalized with F, OH and CH3 groups (AsX, X = F, OH and CH3), which preserved large bulk band gaps from 100 to 160 meV (up to 260 meV) derived from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) within the px,y orbitals. This picture is similar to what was reported for an AsH monolayer with a band gap of 193 meV. Ab initio molecular dynamic (AIMD) simulations demonstrated the thermal stabilities of the AsX monolayers even at 500 K. The nontrivial topological phase was confirmed by the topological invariant Z2 and topological edge state. The topological electronic bandgap of the AsF monolayer can be effectively modulated by biaxial tensile strain and vertical external electric field. In addition, pronounced light absorption in the near-infrared and visible range of the solar spectrum was expected for the AsX (X = H, F) monolayers from the adsorption peaks at 0.45-1.6 eV, which is attractive for light harvesting. The nontrivial quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators AsX could be promising candidates for practical room-temperature applications in dissipationless transport devices and photovoltaics.

  18. Ontogeny of pronounced female-biased sexual size dimorphism in the Malaysian cat gecko (Aeluroscalabotes felinus: Squamata: Eublepharidae): a test of the role of testosterone in growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Kubička, Lukáš; Golinski, Alison; John-Alder, Henry; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2013-07-01

    Species differences in the effect of male gonadal androgens on male growth are considered a possible mechanism allowing shifts in magnitude and even direction of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) in squamate reptiles. According to the bipotential growth regulation hypothesis, the androgen testosterone (T) enhances male growth in species with male-biased SSD and conversely inhibits male growth in males of female-larger species. In the present study, we describe the ontogeny of the pronounced female-biased SSD and report the effect of T on growth via hormonal manipulations in males and females of the Malaysian cat gecko (Aeluroscalabotes felinus). In accord with the predictions of the bipotential growth regulation hypothesis, growth was inhibited by replacement of T in castrated males. Additionally, exogenous T inhibited growth of females to male-typical levels. Nevertheless, male castration alone did not significantly affect growth, contrary to the prediction of the bipotential growth regulation hypothesis, which contradicts the generality of this hypothesis. Application of exogenous T to females can interfere with normal ovarian function. Therefore, although not directly tested in this study, we suggest that ovarian effects on the ontogeny of SSD in A. felinus are consistent with our results. The development of SSD is a function of differential growth between the sexes, and potential sex-specific growth regulation in both males and females should be taken into account as possible proximate mechanisms responsible for SSD.

  19. Are mammographic changes in the tumor bed more pronounced after intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer? Subgroup analysis from a randomized trial (TARGIT-A).

    PubMed

    Engel, Dorothee; Schnitzer, Andreas; Brade, Joachim; Blank, Elena; Wenz, Frederik; Suetterlin, Marc; Schoenberg, Stefan; Wasser, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with low-energy x-rays is increasingly used in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). Previous non-randomized studies have observed mammographic changes in the tumor bed to be more pronounced after IORT. The purpose of this study was to reassess the postoperative changes in a randomized single-center subgroup of patients from a multicenter trial (TARGIT-A). In this subgroup (n = 48) 27 patients received BCT with IORT, 21 patients had BCT with standard whole-breast radiotherapy serving as controls. Overall 258 postoperative mammograms (median follow-up 4.3 years, range 3-8) were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists in consensus focusing on changes in the tumor bed. Fat necroses showed to be significantly more frequent (56% versus 24%) and larger (8.7 versus 1.6 sq cm, median) after IORT than those in controls. Scar calcifications were also significantly more frequent after IORT (63% versus 19%). The high incidence of large fat necroses in our study confirms previous study findings. However, the overall higher incidence of calcifications in the tumor bed after IORT represents a new finding, requiring further attention. PMID:23173717

  20. Photosynthetic temperature responses of tree species in Rwanda: evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in montane rainforest climax species.

    PubMed

    Vårhammar, Angelica; Wallin, Göran; McLean, Christopher M; Dusenge, Mirindi Eric; Medlyn, Belinda E; Hasper, Thomas B; Nsabimana, Donat; Uddling, Johan

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthetic metabolism to temperature has been identified as a key uncertainty for projecting the magnitude of the terrestrial feedback on future climate change. While temperature responses of photosynthetic capacities have been comparatively well investigated in temperate species, the responses of tropical tree species remain unexplored. We compared the responses of seedlings of native cold-adapted tropical montane rainforest tree species with those of exotic warm-adapted plantation species, all growing in an intermediate temperature common garden in Rwanda. Leaf gas exchange responses to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) at different temperatures (20-40°C) were used to assess the temperature responses of biochemical photosynthetic capacities. Analyses revealed a lower optimum temperature for photosynthetic electron transport rates than for Rubisco carboxylation rates, along with lower electron transport optima in the native cold-adapted than in the exotic warm-adapted species. The photosynthetic optimum temperatures were generally exceeded by daytime peak leaf temperatures, in particular in the native montane rainforest climax species. This study thus provides evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in tropical trees and indicates high susceptibility of montane rainforest climax species to future global warming.

  1. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of (-)-β-D-(2R,4R) 1,3-dioxolane 2,6-diamino purine (DAPD) (Amdoxovir) and (-)-β-D-(2R,4R) 1,3-dioxolane guanosine (DXG) prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, Janarthanan; Pullagurla, Manik R.; Sharon, Ashoke; Wang, Jianing; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Chu, Chung K.

    2007-01-01

    Prodrugs of (-)-β-D-(2R,4R)-1,3-dioxolane-2,6-diamino purine (DAPD), organic salts of DAPD, 5′-l-valyl DAPD and N-1 substituted (-)-β-D-(2R,4R)-1,3-dioxolane guanosine (DXG) have been synthesized with the objective of finding molecules which might be superior to DAPD and DXG in solubility as well as pharmacologic profiles. Synthesized prodrugs were evaluated for anti-HIV activity against HIV-1LAI in primary human lymphocytes (PBM cells) as well as their cytotoxicity in PBM, CEM and Vero cells. DAPD prodrugs, modified at the C6 position of the purine ring, demonstrated several folds of enhanced anti-HIV activity in comparison to the parent compound DAPD without increasing the toxicity. The presence of alkyl amino groups at the C6 position of the purine ring increased the antiviral potency several folds, and the most potent compound (-)-β-D-(2R,4R)-1,3-dioxolane-2-amino-6-aminoethyl purine (8) was 17 times more potent than that of DAPD. 5′-l-Valyl DAPD 20 and organic acid salts 21-24 also exhibited enhanced anti-HIV activity in comparison to DAPD, while DXG prodrugs 16-17 exhibited lower potency than that of DXG or DAPD. PMID:17532483

  2. Functional analysis of 14 genes that constitute the purine catabolic pathway in Bacillus subtilis and evidence for a novel regulon controlled by the PucR transcription activator.

    PubMed

    Schultz, A C; Nygaard, P; Saxild, H H

    2001-06-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis has developed a highly controlled system for the utilization of a diverse array of low-molecular-weight compounds as a nitrogen source when the preferred nitrogen sources, e.g., glutamate plus ammonia, are exhausted. We have identified such a system for the utilization of purines as nitrogen source in B. subtilis. Based on growth studies of strains with knockout mutations in genes, complemented with enzyme analysis, we could ascribe functions to 14 genes encoding enzymes or proteins of the purine degradation pathway. A functional xanthine dehydrogenase requires expression of five genes (pucA, pucB, pucC, pucD, and pucE). Uricase activity is encoded by the pucL and pucM genes, and a uric acid transport system is encoded by pucJ and pucK. Allantoinase is encoded by the pucH gene, and allantoin permease is encoded by the pucI gene. Allantoate amidohydrolase is encoded by pucF. In a pucR mutant, the level of expression was low for all genes tested, indicating that PucR is a positive regulator of puc gene expression. All 14 genes except pucI are located in a gene cluster at 284 to 285 degrees on the chromosome and are contained in six transcription units, which are expressed when cells are grown with glutamate as the nitrogen source (limiting conditions), but not when grown on glutamate plus ammonia (excess conditions). Our data suggest that the 14 genes and the gde gene, encoding guanine deaminase, constitute a regulon controlled by the pucR gene product. Allantoic acid, allantoin, and uric acid were all found to function as effector molecules for PucR-dependent regulation of puc gene expression. When cells were grown in the presence of glutamate plus allantoin, a 3- to 10-fold increase in expression was seen for most of the genes. However, expression of the pucABCDE unit was decreased 16-fold, while expression of pucR was decreased 4-fold in the presence of allantoin. We have identified genes of the purine degradation pathway in B

  3. Sequence-specific initiator elements focus initiation of transcription to distinct sites in the yeast TRP4 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Mösch, H U; Graf, R; Braus, G H

    1992-01-01

    Transcription from the yeast TRP4 promoter initiates at two basal (i127 and i76) and three GCN4 dependent (i31, i25 and i12) initiator elements. All of these elements contain not more than one deviation from the earlier proposed initiator consensus sequence PuPuPyPuPu, a pyrimidine nucleotide flanked on either side by two purine nucleotides. A point mutation analysis of these elements in various combinations was performed and revealed that the central pyrimidine nucleotide and at least one of the 3' flanking purine nucleotides of the PuPuPyPuPu consensus sequence are essential but alone not sufficient to define a functional initiator element. Multiple cryptic transcription start sites, which function independently whether they are located on the coding or the non-coding strand, can replace the function of mutated initiator elements and therefore the overall level of transcription initiation is not affected. The sequence specificity is identical for basal and GCN4 dependent initiator elements demonstrating that they are functionally homologous. These findings imply that the role of initiator elements is to 'focus' the start point(s) of transcription to distinct sites located in the region between the site(s) of the assembly of the transcriptional complex and the start codon of translation. Images PMID:1425591

  4. Development of Purine-Derived 18F-Labeled Pro-drug Tracers for Imaging of MRP1 Activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is a drug efflux transporter that has been implicated in the pathology of several neurological diseases and is associated with development of multidrug resistance. To enable measurement of MRP1 function in the living brain, a series of 6-halopurines decorated with fluorinated side chains have been synthesized and evaluated as putative pro-drug tracers. The tracers were designed to undergo conjugation with glutathione within the brain and hence form the corresponding MRP1 substrate tracers in situ. 6-Bromo-7-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)purine showed good brain uptake and rapid metabolic conversion. Dynamic PET imaging demonstrated a marked difference in brain clearance rates between wild-type and mrp1 knockout mice, suggesting that the tracer can allow noninvasive assessment of MRP1 activity in vivo. PMID:24456310

  5. Comparing antioxidant capacity of purine alkaloids: a new, efficient trio for screening and discovering potential antioxidants in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Bun; Yi, Ruo-Nan; Cao, Ling-Fang; Li, Shan-Bing; Tan, Rui-Rong; Chen, Min; Li, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Chen; Li, Yi-Fang; Kurihara, Hiroshi; He, Rong-Rong

    2015-06-01

    The most commonly applied strategies for the evaluation of antioxidant capacity are the chemical- or cell-based approaches. However, the results obtained from these methods might not reflect the antioxidant ability of test samples within organisms. In this study, we propose a combination of experiments, including oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), cellular antioxidant activity assay (CAA), and the chick embryo model, as an efficient trio to evaluate antioxidant capacity of food components. Taking purine alkaloids as example, results demonstrate that chemical and cellular method might misinterpret their true ability on antioxidation. In chick embryo model, caffeine and theacrine can significantly improve vessel density on chorioallantoic membrane and myocardial apoptosis. The mechanism can be involving multiple targets within the organism. We believe that the trio proposed can be widely utilized in screening massive number of antioxidant in a cost-effective way. It will also help discovering new antioxidants that are easily being omitted due to their relatively poor in vitro activities.

  6. Quantum spin Hall insulators in functionalized arsenene (AsX, X = F, OH and CH3) monolayers with pronounced light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Yanle; Ma, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The search for new two-dimensional topological insulators (2D-TIs) with large band gaps is of great interest and importance. Our first-principles calculations predicted three candidates for 2D-TIs, arsenene functionalized with F, OH and CH3 groups (AsX, X = F, OH and CH3), which preserved large bulk band gaps from 100 to 160 meV (up to 260 meV) derived from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) within the px,y orbitals. This picture is similar to what was reported for an AsH monolayer with a band gap of 193 meV. Ab initio molecular dynamic (AIMD) simulations demonstrated the thermal stabilities of the AsX monolayers even at 500 K. The nontrivial topological phase was confirmed by the topological invariant Z2 and topological edge state. The topological electronic bandgap of the AsF monolayer can be effectively modulated by biaxial tensile strain and vertical external electric field. In addition, pronounced light absorption in the near-infrared and visible range of the solar spectrum was expected for the AsX (X = H, F) monolayers from the adsorption peaks at 0.45-1.6 eV, which is attractive for light harvesting. The nontrivial quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators AsX could be promising candidates for practical room-temperature applications in dissipationless transport devices and photovoltaics.The search for new two-dimensional topological insulators (2D-TIs) with large band gaps is of great interest and importance. Our first-principles calculations predicted three candidates for 2D-TIs, arsenene functionalized with F, OH and CH3 groups (AsX, X = F, OH and CH3), which preserved large bulk band gaps from 100 to 160 meV (up to 260 meV) derived from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) within the px,y orbitals. This picture is similar to what was reported for an AsH monolayer with a band gap of 193 meV. Ab initio molecular dynamic (AIMD) simulations demonstrated the thermal stabilities of the AsX monolayers even at 500 K. The nontrivial topological phase was confirmed by the topological

  7. Pronounced reduction of fluoride exposure in free-ranging deer in North Bohemia (Czech Republic) as indicated by the biomarkers skeletal fluoride content and dental fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Kierdorf, Uwe; Bahelková, Petra; Sedláček, František; Kierdorf, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Wild deer have been recommended as bioindicators of fluoride pollution. We compared bone fluoride concentrations and prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in free-ranging European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) from five counties in the northwestern part of the Czech Republic that had been collected by hunters and whose mandibles were presented at trophy exhibitions in the years 1996/1997 ("early period") and 2009 ("late period"). Data on atmospheric fluoride deposition suggested that the deer from the early period had been exposed to markedly higher fluoride levels than those from the late period. We therefore predicted a decline in skeletal fluoride levels and prevalence of dental fluorosis for both species from the early to the late period. Fluoride concentrations were determined in the coronoid process of the mandible, and assessment of dental fluorosis was performed on the permanent cheek teeth. A pronounced drop in fluoride concentrations from the early period (roe deer (n = 157), median: 3147 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone; red deer (n = 127), median: 1263 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone) to the late period (roe deer (n = 117), median: 350 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone; red deer (n = 72), median: 288 mg F(-)/kg of dry bone) was recorded. Prevalence of dental fluorosis also markedly declined from the early to the late period (roe deer: from 93% to 12%, red deer: from 87% to 28%). The reduction of fluoride deposition in the study area and, in consequence, fluoride exposure of the resident deer populations, is attributed largely to the implementation of emission control devices in the brown coal-fired power plants located in North Bohemia from the mid 1990s onwards. The findings of the present study demonstrate that wild deer are well suited for monitoring temporal changes in fluoride pollution of their habitats. PMID:22137477

  8. Purine Analog-Like Properties of Bendamustine Underlie Rapid Activation of DNA Damage Response and Synergistic Effects with Pyrimidine Analogues in Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Nobuya; Kikuchi, Jiro; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Taeko; Uesawa, Mitsuyo; Akutsu, Miyuki; Mori, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Yuichi; Ueda, Takanori; Kano, Yasuhiko; Furukawa, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    Bendamustine has shown considerable clinical activity against indolent lymphoid malignancies as a single agent or in combination with rituximab, but combination with additional anti-cancer drugs may be required for refractory and/or relapsed cases as well as other intractable tumors. In this study, we attempted to determine suitable anti-cancer drugs to be combined with bendamustine for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, aggressive lymphomas and multiple myeloma, all of which are relatively resistant to this drug, and investigated the mechanisms underlying synergism. Isobologram analysis revealed that bendamustine had synergistic effects with alkylating agents (4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil and melphalan) and pyrimidine analogues (cytosine arabinoside, gemcitabine and decitabine) in HBL-2, B104, Namalwa and U266 cell lines, which represent the above entities respectively. In cell cycle analysis, bendamustine induced late S-phase arrest, which was enhanced by 4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide, and potentiated early S-phase arrest by cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), followed by a robust increase in the size of sub-G1 fractions. Bendamustine was able to elicit DNA damage response and subsequent apoptosis faster and with shorter exposure than other alkylating agents due to rapid intracellular incorporation via equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). Furthermore, bendamustine increased the expression of ENT1 at both mRNA and protein levels and enhanced the uptake of Ara-C and subsequent increase in Ara-C triphosphate (Ara-CTP) in HBL-2 cells to an extent comparable with the purine analog fludarabine. These purine analog-like properties of bendamustine may underlie favorable combinations with other alkylators and pyrimidine analogues. Our findings may provide a theoretical basis for the development of more effective bendamustine-based combination therapies. PMID:24626203

  9. New 7-arylpiperazinylalkyl-8-morpholin-4-yl-purine-2,6-dione derivatives with anxiolytic activity - Synthesis, crystal structure and structure-activity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chłoń-Rzepa, Grażyna; Żmudzki, Paweł; Pawłowski, Maciej; Wesołowska, Anna; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J.; Jabłoński, Mateusz; Kalinowska-Tłuścik, Justyna

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of our earlier studies with serotonin (5-HT) receptor ligands in the group of long-chain arylpiperazines (LCAPs), a new series of 7-arylpiperazinylalkyl-8-morpholin-4-yl-purine-2,6-dione derivatives (5-12) has been designed, synthesised and studied in vitro for their affinity for 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors. The introduction of o-OCH3 and m-Cl into the phenylpiperazinyl moiety as well as the elongation of the linker between purine-2,6-dione core and arylpiperazine fragment modified the affinity for the tested 5-HT receptors. The structures of compounds 9-11 (hydrochloride salts) were confirmed by an X-ray diffraction method. All molecules adopted a different conformation in the crystal. The strongest observed type of interaction is a charge assisted hydrogen bond N+-H⋯Cl-. Additionally, the π-π interactions between 1,3-dimethyl-3,7-dihydropurine-2,6-dione cores of the neighbouring molecules were also observed. As it is observed in the presented crystal structures, the morpholine ring (a potential donor and acceptor of the hydrogen bonds) seems to be an attractive substituent, that may support binding to the non-specific sites of 5-HT receptors. Another interesting feature is the mutual orientation of rings in the arylpiperazine fragment, with plausible influence on ligand-receptor recognition. For compound 10, with strong 5-HT1A binding affinity, the mutual orientation of rings is determined by the intramolecular weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bond. This observation may contribute to a better understanding of the more selective binding of o-OCH3 arylpiperazine derivatives to the 5-HT1A receptor.

  10. Investigation of free amino acid, total phenolics, antioxidant activity and purine alkaloids to assess the health properties of non-Camellia tea

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wu; He, Chunnian; Ma, Yunyun; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Linghua Harris; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Peigen

    2015-01-01

    To find novel functional beverages from folk teas, 33 species of frequently used non-Camellia tea (plants other than Camellia) were collected and compared with Camellia tea (green tea, pu-erh tea and black tea) for the first time. Data are reported here on the quantities of 20 free amino acids (FAAs) and three purine alkaloids (measured by UHPLC), total polyphenols (measured by Folin-Ciocalteu assay), and antioxidant activity (DPPH). The total amounts of FAAs in non-Camellia tea (0.62–18.99 mg/g) are generally less than that of Camellia tea (16.55–24.99 mg/g). However, for certain FAAs, the quantities were much higher in some non-Camellia teas, such as γ-aminobutyric acid in teas from Ampelopsis grossedentata, Isodon serra and Hibiscus sabdariffa. Interestingly, theanine was detected in tea from Potentilla fruticosa (1.16±0.81 mg/g). Furthermore, the content of polyphenols in teas from A. grossedentata, Acer tataricum subsp. ginnala are significantly higher than those from Camellia tea; teas from I. serra, Pistacia chinensis and A. tataricum subsp. ginnala have remarkable antioxidant activities similar to the activities from green tea (44.23 μg/mL). Purine alkaloids (caffeine, theobromine and theophylline) were not detected in non-Camellia teas. The investigation suggest some non-Camellia teas may be great functional natural products with potential for prevention of chronic diseases and aging, by providing with abundant polyphenols, antioxidants and specific FAAs. PMID:27006902

  11. Investigation of free amino acid, total phenolics, antioxidant activity and purine alkaloids to assess the health properties of non-Camellia tea.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wu; He, Chunnian; Ma, Yunyun; Shen, Jie; Zhang, Linghua Harris; Peng, Yong; Xiao, Peigen

    2016-03-01

    To find novel functional beverages from folk teas, 33 species of frequently used non-Camellia tea (plants other than Camellia) were collected and compared with Camellia tea (green tea, pu-erh tea and black tea) for the first time. Data are reported here on the quantities of 20 free amino acids (FAAs) and three purine alkaloids (measured by UHPLC), total polyphenols (measured by Folin-Ciocalteu assay), and antioxidant activity (DPPH). The total amounts of FAAs in non-Camellia tea (0.62-18.99 mg/g) are generally less than that of Camellia tea (16.55-24.99 mg/g). However, for certain FAAs, the quantities were much higher in some non-Camellia teas, such as γ-aminobutyric acid in teas from Ampelopsis grossedentata, Isodon serra and Hibiscus sabdariffa. Interestingly, theanine was detected in tea from Potentilla fruticosa (1.16±0.81 mg/g). Furthermore, the content of polyphenols in teas from A. grossedentata, Acer tataricum subsp. ginnala are significantly higher than those from Camellia tea; teas from I. serra, Pistacia chinensis and A. tataricum subsp. ginnala have remarkable antioxidant activities similar to the activities from green tea (44.23 μg/mL). Purine alkaloids (caffeine, theobromine and theophylline) were not detected in non-Camellia teas. The investigation suggest some non-Camellia teas may be great functional natural products with potential for prevention of chronic diseases and aging, by providing with abundant polyphenols, antioxidants and specific FAAs. PMID:27006902

  12. Effect of high-dose nano-selenium and selenium-yeast on feed digestibility, rumen fermentation, and purine derivatives in sheep.

    PubMed

    Xun, Wenjuan; Shi, Liguang; Yue, Wenbin; Zhang, Chunxiang; Ren, Youshe; Liu, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nano-selenium (NS) and yeast-selenium (YS) supplementation on feed digestibility, rumen fermentation, and urinary purine derivatives in sheep. Six male ruminally cannulated sheep, average 43.32 ± 4.8 kg of BW, were used in a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square experiment. The treatments were control (without NS and YS), NS with 4 g nano-Se (provide 4 mg Se), and YS with 4 g Se-yeast (provide 4 mg Se) per kilogram of diet dry matter (DM), respectively. Experimental periods were 25 days with 15 days of adaptation and 10 days of sampling. Ruminal pH, ammonia N concentration, molar proportion of propionate, and ratio of acetate to propionate were decreased (P < 0.01), and total ruminal VFA concentration was increased with NS and YS supplementation (P < 0.01). In situ ruminal neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) degradation of Leymus chinensis (P < 0.01) and crude protein (CP) of soybean meal (P < 0.01) were significantly improved by Se supplementation. Digestibilities of DM, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract, aNDF, and ADF in the total tract and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were also affected by feeding Se supplementation diets (P < 0.01). Ruminal fermentation was improved by feeding NS, and feed conversion efficiency was also increased compared with YS (P < 0.01). We concluded that nano-Se can be used as a preferentially available selenium source in ruminant nutrition.

  13. Purification and Characterization of a White Laccase with Pronounced Dye Decolorizing Ability and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activity from Lepista nuda.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengjuan; Zhang, Guoqing; Meng, Li; Wang, Hexiang; Gao, Kexiang; Ng, Tb

    2016-01-01

    A strain LN07 with high laccase yield was identified as basidiomycete fungus Lepista nuda from which a white laccase without type I copper was purified and characterized. The laccase was a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 56 kDa. Its N-terminal amino acid sequence was AIGPAADLHIVNKDISPDGF. Besides, eight inner peptide sequences were determined and lac4, lac5 and lac6 sequences were in the Cu(2+) combination and conservation zones of laccases. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase was inhibited by the laccase with a half-inhibitory concentration of 0.65 μM. Cu(2+) ions (1.5 mM) enhanced the laccase production and the optimal pH and temperature of the laccase were pH 3.0 and 50 °C, respectively. The Km and Vmax of the laccase using ABTS as substrate were respectively 0.19 mM and 195 μM. Several dyes including laboratory dyes and textile dyes used in this study, such as Methyl red, Coomassie brilliant blue, Reactive brilliant blue and so on, were decolorized in different degrees by the purified laccase. By LC-MS analysis, Methyl red was structurally degraded by the laccase. Moreover, the laccase affected the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of many pesticides. Thus, the white laccase had potential commercial value for textile finishing and wastewater treatment. PMID:27023513

  14. Plastid sequence evolution: a new pattern of nucleotide substitutions in the Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Decker-Walters, Deena S; Chung, Sang-Min; Staub, Jack E

    2004-05-01

    Nucleotide substitutions (i.e., point mutations) are the primary driving force in generating DNA variation upon which selection can act. Substitutions called transitions, which entail exchanges between purines (A = adenine, G = guanine) or pyrimidines (C = cytosine, T = thymine), typically outnumber transversions (e.g., exchanges between a purine and a pyrimidine) in a DNA strand. With an increasing number of plant studies revealing a transversion rather than transition bias, we chose to perform a detailed substitution analysis for the plant family Cucurbitaceae using data from several short plastid DNA sequences. We generated a phylogenetic tree for 19 taxa of the tribe Benincaseae and related genera and then scored conservative substitution changes (e.g., those not exhibiting homoplasy or reversals) from the unambiguous branches of the tree. Neither the transition nor (A+T)/(G+C) biases found in previous studies were supported by our overall data. More importantly, we found a novel and symmetrical substitution bias in which Gs had been preferentially replaced by A, As by C, Cs by T, and Ts by G, resulting in the G-->A-->C-->T-->G substitution series. Understanding this pattern will lead to new hypotheses concerning plastid evolution, which in turn will affect the choices of substitution models and other tree-building algorithms for phylogenetic analyses based on nucleotide data.

  15. Attenuation of High-Frequency (50-200 Hz) Thalamocortical EEG Rhythms by Propofol in Rats Is More Pronounced for the Thalamus than for the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sean J.; Plourde, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Background Thalamocortical EEG rhythms in gamma (30-80 Hz) and high-gamma (80-200 Hz) ranges have been linked to arousal and conscious processes. To test the hypothesis that general anesthetics attenuate these rhythms, we characterized the concentration-effect relationship of propofol on the spectral power of these rhythms. In view of the ongoing debate about cortex versus thalamus as the primary site of anesthetic action for unconsciousness, we also compared the relative sensitivity of cortex and thalamus to this effect propofol. Methods Adult male Long-Evans rats were chronically implanted with electrodes in somatosensory (barrel) cortex and ventroposteromedial thalamus. Propofol was delivered by a computer-controlled infusion using real-time pharmacokinetic modeling to obtain the desired plasma concentration. Spectral power was assessed during baseline, at four stable propofol plasma-concentrations (0, 3,6,9,12 μg/ml) and during recovery over four frequency ranges (30-50, 51-75, 76-125, 126-200 Hz). Unconsciousness was defined as complete loss of righting reflex. Multiple regression was used to model the change of power (after logarithmic transformation) as a function of propofol concentration and recording site. Results Unconsciousness occurred at the 9 μg/ml concentration in all animals. Propofol caused a robust linear concentration-dependent attenuation of cortical power in the 76-200 Hz range and of thalamic power in the 51-200 Hz range. In all instances the concentration-effect slope for the thalamus was markedly steeper than for the cortex. Furthermore the lowest concentration causing unconsciousness significantly reduced cortical power in the 126-200 Hz range and thalamic power in the 51-200 Hz range. Conclusions Propofol causes a concentration-dependent attenuation of the power of thalamocortical rhythms in the 51-200 Hz range and this effect is far more pronounced for the thalamus, where the attenuation provides a robust correlate of the hypnotic

  16. Pronounced Weakening of Deep Components of the AMOC During the Late Holocene Caused by Export of Arctic Sea-Ice and Freshwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppo, D.; Thornalley, D. J.; Moffa-Sanchez, P.; Hall, I. R.; Keigwin, L. D.; McCave, I. N. N.

    2015-12-01

    Several proxy and modelling studies suggest that there may have been considerable change in the operation of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the last millennium. Yet despite its importance for regional and global climate, the recent history of the AMOC is poorly constrained, and comprehensive observational records only extend back a few decades at most. Observational data suggest that the export of large volumes of sea-ice and freshwater from the Arctic during the Great Salinity Anomaly of the late 1960s to early 1970s impacted North Atlantic circulation, and perhaps the strength of the AMOC, thus raising the possibility that more extreme events may have affected the AMOC during the pre-instrumental era. Firstly, we place the last millennium in a longer-term context by presenting Holocene grain-size records in depth transects from Blake Outer Ridge and Cape Hatteras, sampling the full-depth range of the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC), part of the lower limb of the AMOC. These records complement a depth-transect of grain-size records sampling the Iceland-Scotland (I-S) overflow, and together enable us to provide a synthesis of Holocene changes in the deep components of the AMOC and the impact on the AMOC of long-term variability in the export of Arctic sea-ice and freshwater. We then present detailed grain-size records for the last 1,000 years, both in a depth transect of cores off Cape Hatteras, and from cores in the Iceland Basin, sampling the I-S overflow. Initial results suggest a pronounced reduction over the last ~100-200 years in the inferred flow strength at sites bathed by Labrador Sea Water (LSW), while sites south of Iceland show an exceptional weakening of the I-S overflow over the last ~300 years. We explore the possibility that these events are linked to the export of large volumes of sea-ice and freshwater from the Arctic during the end of the Little Ice Age.

  17. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA.

    PubMed

    Heather, James M; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way.

  18. Preserving sequence annotations across reference sequences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Matching and comparing sequence annotations of different reference sequences is vital to genomics research, yet many annotation formats do not specify the reference sequence types or versions used. This makes the integration of annotations from different sources difficult and error prone. Results As part of our effort to create linked data for interoperable sequence annotations, we present an RDF data model for sequence annotation using the ontological framework established by the OBO Foundry ontologies and the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). We defined reference sequences as the common domain of integration for sequence annotations, and identified three semantic relationships between sequence annotations. In doing so, we created the Reference Sequence Annotation to compensate for gaps in the SO and in its mapping to BFO, particularly for annotations that refer to versions of consensus reference sequences. Moreover, we present three integration models for sequence annotations using different reference assemblies. Conclusions We demonstrated a working example of a sequence annotation instance, and how this instance can be linked to other annotations on different reference sequences. Sequence annotations in this format are semantically rich and can be integrated easily with different assemblies. We also identify other challenges of modeling reference sequences with the BFO. PMID:25093075

  19. The Sequence and Structure Determine the Function of Mature Human miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Katarzyna; Piwecka, Monika; Belter, Agnieszka; Wawrzyniak, Dariusz; Jeleniewicz, Jaroslaw; Barciszewska, Miroslawa Z; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) (19-25 nucleotides in length) belong to the group of non-coding RNAs are the most abundant group of posttranscriptional regulators in multicellular organisms. They affect a gene expression by binding of fully or partially complementary sequences to the 3'-UTR of target mRNA. Furthermore, miRNAs present a mechanism by which genes with diverse functions on multiple pathways can be simultaneously regulated at the post-transcriptional level. However, little is known about the specific pathways through which miRNAs with specific sequence or structural motifs regulate the cellular processes. In this paper we showed the broad and deep characteristics of mature miRNAs according to their sequence and structural motifs. We investigated a distinct group of miRNAs characterized by the presence of specific sequence motifs, such as UGUGU, GU-repeats and purine/pyrimidine contents. Using computational function and pathway analysis of their targeted genes, we were able to observe the relevance of sequence and the type of targeted mRNAs. As the consequence of the sequence analysis we finally provide the comprehensive description of pathways, biological processes and proteins associated with the distinct group of characterized miRNAs. Here, we found that the specific group of miRNAs with UGUGU can activate the targets associated to the interferon induction pathway or pathways prominently observed during carcinogenesis. GU-rich miRNAs are prone to regulate mostly processes in neurogenesis, whereas purine/pyrimidine rich miRNAs could be involved rather in transport and/or degradation of RNAs. Additionally, we have also analyzed the simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Their variation within mature miRNAs might be critical for normal miRNA regular activity. Expansion or contraction of SSRs in mature miRNA might directly affect its mRNA interaction or even change the function of that distinct miRNA. Our results prove that due to the specific sequence features, these

  20. Crystal structure of calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase with two full trimers in the asymmetric unit: important implications for the mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bzowska, Agnieszka; Koellner, Gertraud; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Stroh, Albrecht; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Holý, Antonin; Steiner, Thomas; Frank, Joachim

    2004-09-17

    The crystal structure of the binary complex of trimeric purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from calf spleen with the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate inhibitor 2,6-diamino-(S)-9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]purine ((S)-PMPDAP) is determined at 2.3A resolution in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). Crystallization in this space group, which is observed for the first time with a calf spleen PNP crystal structure, is obtained in the presence of calcium atoms. In contrast to the previously described cubic space group P2(1)3, two independent trimers are observed in the asymmetric unit, hence possible differences between monomers forming the biologically active trimer could be detected, if present. Such differences would be expected due to third-of-the-sites binding documented for transition-state events and inhibitors. However, no differences are noted, and binding stoichiometry of three inhibitor molecules per enzyme trimer is observed in the crystal structure, and in the parallel solution studies using isothermal titration calorimetry and spectrofluorimetric titrations. Presence of phosphate was shown to modify binding stoichiometry of hypoxanthine. Therefore, the enzyme was also crystallized in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) in the presence of (S)-PMPDAP and phosphate, and the resulting structure of the binary PNP/(S)-PMPDAP complex was refined at 2.05A resolution. No qualitative differences between complexes obtained with and without the presence of phosphate were detected, except for the hydrogen bond contact of Arg84 and a phosphonate group, which is observed only in the former complex in three out of six independent monomers. Possible hydrogen bonds observed in the enzyme complexed with (S)-PMPDAP, in particular a putative hydrogen bonding contact N(1)-H cdots, three dots, centered Glu201, indicate that the inhibitor binds in a tautomeric or ionic form in which position N(1) acts as a hydrogen bond donor. This points to a crucial role of this hydrogen bond in defining

  1. Poincaré recurrences of DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, K. M.; Shepelyansky, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the statistical properties of Poincaré recurrences of Homo sapiens, mammalian, and other DNA sequences taken from the Ensembl Genome data base with up to 15 billion base pairs. We show that the probability of Poincaré recurrences decays in an algebraic way with the Poincaré exponent β≈4 even if the oscillatory dependence is well pronounced. The correlations between recurrences decay with an exponent ν≈0.6 that leads to an anomalous superdiffusive walk. However, for Homo sapiens sequences, with the largest available statistics, the diffusion coefficient converges to a finite value on distances larger than one million base pairs. We argue that the approach based on Poncaré recurrences determines new proximity features between different species and sheds a new light on their evolution history.

  2. RECEPTOR AFFINITY AND PHOSPHODIESTERASES 4B AND 10A ACTIVITY OF OCTAHYDRO- AND 6,7-DIMETHOXY-3,4-DIHYDRO- ISOQUINOLIN-2(1H)-YL-ALKYL DERIVATIVES OF IMIDAZO- AND PYRIMIDINO[2,1-f]PURINES.

    PubMed

    Zagórska, Agnieszka; Gryzło, Beata; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Mordyl, Barbara; Kazek, Grzegorz; Pawłowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    A series of octahydro- and 6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydro- isoquinolin-2(1H)-yl-alkyl derivatives of imidazo- and pyrimidino[2,1-f]purines were synthesized and biologically evaluated in in vitro competition binding experiments for serotonin 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(6), 5-HT(7), and dopamine D2 receptors and inhibitory potencies for phosphodiesterases - PDE4B1 and PDE10A. The structure-activity relationships allowed to determine the structural features responsible for receptor and enzyme activity. Compound 5 (8-(4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroiso- quinolin-2(1H)butyl)1,3-dimethyl-H-imidazo[2,1-f]purine-2,4(3H,8H)-dione) could be regarded as promising structure for further modification and detailed mechanistic study for obtained hybrid ligands.

  3. Crystal structure of 6,7-dihy­droxy-6,7-di­hydro-3H-imidazo[1,2-a]purin-9(5H)-one

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Li, Cheng-Xun; Lv, Jie; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The title purine derivative, C7H7N5O3, is an adduct of guanine with glyoxal. In the mol­ecule, the di­hydro­imidazole ring adopts a twisted conformation on the C—C bond, and the two hydroxyl groups lie on opposite sides of the mean plane of the ring. In the crystal, the mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O, O—H⋯N and N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds forming a three-dimensional framework. The crystal packing is reinforced by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and by offset π–π stacking of the purine ring systems of inversion related mol­ecules [inter­centroid distance = 3.4839 (12) Å]. PMID:27536400

  4. (1-Adamant­yl){4-[(2-chloro-9-isopropyl-9H-purin-6-yl)aminometh­yl]phen­yl}methanone trichloro­methane solvate

    PubMed Central

    Rouchal, Michal; Nečas, Marek; Vícha, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, C26H30ClN5O·CHCl3, the purine mol­ecule consists of essentially planar benzene and purine ring systems [maximum deviation 0.010 (4) Å for both ring systems] forming a dihedral angle of 85.52 (9)°. Inter­molecular N—H⋯N hydrogen bonds link adjacent mol­ecules into centrosymmetric dimers. The structure also contains inter­molecular C—H⋯O and C—H⋯N inter­actions. The benzene rings form offset face-to-face π–π stacking inter­actions with an inter­planar distance of 3.541 (4) Å and a centroid-to-centroid distance of 4.022 (4) Å. PMID:21583132

  5. Effect of single mutations on the specificity of Escherichia coli FPG protein for excision of purine lesions from DNA damaged by free radicals.

    PubMed

    Sidorkina, O; Dizdaroglu, M; Laval, J

    2001-09-15

    The formamidopyrimidine N-DNA glycosylase (Fpg protein) of Escherichia coli is a DNA repair enzyme that is specific for the removal of purine-derived lesions from DNA damaged by free radicals and other oxidative processes. We investigated the effect of single mutations on the specificity of this enzyme for three purine-derived lesions in DNA damaged by free radicals. These damaging agents generate a multiplicity of base products in DNA, with the yields depending on the damaging agent. Wild type Fpg protein (wt-Fpg) removes 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-Gua), 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyAde), and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyGua) from damaged DNA with similar specificities. We generated five mutant forms of this enzyme with mutations involving Lys-57-->Gly (FpgK57G), Lys-57-->Arg (FpgK57R), Lys-155-->Ala (FpgK155A), Pro-2-->Gly (FpgP2G), and Pro-2-->Glu (FpgP2E), and purified them to homogeneity. FpgK57G and FpgK57R were functional for removal of FapyAde and FapyGua with a reduced activity when compared with wt-Fpg. The removal of 8-OH-Gua was different in that the specificity of FpgK57G was significantly lower for its removal from irradiated DNA, whereas wt-Fpg, FpgK57G, and FpgK57R excised 8-OH-Gua from H2O2/Fe(III)-EDTA/ascorbic acid-treated DNA with almost the same specificity. FpgK155A and FpgP2G had very low activity and FpgP2E exhibited no activity at all. Michaelis-Menten kinetics of excision was measured and kinetic constants were obtained. The results indicate an important role of Lys-57 residue in the activity of Fpg protein for 8-OH-Gua, but a lesser significant role for formamidopyrimidines. Mutations involving Lys-155 and Pro-2 had a dramatic effect with Pro-2-->Glu leading to complete loss of activity, indicating a significant role of these residues. The results show that point mutations significantly change the specificity of Fpg protein and suggest that point mutations are also expected to change specificities of other DNA

  6. Effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on purine receptor expression in the brain and gliosis in rats tolerant to morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Listos, Joanna; Gutowska, Izabela; Machoy-Mokrzyńska, Anna; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Maciej; Puchałowicz, Kamila; Prokopowicz, Adam; Talarek, Sylwia; Listos, Piotr; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on protein and mRNA expression of purine receptors: P2X4, P2X7, adenosine receptor A1; and astrocytes (GFAP mRNA expression) and on microglia activation (Iba1 mRNA expression) in several structures of the mesolimbic system (striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex) in rats expressing tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine. Rat mothers were orally treated with 0.1% lead acetate from conception, through gestation, and postnatally, as well as to offspring up to day (PND) 28; subsequently molecular studies were conducted on adult (PND 60) male rats. Morphine tolerance developed more strongly in rats perinatally exposed to Pb. The analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of protein and mRNA P2X4 receptor expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex but not in the hippocampus; P2X7 protein and mRNA receptor expression in the striatum and hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex; A1 protein receptor expression in all investigated structures and A1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; Iba1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; and GFAP mRNA expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. Immunohistochemical analysis has also revealed significant alterations. Strong expressions of P2X4, P2X7, A1 receptors, astrocytes and microglia activation were observed in the hippocampus in Pb and/or morphine treated rats. The higher expression of purine receptors and glial cell activation are important markers of neuroinflammatory processes. Therefore, we conclude that Pb-induced neuroinflammation may be responsible for the intensification of morphine tolerance in the Pb-treated rats. Additionally, the dysregulation of A1 adenosine receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, may also be involved in the intensification of morphine tolerance in Pb-treated rats. Our study demonstrates the significant participation of environmental factors in

  7. Serotonin transporter activity of imidazolidine-2,4-dione and imidazo[2,1-f]purine-2,4-dione derivatives in aspect of their acid-base properties.

    PubMed

    Zagórska, Agnieszka; Czopek, Anna; Pawłowski, Maciej; Dybała, Małgorzata; Siwek, Agata; Nowak, Gabriel

    2012-11-01

    Affinities of arylpiperazinylalkyl derivatives of imidazo[2,1-f]purine-2,4-dione and imidazolidine-2,4-dione for serotonin transporter and their acid-base properties were evaluated. The dissociation constant (pK(a)) of compounds 1-22 were determinated by potentiometric titration and calculated using pKalc 3.1 module of the Pallas system. The data from experimental methods and computational calculations were compared and suitable conclusions were reached.

  8. Influence of nucleotides flanking the ggaa core sequence on ets1 and ets2 DNA-binding activity and the mechanism of ets1 autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Ascione, R; Thompson, D; Thomas, R; Panayiotakis, A; Ramsay, R; Tymms, M; Kola, I; Seth, A

    1992-11-01

    The Ets family of genes encode nuclear proteins that activate transcription by binding to a specific purine-rich (GGAA) ets binding sequence (EBS) present in promoters/enhancers of various genes. We have previously shown that over-expression of ets1 via transfection of ets1 expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells induced the expression of the endogenous Ets1 gene. Here we report that the autoregulation occurs as a result of the ets1 protein binding to the EBS-core located in its own promoter. In the present study, we have also identified Ets binding sites in the IL-4, G-CSF (granulocyte colony stimulating factor), and the 2'5' OAS (oligoadenylate synthetase) promoters by binding with Ets1 and Ets2 proteins using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Interestingly, we have found that the EBS containing T nucleotides on either side of the GGAA core sequence, does not bind Ets1 or Ets2 proteins. Our findings demonstrate that the sequences surrounding the purine core - GGAA- have a profound influence on the binding of Ets proteins. PMID:21584592

  9. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF 8-METHOXY-1,3-DIMETHYL-2,6-DIOXO-PURIN-7-YL DERIVATIVES WITH TERMINAL CARBOXYLIC, ESTER OR AMIDE MOIETIES IN ANIMAL MODELS.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Chłon-Rzepa, Grazyna; Wyska, Elzbieta; Pociecha, Krzysztof; Sapa, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    The previous studies in a series of 8-methoxy-1,3-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-purin-7-yl derivatives revealed their analgesic properties. We extended the study with these compounds in aim to assess their impact on inflammatory process. For this purpose we used: the zymosan-induced peritonitis and the carrageenan-induced edema model. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the investigated compounds by the FRAP assay was determined. For the most active derivatives from evaluated series their influence on plasma TNF-α level was also tested in vivo. All investigated purine-2,6-dione derivatives 1-11 decreased neutrophils count and inhibited intensity of early vascular permeability. Furthermore, all evaluated compounds reduced the volume of edema caused by subcutaneous injection of carrageenan. Derivatives 1 (with ester moiety), 3 and 4 (with carboxylic group) showed the highest activity in the zymosan-induced peritonitis. In addition, a significant inhibition of plasma TNF-α level in rats with endotoxemia was observed following intraperitoneal administration of these compounds. In turn, compounds 6 and 8-11 containing amide moiety showed the greatest anti-inflammatory (antiedematous) effect in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. All compounds did not show significant antioxidant properties. The present studies revealed that the presented purine-2,6-dione derivatives exhibit a significant anti-inflammatory activity and this effect may result from their ability to lower TNF-α level. PMID:27476295

  10. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  11. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  12. Structure and dynamics of near-threshold leptons driven by dipolar interactions: an accurate computational study for the DNA purinic bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carelli, Fabio; Gianturco, Francesco Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of low-energy scattering electrons/positrons with molecular targets characterized by a "supercritical" permanent dipole moment (≳2.0 D) presents special physical characteristics that affect their spatial distributions, around the nuclear network of the molecular partners, both above and below the energy thresholds. Such special states are described as either dipole scattering states (DSS) above thresholds or as dipole bound states (DBS) below thresholds. The details of their respective behaviour will be presented and discussed in this work in the case of the purinic DNA bases of adenine and guanine. The behavior of the additional electron, in particular, will be discussed in detail by providing new computational results that will be related to the findings from recent experiments on the same DNA bases, confirming the transient electron's behaviour surmised by them. This work is affectionately dedicated to Michael Allan on the occasion of his official retirement. We wish to this dear friend and outstanding scientist many years to come in the happy pursuit of his many scientific interests.Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  13. Nucleolipids of Canonical Purine ß‐d‐Ribo‐Nucleosides: Synthesis and Cytostatic/Cytotoxic Activities Toward Human and Rat Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knies, Christine; Hammerbacher, Katharina; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report on the synthesis of two series of canonical purine ß‐d‐ribonucleoside nucleolipids derived from inosine and adenosine, which have been characterized by elemental analyses, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) as well as by 1H and 13C NMR, and pH‐dependent UV/Vis spectroscopy. A selection of the novel nucleolipids with different lipophilic moieties were first tested on their cytotoxic effect toward human macrophages. Compounds without a significant inhibitory effect on the viability of the macrophages were tested on their cytostatic/cytotoxic effect toward human astrocytoma/oligodendroglioma GOS‐3 cells as well as against the rat malignant neuroectodermal BT4Ca cell line. In order to additionally investigate the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the cytotoxic effects of the derivatives on GOS‐3 or BT4Ca cells, we evaluated the induction of apoptosis and observed the particular activity of the nucleolipid ethyl 3‐{4‐hydroxymethyl‐2‐methyl‐6‐[6‐oxo‐1‐(3,7,11‐trimethyl‐dodeca‐2,6,10‐trienyl)‐1,6‐dihydro‐purin‐9‐yl]‐tetrahydro‐furo[3,4‐d][1,3]dioxol‐2‐yl}propionate (8 c) toward both human and rat glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. PMID:27308225

  14. Towards in vivo regulon kinetics: PurR activation by 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate during purine depletion in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Dimitrov, Peter; Gautier, Laurent; Liu, Meng; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2014-07-01

    Short-term adaptation to changing environments relies on regulatory elements translating shifting metabolite concentrations into a specifically optimized transcriptome. So far the focus of analyses has been divided between regulatory elements identified in vivo and kinetic studies of small molecules interacting with the regulatory elements in vitro. Here we describe how in vivo regulon kinetics can describe a regulon through the effects of the metabolite controlling it, exemplified by temporal purine exhaustion in Lactococcus lactis. We deduced a causal relation between the pathway precursor 5-phosphoribosyl-α-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) and individual mRNA levels, whereby unambiguous and homogeneous relations could be obtained for PurR regulated genes, thus linking a specific regulon to a specific metabolite. As PurR activates gene expression upon binding of PRPP, the pur mRNA curves reflect the in vivo kinetics of PurR PRPP binding and activation. The method singled out the xpt-pbuX operon as kinetically distinct, which was found to be caused by a guanine riboswitch whose regulation was overlaying the PurR regulation. Importantly, genes could be clustered according to regulatory mechanism and long-term consequences could be distinguished from transient changes--many of which would not be seen in a long-term adaptation to a new environment. The strategy outlined here can be adapted to analyse the individual effects of members from larger metabolomes in virtually any organism, for elucidating regulatory networks in vivo.

  15. Design, synthesis, and in vitro biological evaluation of novel 6-methyl-7-substituted-7-deaza purine nucleoside analogs as anti-influenza A agents.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cai; Sun, Chenghai; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Yiqian; Hussain, Muzammal; Wan, Junting; Li, Minke; Li, Xue; Jin, Ruiliang; Tu, Zhengchao; Zhang, Jiancun

    2016-05-01

    Among many subtypes of influenza A viruses, influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) subtypes are currently circulating among humans (WHO report 2014-15). Therapeutically, the emergence of viral resistance to currently available drugs (adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors) has heightened alarms for developing novel drugs that could address diverse targets in the viral replication cycle in order to improve treatment outcomes. To this regard, the design and synthesis of nucleoside analog inhibitors as potential anti-influenza A agents is a very active field of research nowadays. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of hitherto unknown 6-methyl-7-substituted-7-deaza purine nucleoside analogs, and evaluated for their biological activities against influenza A virus strains, H1N1 and H3N2. From the viral inhibition assay, we identified some effective compounds, among which, compounds 5x (IC50 = 5.88 μM and 6.95 μM for H1N1 and H3N2, respectively) and 5z (IC50 = 3.95 μM and 3.61 μM for H1N1 and H3N2, respectively) demonstrated potent anti-influenza A activity. On the basis of selectivity index, we conceive that compound 5x may serve as a chemical probe of interest for further lead optimization studies with a general aim of developing novel and effective anti-influenza A virus agents.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated cytotoxicity of rat endothelial cells: Changes in ATP and purine products and the effects of protective interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, D.F.; Varanl, J.; Phan, S.H.; Ward, P.A. )

    1990-02-26

    Hydrogen peroxide-mediated cytotoxicity (as measured by {sup 51}Cr-release) of rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells was time-dependent and related to the concentration of peroxide employed. The cytotoxic effects of hydrogen peroxide were, as expected, prevented by catalase and the degree of protection was directly related to its time of addition. Endothelial cells were incubated with {sup 14}C-adenosine to achieve intracellular labeling of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), following which the cells were washed and exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Based on analysis of cell extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography, there was a time-dependent loss of intracellular radioactivity and ATP with the simultaneous appearance of purine degradation products including xanthine/hypoxanthine. The extracellular fluid of cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide contained significant amounts of xanthine/hypoxanthine. The ferric iron chelator deferoxamine provided almost complete protection against hydrogen peroxide-mediated cytotoxicity. Two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase-(allopurinol and oxypurinol) were protective as was deoxycoformycin, an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase. Remarkably, cells protected by these agents showed the same loss of intracellular ATP as unprotected, hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. These findings demonstrate the dissociation between ATP loss per se and oxidant mediated cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

  17. Enantiomeric radiochemical synthesis of R and S (1-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-3-fluoropropan-2-yloxy)methylphosphonic acid (FPMPA)

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Knudson, Kathleen; Collins, Matt; Srinivasula, Sharat; Lim, Esther; Di Mascio, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients requires chronic multidrug administration. The eventual failure of therapy in some patients has brought into question the tissue concentration of the drugs. With an appropriately radiolabeled compound, we could utilize positron emission tomography to provide quantitative time–activity curves for various tissues. We have developed a fluorine-18 labeled analog of Tenofovir, the active metabolite of Tenofovir DF, a commonly prescribed component of multidrug therapy. Because (1-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)-3-fluoropropan-2-yloxy)methylphosphonic acid (FPMPA) has a chiral center, we prepared both enantiomers and confirmed that the S-isomer exhibited significantly higher antiviral activity than the R-isomer. In viral replication inhibition assays in human MT4 cells infected with SHIVDH12R, S-FPMPA had an IC50 of 1.85 μM (95% CI; 0.8–5.53), while the R-isomer was inactive. An appropriate chiral precursor was prepared to allow the incorporation of fluorine-18. The [18F]FPMPA in racemic, R, or S form was prepared in a 50 min synthesis in 38±5% yield (n = 23, corrected for decay). The product was of high radiochemical and enantiomeric purity. The specific activity of the final product was 4.0±1.8 Ci/μmol at EOB (end of bombardment). This product may provide information about drug tissue distribution in animal models under chronic drug treatment. PMID:19724660

  18. Probing the mechanism of purine nucleoside phosphorylase by steady-state kinetic studies and ligand binding characterization determined by fluorimetric titrations.

    PubMed

    Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2006-05-01

    Reversible reaction catalyzed by trimeric purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Cellulomonas sp. with typical and non-typical substrates, including product inhibition patterns of both reaction directions, and interactions of the enzyme with bisubstrate analogue inhibitors, were investigated by the steady-state kinetic methods and fluorimetric titrations. The ligand chromophores exist most probably as neutral species, and not N(1)-H monoanions, in the complex with PNP, as shown by determination of inhibition constants vs. pH. This supports the mechanism in which hydrogen bond interaction of N(1)-H with Glu204 is crucial in the catalytic process. Stoichiometry of ligand binding, with possible exception of hypoxanthine, is three molecules per enzyme trimer. Kinetic experiments show that in principle the Michaelis-Menten model could not properly describe the reaction. However, this model seems to hold for certain experimental conditions. Data presented here are supported by earlier findings obtained by means of fluorimetric titrations and protective effects of ligands on thermal inactivation of the enzyme. All results are consistent with the following mechanism for trimeric PNPs: (i) random binding of substrates, (ii) potent binding and slow release of some reaction products leading to the circumstances that the chemical step is not the slowest one and that rapid-equilibrium assumptions do not hold, (iii) a dual role of phosphate--a substrate and also a reaction modifier.

  19. Adenine versus guanine DNA adducts of aristolochic acids: role of the carcinogen–purine linkage in the differential global genomic repair propensity

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Preetleen; Sharma, Purshotam; Wetmore, Stacey D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling is employed to provide a plausible structural explanation for the experimentally-observed differential global genome repair (GGR) propensity of the ALII-N2-dG and ALII-N6-dA DNA adducts of aristolochic acid II. Our modeling studies suggest that an intrinsic twist at the carcinogen–purine linkage of ALII-N2-dG induces lesion site structural perturbations and conformational heterogeneity of damaged DNA. These structural characteristics correlate with the relative repair propensities of AA-adducts, where GGR recognition occurs for ALII-N2-dG, but is evaded for intrinsically planar ALII-N6-dA that minimally distorts DNA and restricts the conformational flexibility of the damaged duplex. The present analysis on the ALII adduct model systems will inspire future experimental studies on these adducts, and thereby may extend the list of structural factors that directly correlate with the propensity for GGR recognition. PMID:26175048

  20. Di-μ-but-2-enoato-bis­[diaqua­bis(but-2-enoato)neodymium(III)] 2,6-diamino­purine disolvate

    PubMed Central

    Atria, Ana María; Astete, Alan; Garland, Maria Teresa; Baggio, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    The title Nd complex [Nd2(C4H5O2)6(H2O)4]·2C5H6N6 is isotypic with two previously reported Dy and Ho isologues. It is composed of [Nd(crot)3(H2O)2]2 dimers [crot(onate) = but-2-enoate = C4H5O2], built up around symmetry centres and completed by 2,6-diamine­purine mol­ecules acting as solvates. The neodymium cations are coordinated by three chelating crotonato units and two water mol­ecules. One of the chelating carboxyl­ates acts also in a bridging mode, sharing one oxygen with both cations, and the final result is a pair of NdO9 tricapped prismatic polyhedra linked to each other through a central (Nd—O)2 loop. A most attractive aspect of the structures resides in the existence of a complex inter­molecular hydrogen-bonding interaction scheme involving two sets of tightly inter­linked, non-inter­secting one-dimensional structures, one of them formed by the [Nd(crot)3(H2O)2]2 dimers running along [100] and the second by the solvate mol­ecules evolving along [010]. PMID:22058842

  1. Competition of nucleoside transport inhibitors with binding of 6-[(4-nitrobenzyl)-mercapto]purine ribonucleoside to intact erythrocytes and ghost membranes from different species.

    PubMed

    Ogbunude, P O; Baer, H P

    1990-04-01

    The potency of nucleoside transport inhibitors, including 6-[(4-nitrobenzyl)-mercapto]purine ribonucleoside (NBMPR), dilazep, mioflazine and its derivatives soluflazine and R57974 as inhibitors of the binding of [3H(G)]NBMPR to intact erythrocytes and respective ghost membranes from human, mouse and hamster was determined. There was no close agreement between the IC50 profiles for the different inhibitors when comparing values obtained for intact cells and membranes from each species, and there was no consistent profile of differences when considering individual drugs and comparing their actions in the three species. Present data also were compared with potency values obtained previously with the same drugs directly in nucleoside transport inhibition studies with erythrocytes from the same species as well as with [3H(G)]NBMPR binding studies in isolated liver and lung membranes from hamster. The overall conclusion from this and previous studies is that the evaluation of relative potencies in screening of potential nucleoside transport inhibitors is best carried out at the level actual nucleoside transport studies in intact cells, since [3H(G)]NBMPR binding studies yield discrepant data. PMID:2322305

  2. Multimodal sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence.

  3. Whole Genome Sequencing

    MedlinePlus

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  4. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  5. Science sequence design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskela, P. E.; Bollman, W. E.; Freeman, J. E.; Helton, M. R.; Reichert, R. J.; Travers, E. S.; Zawacki, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The activities of the following members of the Navigation Team are recorded: the Science Sequence Design Group, responsible for preparing the final science sequence designs; the Advanced Sequence Planning Group, responsible for sequence planning; and the Science Recommendation Team (SRT) representatives, responsible for conducting the necessary sequence design interfaces with the teams during the mission. The interface task included science support in both advance planning and daily operations. Science sequences designed during the mission are also discussed.

  6. Conserved Sequence Preferences Contribute to Substrate Recognition by the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houqing; Singh Gautam, Amit K.; Wilmington, Shameika R.; Wylie, Dennis; Martinez-Fonts, Kirby; Kago, Grace; Warburton, Marie; Chavali, Sreenivas; Inobe, Tomonao; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of its substrates at the site where it initiates degradation. Here, we report that modulating these sequences can tune the steady-state abundance of proteins over 2 orders of magnitude in cells. This is the same dynamic range as seen for inducing ubiquitination through a classic N-end rule degron. The stability and abundance of His3 constructs dictated by the initiation site affect survival of yeast cells and show that variation in proteasomal initiation can affect fitness. The proteasome's sequence preferences are linked directly to the affinity of the initiation sites to their receptor on the proteasome and are conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. These findings establish that the sequence composition of unstructured initiation sites influences protein abundance in vivo in an evolutionarily conserved manner and can affect phenotype and fitness. PMID:27226608

  7. The generalized quaternion sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveci, Ömür

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we define the recurrence sequence by using the relation matrix of the generalized quaternion group and then, we obtain miscellaneous properties of this sequence. Also, we obtain the cyclic groups and the semigroups which are produced by generating matrix of the sequence defined when read modulo m. Furthermore, we study this sequence modulo m, and then we derive the relationship among the order the cyclic groups obtained and the periods of the sequence defined.

  8. 6-Methylpurine derived sugar modified nucleosides: Synthesis and in vivo antitumor activity in D54 tumor expressing M64V-Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Abdalla E A; Abou-Elkhair, Reham A I; Parker, William B; Allan, Paula W; Secrist, John A

    2016-01-27

    Impressive antitumor activity has been observed with fludarabine phosphate against tumors that express Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) due to the liberation of 2-fluoroadenine in the tumor tissue. 6-Methylpurine (MeP) is another cytotoxic adenine analog that does not exhibit selectivity when administered systemically, and could be very useful in a gene therapy approach to cancer treatment involving E. coli PNP. The prototype MeP releasing prodrug 9-(2-deoxy-β-d-ribofuranosyl)-6-methylpurine (1) [MeP-dR] has demonstrated good activity against tumors expressing E. coli PNP, but its antitumor activity is limited due to toxicity resulting from the generation of MeP from gut bacteria. Therefore, we have embarked on a medicinal chemistry program to identify a combination of non-toxic MeP prodrugs and non-human adenosine glycosidic bond cleaving enzymes. The two best MeP-based substrates with M64V-E coli PNP, a mutant which was engineered to tolerate modification at the 5'-position of adenosine and its analogs, were 9-(6-deoxy-α-l-talofuranosyl)-6-methylpurine (3) [methyl(talo)-MeP-R] and 9-(α-l-lyxofuranosyl)6-methylpurine (4) [lyxo-MeP-R]. The detailed synthesis methyl(talo)-MeP-R and lyxo-MeP-R, and the evaluation of their substrate activity with 4 enzymes not normally associated with cancer patients is described. In addition, we have determined the intraperitoneal pharmacokinetic (ip-PK) properties of methyl(talo)-MeP-R and have determined its in vivo bystander activity in mice bearing D54 tumors that express M64V PNP. The observed good in vivo bystander activity of [methyl(talo)-MeP-R/M64V-E coli PNP combination suggests that these agents could be useful for the treatment of cancer.

  9. Effects of dietary supplementation of rumen-protected folic acid on rumen fermentation, degradability and excretion of urinary purine derivatives in growing steers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Liu, Qiang; Guo, Gang; Huo, WenJie; Ma, Le; Zhang, YanLi; Pei, CaiXia; Zhang, ShuanLin; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The present experiment was undertaken to determine the effects of dietary addition of rumen-protected folic acid (RPFA) on ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradability, enzyme activity and the relative quantity of ruminal cellulolytic bacteria in growing beef steers. Eight rumen-cannulated Jinnan beef steers averaging 2.5 years of age and 419 ± 1.9 kg body weight were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. The four treatments comprised supplementation levels of 0 (Control), 70, 140 and 210 mg RPFA/kg dietary dry matter (DM). On DM basis, the ration consisted of 50% corn silage, 47% concentrate and 3% soybean oil. The DM intake (averaged 8.5 kg/d) was restricted to 95% of ad libitum intake. The intake of DM, crude protein (CP) and net energy for growth was not affected by treatments. In contrast, increasing RPFA supplementation increased average daily gain and the concentration of total volatile fatty acid and reduced ruminal pH linearly. Furthermore, increasing RPFA supplementation enhanced the acetate to propionate ratio and reduced the ruminal ammonia N content linearly. The ruminal effective degradability of neutral detergent fibre from corn silage and CP from concentrate improved linearly and was highest for the highest supplementation levels. The activities of cellobiase, xylanase, pectinase and α-amylase linearly increased, but carboxymethyl-cellulase and protease were not affected by the addition of RPFA. The relative quantities of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes increased linearly. With increasing RPFA supplementation levels, the excretion of urinary purine derivatives was also increased linearly. The present results indicated that the supplementation of RPFA improved ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradability, activities of microbial enzymes and the relative quantity of the ruminal cellulolytic bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. According to the conditions of this