Science.gov

Sample records for propane oxidative dehydrogenation

  1. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over Mg-Mo-O catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cadus, L.E.; Abello, M.C.; Gomez, M.F.; Rivarola, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Mg-Mo-O catalysts have been investigated with different techniques (XRD, XPS, IR, and EPR spectroscopies) in order to explain the difference in catalytic behavior in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene. The active site would be a coordinatively unsaturated form of Mo{sup 5+}. The active Mo{sup 5+} could be generated on the surface by propane reduction. The slight excess of MoO{sub 3} which is necessary for the catalyst to become an active one probably contributes to the formation of Mo{sup 5+}.

  2. NiO-polyoxometalate nanocomposites as efficient catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane and isobutane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghong; Cao, Chuanjing; Xu, Ting; Sun, Miao; Zhang, Jizhe; Wang, Ye; Wan, Huilin

    2009-05-07

    Novel nanocomposites of NiO and polyoxometalate (Cs(2.5)H(0.5)PMo(12)O(40)) with particle sizes in the range of 5-10 nm showed exceptional oxygen and ammonia adsorption capabilities, and the nanocomposites catalyzed the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane and isobutane efficiently under mild conditions.

  3. Effect of catalyst structure on oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane on alumina-supported vanadia

    SciTech Connect

    Argyle, Morris D.; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-09-11

    The catalytic properties of Al2O3-supported vanadia with a wide range of VOx surface density (1.4-34.2 V/nm2) and structure were examined for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane. UV-visible and Raman spectra showed that vanadia is dispersed predominantly as isolated monovanadate species below {approx}2.3 V/nm2. As surface densities increase, two-dimensional polyvanadates appear (2.3-7.0 V/nm2) along with increasing amounts of V2O5 crystallites at surface densities above 7.0 V/nm2. The rate constant for oxidative dehydrogenation (k1) and its ratio with alkane and alkene combustion (k2/k1 and k3/k1, respectively) were compared for both alkane reactants as a function of vanadia surface density. Propene formation rates (per V-atom) are {approx}8 times higher than ethene formation rates at a given reaction temperature, but the apparent ODH activation energies (E1) are similar for the two reactants and relatively insensitive to vanadia surface density. Ethene and propene formation rates (per V-atom) are strongly influenced by vanadia surface density and reach a maximum value at intermediate surface densities ({approx}8 V/nm2). The ratio of k2/k1 depends weakly on reaction temperature, indicating that activation energies for alkane combustion and ODH reactions are similar. The ratio of k2/k1 is independent of surface density for ethane, but increase slightly with vanadia surface density for propane, suggesting that isolated structures prevalent at low surface densities are slightly more selective for alkane dehydrogenation reactions. The ratio of k3/k1 decreases markedly with increasing reaction temperature for both ethane and propane ODH. Thus, the apparent activation energy for alkene combustion (E3) is much lower than that for alkane dehydrogenation (E1) and the difference between these two activation energies decreases with increasing surface density. The lower alkene selectivities observed at high vanadia surface densities are attributed to an

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of new wolframite type trimetallic materials and their use in oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, Maurin; Licea, Yordy E; Echavarría, Adriana; Faro, Arnaldo C; Palacio, Luz A

    2009-11-07

    With the aim of obtaining materials with properties for use as catalysts, two new trimetallic oxides containing Co or Ni and Mo and W were synthesized by a hydrothermal method, using milder conditions than those normally used for wolframite type solids. They were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction and atomic absorption spectroscopy, indicating that pure wolframite phases were formed. The X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of the structure in the monoclinic system with cell parameters similar to nickel tungsten wolframite. The laser Raman and infrared spectra showed differences among the samples, mainly due to the incorporation of molybdenum atoms in the wolframite structure. Incorporation of molybdenum in the catalysts improved catalytic activity for propane oxidative dehydrogenation, and lower reaction temperatures were required in order to obtain similar propene yields as in bimetallic tungsten wolframites.

  5. Carbon nanofibers modified with heteroatoms as metal-free catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

    PubMed

    Marco, Yanila; Roldán, Laura; Muñoz, Edgar; García-Bordejé, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) were modified with B and P by an ex situ approach. In addition, CNFs doped with N were prepared in situ using ethylenediamine as the N and C source. After calcination, the doped CNFs were used as catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. For B-CNFs, the effects of boron loading and calcination temperature on B speciation and catalytic conversion were studied. For the same reaction temperatures and conversions, B- and P-doped CNFs exhibited higher selectivities to propene than pristine CNFs. The N-CNFs were the most active but the least selective of the catalysts tested here. Our results also show that the type of P precursor affects the selectivity to propene and that CNFs modified using triphenylphosphine as the precursor provided the highest selectivity at isoconversion.

  6. Metal–organic framework supported cobalt catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane at low temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Zhanyong; Peters, Aaron W.; Bernales, Varinia; ...

    2016-11-30

    Here, Zr-based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have been shown to be excellent catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalysis due to their exceptional stability. Additionally, their crystalline nature affords the opportunity for molecular level characterization of both the support and the catalytically active site, facilitating mechanistic investigations of the catalytic process. We describe herein the installation of Co(II) ions to the Zr6 nodes of the mesoporous MOF, NU-1000, via two distinct routes, namely, solvothermal deposition in a MOF (SIM) and atomic layer deposition in a MOF (AIM), denoted as Co-SIM+NU-1000 and Co-AIM+NU-1000, respectively. The location of the deposited Co species in the twomore » materials is determined via difference envelope density (DED) analysis. Upon activation in a flow of O2 at 230 °C, both materials catalyze the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane to propene under mild conditions. Catalytic activity as well as propene selectivity of these two catalysts, however, is different under the same experimental conditions due to differences in the Co species generated in these two materials upon activation as observed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A potential reaction mechanism for the propane ODH process catalyzed by Co-SIM+NU-1000 is proposed, yielding a low activation energy barrier which is in accord with the observed catalytic activity at low temperature.« less

  7. Metal–Organic Framework Supported Cobalt Catalysts for the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Zr-based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) have been shown to be excellent catalyst supports in heterogeneous catalysis due to their exceptional stability. Additionally, their crystalline nature affords the opportunity for molecular level characterization of both the support and the catalytically active site, facilitating mechanistic investigations of the catalytic process. We describe herein the installation of Co(II) ions to the Zr6 nodes of the mesoporous MOF, NU-1000, via two distinct routes, namely, solvothermal deposition in a MOF (SIM) and atomic layer deposition in a MOF (AIM), denoted as Co-SIM+NU-1000 and Co-AIM+NU-1000, respectively. The location of the deposited Co species in the two materials is determined via difference envelope density (DED) analysis. Upon activation in a flow of O2 at 230 °C, both materials catalyze the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane to propene under mild conditions. Catalytic activity as well as propene selectivity of these two catalysts, however, is different under the same experimental conditions due to differences in the Co species generated in these two materials upon activation as observed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. A potential reaction mechanism for the propane ODH process catalyzed by Co-SIM+NU-1000 is proposed, yielding a low activation energy barrier which is in accord with the observed catalytic activity at low temperature. PMID:28149950

  8. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over molybdenum supported on MgO-{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Abello, M.C.; Gomez, M.F.; Cadus, L.E.

    1996-07-01

    Catalysts of Mo supported on MgO-{gamma} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were studied in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene. The catalysts were active and very stable, but the dehydrogenation selectivity was reduced by the formation of carbon oxides. Characterizations by XRD, XPS, Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, and BET surface measurements were performed. The catalyst preparation method led to large and stable magnesium molybdate particles on the surface. EPR and XPS measurements gave clues about the fact that the active centers for the reaction include Mo{sup 5+} ions. A scheme for the surface architecture is proposed.

  9. Catalytic propane dehydrogenation over In₂O₃–Ga₂O₃ mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Shuai; Gil, Laura Briones; Subramanian, Nachal; Sholl, David S.; Nair, Sankar; Jones, Christopher W.; Moore, Jason S.; Liu, Yujun; Dixit, Ravindra S.; Pendergast, John G.

    2015-08-26

    We have investigated the catalytic performance of novel In₂O₃–Ga₂O₃ mixed oxides synthesized by the alcoholic-coprecipitation method for propane dehydrogenation (PDH). Reactivity measurements reveal that the activities of In₂O₃–Ga₂O₃ catalysts are 1–3-fold (on an active metal basis) and 12–28-fold (on a surface area basis) higher than an In₂O₃–Al₂O₃ catalyst in terms of C₃H₈ conversion. The structure, composition, and surface properties of the In₂O₃–Ga₂O₃ catalysts are thoroughly characterized. NH₃-TPD shows that the binary oxide system generates more acid sites than the corresponding single-component catalysts. Raman spectroscopy suggests that catalysts that produce coke of a more graphitic nature suppress cracking reactions, leading to higher C₃H₆ selectivity. Lower reaction temperature also leads to higher C₃H₆ selectivity by slowing down the rate of side reactions. XRD, XPS, and XANES measurements, strongly suggest that metallic indium and In₂O₃ clusters are formed on the catalyst surface during the reaction. The agglomeration of In₂O₃ domains and formation of a metallic indium phase are found to be irreversible under O₂ or H₂ treatment conditions used here, and may be responsible for loss of activity with increasing time on stream.

  10. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane on the VO x /CeZrO/Al2O3 supported catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turakulova, A. O.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Levanov, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of propane on a supported vanadium catalyst was studied (the support was a complex oxide system consisting of a ceria-zirconia solid solution deposited on γ-Al2O3 (CeZrO/γ-Al2O3)). A comparative analysis of the properties of the support and the catalyst prepared on its basis was performed. The support and catalyst were characterized by the BET method, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The catalytic properties of the catalyst and support were studied in propane oxidation at 450 and 500°C with pulse feeding of the reagent. The effect of propane on the support was found to improve the oxidative properties of the latter. This behavior of the support is related to the preparation procedure, which leads to the formation on its surface of the crystalline phase of the ceria-zirconia solid solution and amorphous ZrO2 and Al2O3 phases and/or their solid solution. Similar processes occur with the catalyst support during the oxidative dehydrogenation, giving rise to additional active centers (CeVO4).

  11. Stability and catalytic performance of vanadia supported on nanostructured titania catalyst in oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kootenaei, A. H. Shahbazi; Towfighi, J.; Khodadadi, A.; Mortazavi, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Titanate nanotubes with a high specific surface area were synthesized by the simple hydrothermal method and investigated as support for V2O5 catalyst in oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODP). The structures of pristine nanotubes as well as the prepared catalysts were investigated by XRD, Raman, FTIR, HRTEM, SEM, EDS, BET, and XPS techniques. The characterization of the as-synthesized nanotubes showed the synthesis of hydrogen titanate nanotube. The incipient wetness impregnation method was utilized to prepare VTNT-x (x = 5, 10, and 15 wt.% vanadia supported on nanotube) together with VTi5 (5 wt.% vanadia supported on Degussa P25). The anatase phase was developed in VTNT-x catalysts upon calcination along with specific surface area loss. Higher vanadia loading resulted in the lowering of support capacity in maintaining vanadia in dispersed state such that eventually crystalline vanadia appeared. The measured catalyst activity demonstrates that in spite of major support surface area loss in VTNT-5 catalyst, the propylene yield is superior in comparison with VTi5 catalyst. The catalyst activity can be correlated with maximum reduction temperature. Deactivation of VTi5 and VTNT-5 as well as VTNT-15 were studied for 3,000 min time-on-stream. It was found that the activity of VTNT-5 catalyst remain unchanged while a decline in catalytic activity observed in VTi5 and VTNT-15 catalysts. The development of rutile was considered as being a major element in the deactivation of the investigated catalysts which is influenced by the presence of vanadium and reaction atmosphere.

  12. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane on [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] supported vanadium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Eon, J.G. ); Olier, R. ); Volta, J.C. )

    1994-02-01

    [gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] supported vanadium oxides have been prepared following the continuous adsorption method. The superficial loading and the nature of the precursor species were monitored by varying the pH of the impregnation ammonium vanadate solution. The vanadium coordination was investigated by UV-visible, near infrared, Raman, [sup 51]V NMR, and ESR spectroscopies, respectively after drying, calcination and catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of propane in the 300-450[degrees]C temperature range. It is shown that mainly tetrahedral V[sup 5+] cover the alumina surface. Bridging V-O-V groups from the two-dimensional VO[sub 4] array, occurring at high coverage, are suggested to be the active sites for catalytic oxidation. These species are converted to vanadyl ions (V[double bond]O[sup 2+]) in a C4[sub v] environment during propane oxidation. A mechanism for the structural transformation is proposed. 30 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Fine-Tuning the Activity of Metal-Organic Framework-Supported Cobalt Catalysts for the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Propane.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhanyong; Peters, Aaron W; Platero-Prats, Ana E; Liu, Jian; Kung, Chung-Wei; Noh, Hyunho; DeStefano, Matthew R; Schweitzer, Neil M; Chapman, Karena W; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2017-10-04

    Few-atom cobalt-oxide clusters, when dispersed on a Zr-based metal-organic framework (MOF) NU-1000, have been shown to be active for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of propane at low temperatures (< 230 °C), affording a selective and stable propene production catalyst. In our current work, a series of promoter ions with varying Lewis acidity, including Ni(II), Zn(II), Al(III), Ti(IV) and Mo(VI), are anchored as metal-oxide,hydroxide clusters to NU-1000 followed by Co(II) ion deposition, yielding a series of NU-1000-supported bimetallic-oxo,hydroxo,aqua clusters. Using difference envelope density (DED) analyses, the spatial locations of the promoter ions and catalytic cobalt ions are determined. For all samples the promoter ions are sited between pairs of Zr6 nodes along the MOF c axis whereas the location of the cobalt ions varies with the promoter ions. These NU-1000-supported bimetallic-oxide clusters are active for propane ODH after thermal activation under O2 to open a cobalt coordination site and to oxidize Co(II) to Co(III), as evidenced by operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Co K-edge. In accord with the decreasing Lewis acidity of the promoter ion, catalytic activity increases in the order: Mo(VI)propane transition state as the Lewis acidity of the promoter ions decreases. The results point to an increasing ability to fine-tune the structure-dependent activity of MOF-supported heterogeneous catalysts. Coupled with mechanistic studies-computational or experimental-this ability may translate into informed prediction of improved catalysts for propane ODH and other chemical reactions.

  14. Nature of active tin species and promoting effect of nickle in silica supported tin oxide for dehydrogenation of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoren; Wang, Hui; Li, Xiuyi; Li, Chunyi

    2017-06-01

    Different with Wang et. al.'s study, we found that polymeric Si-O-Sn2+ rather than Ni-Sn alloy and metallic Sn are active species in silica-supported tin oxide catalysts for dehydrogenation of propane. The results showed that high surface area of mesoporous silica brought about high dispersion of tin oxide species, as a result, catalytic activity and stability were both improved. DRUV-vis, XPS, TPR and XRD studies of fresh and reduced catalysts indicated that the deactivation was related to the reduction of active species rather than the coke formation since active tin species cannot maintain its oxidation state at reaction conditions (high temperature and reducing atmosphere). The formed Ni3Sn2 alloy after reduction just functioned as promoter which accelerated the desorption of H2 and regeneration of active site. A synergy effect between active tin species and Ni3Sn2 alloy were observed.

  15. Catalytic properties of the VO x /Ce0.46Zr0.54O2 oxide system in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turakulova, A. O.; Kharlanov, A. N.; Levanov, A. V.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Lunin, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Ce0.46Zr0.54O2 solid solution prepared using a cellulose template was employed as a carrier for vanadium catalysts of the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. The properties of VO x /Ce0.46Zr0.54O2 catalyst (5 wt % vanadium) are compared with the properties of the neat support. The carrier and catalyst are studied by means of BET, SEM, DTA, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the CeVO4 phase responsible for the ODH process is formed upon interaction between vanadate ions and cerium ions on the surface of the solid solution. The catalytic properties of the catalyst and the support are studied in the propane oxidation reaction at temperatures of 450 and 500°C with pulse feeding of the reagent. It is found that the complete oxidation of propane occurs on the support with formation of CO2 and H2O. Three products (propene, CO2, and H2O) form in the presence of the vanadium catalyst. It is suggested that there are two types of catalytic centers on the catalyst's surface. It is concluded that the centers responsible for the complete oxidation of propane are concentrated mainly on the carrier, while the centers responsible for propane ODH are on the CeVO4.

  16. Synthesis of Pt–Pd Core–Shell Nanostructures by Atomic Layer Deposition: Application in Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation to Propylene

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Yu; Liu, Bin; Lu, Junling; Lobo-Lapidus, Rodrigo J.; Wu, Tianpin; Feng, Hao; Xia, Xiaoxing; Mane, Anil U.; Libera, Joseph A.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2012-08-20

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to synthesize supported Pt–Pd bimetallic particles in the 1 to 2 nm range. The metal loading and composition of the supported Pt–Pd nanoparticles were controlled by varying the deposition temperature and by applying ALD metal oxide coatings to modify the support surface chemistry. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images showed monodispersed Pt–Pd nanoparticles on ALD Al2O3- and TiO2-modified SiO2 gel. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the bimetallic nanoparticles have a stable Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the most stable surface configuration for the Pt–Pd alloys in an H2 environment has a Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. Finally, in comparison to their monometallic counterparts, the small Pt–Pd bimetallic core–shell nanoparticles exhibited higher activity in propane oxidative dehydrogenation as compared to their physical mixture.

  17. Selective dehydrogenation of propane over novel catalytic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sault, A.G.; Boespflug, E.P.; Martino, A.; Kawola, J.S.

    1998-02-01

    The conversion of small alkanes into alkenes represents an important chemical processing area; ethylene and propylene are the two most important organic chemicals manufactured in the U.S. These chemicals are currently manufactured by steam cracking of ethane and propane, an extremely energy intensive, nonselective process. The development of catalytic technologies (e.g., selective dehydrogenation) that can be used to produce ethylene and propylene from ethane and propane with greater selectivity and lower energy consumption than steam cracking will have a major impact on the chemical processing industry. This report details a study of two novel catalytic materials for the selective dehydrogenation of propane: Cr supported on hydrous titanium oxide ion-exchangers, and Pt nanoparticles encapsulated in silica and alumina aerogel and xerogel matrices.

  18. ED-XAS Data Reveal In-situ Time-Resolved Adsorbate Coverage on Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts during Propane Dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaker, David; Gatewood, Daniel; Beale, Andrew M.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2007-02-01

    Energy-Dispersive X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (ED-XAS) data combined with UV/Vis, Raman, and mass spectrometry data on alumina- and silica-supported molybdenum oxide catalysts under propane dehydrogenation conditions have been previously reported. A novel Δμ adsorbate isolation technique was applied here to the time-resolved (0.1 min) Mo K-edge ED-XAS data by taking the difference of absorption, μ, at t>1 against the initial time, t=0. Further, full multiple scattering calculations using the FEFF 8.0 code are performed to interpret the Δμ signatures. The resulting difference spectra and interpretation provide real time propane coverage and O depletion at the MoOn surface. The propane coverage is seen to correlate with the propene and/or coke production, with the maximum coke formation occurring when the propane coverage is the largest. Combined, these data give unprecedented insight into the complicated dynamics for propane dehydrogenation.

  19. ED-XAS Data Reveal In-situ Time-Resolved Adsorbate Coverage on Supported Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts during Propane Dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaker, David; Gatewood, Daniel; Beale, Andrew M.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2007-02-02

    Energy-Dispersive X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (ED-XAS) data combined with UV/Vis, Raman, and mass spectrometry data on alumina- and silica-supported molybdenum oxide catalysts under propane dehydrogenation conditions have been previously reported. A novel {delta}{mu} adsorbate isolation technique was applied here to the time-resolved (0.1 min) Mo K-edge ED-XAS data by taking the difference of absorption, {mu}, at t>1 against the initial time, t=0. Further, full multiple scattering calculations using the FEFF 8.0 code are performed to interpret the {delta}{mu} signatures. The resulting difference spectra and interpretation provide real time propane coverage and O depletion at the MoOn surface. The propane coverage is seen to correlate with the propene and/or coke production, with the maximum coke formation occurring when the propane coverage is the largest. Combined, these data give unprecedented insight into the complicated dynamics for propane dehydrogenation.

  20. Role of tetrachloromethane as a gas-phase additive in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Iizuka, Y.; Nitta, E.; Hayashi, H.; Moffat, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    In the absence of tetrachloromethane (TCM) carbon dioxide is the principal product formed in the oxidation of propane on ceria. The introduction of small partial pressures of TCM increases the conversion of propane with selectivities to propene up to 80%. Except under special circumstances no evidence of chlorinated species from TCM is found in the bulk structure while the surface region is shown to contain chlorine, although its form is not known. The enhancement of conversion and selectivity to propene is shown to be dependent upon the presence of chlorine, in whatever form, in the surface region of the catalyst.

  1. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over vanadia-based catalysts supported on high-surface-area mesoporous MgAl2O4

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Owen R.; Bell, Alexis T.; Tilley, T. Don

    2004-06-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene was investigated over a series of novel vanadia-based catalysts supported on high-surface-area magnesium spinel. A mesoporous MgAl2O4 support was synthesized via a low-temperature sol gel process involving the heterobimetallic alkoxide precursor, Mg[Al(O iPr)4]2. A high-purity catalyst support was obtained after calcination at 1173 K under O2 atmosphere and active vanadia catalysts were prepared from the thermolysis of OV(O tBu)3 after grafting onto the spinel support. MgAl2O4-supported catalysts prepared in this manner have BET surface areas of 234 245 m2/g. All of the catalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, and Raman, solid-state NMR, and diffuse-reflectance UV vis spectroscopy. At all vanadium loadings the vanadia supported on MgAl2O4 exist as a combination of isolated monovanadate and tetrahedral polyvanadate species. As the vanadium surface density increases for these catalysts the ratio of polyvanadate species to isolated monovanadate species increases. In addition, as the vanadium surface density increases for these catalysts, the initial rate of propane ODH per V atom increases and reaches a maximum value at 6 VOx/nm2. Increasing the vanadium surface density past this point results in a decrease in the rate of propane ODH owing to the formation of multilayer species in which subsurface vanadium atoms are essentially rendered catalytically inactive. The initial propene selectivity increases with increasing vanadium surface density and reaches a plateau of {approx}95 percent for the V/MgAl catalysts. Rate coefficients for propane ODH (k1), propane combustion (k2), and propene combustion (k3) were calculated for these catalysts. The value of k1 increases with increasing VOx surface density, reaching a maximum at about 5.5 VOx/nm2. On the other hand, the ratio (k2/k1) for V/MgAl decreases with increasing VOx surface density. The ratio (k3/k1) for both sets of catalysts shows no dependence on

  2. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane on Ni{sub x}Mg{sub 1{minus}x}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4} and NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Sloczynski, J.; Ziolkowski, J.; Grzybowska, B.; Grabowski, R.; Jachewicz, D.; Wcislo, K.; Gengembre, L.

    1999-10-25

    The Ni{sub x}Mg{sub 1{minus}x}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels have been synthesized, characterized with the XRD and XPS methods, and tested in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. The crystallochemical model of solid surfaces, CMSS, has been used to calculate the oxygen cation's bond energies in the spinels. For the NiMgAl spinels the activity and selectivity to propene increase with the increase in the Ni content. The Ni ions surrounded by oxygen in the spinel structure are proposed as active centers for oxidative dehydrogenation to propene. The NiCr spinel is more active but less selective than the NiMgAl spinels; the difference in catalytic behavior has been ascribed to different coordination of Ni ions in the two groups of the spinels and to the lower oxygen cation's bond energy in the NiCr spinel.

  3. Isolated FeII on Silica As a Selective Propane Dehydrogenation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bo; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Zhang, Guanghui; Kraft, Steven J.; Childers, David J.; Lanci, Michael P.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2015-04-17

    ABSTRACT: We report a comparative study of isolated FeII, iron oxide particles, and metallic nanoparticles on silica for non-oxidative propane dehydrogenation. It was found that the most selective catalyst was an isolated FeII species on silica prepared by grafting the open cyclopentadienide iron complex, bis(2,4-dimethyl-1,3-pentadienide) iron(II) or Fe(oCp)2. The grafting and evolution of the surface species was elucidated by 1H NMR, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The oxidation state and local structure of surface Fe were characterized by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The initial grafting of iron proceeds by one surface hydroxyl Si-OH reacting with Fe(oCp)2 to release one diene ligand (oCpH), generating a SiO2-bound FeII(oCp) species, 1-FeoCp. Subsequent treatment with H2 at 400 °C leads to loss of the remaining diene ligand and formation of nanosized iron oxide clusters, 1-C. Dispersion of these Fe oxide clusters occurs at 650 °C, forming an isolated, ligand-free FeII on silica, 1-FeII, which is catalytically active and highly selective (~99%) for propane dehydrogenation to propene. Under reaction conditions, there is no evidence of metallic Fe by in situ XANES. For comparison, metallic Fe nanoparticles, 2-NP-Fe0, were independently prepared by grafting Fe[N(SiMe3)2]2 onto silica, 2-FeN*, and reducing it at 650 °C in H2. The Fe NPs were highly active for propane conversion but showed poor selectivity (~14%) to propene. Independently prepared Fe oxide clusters on silica display a low activity. The sum of these results suggests that selective propane dehydrogenation occurs at isolated FeII sites.

  4. Novel Pt/Mg(In)(Al)O catalysts for ethane and propane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Pingping; Siddiqi, Georges; Vining, William C.; Chi, Miaofang; Bell, Alexis T.

    2011-10-28

    Catalysts for the dehydrogenation of light alkanes were prepared by dispersing Pt on the surface of a calcined hydrotalcite-like support containing indium, Mg(In)(Al)O. Upon reduction in H{sub 2} at temperatures above 673 K, bimetallic particles of PtIn are observed by TEM, which have an average diameter of 1 nm. Analysis of Pt LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data shows that the In content of the bimetallic particles increases with increasing bulk In/Pt ratio and reduction temperature. Pt LIII-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) indicates that an increasing donation of electronic charge from In to Pt occurs with increasing In content in the PtIn particles. The activity and selectivity of the Pt/Mg(In)(Al)O catalysts for ethane and propane dehydrogenation reactions are strongly dependent on the bulk In/Pt ratio. For both reactants, maximum activity was achieved for a bulk In/Pt ratio of 0.48, and at this In/Pt ratio, the selectivity to alkene was nearly 100%. Coke deposition was observed after catalyst use for either ethane or propane dehydrogenation, and it was observed that the alloying of Pt with In greatly reduced the amount of coke deposited. Characterization of the deposit by Raman spectroscopy indicates that the coke is present as highly disordered graphite particles <30 nm in diameter. While the amount of coke deposited during ethane and propane dehydrogenation are comparable, the effects on activity are dependent on reactant composition. Coke deposition had no effect on ethane dehydrogenation activity, but caused a loss in propane dehydrogenation activity. This difference is attributed to the greater ease with which coke produced on the surface of PtIn nanoparticles migrates to the support during ethane dehydrogenation versus propane dehydrogenation.

  5. Selective propane dehydrogenation with single-site Co{super II} on SiO{sub 2} by a non-redox mechanism.

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Bo; Getsoian, Andrew "Bean"; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Das, Ujjal; Kim, HackSung; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg; Curtiss, Larry A.; Stair, Peter C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2015-02-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and catalytic performance for gas phase propane dehydrogenation of single-site Co2+ ions supported on silica. Spectroscopic characterization by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray near-edge and extended absorption fine structure revealed that tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ ions are chemisorbed into the trisiloxane rings on the surface of amorphous silica. In situ XAS shows that Co is not oxidized by air nor reduced by hydrogen even at 650 degrees C. For catalytic propane dehydrogenation, single-site Co2+/SiO2 exhibits selectivities >95% at 550 degrees C and >90% at 650 degrees C with stable activity over 24 h. Calculations with hybrid density functional theory support a non-redox mechanism for activation of C-H and H-H bonds by Co2+ similar to that previously reported for single-site Zn2+/SiO2.

  6. Novel Sol-Gel Based Pt Nanocluster Catalysts for Propane Dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Boespflug, Elaine; Kawola, Jeffrey S.; Martino, Anthony; Sault, Allen G.

    1999-08-09

    We report propane dehydrogenation behavior of catalysts prepared using two novel synthesis strategies that combine inverse micelle Pt nanocluster technology with silica and alumina sol-gel processing. Unlike some other sol-gel catalyst preparations. Pt particles in these catalysts are not encapsulated in the support structure and the entire Pt particle surface is accessible for reaction. Turnover frequencies (TOF) for these catalysts are comparable to those obtained over Pt catalysts prepared by traditional techniques such as impregnation, yet the resistance to deactivation by carbon poisoning is much greater in our catalysts. The deactivation behavior is more typical of traditionally prepared PtSn catalysts than of pure Pt catalysts.

  7. Mechanistic Investigations of C-H Activations on Silica-Supported Co(ii) Sites in Catalytic Propane Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P

    2017-04-26

    Catalytic reactions involving C-H bond activations are central to the chemical industry. One such example, alkane dehydrogenation, has recently become very important due to shortfalls in propene production and a large supply of cheap propane. However, current technologies are inefficient and have only moderate selectivity. In order to understand how to improve currently used catalysts, we must know more about the mechanism by which propane is dehydrogenated. We show here that Co(ii) sites on silica are good catalysts for the dehydrogenation of propane, having high activity and selectivity that is reasonably stable over the course of 10 h. Mechanistic investigations of this catalyst show that the main activation mechanism is most likely C-H activation by 1,2 addition.

  8. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  9. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  10. Catalysis of propane oxidation and premixed propane-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiswall, James T.

    Improvements in deriving energy from hydrocarbon fuels will have a large impact on our efforts to transition to sustainable and renewable energy resources. The hypothesis for this work is that catalysis can extend the useful operating conditions for hydrocarbon oxidation and combustion, improve device efficiencies, and reduce pollutants. Catalysis of propane oxidation and premixed propane-air flames are examined experimentally, using a stagnation-flow reactor to identify the important physical and chemical mechanisms over a range of flow catalyst, and temperature conditions. The propane oxidation studies consider five catalyst materials: platinum, palladium, SnO2, 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt (by mass), and quartz. The volume fractions of CO2, O2, C 3H8, CO, NO and the electric power required to control the catalyst temperature quantify the activity of each catalyst for the equivalence ratios of φ = 0.67, 1.00, and 1.50, and over the catalyst temperature range 23-800°C. Quartz is used as a baseline and confirmed to be non-reactive at all conditions. 100% SnO2 has minimal reactivity. Platinum, palladium, and 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt show similar trends and have the highest catalytic activity at φ = 1.50. Palladium and 90% SnO 2 -- 10% Pt show an increasing catalyst-activation temperature (Tsa) for decreasing φ, and platinum shows an approximately constant catalyst-activation temperature for decreasing φ (Tsa = 310°C). Of these the 90% SnO2 -- 10% Pt catalyst shows the lowest Tsa, occurring for the φ = 1.5 mixture (Tsa = 250°C). The studies of premixed propane-air flames consider platinum and quartz stagnation surfaces for fuel-mixture velocities from 0.6-1.6 m/s. Five flame structures are observed: cool core envelope, cone, envelope, disk and ring flames. The lean-extinction limit, disk-to-ring flame transition φ, and the disk-flame to stagnation-plane distance are reported. Platinum inhibits the ring flame structure. The lean-extinction limit and disk-flame to stagnation

  11. Microchannel apparatus and methods of conducting catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Yang, Bin; Perry, Steven T.; Mazanec, Terry; Arora, Ravi; Daly, Francis P.; Long, Richard; Yuschak, Thomas D.; Neagle, Paul W.; Glass, Amanda

    2011-08-16

    Methods of oxidative dehydrogenation are described. Surprisingly, Pd and Au alloys of Pt have been discovered to be superior for oxidative dehydrogenation in microchannels. Methods of forming these catalysts via an electroless plating methodology are also described. An apparatus design that minimizes heat transfer to the apparatus' exterior is also described.

  12. Propane dehydrogenation catalyzed by ZSM-5 zeolites. A mechanistic study based on the selective energy transfer (SET) theory.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ragnar

    2015-02-02

    Experimentally determined activation energies of propane dehydrogenation catalyzed by ZSM-5 zeolites have been used to test the SET theory. The basis of this theory is that the catalyst system transfers vibrational energy via a resonance process to a specific vibration mode of the reacting molecule. Being excited up to a certain number of vibrational quanta the molecule is brought to reaction. By analyzing the above-mentioned activation energies we found the wave number of this "specific mode" to be 1065 cm-1. This is very close to the rocking vibration of propane (1053 cm-1). We suggest that the propane molecule reacts when excited so that the CH3 group has been forced towards a flat structure with a carbon atom hybridization that is more sp2 than sp3. Consequently there is no way for three H-atoms to bind to the carbon and one of them must leave. This is the starting point of the reaction. The isokinetic temperature of the system was found as Tiso = 727 ± 4 K. From the SET formula for Tiso when both energy-donating (ω) and energy-accepting (ν) vibrations have the same frequency, viz., Tiso = Nhcν/2R, we obtain ν = ω = 1011 ± 6 cm-1. This agrees rather well with the CH3 rocking mode (1053 cm-1) and also with asymmetric "TO4" stretching vibrations of the zeolite structure (ω).

  13. Propane dehydrogenation over PtSnMg/Cr2O3·Al2O3 catalysts: effect of the amount of Mg loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Guan, Yunfei; Wang, Yanmei; Guo, Xianzhi; Zhang, Jingya; Du, Zongjie; Zhang, Shoumin; Xie, Qinxing; Wu, Shihua

    2017-01-01

    A series of PtSnMg/Cr2O3·Al2O3 catalysts with different Mg loading amounts were synthetized by chemical co-deposition method and their propane dehydrogenation catalytic performances were tested. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, BET, TG, XPS. It was found that alkali metal Mg can reduce the surface acidity of carrier, improve the catalytic performance. Propane conversion peaks at Mg loading of 0.6wt.%, increasing Mg loading further than this saw a decline in conversion.

  14. Room temperature dehydrogenation of ethane, propane, linear alkanes C4-C8, and some cyclic alkanes by titanium-carbon multiple bonds.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Marco G; Hickey, Anne K; Gao, Xinfeng; Pinter, Balazs; Cavaliere, Vincent N; Ito, Jun-Ichi; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2013-10-02

    The transient titanium neopentylidyne, [(PNP)Ti≡C(t)Bu] (A; PNP(-)≡N[2-P(i)Pr2-4-methylphenyl]2(-)), dehydrogenates ethane to ethylene at room temperature over 24 h, by sequential 1,2-CH bond addition and β-hydrogen abstraction to afford [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CH2)(CH2(t)Bu)] (1). Intermediate A can also dehydrogenate propane to propene, albeit not cleanly, as well as linear and volatile alkanes C4-C6 to form isolable α-olefin complexes of the type, [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CHR)(CH2(t)Bu)] (R = CH3 (2), CH2CH3 (3), (n)Pr (4), and (n)Bu (5)). Complexes 1-5 can be independently prepared from [(PNP)Ti═CH(t)Bu(OTf)] and the corresponding alkylating reagents, LiCH2CHR (R = H, CH3(unstable), CH2CH3, (n)Pr, and (n)Bu). Olefin complexes 1 and 3-5 have all been characterized by a diverse array of multinuclear NMR spectroscopic experiments including (1)H-(31)P HOESY, and in the case of the α-olefin adducts 2-5, formation of mixtures of two diastereomers (each with their corresponding pair of enantiomers) has been unequivocally established. The latter has been spectroscopically elucidated by NMR via C-H coupled and decoupled (1)H-(13)C multiplicity edited gHSQC, (1)H-(31)P HMBC, and dqfCOSY experiments. Heavier linear alkanes (C7 and C8) are also dehydrogenated by A to form [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CH(n)Pentyl)(CH2(t)Bu)] (6) and [(PNP)Ti(η(2)-H2C═CH(n)Hexyl)(CH2(t)Bu)] (7), respectively, but these species are unstable but can exchange with ethylene (1 atm) to form 1 and the free α-olefin. Complex 1 exchanges with D2C═CD2 with concomitant release of H2C═CH2. In addition, deuterium incorporation is observed in the neopentyl ligand as a result of this process. Cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane can be also dehydrogenated by transient A, and in the case of cyclohexane, ethylene (1 atm) can trap the [(PNP)Ti(CH2(t)Bu)] fragment to form 1. Dehydrogenation of the alkane is not rate-determining since pentane and pentane-d12 can be dehydrogenated to 4 and 4-d12 with comparable

  15. Platinum-Promoted Ga/Al2O3 as Highly Active, Selective, and Stable Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Propane**

    PubMed Central

    Sattler, Jesper J H B; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Ines D; Luo, Lin; Stears, Brien A; Malek, Andrzej; Barton, David G; Kilos, Beata A; Kaminsky, Mark P; Verhoeven, Tiny W G M; Koers, Eline J; Baldus, Marc; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2014-01-01

    A novel catalyst material for the selective dehydrogenation of propane is presented. The catalyst consists of 1000 ppm Pt, 3 wt % Ga, and 0.25 wt % K supported on alumina. We observed a synergy between Ga and Pt, resulting in a highly active and stable catalyst. Additionally, we propose a bifunctional active phase, in which coordinately unsaturated Ga3+ species are the active species and where Pt functions as a promoter. PMID:24989975

  16. Relationship between Surface Chemistry and Catalytic Performance of Mesoporous γ-Al2O3 Supported VOX Catalyst in Catalytic Dehydrogenation of Propane.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Ma, Zhipeng; Li, Tingting; Tian, Yupeng; Zhang, Zhanquan; Zhong, Ziyi; Xing, Wei; Wu, Pingping; Liu, Xinmei; Yan, Zifeng

    2016-10-05

    Mesoporous γ-Al2O3 was synthesized via a cation-anion double hydrolysis approach (CADH). The synthesized mesoporous alumina displayed a relatively high surface area, a large pore volume and a narrow pore size distribution. By applying the mesoporous alumina as a support, supported vanadium catalysts were prepared and evaluated in the dehydrogenation of propane, exhibiting a superior catalytic performance over that supported on a commercial alumina. Materials were characterized with a variety of techniques such as X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, (51)V magnetic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy of pyridine adsorption and thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The correlated structure-performance relationship of catalysts reveals that a higher crystallization temperature endows mesoporous alumina materials with more surface acid sites, favoring the formation of polymerized VOX species, which are more active than isolated ones in the propane dehydrogenation, resulting in a better catalytic performance. The established relationship between surface chemistry and catalytic performance of supported VOX catalysts suggests that a superior vanadium catalyst for propane dehydrogenation could be achieved by rationally enriching the concentration of polymeric VOX species on the catalyst, which can be realized by tuning the surface acidity of alumina support.

  17. Molybdenum Catalyzed Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation: Oxidation State Specific Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Though numerous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) are known, those that release >2 equiv of H2 are uncommon. Herein, we report the synthesis of Mo complexes supported by a para-terphenyl diphosphine ligand, 1, displaying metal–arene interactions. Both a Mo0 N2 complex, 5, and a MoII bis(acetonitrile) complex, 4, exhibit high levels of AB dehydrogenation, releasing over 2.0 equiv of H2. The reaction rate, extent of dehydrogenation, and reaction mechanism vary as a function of the precatalyst oxidation state. Several Mo hydrides (MoII(H)2, [MoII(H)]+, and [MoIV(H)3]+) relevant to AB chemistry were characterized. PMID:25034459

  18. Pd-Ag Membrane Coupled to a Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) for Propane Dehydrogenation on a Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, José-Antonio; Julián, Ignacio; Herguido, Javier; Menéndez, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Several reactor configurations have been tested for catalytic propane dehydrogenation employing Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 as a catalyst. Pd-Ag alloy membranes coupled to the multifunctional Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) provide an improvement in propane conversion by hydrogen removal from the reaction bed through the inorganic membrane in addition to in situ catalyst regeneration. Twofold process intensification is thereby achieved when compared to the use of traditional fluidized bed reactors (FBR), where coke formation and thermodynamic equilibrium represent important process limitations. Experiments were carried out at 500–575 °C and with catalyst mass to molar flow of fed propane ratios between 15.1 and 35.2 g min mmol−1, employing three different reactor configurations: FBR, TZFBR and TZFBR + Membrane (TZFBR + MB). The results in the FBR showed catalyst deactivation, which was faster at high temperatures. In contrast, by employing the TZFBR with the optimum regenerative agent flow (diluted oxygen), the process activity was sustained throughout the time on stream. The TZFBR + MB showed promising results in catalytic propane dehydrogenation, displacing the reaction towards higher propylene production and giving the best results among the different reactor configurations studied. Furthermore, the results obtained in this study were better than those reported on conventional reactors. PMID:24958620

  19. Pd-Ag Membrane Coupled to a Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) for Propane Dehydrogenation on a Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Medrano, José-Antonio; Julián, Ignacio; Herguido, Javier; Menéndez, Miguel

    2013-05-14

    Several reactor configurations have been tested for catalytic propane dehydrogenation employing Pt-Sn/MgAl2O4 as a catalyst. Pd-Ag alloy membranes coupled to the multifunctional Two-Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor (TZFBR) provide an improvement in propane conversion by hydrogen removal from the reaction bed through the inorganic membrane in addition to in situ catalyst regeneration. Twofold process intensification is thereby achieved when compared to the use of traditional fluidized bed reactors (FBR), where coke formation and thermodynamic equilibrium represent important process limitations. Experiments were carried out at 500-575 °C and with catalyst mass to molar flow of fed propane ratios between 15.1 and 35.2 g min mmol-1, employing three different reactor configurations: FBR, TZFBR and TZFBR + Membrane (TZFBR + MB). The results in the FBR showed catalyst deactivation, which was faster at high temperatures. In contrast, by employing the TZFBR with the optimum regenerative agent flow (diluted oxygen), the process activity was sustained throughout the time on stream. The TZFBR + MB showed promising results in catalytic propane dehydrogenation, displacing the reaction towards higher propylene production and giving the best results among the different reactor configurations studied. Furthermore, the results obtained in this study were better than those reported on conventional reactors.

  20. Propane dehydrogenation over Pt-Cu bimetallic catalysts: the nature of coke deposition and the role of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhiping; Li, Shuirong; Jiang, Feng; Wang, Tuo; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the promotional effect of Cu on the catalytic performance of Pt/Al2O3 catalysts for propane dehydrogenation. We have shown that Pt/Al2O3 catalysts possess higher propylene selectivity and lower deactivation rate as well as enhanced anti-coking ability upon Cu addition. The optimized loading content of Cu is 0.5 wt%, which increases the propylene selectivity to 90.8% with a propylene yield of 36.5%. The origin of the enhanced catalytic performance and anti-coking ability of the Pt-Cu/Al2O3 catalyst is ascribed to the intimate interaction between Pt and Cu, which is confirmed by the change of particle morphology and atomic electronic environment of the catalyst. The Pt-Cu interaction inhibits propylene adsorption and elevates the energy barrier of C-C bond rupture. The inhibited propylene adsorption diminishes the possibility of coke formation and suppresses the cracking reaction towards the formation of lighter hydrocarbons on Pt-Cu/Al2O3, while a higher energy barrier for C-C bond cleavage suppresses the methane formation.

  1. A Detailed Modeling Study of Propane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Jayaweera, T M; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2004-03-19

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been used to simulate ignition delay times recorded by a number of experimental shock tube studies over the temperature range 900 {le} T {le} 1800 K, in the pressure range 0.75-40 atm and in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 2.0. Flame speed measurements at 1 atm in the equivalence ratio range 0.4 {le} {phi} {le} 1.8 have also been simulated. Both of these data sets, particularly those recorded at high pressure, are of particular importance in validating a kinetic mechanism, as internal combustion engines operate at elevated pressures and temperatures and rates of fuel oxidation are critical to efficient system operation. Experiments in which reactant, intermediate and product species were quantitatively recorded, versus temperature in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) and versus time in a flow reactor are also simulated. This data provide a stringent test of the kinetic mechanism as it must reproduce accurate quantitative profiles for all reactant, intermediate and product species. The JSR experiments were performed in the temperature range 1000-1110 K, in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 4.0, at a pressure of 5 atm. These experiments are complemented by those carried out in a flow reactor in the temperature range 660-820 K, at 10 atm and at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. In addition, burner stabilized flames were simulated, where chemical species profiles were measured at atmospheric pressure for two propane-air flat flames. Overall, reasonably good agreement is observed between the model simulations and the experimental results.

  2. Organo-Photoredox Catalyzed Oxidative Dehydrogenation of N-Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Ekambaram, Balaraman; Sahoo, Manoj K; Jaiswal, Garima; Rana, Jagannath

    2017-08-14

    We report here for the first time the catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation of N-heterocycles by a visible-light organo-photoredox catalyst with low catalyst loading (0.1 - 1 mol%). The reaction proceeds efficiently under base- and additive-free conditions with ambient air at room temperature. The utility of this benign approach is demonstrated by the synthesis of various pharmaceutically relevant N-heteroarenes such as quinoline, quinoxaline, quinazoline, acridine, and indole. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Ethane oxidative dehydrogenation pathways on vanadium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Argyle, Morris; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-12-10

    Kinetic and isotopic tracer and exchange measurements were used to determine the identity and reversibility of elementary steps involved in ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) on VOx/Al2O3 and VOx/ZrO2. C2H6-C2D6-O2 and C2H6-D2O-O2 react to form alkenes and COx without concurrent formation of C2H6-xDx orC2H4-xDx isotopomers, suggesting that C-H bond cleavage in ethane and ethene is an irreversible and kinetically relevant step in ODH and combustion reactions. Primary ethane ODH reactions show normal kinetic isotopic effects (kC-H/kC-D 2.4); similar values were measured for ethane and ethene combustion(1.9 and 2.8, respectively). 16O2-18O2-C2H6 reactions on supported V16Ox domains led to the initial appearance of 16O from the lattice in H2O, CO, and CO2, consistent with the involvement of lattice oxygen in C-H bond activation steps. Isotopic contents are similar in H2O, CO, and CO2, suggesting that ODH and combustion reactions use similar lattice oxygen sites. No 16O-18O isotopomer s were detected during reactions of 16O2-18O2-C2H6 mixtures, as expected if dissociative O2 chemisorption steps were irreversible. The alkyl species formed in these steps desorb irreversibly as ethene and the resulting O-H groups recombine to form H2O and reduced V centers in reversible desorption steps. These reduced V centers reoxidize by irreversible dissociative chemisorption of O2. A pseudo-steady state analysis of these elementary steps together with these reversibility assumptions led to a rate expression that accurately describes the observed inhibition of ODH rates by water and the measured kinetic dependence of ODH rates on C2H6 and O2 pressures. This kinetic analysis suggests that surface oxygen, OH groups, and oxygen vacancies are the most abundant reactive intermediates during ethane ODH on active VOx domains.

  4. Ethane oxidative dehydrogenation pathways on vanadium oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Argyle, Morris; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-12-10

    Kinetic and isotopic tracer and exchange measurements were used to determine the identity and reversibility of elementary steps involved in ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) on VOx/Al2O3 and VOx/ZrO2. C2H6-C2D6-O2 and C2H6-D2O-O2 react to form alkenes and COx without concurrent formation of C2H6-xDx orC2H4-xDx isotopomers, suggesting that C-H bond cleavage in ethane and ethene is an irreversible and kinetically relevant step in ODH and combustion reactions. Primary ethane ODH reactions show normal kinetic isotopic effects (kC-H/kC-D) 2.4; similar values were measured for ethane and ethene combustion(1.9 and 2.8, respectively). 16O2-18O2-C2H6 reactions on supported V16Ox domains led to the initial appearance of 16O from the lattice in H2O, CO, and CO2, consistent with the involvement of lattice oxygen in C-H bond activation steps. Isotopic contents are similar in H2O, CO, and CO2, suggesting that ODH and combustion reactions use similar lattice oxygen sites. No 16O-18O isotopomer s were detected during reactions of 16O2-18O2-C2H6 mixtures, as expected if dissociative O2 chemisorption steps were irreversible. The alkyl species formed in these steps desorb irreversibly as ethene and the resulting O-H groups recombine to form H2O and reduced V centers in reversible desorption steps. These reduced V centers reoxidize by irreversible dissociative chemisorption of O2. A pseudo-steady state analysis of these elementary steps together with these reversibility assumptions led to a rate expression that accurately describes the observed inhibition of ODH rates by water and the measured kinetic dependence of ODH rates on C2H6 and O2 pressures. This kinetic analysis suggests that surface oxygen, OH groups, and oxygen vacancies are the most abundant reactive intermediates during ethane ODH on active VOx domains.

  5. Operando UV-Vis spectroscopy of a catalytic solid in a pilot-scale reactor: deactivation of a CrO(x)/Al2O3 propane dehydrogenation catalyst.

    PubMed

    Sattler, J J H B; González-Jiménez, I D; Mens, A M; Arias, M; Visser, T; Weckhuysen, B M

    2013-02-21

    A novel operando UV-Vis spectroscopic set-up has been constructed and tested for the investigation of catalyst bodies loaded in a pilot-scale reactor under relevant reaction conditions. Spatiotemporal insight into the formation and burning of coke deposits on an industrial CrO(x)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst during propane dehydrogenation has been obtained.

  6. Oxidative pit formation in pristine, hydrogenated and dehydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. D.; Morris, C. F.; Verbeck, G. F.; Perez, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We study oxidative pit formation in pristine, hydrogenated, and dehydrogenated monolayer graphene (MLG), bilayer graphene (BLG) and trilayer graphene (TLG). Graphene samples are produced by mechanical exfoliation of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) onto SiO2 substrates. Etching is carried out by exposing samples to O2 gas at 450-700 °C. Using atomic force microscopy, we observe that pre-heating pristine MLG in vacuum at 590 °C increases the onset temperature for pit formation to values comparable to those in HOPG. We attribute this decrease in reactivity to an increase in adhesion between the MLG and substrate. In hydrogenated MLG and BLG, we observe a significant decrease in the onset temperature for pit formation. Dehydrogenation of these materials results in a decrease in the density of pits. We attribute the decrease in onset temperature to H-related defects in their sp3-bonded structure. In contrast, hydrogenated TLG and thicker-layer samples show no significant change in pit formation. We propose that this is because they are not transformed into an sp3-bonded structure by hydrogenation.

  7. Unexpectedly high activity of bare alumina for non-oxidative isobutane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Rodemerck, Uwe; Kondratenko, Evgenii V; Otroshchenko, Tatyana; Linke, David

    2016-10-06

    Bare alumina shows surprisingly high activity in non-oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane to isobutylene. The activity is related to surface coordinatively unsaturated Al sites (Alcus), which are created upon removal of OH groups during alumina treatment at high temperatures. Alcus and neighbouring lattice oxygen represent the active site for isobutane dehydrogenation.

  8. Moessbauer spectra of ferrite catalysts used in oxidative dehydrogenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cares, W. R.; Hightower, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Room temperature Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to examine bulk changes which occur in low surface area CoFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 catalysts as a result of contact with various mixtures of trans-2-butene and O2 during oxidative dehydrogenation reactions at about 420 C. So long as there was at least some O2 in the gas phase, the CoFe2O4 spectrum was essentially unchanged. However, the spectrum changed from a random spinel in the oxidized state to an inverse spinel as it was reduced by oxide ion removal. The steady state catalyst lies very near the fully oxidized state. More dramatic solid state changes occurred as the CuFe2O4 underwent reduction. Under severe reduction, the ferrite was transformed into Cu and Fe3O4, but it could be reversibly recovered by oxidation. An intense doublet located near zero velocity persisted in all spectra of CuFe2O4 regardless of the state of reduction.

  9. Catalytic Aerobic Dehydrogenation of Nitrogen Heterocycles Using Heterogeneous Cobalt Oxide Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon.

    PubMed

    Iosub, Andrei V; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-09-18

    Dehydrogenation of (partially) saturated heterocycles provides an important route to heteroaromatic compounds. A heterogeneous cobalt oxide catalyst, previously employed for aerobic oxidation of alcohols and amines, is shown to be effective for aerobic dehydrogenation of various 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines to the corresponding quinolines. The reactions proceed in good yields under mild conditions. Other N-heterocycles are also successfully oxidized to their aromatic counterparts.

  10. Hybrid nanocarbon as a catalyst for direct dehydrogenation of propane: formation of an active and selective core-shell sp2/sp3 nanocomposite structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Bingsen; Sun, Xiaoying; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-05-19

    Hybrid nanocarbon, comprised of a diamond core and a graphitic shell with a variable sp(2)-/sp(3)-carbon ratio, is controllably obtained through sequential annealing treatment (550-1300 °C) of nanodiamond. The formation of sp(2) carbon increases with annealing temperature and the nanodiamond surface is reconstructed from amorphous into a well-ordered, onion-like carbon structure via an intermediate composite structure--a diamond core covered by a defective, curved graphene outer shell. Direct dehydrogenation of propane shows that the sp(2)-/sp(3)-nanocomposite exhibits superior catalytic performance to that of individual nanodiamond and graphitic nanocarbon. The optimum catalytic activity of the diamond/graphene composite depends on the maximum structural defectiveness and high chemical reactivity of the ketone groups. Ketone-type functional groups anchored on the defects/vacancies are active for propene formation; nevertheless, once the oxygen functional groups are desorbed, the defects/vacancies alone might be active sites responsible for the C-H bond activation of propane. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Heterolytic Activation of C-H Bonds on Cr(III)-O Surface Sites Is a Key Step in Catalytic Polymerization of Ethylene and Dehydrogenation of Propane.

    PubMed

    Conley, Matthew P; Delley, Murielle F; Núñez-Zarur, Francisco; Comas-Vives, Aleix; Copéret, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    We describe the reactivity of well-defined chromium silicates toward ethylene and propane. The initial motivation for this study was to obtain a molecular understanding of the Phillips polymerization catalyst. The Phillips catalyst contains reduced chromium sites on silica and catalyzes the polymerization of ethylene without activators or a preformed Cr-C bond. Cr(II) sites are commonly proposed active sites in this catalyst. We synthesized and characterized well-defined chromium(II) silicates and found that these materials, slightly contaminated with a minor amount of Cr(III) sites, have poor polymerization activity and few active sites. In contrast, chromium(III) silicates have 1 order of magnitude higher activity. The chromium(III) silicates initiate polymerization by the activation of a C-H bond of ethylene. Density functional theory analysis of this process showed that the C-H bond activation step is heterolytic and corresponds to a σ-bond metathesis type process. The same well-defined chromium(III) silicate catalyzes the dehydrogenation of propane at elevated temperatures with activities similar to those of a related industrial chromium-based catalyst. This reaction also involves a key heterolytic C-H bond activation step similar to that described for ethylene but with a significantly higher energy barrier. The higher energy barrier is consistent with the higher pKa of the C-H bond in propane compared to the C-H bond in ethylene. In both cases, the rate-determining step is the heterolytic C-H bond activation.

  12. Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane on Cobalt Oxide (Co3O4) Nanoparticles: The Effect of Particle Size on Activity and Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Tyo, Eric C.; Yin, Chunrong; Di Vece, Marcel; Qian, Qiang; Kwon, Gihan; Lee, Sungsik; Lee, Byeongdu; DeBartolo, Janae E.; Seifert, Sönke; Winans, Randall E.; Si, Rui; Ricks, Brian; Goergen, Simone; Rutter, Matthew; Zugic, Branko; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Wang, Zhi Wei; Palmer, Richard E.; Neurock, Matthew; Vajda, Stefan

    2012-10-02

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane by cobalt oxide nanoparticles was studied via temperature programmed reaction combined with in situ grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and theoretical calculations on model Co3O4 substrates. Both 6 and 12 nm Co3O4 nanoparticles were made through a surfactant-free preparation and dispersed on an Al2O3 surface formed by atomic layer deposition. Under reaction conditions the nanoparticles retained their oxidation state and did not sinter. They instead underwent an assembly/disassembly process and could reorganize within their assemblies. The selectivity of the catalyst was found to be size- and temperature-dependent, with larger particles preferentially producing cyclohexene at lower temperatures and smaller particles predominantly resulting in benzene at higher temperatures. The mechanistic features thought to control the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane and other light alkanes on cobalt oxide were established by carrying out density functional theory calculations on the activation of propane, a surrogate model alkane, over model Co3O4 surfaces. The initial activation of the alkane (propane) proceeds via hydrogen abstraction over surface oxygen sites. The subsequent activation of the resulting alkoxide intermediate occurs at a second surface oxygen site to form the alkene (propene) which then desorbs from the surface. Hydroxyl recombination results in the formation of water which desorbs from the surface. Finally, oxygen is necessary to regenerate the surface oxygen sites, catalyze C–H activation steps, and minimize catalyst degradation.

  13. Catalytic dehydrogenation of propane by carbon dioxide: a medium-temperature thermochemical process for carbon dioxide utilisation.

    PubMed

    Du, X; Yao, B; Gonzalez-Cortes, S; Kuznetsov, V L; AlMegren, Hamid; Xiao, T; Edwards, P P

    2015-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 is an attractive catalytic route for C3H6 production. In studying the various possibilities to utilise CO2 to convert hydrocarbons using the sustainable energy source of solar thermal energy, thermodynamic calculations were carried out for the dehydrogenation of C3H8 using CO2for the process operating in the temperature range of 300-500 °C. Importantly, the results highlight the enhanced potential of C3H8 as compared to its lighter and heavier homologues (C2H6 and C4H10, respectively). To be utilised in this CO2 utilisation reaction the Gibbs free energy (ΔrGθm) of each reaction in the modelled, complete reacting system of the dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 also indicate that further cracking of C3H6 will affect the ultimate yield and selectivity of the final products. In a parallel experimental study, catalytic tests of the dehydrogenation of C3H8 in the presence of CO2 over 5 wt%-Cr2O3/ZrO2 catalysts operating at 500 °C, atmospheric pressure, and for various C3H8 partial pressures and various overall GHSV (Gas Hourly Space Velocity) values. The results showed that an increase in the C3H8 partial pressure produced an inhibition of C3H8 conversion but, importantly, a promising enhancement of C3H6 selectivity. This phenomenon can be attributed to competitive adsorption on the catalyst between the generated C3H6 and inactivated C3H8, which inhibits any further cracking effect on C3H6 to produce by-products. As a comparison, the increase of the overall GHSV can also decrease the C3H8 conversion to a similar extent, but the further cracking of C3H6 cannot be limited.

  14. The effect of mixed HCl-KCl competitive adsorbate on Pt adsorption and catalytic properties of Pt-Sn/Al2O3 catalysts in propane dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, Farnaz Tahriri; Taeb, Abbas; Gholivand, Khodayar; Sahebdelfar, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The effect of competitive adsorbate concentration and combination on the adsorption of H2PtCl6 onto γ-Al2O3 in the preparation and performance of PtSnK/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for propane dehydrogenation was investigated. The catalysts were prepared by sequential impregnation of Sn and Pt precursors. The effect of competitor concentration on Pt adsorption was studied by using hydrochloric acid (0.1-0.3 M) and the effect of pH was studied by using KCl/HCl mixtures at constant (0.1 M) total chloride ion concentration. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption, XRD, XRF, SEM and CO chemisorption. The catalytic performance tests were carried out in a fixed-bed quartz reactor under kinetic controlled condition for proper catalyst screening. It was found that the corrosive competitor HCl could be partially substituted with KCl without appreciable impact on catalyst performance with the advantage of lower acid attack on the support and reduced leaching of the deposited tin. A model based on initial concentration and uptake of the adsorbates was developed to obtain the adsorption parameters. Values of 890 μmol/g and 600 lit/mol were obtained for adsorption site concentration of the tin-impregnated support and equilibrium constant for Pt adsorption, respectively, for HCl concentration range of 0.1-0.3 M.

  15. Preparation of vanadium III oxidic compounds and dehydrogenation of paraffins

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, A.T.; Grasselli, R.K.; Brazdill, J.F.

    1988-08-09

    This patent describes the vapor phase catalytic dehydrogenation of a C/sub 2/-C/sub 4/ paraffin by contacting the paraffin with a spinel of the formula A/sup III/V/sub 2-x//sup III/C/sub x//sup III/O/sub 4/, formula (1) or a crystalline perovskite of the formula D/sup III/V/sub 1-y//sup III/C/sub y//sup III/O/sub 3/, formula (2) where A is one or more of Mg, Zn, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Cd; D is oone of more of Y, the rare earths and Bi; C is one or more of Al, Ga, Cr, Fe and Co, x is zero to < 1.9, and y is zero to < 0.9, which spinel or perovskite is made by a process which comprises (1) reducing a pentavalent vanadium oxidic compound to substantially the V/sup 111/ state by heating at 100/sup 0/C or less an aqueous medium slurry of solution of the pentavalent compound containing a reducing agent selected from hydrazine and a hydrocarbylhydrazine, (2) providing in the aqueous medium ether before, during or after the reducing step, A/sup II/, D/sup III/ and C/sup III/ cations in solution in the ratio called for by the selected formula, (3) removing the liquid aqueous medium, and (4) calcining the resulting dry solid at a temperature in the range from 400/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C in an inert atmosphere.

  16. IR-spectroscopic study of the state of Cu and Pt in copper-platinum-alumina catalysts for paraffin dehydrogenation subjected to different reductive and oxidative treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolova, N.A.; Barkova, A.P.; Furman, D.B.

    1995-05-01

    The state of supported metals in copper-platinum-alumina catalysts (0.15 at % Pt, 2 and 7.5 at % Cu), which differ in the preparation method and pretreatment conditions, is studied by diffuse-reflectance IR spectroscopy using CO adsorption. The activity of the catalysts in propane dehydrogenation is studied. The propylene yield is shown to depend on the concentration of Pt atoms. Also, partial hydrogenolyisis of propane and prolpylene occurs resulting in C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} hydrocarbons. These Pt atoms are assumed to be responsible for the activity of the catalysts in the reaction of propane dehydrogenation.

  17. Synthesis and Evaluation of Nanostructured Gold-Iron Oxide Catalysts for the Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng

    Shape-controlled iron oxide and gold-iron oxide catalysts with a cubic inverse spinel structure were studied in this thesis for the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane. The structure of iron oxide and gold-iron oxide catalysts has no major impact on their oxidative dehydrogenation activity. However, the product selectivity is influenced. Both cyclohexene and benzene are formed on bare iron oxide nanoshapes, while benzene is the only dehydrogenation product in the presence of gold. The selectivity of benzene over CO2 depends strongly on the stability of the iron oxide support and the gold-support interaction. The highest benzene yield has been observed on gold-iron oxide octahedra. {111}-bound nanooctahedra are highly stable in reaction conditions at 300 °C, while {100}-bound nanocubes start to sinter above 250 °C. The highest benzene yield has been observed on gold-iron oxide nanooctahedra, which are likely to have gold atoms, and few-atom gold clusters strongly-bound on their surface. Cationic gold appears to be the active site for benzene formation. An all-organic method to prepare Au-FeOx nano-catalysts is needed due to the inconvenience of the half-organic, half-inorganic synthesis process discussed above. Several methods from the literature to prepare gold-iron oxide nanocomposites completely in organic solvents were reviewed and followed. FeOx Au synthesis procedures in literatures are initially designed for a Au content of over 70%. This approach was tried here to prepare composites with a much lower Au content (2-5 atom. %). Heat treatment is required to bond Au and FeOx NPs in the organic-phase syntheses. Au-FeOx-4 was obtained as a selective catalyst for the ODH of cyclohexane. A Audelta+ peak is observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of sample Au-FeOx-4. This different Au delta+ form may be cationic Au nano-clusters interacting with the FeOx support. It has been demonstrated that cationic gold is responsible for dehydrogenation behavior. Furthermore, the

  18. The chemical origin and catalytic activity of coinage metals: from oxidation to dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Syu, Cih-Ying; Yang, Hao-Wen; Hsu, Fu-Hsing; Wang, Jeng-Han

    2014-04-28

    The high oxidation activity of coinage metals (Cu, Ag and Au) has been widely applied in various important reactions, such as oxidation of carbon monoxide, alkenes or alcohols. The catalytic behavior of those inert metals has mostly been attributable to their size effect, the physical effect. In the present study, the chemical effects on their high oxidation activity have been investigated. We mechanistically examine the direct and oxidative dehydrogenation (partial oxidation) reactions of ethanol to acetaldehyde on a series of transition metals (groups 9, 10 and 11) with identical physical characteristics and varied chemical origins using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and electronic structure analyses at the GGA-PW91 level. The energetic results show that coinage metals have much lower activation energies and higher exothermicities for the oxidative dehydrogenation steps although they have higher energy for the direct dehydrogenation reaction. In the electronic structure analyses, coinage metals with saturated d bands can efficiently donate electrons to O* and OH*, or other electronegative adspecies, and better promote their p bands to higher energy levels. The negatively charged O* and OH* with high-lying p bands are responsible for lowering the energies in oxidative steps. The mechanistic understanding well explains the better oxidation activity of coinage metals and provides valuable information on their utilization in other useful applications, for example, the dehydrogenation process.

  19. Propane and n-Butane Oxidation by Pseudomonas putida GPo1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erika L.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Propane and n-butane inhibit methyl tertiary butyl ether oxidation by n-alkane-grown Pseudomonas putida GPo1. Here we demonstrate that these gases are oxidized by this strain and support cell growth. Both gases induced alkane hydroxylase activity and appear to be oxidized by the same enzyme system used for the oxidation of n-octane. PMID:16391142

  20. Reforming and oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane with CO2 as a soft oxidant over bimetallic catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Myint, MyatNoeZin; Yan, Binhang; Wan, Jie; ...

    2016-02-26

    An efficient mitigation of abundantly available CO2 is critical for sustainable environmental impact as well as for novel industrial applications. Using ethane, CO2 can be catalytically converted into a useful feedstock (synthesis gas) and a value-added monomer (ethylene) via the dry reforming pathway through the C–C bond scission and the oxidative dehydrogenation pathway through the C–H bond scission, respectively. Results from the current flow-reactor study show that the precious metal bimetallic CoPt/CeO2 catalyst undergoes the reforming reaction to produce syngas with enhanced activity and stability compared to the parent monometallic catalysts. In this paper, in order to replace Pt, themore » activities of non-precious CoMo/CeO2 and NiMo/CeO2 are investigated and the results indicate that NiMo/CeO2 is nearly as active as CoPt/CeO2 for the reforming pathway. Furthermore, FeNi/CeO2 is identified as a promising catalyst for the oxidative dehydrogenation to produce ethylene. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to further understand the different pathways of the CoPt/CeO2 and FeNi/CeO2 catalysts.« less

  1. Support shape effect in metal oxide catalysis: ceria nanoshapes supported vanadia catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of iso-butane

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Schwartz, Viviane; Li, Meijun; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2012-01-01

    The activation energy of VOx/CeO2 catalysts in oxidative dehydrogenation of iso-butane was found dependent on the shape of ceria support: rods < octahedra, closely related to the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy and defects amount of the two ceria supports with different crystallographic surface planes.

  2. Graphene oxide based recyclable dehydrogenation of ammonia borane within a hybrid nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ziwei; Chen, Hao; Chen, Xiaowei; Wu, Limin; Yu, Xuebin

    2012-03-28

    The recyclable dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) is achievable within a graphene oxide (GO)-based hybrid nanostructure, in which a combined modification strategy of acid activation and nanoconfinement by GO allows AB to release more than 2 equiv of pure H(2) at temperatures below 100 °C. This process yields polyborazylene (PB) as a single product and, thus, promotes the chemical regeneration of AB via reaction of PB with hydrazine in liquid ammonia.

  3. Dehydrogenative N-incorporation: a direct approach to quinoxaline N-oxides under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xinyao; Shen, Tao; Zou, Miancheng; Jiao, Ning

    2014-09-22

    An efficient method for the synthesis of quinoxaline N-oxides proceeds by the dehydrogenative N-incorporation of simple imines by C(sp(2))-H and C(sp(3))-H bond functionalization. The overall transformation involves the cleavage of three C-H bonds. The reaction is easily handled and proceeds under mild conditions. Simple and readily available tert-butyl nitrite (TBN) was employed as the NO source.

  4. TBHP-mediated highly efficient dehydrogenative cross-oxidative coupling of methylarenes with acetanilides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weibing; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    A TBHP-mediated dehydrogenative cross-oxidative-coupling approach has been developed for the synthesis of N-arylbenzamides from methylarenes and acetanilides. This cross-coupling method is free of transition metal catalysts and ligands, and no extra organic solvents are required, which make it an useful and attractive strategy for the straightforward construction of C–N bonds. Besides, this conversion is an important complement to the conventional C–N forming strategies. PMID:28144291

  5. Structure and properties of oxidative dehydrogenation catalysts based on MoO3/Al2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kaidong; Xie, Shiubo; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2000-11-20

    The effects of MoOx structure on propane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) rates and selectivity were examined on Al2O3-supported molybdenum oxide catalysts with a wide range of Mo surface density (0.4-12 Mo/nm2). X-ray diffraction and Raman, UV-visible, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies showed that the structure of dispersed molybdena depends strongly on the Mo surface density. Two-dimensional MoOx oligomers formed preferentially for Mo surface densities below 4 Mo/nm2. At higher surface densities, these MoOx oligomers coexist on Al2O3 surfaces with three-dimensional MoO3. UV-visible edge energies decrease with increasing Mo surface density, consistent with the growth of MoOx structures. The evolution of near-edge spectral features in the X-ray absorption spectra and the gradual appearance of a Mo-Mo scattering peak in the radial structure function confirmed the growth of MoOx domains with increasing surface density. ODH rates per Mo atom increased with increasing Mo surface density a nd reached a maximum value for samples with (a) 4.5 Mo/nm2; this behavior reflects an increase in the reactivity of surface Mo species, because all MoOx species are exposed at domain surfaces in this surface density range. As also shown for VOx-based catalysts, turnover rates are higher on two-dimensional domains than on isolated monomers and they increase as the MoOx domain size increases. The rates of reduction of MoOx species in H2 or C3H8 were probed using kinetic and X-ray absorption methods; these reduction rates increased in parallel with ODH rates as the MoOx surface density increased, apparently as a result of the ability of larger domains to delocalize the higher electron density that accompanies the reduction process. As the surface density increased above 4.5 Mo/nm2, ODH rates (per Mo atom) decrease, as a result of the loss of accessibility caused by the formation of MoO3 crystallites. For these latter samples, the ODH rate per BET surface area approached a constant value

  6. Bulk binary ZrO2-based oxides as highly active alternative-type catalysts for non-oxidative isobutane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Otroshchenko, Tatyana; Radnik, Jörg; Schneider, Matthias; Rodemerck, Uwe; Linke, David; Kondratenko, Evgenii V

    2016-06-21

    Bulk binary ZrO2-based oxides efficiently catalyse non-oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane to isobutylene. Their activity strongly depends on the kind of second metal oxide. So designed CrZrOx showed superior activity to industrially relevant catalysts with supported Pt or CrOx species. It was also stable under alternating dehydrogenation and oxidative regeneration cycles over ca. 110 h under different reaction conditions between 550 and 600 °C.

  7. Direct operation of Ag-based anode solid oxide fuel cells on propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yapeng; Yu, Fangyong; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhou, Qian; Liu, Jiang; Liu, Meilin

    2017-10-01

    A cermet of sliver and gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) is investigated as the anode material of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The SOFCs are operated with hydrogen and dry propane as the fuel and ambient air as the oxidant. Their electrochemical and durability performances are tested and compared to those of SOFCs with conventional Ni-GDC anode. Experimental results show that performances of the SOFCs, respectively with Ag-GDC and Ni-GDC anode, are similar when operated on hydrogen, while quite different on propane. The open circuit voltage (OCV) of a SOFC with Ag-GDC anode is stable at ∼1 V while that with Ni-GDC anode continuously drops from the initial 1.2 V-0.85 V in 140 min. A SOFC with Ag-GDC anode has been stably operated on propane at a constant current density of 103 mA cm-2 for more than 160 h while that with Ni-GDC anode for only 50 h. SEM examination shows Ni-GDC anode is destroyed by carbon deposition during operation on propane, while Ag-GDC anode is well conserved and has a carbon layer, with some breakages, built on its surface. Mechanisms of the stable operation of SOFCs with Ag-GDC anode on dry propane is investigated and analyzed.

  8. Identifying active functionalities on few-layered graphene catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane.

    PubMed

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Tsai, Yu-Tung; Gierszal, Kamil; Xu, Ye; Liang, Chengdu; Rondinone, Adam J; Overbury, Steven H; Schwartz, Viviane

    2014-02-01

    The general consensus in the studies of nanostructured carbon catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanes to olefins is that the oxygen functionalities generated during synthesis and reaction are responsible for the catalytic activity of these nanostructured carbons. Identification of the highly active oxygen functionalities would enable engineering of nanocarbons for ODH of alkanes. Few-layered graphenes were used as model catalysts in experiments to synthesize reduced graphene oxide samples with varying oxygen concentrations, to characterize oxygen functionalities, and to measure the activation energies for ODH of isobutane. Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed on graphene nanoribbon models with a variety of oxygen functionalities at the edges to calculate their thermal stability and to model reaction mechanisms for ODH of isobutane. Comparing measured and calculated thermal stability and activation energies leads to the conclusion that dicarbonyls at the zigzag edges and quinones at armchair edges are appropriately balanced for high activity, relative to other model functionalities considered herein. In the ODH of isobutane, both dehydrogenation and regeneration of catalytic sites are relevant at the dicarbonyls, whereas regeneration is facile compared with dehydrogenation at quinones. The catalytic mechanism involves weakly adsorbed isobutane reducing functional oxygen and leaving as isobutene, and O2 in the feed, weakly adsorbed on the hydrogenated functionality, reacting with that hydrogen and regenerating the catalytic sites. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Phosphate-modified carbon nanotubes in the oxidative dehydrogenation of isopentanes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Liu, Hong Yang; Zhang, Bing Sen; Sun, Xiao Yan; Liang, Chang Hai; Su, Dang Sheng; Zong, Bao Ning; Rong, Jun Feng

    2014-12-01

    Ketonic/quinonic C=O groups on the surface of a carbon matrix are capable of abstracting hydrogen in C=H bonds from hydrocarbons and enable them to selectively convert into corresponding unsaturated hydrocarbons; this process is the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction. However, a variety of inevitable defects or graphene edges and other oxygen-containing groups on the carbon matrix are detrimental to the selective production of alkenes due to their high activity towards overoxidation. Herein, we show that phosphate can not only impede the total oxidation but also cover the selective C=O groups, hence allowing its use as a modulator to defects and oxygen-containing functional groups on the multiwalled carbon nanotubes, regulating the distribution of active sites and related catalytic targets.

  10. Catalytic ozonation of propanal using wood fly ash and metal oxide nanoparticle impregnated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kastner, James R; Ganagavaram, Rangan; Kolar, Praveen; Teja, Amyn; Xu, Chunbao

    2008-01-15

    Catalytic ozonation of propanal at ambient temperatures (23-25 degrees C) was investigated by varying propanal and ozone concentrations and catalyst type. The catalysts tested included wood fly ash (WFA), magnetically separated ash, synthetic hematite and magnetite, and metal oxide nanoparticle impregnated activated carbon and peanut hull char. A power law model independent of ozone concentration for WFA (r(w), moles g(-1) s(-1)) and magnetite (r(m)) were, respectively, r(w) = k'(w) C(R(0.89)) and r(m) = k'(m)C(R(1.55)), where kw, and k'(m) were 2.36 x 10(-6) g(-1) s(-1) (moles)(-0.11) (m3)(0.89) and 6.5 x 10(-4) g(-1) s(-1) (moles)(-0.55) (m3)(1.55), respectively (5-15 ppmv). Magnetite and hematite present in the WFA were theorized to be the primary active sites, since magnetically separated WFA had a significantly higher reaction rate (approximately 12x, mol m(-2) s(-1)) than that of WFA. X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated a qualitative increase in magnetite and hematite in the magnetically separated ash, and synthetic magnetite and hematite had reaction rates >80x and 200x that of WFA or activated carbon (surface area basis). Supercritical deposition of hematite on/in peanut hull char successfully generated a porous, pelleted catalystfrom an agricultural residue capable of oxidizing propanal at rates 12x activated carbon and similar to commercially available catalysts (per mass basis). Water vapor significantly increased the propanal reaction rate when using wood fly ash and activated carbon.

  11. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative Dehydrogenative Carboxylation of Unactivated Alkanes to Allylic Esters via Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative carboxylation (ODC) of unactivated alkanes with various substituted benzoic acids to produce the corresponding allylic esters. Spectroscopic studies (EPR, UV–vis) revealed that the resting state of the catalyst is [(BPI)Cu(O2CPh)] (1-O2CPh), formed from [(BPI)Cu(PPh3)2], oxidant, and benzoic acid. Catalytic and stoichiometric reactions of 1-O2CPh with alkyl radicals and radical probes imply that C–H bond cleavage occurs by a tert-butoxy radical. In addition, the deuterium kinetic isotope effect from reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane in separate vessels showed that the turnover-limiting step for the ODC of cyclohexane is C–H bond cleavage. To understand the origin of the difference in products formed from copper-catalyzed amidation and copper-catalyzed ODC, reactions of an alkyl radical with a series of copper–carboxylate, copper–amidate, and copper–imidate complexes were performed. The results of competition experiments revealed that the relative rate of reaction of alkyl radicals with the copper complexes follows the trend Cu(II)–amidate > Cu(II)–imidate > Cu(II)–benzoate. Consistent with this trend, Cu(II)–amidates and Cu(II)–benzoates containing more electron-rich aryl groups on the benzamidate and benzoate react faster with the alkyl radical than do those with more electron-poor aryl groups on these ligands to produce the corresponding products. These data on the ODC of cyclohexane led to preliminary investigation of copper-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenative amination of cyclohexane to generate a mixture of N-alkyl and N-allylic products. PMID:25389772

  12. Experimental and analytical study of nitric oxide formation during combustion of propane in a jet-stirred combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakelyn, N. T.; Jachimowski, C. J.; Wilson, C. H.

    1978-01-01

    A jet-stirred combustor, constructed of castable zirconia and with an Inconel injector, was used to study nitric oxide formation in propane-air combustion with residence times in the range from 3.2 to 3.3 msec and equivalence ratios varying from 0.7 to 1.4. Measurements were made of combustor operating temperature and of nitric oxide concentration. Maximum nitric oxide concentrations of the order of 55 ppm were found in the range of equivalence ratio from 1.0 to 1.1. A finite-rate chemical kinetic mechanism for propane combustion and nitric oxide formation was assembled by coupling an existing propane oxidation mechanism with the Zeldovich reactions and reactions of molecular nitrogen with hydrocarbon fragments. Analytical studies using this mechanism in a computer simulation of the experimental conditions revealed that the hydrocarbon-fragment-nitrogen reactions play a significant role in nitric oxide formation during fuel-rich combustion.

  13. Support Shape Effect in Metal Oxide Catalysis: Ceria-Nanoshape-Supported Vanadia Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Isobutane.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zili; Schwartz, Viviane; Li, Meijun; Rondinone, Adam J; Overbury, Steven H

    2012-06-07

    The support effect has long been an intriguing topic in catalysis research. With the advancement of nanomaterial synthesis, the availability of faceted oxide nanocrystals provides the opportunity to gain unprecedented insights into the support effect by employing these well-structured nanocrystals. In this Letter, we show by utilizing ceria nanoshapes as supports for vanadium oxide that the shape of the support poses a profound effect on the catalytic performance of metal oxide catalysts. Specifically, the activation energy of VOx/CeO2 catalysts in oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane was found to be dependent on the shape of ceria support, rods < octahedra, closely related to the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy and the numbe of defects of the two ceria supports with different crystallographic surface planes.

  14. Dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with nitrous oxide in the presence of mesoporous silica materials modified with transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Kuśtrowski, Piotr; Chmielarz, Lucjan; Dziembaj, Roman; Cool, Pegie; Vansant, Etienne F

    2005-01-20

    The novel mesoporous templated silicas (MCM-48, SBA-15, MCF, and MSU) were used as supports for transition metal (Cu, Cr, or Fe) oxides. The catalysts were synthesized using the incipient wetness impregnation, and characterized by low-temperature N2 sorption, DRIFT, photoacoustic IR spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia. It was shown that the preparation method used results in different distributions and dimensions of the transition metal oxide clusters on the inert support surface. The prepared catalysts were tested in the reaction of oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene in the presence of nitrous oxide. The iron-containing catalysts showed the highest catalytic activity. The presence of isolated Fe3+ was found to be the most important factor influencing the ethylbenzene conversion. The undesirable effect of the increase in selectivity toward CO2 was observed for the samples with the highest concentrations of acidic surface sites.

  15. Electrochemical promotion of propane oxidation on Pt deposited on a dense β"-Al2O3 ceramic Ag+ conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsampas, Michail; Kambolis, Anastasios; Obeid, Emil; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Sapountzi, Foteini; Vernoux, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    A new kind of electrochemical catalyst based on a Pt porous catalyst film deposited on a β"-Al2O3 ceramic Ag+ conductor was developed and evaluated during propane oxidation. It was observed that upon anodic polarization, the rate of propane combustion was significantly electropromoted up to 400%. Moreover, for the first time, exponential increase of the catalytic rate was evidenced during galvanostatic transient experiment in excellent agreement with EPOC equation.

  16. Open-cage fullerene-like graphitic carbons as catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chengdu; Xie, Hong; Schwartz, Viviane; Howe, Jane; Dai, Sheng; Overbury, Steven H

    2009-06-10

    We report herein a facile synthesis of fullerene-like cages, which can be opened and closed through simple thermal treatments. A glassy carbon with enclosed fullerene-like cages of 2-3 nm was synthesized through a soft-template approach that created open mesopores of 7 nm. The open mesopores provided access to the fullerene-like cages, which were opened and closed through heat treatments in air and inert gas at various temperatures. Catalytic measurements showed that the open cages displayed strikingly higher activity for the oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane in comparison to the closed ones. We anticipate that this synthesis approach could unravel an avenue for pursuing fundamental understanding of the unique catalytic properties of graphitic carbon nanostructures.

  17. Cometabolic biodegradation of 1,2,3-trichloropropane by propane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baixin; Chu, Kung-Hui

    2017-02-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is an emerging groundwater pollutant and suspected human carcinogen. TCP, a recalcitrant contaminant, has been detected in the subsurface near TCP manufacture facilities and many superfund sites. Considering the toxicity and the occurence of TCP, there is a need to seek for cost-effective treatment technologies for TCP-contaminated sites. This paper investigated TCP biodegradation by propane-oxidizing bacteria (PrOB) which are known to express propane monooxygenase (PrMO). PrMO can cometabolically degrade many different contaminants. Four PrOB, Rhodococus jostii RHA1, Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5, Rhodococcus rubber ENV425 and one isolate Sphingopyxis sp. AX-A were examined for their ability to degrade TCP. All the four PrOB resting cells were able to degrade TCP. Strain JOB5 exhibited the best TCP degradation ability (vinitial = 9.7 ± 0.7 μg TCP (mg protein)(-1)h(-1)). No TCP was degraded in the presence of acetylene (an inhibitor for PrMO), suggesting that PrMO might be responsible for TCP degradation. Furthermore, competitive inhibition was observed between propane and TCP, and between trichloroethylene (TCE) and TCP.

  18. Gold nanoparticles on OMS-2 for heterogeneously catalyzed aerobic oxidative α,β-dehydrogenation of β-heteroatom-substituted ketones.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Daichi; Jin, Xiongjie; Yatabe, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2016-12-06

    In the presence of Au nanoparticles supported on manganese oxide OMS-2 (Au/OMS-2), various kinds of β-heteroatom-substituted α,β-unsaturated ketones (heteroatom = N, O, S) can be synthesized through α,β-dehydrogenation of the corresponding saturated ketones using O2 (in air) as the oxidant. The catalysis of Au/OMS-2 is truly heterogeneous, and the catalyst can be reused.

  19. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of phase conversions of an iron-containing oxide catalyst for oxidative dehydrogenation of butenes

    SciTech Connect

    Golub'ev, A.V.; Matveev, A.I.; Amirbekov, E.N.; Maksimov, Yu.V.; Suzdalev, I.P.

    1988-06-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the structure of ..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-supported iron oxide, which is catalytically active in the oxidative dehydrogenation of butenes to divinyl. The phase conversions of the catalyst were investigated after treating it in reducing (butenes) and reaction (butenes + oxygen + water vapor) media and after regeneration in a stream of oxygen. It is shown that the supported phase changes from a structure similar to hematite (..cap alpha..-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/) to spinel structure both under the effect of butenes and the reaction mixture. When this happens ion exchange occurs between the spinel and the support, with the formation of partly hydrated complexes of Fe/sup 2 +/ ions in an asymmetric environment of O/sup 2 -/ ions and OH/sup -/ groups of the lattice of the support. These complexes vanish upon reoxidation of the catalyst, and part of the spinel is oxidized to hematite.

  20. Oxygen-functionalized few-layer graphene sheets as active catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Viviane; Fu, Wujun; Tsai, Yu-Tung; Meyer, Harry M; Rondinone, Adam J; Chen, Jihua; Wu, Zili; Overbury, Steven H; Liang, Chengdu

    2013-05-01

    Nanostructured graphitic forms of carbons have shown intersting potential for catalysis research and are ideal candidates to substitute the conventional metal-oxide catalysts because they can be easily disposed, which enables a greener, more sustainable catalytic process. Few-layer graphene and its functionalized form offer the opportunity to investigate the nature of graphitic active sites for oxidation reactions in well-defined carbon-based catalysts. In this paper, we report the utilization of oxygen-functionalized few-layer graphene sheets containing variable amounts of oxygen in the heterogeneous catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction of isobutane at 400ºC. Interestingly, there is poor correlation between oxygen content and catalytic performance. Carbonyl groups were found to be highly stable, and graphene that had higher sp(2) character, the lowest oxygen content, and fewer edge sites presented the lowest specific rate of isobutane reaction, although the isobutene selectivity remained high. The reoxidation of the graphene surface occurred at the same rate as the ODH reaction suggesting a Mars-van Krevelen type of mechanism, similar to that which takes place on oxide surfaces. These results appear to suggest that a higher fraction of exposed edges where oxygen active sites can be formed and exchanged should lead to more active catalysts for ODH reactions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Reforming and oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane with CO2 as a soft oxidant over bimetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Myint, MyatNoeZin; Yan, Binhang; Wan, Jie; Zhao, Shen; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-02-26

    An efficient mitigation of abundantly available CO2 is critical for sustainable environmental impact as well as for novel industrial applications. Using ethane, CO2 can be catalytically converted into a useful feedstock (synthesis gas) and a value-added monomer (ethylene) via the dry reforming pathway through the C–C bond scission and the oxidative dehydrogenation pathway through the C–H bond scission, respectively. Results from the current flow-reactor study show that the precious metal bimetallic CoPt/CeO2 catalyst undergoes the reforming reaction to produce syngas with enhanced activity and stability compared to the parent monometallic catalysts. In this paper, in order to replace Pt, the activities of non-precious CoMo/CeO2 and NiMo/CeO2 are investigated and the results indicate that NiMo/CeO2 is nearly as active as CoPt/CeO2 for the reforming pathway. Furthermore, FeNi/CeO2 is identified as a promising catalyst for the oxidative dehydrogenation to produce ethylene. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to further understand the different pathways of the CoPt/CeO2 and FeNi/CeO2 catalysts.

  2. Propane poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Propane is a colorless and odorless flammable gas that can turn into liquid under very cold temperatures. This article discusses the harmful effects from breathing in or swallowing propane. Breathing in or swallowing propane can be ...

  3. Lanthanoid-free perovskite oxide catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene working with redox mechanism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryo; Ikushima, Maiko; Mukawa, Kei; Sumomozawa, Fumitaka; Ogo, Shuhei; Sekine, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    For the development of highly active and robust catalysts for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EBDH) to produce styrene; an important monomer for polystyrene production, perovskite-type oxides were applied to the reaction. Controlling the mobility of lattice oxygen by changing the structure of Ba1 - x SrxFe y Mn1 - y O3 - δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 1, 0.2 ≤ y ≤ 0.8), perovskite catalyst showed higher activity and stability on EBDH. The optimized Ba/Sr and Fe/Mn molar ratios were 0.4/0.6 and 0.6/0.4, respectively. Comparison of the dehydrogenation activity of Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ catalyst with that of an industrial potassium promoted iron (Fe-K) catalyst revealed that the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ catalyst showed higher initial activity than the industrial Fe-K oxide catalyst. Additionally, the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ catalyst showed high activity and stability under severe conditions, even at temperatures as low as 783 K, or at the low steam/EB ratio of 2, while, the Fe-K catalyst showed low activity in such conditions. Comparing reduction profiles of the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ and the Fe-K catalysts in a H2O/H2 atmosphere, reduction was suppressed by the presence of H2O over the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ catalyst while the Fe-K catalyst was reduced. In other words, Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ catalyst had higher potential for activating the steam than the Fe-K catalyst. The lattice oxygen in perovskite-structure was consumed by H2, subsequently the consumed lattice oxygen was regenerated by H2O. So the catalytic performance of Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ was superior to that of Fe-K catalyst thanks to the high redox property of the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 - δ perovskite oxide.

  4. Lanthanoid-free perovskite oxide catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene working with redox mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ryo; Ikushima, Maiko; Mukawa, Kei; Sumomozawa, Fumitaka; Ogo, Shuhei; Sekine, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    For the development of highly active and robust catalysts for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EBDH) to produce styrene; an important monomer for polystyrene production, perovskite-type oxides were applied to the reaction. Controlling the mobility of lattice oxygen by changing the structure of Ba1 − xSrxFeyMn1 − yO3 − δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 1, 0.2 ≤ y ≤ 0.8), perovskite catalyst showed higher activity and stability on EBDH. The optimized Ba/Sr and Fe/Mn molar ratios were 0.4/0.6 and 0.6/0.4, respectively. Comparison of the dehydrogenation activity of Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ catalyst with that of an industrial potassium promoted iron (Fe–K) catalyst revealed that the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ catalyst showed higher initial activity than the industrial Fe–K oxide catalyst. Additionally, the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ catalyst showed high activity and stability under severe conditions, even at temperatures as low as 783 K, or at the low steam/EB ratio of 2, while, the Fe–K catalyst showed low activity in such conditions. Comparing reduction profiles of the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ and the Fe–K catalysts in a H2O/H2 atmosphere, reduction was suppressed by the presence of H2O over the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ catalyst while the Fe–K catalyst was reduced. In other words, Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ catalyst had higher potential for activating the steam than the Fe–K catalyst. The lattice oxygen in perovskite-structure was consumed by H2, subsequently the consumed lattice oxygen was regenerated by H2O. So the catalytic performance of Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ was superior to that of Fe–K catalyst thanks to the high redox property of the Ba0.4Sr0.6Fe0.6Mn0.4O3 − δ perovskite oxide. PMID:24790949

  5. Porous AgPt@Pt Nanooctahedra as an Efficient Catalyst toward Formic Acid Oxidation with Predominant Dehydrogenation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xian; Yan, Xiaoxiao; Ren, Wangyu; Jia, Yufeng; Chen, Jianian; Sun, Dongmei; Xu, Lin; Tang, Yawen

    2016-11-16

    For direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs), the dehydrogenation pathway is a desired reaction pathway, to boost the overall cell efficiency. Elaborate composition tuning and nanostructure engineering provide two promising strategies to design efficient electrocatalysts for DFAFCs. Herein, we present a facile synthesis of porous AgPt bimetallic nanooctahedra with enriched Pt surface (denoted as AgPt@Pt nanooctahedra) by a selective etching strategy. The smart integration of geometric and electronic effect confers a substantial enhancement of desired dehydrogenation pathway as well as electro-oxidation activity for the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR). We anticipate that the obtained nanocatalyst may hold great promises in fuel cell devices, and furthermore, the facile synthetic strategy demonstrated here can be extendable for the fabrication of other multicomponent nanoalloys with desirable morphologies and enhanced electrocatalytic performances.

  6. Effect of surface phosphorus on the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane: A first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Amitesh; Govind, Niranjan; Kung, Paul; King-Smith, Dominic; Miller, James E.; Zhang, Conrad; Whitwell, George

    2002-11-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of small-chain alkanes has the potential to displace thermal cracking as the preferred method of light olefin production. Many heterogeneous catalysts for the ODH reaction have been discussed in the literature, including oxides, vanadates, and phosphates of rare earth and transition metals. Our experiments and the literature indicate that for most of these catalysts, including silica gel and alumina, a phosphorus-enriched surface enhances the ODH yield of ethane to ethylene. To understand the role of P, the ODH reactions were simulated on a silica surface, with and without P, using the density functional theory code DMol3 in a periodic supercell. Optimized structures for all intermediates as well as transition states were obtained for full catalytic cycles. The simulations reveal that activation barriers for the rate-limiting steps are lowered by ˜10 kcal/mol in the presence of P. The decrease results from a transition state in which the P atom remains quasi-5-valent and fourfold coordinated.

  7. Reversible Bulk Oxidation of Ni Foil During Oscillatory Catalytic Oxidation of Propane: A Novel Type of Spatiotemporal Self-Organization.

    PubMed

    Kaichev, V V; Saraev, A A; Gladky, A Yu; Prosvirin, I P; Blume, R; Teschner, D; Hävecker, M; Knop-Gericke, A; Schlögl, R; Bukhtiyarov, V I

    2017-07-14

    A novel type of temporal and spatial self-organization in a heterogeneous catalytic reaction is described for the first time. Using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry, we show that, under certain conditions, self-sustained reaction-rate oscillations arise in the oxidation of propane over Ni foil because of reversible bulk oxidation of Ni to NiO, which can be observed even with the naked eye as chemical waves propagating over the catalyst surface.

  8. Reversible Bulk Oxidation of Ni Foil During Oscillatory Catalytic Oxidation of Propane: A Novel Type of Spatiotemporal Self-Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaichev, V. V.; Saraev, A. A.; Gladky, A. Yu.; Prosvirin, I. P.; Blume, R.; Teschner, D.; Hävecker, M.; Knop-Gericke, A.; Schlögl, R.; Bukhtiyarov, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    A novel type of temporal and spatial self-organization in a heterogeneous catalytic reaction is described for the first time. Using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry, we show that, under certain conditions, self-sustained reaction-rate oscillations arise in the oxidation of propane over Ni foil because of reversible bulk oxidation of Ni to NiO, which can be observed even with the naked eye as chemical waves propagating over the catalyst surface.

  9. Indium-catalyzed oxidative cross-dehydrogenative coupling of chromenes with 1,3-dicarbonyls and aryl rings.

    PubMed

    Li, Fanmei; Meng, Zhilin; Hua, Jing; Li, Wei; Lou, Hongxiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-05-28

    An effective indium-catalyzed oxidative cross-dehydrogenative coupling of electronically varied chromenes with 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds and aryl rings has been established. Both the C-H alkylation and arylation proceed smoothly at room temperature to afford diverse α-substituted chromene compounds in up to 91% yields. Besides these two types of C-H components, simple ketones like cyclohexanones also prove to be well tolerated.

  10. Synthesis of isoxazoles en route to semi-aromatized polyketides: dehydrogenation of benzonitrile oxide-para-quinone acetal cycloadducts.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yoshimitsu; Takada, Akiomi; Takikawa, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Keisuke

    2012-08-14

    A variety of highly functionalized polycyclic isoxazoles are prepared by a two-step protocol: (1) 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of o,o'-disubstituted benzonitrile oxides to para-quinone mono-acetals, then (2) dehydrogenation. The cycloaddition proceeds in a regioselective manner, favouring the formation of the 4-acyl cycloadducts, which are suitable intermediates for the synthesis of semi-aromatized polycyclic targets derived from polyketide type-II biosynthesis.

  11. Operating envelope of a short contact time fuel reformer for propane catalytic partial oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Michael G.; Walluk, Mark R.; Trabold, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Fuel cell technology has yet to realize widespread deployment, in part because of the hydrogen fuel infrastructure required for proton exchange membrane systems. One option to overcome this barrier is to produce hydrogen by reforming propane, which has existing widespread infrastructure, is widely used by the general public, easily transported, and has a high energy density. The present work combines thermodynamic modeling of propane catalytic partial oxidation (cPOx) and experimental performance of a Precision Combustion Inc. (PCI) Microlith® reactor with real-time soot measurement. Much of the reforming research using Microlith-based reactors has focused on fuels such as natural gas, JP-8, diesel, and gasoline, but little research on propane reforming with Microlith-based catalysts can be found in literature. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal operating parameters for the reformer that maximizes efficiency and minimizes solid carbon formation. The primary parameters evaluated were reformate composition, carbon concentration in the effluent, and reforming efficiency as a function of catalyst temperature and O2/C ratio. Including the lower heating values for product hydrogen and carbon monoxide, efficiency of 84% was achieved at an O2/C ratio of 0.53 and a catalyst temperature of 940 °C, resulting in near equilibrium performance. Significant solid carbon formation was observed at much lower catalyst temperatures, and carbon concentration in the effluent was determined to have a negative linear relationship at T < 750 °C. The Microlith reactor displayed good stability during more than 80 experiments with temperature cycling from 360 to 1050 °C.

  12. Oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane over vanadia catalysts supported by titania nanoshapes

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Shannon K.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Tsai, Yu-Tung; Schwartz, Viviane; Steven H. Overbury; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Wu, Zili

    2015-11-02

    Support plays a complex role in catalysis by supported metal oxides and the exact support effect still remains elusive. One of the approaches to gain fundamental insights into the support effect is to utilize model support systems. In this study, we employed for the first time titania nanoshapes as the model supports and investigated how the variation of surface structure of the support (titania, TiO2) impacts the catalysis of supported oxide (vanadia, VOx). TiO2 truncated rhombi, spheres and rods were synthesized via hydrothermal method and characterized with XRD and TEM. These TiO2 nanoshapes represent different mixtures of surface facets including [1 0 1], [0 1 0] and [0 0 1] and were used to support vanadia. The structure of supported VOx species was characterized in detail with in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of loading on the three TiO2 nanoshapes. Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of isobutane to isobutene was used as a model reaction to test how the support shape influences the activity, selectivity and activation energy of the surface VOx species. It was shown that the shape of TiO2 support does not pose evident effect on either the structure of surface VOx species or the catalytic performance of surface VOx species in isobutane ODH reaction. Finally, this insignificant support shape effect was ascribed to the small difference in the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy among the different TiO2 surfaces and the multi-faceting nature of the TiO2 nanoshapes.

  13. Oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane over vanadia catalysts supported by titania nanoshapes

    DOE PAGES

    Kraemer, Shannon K.; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Tsai, Yu-Tung; ...

    2015-11-02

    Support plays a complex role in catalysis by supported metal oxides and the exact support effect still remains elusive. One of the approaches to gain fundamental insights into the support effect is to utilize model support systems. In this study, we employed for the first time titania nanoshapes as the model supports and investigated how the variation of surface structure of the support (titania, TiO2) impacts the catalysis of supported oxide (vanadia, VOx). TiO2 truncated rhombi, spheres and rods were synthesized via hydrothermal method and characterized with XRD and TEM. These TiO2 nanoshapes represent different mixtures of surface facets includingmore » [1 0 1], [0 1 0] and [0 0 1] and were used to support vanadia. The structure of supported VOx species was characterized in detail with in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of loading on the three TiO2 nanoshapes. Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of isobutane to isobutene was used as a model reaction to test how the support shape influences the activity, selectivity and activation energy of the surface VOx species. It was shown that the shape of TiO2 support does not pose evident effect on either the structure of surface VOx species or the catalytic performance of surface VOx species in isobutane ODH reaction. Finally, this insignificant support shape effect was ascribed to the small difference in the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy among the different TiO2 surfaces and the multi-faceting nature of the TiO2 nanoshapes.« less

  14. Oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane over vanadia catalysts supported by titania nanoshapes

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Shannon; Rondinone, Adam J.; Tsai, Yu-Tong; Schwartz, Viviane; Overbury, Steven H.; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Wu, Zili

    2016-04-01

    Support plays a complex role in catalysis by supported metal oxides and the exact support effect still remains elusive. One of the approaches to gain fundamental insights into the support effect is to utilize model support systems. In this paper, we employed for the first time titania nanoshapes as the model supports and investigated how the variation of surface structure of the support (titania, TiO2) impacts the catalysis of supported oxide (vanadia, VOx). TiO2 truncated rhombi, spheres and rods were synthesized via hydrothermal method and characterized with XRD and TEM. These TiO2 nanoshapes represent different mixtures of surface facets including [1 0 1], [0 1 0] and [0 0 1] and were used to support vanadia. The structure of supported VOx species was characterized in detail with in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of loading on the three TiO2 nanoshapes. Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of isobutane to isobutene was used as a model reaction to test how the support shape influences the activity, selectivity and activation energy of the surface VOx species. It was shown that the shape of TiO2 support does not pose evident effect on either the structure of surface VOx species or the catalytic performance of surface VOx species in isobutane ODH reaction. This insignificant support shape effect was ascribed to the small difference in the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy among the different TiO2 surfaces and the multi-faceting nature of the TiO2 nanoshapes.

  15. Identification of Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps by Stable Isotope Probing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, M.; Ding, H.; Friedrich, M. W.; Valentine, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps emit substantial amounts of oil and natural gas into the marine environment, where they can be oxidized by microorganisms in the sediment and water column. Here, we used stable isotope probing of DNA and lipid biomarkers to identify the microorganisms actively consuming 13C-labeled natural gas compounds in seep sediment samples. Surface sediment was collected from the Coal Oil Point seep field (offshore Santa Barbara, California, USA) and incubated under aerobic conditions with 13C labeled methane, ethane, or propane for up to 37 days, with sediment sub-samples taken at 3-4 intermediate time points. DNA was extracted from sediment and separated by CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The microbial community in each fraction was profiled using T-RFLP, and bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from un-incubated hydrocarbon seep sediment and selected isotopically 'heavy' (13C) and 'light' (12C) gradient fractions from ethane incubations. All clone libraries were dominated by sequences from members of the family Rhodobacteraceae (>25% of sequences) and a diverse group of Gammaproteobacteria, including sequences related to those of methylotrophs and to those of bacteria known to consume the longer-chain alkanes present in crude oil. After 14 days of incubation, the relative abundance of Rhodobacteraceae was higher in 'heavy' fractions from the 13C-ethane incubation than in 'light' fractions, suggesting incorporation of 13C label. The Rhodobacteraceae are very diverse metabolically, but have often been observed in abundance in oil contaminated seawater. Several members of this group have been shown to oxidize longer chain alkanes (C10 or higher), but none have been previously linked to the consumption of the gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, and butane. For the final time point, 13C content of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were also analyzed, showing substantial incorporation of 13C over 37 days. In the methane incubation

  16. Non-Oxidative Dehydrogenation Pathways for the Conversion of C2 -C4 Alcohols to Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Shylesh, Sankaranarayanapillai; Kim, Daeyoup; Ho, Christopher R; Johnson, Gregory R; Wu, Jason; Bell, Alexis T

    2015-12-07

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) supported on hydrotalcite (Au/HT) are highly active and selective catalysts for the continuous, gas-phase, non-oxidative dehydrogenation of bioderived C2 -C4 alcohols. A sharp increase in turn over frequency (TOF) is noted when the size of Au NPs is less than 5 nm relating to the strong synergy between metallic Au NPs and the acid-base groups on the support surface. It is shown that catalytic activity depends critically on Au NP size, support composition, and support pretreatments. A reaction pathway elucidated from kinetic isotope effects suggests that the abstraction of β-H by Au NPs (C-H activation) is the rate-determining step in the dehydrogenation of bioderived C2 -C4 alcohols. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Significance of β-dehydrogenation in ethanol electro-oxidation on platinum doped with Ru, Rh, Pd, Os and Ir.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Tian; Lin, Wen-Feng; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P

    2014-07-14

    In the exploration of highly efficient direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs), how to promote the CO2 selectivity is a key issue which remains to be solved. Some advances have been made, for example, using bimetallic electrocatalysts, Rh has been found to be an efficient additive to platinum to obtain high CO2 selectivity experimentally. In this work, the mechanism of ethanol electrooxidation is investigated using the first principles method. It is found that CH3CHOH* is the key intermediate during ethanol electrooxidation and the activity of β-dehydrogenation is the rate determining factor that affects the completeness of ethanol oxidation. In addition, a series of transition metals (Ru, Rh, Pd, Os and Ir) are alloyed on the top layer of Pt(111) in order to analyze their effects. The elementary steps, α-, β-C-H bond and C-C bond dissociations, are calculated on these bimetallic M/Pt(111) surfaces and the formation potential of OH* from water dissociation is also calculated. We find that the active metals increase the activity of β-dehydrogenation but lower the OH* formation potential resulting in the active site being blocked. By considering both β-dehydrogenation and OH* formation, Ru, Os and Ir are identified to be unsuitable for the promotion of CO2 selectivity and only Rh is able to increase the selectivity of CO2 in DEFCs.

  18. Chemical kinetic modeling of high pressure propane oxidation and comparison to experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Koert, D.N.; Pitz, W.J.; Bozzelli, J.W.; Cernansky, N.P.

    1995-11-08

    A pressure dependent kinetic mechanism for propane oxidation is developed and compared to experimental data from a high pressure flow reactor. The experiment conditions range from 10--15 atm, 650--800 K, and were performed at a residence time of 200 {micro}s for propane-air mixtures at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. The experimental results include data on negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior, where the chemistry describing this phenomena is considered critical in understanding automotive engine knock and cool flame oscillations. Results of the numerical model are compared to a spectrum of stable species profiles sampled from the flow reactor. Rate constants and product channels for the reaction of propyl radicals, hydroperoxy-propyl radicals and important isomers with O{sub 2} were estimated using thermodynamic properties, with multifrequency quantum Kassel Theory for k(E) coupled with modified strong collision analysis for fall-off. Results of the chemical kinetic model show an NTC region over nearly the same temperature regime as observed in the experiments. The model simulates properly the production of many of the major and minor species observed in the experiments. Numerical simulations show many of the key reactions involving propylperoxy radicals are in partial equilibrium at 10--15 atm. This indicates that their relative concentrations are controlled by a combination of thermochemistry and rate of minor reaction channels (bleed reactions) rather than primary reaction rates. This suggests that thermodynamic parameters of the oxygenated species, which govern equilibrium concentrations, are important. The modeling results show propyl radical and hydroperoxy-propyl radicals reaction with O{sub 2} proceeds, primarily, through thermalized adducts, not chemically activated channels.

  19. Propane Basics

    SciTech Connect

    NREL

    2010-03-01

    Propane powers about 190,000 vehicles in the U.S. and more than 14 million worldwide. Propane vehicles are a good choice for many fleet applications including school buses, shuttle buses, taxies and light-duty trucks.

  20. Propane Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantner, Max

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a northern Illinois school bus fleet converted to propane fuel in 1981 and 1982. Includes tables showing, first, total annual fuel costs before and after conversion and, second, fuel efficiency for 16 buses using propane and three using gasoline. Notes precautions for propane use. (MCG)

  1. Propane Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantner, Max

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a northern Illinois school bus fleet converted to propane fuel in 1981 and 1982. Includes tables showing, first, total annual fuel costs before and after conversion and, second, fuel efficiency for 16 buses using propane and three using gasoline. Notes precautions for propane use. (MCG)

  2. Non-Oxidative Dehydrogenation Pathways for the Conversion of C2 -C4 Alcohols to Carbonyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Shylesh, Sankaranarayanapillai; Kim, Daeyoup; Ho, Christopher R; Johnson, Gregory R; Wu, Jason; Bell, Alexis T

    2015-11-24

    Invited for this month's cover is the group of Alexis T. Bell at The University of California, Berkeley in Berkeley, California. The image shows the utility of gold nanoparticles deposited on hydrotalcite (Au/HT) for the continuous gas-phase non- oxidative dehydrogenation reaction of bioderived C2 -C4 alcohols to the respective carbonyl compounds and hydrogen. The Communication itself is available at 10.1002/cssc.201500786. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Methanol Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Oxide Catalysts: Molecular and Dissociative Routes and Hydrogen Addition Energies as Descriptors of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-13

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanols on oxide catalysts is generally described as involving H-abstraction from alkoxy species formed via O–H dissociation. Kinetic and isotopic data cannot discern between such routes and those involving kinetically-relevant H-abstraction from undissociated alkanols. Here, we combine such experiments with theoretical estimates of activation energies and entropies to show that the latter molecular routes prevail over dissociative routes for methanol reactions on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters at all practical reaction temperatures. The stability of the late transition states that mediate H-abstraction depend predominantly on the stability of the O–H bond formed, making H-addition energies (HAE) accurate and single-valued descriptors of reactivity. Density functional theory-derived activation energies depend linearly on HAE values at each O-atom location on clusters with a range of composition (H3PMo12, H4SiMo12, H3PW12, H4PV1Mo11, and H4PV1W11); both barriers and HAE values reflect the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy of metal centers that accept the electron and the protonation energy of O-atoms that accept the proton involved in the H-atom transfer. Bridging O-atoms form O–H bonds that are stronger than those of terminal atoms and therefore exhibit more negative HAE values and higher ODH reactivity on all POM clusters. For each cluster composition, ODH turnover rates reflect the reactivity-averaged HAE of all accessible O-atoms, which can be evaluated for each cluster composition to provide a rigorous and accurate predictor of ODH reactivity for catalysts with known structure. These relations together with oxidation reactivity measurements can then be used to estimate HAE values and to infer plausible structures for catalysts with uncertain active site structures.

  4. Silylesterification of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes by catalyzed dehydrogenative cross-coupling between carboxylic and hydrosilane functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, J.-F.; Detriche, S.; Nagy, J. B.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Surface modification of oxidized carbon nanotubes (O-CNTs) with silicon based anchoring groups (R-SiR3) is a relatively uncommon approach of the CNTs functionalization. Hydrosilane derivatives constitute an attractive subclass of compounds for silanization reactions on the CNTs surface. In this work, we report on the ZnCl2 catalytically controlled reaction (hydrosilane dehydrogenative cross-coupling, DHCC) of fluorinated hydrosilane probes with the carboxylic functions present on the surface of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with essentially alcohol groups are also used to compare the selectivity of zinc chloride toward carboxylic groups. To assess the efficiency of functionalization, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to determine the qualitative and quantitative composition of the different samples. Solubility tests on the oxidized and silanized MWNTs are also carried out in the framework of the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP) theory to apprehend at another scale the effect of DHCC.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Nearly Monodisperse Pt Nanoparticles for C1 to C3 Alcohol Oxidation and Dehydrogenation of Dimethylamine-borane (DMAB).

    PubMed

    Erken, Esma; Yildiz, Yunus; Kilbaş, Benan; Sen, Fatih

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient nearly monodisperse Pt NPs catalyze C1 to C3 alcohol oxidation with very high electrochemical activities and provides one of the highest catalytic activities (TOF = 21.50 h(-1)) in the dehydrogenation of DMAB at room temperature. The exceptional stability towards agglomeration, leaching and CO poisoning for the prepared catalyst allow these particles to be recycled and reused in the catalysis of both DMAB dehydrogenation and C1 to C3 alcohol oxidation. After four subsequent reaction and recovery cycles, catalyst retained ≥ 80% activity towards the complete dehydrogenation of DMAB. The prepared catalyst structures were determined by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively.

  6. Chromium and Ruthenium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films for Propane Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Pozos, Heberto; González-Vidal, José Luis; Torres, Gonzalo Alberto; Rodríguez-Baez, Jorge; Maldonado, Arturo; de la Luz Olvera, María; Acosta, Dwight Roberto; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Castañeda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Chromium and ruthenium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Cr) and (ZnO:Ru) thin solid films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by the sol-gel dip-coating method. A 0.6 M solution of zinc acetate dihydrate dissolved in 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine was used as basic solution. Chromium (III) acetylacetonate and Ruthenium (III) trichloride were used as doping sources. The Ru incorporation and its distribution profile into the films were proved by the SIMS technique. The morphology and structure of the films were studied by SEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements, respectively. The SEM images show porous surfaces covered by small grains with different grain size, depending on the doping element, and the immersions number into the doping solutions. The sensing properties of ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films in a propane (C3H8) atmosphere, as a function of the immersions number in the doping solution, have been studied in the present work. The highest sensitivity values were obtained for films doped from five immersions, 5.8 and 900, for ZnO:Cr and ZnO:Ru films, respectively. In order to evidence the catalytic effect of the chromium (Cr) and ruthenium (Ru), the sensing characteristics of undoped ZnO films are reported as well. PMID:23482091

  7. Propane fear

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.

    1992-02-12

    A minor feature of a Congressional energy bill is causing consternation for a number of propane-consuming chemical companies. The firms are fighting the bill`s inclusion of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on a list of alternative fuels that can be used to meet its urban fleet vehicles requirements. The firms fear that this added use would drive up the price of propane-an LPG-for homeowners, farmers, and themselves. Speaking for the Propane Consumers Coalition, a Dow Chemical spokesman says 7.7 million households use propane, as does agriculture, and current demand is such that December saw a 23-year low in US inventories. The US depends on imports of propane, he says, and about half the propane sold in the US is derived from the refining of oil, much of which is also imported. Adding demand for vehicle fuel would drive up imports and process, the spokesman says, thereby damaging all users, including the petrochemical industry.

  8. Crystal chemistry of volcanic allanites indicative of naturally induced oxidation-dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Mihoko; Kimata, Mitsuyoshi; Chesner, Craig A.; Nishida, Norimasa; Shimizu, Masahiro; Akasaka, Takeshi

    2010-05-01

    welding of the Youngest Toba Tuff caused the following post-crystallization changes to occur in YTT allanite: oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+, release of H2, and the concomitant replacement of OH- by O2-. These oxidation and dehydrogenation processes advanced during the welding to thereby produce oxyallanite. Oxyallanite had been reported only in laboratory studies where it was produced by heating natural allanite. Our report on natural oxyallanite suggests that it may be present in other welded silicic volcanic rocks as well.

  9. A versatile approach to flavones via a one-pot Pd(II)-catalyzed dehydrogenation/oxidative boron-Heck coupling sequence of chromanones.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Yu, Jihyun; Son, Seung Hwan; Heo, Jinyuk; Kim, Taelim; An, Ji-Young; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Nam-Jung

    2016-01-14

    A variety of flavones were expediently synthesized from readily accessible chromanones via a one-pot sequence involving Pd(II)-catalyzed dehydrogenation and oxidative boron-Heck coupling with arylboronic acid pinacol esters. In particular, the use of arylboronic acid pinacol esters was found to significantly improve the yield of the reaction.

  10. New insights into low-temperature oxidation of propane from synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry and multi-scale informatics modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Welz, Oliver; Burke, Michael P.; Antonov, Ivan O.; ...

    2015-04-10

    We studied low-temperature propane oxidation at P = 4 Torr and T = 530, 600, and 670 K by time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS), which probes the reactants, intermediates, and products with isomeric selectivity using tunable synchrotron vacuum UV ionizing radiation. The oxidation is initiated by pulsed laser photolysis of oxalyl chloride, (COCl)2, at 248 nm, which rapidly generates a ~1:1 mixture of 1-propyl (n-propyl) and 2-propyl (i-propyl) radicals via the fast Cl + propane reaction. At all three temperatures, the major stable product species is propene, formed in the propyl + O2 reactions by direct HO2 elimination frommore » both n- and i-propyl peroxy radicals. The experimentally derived propene yields relative to the initial concentration of Cl atoms are (20 ± 4)% at 530 K, (55 ± 11)% at 600 K, and (86 ± 17)% at 670 K at a reaction time of 20 ms. The lower yield of propene at low temperature reflects substantial formation of propyl peroxy radicals, which do not completely decompose on the experimental time scale. In addition, C3H6O isomers methyloxirane, oxetane, acetone, and propanal are detected as minor products. Our measured yields of oxetane and methyloxirane, which are coproducts of OH radicals, suggest a revision of the OH formation pathways in models of low-temperature propane oxidation. The experimental results are modeled and interpreted using a multiscale informatics approach, presented in detail in a separate publication (Burke, M. P.; Goldsmith, C. F.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Welz, O.; Huang H.; Antonov I. O.; Savee J. D.; Osborn D. L.; Zádor, J.; Taatjes, C. A.; Sheps, L. Multiscale Informatics for Low-Temperature Propane Oxidation: Further Complexities in Studies of Complex Reactions. J. Phys. Chem A. 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpca.5b01003). Additionally, we found that the model predicts the time profiles and yields of the experimentally observed primary products well, and shows satisfactory agreement for products

  11. New insights into low-temperature oxidation of propane from synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry and multi-scale informatics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Oliver; Burke, Michael P.; Antonov, Ivan O.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Savee, John David; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Sheps, Leonid

    2015-04-10

    We studied low-temperature propane oxidation at P = 4 Torr and T = 530, 600, and 670 K by time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS), which probes the reactants, intermediates, and products with isomeric selectivity using tunable synchrotron vacuum UV ionizing radiation. The oxidation is initiated by pulsed laser photolysis of oxalyl chloride, (COCl)2, at 248 nm, which rapidly generates a ~1:1 mixture of 1-propyl (n-propyl) and 2-propyl (i-propyl) radicals via the fast Cl + propane reaction. At all three temperatures, the major stable product species is propene, formed in the propyl + O2 reactions by direct HO2 elimination from both n- and i-propyl peroxy radicals. The experimentally derived propene yields relative to the initial concentration of Cl atoms are (20 ± 4)% at 530 K, (55 ± 11)% at 600 K, and (86 ± 17)% at 670 K at a reaction time of 20 ms. The lower yield of propene at low temperature reflects substantial formation of propyl peroxy radicals, which do not completely decompose on the experimental time scale. In addition, C3H6O isomers methyloxirane, oxetane, acetone, and propanal are detected as minor products. Our measured yields of oxetane and methyloxirane, which are coproducts of OH radicals, suggest a revision of the OH formation pathways in models of low-temperature propane oxidation. The experimental results are modeled and interpreted using a multiscale informatics approach, presented in detail in a separate publication (Burke, M. P.; Goldsmith, C. F.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Welz, O.; Huang H.; Antonov I. O.; Savee J. D.; Osborn D. L.; Zádor, J.; Taatjes, C. A.; Sheps, L. Multiscale Informatics for Low-Temperature Propane Oxidation: Further Complexities in Studies of Complex Reactions. J. Phys. Chem A. 2015, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpca.5b01003). Additionally, we found that the model predicts the time profiles and yields of the experimentally observed primary products well

  12. New Insights into Low-Temperature Oxidation of Propane from Synchrotron Photoionization Mass Spectrometry and Multi-Scale Informatics Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Oliver; Burke, Michael P.; Antonov, Ivan O.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Sheps, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the low-temperature oxidation of propane at 4 Torr and temperatures of 530, 600, and 670 K. The oxidation is initiated by pulsed laser photolysis of oxalyl chloride, (COCl)2, at 248 nm, which rapidly generates a ~1:1 mixture of 1-propyl (n-propyl) and 2-propyl (i-propyl) radicals via the fast Cl + propane reaction. Reactants, intermediates and products are probed with isomeric selectivity by time-resolved multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry (MPIMS) with tunable synchrotron vacuum UV radiation as the ionization source. At all three temperatures, the major stable product species is propene, formed in the C3H7 + O2 reactions by direct HO2-elimination from both n- and i-propyl peroxy radicals. The experimentally derived propene yields relative to the initial concentration of Cl atoms are (20 ± 4)% at 530 K, (55 ± 11)% at 600 K, and (86 ± 17)% at 670 K at a reaction time of 20 ms. The lower yield of propene at low temperature reflects substantial formation of propyl peroxy radicals, which do not completely decompose on the experimental time scale. In addition, we detect the C3H6O isomers methyloxirane, oxetane, acetone and propanal as minor products. Our measured yields of oxetane and methyloxirane, which are co-products of OH radicals, suggest a revision of the OH formation pathways in models of low-temperature propane oxidation. The experimental results are modeled and interpreted using a multi-scale informatics approach that is presented in detail in a separate publication (Burke, M. P.; Goldsmith, C. F.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Welz, O.; Huang H.; Antonov I. O.; Savee J. D.; Osborn D. L.; Zádor, J.; Taatjes, C. A.; Sheps, L., Multi-Scale Informatics for Low-Temperature Propane Oxidation: Further Complexities in Studies of Complex Rections, submitted, 2015). The model predicts the time profiles and yields of the experimentally observed primary products well, and shows satisfactory agreement for products formed mostly via secondary radical

  13. Electrochemical promotion of propane oxidation on Pt deposited on a dense β″-Al2O3 ceramic Ag(+) conductor.

    PubMed

    Tsampas, Mihalis N; Kambolis, Anastasios; Obeid, Emil; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Sapountzi, Foteini M; Vernoux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A new kind of electrochemical catalyst based on a Pt porous catalyst film deposited on a β″-Al2O3 ceramic Ag(+) conductor was developed and evaluated during propane oxidation. It was observed that, upon anodic polarization, the rate of propane combustion was significantly electropromoted up to 400%. Moreover, for the first time, exponential increase of the catalytic rate was evidenced during galvanostatic transient experiment in excellent agreement with EPOC equation.

  14. Electrochemical promotion of propane oxidation on Pt deposited on a dense β″-Al2O3 ceramic Ag+ conductor

    PubMed Central

    Tsampas, Mihalis N.; Kambolis, Anastasios; Obeid, Emil; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Sapountzi, Foteini M.; Vernoux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A new kind of electrochemical catalyst based on a Pt porous catalyst film deposited on a β″-Al2O3 ceramic Ag+ conductor was developed and evaluated during propane oxidation. It was observed that, upon anodic polarization, the rate of propane combustion was significantly electropromoted up to 400%. Moreover, for the first time, exponential increase of the catalytic rate was evidenced during galvanostatic transient experiment in excellent agreement with EPOC equation. PMID:24790942

  15. In situ UV-visible assessment of extent of reduction during oxidation reactions on oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Argyle, Morris D; Chen, Kaidong; Resini, Carlo; Krebs, Catherine; Bell, Alexis T; Iglesia, Enrique

    2003-08-21

    The extent of reduction of active centers during oxidative alkane dehydrogenation on VOx/Al2O3 was measured from pre-edge UV-visible spectral features and found to increase with increasing VOx domain size and propane/O2 ratio.

  16. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Guliants, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  17. Reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohols for energy storage

    DOE PAGES

    Bonitatibus, Jr., Peter J.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Doherty, Mark D.; ...

    2015-01-14

    Reversibility of a dehydrogenation/hydrogenation catalytic reaction has been an elusive target for homogeneous catalysis. In this paper, reversible acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols and diols on iron pincer complexes and reversible oxidative dehydrogenation of primary alcohols/reduction of aldehydes with separate transfer of protons and electrons on iridium complexes are shown. Finally, this reactivity suggests a strategy for the development of reversible fuel cell electrocatalysts for partial oxidation (dehydrogenation) of hydroxyl-containing fuels.

  18. Reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohols for energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Bonitatibus, Peter J.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Doherty, Mark D.; Siclovan, Oltea; Jones, William D.; Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2015-01-01

    Reversibility of a dehydrogenation/hydrogenation catalytic reaction has been an elusive target for homogeneous catalysis. In this report, reversible acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols and diols on iron pincer complexes and reversible oxidative dehydrogenation of primary alcohols/reduction of aldehydes with separate transfer of protons and electrons on iridium complexes are shown. This reactivity suggests a strategy for the development of reversible fuel cell electrocatalysts for partial oxidation (dehydrogenation) of hydroxyl-containing fuels. PMID:25588879

  19. Dispersion-precipitation synthesis of highly active nanosized Co3O4 for catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide and propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun; You, Zhixiong

    2017-07-01

    Nanosized Co3O4 catalyst was prepared through a dispersion-precipitation method involving a reaction between wet cobalt hydroxide and acetic acid, which forms a colloidal dispersion, and subsequent dilution, which destabilizes and precipitates the colloidal particles. The catalyst had a particle size of 5-15 nm and a specific surface area of 82 m2/g. Compared with the analogue prepared by conventional alkali-induced precipitation method, the nanosized catalyst was more reducible and contained a larger amount of active surface oxygen species, as revealed by experiments using temperature-programmed reduction in hydrogen and temperature-programmed desorption of oxygen. The oxygen species could contribute to the observed higher activity in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide and propane. In addition, a kinetics study revealed that the apparent activation energies for carbon monoxide and propane oxidation over the catalyst were 34.0 and 49.5 kJ/mol, respectively, much lower than those over the analogue (54.7 and 71.1 kJ/mol, respectively). Furthermore, a long-term test (76 h) showed that the nanosized catalyst is highly stable.

  20. Kinetics of Hydrogen Oxidation Downstream of Lean Propane and Hydrogen Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fine, Burton

    1961-01-01

    The decay of hydrogen was measured downstream of lean, flat, premixed hydrogen and propane-air flames seated on cooled porous burners. Experimental variables included temperature, pressure, initial equivalence ratio and diluent. Sampling of burned gas was done through uncooled quartz orifice probes, and the analysis was based on gas chromatography. An approximate treatment of the data in which diffusion was neglected led to the following rate expression for the zone downstream of hydrogen flames d[H (sub 2)] divided by (d times t) equals 1.7 times 10 (sup 10) [H (sub 2)] (sup 3) divided by (sub 2) [O (sub 2)]e (sup (-8100 divided by RT)) moles per liters per second. On the basis of a rate expression of this form, the specific rate constant for the reaction downstream of hydrogen flames was about three times as great as that determined downstream of propane flames. This result was explained on the basis of the existence of a steady state between hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the burned gas downstream of propane flames.

  1. Biodegradation of the gasoline oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether, ethyl tert-butyl ether, and tert-amyl methyl ether by propane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Steffan, R J; McClay, K; Vainberg, S; Condee, C W; Zhang, D

    1997-11-01

    Several propane-oxidizing bacteria were tested for their ability to degrade gasoline oxygenates, including methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME). Both a laboratory strain and natural isolates were able to degrade each compound after growth on propane. When propane-grown strain ENV425 was incubated with 20 mg of uniformly labeled [14C]MTBE per liter, the strain converted > 60% of the added MTBE to 14CO2 in < 30 h. The initial oxidation of MTBE and ETBE resulted in the production of nearly stoichiometric amounts of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), while the initial oxidation of TAME resulted in the production of tert-amyl alcohol. The methoxy methyl group of MTBE was oxidized to formaldehyde and ultimately to CO2. TBA was further oxidized to 2-methyl-2-hydroxy-1-propanol and then 2-hydroxy isobutyric acid; however, neither of these degradation products was an effective growth substrate for the propane oxidizers. Analysis of cell extracts of ENV425 and experiments with enzyme inhibitors implicated a soluble P-450 enzyme in the oxidation of both MTBE and TBA. MTBE was oxidized to TBA by camphor-grown Pseudomonas putida CAM, which produces the well-characterized P-450cam, but not by Rhodococcus rhodochrous 116, which produces two P-450 enzymes. Rates of MTBE degradation by propane-oxidizing strains ranged from 3.9 to 9.2 nmol/min/mg of cell protein at 28 degrees C, whereas TBA was oxidized at a rate of only 1.8 to 2.4 nmol/min/mg of cell protein at the same temperature.

  2. Identifying different types of catalysts for CO2 reduction by ethane through dry reforming and oxidative dehydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Marc D. Porosoff; Chen, Jingguang G.; Myint, Myat Noe Zin; ...

    2015-11-10

    In this study, the recent shale gas boom combined with the requirement to reduce atmospheric CO2 have created an opportunity for using both raw materials (shale gas and CO2) in a single process. Shale gas is primarily made up of methane, but ethane comprises about 10 % and reserves are underutilized. Two routes have been investigated by combining ethane decomposition with CO2 reduction to produce products of higher value. The first reaction is ethane dry reforming which produces synthesis gas (CO+H2). The second route is oxidative dehydrogenation which produces ethylene using CO2 as a soft oxidant. The results of thismore » study indicate that the Pt/CeO2 catalyst shows promise for the production of synthesis gas, while Mo2C-based materials preserve the C—C bond of ethane to produce ethylene. These findings are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) characterization of the catalysts under in situ reaction conditions.« less

  3. Identifying different types of catalysts for CO2 reduction by ethane through dry reforming and oxidative dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Marc D. Porosoff; Chen, Jingguang G.; Myint, Myat Noe Zin; Kattel, Shyam; Xie, Zhenhua; Gomez, Elaine; Liu, Ping

    2015-11-10

    In this study, the recent shale gas boom combined with the requirement to reduce atmospheric CO2 have created an opportunity for using both raw materials (shale gas and CO2) in a single process. Shale gas is primarily made up of methane, but ethane comprises about 10 % and reserves are underutilized. Two routes have been investigated by combining ethane decomposition with CO2 reduction to produce products of higher value. The first reaction is ethane dry reforming which produces synthesis gas (CO+H2). The second route is oxidative dehydrogenation which produces ethylene using CO2 as a soft oxidant. The results of this study indicate that the Pt/CeO2 catalyst shows promise for the production of synthesis gas, while Mo2C-based materials preserve the C—C bond of ethane to produce ethylene. These findings are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) characterization of the catalysts under in situ reaction conditions.

  4. Effects of CeO2 Support Facets on VOx/CeO2 Catalysts in Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhehao; Gao, Feng; Kovarik, Libor; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2014-05-13

    CeO2 supports with dominating facets, i.e., low index (100), (110) and (111) facets, are prepared. The facet effects on the structure and catalytic performance of supported vanadium oxide catalysts are investigated using oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol as a model reaction. In the presence of mixed facets, Infrared and Raman characterizations demonstrate that surface vanadia species preferentially deposit on CeO2 (100) facets, presumably because of its higher surface energy. At the same surface vanadium densities, VOx species on (100) facets show better dispersion, followed by (110) and (111) facets. The VOx species on CeO2 nanorods with (110) and (100) facets display higher activity and lower apparent activation energies compared to that on CeO2 nanopolyhedras with dominating (111) facets and CeO2 nanocubes with dominating (100) facets. The higher activity for VOx/CeO2(110) might be related to the more abundant oxygen vacancies present on the (110) facets, evidenced from Raman spectroscopic measurements.

  5. Cu-catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling: A versatile strategy for C-C bond formations via the oxidative activation of sp3 C-H bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiping; Bohle, D. Scott; Li, Chao-Jun

    2006-06-01

    Cu-catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) methodologies were developed based on the oxidative activation of sp3 C-H bonds adjacent to a nitrogen atom. Various sp, sp2, and sp3 C-H bonds of pronucleophiles were used in the Cu-catalyzed CDC reactions. Based on these results, the mechanisms of the CDC reactions also are discussed. C-H activation | catalysis | Baylis-Hillman reaction | Mannich reaction | Friedel-Crafts reaction

  6. Cu-catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling: A versatile strategy for C–C bond formations via the oxidative activation of sp3 C–H bonds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiping; Bohle, D. Scott; Li, Chao-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Cu-catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) methodologies were developed based on the oxidative activation of sp3 C–H bonds adjacent to a nitrogen atom. Various sp, sp2, and sp3 C–H bonds of pronucleophiles were used in the Cu-catalyzed CDC reactions. Based on these results, the mechanisms of the CDC reactions also are discussed. PMID:16754869

  7. Silver-Free Direct Synthesis of Alkynylphosphine Oxides via spC-H/P(O)-H Dehydrogenative Coupling Catalyzed by Palladium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qiu; Chen, Tieqiao; Zhang, Ji-Shu; Han, Li-Biao

    2017-09-01

    A silver-free palladium-catalyzed dehydrogenative phosphorylation of terminal alkynes with hydrogen phosphine oxides has been developed. Both aromatic and aliphatic terminal alkynes including those bearing functional groups coupled readily with hydrogen phosphine oxides, producing the corresponding value-added alkynylphosphine oxides in good to excellent yields. This reaction could be easily conducted at gram scales (10 mmol) without any decrease of the reaction efficiency, showing highly potential synthetic value in organic synthesis. A plausible Pd(0)/Pd(II) mechanism is proposed.

  8. Effect of Sodium on the Catalytic Properties of VOx/CeO2 Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhehao; Sun, Junming; Gao, Feng; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2013-03-21

    A series of VOx/CeO2 catalysts with various sodium loadings (Na/V ratio from 0 to 1) has been studied for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of methanol. The effect of sodium on the surface structure, redox properties, and surface acidity/basicity of VOx/CeO2 was investigated using hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), Raman spectroscopy, and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform spectroscopy (DRIFT). The experimental results indicate that the effect of sodium on VOx/CeO2 is highly dependent on the Na/V ratio. At a low Na/V ratio (Na/V<0.25), sodium addition only slightly decreases the redox properties of VOx/CeO2 and has little effect on its activity and selectivity to formaldehyde, even though the Brönsted acidity is almost completely eliminated at a Na/V ratio of 0.25. At a high Na/V ratio (Na/V>0.25), sodium addition greatly alters the nature of the active sites by V-O-Ce bond cleavage and V-O-Na bond formation, leading to significantly reduced activity of the VOx/CeO2 catalysts. At Na/V>0.25, the selectivity to formaldehyde also decreases with increasing Na/V ratio due to: (1) the suppressed reducibility of VOx, and (2) increased basicity leading to increased CO2.

  9. Cellular consequences of oxidative stress in riboflavin responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency patient fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Nanna; Corydon, Thomas J; Gregersen, Niels; Olsen, Rikke K J

    2014-08-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are central to the molecular pathology of many human diseases. Riboflavin responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (RR-MADD) is in most cases caused by variations in the gene coding for electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). Currently, patients with RR-MADD are treated with high doses of riboflavin resulting in improvements of the clinical and biochemical profiles. However, in our recent studies of RR-MADD, we have shown that riboflavin treatment cannot fully correct the molecular defect in patient cells producing increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the current study, we aim to elucidate the cellular consequences of increased ROS by studying the cellular ROS adaption systems including antioxidant system, mitochondrial dynamics and metabolic reprogramming. We have included fibroblasts from six unrelated RR-MADD patients and two control fibroblasts cultivated under supplemented and depleted riboflavin conditions and with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) treatment. We demonstrated inhibition of mitochondrial fusion with increased fractionation and mitophagy in the patient fibroblasts. Furthermore, we indicated a shift in the energy metabolism by decreased protein levels of SIRT3 and decreased expression of fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes in the patient fibroblasts. Finally, we showed that CoQ10 treatment has a positive effect on the mitochondrial dynamic in the patient fibroblasts, indicated by increased mitochondrial fusion marker and reduced mitophagy. In conclusion, our results indicate that RR-MADD patient fibroblasts suffer from a general mitochondria dysfunction, probably initiated as a rescue mechanism for the patient cells to escape apoptosis as a result of the oxidative stress. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Iron(II) Complexes with Scorpiand-Like Macrocyclic Polyamines: Kinetico-Mechanistic Aspects of Complex Formation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Coordinated Amines.

    PubMed

    Clares, M Paz; Acosta-Rueda, Laura; Castillo, Carmen E; Blasco, Salvador; Jiménez, Hermas R; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G

    2017-04-17

    The Fe(II) coordination chemistry of a pyridinophane tren-derived scorpiand type ligand containing a pyridine ring in the pendant arm is explored by potentiometry, X-ray, NMR, and kinetics methods. Equilibrium studies in water show the formation of a stable [FeL](2+) complex that converts to monoprotonated and monohydroxylated species when the pH is changed. A [Fe(H-2L)](2+) complex containing an hexacoordinated dehydrogenated ligand has been isolated, and its crystal structure shows the formation of an imine bond involving the aliphatic nitrogen of the pendant arm. This complex is low spin Fe(II) both in the solid state and in solution, as revealed by the Fe-N bond lengths and by the NMR spectra, respectively. The formation rate of [Fe(H-2L)](2+) in aqueous solutions containing Fe(2+) and L (1:1 molar ratio) is strongly dependent on the pH, the process being completed in times that range from months in acid solutions to hours in basic conditions. However, detailed kinetic studies show that those differences are caused, at least in part, by the effect of pH on the rate of formation of the unoxidized [FeL](2+) complex. In this sense, the protonation of the donor atoms in the pendant arm of the scorpiand ligand leads to the formation of protonated species resistant to oxidative dehydrogenation. Complementary studies in acetonitrile solution indicate that the initial stage in the oxidative dehydrogenation process is the oxidation of the starting complex to form a [FeL](3+) complex, which then undergoes disproportionation into [Fe(H-2L)](2+) and [FeL](2+). Experiments starting with Fe(III) have allowed us to determine that disproportionation occurs with first order kinetics both in water and acetonitrile solutions. However, whereas a significant acceleration is observed in water when the pH is increased, no effect of the addition of acid or base on the rate of disproportionation is observed in acetonitrile. Oxidative dehydrogenation of the Fe(II) complex formed in

  11. Features of propane conversion in the presence of SmVO3 and SmVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markova, E. B.; Lyadov, A. S.; Kurilkin, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Features of propane conversion in the presence of samarium vanadite and samarium vanadate, both produced via solid-phase synthesis, are studied. It is shown that SmVO3 catalyzes mainly the propane cracking process to form methane and ethylene, while SmVO4 equally accelerates both cracking and the dehydrogenation of propane. Based on the results from catalytic experiments, energies of activation are calculated for the thermal cracking of propane (104 kJ/mol) and the conversion of propane in the presence of SmVO3 (39 kJ/mol) and SmVO4 (42 kJ/mol). The thermal stability of SmVO4 in a hydrogen atmosphere is studied via temperature-programmed reduction, while SmVO3 stability in an oxidizing environment is studied by DTA. Energies of activation for the reduction of SmVO4 (75 kJ/mol) and the oxidation of SmVO3 (244 kJ/mol) are calculated using the Kissinger method.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and testing of a new V2O5/Al2O3-MgO catalyst for butane dehydrogenation and limonene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Strassberger, Zea; Ramos-Fernandez, Enrique V; Boonstra, Agnes; Jorna, Remy; Tanase, Stefania; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2013-04-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of new V2O5/Al2O3-MgO catalysts and their application in oxidative dehydrogenation and epoxidation reactions. The materials were prepared by wet impregnation under excess acid conditions. Anchoring of the desired species on the support occurs via an exchange reaction between the vanadium complex and surface hydroxyl groups. The IR and UV-Vis spectra of these catalysts indicate the presence of monomeric vanadium species at 5 wt% V2O5 loading, along with small amounts of polymeric species at 5 and 10 wt% V2O5 loadings. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy reveals the presence of ferromagnetic VO(2+) dimers following calcination at 773 K. The catalysts were then tested in two reactions, namely the gas phase oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane under flow conditions at 773 K and the liquid phase epoxidation of limonene with H2O2. The dehydrogenation reaction gave butenes and 1,3-butadiene in moderate selectivity at 8-10% conversion. The epoxidation of limonene was less successful, giving 50-70% selectivity to the 1,2-epoxide at 10-20% conversion.

  13. Characterization of the Initial Reactions during the Cometabolic Oxidation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by Propane-Grown Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christy A.; O'Reilly, Kirk T.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The initial reactions in the cometabolic oxidation of the gasoline oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), by Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 have been characterized. Two products, tert-butyl formate (TBF) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), rapidly accumulated extracellularly when propane-grown cells were incubated with MTBE. Lower rates of TBF and TBA production from MTBE were also observed with cells grown on 1- or 2-propanol, while neither product was generated from MTBE by cells grown on casein-yeast extract-dextrose broth. Kinetic studies with propane-grown cells demonstrated that TBF is the dominant (≥80%) initial product of MTBE oxidation and that TBA accumulates from further biotic and abiotic hydrolysis of TBF. Our results suggest that the biotic hydrolysis of TBF is catalyzed by a heat-stable esterase with activity toward several other tert-butyl esters. Propane-grown cells also oxidized TBA, but no further oxidation products were detected. Like the oxidation of MTBE, TBA oxidation was fully inhibited by acetylene, an inactivator of short-chain alkane monooxygenase in M. vaccae JOB5. Oxidation of both MTBE and TBA was also inhibited by propane (Ki = 3.3 to 4.4 μM). Values for Ks of 1.36 and 1.18 mM and for Vmax of 24.4 and 10.4 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 were derived for MTBE and TBA, respectively. We conclude that the initial steps in the pathway of MTBE oxidation by M. vaccae JOB5 involve two reactions catalyzed by the same monooxygenase (MTBE and TBA oxidation) that are temporally separated by an esterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of TBF to TBA. These results that suggest the initial reactions in MTBE oxidation by M. vaccae JOB5 are the same as those that we have previously characterized in gaseous alkane-utilizing fungi. PMID:12570997

  14. Temperature programmed oxidation of coked H-gallosilicate (MFI) propane aromatization catalyst: Influence of catalyst composition and pretreatment parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, V.R.; Devadas, P.; Sansare, S.D.; Guisnet, M.

    1997-03-01

    Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) of H-gallosilicate (MFI) coked in the propane aromatization at 550{degrees}C for a time-on-stream of 7-8 h has been investigated by measuring point to point the consumption of oxygen and also the formation of the both CO and CO{sub 2} (by GC analysis using a 16-loop gas sampling valve) during the TPO run from 50{degrees} to 900{degrees}C at a linear heating rate of 20{degrees}C min{sup -1} in a flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup -1}) of a O{sub 2}-He mixture (8.0 mol% O{sub 2}). The SiGa and Na/Ga ratios, calcination temperature, and hydrothermal pretreatments of the zeolite and also the presence of binder (silica or kaolin) in the catalyst have a strong influence on the TPO of coked zeolite. The influence is attributed to changes in the zeolite properties (viz., zeolitic acidity or framework Ga and non-GW Ga-oxide species), which affect the coke oxidation both directly and/or indirectly, by controlling the nature of coke formed during the coking process. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Multi-Scale Informatics for Low-Temperature Propane Oxidation: Further Complexities in Studies of Complex Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Michael P.; Goldsmith, C. Franklin; Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Welz, Oliver; Huang, Haifeng; Antonov, Ivan O.; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Zador, Judit; Taatjes, Craig A.; Sheps, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a multi-scale approach (Burke, M. P.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B. Proc. Combust. Inst. 2013, 34, 547–555.) to kinetic model formulation that directly incorporates elementary kinetic theories as a means to provide reliable, physics-based extrapolation to unexplored conditions. Here, we extend and generalize the multi-scale modeling strategy to treat systems of considerable complexity – involving multi-well reactions, potentially missing reactions, non-statistical product branching ratios, and non-Boltzmann (i.e. non-thermal) reactant distributions. The methodology is demonstrated here for a subsystem of low-temperature propane oxidation, as a representative system for low-temperature fuel oxidation. A multi-scale model is assembled and informed by a wide variety of targets that include ab initio calculations of molecular properties, rate constant measurements of isolated reactions, and complex systems measurements. Active model parameters are chosen to accommodate both “parametric” and “structural” uncertainties. Theoretical parameters (e.g. barrier heights) are included as active model parameters to account for parametric uncertainties in the theoretical treatment; experimental parameters (e.g. initial temperatures) are included to account for parametric uncertainties in the physical models of the experiments. RMG software is used to assess potential structural uncertainties due to missing reactions. Additionally, branching ratios among product channels are included as active model parameters to account for structural uncertainties related to difficulties in modeling sequences of multiple chemically activated steps. The approach is demonstrated here for interpreting time-resolved measurements of OH, HO2, n-propyl, i-propyl, propene, oxetane, and methyloxirane from photolysis-initiated low-temperature oxidation of propane at pressures from 4 to 60 Torr and temperatures from 300 to 700 K. In particular, the multi-scale informed

  16. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of chlorine loading effects on Mo/Si:Ti catalysts in oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Ozkan, Umit S

    2005-02-17

    The structural changes induced in a silica-titania mixed-oxide support (1:1 molar ratio) by chlorine addition at different loading levels, their relation to the structural characteristics of supported MoOx species over the support, and their correlation with ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) activity have been examined. The molybdenum and chlorine precursors are incorporated into the Si/Ti support network as it forms during gelation by using a "one-pot" modified sol-gel/coprecipitation technique. In situ X-ray diffraction during calcination shows the Si/Ti 1:1 mixed-oxide support is in a state of nanodispersed anatase titania over amorphous silica. With the addition of molybdenum and chlorine modifier, this anatase feature becomes more pronounced, indicating a decreased dispersion of titania. The effective titania surface area on the chlorine-doped Si:Ti support obtained from 2-propanol temperature-programmed reaction supports this observation. Raman spectra of dehydrated samples point to an enhanced interaction of MoOx species with silica at the expense of titania. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results show that, without forming a molybdenum chloride, the presence of chlorine significantly alters the relative surface concentration of Si vs Ti, the electronic structure of the surface MoOx species, and the oxygen environment around supported MoOx species in the Si/Ti network. Secondary ion mass spectrometry detected the existence of SiCl fragments from the mass spectra, which provides molecular insight into the location of chlorine in Mo/Si:Ti catalysts. The observed increase in ethane ODH selectivity with chlorine modification may be ascribed to the MoOx species sharing more complex ligands with silica and titania with the indirect participation of chlorine. Steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA) is used to to examine the oxygen insertion and exchange mechanisms. The catalysts show very little oxygen exchange with the gas phase in the

  17. Photocatalytic Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling of Alkenes with Alcohols or Azoles without External Oxidant.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong; Niu, Linbin; Song, Chunlan; Li, Yiying; Dou, Bowen; Singh, Atul K; Lei, Aiwen

    2017-01-19

    Direct cross-coupling between alkenes/R-H or alkenes/RXH is a dream reaction, especially without external oxidants. Inputting energy by photocatalysis and employing a cobalt catalyst as a two-electron acceptor, a direct C-H/X-H cross-coupling with H2 evolution has been achieved for C-O and C-N bond formation. A new radical alkenylation using alkene as the redox compound is presented. A wide range of aliphatic alcohols-even long chain alcohols-are tolerated well in this system, providing a new route to multi-substituted enol ether derivatives using simple alkenes. Additionally, this protocol can also be used for N-vinylazole synthesis. Mechanistic insights reveal that the cobalt catalyst oxidizes the photocatalyst to revive the photocatalytic cycle.

  18. The role of CO2 as a soft oxidant for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene over a high-surface-area ceria catalyst

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Nelson, Nicholas; ...

    2015-09-22

    Catalytic performance and the nature of surface adsorbates were investigated for high-surface-area ceria during ethylbenzene oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction using CO2 as a soft oxidant. A template assisted method was used to synthesize the high-surface-area ceria. The interactions between ethylbenzene, styrene and CO2 on the surface of ceria and the role of CO2 for the ethylbenzene ODH reaction have been investigated in detail by using activity test, in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Not only did CO2 as an oxidant favor the higher yield of styrene, but it also inhibited the deposition of coke during the ethylbenzene ODHmore » reaction. Ethylbenzene ODH reaction over ceria followed a two-step pathway: Ethylbenzene is first dehydrogenated to styrene with H2 formed simultaneously, and then CO2 reacts with H2 via the reverse water gas shift. The styrene produced can easily polymerize to form polystyrene, a key intermediate for coke formation. In the absence of CO2, the polystyrene transforms into graphite-like coke at temperatures above 500 °C, which leads to catalyst deactivation. While in the presence of CO2, the coke deposition can be effectively removed via oxidation with CO2.« less

  19. The role of CO2 as a soft oxidant for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene over a high-surface-area ceria catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Nelson, Nicholas; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Overbury, Steven H.

    2015-09-22

    Catalytic performance and the nature of surface adsorbates were investigated for high-surface-area ceria during ethylbenzene oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reaction using CO2 as a soft oxidant. A template assisted method was used to synthesize the high-surface-area ceria. The interactions between ethylbenzene, styrene and CO2 on the surface of ceria and the role of CO2 for the ethylbenzene ODH reaction have been investigated in detail by using activity test, in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Not only did CO2 as an oxidant favor the higher yield of styrene, but it also inhibited the deposition of coke during the ethylbenzene ODH reaction. Ethylbenzene ODH reaction over ceria followed a two-step pathway: Ethylbenzene is first dehydrogenated to styrene with H2 formed simultaneously, and then CO2 reacts with H2 via the reverse water gas shift. The styrene produced can easily polymerize to form polystyrene, a key intermediate for coke formation. In the absence of CO2, the polystyrene transforms into graphite-like coke at temperatures above 500 °C, which leads to catalyst deactivation. While in the presence of CO2, the coke deposition can be effectively removed via oxidation with CO2.

  20. Nanoflake-assembled Al2O3-supported CeO2-ZrO2 as an efficient catalyst for oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tehua; Guan, Xiaolin; Lu, Huiyi; Liu, Zhongwen; Ji, Min

    2017-03-01

    An Al2O3 material assembled by nanoflakes was used to prepare supported CeO2-ZrO2 catalyst via a deposition-precipitation method for oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with CO2. Both unsupported and commercial Al2O3-supported CeO2-ZrO2 were prepared for comparison. It was found that the CeO2-ZrO2/nanoflake-assembled Al2O3 catalyst exhibited the best catalytic activity. The characterization results revealed that the slit-shape pores existing in nanoflake-assembled Al2O3 were responsible for the small particle size and high Ce/Zr surface ratio of supported CeO2-ZrO2 species. The dispersion of Ce1-xZrx(OH)4 precursors onto Al2O3 support surface during the deposition-precipitation process was proposed. The high dispersion and large numbers of surface oxygen vacancies of the CeO2-ZrO2 species on nanoflake-assembled Al2O3 contributed to the excellent catalytic performance in oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with CO2. This kind of special Al2O3 is expected to be a promising support for preparing highly dispersed metal/metal oxide catalysts.

  1. Mg3(VO4)2-MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Hyun; Hong, Ung Gi; Yoo, Yeonshick; Cho, Young-Jin; Lee, Jinsuk; Park, Gle; Chang, Hosik; Song, In Kyu

    2014-11-01

    A series of X-Mg3(VO4)2-MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts with different vanadium content (X = 3.3, 5.3, 7.0, 10.2, and 13.4) were prepared by a single-step citric acid-derived sol-gel method for use in the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane to n-butene and 1,3-butadiene. The effect of vanadium content of X-Mg3(VO4)2-MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts on their physicochemical properties and catalytic activities in the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane was investigated. Successful formation of X-Mg3(VO4)2-MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts was confirmed by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and ICP-AES analyses. The catalytic performance of X-Mg3(VO4)2-MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts strongly depended on vanadium content. All the X-Mg3(VO4)2-MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts showed a stable catalytic performance without catalyst deactivation during the reaction. Among the catalysts tested, 7.0-Mg3(VO4)2-MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalyst showed the best catalytic performance in terms of yield for total dehydrogenation products (TDP, n-butene and 1,3-butadiene). TPRO (temperature-programmed reoxidation) experiments were carried out to measure the oxygen capacity of the catalyst. Experimental results revealed that oxygen capacity of the catalyst was closely related to the catalytic performance. Yield for TDP increased with increasing oxygen capacity of the catalyst.

  2. Oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane over magnesium vanadate nano-catalysts supported on magnesia-zirconia: effect of vanadium content.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Hong, Ung Gi; Yoo, Yeonshick; Cho, Young-Jin; Lee, Jinsuk; Chang, Hosik; Song, In Kyu

    2013-12-01

    Magnesia-zirconia (MgO-ZrO2) support was prepared by a sol-gel method, and magnesium vanadate nano-catalysts supported on magnesia-zirconia (X-Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2) were then prepared by a wet impregnation method with a variation of vanadium content (X = 6.6, 9.9, 12.8, 15.2, and 19.1 wt%). X-Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts were applied to the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane to n-butene and 1,3-butadiene. The formation of X-Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts was well confirmed by XRD, XPS, and ICP-AES analyses. 15.2-Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2 and 19.1-Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2 catalysts experienced a catalyst deactivation, while the other Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2 catalysts showed a stable catalytic performance during the whole reaction time. The effect of oxygen property of X-Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2 nano-catalysts on the catalytic performance in the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane was investigated. Experimental results revealed that oxygen capacity of the catalyst was closely related to the catalytic performance, while oxygen mobility of the catalyst played an important role in the catalyst stability. Among the catalysts tested, 12.8-Mg3(VO4)2/MgO-ZrO2 catalyst showed the best catalytic performance in terms of yield for TDP (total dehydrogenation products).

  3. Silane-propane ignitor/burner

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Richard W.; Skinner, Dewey F.; Thorsness, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

  4. Silane-propane ignitor/burner

    DOEpatents

    Hill, R.W.; Skinner, D.F. Jr.; Thorsness, C.B.

    1983-05-26

    A silane propane burner for an underground coal gasification process which is used to ignite the coal and to controllably retract the injection point by cutting the injection pipe. A narrow tube with a burner tip is positioned in the injection pipe through which an oxidant (oxygen or air) is flowed. A charge of silane followed by a supply of fuel, such as propane, is flowed through the tube. The silane spontaneously ignites on contact with oxygen and burns the propane fuel.

  5. Catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation process

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Huff, Marylin

    2002-01-01

    A process for the production of a mono-olefin from a gaseous paraffinic hydrocarbon having at least two carbon atoms or mixtures thereof comprising reacting said hydrocarbons and molecular oxygen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. The catalyst consist essentially of platinum supported on alumina or zirconia monolith, preferably zirconia and more preferably in the absence of palladium, rhodium and gold.

  6. Mesoporous xEr2O3·CoTiO3 composite oxide catalysts for low temperature dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene using CO2 as a soft oxidant

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jihua; ...

    2016-01-01

    A series of mesoporous xEr2O3·CoTiO3 composite oxide catalysts have been prepared using template method and tested as a new type of catalyst for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene by using CO2 as a soft oxidant. Among the catalysts tested, the 0.25Er2O3 CoTiO3 sample with a ratio of 1:4:4 content and calcined at 600 oC exhibited the highest ethylbenzene conversion (58%) and remarkable styrene selectivity (95%) at low temperature (450 °C).

  7. Effect of varying the combustion parameters on the emissions of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases from propane-fueled vehicles.

    PubMed

    Roberge, B

    2000-05-01

    Propane-fueled forklifts are one source of carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of workplace air. The previous study carried out by the Quebec Occupational Health and Safety Research Institute dealt with worker exposure to CO during forklift use in buildings. It recommends that exhaust gas emissions be kept below a 1 percent concentration. However, this control has not produced a significant reduction in worker exposure to CO, when factors (ventilation, type of work tasks, and management of vehicle fleet) specific to companies are taken into account. Consequently, a reduction in CO emissions below the threshold of 0.3 percent should be considered. The experience acquired with propane-fueled ice resurfacers can be used to determine the effect of combustion parameters on exhaust gas emissions. It is known that a reduction in CO emissions from ice resurfacers resulted in the appearance of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and eventually in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) poisoning. Few publications present NOx results in relation to the CO measured in the exhaust gases of propane-fueled vehicles. The objective of this study is to define the level to which CO emissions can be reduced without increasing NOx concentrations. This real-situation study quantified the CO, NO, and NOx in the exhaust gases of a fleet of propane-fueled forklifts in relation to the mixture ratio. The results show the impact of the motor speed and mixture ratio on the CO, NO, and NO2 concentrations. They confirm an increase in NOx concentrations when CO concentrations are reduced. They also show that proper maintenance of forklifts combined with optimal adjustments can reduce CO and NOx emissions. The study proposes a compromise between CO and NOx emissions by taking into account worker health and safety as well as vehicle performance. Monitoring must be done to control air quality in work areas and worker exposure to CO and NO2. A forklift preventive maintenance program and general building ventilation are the favored

  8. Process for para-ethyltoluene dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.C.

    1986-06-03

    A process is described of dehydrogenating para-ethyltoluene to selectively form para-methylstyrene comprising contacting to para-ethyltoluene under dehydrogenation reaction conditions with a catalyst composition comprising: (a) from about 30% to 60% by weight of iron oxide, calculated as ferric oxide; (b) from about 13% to 48% by weight of a potassium compound, calculated as potassium oxide; and (c) from about 0% to 5% by weight of a chromium compound, calculated as chromic oxide. The improvement is described comprising dehydrogenating the para-ethyltoluene with a catalyst composition comprising, in addition to the components (a), (b) and (c), a modifying component (d) capable of rendering the para-methylstyrene-containing dehydrogenation reaction effluent especially resistant to the subsequent formation of popcorn polymers when the dehydrogenation of para-ethyltoluene is conducted over the modified catalyst, the modifying component (d) being a bismuth compound present to the extent of from about 1% to 20% by weight of the catalyst composition, calculated as bismuth trioxide.

  9. Low Temperature Propane Oxidation over Co3O4 based Nano-array Catalysts. Ni Dopant Effect, Reaction Mechanism and Structural Stability

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Zheng; Wu, Zili; Gao, Puxian; ...

    2015-06-09

    Low temperature propane oxidation has been achieved by Co3O4-based nano-array catalysts featuring low catalytic materials loading. The Ni doping into the Co3O4 lattice has led to enhanced reaction kinetics at low temperature by promoting the surface lattice oxygen activity. In situ DRIFTS investigation in tandem with isotopic oxygen exchange reveals that the propane oxidation proceeds via Mars-van Krevelen mechanism where surface lattice oxygen acts as the active site whereas O2 in the reaction feed does not directly participate in CO2 formation. The Ni doping promotes the formation of less stable carbonates on the surface to facilitate the CO2 desorption. Themore » thermal stability of Ni doped Co3O4 decreases with increased Ni concentration while catalytic activity increases. A balance between enhanced activity and compromised thermal stability shall be considered in the Ni doped Co3O4 nano-array catalysts for low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. This study provides useful and timely guidance for rational catalyst design toward low temperature catalytic oxidation.« less

  10. Low Temperature Propane Oxidation over Co3O4 based Nano-array Catalysts. Ni Dopant Effect, Reaction Mechanism and Structural Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Zheng; Wu, Zili; Gao, Puxian; Song, Wenqiao; Xiao, Wen; Guo, Yanbing; Ding, Jun; Suib, Steven L.; Gao, Pu-Xian

    2015-06-09

    Low temperature propane oxidation has been achieved by Co3O4-based nano-array catalysts featuring low catalytic materials loading. The Ni doping into the Co3O4 lattice has led to enhanced reaction kinetics at low temperature by promoting the surface lattice oxygen activity. In situ DRIFTS investigation in tandem with isotopic oxygen exchange reveals that the propane oxidation proceeds via Mars-van Krevelen mechanism where surface lattice oxygen acts as the active site whereas O2 in the reaction feed does not directly participate in CO2 formation. The Ni doping promotes the formation of less stable carbonates on the surface to facilitate the CO2 desorption. The thermal stability of Ni doped Co3O4 decreases with increased Ni concentration while catalytic activity increases. A balance between enhanced activity and compromised thermal stability shall be considered in the Ni doped Co3O4 nano-array catalysts for low temperature hydrocarbon oxidation. This study provides useful and timely guidance for rational catalyst design toward low temperature catalytic oxidation.

  11. Catalytic coatings on steel for low-temperature propane prereforming to solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Pierre; Ansart, Florence

    2009-08-15

    Catalyst layers (4-20 microm) of rhodium (1 wt%) supported on alumina, titania, and ceria-zirconia (Ce(0.5)Zr(0.5)O(2)) were coated on stainless-steel corrugated sheets by dip-coating in very stable colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in water. Catalytic performances were studied for low-temperature (< or = 500 degrees C) steam reforming of propane at a steam to carbon ratio equal to 3 and low contact time (approximately 0.01 s). The best catalytic activity for propane steam reforming was observed for titania and ceria-zirconia supports for which propane conversion started at 250 degrees C and was more than three times better at 350 degrees C than conversion measured on alumina catalyst. For all catalysts a first-order kinetics was found with respect to propane at 500 degrees C. Addition of PEG 2000 in titania and ceria-zirconia sols eliminated the film cracking observed without additive with these supports. Besides, the PEG addition strongly expanded the porosity of the layers, so that full catalytic efficiency was maintained when the thickness of the ceria-zirconia and titania films was increased.

  12. Synergy between hexavalent chromium ions and TiO2 nanoparticles inside TUD-1 in the photocatalytic oxidation of propane, a spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdy, Mohamed S.

    2016-02-01

    Siliceous TUD-1 mesoporous material was bi-functionalized by titanium dioxide nanoparticles and hexavalent chromium ions. The synthesis was carried out by one-pot procedure based on sol-gel technique. The photocatalytic performance of the prepared material was evaluated in the oxidation of propane under the illumination of ultraviolet light (wavelength = 360 nm) and monitored by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the prepared material exhibited an extra-ordinary activity than the reference samples that contain either hexavalent chromium ions or titanium dioxide nanoparticles only, confirming the true synergy between hexavalent chromium and tetravalent titanium ions of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

  13. Structures, Mechanisms, and Kinetics of Ammoxidation and Selective Oxidation of Propane Over the M2 Phase of MoVNbTeO Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, William A.; Liu, Lianchi; Mueller, Jonathan E.; Pudar, Sanja; Nielsen, Robert J.

    2011-05-04

    We report here first-principles-based predictions of the structures, mechanisms, and activation barriers for propane activation by the M2 phase of the MoVNbTeO multi-metal oxide catalysts capable of the direct conversion of propane to acrylonitrile. Our approach is to combine extensive quantum mechanical (QM) calculations to establish the mechanisms for idealized representations of the surfaces for these catalytic systems and then to modify the parameters in the ReaxFF reactive force field for molecular dynamics (MD) calculations to describe accurately the activation barriers and reaction mechanisms of the chemical reactions over complex mixed metal oxides. The parameters for ReaxFF are derived entirely from QM without the use of empirical data so that it can be applied to novel systems on which there is little or no data. To understand the catalysis in these systems it is essential to determine the surface structures that control the surface chemistry. High quality three-dimensional (3D) Rietveld structures are now available for the M1 and M2 phases of the MoVNbTeO catalysts.

  14. Kinetic modeling of propane aromatization reaction over HZSM-5 and GaHZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, D.B.; Gnep, N.S.; Guisnet, M.R. . Catalyse en Chimie Organique)

    1995-02-01

    A detailed kinetic model for a propane aromatization reaction over HZSM-5 and GaHZSM-5 is developed. Kinetic modeling results show that propane transformation over HZSM-5 occurs via protolytic cracking and hydrogen transfer routes. The contributions of both routes in propane conversion are established. Rate constants of propane transformation steps are found to be at least 1,000 times lower than the rate constants of diene formation steps, which, in turn, are the slowest among the acid-catalyzed olefin aromatization steps. Gallium introduced into ZSM-5 catalyst is active in dehydrogenation of propane into propene, of olefins into dienes, and of naphthenes into aromatics. At the same time, gallium species catalyze propane transformation into methane and ethene hydrogenation into ethane. Both latter reactions appear to be the main reasons for the limit to aromatics selectivity over GaHZSM-5 catalysts.

  15. Cross-dehydrogenative coupling and oxidative-amination reactions of ethers and alcohols with aromatics and heteroaromatics

    PubMed Central

    Vuram, Prasanna K.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) is a process in which, typically, a C–C bond is formed at the expense of two C–H bonds, either catalyzed by metals or other organic compounds, or via uncatalyzed processes. In this perspective, we present various modes of C–H bond-activation at sp3 centers adjacent to ether oxygen atoms, followed by C–C bond formation with aromatic systems as well as with heteroaromatic systems. C–N bond-formation with NH-containing heteroaromatics, leading to hemiaminal ethers, is also an event that can occur analogously to C–C bond formation, but at the expense of C–H and N–H bonds. A large variety of hemiaminal ether-forming reactions have recently appeared in the literature and this perspective also includes this complementary chemistry. In addition, the participation of C–H bonds in alcohols in such processes is also described. Facile access to a wide range of compounds can be attained through these processes, rendering such reactions useful for synthetic applications via Csp3 bond activations. PMID:28970941

  16. Study on the role of SBA-15 in the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane over vanadia catalyst using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Huyen, Ngo Duc; Cam, Le Minh

    2013-08-01

    The first step in the mechanism of n-butane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) on a V4O10 cluster and V4O10 supported SBA-15 is examined using DFT method. The activation and adsorption energies, oxidation state of V atoms are calculated. Over V4O10 the obtained results indicate that the activation of C-H bond of methylene group can occur at both the terminal and the bridging oxygen atoms with similar barrier (21.5-22.5 kcal mol(-1)). The role of SBA-15 (with and without modification by Al) in n-butane adsorption step has been studied in detail. SBA-15 itself has mild effect on the reaction process, but the substitution of silicon atoms by aluminum atoms results in an active supporter for V2O5 in ODH reaction. In that, the ratio of Si/Al will decide the direction of initial interaction steps between n-butane and catalyst surface and it will result in the selectivity of the reaction products.

  17. Silica-supported isolated gallium sites as highly active, selective and stable propane dehydrogenation catalysts† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, material characterization data, catalytic measurement details and crystallographic details. CCDC 1499756. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c6sc05178b Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Searles, Keith; Siddiqi, Georges; Safonova, Olga V.

    2017-01-01

    Single-site gallium centers on the surface of silica are prepared via grafting of [Ga(OSi(OtBu)3)3(THF)] on SiO2–700 followed by a thermolysis step. The resulting surface species corresponds to well-defined tetra-coordinate gallium single-sites, [( 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 SiO)3Ga(XOSi)] (X = –H or Si) according to IR, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. These gallium sites show high activity, selectivity and stability for propane dehydrogenation with an initial turnover frequency of 20 per h per gallium center, propylene selectivity of ≥93% and remarkable stability over 20 h. The stability of the catalyst probably results from site-isolation of the active site on a non-reducible support such as silica, diminishing facile reduction typical of Ga2O3-based

  18. The ALMA-PILS survey: First detections of ethylene oxide, acetone and propanal toward the low-mass protostar IRAS 16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykke, J. M.; Coutens, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Garrod, R. T.; Müller, H. S. P.; Bjerkeli, P.; Bourke, T. L.; Calcutt, H.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Favre, C.; Fayolle, E. C.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Öberg, K. I.; Persson, M. V.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2017-01-01

    Context. One of the open questions in astrochemistry is how complex organic and prebiotic molecules are formed. The unsurpassed sensitivity of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) takes the quest for discovering molecules in the warm and dense gas surrounding young stars to the next level. Aims: Our aim is to start the process of compiling an inventory of oxygen-bearing complex organic molecules toward the solar-type Class 0 protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 from an unbiased spectral survey with ALMA, Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS). Here we focus on the new detections of ethylene oxide (c-C2H4O), acetone (CH3COCH3), and propanal (C2H5CHO). Methods: With ALMA, we surveyed the spectral range from 329 to 363 GHz at 0.5″ (60 AU diameter) resolution. Using a simple model for the molecular emission in local thermodynamical equilibrium, the excitation temperatures and column densities of each species were constrained. Results: We successfully detect propanal (44 lines), ethylene oxide (20 lines) and acetone (186 lines) toward one component of the protostellar binary, IRAS 16293B. The high resolution maps demonstrate that the emission for all investigated species originates from the compact central region close to the protostar. This, along with a derived common excitation temperature of Tex ≈ 125 K, is consistent with a coexistence of these molecules in the same gas. Conclusions: The observations mark the first detections of acetone, propanal and ethylene oxide toward a low-mass protostar. The relative abundance ratios of the two sets of isomers, a CH3COCH3/C2H5CHO ratio of 8 and a CH3CHO/c-C2H4O ratio of 12, are comparable to previous observations toward high-mass protostars. The majority of observed abundance ratios from these results as well as those measured toward high-mass protostars are up to an order of magnitude above the predictions from chemical models. This may reflect either missing reactions or uncertain rates in the

  19. Effect of carbon-sulphur bond in a sulphur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile/reduced graphene oxide composite cathode for lithium-sulphur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konarov, Aishuak; Bakenov, Zhumabay; Yashiro, Hitoshi; Sun, Yang-Kook; Myung, Seung-Taek

    2017-07-01

    A S/DPAN (dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile) composite shows promising electrode performances as a cathode material for Li-S batteries though its electric conductivity is insufficient for high rate tests. In an attempt to enhance the electric conductivity, the S/DPAN composite is attached on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets via self-assembling modification. As a result, the conductivity improves to ∼10-4 S cm-1, and the S/DPAN/rGO composite thereby delivers approximately 90% of the theoretical capacity of sulphur at a rate of 0.2C (0.34 A g-1) over 700 mAh (g-S)-1 even at 2C (3.4 A g-1). We first report on the Csbnd S bond between sulphur and DPAN in a composite that maintains the bond even after an extensive cycling test, as confirmed by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). These synergistic effects enable facile electron transport such that the S/DPAN/rGO composite electrode is able to maintain superior electrode performances.

  20. I. Synthesis, characterization, and base catalysis of novel zeolite supported super-basic materials II. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over reduced heteropolyanion catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galownia, Jonathan M.

    reliable precursor for the formation of zeolite supported super-basic materials. The second part of this thesis describes the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over partially reduced heteropolyanions. Niobium and pyridine exchanged salts of phosphomolybdic (NbPMo12Pyr) and phosphovanadomolybdic (NbPMo11VPyr) acids are investigated as catalyst precursors to prepare materials for catalyzing the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene and acetic acid at atmospheric pressure. The effects of feed composition, steam flow, temperature, and precursor composition on catalytic activity and selectivity are presented for both ethane and ethylene oxidation. Production of ethylene and acetic acid from ethane using the catalytic materials exceeds that reported in the literature for Mo-V-Nb-Ox systems under atmospheric or elevated pressure. Production of acetic acid from ethylene is also greater than that observed for Mo-V-Nb-Ox systems. Addition of vanadium reduces catalytic activity and selectivity to both ethylene and acetic acid while niobium is essential for the formation of acetic acid from ethane. Other metals such as antimony, iron, and gallium do not provide the same beneficial effect as niobium. Molybdenum in close proximity to niobium is the active site for ethane activation while niobium is directly involved in the transformation of ethylene to acetic acid. A balance of niobium and protonated pyridine is required to produce an active catalyst. Water is found to aid in desorption of acetic acid, thereby limiting deep oxidation to carbon oxides. A reaction scheme is proposed for the production of acetic acid from ethane over the catalytic materials.

  1. Oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane over vanadium magnesium oxide catalysts supported on nano-structured MgO and ZrO2: effect of oxygen capacity of the catalyst.

    PubMed

    Lee, Howon; Lee, Jong Kwon; Hong, Ung Gi; Song, In Kyu; Yoo, Yeonshick; Cho, Young-Jin; Lee, Jinsuk; Chang, Hosik; Jung, Ji Chul

    2012-07-01

    Vanadium-magnesium oxide catalysts supported on nano-structured MgO and ZrO2 (Mg3(VO4)2/MgO/ZrO2) were prepared by a wet impregnation method with a variation of Mg:Zr ratio (8:1, 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1). For comparison, Mg3(VO4)2/MgO and Mg3(VO4)2/ZrO2 catalysts were also prepared by a wet impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were applied to the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. Mg3(VO4)2/MgO/ZrO2 (Mg:Zr = 4:1, 2:1, and 1:1) and Mg3(VO4)2/ZrO2 catalysts showed a stable catalytic activity during the whole reaction time, while Mg3(VO4)2/MgO/ZrO2 (8:1) and Mg3(VO4)2/MgO catalysts experienced a severe catalyst deactivation. Deactivation of Mg3(VO4)2/MgO/ZrO2 (8:1) and Mg3(VO4)2/MgO catalysts was due to their low oxygen mobility. Effect of oxygen capacity (the amount of oxygen in the catalyst involved in the reaction) of the supported Mg3(V04)2 catalysts on the catalytic performance in the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane was investigated. Experimental results revealed that oxygen capacity of the catalyst was closely related to the catalytic activity in the oxidative dehydrogenation of n-butane. A large oxygen capacity of the catalyst was favorable for obtaining a high catalytic activity in this reaction. Among the catalysts tested, Mg3(VO4)2/MgO/ZrO2 (4:1) catalyst with the largest oxygen capacity showed the best catalytic performance.

  2. Secondary coenzyme Q10 deficiency and oxidative stress in cultured fibroblasts from patients with riboflavin responsive multiple Acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, Nanna; Byron, Colleen; Hargreaves, Iain; Guerra, Paula Fernandez; Furdek, Andrea K; Land, John; Radford, Weston W; Frerman, Frank; Corydon, Thomas J; Gregersen, Niels; Olsen, Rikke K J

    2013-10-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is essential for the energy production of the cells and as an electron transporter in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. CoQ10 links the mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation to the respiratory chain by accepting electrons from electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO). Recently, it was shown that a group of patients with the riboflavin responsive form of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (RR-MADD) carrying inherited amino acid variations in ETF-QO also had secondary CoQ10 deficiency with beneficial effects of CoQ10 treatment, thus adding RR-MADD to an increasing number of diseases involving secondary CoQ10 deficiency. In this study, we show that moderately decreased CoQ10 levels in fibroblasts from six unrelated RR-MADD patients were associated with increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with CoQ10, but not with riboflavin, could normalize the CoQ10 level and decrease the level of ROS in the patient cells. Additionally, riboflavin-depleted control fibroblasts showed moderate CoQ10 deficiency, but not increased mitochondrial ROS, indicating that variant ETF-QO proteins and not CoQ10 deficiency are the causes of mitochondrial ROS production in the patient cells. Accordingly, the corresponding variant Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO proteins, when overexpressed in vitro, bind a CoQ10 pseudosubstrate, Q10Br, less tightly than the wild-type ETF-QO protein, suggesting that molecular oxygen can get access to the electrons in the misfolded ETF-QO protein, thereby generating superoxide and oxidative stress, which can be reversed by CoQ10 treatment.

  3. Efficiency gain of solid oxide fuel cell systems by using anode offgas recycle - Results for a small scale propane driven unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Ralph-Uwe; Oelze, Jana; Lindermeir, Andreas; Spitta, Christian; Steffen, Michael; Küster, Torben; Chen, Shaofei; Schlitzberger, Christian; Leithner, Reinhard

    The transfer of high electrical efficiencies of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) into praxis requires appropriate system concepts. One option is the anode-offgas recycling (AOGR) approach, which is based on the integration of waste heat using the principle of a chemical heat pump. The AOGR concept allows a combined steam- and dry-reforming of hydrocarbon fuel using the fuel cell products steam and carbon dioxide. SOFC fuel gas of higher quantity and quality results. In combination with internal reuse of waste heat the system efficiency increases compared to the usual path of partial oxidation (POX). The demonstration of the AOGR concept with a 300 Wel-SOFC stack running on propane required: a combined reformer/burner-reactor operating in POX (start-up) and AOGR modus; a hotgas-injector for anode-offgas recycling to the reformer; a dynamic process model; a multi-variable process controller; full system operation for experimental proof of the efficiency gain. Experimental results proof an efficiency gain of 18 percentage points (η·POX = 23%, η·AOGR = 41%) under idealized lab conditions. Nevertheless, further improvements of injector performance, stack fuel utilization and additional reduction of reformer reformer O/C ratio and system pressure drop are required to bring this approach into self-sustaining operation.

  4. Structural characterization and oxidative dehydrogenation activity of V2O5/Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Benjaram M; Lakshmanan, Pandian; Loridant, Stéphane; Yamada, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Tetsuhiko; López-Cartes, Carlos; Rojas, Teresa C; Fernandez, Asunción

    2006-05-11

    The thermal stability of a nanosized Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2 solid solution on a silica surface and the dispersion behavior of V2O5 over Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 have been investigated using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, HREM, and BET surface area techniques. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene was performed as a test reaction to assess the usefulness of the VOx/Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 catalyst. Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 (1:1:2 mol ratio based on oxides) was synthesized through a soft-chemical route from ultrahigh dilute solutions by adopting a deposition coprecipitation technique. A theoretical monolayer equivalent to 10 wt % V2O5 was impregnated over the calcined Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 sample (773 K) by an aqueous wet impregnation technique. The prepared V2O5/Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 sample was subjected to thermal treatments from 773 to 1073 K. The XRD measurements indicate the presence of cubic Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 in the case of Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2, while cubic Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 and tetragonal Ce0.16Zr0.84O2 in the case of V2O5/Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 when calcined at various temperatures. Dispersed vanadium oxide induces more incorporation of zirconium into the ceria lattice, thereby decreasing its lattice size and also accelerating the crystallization of Ce-Zr-O solid solutions at higher calcination temperatures. Further, it interacts selectively with the ceria portion of the composite oxide to form CeVO4. The RS measurements provide good evidence about the dispersed form of vanadium oxide and the CeVO4 compound. The HREM studies show the presence of small Ce-Zr-oxide particles of approximately 5 nm size over the surface of amorphous silica and corroborate with the results obtained from other techniques. The catalytic activity studies reveal the ability of vanadium oxide supported on Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2/SiO2 to efficiently catalyze the ODH of ethylbenzene at normal atmospheric pressure. The remarkable ability of Ce(x)Zr(1-x)O2 to prevent the deactivation of supported vanadium oxide leading to

  5. Hydrogen transport membranes for dehydrogenation reactions

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran,; Uthamalingam, [Hinsdale, IL

    2008-02-12

    A method of converting C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes to olefins by contacting a feedstock containing C.sub.2 and/or higher alkanes with a first surface of a metal composite membrane of a sintered homogenous mixture of an Al oxide or stabilized or partially stabilized Zr oxide ceramic powder and a metal powder of one or more of Pd, Nb, V, Zr, Ta and/or alloys or mixtures thereof. The alkanes dehydrogenate to olefins by contact with the first surface with substantially only atomic hydrogen from the dehydrogenation of the alkanes passing through the metal composite membrane. Apparatus for effecting the conversion and separation is also disclosed.

  6. Point-defect-mediated dehydrogenation of alane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismer, Lars

    2011-03-01

    For the engineering of better hydrogen storage materials a systematic understanding of their hydrogen sorption kinetics is crucial. Theoretical studies on metal hydrides have indicated that in many cases point defects control mass transport and hence hydrogen uptake and release. Manipulating point-defect concentrations thus allows control over hydrogen sorption kinetics, opening up new engineering strategies. However, in some cases the relevance of kinetic limitations due to point defects is still under debate; kinetic inhibition of hydrogen sorption has also been attributed to surface effects, e.g. oxide layers or low recombination rates. We present a systematic analysis of the dehydrogenation kinetics of alane (AlH3), one of the prime candidate materials for hydrogen storage. Using hybrid-density functional calculations we determine the concentrations and mobilities of point defects and their complexes. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the full dehydrogenation reaction. We show that under dehydrogenation conditions charged hydrogen vacancy defects form in the crystal, which have a strong tendency towards clustering. The vacancy clusters denote local nuclei of Al phase, and the growth of these nuclei eventually drives the AlH3/Al transformation. However, the low concentration of vacancy defects limits the transport of hydrogen across the bulk, and hence acts as the rate-limiting part of the process. The dehydrogenation is therefore essentially inactive at room temperature, explaining why AlH3 is metastable for years, even though it is thermodynamically unstable. Our derived activation energy and dehydrogenation curves are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, providing evidence for the relevance of bulk point-defect kinetics. Work performed in collaboration with A. Janotti and C. G. Van de Walle, and supported by DOE.

  7. Light-mediated heterogeneous cross dehydrogenative coupling reactions: metal oxides as efficient, recyclable, photoredox catalysts in C-C bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Rueping, Magnus; Zoller, Jochen; Fabry, David C; Poscharny, Konstantin; Koenigs, René M; Weirich, Thomas E; Mayer, Joachim

    2012-03-19

    Let there be light: A heterogeneous photocatalytic system based on easily recyclable TiO(2) or ZnO allows cross dehydrogenative coupling reactions of tertiary amines. The newly developed protocols have successfully been applied to various C-C and C-P bond-forming reactions to provide nitro amines as well as amino ketones, nitriles and phosphonates.

  8. Effect of Oxygen Defects on the Catalytic Performance of VOx/CeO2 Catalysts for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhehao; Gao, Feng; Kovarik, Libor; Baylon, Rebecca A.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    In this work, CeO2 nanocubes with controlled particle size and dominating (100) facets are synthesized as supports for VOx catalysts. Combined TEM, SEM, XRD, and Raman study reveals that the oxygen vacancy density of CeO2 supports can be tuned by tailoring the particle sizes without altering the dominating facets, where smaller particle sizes result in larger oxygen vacancy densities. At the same vanadium coverage, the VOx catalysts supported on small-sized CeO2 supports with higher oxygen defect densities exhibit promoted redox property and lower activation energy for methoxyl group decomposition, as evidenced by H2-TPR and methanol TPD study. These results further confirm that the presence of oxygen vacancies plays an important role in promoting the activity of VOx species in methanol oxidation. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Part of this work was conducted in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the DOE by Battelle.

  9. Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Mallinger

    2004-08-27

    Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

  10. Organometallic model complexes elucidate the active gallium species in alkane dehydrogenation catalysts based on ligand effects in Ga K-edge XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Getsoian, Andrew “Bean”; Das, Ujjal; Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Hu, Bo; Cheah, Singfoong; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Krause, Theodore R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-modified zeolites are known catalysts for the dehydrogenation of alkanes, reactivity that finds industrial application in the aromatization of light alkanes by Ga-ZSM5. While the role of gallium cations in alkane activation is well known, the oxidation state and coordination environment of gallium under reaction conditions has been the subject of debate. Edge shifts in Ga K-edge XANES spectra acquired under reaction conditions have long been interpreted as evidence for reduction of Ga(III) to Ga(I). However, a change in oxidation state is not the only factor that can give rise to a change in the XANES spectrum. In order to better understand the XANES spectra of working catalysts, we have synthesized a series of molecular model compounds and grafted surface organometallic Ga species and compared their XANES spectra to those of gallium-based catalysts acquired under reducing conditions. We demonstrate that changes in the identity and number of gallium nearest neighbors can give rise to changes in XANES spectra similar to those attributed in literature to changes in oxidation state. Specifically, spectral features previously attributed to Ga(I) may be equally well interpreted as evidence for low-coordinate Ga(III) alkyl or hydride species. These findings apply both to gallium-impregnated zeolite catalysts and to silica-supported single site gallium catalysts, the latter of which is found to be active and selective for dehydrogenation of propane and hydrogenation of propylene.

  11. Organometallic model complexes elucidate the active gallium species in alkane dehydrogenation catalysts based on ligand effects in Ga K-edge XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Getsoian, Andrew "Bean"; Das, Ujjal; Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; Zhang, Guanghui; Gallagher, James R.; Hu, Bo; Cheah, Singfoong; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Krause, Theodore R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Hock, Adam S.

    2016-06-13

    Gallium-modified zeolites are known catalysts for the dehydrogenation of alkanes, reactivity that finds industrial application in the aromatization of light alkanes by Ga-ZSM5. While the role of gallium cations in alkane activation is well known, the oxidation state and coordination environment of gallium under reaction conditions has been the subject of debate. Edge shifts in Ga K-edge XANES spectra acquired under reaction conditions have long been interpreted as evidence for reduction of Ga(III) to Ga(I). However, a change in oxidation state is not the only factor that can give rise to a change in the XANES spectrum. In order to better understand the XANES spectra of working catalysts, we have synthesized a series of molecular model compounds and grafted surface organometallic Ga species and compared their XANES spectra to those of gallium-based catalysts acquired under reducing conditions. We demonstrate that changes in the identity and number of gallium nearest neighbors can give rise to changes in XANES spectra similar to those attributed in literature to changes in oxidation state. Specifically, spectral features previously attributed to Ga(I) may be equally well interpreted as evidence for low-coordinate Ga(III) alkyl or hydride species. Furthermore, these findings apply both to gallium-impregnated zeolite catalysts and to silica-supported single site gallium catalysts, the latter of which is found to be active and selective for dehydrogenation of propane and hydrogenation of propylene.

  12. Organometallic model complexes elucidate the active gallium species in alkane dehydrogenation catalysts based on ligand effects in Ga K-edge XANES

    DOE PAGES

    Getsoian, Andrew "Bean"; Das, Ujjal; Camacho-Bunquin, Jeffrey; ...

    2016-06-13

    Gallium-modified zeolites are known catalysts for the dehydrogenation of alkanes, reactivity that finds industrial application in the aromatization of light alkanes by Ga-ZSM5. While the role of gallium cations in alkane activation is well known, the oxidation state and coordination environment of gallium under reaction conditions has been the subject of debate. Edge shifts in Ga K-edge XANES spectra acquired under reaction conditions have long been interpreted as evidence for reduction of Ga(III) to Ga(I). However, a change in oxidation state is not the only factor that can give rise to a change in the XANES spectrum. In order tomore » better understand the XANES spectra of working catalysts, we have synthesized a series of molecular model compounds and grafted surface organometallic Ga species and compared their XANES spectra to those of gallium-based catalysts acquired under reducing conditions. We demonstrate that changes in the identity and number of gallium nearest neighbors can give rise to changes in XANES spectra similar to those attributed in literature to changes in oxidation state. Specifically, spectral features previously attributed to Ga(I) may be equally well interpreted as evidence for low-coordinate Ga(III) alkyl or hydride species. Furthermore, these findings apply both to gallium-impregnated zeolite catalysts and to silica-supported single site gallium catalysts, the latter of which is found to be active and selective for dehydrogenation of propane and hydrogenation of propylene.« less

  13. Nitrile-assisted oxidation over oxidative-annulation: Pd-catalyzed α,β-dehydrogenation of α-cinnamyl β-keto nitriles.

    PubMed

    Nallagonda, Rajender; Reddy, Reddy Rajasekhar; Ghorai, Prasanta

    2017-09-13

    A palladium-catalyzed oxidation reaction is disclosed where the nitrile functionality on the substrate simply changes the course of the reaction. Our previous finding showed that using the Pd(ii)-catalyst in the presence of benzoquinone as an oxidant, 2-cinnamyl-1,3-dicarbonyls provides functionalized furans via oxidative cyclization. When a nitrile group is replaced with one of the carbonyl functionalities of the same substrate, the oxidative cyclization was completely suppressed; instead, the oxidation at the α,β-position occurred to provide α,β,γ,δ-diene containing β-keto nitriles.

  14. A comparative study of the oxides of lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and samarium as catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of methane in the presence and absence of carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Matsumura, Yasuyuki; Moffat, J.B. )

    1993-02-01

    The catalytic oxidative coupling of methane to ethane and ethene has been investigated on the rare earth oxides, i.e., La[sub 2]O[sub 3], CeO[sub 2], Pr[sub 6]O[sub 11], and Sm[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Addition of a small amount of tetrachloromethane (TCM) to the reactant stream improves the catalytic activity of these oxides. In particular, the praseodymium catalyst yields high selectivity to the C[sub 2] compounds comparable to La[sub 2]O[sub 3] or Sm[sub 2]O[sub 3] when TCM is present in the feedstream. The X-ray diffraction patterns for these catalysts after the reaction with TCM show the presence of the oxychlorides in the catalysts except for the cerium catalyst, for which the selectivity to C[sub 2] compounds is very low even in the presence of TCM. The oxychlorides can be generated on La[sub 2]O[sub 3], Sm[sub 2]O[sub 3], or Pr[sub 6]O[sub 11] by preheating under a stream including TCM. The product distribution of the reaction with these catalysts in the absence of TCM is similar to that with the oxides in the presence of TCM, while Pr[sub 6]O[sub 11] pretreated with TCM is unstable with no TCM in the feedstream. It appears that the improvement of the activity of the rare earth catalysts with TCM in the feedstream is primarily due to the formation of the oxychlorides during the reaction. 49 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Mild, Periodate-Mediated, Dehydrogenative C-N Bond Formation with Phenothiazines and Phenols.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongwei; Patureau, Frederic W

    2016-09-16

    The dehydrogenative amination of phenols with phenothiazines was achieved in transition-metal-free conditions, utilizing cheap sodium periodate as oxidant, at low temperature. A significantly larger scope of phenol substrates was tolerated compared to previous methods.

  16. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  17. Spectroscopic evidence for origins of size and support effects on selectivity of Cu nanoparticle dehydrogenation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Witzke, M. E.; Dietrich, P. J.; Ibrahim, M. Y. S.; Al-Bardan, K.; Triezenberg, M. D.; Flaherty, D. W.

    2016-12-12

    Selective dehydrogenation catalysts that produce acetaldehyde from bio-derived ethanol can increase the efficiency of subsequent processes such as C–C coupling over metal oxides to produce 1-butanol or 1,3-butadiene or oxidation to acetic acid. Here, we use in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and steady state kinetics experiments to identify Cuδ+ at the perimeter of supported Cu clusters as the active site for esterification and Cu0 surface sites as sites for dehydrogenation. Correlation of dehydrogenation and esterification selectivities to in situ measures of Cu oxidation states show that this relationship holds for Cu clusters over a wide-range of diameters (2–35 nm) and catalyst supports and reveals that dehydrogenation selectivities may be controlled by manipulating either.

  18. Physicochemical and catalytic properties of Ga and In pentasils in the reaction of propane aromatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosmerikova, L. N.; Volynkina, A. N.; Zaikovskii, V. I.; Vosmerikov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Ga and In ZSM-5 zeolites are obtained via hydrothermal crystallization from alkali aluminosilicate gels. Their physicochemical and catalytic properties during conversion of propane into aromatic hydrocarbons are studied. These catalysts exhibit different activity and selectivity in propane aromatization process due to their specific physicochemical properties and the localization of promoter atoms in different sites of the zeolite structure. A zeolite containing 1.85 wt % of gallium oxide is the most effective catalyst for propane aromatization.

  19. Determination of the active center in calcium-nickel phosphate dehydrogenation catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Attali, S.; Vigouroux, B.; Lenzi, M.; Pescia, J.

    1980-06-01

    Determination of the active center in calcium-nickel phosphate dehydrogenation catalyst, used industrially in the dehydrogenation of butenes to butadiene, showed that a stable trivalent nickel ion is involved. Apparently, electrons generated in the first (oxidation) step of the reaction are eliminated by reducing the trivalent to divalent nickel which is reoxidized by protons. The results were obtained by propanol dehydration-dehydrogenation on calcium-nickel phosphate (Ca/sub 8/Ni(PO/sub 4//sub )/6) calcined at 400/sup 0/-900/sup 0/C and by ESR spectroscopy.

  20. Propane-d6 Heterogeneously Hyperpolarized by Parahydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived spin states of hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas were demonstrated following pairwise addition of parahydrogen gas to propene-d6 using heterogeneous parahydrogen-induced polarization (HET-PHIP). Hyperpolarized molecules were synthesized using Rh/TiO2 solid catalyst with 1.6 nm Rh nanoparticles. Hyperpolarized (PH ∼ 1%) propane-d6 was detected at high magnetic field (9.4 T) spectroscopically and by high-resolution 3D gradient-echo MRI (4.7 T) as the gas flowed through the radiofrequency coil with a spatial and temporal resolution of 0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 mm3 and 17.7 s, respectively. Stopped-flow hyperpolarized propane-d6 gas was also detected at 0.0475 T with an observed nuclear spin polarization of PH ∼ 0.1% and a relatively long lifetime with T1,eff = 6.0 ± 0.3 s. Importantly, it was shown that the hyperpolarized protons of the deuterated product obtained via pairwise parahydrogen addition could be detected directly at low magnetic field. Importantly, the relatively long low-field T1,eff of HP propane-d6 gas is not susceptible to paramagnetic impurities as tested by exposure to ∼0.2 atm oxygen. This long lifetime and nontoxic nature of propane gas could be useful for bioimaging applications including potentially pulmonary low-field MRI. The feasibility of high-resolution low-field 2D gradient-echo MRI was demonstrated with 0.88 × 0.88 mm2 spatial and ∼0.7 s temporal resolution, respectively, at 0.0475 T. PMID:25506406

  1. The multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenation disorders, glutaric aciduria type II and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, and electron transfer flavoprotein activities in fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Amendt, B A; Rhead, W J

    1986-01-01

    The multiple acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenation disorders (MAD) include severe (S) and mild (M) variants, glutaric aciduria type II (MAD:S) and ethylmalonic-adipic aciduria (MAD:M). Intact MAD:M mitochondria oxidized [1-14C]octanoate, [1-14C]palmityl-CoA, and [1,5-14C]glutarate at 20-46% of control levels; MAD:S mitochondria oxidized these three substrates at 0.4-18% of control levels. In MAD:M mitochondria, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were similar to control, whereas MAD:S ADH activities ranged from 38% to 73% of control. Electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) activities in five MAD:M cell lines ranged from 29 to 51% of control (P less than 0.01); ETF deficiency was the primary enzymatic defect in two MAD:M lines. In four MAD:S patients, ETF activities ranged from 3% to 6% of control (P less than 0.001); flavin adenine dinucleotide addition increased residual ETF activity from 4% to 21% of control in a single MAD:S line (P less than 0.01). Three MAD:S patients had ETF activities ranging from 33 to 53% of control; other investigators found deficient ETF-dehydrogenase activity in these MAD:S and three of our MAD:M cell lines. PMID:3722376

  2. Regioselective acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of N-heterocycles toward functionalized quinolines, phenanthrolines, and indoles.

    PubMed

    Talwar, Dinesh; Gonzalez-de-Castro, Angela; Li, Ho Yin; Xiao, Jianliang

    2015-04-20

    A new strategy has been developed for the oxidant- and base-free dehydrogenative coupling of N-heterocycles at mild conditions. Under the action of an iridium catalyst, N-heterocycles undergo multiple sp(3) CH activation steps, generating a nucleophilic enamine that reacts in situ with various electrophiles to give highly functionalized products. The dehydrogenative coupling can be cascaded with Friedel-Crafts addition, resulting in a double functionalization of the N-heterocycles.

  3. Water co-catalyzed selective dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde and hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Junjun; Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; El-Soda, Mostafa; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Sykes, E. Charles H.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2016-08-01

    The non-oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde is considered a promising method to produce formaldehyde and clean hydrogen gas. Although Cu-based catalysts have an excellent catalytic activity in the oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol, metallic Cu is commonly believed to be unreactive for the dehydrogenation of methanol in the absence of oxygen adatoms or oxidized copper. Herein we show that metallic Cu can catalyze the dehydrogenation of methanol in the absence of oxygen adatoms by using water as a co-catalyst both under realistic reaction conditions using silica-supported PtCu nanoparticles in a flow reactor system at temperatures below 250 °C, and in ultra-high vacuum using model PtCu(111) catalysts. Adding small amounts of isolated Pt atoms into the Cu surface to form PtCu single atom alloys (SAAs) greatly enhances the dehydrogenation activity of Cu. Under the same reaction conditions, the yields of formaldehyde from PtCu SAA nanoparticles are more than one order of magnitude higher than on the Cu nanoparticles, indicating a significant promotional effect of individual, isolated Pt atoms. Moreover, this study also shows the unexpected role of water in the activation of methanol. Water, a catalyst for methanol dehydrogenation at low temperatures, becomes a reactant in the methanol steam reforming reactions only at higher temperatures over the same metal catalyst.

  4. Mesoporous xEr2O3·CoTiO3 composite oxide catalysts for low temperature dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene using CO2 as a soft oxidant

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yanfeng; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.; Dai, Sheng; Overbury, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    A series of mesoporous xEr2O3·CoTiO3 composite oxide catalysts have been prepared using template method and tested as a new type of catalyst for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene by using CO2 as a soft oxidant. Among the catalysts tested, the 0.25Er2O3 CoTiO3 sample with a ratio of 1:4:4 content and calcined at 600 oC exhibited the highest ethylbenzene conversion (58%) and remarkable styrene selectivity (95%) at low temperature (450 °C).

  5. In-Situ Remediation of MTBE Contaminated Aquifers Using Propane Biosparging. Revision 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-03

    NOAEL No-Observable-Adverse- Effect -Level OIPs Oxygen injection points ORP Oxidation reduction potential PIPs Propane injection points PMO Propane...most petroleum constituents (BTEX, alkanes, etc), subsurface aeration effectively promotes aerobic contaminant destruction by stimulating the natural...flow rates. Unfortunately, active MTBE degradation in our Control Plot during this demonstration prevents a thorough evaluation of the effectiveness of

  6. Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of ammonia boranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heinekey, Dennis M.

    2009-10-31

    Several effective homogeneous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of amine boranes have been developed. The best catalyst uses an iridium complex, and is capable of dehydrogenating H3NBH3 (AB) and CH3NH2BH3 (MeAB) at comparable rates. Thermodynamic measurements using this catalyst demonstrate that the dehydrogenation of AB and MeAB is substantially exothermic, which has important implications for regeneration.

  7. Position-specific and clumped stable isotope studies: comparison of the Urey and path-integral approaches for carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, methane, and propane.

    PubMed

    Webb, Michael A; Miller, Thomas F

    2014-01-16

    We combine path-integral Monte Carlo methods with high-quality potential energy surfaces to compute equilibrium isotope effects in a variety of systems relevant to 'clumped' isotope analysis and isotope geochemistry, including CO2, N2O, methane, and propane. Through a systematic study of heavy-atom isotope-exchange reactions, we quantify and analyze errors that arise in the widely used Urey model for predicting equilibrium constants of isotope-exchange reactions using reduced partition function ratios. These results illustrate that the Urey model relies on a nontrivial cancellation of errors that can shift the apparent equilibrium temperature by as much as 35 K for a given distribution of isotopologues. The calculations reported here provide the same level of precision as the best existing analytical instrumentation, resolving the relative enrichment of certain isotopologues to as little as 0.01‰. These findings demonstrate path-integral methods to be a rigorous and viable alternative to more approximate methods for heavy-atom geochemical applications.

  8. Kinetics modeling of propane conversion to BTX over [Al, Ga]-ZSM-5 based catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Papa, J.; Santos, F.; Leon, G.; Giannetto, G.

    1996-12-31

    The developed model attempts to describe the overall reaction rate of propane over three catalysts, which were prepared by straightforward calcination of as-synthesized [Ga,Al]-ZSM-5 zeolite from alkali-free media. Their behavior changes from a typically acidic one for the catalyst obtained by straightforward calcination at 500{degrees}C ([Ga,Al]-500), to a bifunctional one when the calcination was done at 700{degrees}C ([Ga,Al]-700) and at 750{degrees}C ([Ga,Al]-750). Results show that changes in activity and selectivity are mainly, but not totally, due to an approximately tenfold increase in the propane dehydrogenation rate when extra framework gallium species, as it is the case for the last two catalysts, are present. The change in selectivity of bifunctional catalysts with conversion, toward those observed with purely acidic ones, is explained by a higher inhibition effect of reaction products over metallic sites. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-08-05

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

  10. Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-08-01

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

  11. 75 FR 14131 - Effect on Propane Consumers of the Propane Education and Research Council's Operations, Market...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... International Trade Administration Effect on Propane Consumers of the Propane Education and Research Council's... comment on whether the operation of the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC), in conjunction with... information to fulfill requirements under the Propane Education and Research Act of 1996 that established PERC...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1655 - Propane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Propane. 184.1655 Section 184.1655 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1655 Propane. (a) Propane (empirical formula C3H8, CAS Reg. No. 74-98-6) is... in the liquid state. Propane is obtained from natural gas by fractionation following absorption in...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1655 - Propane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Propane. 184.1655 Section 184.1655 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1655 Propane. (a) Propane (empirical formula C3H8, CAS Reg. No. 74-98-6) is... in the liquid state. Propane is obtained from natural gas by fractionation following absorption in...

  14. Mechanisms of catalytic dehydrogenation of alkanes by rhodium clusters Rhn+ probed by isotope labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlhart, Christian; Uggerud, Einar

    2006-03-01

    The regioselectivity for the dehydrogenation of alkanes by rhodium clusters was investigated by reacting Rhn+, n = 1-20, with the isotopically labelled alkanes ethane-1,1,1-d3 and propane-1,1,1,3,3,3-d6. For Rh+ reacting with propane a clear preference for a 1,2- over a 1,1- and 1,3-mechanism was observed. For larger clusters, hydrogen scrambling is faster than hydrogen elimination, which essentially leads to statistical formation of the neutrals H2, HD, and D2. Isotope scrambling with D2 was also used as a structural probe for the reaction products of rhodium clusters with ethane. The intactness of the CH bonds was demonstrated for (n > 6). The studies are completed with a detailed kinetic analysis for the reaction of Rh7+ with ethane and ethane/hydrogen and ethane/helium mixtures. An over-all picture with efficient CH bond activation and fast and reversible hydrogen rearrangements emerges on the basis of these experiments. Some of the dehydrogenation reactions appear to be reversible.

  15. Dehydration, Dehydrogenation, and Condensation of Alcohols on Supported Oxide Catalysts Based on Cyclic (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Roger J.; Dixon, David A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Supported early transition metal oxides have important applications in numerous catalytic reactions. In this article we review preparation and activity of well-defined model WO3 and MoO3 catalysts prepared via deposition of cyclic gas-phase (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters generated by sublimation of WO3 and MoO3 powders. Conversion of small aliphatic alcohols to alkenes, aldehydes/ketons, and ethers is employed to probe the structure-activity relationships on model WO3 and MoO3 catalysts ranging from unsupported (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters embedded in alcohol matrices, to (WO3)3 clusters supported on surfaces of other oxides, and epitaxial and nanoporous WO3 films. Detailed theoretical calculations reveal the underlying reaction mechanisms and provide insight into the origin of the differences in the WO3 and MoO3 reactivity. For the range of interrogated (WO3)3 they further shed light into the role structure and binding of (WO3)3 clusters with the support play in determining their catalytic activity.

  16. Dehydration, dehydrogenation, and condensation of alcohols on supported oxide catalysts based on cyclic (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Roger; Dixon, David A; Kay, Bruce D; Dohnálek, Zdenek

    2014-11-21

    Supported early transition metal oxides have important applications in numerous catalytic reactions. In this article, we review the synthesis and activity of well-defined model WO3 and MoO3 catalysts that are prepared via deposition of cyclic gas-phase (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters generated by sublimation of WO3 and MoO3 powders. Conversion of small aliphatic alcohols to alkenes, aldehydes/ketones, and ethers is employed to probe the structure-activity relationships on model catalysts ranging from unsupported (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters embedded in alcohol matrices, to (WO3)3 clusters supported on surfaces of other oxides, and epitaxial and nanoporous WO3 films. Detailed theoretical calculations reveal the underlying reaction mechanisms and provide insight into the origin of the differences in the WO3 and MoO3 reactivity. The catalytic activity for a range of interrogated (WO3)3 motifs (from unsupported clusters to nanoporous films) further sheds light onto the role structure and binding of (WO3)3 clusters with the support play in determining their catalytic activity.

  17. CO2 emission free co-generation of energy and ethylene in hydrocarbon SOFC reactors with a dehydrogenation anode.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian-Zhu; Lin, Jie-Yuan; Xu, Shihong; Luo, Jing-Li; Chuang, Karl T; Sanger, Alan R; Krzywicki, Andrzej

    2011-11-21

    A dehydrogenation anode is reported for hydrocarbon proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A Cu-Cr(2)O(3) nanocomposite is obtained from CuCrO(2) nanoparticles as an inexpensive, efficient, carbon deposition and sintering tolerant anode catalyst. A SOFC reactor is fabricated using a Cu-Cr(2)O(3) composite as a dehydrogenation anode and a doped barium cerate as a proton conducting electrolyte. The protonic membrane SOFC reactor can selectively convert ethane to valuable ethylene, and electricity is simultaneously generated in the electrochemical oxidative dehydrogenation process. While there are no CO(2) emissions, traces of CO are present in the anode exhaust when the SOFC reactor is operated at over 700 °C. A mechanism is proposed for ethane electro-catalytic dehydrogenation over the Cu-Cr(2)O(3) catalyst. The SOFC reactor also has good stability for co-generation of electricity and ethylene at 700 °C.

  18. Theoretical investigation of the selective dehydration and dehydrogenation of ethanol catalyzed by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqun; Tang, Yizhen; Shao, Youxiang

    2017-09-01

    Catalytic dehydration and dehydrogenation reactions of ethanol have been investigated systematically using the ab initio quantum chemistry methods The catalysts include water, hydrogen peroxide, formic acid, phosphoric acid, hydrogen fluoride, ammonia, and ethanol itself. Moreover, a few clusters of water and ethanol were considered to simulate the catalytic mechanisms in supercritical water and supercritical ethanol. The barriers for both dehydration and dehydrogenation can be reduced significantly in the presence of the catalysts. It is revealed that the selectivity of the catalytic dehydration and dehydrogenation depends on the acidity and basicity of the catalysts and the sizes of the clusters. The acidic catalyst prefers dehydration while the basic catalysts tend to promote dehydrogenation more effectively. The calculated water-dimer catalysis mechanism supports the experimental results of the selective oxidation of ethanol in the supercritical water. It is suggested that the solvent- and catalyst-free self-oxidation of the supercritical ethanol could be an important mechanism for the selective dehydrogenation of ethanol on the theoretical point of view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Acetone Metabolism in a Propane-Utilizing Bacterium, Gordonia sp. Strain TY-5▿

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Tetsuya; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Kato, Nobuo; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the propane-utilizing bacterium Gordonia sp. strain TY-5, propane was shown to be oxidized to 2-propanol and then further oxidized to acetone. In this study, the subsequent metabolism of acetone was studied. Acetone-induced proteins were found in extracts of cells induced by acetone, and a gene cluster designated acmAB was cloned on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of acetone-induced proteins. The acmA and acmB genes encode a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) and esterase, respectively. The BVMO encoded by acmA was purified from acetone-induced cells of Gordonia sp. strain TY-5 and characterized. The BVMO exhibited NADPH-dependent oxidation activity for linear ketones (C3 to C10) and cyclic ketones (C4 to C8). Escherichia coli expressing the acmA gene oxidized acetone to methyl acetate, and E. coli expressing the acmB gene hydrolyzed methyl acetate. Northern blot analyses revealed that polycistronic transcription of the acmAB gene cluster was induced by propane, 2-propanol, and acetone. These results indicate that the acmAB gene products play an important role in the metabolism of acetone derived from propane oxidation and clarify the propane metabolism pathway of strain TY-5 (propane → 2-propanol → acetone → methyl acetate → acetic acid + methanol). This paper provides the first evidence for BVMO-dependent acetone metabolism. PMID:17071761

  20. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  1. Photocatalytic oxidation of methane over silver decorated zinc oxide nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuxing; Li, Yunpeng; Pan, Xiaoyang; Cortie, David; Huang, Xintang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2016-07-20

    The search for active catalysts that efficiently oxidize methane under ambient conditions remains a challenging task for both C1 utilization and atmospheric cleansing. Here, we show that when the particle size of zinc oxide is reduced down to the nanoscale, it exhibits high activity for methane oxidation under simulated sunlight illumination, and nano silver decoration further enhances the photo-activity via the surface plasmon resonance. The high quantum yield of 8% at wavelengths <400 nm and over 0.1% at wavelengths ∼470 nm achieved on the silver decorated zinc oxide nanostructures shows great promise for atmospheric methane oxidation. Moreover, the nano-particulate composites can efficiently photo-oxidize other small molecular hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane and ethylene, and in particular, can dehydrogenize methane to generate ethane, ethylene and so on. On the basis of the experimental results, a two-step photocatalytic reaction process is suggested to account for the methane photo-oxidation.

  2. Photocatalytic oxidation of methane over silver decorated zinc oxide nanocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuxing; Li, Yunpeng; Pan, Xiaoyang; Cortie, David; Huang, Xintang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    The search for active catalysts that efficiently oxidize methane under ambient conditions remains a challenging task for both C1 utilization and atmospheric cleansing. Here, we show that when the particle size of zinc oxide is reduced down to the nanoscale, it exhibits high activity for methane oxidation under simulated sunlight illumination, and nano silver decoration further enhances the photo-activity via the surface plasmon resonance. The high quantum yield of 8% at wavelengths <400 nm and over 0.1% at wavelengths ∼470 nm achieved on the silver decorated zinc oxide nanostructures shows great promise for atmospheric methane oxidation. Moreover, the nano-particulate composites can efficiently photo-oxidize other small molecular hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane and ethylene, and in particular, can dehydrogenize methane to generate ethane, ethylene and so on. On the basis of the experimental results, a two-step photocatalytic reaction process is suggested to account for the methane photo-oxidation. PMID:27435112

  3. Marine microbes rapidly adapt to consume ethane, propane, and butane within the dissolved hydrocarbon plume of a natural seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Stephanie D.; Redmond, Molly C.; Voigritter, Karl; Perez, Christian; Scarlett, Rachel; Valentine, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Simple hydrocarbon gases containing two to four carbons (ethane, propane, and butane) are among the most abundant compounds present in petroleum reservoirs, and are introduced into the ocean through natural seepage and industrial discharge. Yet little is known about the bacterial consumption of these compounds in ocean waters. To assess the timing by which microbes metabolize these gases, we conducted a three-phase study that tested and applied a radiotracer-based method to quantify the oxidation rates of ethane, propane, and butane in fresh seawater samples. Phase 1 involved the synthesis of tritiated ethane, propane, and butane using Grignard reagents and tritiated water. Phase 2 was a systematic assessment of experimental conditions, wherein the indigenous microbial community was found to rapidly oxidize ethane, propane, and butane. Phase 3 was the application of this tritium method near the Coal Oil Point seeps, offshore California. Spatial and temporal patterns of ethane, propane, and butane oxidation down current from the hydrocarbon seeps demonstrated that >99% of these gases are metabolized within 1.3 days following initial exposure. The oxidation of ethane outpaced oxidation of propane and butane with patterns indicating the microbial community responded to these gases by rapid adaptation or growth. Methane oxidation responded the slowest in plume waters. Estimates based on the observed metabolic rates and carbon mass balance suggest that ethane, propane, and butane-consuming microorganisms may transiently account for a majority of the total microbial community in these impacted waters.

  4. Acceptorless Dehydrogenation of N-Heterocycles by Merging Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis and Cobalt Catalysis.

    PubMed

    He, Ke-Han; Tan, Fang-Fang; Zhou, Chao-Zheng; Zhou, Gui-Jiang; Yang, Xiao-Long; Li, Yang

    2017-03-06

    Herein, the first acceptorless dehydrogenation of tetrahydroquinolines (THQs), indolines, and other related N-heterocycles, by merging visible-light photoredox catalysis and cobalt catalysis at ambient temperature, is described. The potential applications to organic transformations and hydrogen-storage materials are demonstrated. Primary mechanistic investigations indicate that the catalytic cycle occurs predominantly by an oxidative quenching pathway.

  5. Dehydrogenation of liquid fuel in microchannel catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Toseland, Bernard Allen; Pez, Guido Peter; Puri, Pushpinder Singh

    2010-08-03

    The present invention is an improved process for the storage and delivery of hydrogen by the reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of an organic compound wherein the organic compound is initially in its hydrogenated state. The improvement in the route to generating hydrogen is in the dehydrogenation step and recovery of the dehydrogenated organic compound resides in the following steps: introducing a hydrogenated organic compound to a microchannel reactor incorporating a dehydrogenation catalyst; effecting dehydrogenation of said hydrogenated organic compound under conditions whereby said hydrogenated organic compound is present as a liquid phase; generating a reaction product comprised of a liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound and gaseous hydrogen; separating the liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound from gaseous hydrogen; and, recovering the hydrogen and liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound.

  6. Dehydrogenation of liquid fuel in microchannel catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Toseland, Bernard Allen; Pez, Guido Peter; Puri, Pushpinder Singh

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is an improved process for the storage and delivery of hydrogen by the reversible hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of an organic compound wherein the organic compound is initially in its hydrogenated state. The improvement in the route to generating hydrogen is in the dehydrogenation step and recovery of the dehydrogenated organic compound resides in the following steps: introducing a hydrogenated organic compound to a microchannel reactor incorporating a dehydrogenation catalyst; effecting dehydrogenation of said hydrogenated organic compound under conditions whereby said hydrogenated organic compound is present as a liquid phase; generating a reaction product comprised of a liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound and gaseous hydrogen; separating the liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound from gaseous hydrogen; and, recovering the hydrogen and liquid phase dehydrogenated organic compound.

  7. Better Catalysts through Microscopy: Mesoscale M1/M2 Intergrowth in Molybdenum–Vanadium Based Complex Oxide Catalysts for Propane Ammoxidation

    DOE PAGES

    He, Qian; Woo, Jungwon; Belianinov, Alexei; ...

    2015-03-06

    Catalysis research has transformed from the predominantly empirical field to one where it is possible to control the catalytic properties via characterization and modification of the atomic-scale active centers. Many phenomena in catalysis, such as synergistic effect, however, transcend the atomic scale and also require the knowledge and control of the mesoscale structure of the specimen to harness. Our paper, we use our discovery of atomic-scale epitaxial interfaces in molybdenum vanadium based complex oxide catalysts systems (i.e., MoVMO, M = Ta, Te, Sb, Nb, etc.) to achieve control of the mesoscale structure of this complex mixture of very different activemore » phases. We can now achieve true epitaxial intergrowth between the catalytically critical M1 and M2 phases in the system that are hypothesized to have synergistic interactions, and demonstrate that the resulting catalyst has improved selectivity in the initial studies. Finally, we highlight the crucial role atomic scale characterization and mesoscale structure control play in uncovering the complex underpinnings of the synergistic effect in catalysis.« less

  8. Better Catalysts through Microscopy: Mesoscale M1/M2 Intergrowth in Molybdenum–Vanadium Based Complex Oxide Catalysts for Propane Ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qian; Woo, Jungwon; Belianinov, Alexei; Guliants, Vadim V.; Borisevich, Albina Y.

    2015-03-06

    Catalysis research has transformed from the predominantly empirical field to one where it is possible to control the catalytic properties via characterization and modification of the atomic-scale active centers. Many phenomena in catalysis, such as synergistic effect, however, transcend the atomic scale and also require the knowledge and control of the mesoscale structure of the specimen to harness. Our paper, we use our discovery of atomic-scale epitaxial interfaces in molybdenum vanadium based complex oxide catalysts systems (i.e., MoVMO, M = Ta, Te, Sb, Nb, etc.) to achieve control of the mesoscale structure of this complex mixture of very different active phases. We can now achieve true epitaxial intergrowth between the catalytically critical M1 and M2 phases in the system that are hypothesized to have synergistic interactions, and demonstrate that the resulting catalyst has improved selectivity in the initial studies. Finally, we highlight the crucial role atomic scale characterization and mesoscale structure control play in uncovering the complex underpinnings of the synergistic effect in catalysis.

  9. Base metal dehydrogenation of amine-boranes

    DOEpatents

    Blacquiere, Johanna Marie [Ottawa, CA; Keaton, Richard Jeffrey [Pearland, TX; Baker, Ralph Thomas [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-06-09

    A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane having the formula R.sup.1H.sub.2N--BH.sub.2R.sup.2 using base metal catalyst. The method generates hydrogen and produces at least one of a [R.sup.1HN--BHR.sup.2].sub.m oligomer and a [R.sup.1N--BR.sup.2].sub.n oligomer. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate H.sub.2 for portable power sources, such as, but not limited to, fuel cells.

  10. Nonacene Generated by On-Surface Dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zuzak, Rafal; Dorel, Ruth; Krawiec, Mariusz; Such, Bartosz; Kolmer, Marek; Szymonski, Marek; Echavarren, Antonio M; Godlewski, Szymon

    2017-09-26

    The on-surface synthesis of nonacene has been accomplished by dehydrogenation of an air-stable partially saturated precursor, which could be aromatized by using a combined scanning tunneling and atomic force microscope as well as by on-surface annealing. This transformation allowed the in-detail analysis of the electronic properties of nonacene molecules physisorbed on Au(111) by scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements. The spatial mapping of molecular orbitals was corroborated by density functional theory calculations. Furthermore, the thermally induced dehydrogenation uncovered the isomerization of intermediate dihydrononacene species, which allowed for their in-depth structural and electronic characterization.

  11. Elucidating the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziyun; Liu, Xinyi; Rooney, D. W.; Hu, P.

    2015-10-01

    The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone is very important in the manufacture of nylon. Copper-based catalysts are the most popular catalysts for this reaction, and on these catalysts the reaction mechanism and active site are in debate. In order to elucidate the mechanism and active site of the cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on copper-based catalysts, density functional theory with dispersion corrections were performed on up to six facets of copper in two different oxidation states: monovalent copper and metallic copper. By calculating the surface energies of these facets, Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) were found to be the most stable facets for metallic copper and for monovalent copper, respectively. On these two facets, all the possible elementary steps in the dehydrogenation pathway of cyclohexanol were calculated, including the adsorption, dehydrogenation, hydrogen coupling and desorption. Two different reaction pathways for dehydrogenation were considered on both surfaces. It was revealed that the dehydrogenation mechanisms are different on these two surfaces: on Cu(111) the hydrogen belonging to the hydroxyl is removed first, then the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is subtracted, while on Cu2O(111) the hydrogen belonging to the carbon is removed followed by the subtraction of the hydrogen in the hydroxyl group. Furthermore, by comparing the energy profiles of these two surfaces, Cu2O(111) was found to be more active for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation than Cu(111). In addition, we found that the coordinatively unsaturated copper sites on Cu2O(111) are the reaction sites for all the steps. Therefore, the coordinatively unsaturated copper site on Cu2O(111) is likely to be the active site for cyclohexanol dehydrogenation on the copper-based catalysts.

  12. Influence of Ionic Liquids on an Iron(III) Catalyzed Three-Component Coupling/Hydroarylation/Dehydrogenation Tandem Reaction.

    PubMed

    Muntzeck, Maren; Wilhelm, René

    2016-06-01

    A three-component oxidative dehydrogenation tandem reaction via the coupling and hydroarylation of benzaldehyde, aniline and phenylacetylene to a quinoline derivate was catalyzed by an iron-containing ionic liquid. The reaction was air mediated and could be performed under neat conditions. The iron(III) of the ionic liquid was the oxidizing species.

  13. Influence of Ionic Liquids on an Iron(III) Catalyzed Three-Component Coupling/Hydroarylation/Dehydrogenation Tandem Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Muntzeck, Maren; Wilhelm, René

    2016-01-01

    A three-component oxidative dehydrogenation tandem reaction via the coupling and hydroarylation of benzaldehyde, aniline and phenylacetylene to a quinoline derivate was catalyzed by an iron-containing ionic liquid. The reaction was air mediated and could be performed under neat conditions. The iron(III) of the ionic liquid was the oxidizing species. PMID:27258264

  14. Acceptorless dehydrogenation of small molecules through cooperative base metal catalysis

    PubMed Central

    West, Julian G.; Huang, David; Sorensen, Erik J.

    2015-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of unactivated alkanes is an important transformation both in industrial and biological systems. Recent efforts towards this reaction have revolved around high temperature, organometallic C–H activation by noble metal catalysts that produce alkenes and hydrogen gas as the sole products. Conversely, natural desaturase systems proceed through stepwise hydrogen atom transfer at physiological temperature; however, these transformations require a terminal oxidant. Here we show combining tetra-n-butylammonium decatungstate (TBADT) and cobaloxime pyridine chloride (COPC) can catalytically dehydrogenate unactivated alkanes and alcohols under near-UV irradiation at room temperature with hydrogen as the sole by-product. This noble metal-free process follows a nature-inspired pathway of high- and low-energy hydrogen atom abstractions. The hydrogen evolution ability of cobaloximes is leveraged to render the system catalytic, with cooperative turnover numbers up to 48 and yields up to 83%. Our results demonstrate how cooperative base metal catalysis can achieve transformations previously restricted to precious metal catalysts. PMID:26656087

  15. Propane vehicles : status, challenges, and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect

    Rood Werpy, M.; Burnham, A.; Bertram, K.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-17

    Propane as an auto fuel has a high octane value and has key properties required for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. To operate a vehicle on propane as either a dedicated fuel or bi-fuel (i.e., switching between gasoline and propane) vehicle, only a few modifications must be made to the engine. Until recently propane vehicles have commonly used a vapor pressure system that was somewhat similar to a carburetion system, wherein the propane would be vaporized and mixed with combustion air in the intake plenum of the engine. This leads to lower efficiency as more air, rather than fuel, is inducted into the cylinder for combustion (Myers 2009). A newer liquid injection system has become available that injects propane directly into the cylinder, resulting in no mixing penalty because air is not diluted with the gaseous fuel in the intake manifold. Use of a direct propane injection system will improve engine efficiency (Gupta 2009). Other systems include the sequential multi-port fuel injection system and a bi-fuel 'hybrid' sequential propane injection system. Carbureted systems remain in use but mostly for non-road applications. In the United States a closed-loop system is used in after-market conversions. This system incorporates an electronic sensor that provides constant feedback to the fuel controller to allow it to measure precisely the proper air/fuel ratio. A complete conversion system includes a fuel controller, pressure regulator valves, fuel injectors, electronics, fuel tank, and software. A slight power loss is expected in conversion to a vapor pressure system, but power can still be optimized with vehicle modifications of such items as the air/fuel mixture and compression ratios. Cold start issues are eliminated for vapor pressure systems since the air/fuel mixture is gaseous. In light-duty propane vehicles, the fuel tank is typically mounted in the trunk; for medium- and heavy-duty vans and trucks, the tank is located under the body of the vehicle

  16. Epoxidation of Short-Chain Alkenes by Resting-Cell Suspensions of Propane-Grown Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ching T.; Patel, Ramesh; Laskin, Allen I.; Barnabe, Nancy; Barist, Irene

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen new cultures of propane-utilizing bacteria were isolated from lake water from Warinanco Park, Linden, N.J. and from lake and soil samples from Bayway Refinery, Linden, N.J. In addition, 19 known cultures obtained from culture collections were also found to be able to grow on propane as the sole carbon and energy source. In addition to their ability to oxidize n-alkanes, resting-cell suspensions of both new cultures and known cultures grown on propane oxidize short-chain alkenes to their corresponding 1,2-epoxides. Among the substrate alkenes, propylene was oxidized at the highest rate. In contrast to the case with methylotrophic bacteria, the product epoxides are further metabolized. Propane and other gaseous n-alkanes inhibit the epoxidation of propylene. The optimum conditions for in vivo epoxidation are described. Results from inhibition studies indicate that a propane monooxygenase system catalyzes both the epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions. Experiments with cell-free extracts show that both hydroxylation and epoxidation activities are located in the soluble fraction obtained after 80,000 × g centrifugation. PMID:16346338

  17. Divergent Metabolic Pathways for Propane and Propionate Utilization by a Soil Isolate1

    PubMed Central

    Vestal, J. R.; Perry, Jerome J.

    1969-01-01

    The metabolism of propane and propionate by a soil isolate (Brevibacterium sp. strain JOB5) was investigated. The presence of isocitrate lyase in cells grown on isopropanol, acetate, or propane and the absence of this inducible enzyme in n-propanol- and propionate-grown cells suggested that propane is not metabolized via C-terminal oxidation. Methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase and malate synthase are constitutive in this organism. The incorporation of 14CO2 into pyruvate accumulated during propionate utilization suggests that propionate is metabolized via the methyl-malonyl-succinate pathway. These results were further substantiated by radiorespirometric studies with propionate-1-14C, -2-14C, and -3-14C as substrate. Propane -2-14C was shown, by unlabeled competitor experiments, to be oxidized to acetone; acetone and isopropanol are oxidized in this organism to acetol. Cleavage of acetol to acetate and CO2 would yield the inducer for the isocitrate lyase present in propane-grown cells. PMID:5802607

  18. Evolutionary history of a specialized P450 propane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Fasan, Rudi; Meharenna, Yergalem T.; Snow, Christopher D.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The evolutionary pressures that shaped the specificity and catalytic efficiency of enzymes can only be speculated. While directed evolution experiments show that new functions can be acquired under positive selection with few mutations, the role of negative selection in eliminating undesired activities and achieving high specificity remains unclear. Here we examine intermediates along the ‘lineage’ from a naturally-occurring C12–C20 fatty acid hydroxylase (P450BM3) to a laboratory-evolved P450 propane monooxygenase (P450PMO) having 20 heme domain substitutions compared to P450BM3. Biochemical, crystallographic and computational analyses show that a minimal perturbation of the P450BM3 fold and substrate binding pocket accompanies a significant broadening of enzyme substrate range and the emergence of propane activity. In contrast, refinement of the enzyme catalytic efficiency for propane oxidation (~9,000-fold increase in kcat/Km) involves profound reshaping and partitioning of the substrate access pathway. Remodeling of the substrate recognition mechanisms ultimately results in remarkable narrowing of the substrate profile around propane and enables the acquisition of a basal iodomethane dehalogenase activity as yet unknown in natural alkane monooxygenases. A highly destabilizing L188P substitution in a region of the enzyme that undergoes a large conformational change during catalysis plays an important role in adaptation to the gaseous alkane. This work demonstrates that positive selection alone is sufficient to completely re-specialize the cytochrome P450 for function on a non-native substrate. PMID:18619466

  19. Dermal and pulmonary absorption of propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol from hand rubs.

    PubMed

    Below, Harald; Partecke, Ivo; Huebner, Nils-Olaf; Bieber, Nora; Nicolai, Thomas; Usche, Alexander; Assadian, Ojan; Below, Elke; Kampf, Günter; Parzefall, Wolfram; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Zuba, Dariusz; Bessonneau, Vincent; Kohlmann, Thomas; Kramer, Axel

    2012-04-01

    It has been shown that nontoxic concentrations of ethanol are absorbed after hand hygiene using ethanol-based hand rubs. This study investigated whether absorption of propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol from commercially available hand rubs results in measurable concentrations after use. The pulmonary and dermal absorption of propanol during hand rubs was investigated. Rubs contained 70% (w/w) propan-1-ol, 63.14% (w/w) propan-2-ol, or 45% (w/w) propan-2-ol in combination with 30% (w/w) propan-1-ol. Peak median blood levels were 9.15 mg/L for propan-1-ol and 5.3 mg/L for propan-2-ol after hygienic hand rubs and 18.0 mg/L and 10.0 mg/L, respectively, after surgical hand rubs. Under actual surgical conditions, the highest median blood levels were 4.08 mg/L for propan-1-ol and 2.56 mg/L for propan-2-ol. The same procedure performed with prevention of pulmonary exposure through the use of a gas-tight mask resulted in peak median blood levels of 1.16 mg/L of propan-1-ol and 1.74 mg/L of propan-2-ol. Only minimal amounts of propanols are absorbed through the use of hand rubs. Based on our experimental data, the risk of chronic systemic toxic effects caused by hand rubs is likely negligible. However, our study did not evaluate the consequences of long-term daily and frequent use of hygienic hand rubs. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of MoVTeNbOx catalysts during oxidation reactions using in situ/operando techniques: A review

    DOE PAGES

    Lwin, Soe; Diao, Weijian; Baroi, Chinmoy; ...

    2017-04-08

    The domestic fossil feedstock in recent years is shifting towards light hydrocarbons due to abundance of shale gas from hydraulic fracturing. This shift induces a need for greater flexibility in both new and existing processing plants to produce consumer products (polymers, paints, lubricants, etc.) from new feedstocks. The oxidative catalytic reactions operate at milder conditions than the processing of feedstocks through steam cracking. The conversion of light feedstocks (C3 and shorter hydrocarbons) to high value chemicals through highly selective catalysts in the presence of oxygen plays a crucial role in eliminating wastes, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and lowering market prices.more » Among all catalysts for light hydrocarbon processing through oxidation reactions, bulk mixed metal oxides such as MoVTe(Sb)NbOx catalysts are the most promising due to their performance under favorable reaction conditions (temperature, pressure, etc). Here, state-of-the-art in situ/operando techniques along with transient kinetics can revolutionize the development of catalysts by providing information about the nature of active sites, intermediates and kinetics under realistic industrial conditions. Only through detailed understanding of these catalyst behaviors can new synthesis methods be developed that will improve reactivity, selectivity and lifetimes of these catalysts. In this review, dynamic changes of this mixed oxide catalyst during the reaction (such as changes in surface composition, oxidation states, acidity, etc) are discussed mainly from knowledge and insights obtained from these in situ/operando approaches. The most common oxidation reactions driven by the MoVTeNbOx catalysts and studied under operando/in situ conditions to be discussed here are: (1) oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes (ethane and propane), (2) propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and (3) selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid.« less

  1. Catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohol over solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiguchi, Satoshi; Okumura, Kazu; Nagashima, Sayoko; Chihara, Teiji

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters catalyzed the dehydrogenation of alcohol. • The dehydrogenation proceeded without the addition of any oxidants. • The catalytic activity developed when the cluster was activated at 300–500 °C in H{sub 2}. • The Lewis-acidic molybdenum atom and basic sulfur ligand were catalytically active. • The clusters function as bifunctional acid–base catalysts. - Abstract: Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework, the superconducting Chevrel phases, are applied to catalysis. A copper salt of a nonstoichiometric sulfur-deficient cluster, Cu{sub x}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8–δ} (x = 2.94 and δ ≈ 0.3), is stored in air for more than 90 days. When the oxygenated cluster is thermally activated in a hydrogen stream above 300 °C, catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of primary alcohols to aldehydes and secondary alcohols to ketones develops. The addition of pyridine or benzoic acid decreases the dehydrogenation activity, indicating that both a Lewis-acidic coordinatively unsaturated molybdenum atom and a basic sulfur ligand synergistically act as the catalytic active sites.

  2. Thermodynamic properties and ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for 2-aminoisobutyric acid (2-methylalanine), acetic acid, (Z)-5-ethylidene-2-norbornene, mesityl oxide (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one), 4-methylpent-1-ene, 2,2{prime}-bis(phenylthio)propane, and glycidyl phenyl ether (1,2-epoxy-3-phenoxypropane)

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Cowell, A.B.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.

    1997-11-01

    The results of a study aimed at improvement of group-contribution methodology for estimation of thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in the condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of acetic acid, (Z)-5-ethylidene-2-norbornene, mesityl oxide (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one), 4-methylpent-1-ene, glycidyl phenyl ether (1,2-epoxy-3-phenoxypropane), and 2,2{prime}-bis(phenylthio)propane are reported. An enthalpy of formation of 2-aminoisobutyric acid (2-methylalanine) in the crystalline phase was determined. Using a literature value for the enthalpy of sublimation of 2-aminoisobutyric acid, a value for the ideal-gas enthalpy of formation was derived. An enthalpy of fusion was determined for 2,2{prime}-bis(phenylthio)propane. Two-phase (solid + vapor) or (liquid + vapor) heat capacities were determined from 300 K to the critical region or earlier decomposition temperature for all the compounds except acetic acid. For mesityl oxide and 4-methylpent-1-ene, critical temperatures and critical densities were determined from the DSC results and corresponding critical pressures derived from the fitting procedures. Group-additivity parameters and ring strain energies useful in the application of group-contribution correlations were derived.

  3. Effect of Porphyrin Ligands on the Regioselective Dehydrogenation versus Epoxidation of Olefins by Oxoiron(IV) Mimics of Cytochrome P450

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Devesh; Tahsini, Laleh; Visser, Sam P. De; Kang, Hye Yeon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Nam, Wonwoo

    2009-08-01

    The cytochromes P450 are versatile enzymes involved in various catalytic oxidation reactions, such as hydroxylation, epoxidation and dehydrogenation. In this work, we present combined experimental and theoretical studies on the change of regioselectivity in cyclohexadiene oxidation (i.e., epoxidation vs dehydrogenation) by oxoiron(IV) porphyrin complexes bearing different porphyrin ligands. Our experimental results show that meso-substitution of the porphyrin ring with electron-withdrawing substituents leads to a regioselectivity switch from dehydrogenation to epoxidation, affording the formation of epoxide as a major product. In contrast, electron-rich iron porphyrins are shown to produce benzene resulting from the dehydrogenation of cyclohexadiene. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the regioselectivity switch of epoxidation vs dehydrogenation have been performed using three oxoiron(IV) porphyrin oxidants with hydrogen atoms, phenyl groups, and pentachlorophenyl (ArCl5) groups on the meso-position. The DFT studies show that the epoxidation reaction by the latter catalyst is stabilized because of favorable interactions of the substrate with halogen atoms of the meso-ligand as well as with pyrrole nitrogen atoms of the porphyrin macrocycle. Hydrogen abstraction transition states, in contrast, have a substrate-binding orientation further away from the porphyrin pyrrole nitrogens, and they are much less stabilized. Finally, the regioselectivity of dehydrogenation versus hydroxylation is rationalized using thermodynamic cycles.

  4. The Millimeter-Wave Spectrum of Propanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingsheim, Oliver; Müller, Holger S. P.; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    The microwave spectrum of propanal, also known as propionaldehyde, CH_3CH_2CHO, has been investigated in the laboratory already since 1964^1 and has also been detected in space^2. Recently, propanal was detected with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)^3. The high sensitivity and resolution of ALMA indicated small discrepancies between observed and predicted rotational spectra of propanal. As higher accuracies are desired the spectrum of propanal was measured up to 500 GHz with the Cologne (Sub-)Millimeter spectrometer. Propanal has two stable conformers, syn and gauche, which differ mainly in the rotation of the aldehyd group with respect to the rigid C-atom framework of the molecule. We extensively studied both of them. The lower syn-conformer shows small splittings caused by the internal rotation of the methyl group, whereas the spectrum of gauche-propanal is complicated due to the tunneling rotation interaction from two stable degenerate conformers. Additionally, we analyzed vibrationally excited states. ^1 Butcher et al., J. Chem. Phys. 40 6 (1964) ^2 Hollis et al., Astrophys. J. 610 L21 (2004) ^3 Lykke et al., A&A 597 A53 (2017)

  5. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  6. Thermodynamic aspects of dehydrogenation reactions on noble metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Svane, K. L. Hammer, B.

    2014-11-07

    The reaction free energy for dehydrogenation of phenol, aniline, thiophenol, benzoic acid, and 1,4-benzenediol on the close packed copper, silver, and gold surfaces has been studied by density functional theory calculations. Dehydrogenation of thiophenol is found to be favourable on all three surfaces while aniline does not dehydrogenate on any of them. For phenol, benzenediol and benzoic acid dehydrogenation is favourable on copper and silver only, following the general trend of an increasing reaction free energy when going form gold to silver to copper. This trend can be correlated with the changes in bond lengths within the molecule upon dehydrogenation. While copper is able to replace hydrogen, leaving small changes in the bond lengths of the aromatic ring, the metal-molecule bond is weaker for silver and gold, resulting in a partial loss of aromaticity. This difference in bond strength leads to pronounced differences in adsorption geometries upon multiple dehydrogenations.

  7. Reactivity of alkanes on zeolites: a computational study of propane conversion reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Blowers, Paul

    2005-12-01

    In this work, quantum chemical methods were used to study propane conversion reactions on zeolites; these reactions included protolytic cracking, primary hydrogen exchange, secondary hydrogen exchange, and dehydrogenation reactions. The reactants, products, and transition-state structures were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G level and the energies were calculated with CBS-QB3, a complete basis set composite energy method. The computed activation barriers were 62.1 and 62.6 kcal/mol for protolytic cracking through two different transition states, 30.4 kcal/mol for primary hydrogen exchange, 29.8 kcal/mol for secondary hydrogen exchange, and 76.7 kcal/mol for dehydrogenation reactions. The effects of basis set for the geometry optimization and zeolite acidity on the reaction barriers were also investigated. Adding extra polarization and diffuse functions for the geometry optimization did not affect the activation barriers obtained with the composite energy method. The largest difference in calculated activation barriers is within 1 kcal/mol. Reaction activation barriers do change as zeolite acidity changes, however. Linear relationships were found between activation barriers and zeolite deprotonation energies. Analytical expressions for each reaction were proposed so that accurate activation barriers can be obtained when using different zeolites as catalysts, as long as the deprotonation energies are first acquired.

  8. Cross dehydrogenative arylation (CDA) of a benzylic C-H bond with arenes by iron catalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Zhou; Li, Bi-Jie; Lu, Xing-Yu; Lin, Song; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2009-01-01

    Hooking up: FeCl(2) catalyzes the efficient cross dehydrogenative arylation of substrates having benzylic C-H bonds (see scheme). High regioselectivity was observed during the cross-coupling between compounds containing aromatic C(sp(2))-H bonds and benzylic C(sp(3))-H bonds. This process is proposed to proceed by single-electron-transfer oxidation and Friedel-Crafts alkylation.

  9. An unnatural death by propan-1-ol and propan-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Skopp, Gisela; Gutmann, Isabelle; Schwarz, Clara-Sophie; Schmitt, Georg

    2016-07-01

    A fatality of an inpatient ingesting a disinfectant containing ethanol, propan-1-ol, and propan-2-ol is reported. The alleged survival time was about 1 h. Major findings at autopsy were an extended hemorrhagic lung edema, an edematous brain, and shock kidneys. Concentrations of alcohols and acetone, a major metabolite of propan-2-ol, were determined from body fluids (blood from the heart and the femoral vein, urine, gastric contents) and tissues (brain, muscle, liver, kidneys, lungs) by headspace/gas chromatography using 2-methylpropan-2-ol as the internal standard. All samples investigated were positive for propan-1-ol, propan-2-ol, ethanol, and acetone except stomach contents, where acetone was not detectable. The low concentration of acetone compared to propan-2-ol likely supports the short survival time. The concentration ratios estimated from the results are in accordance with the physico-chemical properties of the particular alcohols, their different affinities towards alcohol dehydrogenase as well as their interdependence during biotransformation. Autopsy did not reveal the cause of death. According to the few published data, blood concentrations of 1.44 and 1.70 mg/g of propan-2-ol and propan-1-ol, respectively, are considered sufficient to have caused the death. This case also points to the need to restrict access to antiseptic solutions containing alcohols in wards with patients at risk.

  10. Regioselective functionalization of alkanes by sequential dehydrogenation-hydrozirconation.

    PubMed

    Kuninobu, Yoichiro; Ureshino, Tomonari; Yamamoto, Shun-ichi; Takai, Kazuhiko

    2010-08-07

    We have succeeded in formal regioselective functionalization of alkanes by iridium-catalyzed dehydrogenation, hydrozirconation of the resulting alkenes, and electrophilic reaction of the generated alkylzirconium intermediate.

  11. I2-Catalyzed C-O Bond Formation and Dehydrogenation: Facile Synthesis of Oxazolines and Oxazoles Controlled by Bases.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Chao; Hu, Fei; Huo, Yu-Ming; Chang, Hong-Hong; Li, Xing; Wei, Wen-Long

    2015-08-07

    A general method for the synthesis of oxazolines and oxazoles was developed through I2-catalyzed C-O bond formation and dehydrogenation with the same oxidant, TBHP. By simply tuning reaction bases, either oxazolines or oxazoles were selectively produced from β-acylamino ketones.

  12. Changing the dehydrogenation pathway of LiBH4-MgH2via nanosized lithiated TiO2.

    PubMed

    Puszkiel, J A; Castro Riglos, M V; Karimi, F; Santoru, A; Pistidda, C; Klassen, T; Bellosta von Colbe, J M; Dornheim, M

    2017-03-15

    Nanosized lithiated titanium oxide (LixTiO2) noticeably improves the kinetic behaviour of 2LiBH4 + MgH2. The presence of LixTiO2 reduces the time required for the first dehydrogenation by suppressing the intermediate reaction to Li2B12H12, leading to direct MgB2 formation.

  13. Visible-Light-Catalyzed Direct Benzylic C(sp(3))-H Amination Reaction by Cross-Dehydrogenative Coupling.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ganesh; Laha, Ramkrishna

    2015-12-01

    A conceptually new and synthetically valuable cross-dehydrogenative benzylic C(sp(3))-H amination reaction is reported by visible-light photoredox catalysis. This protocol employs DCA (9,10-dicyanoanthracene) as a visible-light-absorbing photoredox catalyst and an amide as the nitrogen source without the need of either a transition metal or an external oxidant.

  14. Synthesis of Borohydride and Catalytic Dehydrogenation by Hydrogel Based Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynuegri, Tugba Akkas; Karabulut, Ahmet F.; Guru, Metin

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis of calcium borohydride (Ca(BH4)2) as hydrogen storage material. Calcium chloride salt (CaCl2), magnesium hydride (MgH2), and boron oxide (B2O3) were used as reactants in the mechanochemical synthesis of Ca(BH4)2. The mechanochemical reaction was carried out by means of Spex type ball milling without applying high pressure and temperature. Parametric studies have been established at different reaction times and for different amounts of reactants at a constant ball to powder ratio (BPR) 4:1. The best combination was determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) analysis. According to the FT-IR analysis, reaction time, the first reaction parameter, was found as 1600 min. After the reaction time was fixed at 1600 min, the difference of the B-H peak areas was dependent on the amount of reactant MgH2 that was investigated. The amount of the reactant (MgH2), the second reaction parameter, was measured to be 2.85 times more than the stoichiometric amount of MgH2. According to our previous studies, BPR was selected as 4:1 for all experiments. Samples were prepared in a glove box under argon atmosphere but the time that elapsed for FT-IR analysis highly affected B-H bonds. B-H peak areas clearly decreased with time because of negative effect of ambient atmosphere. A catalyst was prepared by absorbing cobalt fluoride (CoF2) in poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel matrices type and its catalytic dehydrogenation performance that has been characterized by the catalytic reaction of sodium borohydride's known hydrogen capacity in an alkaline medium. The metal amount of hydrogel catalyst was determined as 135.82 mg Co by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The specific dehydrogenation capacity of the Co active compound in the catalyst thanks to catalytic dehydrogenation of commercial sodium borohydride was measured as 1.66 mL H2/mg Co.

  15. The effect of sulphur on the nonsteady state reaction of propane over a platinum/alumina catalyst at 873 K

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.D.; Leeming, P.; Grenfell, J.

    1994-11-01

    The addition of sulphur to Pt/alumina catalysts, both in the preparation stage and in the gas phase during reaction, has been investigated as to the effect on catalyst activity and selectivity for propane dehydrogenation. The sole hydrocarbon product produced from pulses of propane over a freshly reduced Pt/alumina catalyst at 873 K in the absence of sulphur was methane, with concomitant carbon laydown. The effect on activity and selectivity of predosing the catalyst with hydrogen sulphide at 293 and 873 K was examined, as was the effect of cofeeding at ratios of 1:10 and 10:1 H{sub 2}S:C{sub 3}H{sub 8}. Predosing at 873 K had the largest effect on selectivity, allowing the formation of propene from the first pulse of propane, whereas cofeeding required the build-up of sulphur on the surface before selectivity was achieved. Adding sulphur into the catalyst preparation was more effective than subsequent addition from the gas phase. The results also indicated that the selectivity observed was not directly related to the amount of sulphur on the surface. The presence of a hydrogen reservoir on the catalyst, which was available for reaction, was detected using catalysts reduced in deuterium. The results also indicated that hydrogen from adsorbed hydrogen sulphide could react with hydrocarbon fragments on the catalyst surface to produce methane. 31 refs., 7 tabs.

  16. Cellular Lipids of a Nocardia Grown on Propane and n-Butane

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. B.

    1964-01-01

    Lipid fractions of propane- and n-butane-grown nocardial cells each contain a chloroform-soluble, ether-insoluble polymer not observed previously in liquid n-alkane-grown cells. The polymer in propane-grown cells is poly-β-hydroxybutyrate. The polymer in n-butane-grown cells apparently contains unsaturation in the molecule, and is identified tentatively as a co-polymer of β-hydroxybutyric and β-hydroxybutenoic (specifically 3-hydroxy 2-butenoic) acids. The other major component of the lipid fraction consists of triglycerides containing principally palmitic and stearic acids. There seems to be little qualitative distinction in the glycerides of propane- or n-butane-grown cells. Oxidative assimilation of n-butane is described. PMID:14199017

  17. Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Frances Helen; Baker, Ralph Thomas

    2010-01-12

    A method of dehydrogenating an amine-borane using an acid-catalyzed reaction. The method generates hydrogen and produces a solid polymeric [R.sup.1R.sup.2B--NR.sup.3R.sup.4].sub.n product. The method of dehydrogenating amine-boranes may be used to generate H.sub.2 for portable power sources.

  18. Acceptorless Photocatalytic Dehydrogenation for Alcohol Decarbonylation and Imine Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Hung-An; Manna, Kuntal; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2012-07-29

    It has come to light: Renewed interest in conversions of highly oxygenated materials has motivated studies of the organometallic-catalyzed photocatalytic dehydrogenative decarbonylation of primary alcohols into alkanes, CO, and H2 (see scheme). Methanol, ethanol, benzyl alcohol, and cyclohexanemethanol are readily decarbonylated. The photocatalysts are also active for amine dehydrogenation to give N-alkyl aldimines and H2.

  19. Adsorption and desorption of propane on Pd (111): A van der Waals density functional study. Energy binding sites and geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    e Silva, Tadeu Leonardo Soares; Schmal, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Palladium supported catalysts used for the partial oxidation of propane reaction aiming the H2 production deserves specific characterizations and theoretical modeling for the explanation of the transition phase and energy needed for the adsorption and desorption of propane on top of the palladium atoms. On the other hand, the product distribution will depend on the adsorption and desorption capacity of the different compounds present during the reaction. In this work, the adsorption of propane on a Pd (111) surface was studied by using different approximations. A periodic method based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT) formalism employing vdW-DF functional was investigated for determining preferred binding sites of propane on palladium. The results show that the adsorption on hcp site is more stable than on top site and predictions fit well the experimental results.

  20. A Three-Stage Mechanistic Model for Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation by Shvo’s Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiyao; Conley, Brian L.; Williams, Travis J.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a mechanistic model for three-stage dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB) catalyzed by Shvo’s cyclopentadienone-ligated ruthenium complex. We provide evidence for a plausible mechanism for catalyst deactivation, the transition from fast catalysis to slow catalysis, and relate those findings to the invention of a second-generation catalyst that does not suffer from the same deactivation chemistry. The primary mechanism of catalyst deactivation is borazine-mediated hydroboration of the ruthenium species that is the active oxidant in the fast catalysis case. This transition is characterized by a change in the rate law for the reaction and changes in the apparent resting state of the catalyst. Also, in this slow catalysis situation, we see an additional intermediate in the sequence of boron, nitrogen species, aminodiborane. This occurs with concurrent generation of NH3, which itself does not strongly affect the rate of AB dehydrogenation. PMID:23335832

  1. RMP Guidance for Propane Storage Facilities - Main Text

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document is intended as comprehensive Risk Management Program guidance for larger propane storage or distribution facilities who already comply with propane industry standards. Includes sample RMP, and release calculations.

  2. Metabolism of Propane, n-Propylamine, and Propionate by Hydrocarbon-Utilizing Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, W. T.; Perry, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the oxidation and assimilation of various three-carbon compounds by a gram-positive rod isolated from soil and designated strain R-22. This organism can utilize propane, propionate, or n-propylamine as sole source of carbon and energy. Respiration rates, enzyme assays, and 14CO2 incorporation experiments suggest that propane is metabolized via methyl ketone formation; propionate and n-propylamine are metabolized via the methylmalonyl-succinate pathway. Isocitrate lyase activity was found in cells grown on acetate and was not present in cells grown on propionate or n-propylamine. 14CO2 was incorporated into pyruvate when propionate and n-propylamine were oxidized in the presence of NaAsO2, but insignificant radioactivity was found in pyruvate produced during the oxidation of propane and acetone. The n-propylamine dissimilatory mechanism was inducible in strain R-22, and amine dehydrogenase activity was detected in cells grown on n-propylamine. Radiorespirometer and 14CO2 incorporation studies with several propane-utilizing organisms indicate that the methylmalonyl-succinate pathway is the predominant one for the metabolism of propionate. PMID:16559164

  3. . . . While Others Conserve Cash by Converting from Gasoline to Propane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Scott A.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1983, when the David Douglas Public Schools (Portland, Oregon) converted 30 buses to propane fuel, the district has saved $75,000 in fuel and maintenance costs. Propane is priced consistently lower than gasoline and burns cleaner. Since propane engines do not require a carburetor, there are fewer maintenance problems. (MLH)

  4. . . . While Others Conserve Cash by Converting from Gasoline to Propane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Scott A.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1983, when the David Douglas Public Schools (Portland, Oregon) converted 30 buses to propane fuel, the district has saved $75,000 in fuel and maintenance costs. Propane is priced consistently lower than gasoline and burns cleaner. Since propane engines do not require a carburetor, there are fewer maintenance problems. (MLH)

  5. Portland Public School Children Move with Propane

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of propane as a fuel source for Portland Public Schools' fleet of buses. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Portland Public Schools.

  6. Case Study - Propane Bakery Delivery Step Vans

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, M.; Burnham, A.

    2016-04-01

    A switch to propane from diesel by a major Midwest bakery fleet showed promising results, including a significant displacement of petroleum, a drop in greenhouse gases and a fuel cost savings of seven cents per mile, according to a study recently completed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory for the Clean Cities program.

  7. Case Study - Propane School Bus Fleets

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, M; Burnham, A.

    2014-08-31

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) effort to deploy transportation technologies that reduce U.S. dependence on imported petroleum, this study examines five school districts, one in Virginia and four in Texas, successful use of propane school buses. These school districts used school buses equipped with the newly developed liquid propane injection system that improves vehicle performance. Some of the school districts in this study saved nearly 50% on a cost per mile basis for fuel and maintenance relative to diesel. Using Argonne National Laboratory’s Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Transportation (AFLEET) Tool developed for the DOE’s Clean Cities program to help Clean Cities stakeholders estimate petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions and cost of ownership of light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles, the results showed payback period ranges from 3—8 years, recouping the incremental cost of the vehicles and infrastructure. Overall, fuel economy for these propane vehicles is close to that of displaced diesel vehicles, on an energy-equivalent basis. In addition, the 110 propane buses examined demonstrated petroleum displacement, 212,000 diesel gallon equivalents per year, and GHG benefits of 770 tons per year.

  8. Theoretical Investigation of the Gas-Phase Reaction of CrO(+) with Propane.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jennifer E; Dudley, Timothy J

    2017-03-02

    Transition metal oxide cations (e.g., MO(+)) have been shown to oxidize small alkanes in the gas phase. The chromium oxide cation is of particular interest because it is more reactive than oxides of earlier transition metals but is more selective than oxides of later transition metals. The reaction of CrO(+) with propane has been shown to produce a number of products: propanol, propene, ethene, and hydrogen. Few theoretical studies exist for reactions of simple transition metal oxide cations with larger alkanes. We have analyzed the potential energy surfaces associated with the reaction of CrO(+) with propane using two DFT methods, B3LYP and M06-L. Energetically viable reaction paths leading to each experimentally observed product have been characterized. Each reaction path begins with formation of a reactive intermediate in which either an α- or β-hydrogen from propane is extracted by the oxygen atom of CrO(+). While pathways leading to formation of hydrogen and ethene were found to occur on a single spin surface, energetically viable pathways to forming propanol and propene require a transition from the quartet spin surface to the sextet surface. The minimum-energy crossing points between the quartet and sextet surfaces were found to be well below the energy level of the reactants and structurally resemble the initial reactive intermediates.

  9. Second sphere ligand modifications enable a recyclable catalyst for oxidant-free alcohol oxidation to carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eric W; Louis-Goff, Thomas; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2017-02-14

    Modification of the classic terpyridine pincer ligand with pendent NHR (R = mesityl) groups provides enhanced activity and stability in Ru-catalyzed dehydrogenation catalysis. These second sphere modifications furnish highly active catalysts for the oxidant-free dehydrogenative oxidation of primary alcohols to carboxylates and facilitate catalyst recycling.

  10. An experimental survey of additives for improving dehydrogenation properties of magnesium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengshang; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sun, Pei

    2015-03-01

    The use of a wide range of additives has been known as an important method for improving hydrogen storage properties of MgH2. There is a lack of a standard methodology, however, that can be used to select or compare the effectiveness of different additives. A systematic experimental survey was carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. MgH2 with various additives were prepared by using a high-energy-high-pressure planetary ball milling method and characterized by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. The results showed that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Additives such as Al, In, Sn, Si showed minor effects on the kinetics of the dehydrogenation of MgH2, while exhibiting moderate thermodynamic destabilizing effects. In combination, MgH2 with both kinetic and thermodynamic additives, such as the MgH2-In-TiMn2 system, exhibited a drastically decreased dehydrogenation temperature.

  11. Cross-dehydrogenative coupling for the intermolecular C–O bond formation

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Igor B; Vil’, Vera A

    2015-01-01

    Summary The present review summarizes primary publications on the cross-dehydrogenative C–O coupling, with special emphasis on the studies published after 2000. The starting compound, which donates a carbon atom for the formation of a new C–O bond, is called the CH-reagent or the C-reagent, and the compound, an oxygen atom of which is involved in the new bond, is called the OH-reagent or the O-reagent. Alcohols and carboxylic acids are most commonly used as O-reagents; hydroxylamine derivatives, hydroperoxides, and sulfonic acids are employed less often. The cross-dehydrogenative C–O coupling reactions are carried out using different C-reagents, such as compounds containing directing functional groups (amide, heteroaromatic, oxime, and so on) and compounds with activated C–H bonds (aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, compounds containing the benzyl, allyl, or propargyl moiety). An analysis of the published data showed that the principles at the basis of a particular cross-dehydrogenative C–O coupling reaction are dictated mainly by the nature of the C-reagent. Hence, in the present review the data are classified according to the structures of C-reagents, and, in the second place, according to the type of oxidative systems. Besides the typical cross-dehydrogenative coupling reactions of CH- and OH-reagents, closely related C–H activation processes involving intermolecular C–O bond formation are discussed: acyloxylation reactions with ArI(O2CR)2 reagents and generation of O-reagents in situ from C-reagents (methylarenes, aldehydes, etc.). PMID:25670997

  12. Methanol dehydrogenation by iridium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; Sharninghausen, Liam S; Manas, Michael G; Crabtree, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    A series of homogeneous iridium bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) catalysts are active for three transformations involving dehydrogenative methanol activation: acceptorless dehydrogenation, transfer hydrogenation, and amine monoalkylation. The acceptorless dehydrogenation reaction requires base, yielding formate and carbonate, as well as 2-3 equivalents of H2. Of the few homogeneous systems known for this reaction, our catalysts tolerate air and employ simple ligands. Transfer hydrogenation of ketones and imines from methanol is also possible. Finally, N-monomethylation of anilines occurs through a "borrowing hydrogen" reaction. Notably, this reaction is highly selective for the monomethylated product.

  13. Rhodium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Borylation of Cyclic Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Kondoh, Azusa; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    A rhodium-catalyzed dehydrogenative borylation of cyclic alkenes is described. This reaction provides direct access to cyclic 1-alkenylboronic acid pinacol esters, useful intermediates in organic synthesis. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling applications are also presented. PMID:20107646

  14. Dehydrogenation of indoline by cytochrome P450 enzymes: a novel "aromatase" process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Ehlhardt, William J; Kulanthaivel, Palaniappan; Lanza, Diane L; Reilly, Christopher A; Yost, Garold S

    2007-08-01

    Indoline derivatives possess therapeutic potential within a variety of drug candidates. In this study, we found that indoline is aromatized by cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes to produce indole through a novel dehydrogenation pathway. The indole products can potentially be bioactivated to toxic intermediates through an additional dehydrogenation step. For example, 3-substituted indoles like 3-methylindole and zafirlukast [4-(5-cyclopentyloxy-carbonylamino-1-methyl-indol-3-ylmethyl)-3-methoxy-N-o-tolylsulfonylbenzamide] are dehydrogenated to form 3-methyleneindolenine electrophiles, which react with protein and/or DNA nucleophilic residues to cause toxicities. Another potentially significant therapeutic consequence of indoline aromatization is that the product indoles might have dramatically different therapeutic potency than the parent indolines. In this study, indoline was indeed efficiently aromatized by human liver microsomes and by several P450s, but not by flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3. CYP3A4 had the highest aromatase activity. Four additional indoline metabolites [2,3,4,7-tetrahydro-4,5-epoxy-1H-indole (M1); N-hydroxyindole (M2), N-hydroxyindoline (M3), and M4 ([1,4,2,5]dioxadiazino[2,3-a:5,6-a']diindole)] were characterized; none was a metabolite of indole. M1 was an arene oxide from P450 oxidation, and M2, M3, and M4 were produced by FMO3. Our data indicated that indoline was oxidized to M3 and then to an intermediate indoline nitrone, which tautomerized to form M2, and subsequently dimerized to a di-indoline. This dimer was immediately oxidized by FMO3 or atmospheric oxygen to the final product, M4. No evidence was found for the P450-mediated production of an aliphatic alcohol from indoline that might dehydrate to produce indole. Therefore, P450 enzymes catalyze the novel "aromatase" metabolism of indoline to produce indole. The aromatase mechanism does not seem to occur through N-oxidation or dehydration of an alcohol but rather through a formal

  15. Adsorptive separation of propylene-propane mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Jaervelin, H.; Fair, J.R. )

    1993-10-01

    The separation of propylene-propane mixtures is of great commercial importance and is carried out by fractional distillation. It is claimed to be the most energy-intensive distillation practiced in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to describe experimental work that suggests a practical alternative to distillation for separating the C[sub 3] hydrocarbons: adsorption. As studied, the process involves three adsorptive steps: initial separation with molecular sieves with heavy dilution with an inert gas; separation of propylene and propane separately from the inert gas, using activated carbon; and drying of the product streams with any of several available desiccants. The research information presented here deals with the initial step and includes both equilibrium and kinetic data. Isotherms are provided for propylene and propane adsorbed on three zeolites, activated alumina, silica gel, and coconut-based activated carbon. Breakthrough data are provided for both adsorption and regeneration steps for the zeolites, which were found to be superior to the other adsorbents for breakthrough separations. A flow diagram for the complete proposed process is included.

  16. Site-selective Alkane Dehydrogenation of Fatty Acids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-14

    dehydrogenation of fatty acids Contract/Grant#: FA9550-10-1-0532 Final Reporting Period: 15 September 2011 to 14 September 2011...directly incorporate fatty acids into the ligand. The preparation of the acyl phosphines (1-5) was easily accomplished starting from the corresponding...AFOSR Final Report Final Report 
 The proposed research examines the site-selective dehydrogenation of alkanes. The alkanes employed were fatty

  17. Experimental investigations about the effect of trace amount of propane on the formation of mixed hydrates of methane and propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, W.; Lu, H.; Huang, X.

    2016-12-01

    In natural gas hydrates, some heavy hydrocarbons are always detected in addition to methane. However, it is still not well understood how the trace amount of heavy gas affect the hydrate properties. Intensive studies have been carried out to study the thermodynamic properties and structure types of mixed gases hydrates, but comparatively few investigations have been carried out on the cage occupancies of guest molecules in mixed gases hydrates. For understanding how trace amount of propane affects the formation of mixed methane-propane hydrates, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and gas chromatography were applied to the synthesized mixed methane-propane hydrate specimens, to get their structural characteristics (structure type, structural parameters, cage occupancy, etc.) and gas compositions. The mixed methane-propane hydrates were prepared by reacting fine ice powders with various gas mixtures of methane and propane. When the propane content was below 0.4%, the hydrates synthesized were found containing both sI methane hydrate and sII methane-propane hydrate; while the hydrates were found always sII when propane was over certain content. Detail studies about the cage occupancies of propane and methane in sII hydrate revealed that: 1) with the increase in propane content of methane-propane mixture, the occupancy of propane in large cage increased as accompanied with the decrease in methane occupancy in large cage, however the occupancy of methane in small cage didn't experience significant change; 2) temperature and pressure seemed no obvious influence on cage occupancy.

  18. Titan's Propane from Cassini Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Flaud, J.-M.; Bezard, B.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Ansty, T. M.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2009-04-01

    Propane gas (C3H8) was first detected in the atmosphere of Titan by the Voyager 1 IRIS spectrometer, during the 1980 encounter (Maguire et al., 1981), and remains the heaviest saturated hydrocarbon (alkane) found there to date. Although the identification was based on the detection of several bands (including 748, 922, 1054, 1158 cm-1), only the ν26 band at 748 cm-1 has been subsequently modeled to retrieve the abundance, due to the unique availability of its line parameters in the GEISA database (Husson et al. 1992). Subsequent measurements from the ground (Roe et al., 2003) and Earth-orbit (ISO - Coustenis et al. 2003) have also focused on this one band, deriving an abundance of ~0.5 ppm, although it remains compromised by coincidence with the R-branch of the much stronger acetylene (C2H2) gas. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument carried on-board the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn orbit has now been observing Titan during more than 50 flybys over 5 years, and offers a fresh perspective on the prevalence of propane. With much improved spectral and spatial resolution and sensitivity over IRIS, CIRS is also able to perform repeated limb sounding (viewing through the atmosphere above the surface) to increase signal-to-noise still further. Modeling and removal of the emissions of other gases now shows clearly for the first time a multitude of propane bands: including the four seen by IRIS and at least four others (869, 1338, 1376, 1472 cm-1). In addition, a new line atlas for three bands of propane at shorter wavelengths (1300-1500 cm-1) has now been compiled, based on the work of Flaud et al. (2001). With this, we now have the potential to model these weaker bands, and to check the measurements made by CIRS using the 748 cm-1 band alone. Preliminary analysis has shown that the retrievals are very sensitive to the spectral baseline (haze model) assumed, and that existing lab tholin spectral properties (Khare et al. 1984) do not well match the opacity

  19. Vacancy-mediated dehydrogenation of sodium alanate

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, Kendall N.; Ozoliņš, Vidvuds

    2008-01-01

    Clarification of the mechanisms of hydrogen release and uptake in transition-metal-doped sodium alanate, NaAlH4, a prototypical high-density complex hydride, has fundamental importance for the development of improved hydrogen-storage materials. In this and most other modern hydrogen-storage materials, H2 release and uptake are accompanied by long-range diffusion of metal species. Using first-principles density-functional theory calculations, we have determined that the activation energy for Al mass transport via AlH3 vacancies is Q = 85 kJ/mol·H2, which is in excellent agreement with experimentally measured activation energies in Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4. The activation energy for an alternate decomposition mechanism via NaH vacancies is found to be significantly higher: Q = 112 kJ/mol·H2. Our results suggest that bulk diffusion of Al species is the rate-limiting step in the dehydrogenation of Ti-doped samples of NaAlH4 and that the much higher activation energies measured for uncatalyzed samples are controlled by other processes, such as breaking up of AlH4− complexes, formation/dissociation of H2 molecules, and/or nucleation of the product phases. PMID:18299582

  20. AN EQUIVALENT ELECTRIC CIRCUIT APPROACH TO THE STUDY OF HYDROCARBON OXIDATION KINETICS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HYDROCARBONS, *OXIDATION), (*PROPANE, OXIDATION), (*FUEL CELLS, ELECTROCHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC DOUBLE LAYER, PLATINUM, ELECTRODES, REACTION KINETICS, ACETIC ACID , ELECTROLYTES, HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, FLUORINE COMPOUNDS

  1. 77 FR 2293 - AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy Transfer...'') with AmeriGas Propane, L.P. (``AmeriGas''), AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. (``ETP''), and Energy Transfer Partners GP, L.P. (``ETP GP''), which is designed to guard...

  2. Using ceramic membranes for the separation of hydrogen produced by dehydrogenation of perhydro- m-terphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenchuk, A. N.; Bogdan, V. I.; Kustov, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of a variety of ceramic membranes for the purification of hydrogen obtained by dehydrogenation of perhydro- m-terphenyl in a catalytic flow reactor from vapors of initial hydrocarbons and dehydrogenation products is investigated.

  3. Reduced chemical kinetics for propane combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ying, Shuh-Jing; Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1990-01-01

    It is pointed out that a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism for the combustion of propane consists of 40 chemical species and 118 elementary chemical reactions. An attempt is made to reduce the number of chemical species and elementary chemical reactions so that the computer run times and storage requirements may be greatly reduced in three-dimensional gas turbine combustion flow calculations, while maintaining accurate predictions of the propane combustion and exhaust emissions. By way of a sensitivity analysis, the species of interest and chemical reactions are classified in descending order of importance. Nineteen species are chosen, and their pressure, temperature, and concentration profiles are presented for the reduced mechanisms, which are then compared with those from the full 118 reactions. It is found that 45 reactions involving 27 species have to be kept for comparable agreement. A comparison of the results obtained from the 45 reactions to that of the full 118 shows that the pressure and temperature profiles and concentrations of C3H8, O2, N2, H2O, CO, and CO2 are within 10 percent of maximum change.

  4. TEPC gas gain measurements in propane.

    PubMed

    Moro, D; Chiriotti, S; Colautti, P; Conte, V

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the gas gain is important to optimise the design and the operating characteristics of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), especially for simulated sites smaller than 1 µm. TEPC area monitors of the order of centimetres must operate at very low gas pressure to simulate micrometric volumes, consequently the Townsend theory cannot be applied: effects related to the presence of an electric-field gradient become important and must be considered. A detailed description of the electron avalanche formation is complex, but in most practical cases an analytical formula can be used. The so-called gradient-field model includes three characteristic constants of the counting gas, which were already experimentally determined for propane-tissue equivalent (TE) and dimethyl ether (DME) gases. The aim of this work is to measure the gas-dependent parameters for propane gas. Preliminary results obtained with a spherical TEPC are presented. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Extending the Lifetime of Hyperpolarized Propane Gas through Reversible Dissolution.

    PubMed

    Burueva, Dudari B; Romanov, Alexey S; Salnikov, Oleg G; Zhivonitko, Vladimir V; Chen, Yu-Wen; Barskiy, Danila A; Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Hwang, Dennis W; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V

    2017-03-02

    Hyperpolarized (HP) propane produced by the parahydrogen-induced polarization (PHIP) technique has been recently introduced as a promising contrast agent for functional lung magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, its short lifetime due to a spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of less than 1 s in the gas phase is a significant translational challenge for its potential biomedical applications. The previously demonstrated approach for extending the lifetime of the HP propane state through long-lived spin states allows the HP propane lifetime to be increased by a factor of ∼3. Here, we demonstrate that a remarkable increase in the propane hyperpolarization decay time at high magnetic field (7.1 T) can be achieved by its dissolution in deuterated organic solvents (acetone-d6 or methanol-d4). The approximate values of the HP decay time for propane dissolved in acetone-d6 are 35.1 and 28.6 s for the CH2 group and the CH3 group, respectively (similar values were obtained for propane dissolved in methanol-d4), which are ∼50 times larger than the gaseous propane T1 value. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to retrieve HP propane from solution to the gas phase with the preservation of hyperpolarization.

  6. Formic Acid Dehydrogenation on Au-Based Catalysts at Near-Ambient Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, Manuel; Iglesia, Enrique

    2008-11-24

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is a convenient hydrogen carrier in fuel cells designed for portable use. Recent studies have shown that HCOOH decomposition is catalyzed with Ru-based complexes in the aqueous phase at near-ambient temperatures. HCOOH decomposition reactions are used frequently to probe the effects of alloying and cluster size and of geometric and electronic factors in catalysis. These studies have concluded that Pt is the most active metal for HCOOH decomposition, at least as large crystallites and extended surfaces. The identity and oxidation state of surface metal atoms influence the relative rates of dehydrogenation (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) and dehydration (HCOOH {yields} H{sub 2}O + CO) routes, a selectivity requirement for the synthesis of CO-free H{sub 2} streams for low-temperature fuel cells. Group Ib and Group VIII noble metals catalyze dehydrogenation selectively, while base metals and metal oxides catalyze both routes, either directly or indirectly via subsequent water-gas shift (WGS) reactions.

  7. Thermocatalytic Destruction of Gas-Phase Perchloroethylene Using Propane as a Hydrogen Source

    PubMed Central

    Willinger, Marty; Rupp, Erik; Barbaris, Brian; Gao, Song; Arnolda, Robert; Betterton, Eric; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The use of propane in combination with oxygen to promote the destruction of perchloroethylene (PCE) over a platinum (Pt)/rhodium (Rh) catalyst on a cerium/zirconium oxide washcoat supported on an alumina monolith was explored. Conversions of PCE were measured in a continuous flow reactor with residence times less than 0.5 s and temperatures ranging from 200 to 600°C. The presence of propane was shown to increase significantly the conversion of PCE over oxygen-only conditions. Conversions close to 100% were observed at temperatures lower than 450°C with 20% oxygen and 2% propane in the feed, which makes this process attractive from a practical standpoint. In the absence of oxygen, PCE conversion is even higher, but the catalyst suffers significant deactivation in less than an hour. Even though results show that oxygen competes with reactants for active sites on the catalyst, the long-term stability that oxygen confers to the catalyst makes the process an efficient alternative to PCE oxidation. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood competitive adsorption model is proposed to quantify PCE conversion. PMID:19217713

  8. Exploring low-temperature dehydrogenation at ionic Cu sites in beta zeolite to enable alkane recycle in dimethyl ether homologation

    DOE PAGES

    Farberow, Carrie A.; Cheah, Singfoong; Kim, Seonah; ...

    2017-04-24

    Cu-based catalysts containing targeted functionalities including metallic Cu, oxidized Cu, ionic Cu, and Bronsted acid sites were synthesized and evaluated for isobutane dehydrogenation. Hydrogen productivities, combined with operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy, indicated that Cu(I) sites in Cu/BEA catalysts activate C-H bonds in isobutane. Computational analysis revealed that isobutane dehydrogenation at a Cu(I) site proceeds through a two-step mechanism with a maximum energy barrier of 159 kJ/mol. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that light alkanes can be reactivated on Cu/BEA, which may enable re-entry of these species into the chain-growth cycle of dimethyl ether homologation, thereby increasing gasoline-range (C5+) hydrocarbon yield.

  9. Direct and Efficient Dehydrogenation of Tetrahydroquinolines and Primary Amines Using Corona Discharge Generated on Ambient Hydrophobic Paper Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kathryn M.; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.

    2017-04-01

    The exposure of an aqueous-based liquid drop containing amines and graphite particles to plasma generated by a corona discharge results in heterogeneous aerobic dehydrogenation reactions. This green oxidation reaction occurring in ambient air afforded the corresponding quinolines and nitriles from tetrahydroquinolines and primary amines, respectively, at >96% yields in less than 2 min of reaction time. The accelerated dehydrogenation reactions occurred on the surface of a low energy hydrophobic paper, which served both as container for holding the reacting liquid drop and as a medium for achieving paper spray ionization of reaction products for subsequent characterization by ambient mass spectrometry. Control experiments indicate superoxide anions (O2 •-) are the main reactive species; the presence of graphite particles introduced heterogeneous surface effects, and enabled the efficient sampling of the plasma into the grounded analyte droplet solution.

  10. Direct and Efficient Dehydrogenation of Tetrahydroquinolines and Primary Amines Using Corona Discharge Generated on Ambient Hydrophobic Paper Substrate.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kathryn M; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2017-04-01

    The exposure of an aqueous-based liquid drop containing amines and graphite particles to plasma generated by a corona discharge results in heterogeneous aerobic dehydrogenation reactions. This green oxidation reaction occurring in ambient air afforded the corresponding quinolines and nitriles from tetrahydroquinolines and primary amines, respectively, at >96% yields in less than 2 min of reaction time. The accelerated dehydrogenation reactions occurred on the surface of a low energy hydrophobic paper, which served both as container for holding the reacting liquid drop and as a medium for achieving paper spray ionization of reaction products for subsequent characterization by ambient mass spectrometry. Control experiments indicate superoxide anions (O2(•-)) are the main reactive species; the presence of graphite particles introduced heterogeneous surface effects, and enabled the efficient sampling of the plasma into the grounded analyte droplet solution. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Direct and Efficient Dehydrogenation of Tetrahydroquinolines and Primary Amines Using Corona Discharge Generated on Ambient Hydrophobic Paper Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kathryn M.; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K.

    2016-10-01

    The exposure of an aqueous-based liquid drop containing amines and graphite particles to plasma generated by a corona discharge results in heterogeneous aerobic dehydrogenation reactions. This green oxidation reaction occurring in ambient air afforded the corresponding quinolines and nitriles from tetrahydroquinolines and primary amines, respectively, at >96% yields in less than 2 min of reaction time. The accelerated dehydrogenation reactions occurred on the surface of a low energy hydrophobic paper, which served both as container for holding the reacting liquid drop and as a medium for achieving paper spray ionization of reaction products for subsequent characterization by ambient mass spectrometry. Control experiments indicate superoxide anions (O2 •-) are the main reactive species; the presence of graphite particles introduced heterogeneous surface effects, and enabled the efficient sampling of the plasma into the grounded analyte droplet solution.

  12. Demonstration of a Fast, Precise Propane Measurement Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahniser, M. S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Nelson, D. D.; Herndon, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Propane is one of the primary components of emissions from natural gas extraction and processing activities. In addition to being an air pollutant, its ratio to other hydrocarbons such as methane and ethane can serve as a "fingerprint" of a particular facility or process, aiding in identifying emission sources. Quantifying propane has typically required laboratory analysis of flask samples, resulting in low temporal resolution and making plume-based measurements infeasible. Here we demonstrate fast (1-second), high precision (<300 ppt) measurements of propane using high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy at 2967 wavenumbers. In addition, we explore the impact of nearby water and ethane absorption lines on the accuracy and precision of the propane measurement. Finally, we discuss development of a dual-laser instrument capable of simultaneous measurements of methane, ethane, and propane (the C1-C3 compounds), all within a small spatial package that can be easily deployed aboard a mobile platform.

  13. "Black-colored olivines" in peridotites: dehydrogenation from hydrous olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shoji; Hoshikawa, Chihiro; Miura, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Fresh olivines that are black to the naked eye are found in some dunites. Peridotites are easily converted to be black in color, when serpentinized, due to production of secondary fine magnetite particles. The dunites that contain fresh but black-colored olivines are usually coarse-grained. These coarse olivine grains are sometimes very heterogeneous in color; the blackish part grades to whitish parts in single grains. The black color is due to homegeneous distribution of minute (< 10 microns) black particles in olivine. They are rod-like or plate-like in shape in thin section, sometimes being aligned under crystallographic control of the host olivine. Olivines are clear and free of these inclusions around primary chromian spinel inclusions or chromian spinel lamellae (Arai, 1978). Raman spectroscopy indicates the minute black particles are magnetite always associated with diopside. It is interesting to note that olivine in mantle peridotites accompanied by the black-colored dunites is totally free of the black inclusions, giving the ordinary colors (pale yellow to whitish) of Mg-rich olivine. It is not likely that the magnetite inclusions formed through secondary oxidation of olivine by invasion of oxygen, which is possible along cracks or grain boundaries. They most probably formed due to dehydrogenation from primary OH-bearing olivines upon cooling. Hydrogen was quickly diffused out from the olivines to leave magnetite and excess silica. The excess silica was possibly combined with a monticellite component to form diopside. The OH-bearing (hydrous) olivines can be precipitated from hydrous magmas, and the hydrous nature of the magma can promote an increase in grain size due to faster diffusion of elements. The minute inclusions of magnetite + diopside is thus an indicator of primary hydrous character of host olivine.

  14. Embedded silicene nanostructures in partly-dehydrogenated polysilane.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuling; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wu, Xiaojun

    2017-04-05

    Developing freestanding silicene nanostructures with tunable electronic and magnetic properties is of particular importance for their applications in nanoelectronics, but still faces big challenges. On the basis of first-principles calculations, here we predict that embedded silicene nanoflakes and nanoribbons can be realized by partly dehydrogenating a freestanding polysilane (Si6H6) sheet. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the embedded silicene nanostructures show good thermal stability at 500 K. In particular, the embedded silicene nanostructures exhibit similar electronics properties to those of isolated ones. These findings imply a practical solution to produce embedded silicene nanostructures from partly dehydrogenated freestanding polysilane.

  15. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation: Mechanism and Utility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyue; Kam, Lisa; Trerise, Ryan; Williams, Travis J

    2017-01-17

    One of the greatest challenges in using H2 as a fuel source is finding a safe, efficient, and inexpensive method for its storage. Ammonia borane (AB) is a solid hydrogen storage material that has garnered attention for its high hydrogen weight density (19.6 wt %) and ease of handling and transport. Hydrogen release from ammonia borane is mediated by either hydrolysis, thus giving borate products that are difficult to rereduce, or direct dehydrogenation. Catalytic AB dehydrogenation has thus been a popular topic in recent years, motivated both by applications in hydrogen storage and main group synthetic chemistry. This Account is a complete description of work from our laboratory in ruthenium-catalyzed ammonia borane dehydrogenation over the last 6 years, beginning with the Shvo catalyst and resulting ultimately in the development of optimized, leading catalysts for efficient hydrogen release. We have studied AB dehydrogenation with Shvo's catalyst extensively and generated a detailed understanding of the role that borazine, a dehydrogenation product, plays in the reaction: it is a poison for both Shvo's catalyst and PEM fuel cells. Through independent syntheses of Shvo derivatives, we found a protective mechanism wherein catalyst deactivation by borazine is prevented by coordination of a ligand that might otherwise be a catalytic poison. These studies showed how a bidentate N-N ligand can transform the Shvo into a more reactive species for AB dehydrogenation that minimizes accumulation of borazine. Simultaneously, we designed novel ruthenium catalysts that contain a Lewis acidic boron to replace the Shvo -OH proton, thus offering more flexibility to optimize hydrogen release and take on more general problems in hydride abstraction. Our scorpionate-ligated ruthenium species (12) is a best-of-class catalyst for homogeneous dehydrogenation of ammonia borane in terms of its extent of hydrogen release (4.6 wt %), air tolerance, and reusability. Moreover, a synthetically

  16. Catalytic propane reforming mechanism over Mn-Doped CeO2 (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krcha, Matthew D.; Janik, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    MnOx/CeOx mixed oxide systems exhibit encouraging hydrocarbon oxidation activity, without the inclusion of a noble metal. Using density functional theory (DFT) methods, we examined the oxidative reforming path of propane over the Mn-doped CeO2 (1 1 1) surface. A plausible set of elementary reaction steps are identified for conversion of propane to CO/CO2 and H2/H2O over the oxide surface. The rate-limiting reaction process may vary with redox conditions, with C-H dissociation limiting under more oxidizing conditions and more complex reaction sequences, including surface re-oxidation, limiting under highly reducing conditions. The possibility of intermediate desorption from the surface during the reforming process is low, with desorption energies of the intermediates being much less favorable than further surface reactions until CO/CO2 products are formed. The reforming paths over Mn-doped ceria are similar to those previously identified over Zr-doped ceria. The extent of surface reduction and the electronic structure of the surface intermediates are examined.

  17. Emissions results for dedicated propane Chrysler minivans: the 1996 propane vehicle challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, C.; Sluder, S.; Larsen, R.

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE), through Argonne National Laboratory, and in cooperation with Natural Resources-Canada and Chrysler Canada, sponsored and organized the 1996 Propane Vehicle Challenge (PVC). For this competition , 13 university teams from North America each received a stock Chrysler minivan to be converted to dedicated propane operation while maintaining maximum production feasibility. The converted vehicles were tested for performance (driveability, cold- and hot-start, acceleration, range, and fuel economy) and exhaust emissions. Of the 13 entries for the 1996 PVC, 10 completed all of the events scheduled, including the emissions test. The schools used a variety of fuel-management, fuel-phase and engine-control strategies, but their strategies can be summarized as three main types: liquid fuel-injection, gaseous fuel-injection, and gaseous carburetor. The converted vehicles performed similarly to the gasoline minivan. The University of Windsor`s minivan had the lowest emissions attaining ULEV levels with a gaseous-injected engine. The Texas A&M vehicle, which had a gaseous-fuel injection system, and the GMI Engineering and Management Institute`s vehicle, which had a liquid-injection system both reached LEV levels. Vehicles with an injection fuel system (liquid or gaseous) performed better in terms of emissions than carbureted systems. Liquid injection appeared to be the best option for fuel metering and control for propane, but more research and calibration are necessary to improve the reliability and performance of this design.

  18. Recovery Act: Demonstration of a SOFC Generator Fueled by Propane to Provide Electrical Power to Real World Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, Norman

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this project provided with funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) was to demonstrate a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) generator capable of operation on propane fuel to improve efficiency and reduce emissions over commercially available portable generators. The key objectives can be summarized as: Development of two portable electrical generators in the 1-3kW range utilizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and propane fuel; The development and demonstration of a proof-of-concept electro-mechanical propane fuel interface that provides a user friendly capability for managing propane fuel; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators to power media production equipment over the course of several months at multiple NASCAR automobile racing events; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators at scheduled events by first responders (police, fire) of the City of Folsom California; and Capturing data with regard to the systems’ ability to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Targets and evaluating the ease of use and potential barriers to further adoption of the systems.

  19. Oxidant-free conversion of primary amines to nitriles.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuei-Nin T; Rizzi, Andrew M; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2013-11-06

    An amide-derived NNN-Ru(II) hydride complex catalyzes oxidant-free, acceptorless, and chemoselective dehydrogenation of primary and secondary amines to the corresponding nitriles and imines with liberation of dihydrogen. The catalyst system tolerates oxidizable functionality and is selective for the dehydrogenation of primary amines (-CH2NH2) in the presence of amines without α-CH hydrogens.

  20. Dehydrogenation of gaseous hydrogen-containing molecules: The formation of elemental and molecular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Walder, G.J.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1994-01-15

    A general concept employing the dehydrogenation of hydrogen-containing organic and inorganic compounds is shown to readily affect the production of a wide variety of elemental and binary clusters. Hydrogen-containing molecules such as C[sub 2]H[sub 4], NH[sub 3], SiH[sub 4], H[sub 2]S, or H[sub 2]O, are introduced into an extremely energetic plasma generated from laser irradiation of a metal surface; this plasma dehydrogenates the molecules to produce nascent C, N, Si, S, and O atoms. These C, N, Si, S, and O atoms can react with metal atoms or ions contained in the plasma and form metallocarbohedrenes or metal-carbide, metal-nitride, metal-silicide, metal-sulfide, or metal-oxide clusters. Alternatively, individual constituents may associate to produce pure elemental clusters such as those comprised of carbon or silicon. In principle, this technique can be applied to all gaseous hydrogen-containing compounds. The results of the present study provide an alternative way (in some cases it could be the only feasible way) to generate clusters of these materials. Study of the ensuing distributions provides unique insight into the cluster-formation mechanisms involving this type of cluster source.

  1. Dehydrogenation of goethite in Earth’s deep lower mantle

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qingyang; Kim, Duck Young; Liu, Jin; Meng, Yue; Yang, Liuxiang; Zhang, Dongzhou; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2017-01-01

    The cycling of hydrogen influences the structure, composition, and stratification of Earth’s interior. Our recent discovery of pyrite-structured iron peroxide (designated as the P phase) and the formation of the P phase from dehydrogenation of goethite FeO2H implies the separation of the oxygen and hydrogen cycles in the deep lower mantle beneath 1,800 km. Here we further characterize the residual hydrogen, x, in the P-phase FeO2Hx. Using a combination of theoretical simulations and high-pressure–temperature experiments, we calibrated the x dependence of molar volume of the P phase. Within the current range of experimental conditions, we observed a compositional range of P phase of 0.39 < x < 0.81, corresponding to 19–61% dehydrogenation. Increasing temperature and heating time will help release hydrogen and lower x, suggesting that dehydrogenation could be approaching completion at the high-temperature conditions of the lower mantle over extended geological time. Our observations indicate a fundamental change in the mode of hydrogen release from dehydration in the upper mantle to dehydrogenation in the deep lower mantle, thus differentiating the deep hydrogen and hydrous cycles. PMID:28143928

  2. Dehydrogenation of goethite in Earth's deep lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qingyang; Kim, Duck Young; Liu, Jin; Meng, Yue; Yang, Liuxiang; Zhang, Dongzhou; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2017-02-01

    The cycling of hydrogen influences the structure, composition, and stratification of Earth’s interior. Our recent discovery of pyrite-structured iron peroxide (designated as the P phase) and the formation of the P phase from dehydrogenation of goethite FeO2H implies the separation of the oxygen and hydrogen cycles in the deep lower mantle beneath 1,800 km. Here we further characterize the residual hydrogen, x, in the P-phase FeO2Hx. Using a combination of theoretical simulations and high-pressure–temperature experiments, we calibrated the x dependence of molar volume of the P phase. Within the current range of experimental conditions, we observed a compositional range of P phase of 0.39 < x < 0.81, corresponding to 19–61% dehydrogenation. Increasing temperature and heating time will help release hydrogen and lower x, suggesting that dehydrogenation could be approaching completion at the high-temperature conditions of the lower mantle over extended geological time. Our observations indicate a fundamental change in the mode of hydrogen release from dehydration in the upper mantle to dehydrogenation in the deep lower mantle, thus differentiating the deep hydrogen and hydrous cycles.

  3. Synthesis of benzimidazoles via iridium-catalyzed acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Lv, Xiao-Hui; Ye, Lin-Miao; Hu, Yu; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Yan, Ming

    2015-07-21

    Iridium-catalyzed acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of tertiary amines and arylamines has been developed. A number of benzimidazoles were prepared in good yields. An iridium-mediated C-H activation mechanism is suggested. This finding represents a novel strategy for the synthesis of benzimidazoles.

  4. Infrared absorption cross sections of propane broadened by hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A.; Hargreaves, R. J.; Billinghurst, B.; Bernath, P. F.

    2017-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared absorption cross-sections of pure propane (C3H8) and propane broadened with H2 have been calculated from transmittance spectra recorded at temperatures from 292 K to 205 K. Transmittance spectra were recorded at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) Far-Infrared beamline, utilizing both the synchrotron source and the internal glowbar source. The absorption cross-sections have been calibrated to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) reference cross-sections of propane and can be used to interpret astronomical observations of giant planets such as Jupiter and Saturn as well as exoplanets.

  5. Study on propane-butane gas storage by hydrate technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Wijayanti, Widya; Widhiyanuriyawan, Denny

    2016-03-01

    Different technology has been applied to store and transport gas fuel. In this work the storage of gas mixture of propane-butane by hydrate technology was studied. The investigation was done on the effect of crystallizer rotation speed on the formation of propane-butane hydrate. The hydrates were formed using crystallizer with rotation speed of 100, 200, and 300 rpm. The formation of gas hydrates was done at initial pressure of 3 bar and temperature of 274K. The results indicated that the higher rotation speed was found to increase the formation rate of propane-butane hydrate and improve the hydrates stability.

  6. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  7. 2. View of Liquified Propane Air Plant (New), former Exhaust ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Liquified Propane Air Plant (New), former Exhaust and Compressor Building and former Purifying Plant in background. - Concord Gas Light Company, South Main Street, Concord, Merrimack County, NH

  8. Direct Dehydrogenation of n-Butane Over Pt/Sn/Zn-K/Al2O3 Catalyst: Effect of Hydrogen in the Feed.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Seo, Hyun; Kim, Jeong Kwon; Seo, Hanuk; Cho, Hye-Ran; Lee, Jinsuk; Chang, Hosik; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Al2O3 was prepared by a sol-gel method for use as a support. Pt/Sn/Zn-K/Al2O3 catalyst was then prepared by a sequential impregnation method, and it was applied to the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane to n-butenes and 1,3-butadiene. Physicochemical properties of Pt/Sn/Zn-K/Al2O3 catalyst were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), CO chemisorption, and temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) measurements. In order to improve the catalyst stability, the effect of hydrogen in the feed on the catalytic performance in the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane was studied. The catalyst stability and reusability in the direct dehydrogenation of n-butane was also investigated. Experimental results revealed that the addition of hydrogen in the feed decreased conversion of n-butane and yield for total dehydrogenation products but improved the stability of the catalyst. The catalytic activity and stability of regenerated Pt/Sn/Zn-K/Al2O3 catalyst in the presence of hydrogen slightly decreased compared to those of fresh Pt/Sn/Zn-K/Al2O3 catalyst due to the slight sintering of platinum particles.

  9. Emission measurements for a lean premixed propane/air system at pressures up to 30 atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roffe, G.; Venkataramani, K. S.

    1978-01-01

    The emissions of a lean premixed system of propane/air were measured in a flametube apparatus. Tests were conducted at inlet temperatures of 600K and 800K and pressures of 10 atm and 30 atm over a range of equivalence ratios. The data obtained were combined with previous data taken in the same apparatus to correlate nitrogen oxide emissions with operating conditions. Sampling probe design was found to have a pronounced effect on measured CO levels but did not influence measurements. The most effective probe tested was one which combined thermal and pressure quenching of the gas sample.

  10. Thermochemical Energy Storage through De/Hydrogenation of Organic Liquids: Reactions of Organic Liquids on Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Cholewa, Martin; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2016-06-08

    A study of the reactions of liquid acetone and toluene on transition metal hydrides, which can be used in thermal energy or hydrogen storage applications, is presented. Hydrogen is confined in TiFe, Ti0.95Zr0.05Mn1.49V0.45Fe0.06 ("Hydralloy C5"), and V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 after contact with acetone. Toluene passivates V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 completely for hydrogen desorption while TiFe is only mildly deactivated and desorption is not blocked at all in the case of Hydralloy C5. LaNi5 is inert toward both organic liquids. Gas chromatography (GC) investigations reveal that CO, propane, and propene are formed during hydrogen desorption from V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 in liquid acetone, and methylcyclohexane is formed in the case of liquid toluene. These reactions do not occur if dehydrogenated samples are used, which indicates an enhanced surface reactivity during hydrogen desorption. Significant amounts of carbon-containing species are detected at the surface and subsurface of acetone- and toluene-treated V40Fe8Ti26Cr26 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The modification of the surface and subsurface chemistry and the resulting blocking of catalytic sites is believed to be responsible for the containment of hydrogen in the bulk. The surface passivation reactions occur only during hydrogen desorption of the samples.

  11. Dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde catalyzed by pristine and defective ceria surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Overbury, Steven H.

    2016-03-09

    We have explored the dehydrogenation of methoxy on pristine and defective (111), (100), and (110) ceria surfaces with density functional methods. Methanol conversion is used as a probe reaction to understand structure sensitivity of the oxide catalysis. Differences in reaction selectivity have been observed experimentally as a function of crystallographically exposed faces and degree of reduction. We find that the barrier for carbon-hydrogen cleavage in methoxy is similar for the pristine and defective (111), (100), and (110) surfaces. However, there are large differences in the stability of the surface intermediates on the different surfaces. The variations in experimentally observed product selectivities are a consequence of the interplay between barrier controlled bond cleavage and desorption processes. Ultimately, subtle differences in activation energies for carbon-hydrogen cleavage on the different crystallographic faces of ceria could not be correlated with structural or electronic descriptors.

  12. Dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde catalyzed by pristine and defective ceria surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Beste, Ariana; Overbury, Steven H.

    2016-03-09

    We have explored the dehydrogenation of methoxy on pristine and defective (111), (100), and (110) ceria surfaces with density functional methods. Methanol conversion is used as a probe reaction to understand structure sensitivity of the oxide catalysis. Differences in reaction selectivity have been observed experimentally as a function of crystallographically exposed faces and degree of reduction. We find that the barrier for carbon-hydrogen cleavage in methoxy is similar for the pristine and defective (111), (100), and (110) surfaces. However, there are large differences in the stability of the surface intermediates on the different surfaces. The variations in experimentally observed productmore » selectivities are a consequence of the interplay between barrier controlled bond cleavage and desorption processes. Ultimately, subtle differences in activation energies for carbon-hydrogen cleavage on the different crystallographic faces of ceria could not be correlated with structural or electronic descriptors.« less

  13. Synthesis of carbon-supported copper catalyst and its catalytic performance in methanol dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelepova, Ekaterina V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.; Ilina, Ludmila Yu.; Nizovskii, Alexander I.; Tsyrulnikov, Pavel G.

    2017-07-01

    Carbon-supported copper catalyst was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of Sibunit with an aqueous solution of copper nitrate. Copper loading was 5 wt.%. Temperature of reductive pretreatment was varied within a range of 200-400 °C. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. Catalytic activity of the samples was studied in a reaction of methanol dehydrogenation. Silica-based catalyst with similar copper loading was used as a reference. It was found that copper is distributed over the surface of support in the form of metallic and partially oxidized particles of about 12-17 nm in size. Diminished interaction of copper with support was supposed to be responsible for high catalytic activity.

  14. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lü, Jing-Tao; Hedegård, Per

    2016-01-01

    Summary We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from the rest of carbon atoms. The electrical current can couple the dimer motion in a coherent fashion. The coupling, which is mediated by nonconservative and pseudo-magnetic current-induced forces, change the atomic dynamics, and thereby show their signature in this simple system. We study the atomic dynamics and current-induced vibrational instabilities using a simplified eigen-mode analysis. Our study illustrates how armchair nanoribbons can serve as a possible testbed for probing the current-induced forces. PMID:26925354

  15. Current-induced runaway vibrations in dehydrogenated graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Lü, Jing-Tao; Hedegård, Per; Brandbyge, Mads

    2016-01-01

    We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach to study current-induced atomic dynamics in a partially dehydrogenated armchair graphene nanoribbon. All parameters are obtained from density functional theory. The dehydrogenated carbon dimers behave as effective impurities, whose motion decouples from the rest of carbon atoms. The electrical current can couple the dimer motion in a coherent fashion. The coupling, which is mediated by nonconservative and pseudo-magnetic current-induced forces, change the atomic dynamics, and thereby show their signature in this simple system. We study the atomic dynamics and current-induced vibrational instabilities using a simplified eigen-mode analysis. Our study illustrates how armchair nanoribbons can serve as a possible testbed for probing the current-induced forces.

  16. New Formulation for the Viscosity of Propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Eckhard; Herrmann, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    A new viscosity formulation for propane, using the reference equation of state for its thermodynamic properties by Lemmon et al. [J. Chem. Eng. Data 54, 3141 (2009)] and valid in the fluid region from the triple-point temperature to 650 K and pressures up to 100 MPa, is presented. At the beginning, a zero-density contribution and one for the critical enhancement, each based on the experimental data, were independently generated in parts. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = Tc/T and of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρc (Tc—critical temperature, ρc—critical density). The final formulation includes 17 coefficients inferred by applying a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the primary data sets are detailed due to its importance. The viscosity at low pressures p ≤ 0.2 MPa is represented with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 273 ≤ T/K ≤ 625. The expanded uncertainty in the vapor phase at subcritical temperatures T ≥ 273 K as well as in the supercritical thermodynamic region T ≤ 423 K at pressures p ≤ 30 MPa is assumed to be 1.5%. In the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2), the expanded uncertainty increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0%. It is further increased to 4.0% in regions of less reliable primary data sets and to 6.0% in ranges in which no primary data are available but the equation of state is valid. Tables of viscosity computed for the new formulation are given in an Appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor-liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  17. Donor-acceptor complexation and dehydrogenation chemistry of aminoboranes.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Adam C; Sabourin, Kyle J; McDonald, Robert; Ferguson, Michael J; Rivard, Eric

    2012-12-03

    A series of formal donor-acceptor adducts of aminoborane (H(2)BNH(2)) and its N-substituted analogues (H(2)BNRR') were prepared: LB-H(2)BNRR'(2)-BH(3) (LB = DMAP, IPr, IPrCH(2) and PCy(3); R and R' = H, Me or tBu; IPr = [(HCNDipp)(2)C:] and Dipp = 2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)). To potentially access complexes of molecular boron nitride, LB-BN-LA (LA = Lewis acid), preliminary dehydrogenation chemistry involving the parent aminoborane adducts LB-H(2)BNH(2)-BH(3) was investigated using [Rh(COD)Cl](2), CuBr, and NiBr(2) as dehydrogenation catalysts. In place of isolating the intended dehydrogenated BN donor-acceptor complexes, the formation of borazine was noted as a major product. Attempts to prepare the fluoroarylborane-capped aminoborane complexes, LB-H(2)BNH(2)-B(C(6)F(5))(3), are also described.

  18. The TNT equivalence of an optimum propane oxygen mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the times of arrival of the primary shock produced by the explosion of a nominal 20 tn propane-oxygen mixture have been analysed to provide the variation of the peak hydrostatic overpressure as a function of distance. The results have been scaled to those for a charge of unit mass at normal temperature and pressure, based on the masses of the propane and oxygen and of the propane alone. The scaled results are compared with those produced by the explosion of a hemispherical unit mass of TNT to provide the TNT equivalence factor as a function of overpressure and distance. For overpressures greater than 1 atm there is a strong dependence on the distance from the centre of the explosion, but at lower overpressures the equivalence factors have almost constant values of 0.55 for the propane-oxygen mixture and 1.95 for the propane alone. The significance of these findings, in relationship to vapour cloud explosions and boiling liquid expanding vapour explosions, is discussed.

  19. An engineered pathway for the biosynthesis of renewable propane

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Thiel, Kati; Akhtar, M. Kalim; Jones, Patrik R.

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of next-generation renewable biofuels can be enhanced by improving their compatibility with the current infrastructure for transportation, storage and utilization. Propane, the bulk component of liquid petroleum gas, is an appealing target as it already has a global market. In addition, it is a gas under standard conditions, but can easily be liquefied. This allows the fuel to immediately separate from the biocatalytic process after synthesis, yet does not preclude energy-dense storage as a liquid. Here we report, for the first time, a synthetic metabolic pathway for producing renewable propane. The pathway is based on a thioesterase specific for butyryl-acyl carrier protein (ACP), which allows native fatty acid biosynthesis of the Escherichia coli host to be redirected towards a synthetic alkane pathway. Propane biosynthesis is markedly stimulated by the introduction of an electron-donating module, optimizing the balance of O2 supply and removal of native aldehyde reductases. PMID:25181600

  20. An engineered pathway for the biosynthesis of renewable propane.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Thiel, Kati; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-09-02

    The deployment of next-generation renewable biofuels can be enhanced by improving their compatibility with the current infrastructure for transportation, storage and utilization. Propane, the bulk component of liquid petroleum gas, is an appealing target as it already has a global market. In addition, it is a gas under standard conditions, but can easily be liquefied. This allows the fuel to immediately separate from the biocatalytic process after synthesis, yet does not preclude energy-dense storage as a liquid. Here we report, for the first time, a synthetic metabolic pathway for producing renewable propane. The pathway is based on a thioesterase specific for butyryl-acyl carrier protein (ACP), which allows native fatty acid biosynthesis of the Escherichia coli host to be redirected towards a synthetic alkane pathway. Propane biosynthesis is markedly stimulated by the introduction of an electron-donating module, optimizing the balance of O2 supply and removal of native aldehyde reductases.

  1. ZnO thin films as propane sensors: Band structure models to explicate the dependence between the structural and morphological properties on gas sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Pozos, Heberto; Karthik, T. V. K.; de la L. Olvera, M.; Barrientos, Abel García; Cortés, Obed Pérez; Vega-Pérez, J.; Maldonado, A.; Pérez-Hernández, R.; Rodríguez-Lugo, V.

    2017-07-01

    Pure Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were deposited on soda-lime glass substrates by utilizing ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique (USP) and tested them as propane sensors. Propane sensitivity increased with decrease in the substrate temperature and water content in the feedstock solution. XRD analysis confirms that, the (002) directional ZnO which correspond to the hexagonal wurzite structure. Also, formations of rose like and spherical structures were confirmed by the SEM analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the presence of loosely bound oxygen atoms on the surface of the low water content substrates. Two energy band structure models were proposed and explicated in detail for analyzing the effect of structural, morphological and optical properties of ZnO thin films on propane sensing properties. Highest sensitivity ( 10) was obtained for ZnO films deposited with the lowest water content, at a deposition temperature of 400 °C and operated at 200 °C.

  2. Three new olanzapine structures: the acetic acid monosolvate, and the propan-2-ol and propan-2-one hemisolvate monohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bojarska, Joanna; Maniukiewicz, Waldemar; Sieroń, Lesław

    2013-07-01

    The crystal structures of three new solvates of olanzapine [systematic name: 2-methyl-4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-10H-thieno[2,3-b][1,5]benzodiazepine], namely olanzapine acetic acid monosolvate, C17H20N4S·C2H4O2, (I), olanzapine propan-2-ol hemisolvate monohydrate, C17H20N4S·0.5C3H8O·H2O, (II), and olanzapine propan-2-one hemisolvate monohydrate, C17H20N4S·0.5C3H6O·H2O, (III), are presented and compared with other known olanzapine forms. There is a fairly close resemblance of the molecular conformation for all studied analogues. The crystal structures are built up through olanzapine dimers, which are characterized via C-H...π interactions between the aliphatic fragment (1-methylpiperazin-4-yl) and the aromatic fragment (benzene system). All solvent (guest) molecules participate in hydrogen-bonding networks. The crystal packing is sustained via intermolecular N(host)-H···O(guest), O(guest)-H···N(host), O(guest)-H···O(guest) and C(host)-H···O(guest) hydrogen bonds. It should be noted that the solvent propan-2-ol in (II) and propan-2-one in (III) show orientational disorder. The propan-2-ol molecule lies close to a twofold axis, while the propan-2-one molecule resides strictly on a twofold axis through the carbonyl C atom. In both cases, the water molecules present positional disorder of the H atoms.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10339 - Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adipic acid, substituted propane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10339 Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol... substance identified generically as adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (PMN P-04-113)...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10339 - Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adipic acid, substituted propane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10339 Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol... substance identified generically as adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (PMN P-04-113)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10339 - Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adipic acid, substituted propane... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10339 Adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol... substance identified generically as adipic acid, substituted propane, alkyldiol, acrylate (PMN P-04-113)...

  6. Preparation of nanoporous graphene and the application of its nanocomposite membrane in propylene/propane separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hai-Xiang; Yuan, Bing-Bing; Li, Peng; Wang, Tao; Xu, Yan-Yan

    2015-11-01

    Chemically reduced graphene oxide containing hydroxyl groups and a wide size distribution of nanopores was prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. The resulting material was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, surface area measurement and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), respectively. It was found that this reduced graphene oxide exhibited more clear nanopores and hydroxyl groups in the basal plane. Then the morphologies of the nanocomposite membrane incorporated into the nanoporous graphene were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the permeation test also was performed. Notably, the results showed that the nanocomposite membrane had a homogenous morphology and a better performance (separation factor 11.09) than polymer membrane in the separation of propylene/propane. This work demonstrates that nanoporous graphene exhibits great potential in the field of olefin/paraffin separation.

  7. Emissions measurements for a lean premixed propane/air system at pressures up to 30 atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roffe, G.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted in which the emissions of a lean premixed system of propane and air were measured at pressures of 5, 10, 20 and 30 atm in a flametube apparatus. Measurements were made for inlet temperatures between 600K and 1000K and combustor residence times from 1.0 to 3.0 msec. A schematic of the test rig is presented along with graphs showing emissions measurements for nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and UHC as functions of bustor residence time for various equivalence ratios, entrance temperatures and pressures; typical behavior of emissions as a function of equivalence ratio for a fixed residence time. Correlations of nitric oxide emission index with adiabatic flame temperature for a fixed residence time of 2 msec and pressures from 5 to 30 atm; and adiabatic flame temperature corresponding to CO breakpoint conditions for 2 msec residence time as a function of inlet temperature.

  8. Point-defect-mediated dehydrogenation of AlH3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismer, Lars; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2010-11-01

    Based on hybrid density functional calculations, we propose a microscopic mechanism for the dehydrogenation of AlH3. Our results indicate that mass transport mediated by positively charged hydrogen vacancies (VH+) is likely the rate-limiting mechanism. The calculated activation energy of 1.72 eV is in good agreement with experimental values. The high formation energy and hence low concentration of VH+ explains why AlH3 does not decompose at room temperature, although it is thermodynamically unstable. Issues of maintaining charge neutrality are addressed.

  9. Structure and chemistry of the heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4]•+: a model system for the gas-phase oxidation of small hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Nicolas; Wende, Torsten; Chen, Kai; Jiang, Ling; Schlangen, Maria; Zhang, Xinhao; Asmis, Knut R; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-03-06

    The heteronuclear oxo-cluster [VPO4](•+) is generated via electrospray ionization and investigated with respect to both its electronic structure as well as its gas-phase reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, thus permitting a comparison to the well-known vanadium-oxide cation [V2O4](•+). As described in previous studies, the latter oxide exhibits no or just minor reactivity toward small hydrocarbons, such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, and C2H4, while substitution of one vanadium by a phosphorus atom yields the reactive [VPO4](•+) ion; the latter brings about oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of saturated hydrocarbons, e.g., propane and butane as well as oxygen-atom transfer (OAT) to unsaturated hydrocarbons, e.g. ethene, at thermal conditions. Further, the gas-phase structure of [VPO4](•+) is determined by IR photodissociation spectroscopy and compared to that of [V2O4](•+). DFT calculations help to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The results underline the crucial role of phosphorus in terms of C-H bond activation of hydrocarbons by mixed VPO clusters.

  10. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers.

  11. Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks for kinetic separation of propane and propene

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jing; Li, Kunhao; Olson, David H.

    2014-08-05

    Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) characterized by organic ligands consisting of imidazole ligands that are either essentially all 2-chloroimidazole ligands or essentially all 2-bromoimidazole ligands are disclosed. Methods for separating propane and propene with the ZIFs of the present invention, as well as other ZIFs, are also disclosed.

  12. Ethane and propane in the Southern marine troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, T. S.; Martin, R. J.; Rudolph, J.

    Nearly 500 measurements of the ethane and propane mixing ratios have been made in clean marine air at Baring Head (New Zealand) and Scott Base (Antarctica) between 1991 and 1996. The annual averages of the mixing ratios (285 and 40 ppt) are lower than previously reported for the Southern Hemisphere. A striking feature of the seasonal cycle is the abrupt drop in mixing ratios of both compounds around November and a corresponding increase in the ethane/propane ratio (from about 7 in winter to > 10 in summer), suggesting a sharp decrease in Southern Hemisphere sources (e.g. biomass burning or fossil gas emissions) of these compounds in the spring. From a simple budget estimate it is concluded that biomass burning is most likely the dominant source of ethane and propane in the Southern Hemisphere. The seasonal variability of the emissions which are required to balance the Southern Hemisphere propane budget agrees very well with the seasonality derived for ethane emissions in a previous study.

  13. Dehydrogenation of methanol on Cu2O(100) and (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besharat, Zahra; Halldin Stenlid, Joakim; Soldemo, Markus; Marks, Kess; Önsten, Anneli; Johnson, Magnus; Öström, Henrik; Weissenrieder, Jonas; Brinck, Tore; Göthelid, Mats

    2017-06-01

    Adsorption and desorption of methanol on the (111) and (100) surfaces of Cu2O have been studied using high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy in the temperature range 120-620 K, in combination with density functional theory calculations and sum frequency generation spectroscopy. The bare (100) surface exhibits a (3,0; 1,1) reconstruction but restructures during the adsorption process into a Cu-dimer geometry stabilized by methoxy and hydrogen binding in Cu-bridge sites. During the restructuring process, oxygen atoms from the bulk that can host hydrogen appear on the surface. Heating transforms methoxy to formaldehyde, but further dehydrogenation is limited by the stability of the surface and the limited access to surface oxygen. The (√3 × √3)R30°-reconstructed (111) surface is based on ordered surface oxygen and copper ions and vacancies, which offers a palette of adsorption and reaction sites. Already at 140 K, a mixed layer of methoxy, formaldehyde, and CHxOy is formed. Heating to room temperature leaves OCH and CHx. Thus both CH-bond breaking and CO-scission are active on this surface at low temperature. The higher ability to dehydrogenate methanol on (111) compared to (100) is explained by the multitude of adsorption sites and, in particular, the availability of surface oxygen.

  14. Modeling of Future-Year Emissions Control Scenarios for the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts of Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Technologies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedley, M.; Jiang, W.; McLaren, R.; Singleton, D. L.

    1998-10-01

    The MC2-CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of two fuel substitution scenarios on ozone levels for a future year in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The relative impacts of selected natural gas and propane vehicle technologies are compared for the year 2005. The chosen natural gas technology imposes large reductions in nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions with moderate reductions in nitrogen oxide emissions, while the propane technology greatly lowers nitrogen oxide emissions with only small changes to nonmethane hydrocarbon emissions.The model results showed that replacing the entire light-duty gasoline car and truck fleet with the selected natural gas vehicle technology in the year 2005 in the Canadian portion of the Lower Fraser Valley yielded significant benefits in terms of reducing potential exposures to elevated ozone levels in suburban and rural areas. Sites closer to the urban core were less affected. For the propane fuel substitution, benefits were realized in terms of lowering ozone concentrations and ozone exposures in the rural areas. Within the urban and suburban areas, ozone exposures tended to increase. The exposures to peroxyacetyl nitrate were universally smaller in the alternative fuel scenarios.The nature of an effective control strategy for the Lower Fraser Valley is discussed, and it is suggested that in addition to the propane fuel substitution, moderate controls on the primary NOx sources in conjunction with moderate nonmethane hydrocarbon controls could be the preferred route to lower ozone exposures.

  15. Desferrioxamine dehydrogenates bilirubin in two stages, leading to a 1:1 red-coloured adduct. Characterization of the products by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Francesco; Lord, Gwyn A

    2008-12-01

    We have used open-chain tetrapyrroles, such as bilirubin, as molecular probes to investigate the pro-oxidant activity of desferrioxamine (DES) and its modulation by Trolox. On exposure to Fe-EDTA/H2O2, bilirubin and mesobilirubin underwent bleaching. When DES was present, bleaching was prevented and both rubins were converted into green-coloured derivatives and then into red pigments. Trolox added with DES inhibited the colour changes induced by DES. The oxidative products were resolved from their parent compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and by UV/visible spectroscopy. The green products were identified as biliverdin or mesobiliverdin; the red pigments as the 1:1 molar adduct of DES with biliverdin or mesobiliverdin, less two hydrogens in both cases. It is concluded that DES exercises its oxidative activity through nitroxyl oxidizing radicals capable of efficient hydrogen abstraction, dehydrogenating either rubin to the corresponding verdin. A diradical derivative of DES (bearing two nitroxyl radicals in the same molecule) may be involved in the oxidation of verdins to red pigments, through concerted dehydrogenation and adduct formation. These results shed further light on the redox properties of bilirubin, DES and Trolox, and their interactions. They provide further evidence of the pro-oxidant activity of DES and suggest a more general biological significance, as rapid removal of bilirubin by bleaching or dehydrogenation may have pharmacological/toxicological implications in severe jaundice. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Aqueous solution synthesis of Pt-M (M = Fe, Co, Ni) bimetallic nanoparticles and their catalysis for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Duo; Ma, Yanyun; Zhang, Hui; Gao, Jing; Nie, Yuting; Sun, Xuhui

    2014-08-13

    Platinum-based bimetallic nanocatalysts have attracted much attention due to their high-efficiency catalytic performance in energy-related applications such as fuel cell and hydrogen storage, for example, the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB). In this work, a simple and green method has been demonstrated to successfully prepare Pt-M (M = Fe, Co, Ni) NPs with tunable composition (nominal Pt/M atomic ratios of 4:1, 1:1, and 1:4) in aqueous solution under mild conditions. All Pt-M NPs with a small size of 3-5 nm show a Pt fcc structure, suggesting the bimetallic formation (alloy and/or partial core-shell), examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. The catalytic activities of Pt-M NPs in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB reveal that Pt-Ni NPs with a ratio of 4:1 show the best catalytic activity and even better than that of pure Pt NPs when normalized to Pt molar amount. The Ni oxidation state in Pt-Ni NPs has been suggested to be responsible for the corresponding catalytic activity for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB by XAFS study. This strategy for the synthesis of Pt-M NPs is simple and environmentally benign in aqueous solution with the potential for scale-up preparation and the in situ catalytic reaction.

  17. Processing of polyolefin blends in supercritical propane solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Suh Joon

    New polymer blending methods are developed and studied by processing polyolefins in supercritical propane in this research. Polypropylene and ethylene copolymers were dissolved in supercritical propane, and processed via various paths and reactions, i.e., RESS (rapid expansion of supercritical solution), ICSS (isobaric crystallization from supercritical solution), and thermoplastic vulcanizate (TPV) formation. Each process resulted in a unique morphology of polyolefin blends. The effect of polyolefin microstructure on the solution behavior in supercritical propane was investigated, and the relationship between the morphology of the polyolefin blends and processing paths in supercritical propane solutions was established. To understand the thermodynamic properties of polyolefins in bulk and solutions, the solubility parameter was estimated by measurement of the internal pressure from the experimental P-V-T data for polyolefins in the melt state. As the short chain branch content in the ethylene copolymers increased, the internal pressure decreased. The cloud-point pressures of binary polymer solutions in propane decreased as the extent of short chain branching increased in the ethylene copolymers. At the same degree of branching, the cloud-point pressure decreased slightly with increasing branch length. The cloud-point pressures of a ternary polymer solution in the pressure-temperature phase diagrams were higher than those of binary polymer solutions at the same composition (indicating poorer solubility). Microfibers and microparticles (10 ˜ 50 mum diameter) were precipitated from the RESS process while microcellular foams were obtained from the ICSS process. The phase domains of the ethylene-butene (EB) copolymer in the polypropylene from the RESS process were smaller for highly branched EB copolymer. The surface morphology of ethylene copolymers in the microcelluar foams was also changed by increasing the branch content from microparticles to a viscous layer. New

  18. Cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC): exploring C-C bond formations beyond functional group transformations.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-Jun

    2009-02-17

    Synthetic chemists aspire both to develop novel chemical reactions and to improve reaction conditions to maximize resource efficiency, energy efficiency, product selectivity, operational simplicity, and environmental health and safety. Carbon-carbon bond formation is a central part of many chemical syntheses, and innovations in these types of reactions will profoundly improve overall synthetic efficiency. This Account describes our work over the past several years to form carbon-carbon bonds directly from two different C-H bonds under oxidative conditions, cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC). We have focused most of our efforts on carbon-carbon bonds formed via the functionalization of sp(3) C-H bonds with other C-H bonds. In the presence of simple and cheap catalysts such as copper and iron salts and oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, dioxygen, tert-butylhydroperoxide, and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyanobenzoquinone (DDQ), we can directly functionalize various sp(3) C-H bonds by other C-H bonds without requiring preactivation. We demonstrate (1) reaction of alpha-C-H bonds of nitrogen in amines, (2) reaction of alpha-C-H bonds of oxygen in ethers, (3) reaction of allylic and benzylic C-H bonds, and (4) reaction of alkane C-H bonds. These CDC reactions can tolerate a variety of functional groups, and some can occur under aqueous conditions. Depending on the specific transformation, we propose the in situ generation of different intermediates. These methods provide an alternative to the separate steps of prefunctionalization and defunctionalization that have traditionally been part of synthetic design. As a result, these methods will increase synthetic efficiencies at the most fundamental level. On an intellectual level, the development of C-C bond formations based on the reaction of only C-H bonds (possibly in water) challenges us to rethink some of the most fundamental concepts and theories regarding chemical reactivities. A successful reaction requires the

  19. An efficient strategy for designing ambipolar organic semiconductor material: Introducing dehydrogenated phosphorus atoms into pentacene core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiao-Dan

    2017-09-01

    The charge transport properties of phosphapentacene (P-PEN) derivatives were systematically explored by theoretical calculation. The dehydrogenated P-PENs have reasonable frontier molecular orbital energy levels to facilitate both electron and hole injection. The reduced reorganization energies of dehydrogenated P-PENs could be intimately connected to the bonding nature of phosphorus atoms. From the idea of homology modeling, the crystal structure of TIPSE-4P-2p is constructed and fully optimized. Fascinatingly, TIPSE-4P-2p shows the intrinsic property of ambipolar transport in both hopping and band models. Thus, introducing dehydrogenated phosphorus atoms into pentacene core could be an efficient strategy for designing ambipolar material.

  20. Two cases of acute propane/butane poisoning in prison.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Riccardo; Suadoni, Fabio; Pieroni, Ludovica; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Lancia, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    Hydrocarbon inhalation is seldom chosen as a means to commit suicide. This practice is exclusively a prerogative of the prison population; it is, however, only exceptionally found in this environment. The two cases of lethal inhalation of propane/butane gas observed by us over a very short time occurred in this context. Toxicologic analyses were performed by means of gas chromatography (head space) and revealed a propane/butane mixture in all specimens (heart blood, bile, and urine) except vitreous humor. Although fatal arrhythmia posthydrocarbon gas abuse is well known, the concentrations of the two hydrocarbons were sufficient to induce death by asphyxiation and were distributed (fairly) homogeneously in all biological fluids and organs examined, a parameter permitting one to assume that death occurred within a relatively short period of time. The absence of finding in vitreous humor and the trace amount in urine suggests that both men died very quickly. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Robert

    2017-03-01

    A six-dimensional potential energy surface (PES) for the interaction of two rigid propane molecules was determined from supermolecular ab initio calculations up to the coupled cluster with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations level of theory for 9452 configurations. An analytical site-site potential function with 14 sites per molecule was fitted to the calculated interaction energies. To validate the analytical PES, the second virial coefficient and the dilute gas shear viscosity and thermal conductivity of propane were computed. The dispersion part of the potential function was slightly adjusted such that quantitative agreement with the most accurate experimental data for the second virial coefficient at room temperature was achieved. The adjusted PES yields values for the three properties that are in very good agreement with the best experimental data at all temperatures.

  2. Pile a combustible a electrolyte polymere solide a consommation directe de gaz propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Varela, Francisco Javier

    A Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell working with propane as the fuel has been studied. The propane was directly introduced into the cell without previous external reforming, resulting in a Direct Propane Fuel Cell (DPFC). Electrodes of composition 40% Pt/C and 40% PtRu/C (commercial), 20% PtOx/C and 20% Pt/C + 10% CrO3 (home-prepared) have been tested as anodes catalysts in the DPFC. Commercial NafionRTM 117 membranes were used as polymer electrolytes. The anode electrocatalysts were also tested in a H2/O2 fuel cell in order to asses their electrocatalytical characteristics. It has been shown by the polarization curves that the anodes based on 40% Pt/C and 40% PtRu/C provide higher current densities from the H2 /O2 fuel cell than the anodes 20% PtOx/C and 20% Pt/C + 10% CrO3. However, a more in-depth analysis has revealed important features of both home-prepared anodes. For example, relatively high current densities were obtained from these electrocatalysts during the oxidation of H2. Also, the lower open circuit anode potential for the oxidation of H2 has been obtained with the anode 20% PtOx/C. On the other hand, the current density at high cell potentials (970 mV) of the fuel cell based on the anode 20% Pt/C + 10% CrO3 was higher than the current densities of 40% Pt/C and 40% PtRu/C. Kinetic data has shown that the catalyst 20% Pt/C + 10% CrO3 provided a more important exchange current density than the rest of the anode catalysts. It has also been shown that 20% Pt/C + 10% CrO3 possess the largest mass activity while the lower mass activity is that of the catalyst 40% Pt/C. These results have revealed that the home-prepared anodes based on 20% PtOx/C and 20% Pt/C + 10% CrO 3 have important electrocatalytic characteristics for PEM fuel cells applications. Samples of the electrocatalysts were analysed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. A polycrystalline structure has been shown for all Pt-based materials except for 20% PtOx/C which

  3. Palladium-Catalyzed Aerobic Dehydrogenation of Substituted Cyclohexanones to Phenols

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Yusuke; Pun, Doris; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic molecules are key constituents of many pharmaceuticals, electronic materials and commodity plastics. The utility of these molecules directly reflects the identity and pattern of substituents on the aromatic ring. Here, we report the discovery of a palladium(II) catalyst system, incorporating an unconventional ortho-dimethylaminopyridine ligand, for the conversion of substituted cyclohexanones to the corresponding phenols. The reaction proceeds via successive dehydrogenation of two saturated carbon-carbon bonds of the six-membered ring and uses molecular oxygen as the hydrogen acceptor. This reactivity demonstrates a versatile and efficient strategy for the synthesis of substituted aromatic molecules with fundamentally different selectivity constraints from the numerous existing synthetic methods that rely on substitution of a pre-existing aromatic ring. PMID:21659567

  4. Supramolecular organization of heteroxylan-dehydrogenation polymers (synthetic lignin) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Abdellatif; Gaillard, Cédric; Lairez, Didier; Saulnier, Luc; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard

    2008-02-01

    The supramolecular organization of particles composed of heteroxylans (HX) and synthetic lignin (dehydrogenation polymer, DHPs) was studied by light scattering (LS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and fluorescent probes. Results from static and quasi-elastic light scattering indicate a dense core surrounded by a soft corona. Such organization is also supported by AFM images of the particles that display Gaussian height profiles when a low tapping force is applied, whereas the shape of the profile obtained at a higher mechanical solicitation is irregular and sharp due to deformation of the particles resulting from the tip indentation. This suggests a difference in mechanical behavior between the inner and outer parts of the particles. The formation of local chemical heterogeneities was demonstrated by use of two fluorescent polarity probes (pyrene and methyl-amino-pyrene) to be induced by the core-corona organization.

  5. A prolific catalyst for dehydrogenation of neat formic acid

    PubMed Central

    Celaje, Jeff Joseph A.; Lu, Zhiyao; Kedzie, Elyse A.; Terrile, Nicholas J.; Lo, Jonathan N.; Williams, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    Formic acid is a promising energy carrier for on-demand hydrogen generation. Because the reverse reaction is also feasible, formic acid is a form of stored hydrogen. Here we present a robust, reusable iridium catalyst that enables hydrogen gas release from neat formic acid. This catalysis works under mild conditions in the presence of air, is highly selective and affords millions of turnovers. While many catalysts exist for both formic acid dehydrogenation and carbon dioxide reduction, solutions to date on hydrogen gas release rely on volatile components that reduce the weight content of stored hydrogen and/or introduce fuel cell poisons. These are avoided here. The catalyst utilizes an interesting chemical mechanism, which is described on the basis of kinetic and synthetic experiments. PMID:27076111

  6. PNP pincer osmium polyhydrides for catalytic dehydrogenation of primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Bertoli, Marcello; Choualeb, Aldjia; Gusev, Dmitry G; Lough, Alan J; Major, Quinn; Moore, Brandon

    2011-09-21

    This paper reports the synthesis, structure, and properties of a series of PNP pincer complexes of osmium OsH(3)Cl[HN(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (1), OsH(3)[N(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (2), OsH(4)[HN(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (3), and OsH(2)(PMe(3))[HN(C(2)H(4)P(i)Pr(2))(2)] (4). The tetrahydride 3 operates as an efficient catalyst at 0.1 mol% loading for the reactions of amination and dehydrogenative coupling of primary alcohols, producing secondary amines and symmetrical esters, respectively. The catalyst 3 is distinguished by outstanding stability, and it can be used in an aqueous environment at temperatures as high as 200 °C.

  7. Origins and trends in ethane and propane in the United Kingdom from 1993 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, R. G.; Field, R. A.; Dumitrean, P.; Murrells, T. P.; Telling, S. P.

    2017-05-01

    Continuous, high frequency in situ observations of ethane and propane began in the United Kingdom in 1993 and have continued through to the present day at a range of kerbside, urban background and rural locations. Whilst other monitored C2 - C8 hydrocarbons have shown dramatic declines in concentrations by close to or over an order of magnitude, ethane and propane levels have remained at or close to their 1993 values. Urban ethane sources appear to be dominated by natural gas leakage. Background levels of ethane associated with long range transport are rising. However, natural gas leakage is not the sole source of urban propane. Oil and gas operations lead to elevated propane levels in urban centres when important refinery operations are located nearby. Weekend versus weekday average diurnal curves for ethane and propane at an urban background site in London show the importance of natural gas leakage for both ethane and propane, and road traffic sources for propane. The road traffic source of propane was tentatively identified as arising from petrol-engined motor vehicle refuelling and showed a strong downwards trend at the long-running urban background and rural sites. The natural gas leakage source of ethane and propane in the observations exhibits an upwards trend whereas that in the UK emission inventory trends downwards. Also, inventory emissions for natural gas leakage appeared to be significantly underestimated compared with the observations. In addition, the observed ethane to propane ratio found here for natural gas leakage strongly disagreed with the inventory ratio.

  8. Differential microbial transformation of nitrosamines by an inducible propane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Homme, Carissa L; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2013-07-02

    The toxicity of N-nitrosamines, their presence in drinking and environmental water supplies, and poorly understood recalcitrance collectively necessitate a better understanding of their potential for bioattenuation. Here, we show that the bacterial strain Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 can biotransform N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), and possibly N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) in addition to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Growth of cells on propane as the sole carbon source greatly enhanced degradation rates when contrasted with cells grown on complex organics. Propane-induced rates in order of fastest to slowest were NDMA > NDEA > NDPA > NPYR > NMOR at concentrations <2000 μg/L. Removal rates for linear functional groups scaled inversely with mass and cyclic nitrosamines were more recalcitrant than linear nitrosamines. Controls demonstrated significant NDEA and NDPA losses independent of biomass, suggesting abiotic processes may play a role in attenuation of these two compounds under experimental conditions tested here. In contrast to NDMA, a transition from first to zero order kinetics was not observed for the other nitrosamines included in this study over a concentration range of 20-2000 μg/L. A genetic knockout for the propane monooxygenase enzyme (PrMO) confirmed the role of this enzyme in the biotransformation of NDEA and NPYR. This study furthers our understanding of environmental nitrosamine attenuation by revealing an enzymatic mechanism for the biotransformation of multiple nitrosamines, their relative recalcitrance to transformation, and potential for abiotic loss.

  9. Gas Phase UTE MRI of Propane and Propene

    PubMed Central

    Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Romanov, Alexey S.; Salnikov, Oleg G.; Barskiy, Danila A.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.; Koptyug, Igor V.

    2016-01-01

    1H MRI of gases can potentially enable functional lung imaging to probe gas ventilation and other functions. In this work, 1H MR images of hyperpolarized and thermally polarized propane gas were obtained using UTE (ultrashort echo time) pulse sequence. A 2D image of thermally polarized propane gas with ~0.9×0.9 mm2 spatial resolution was obtained in less than 2 seconds, demonstrating that even non-hyperpolarized hydrocarbon gases can be successfully utilized for conventional proton MRI. The experiments were also performed with hyperpolarized propane gas and demonstrated acquisition of high-resolution multi-slice FLASH 2D images in ca. 510 s and non slice-selective 2D UTE MRI images in ca. 2 s. The UTE approach adopted in this study can be potentially used for medical lung imaging. Furthermore, the possibility to combine UTE with selective suppression of 1H signals from one of the two gases in a mixture is demonstrated in this MRI study. The latter can be useful for visualizing industrially important processes where several gases may be present, e.g., gas-solid catalytic reactions. PMID:27478870

  10. Experimental study on transmission of an overdriven detonation wave from propane/oxygen to propane/air

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Lai, W.H.; Chung, K.; Lu, F.K.

    2008-08-15

    Two sets of experiments were performed to achieve a strong overdriven state in a weaker mixture by propagating an overdriven detonation wave via a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) process. First, preliminary experiments with a propane/oxygen mixture were used to evaluate the attenuation of the overdriven detonation wave in the DDT process. Next, experiments were performed wherein a propane/oxygen mixture was separated from a propane/air mixture by a thin diaphragm to observe the transmission of an overdriven detonation wave. Based on the characteristic relations, a simple wave intersection model was used to calculate the state of the transmitted detonation wave. The results showed that a rarefaction effect must be included to ensure that there is no overestimate of the post-transmission wave properties when the incident detonation wave is overdriven. The strength of the incident overdriven detonation wave plays an important role in the wave transmission process. The experimental results showed that a transmitted overdriven detonation wave occurs instantaneously with a strong incident overdriven detonation wave. The near-CJ state of the incident wave leads to a transmitted shock wave, and then the transition to the overdriven detonation wave occurs downstream. The attenuation process for the overdriven detonation wave decaying to a near-CJ state occurs in all tests. After the attenuation process, an unstable detonation wave was observed in most tests. This may be attributed to the increase in the cell width in the attenuation process that exceeds the detonability cell width limit. (author)

  11. A Robust, Air-Stable, Reusable Ruthenium Catalyst for Dehydrogenation of Ammonia Borane

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Brian L.; Guess, Denver; Williams, Travis J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an efficient homogeneous ruthenium catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ammonia borane (AB). This catalyst liberates greater than 2 equivalents of H2 and up to 4.6 system wt% H2 from concentrated AB suspensions under air. Importantly, this catalyst is robust, delivering several cycles of dehydrogenation at high [AB] without loss of catalytic activity, even with exposure to air and water. PMID:21827173

  12. Ru-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative C-O Bond Formation with Anilines and Phenols.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Christophe; Jones, Alexander W; Oezkaya, Bünyamin S; Bub, Christina L; Louillat-Habermeyer, Marie-Laure; Wagner, Victoria; Patureau, Frederic W

    2016-12-12

    The Ru catalyzed cross-dehydrogenative C-O bond formation between anilines and phenols is described and discussed. The exclusive C-O versus C-N bond-formation selectivity, moreover in the absence of chelating-assisting directing groups and while leaving the N-H position untouched, is a remarkable feature of this metal-catalyzed radical cross-dehydrogenative coupling. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Compensation effect in the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Anders; Vegge, Tejs; Pedersen, Allan S

    2005-03-03

    The possible existence of a compensation effect, i.e. concurrent changes in activation energy and prefactor, is investigated for the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of metal hydrides, by analyzing a series of reported kinetic studies on Mg and LaNi(5) based hydrides. For these systems, we find a clear linear relation between apparent prefactors and apparent activation energies, as obtained from an Arrhenius analysis, indicating the existence of a compensation effect. Large changes in apparent activation energies in the case of Mg based hydrides are rationalized in terms of a dependency of observed apparent activation energy on the degree of surface oxidation, i.e., a physical effect. On the other hand, we find the large concurrent changes in apparent prefactors to be a direct result of the Arrhenius analysis. Thus, we find the observed compensation effect to be an artifact of the data analysis rather than a physical phenomenon. In the case of LaNi(5) based hydrides, observed scatter in reported apparent activation energies is less pronounced supporting the general experience that LaNi(5) is less sensitive toward surface contamination.

  14. Toward a reliable computational description of hydrocarbon activation in zeolites : a study of cracking, dehydrogenation, and H/D Exchange of alkanes in H-ZSM-5.

    SciTech Connect

    Zygmunt, S. A.; Bootz, B. L.; Miller, A. W.; Curtiss, L. A.; Iton, L. E.

    2000-11-01

    During the past decade, quantum-chemical calculations have been used to model hydrocarbon reactions in zeolite acid catalysts. In the interest of computational feasibility, the zeolite has often been represented by a very small cluster model, at times including only one tetrahedrally-coordinated atom (a 1T cluster). The results of such calculations have given important qualitative insights such as possible reaction pathways and transition state geometries, but the calculated activation energies for hydrocarbon reactions have usually been 50 percent or more higher than experimental values. In our recent work we developed a methodology of quantum-chemical techniques and corrections that allowed us to calculate a quantitatively accurate activation energy for protolytic cracking of ethane in H-ZSM-5 [1]. In order to test the limits of our computational method, we have carried out a study of protolytic cracking, dehydrogenation, and H/D exchange of the n-alkanes ethane, propane, and butane using a cluster model of H-ZSM-5. Our goal is to study the dependence of the activation energy on the alkane chain length in these reactions and to determine whether this method can produce results in quantitative agreement with available experimental results [2-5].

  15. On-Surface Domino Reactions: Glaser Coupling and Dehydrogenative Coupling of a Biscarboxylic Acid To Form Polymeric Bisacylperoxides.

    PubMed

    Held, Philipp Alexander; Gao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Lacheng; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Timmer, Alexander; Mönig, Harry; Barton, Dennis; Neugebauer, Johannes; Fuchs, Harald; Studer, Armido

    2016-08-08

    Herein we report the on-surface oxidative homocoupling of 6,6'-(1,4-buta-1,3-diynyl)bis(2-naphthoic acid) (BDNA) via bisacylperoxide formation on different Au substrates. By using this unprecedented dehydrogenative polymerization of a biscarboxylic acid, linear poly-BDNA with a chain length of over 100 nm was prepared. It is shown that the monomer BDNA can be prepared in situ at the surface via on-surface Glaser coupling of 6-ethynyl-2-naphthoic acid (ENA). Under the Glaser coupling conditions, BDNA directly undergoes polymerization to give the polymeric peroxide (poly-BDNA) representing a first example of an on-surface domino reaction. It is shown that the reaction outcome varies as a function of surface topography (Au(111) or Au(100)) and also of the surface coverage, to give branched polymers, linear polymers, or 2D metal-organic networks.

  16. Synthesis of Functionalized Pyrazoles via Vanadium-Catalyzed C-N Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling and Fluorescence Switch-On Sensing of BSA Protein.

    PubMed

    Sar, Dinabandhu; Bag, Raghunath; Yashmeen, Afsana; Bag, Subhendu Sekhar; Punniyamurthy, Tharmalingam

    2015-11-06

    Vanadium-catalyzed C-N dehydrogenative cross-coupling of alkenyl hydrazones leading to functionalized pyrazoles is described in a 1:1 mixture of toluene/H2O using air as the terminal oxidant. Significant practical features include use of the commercial nontoxic VOSO4 as a recyclable catalyst, mild reaction conditions, scalability, and the broad substrate scope. Some of the product pyrazoles exhibit interesting photophysical properties. Fluorescence light-up sensing of BSA protein by one of the pyrazoles is also highlighted.

  17. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-02-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  18. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  19. Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kaska, W.C.; Jensen, C.M.

    1998-07-14

    An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

  20. Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Kaska, William C.; Jensen, Craig M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

  1. Aerobic treatment of N-nitrosodimethylamine in a propane-fed membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, Paul B; Condee, Charles; McClay, Kevin R; Paul Togna, A

    2011-01-01

    N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a suspected human carcinogen that has recently been detected in wastewater, groundwater and drinking water. Treatment of this compound to low part-per-trillion (ng/L) concentrations is required to mitigate cancer risk. Current treatment generally entails UV irradiation, which while effective, is also expensive. The objective of this research was to explore potential bioremediation strategies as alternatives for treating NDMA to ng/L concentrations. Batch studies revealed that the propanotroph Rhodococcus ruber ENV425 was capable of metabolizing NDMA from 8 μg/L to <2 ng/L after growth on propane, and that the strain produced metabolites that do not pose a significant risk at the concentrations generated (Fournier et al., 2009). A laboratory-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was subsequently constructed to evaluate the potential for long-term ex situ treatment of NDMA. The MBR was seeded with ENV425 and received propane as the primary growth substrate and oxygen as an electron acceptor. At an average influent NDMA concentration of 7.4 μg/L and a 28.5 h hydraulic residence time, the reactor effluent concentration was 3.0 ± 2.3 ng/L (>99.95% removal) over more than 70 days of operation. The addition of trichloroethene (TCE) to the reactor resulted in a significant increase in effluent NDMA concentrations, most likely due to cell toxicity from TCE-epoxide produced during its cometabolic oxidation by ENV425. The data suggest that an MBR system can be a viable treatment option for NDMA in groundwater provided that high concentrations of TCE are not present. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Computational modeling of a direct propane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakdaman, H.; Bourgault, Y.; Ternan, M.

    2011-03-01

    The first two dimensional mathematical model of a complete direct propane fuel cell (DPFC) is described. The governing equations were solved using FreeFem software that uses finite element methods. Robin boundary conditions were used to couple the anode, membrane, and cathode sub-domains successfully. The model showed that a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane having its pores filled with zirconium phosphate (ZrP-PTFE), in a DPFC at 150 °C performed much the same as other electrolytes; Nafion, aqueous H3PO4, and H2SO4 doped polybenzimidazole, when they were used in DPFCs. One advantage of a ZrP-PTFE at 150 °C is that it operates without liquid phase water. As a result corrosion will be much less severe and it may be possible for non-precious metal catalysts to be used. Computational results showed that the thickness of the catalyst layer could be increased sufficiently so that the pressure drop between the reactant and product channels of the interdigitated flow fields is small. By increasing the width of the land and therefore the reactant's contact time with the catalyst it was possible to approach 100% propane conversion. Therefore fuel cell operation with a minimum concentration of propane in the product stream should be possible. Finally computations of the electrical potential in the ZrP phase, the electron flux in the Pt/C phase, and the overpotential in both the anode and cathode catalyst layers showed that serious errors in the model occurred because proton diffusion, caused by the proton concentration gradient, was neglected in the equation for the conservation of protons.

  3. Supercritical convection, critical heat flux, and coking characteristics of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Gross, R. S.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of propane at subcritical and supercritical pressure were experimentally evaluated using electrically heated Monel K-500 tubes. A design correlation for supercritical heat transfer coefficient was established using the approach previously applied to supercritical oxygen. Flow oscillations were observed and the onset of these oscillations at supercritical pressures was correlated with wall-to-bulk temperature ratio and velocity. The critical heat flux measured at subcritical pressure was correlated with the product of velocity and subcooling. Long duration tests at fixed heat flux conditions were conducted to evaluate coking on the coolant side tube wall and coking rates comparable to RP-1 were observed.

  4. Supercritical convection, critical heat flux, and coking characteristics of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Gross, R. S.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of propane at subcritical and supercritical pressure were experimentally evaluated using electrically heated Monel K-500 tubes. A design correlation for supercritical heat transfer coefficient was established using the approach previously applied to supercritical oxygen. Flow oscillations were observed and the onset of these oscillations at supercritical pressures was correlated with wall-to-bulk temperature ratio and velocity. The critical heat flux measured at subcritical pressure was correlated with the product of velocity and subcooling. Long duration tests at fixed heat flux conditions were conducted to evaluate coking on the coolant side tube wall and coking rates comparable to RP-1 were observed.

  5. Regeneration of LOHC dehydrogenation catalysts: In-situ IR spectroscopy on single crystals, model catalysts, and real catalysts from UHV to near ambient pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amende, Max; Kaftan, Andre; Bachmann, Philipp; Brehmer, Richard; Preuster, Patrick; Koch, Marcus; Wasserscheid, Peter; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier (LOHC) concept offers an efficient route to store hydrogen using organic compounds that are reversibly hydrogenated and dehydrogenated. One important challenge towards application of the LOHC technology at a larger scale is to minimize degradation of Pt-based dehydrogenation catalysts during long-term operation. Herein, we investigate the regeneration of Pt/alumina catalysts poisoned by LOHC degradation. We combine ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) studies on Pt(111), investigations on well-defined Pt/Al2O3 model catalysts, and near-ambient pressure (NAP) measurements on real core⿿shell Pt/Al2O3 catalyst pellets. The catalysts were purposely poisoned by reaction with the LOHC perhydro-dibenzyltoluene (H18-MSH) and with dicyclohexylmethane (DCHM) as a simpler model compound. We focus on oxidative regeneration under conditions that may be applied in real dehydrogenation reactors. The degree of poisoning and regeneration under oxidative reaction conditions was quantified using CO as a probe molecule and measured by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and diffuse reflectance Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) for planar model systems and real catalysts, respectively. We find that regeneration strongly depends on the composition of the catalyst surface. While the clean surface of a poisoned Pt(111) single crystal is fully restored upon thermal treatment in oxygen up to 700 K, contaminated Pt/Al2O3 model catalyst and core⿿shell pellet were only partially restored under the applied reaction conditions. Whereas partial regeneration on facet-like sites on supported catalysts is more facile than on Pt(111), carbonaceous deposits adsorbed at low-coordinated defect sites impede full regeneration of the Pt/Al2O3 catalysts.

  6. Dehydrogenation of isopropyl alcohol on modified cobalt catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, E. A.; Naumkin, A. V.; Volkov, I. O.; Lobanov, N. N.; Protasova, I. A.; Yagodovskaya, T. V.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2014-05-01

    The effects of plasmochemical processing and of Ce, K, and Hf additives on the rate of dehydrogenation for isopropyl alcohol on a 5 wt % Co/SiO2 catalyst is studied under static and flow conditions. Glow discharge plasma in O2 and Ar and high-frequency electrodeless plasma in H2 (HF-H2) are used. Except for one sample containing Hf, an increase in catalytic activity is observed due to the formation of new active centers. The change in the composition of the initial catalyst's surface after treatment with Ce and with oxygen, argon, and HF-H2 plasmas is determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The change in the size and shape of Co particles after treating the catalyst with HF-H2 plasma and Ce is determined via X-ray phase analysis. It is suggested that the new catalytic centers formed after treatment in O2 and Ar plasma contain carbon atoms with C1 s bond energies of 282.1 eV; after treatment with HF-H2 plasma, active centers contain hydrogen and carbon atoms with C1 s bond energies of 282.5 eV; with cerium, the C1 s bond energy is 297.7 eV.

  7. Documentation for propane fleet conversion cost-effectiveness model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D.; Euritt, M.; Mahmassani, H.

    1992-10-01

    Increased emphasis on energy efficiency and air quality has resulted in a number of state and federal initiatives examining the use of alternative fuels for motor vehicles. Texas instituted an alternative fuels program for public fleet operations beginning in the 1991-92 fiscal year. Life-cycle cost/benefit models for evaluating the economic implications of the action have been developed at the University of Texas at Austin Center for Transportation Research for both compressed natural gas (CNG) and propane. The report documents the various input data, calculations, and assumptions of the Propane Net Present Value (NPV) model. A similar report (number 983-1) documents the same for the CNG model. Input data with constant values across different fleets and locations are discussed first and include basic parameters for on-board storage capacity, vehicle conversion costs, equipment salvage values, etc. Variable input data, reflecting a given fleet size, composition, and location, include the number and types of vehicles, fuel consumption, etc. The next section presents the formulas for the internal model calculations. The final section discusses the basic assumptions underlying the model.

  8. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engineering judgment and safe practices, this check may be performed using a gas other than propane, such as... § 1065.340. (6) Other problems with the CVS or sampling verification hardware or software.Inspect the CVS system, CVS verification hardware, and software for discrepancies. (b) A propane check uses either a...

  9. A New Homogeneous Catalyst for the Dehydrogenation of Dimethylamine Borane Starting with Ruthenium(III) Acetylacetonate

    PubMed Central

    Ünel Barın, Ebru; Masjedi, Mehdi; Özkar, Saim

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of ruthenium(III) acetylacetonate was investigated for the first time in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane. During catalytic reaction, a new ruthenium(II) species is formed in situ from the reduction of ruthenium(III) and characterized using UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 1H NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The most likely structure suggested for the ruthenium(II) species is mer-[Ru(N2Me4)3(acac)H]. Mercury poisoning experiment indicates that the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane is homogeneous catalysis. The kinetics of the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane starting with Ru(acac)3 were studied depending on the catalyst concentration, substrate concentration and temperature. The hydrogen generation was found to be first-order with respect to catalyst concentration and zero-order regarding the substrate concentration. Evaluation of the kinetic data provides the activation parameters for the dehydrogenation reaction: the activation energy Ea = 85 ± 2 kJ·mol−1, the enthalpy of activation ∆H# = 82 ± 2 kJ·mol−1 and the entropy of activation; ∆S# = −85 ± 5 J·mol−1·K−1. The ruthenium(II) catalyst formed from the reduction of ruthenium(III) acetylacetonate provides 1700 turnovers over 100 hours in hydrogen generation from the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine borane before deactivation at 60 °C.

  10. Ruthenium(II)-PNN pincer complex catalyzed dehydrogenation of benzyl alcohol to ester: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jingcong; Wen, Li; Lv, Xiaobo; Qi, Yong; Yin, Hailiang

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of the dehydrogenation of primary alcohol to ester catalyzed by the ruthenium(II)-PNN pincer complex Ru(H)(η2-BH4)(PNN), [PNN: (2-(di-tert-butylphosphinomethyl)-6-(diethlaminomethyl)-pyridine)] has been investigated using density functional theory calculations. The catalytic cycle includes three stages: (stage I) alcohol dehydrogenation to form aldehyde, (stage II) coupling of aldehyde with alcohol to give hemiacetal or ester, and (stage III) hemiacetal dehydrogenation to form ester. Two dehydrogenation reactions occur via the β-H elimination mechanism rather than the bifunctional double hydrogen transfer mechanism, which could be rationalized as the fluxional behavior of the BH4- ligand. At the second stage, the coupling reaction requires alcohol or the ruthenium catalyst as mediator. The formation of hemiacetal through the alcohol-mediated pathway is kinetically favorable than the ruthenium catalyst-mediated one, which may be attributed to the smaller steric hindrance when the aldehyde approaches the alcohol moiety in the reaction system. Our results would be helpful for experimental chemists to design more effective transition metal catalysts for dehydrogenation of alcohols.

  11. Coverage- and temperature-dependent metalation and dehydrogenation of tetraphenylporphyrin on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Röckert, Michael; Franke, Matthias; Tariq, Quratulain; Ditze, Stefanie; Stark, Michael; Uffinger, Patrick; Wechsler, Daniel; Singh, Upendra; Xiao, Jie; Marbach, Hubertus; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Lytken, Ole

    2014-07-14

    Using temperature-programmed desorption, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, a comprehensive overview of the main reactions of 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (2HTPP) on Cu(111) as a function of coverage and temperature is obtained. Three reactions were identified: metalation with Cu substrate atoms, stepwise partial dehydrogenation, and finally complete dehydrogenation. At low coverage the reactions are independent of coverage, but at higher coverage metalation becomes faster and partial dehydrogenation slower. This behavior is explained by a weaker interaction between the iminic nitrogen atoms and the Cu(111) surface in the high-coverage checkerboard structure, leading to faster metalation, and the stabilizing effect of T-type interactions in the CuTPP islands formed at high coverage after metalation, leading to slower dehydrogenation. Based on the amount of hydrogen released and the appearance in STM, a structure of the partially dehydrogenated molecule is suggested. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Freon or propane: new design methods give a choice for small gas-processing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Love, D.L.

    1986-03-10

    Propane, and sometimes ammonia, have been the major refrigerants considered for refrigeration in liquid extraction plants. Freon was considered only for automotive and building air conditioning. With modular plants on skids becoming more popular for small volume applications, less-expensive equipment approaches are required to economically justify these small projects. Commercial and residential design methods can be used for refrigerated liquid extraction. They can significantly reduce the cost, compared to propane, for small volume applications. Although it appears to be a simple substitution of freon for propane, there are many complications in using freon. They include major changes in materials, and in chiller and compressor design. Love Process Engineering Inc. (LPE) has conducted extensive research on freon and propane plants for modular applications. This article will not discuss detailed design requirements, but compare freon and propane in the initial selection of project development for small volume applications.

  13. Critical evaluation of Jet-A spray combustion using propane chemical kinetics in gas turbine combustion simulated by KIVA-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, H. L.; Ying, S.-J.

    1990-01-01

    Jet-A spray combustion has been evaluated in gas turbine combustion with the use of propane chemical kinetics as the first approximation for the chemical reactions. Here, the numerical solutions are obtained by using the KIVA-2 computer code. The KIVA-2 code is the most developed of the available multidimensional combustion computer programs for application of the in-cylinder combustion dynamics of internal combustion engines. The released version of KIVA-2 assumes that 12 chemical species are present; the code uses an Arrhenius kinetic-controlled combustion model governed by a four-step global chemical reaction and six equilibrium reactions. Researchers efforts involve the addition of Jet-A thermophysical properties and the implementation of detailed reaction mechanisms for propane oxidation. Three different detailed reaction mechanism models are considered. The first model consists of 131 reactions and 45 species. This is considered as the full mechanism which is developed through the study of chemical kinetics of propane combustion in an enclosed chamber. The full mechanism is evaluated by comparing calculated ignition delay times with available shock tube data. However, these detailed reactions occupy too much computer memory and CPU time for the computation. Therefore, it only serves as a benchmark case by which to evaluate other simplified models. Two possible simplified models were tested in the existing computer code KIVA-2 for the same conditions as used with the full mechanism. One model is obtained through a sensitivity analysis using LSENS, the general kinetics and sensitivity analysis program code of D. A. Bittker and K. Radhakrishnan. This model consists of 45 chemical reactions and 27 species. The other model is based on the work published by C. K. Westbrook and F. L. Dryer.

  14. Effect of primary-zone water injection on pollutants from a combustor burning liquid ASTM A-1 and vaporized propane fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A combustor segment 0.457 meter (18 in.) long with a maximum cross section of 0.153 by 0.305 meter (6 by 12 in.) was operated at inlet-air temperatures of 590 and 700 K, inlet-air pressures of 4 and 10 atmospheres, and fuel-air ratios of 0.014 and 0.018 to determine the effect of primary-zone water injection on pollutants from burning either propane or ASTM A-1 fuel. At a simulated takeoff condition of 10 atmospheres and 700 K, multiple-orifice nozzles used to inject water at 1 percent of the airflow rate reduced nitrogen oxides 75 percent with propane and 65 percent with ASTM A-1 fuel. Although carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons increased with water injection, they remained relatively low; and smoke numbers were well below the visibility limit.

  15. Crystal structure of naltrexone chloride solvates with ethanol, propan-2-ol, and 2-methyl-propan-2-ol.

    PubMed

    Menze, Aveary R; Sinnott, Jefferson P; Nazarenko, Alexander Y

    2017-07-01

    Naltrexone [systematic name: 17-(cyclo-propyl-meth-yl)-3,14-di-hydroxy-4,5α-epoxymorphinan-6-one] is an opioid receptor competitive antagonist that has been widely used to prevent relapse in opioid- and alcohol-dependent subjects. Its chloride salt forms non-isomorphic solvates with ethanol (C20H24NO4(+)·Cl(-)·C2H5OH) (I), propan-2-ol (C20H24NO4(+)·Cl(-)·C3H7OH) (II), and 2-methyl-propan-2-ol (C20H24NO4(+)·Cl(-)·C4H9OH) (III). The naltrexone cation can be described as a T-shape made out of two ring systems, a tetra-hydro-2H-naphtho-[1,8-bc]furan system and a deca-hydro-isoquinolinium subunit, that are nearly perpendicular to one another. The flexible cyclo-propyl-methyl group can adopt various different conformations in response to its surroundings: an increase of available space around cyclo-propyl-methyl group may allow it to adopt a more favorable conformation. In all these structures, the alcohol mol-ecules occupy infinite solvent-filled channels. All three compounds described are attractive crystalline forms for unambiguous identification of naltrexone chloride after isolation from a pharmaceutical form. Compound (III) was refined as a two-component twin.

  16. Preparation and characterization of foxtail millet bran oil using subcritical propane and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuzhong; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhang, Ruitin; Ma, Hanjun; Liu, Benguo

    2015-05-01

    The foxtail millet (Setaria italica Beauv) bran oil was extracted with traditional solvent extraction (SE), supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCE) and subcritical propane extraction (SPE) and analyzed the yield, physicochemical property, fatty acid profile, tocopherol composition, oil oxidative stability in this study. The yields of foxtail millet bran oil by SE, SCE and SPE were 17.14 %, 19.65 %, 21.79 % of raw material weight (corresponded to 75.54 %, 86.60 %, 96.03 % of the total amount of the oil measured by using Soxhlet extraction), respectively. The effect of the extraction methods on the physicochemical properties (peroxide value, saponification value and color) was significant while the difference in fatty acid profile was negligible based on GC analysis. The major components of vitamin E in the obtained oils were identified as α- and β-tocopherols by HPLC, and SPE was superior to SE and SCE in the extraction of tocopherols. In Rancimat test, the oil obtained by SPE showed the highest oil oxidative stability, which could attribute to its high tocopherol content and low peroxide value. In view of oil quality, SPE employed smaller times and lower pressures compared to SE and SCE. SPE was a suitable and selective method for the extraction of the foxtail millet bran oil.

  17. Dehydrogenation characteristics of MgnH2n (n = 1-32) nanoclusters: A first-principles DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Chandrakumar, K. R. S.; Das, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    Ground state structures and dehydrogenation characteristics of MgnH2n (n = 1-32) nanoclusters have been investigated using first principles DFT approach. Dehydrogenation temperature gets reduced compared to the bulk rutile phase of MgH2, indicating its favorable usage for hydrogen storage.

  18. Dehydrogenation and Sintering of TiH2: An In Situ Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Liss, Klaus D.; Auchterlonie, Graeme; Tang, Huiping; Cao, Peng

    2017-06-01

    This first-ever study investigated dehydrogenation and microstructural evolution of TiH2 during sintering under vacuum using in situ neutron diffraction, in situ transmission electron microscopy, and ex situ neutron tomography. The densification behavior, microstructure, hydrogen concentration, and in situ phase transformation were reported. The shrinkage, weight loss percentage, and densification of the TiH2 powder compact monotonically increase with sintering temperature, while the open porosity behaves differently; porosity first increases at the initial sintering stage and then decreases during further sintering. The in situ phase transformation observations reveal that dehydrogenation starts from the outer area of either a particle or a powder compact and progressively carries forward into the interior of the particle or the compact. A shrinking core model was proposed to elucidate the dehydrogenation process for a single particle and a powder compact.

  19. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane-Catalyzed Acceptorless Dehydrogenation of N-Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masahiro; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-09-26

    Catalytic acceptorless dehydrogenation is an environmentally benign way to desaturate organic compounds. This process is traditionally accomplished with transition-metal-based catalysts. Herein, a borane-catalyzed, metal-free acceptorless dehydrogenation of saturated N-heterocycles is disclosed. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane was identified as a versatile catalyst, which afforded several synthetically important N-heteroarenes in up to quantitative yield. Specifically, the present metal-free catalytic system exhibited a uniquely high tolerance toward sulfur functionalities, and demonstrated superior reactivity in the synthesis of benzothiazoles compared to conventional metal-catalyzed systems. This protocol can thus be regarded as the first example of metal-free acceptorless dehydrogenation in synthetic organic chemistry.

  20. Uniform dehydrogenation of amorphous silicon thin films using a wide thermal annealing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yong Chan; Seong, Sejong; Lee, Taehoon; Ahn, Jinho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yeo, Won-Jae; Park, In-Sung

    2017-02-01

    To prevent ablation caused by sudden hydrogen eruption during crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin films, a wide dehydrogenation thermal annealing (wDTA) system was developed to reduce hydrogen content in a-Si:H film prior to its crystallization process. The annealed a-Si:H films were fully dehydrogenated and nanocrystallized by the wDTA system. Raman scattering measurement revealed that the dehydrogenation process lowers the hydrogen content through disappearance of the peak intensity at 2000 cm-1. The a-Si:H film was transformed into nanocrystallized Si with lower residual stress. The major advantage of this wDTA was the large area uniformity of the thermal and the resulting material properties for 8 generation display. The uniform material characteristics of the hydrogen content, thickness, energy bandgap, and transmittance of the annealed Si films in the overall area was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and UV-vis spectrometer measurement.

  1. Study on reaction mechanism of dehydrogenation of magnesium hydride by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Shigehito; Ono, Akifumi; Yao, Hao; Wang, Yongming; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2010-05-01

    In situ observation on dehydrogenation of MgH2 was performed by using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The dehydrogenation of MgH2 with 1 mol % Nb2O5 and formation of nanosized Mg particles were observed at 150 °C. Nb2O5 was not confirmed in diffraction patterns and TEM images probably due to wide dispersion. On MgH2 with 10 mol % Nb2O5, the high resolution TEM could recognize the dehydrogenation at the interface between MgH2 and Nb2O5, proceeding with increasing temperature. This suggests that hydrogen atoms could diffuse from MgH2 phase to the interface between Mg and Nb2O5, resulting in formation of hydrogen molecules at the interface.

  2. Communication: Visualization and spectroscopy of defects induced by dehydrogenation in individual silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislitsyn, Dmitry A.; Mills, Jon M.; Kocevski, Vancho; Chiu, Sheng-Kuei; DeBenedetti, William J. I.; Gervasi, Christian F.; Taber, Benjamen N.; Rosenfield, Ariel E.; Eriksson, Olle; Rusz, Ján; Goforth, Andrea M.; Nazin, George V.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) study of the impact of dehydrogenation on the electronic structures of hydrogen-passivated silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) supported on the Au(111) surface. Gradual dehydrogenation is achieved by injecting high-energy electrons into individual SiNCs, which results, initially, in reduction of the electronic bandgap, and eventually produces midgap electronic states. We use theoretical calculations to show that the STS spectra of midgap states are consistent with the presence of silicon dangling bonds, which are found in different charge states. Our calculations also suggest that the observed initial reduction of the electronic bandgap is attributable to the SiNC surface reconstruction induced by conversion of surface dihydrides to monohydrides due to hydrogen desorption. Our results thus provide the first visualization of the SiNC electronic structure evolution induced by dehydrogenation and provide direct evidence for the existence of diverse dangling bond states on the SiNC surfaces.

  3. Dehydrogenation and Sintering of TiH2: An In Situ Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Liss, Klaus D.; Auchterlonie, Graeme; Tang, Huiping; Cao, Peng

    2017-03-01

    This first-ever study investigated dehydrogenation and microstructural evolution of TiH2 during sintering under vacuum using in situ neutron diffraction, in situ transmission electron microscopy, and ex situ neutron tomography. The densification behavior, microstructure, hydrogen concentration, and in situ phase transformation were reported. The shrinkage, weight loss percentage, and densification of the TiH2 powder compact monotonically increase with sintering temperature, while the open porosity behaves differently; porosity first increases at the initial sintering stage and then decreases during further sintering. The in situ phase transformation observations reveal that dehydrogenation starts from the outer area of either a particle or a powder compact and progressively carries forward into the interior of the particle or the compact. A shrinking core model was proposed to elucidate the dehydrogenation process for a single particle and a powder compact.

  4. Mineral-catalyzed dehydrogenation of C6 cyclic hydrocarbons: results from experimental studies under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, S.; Tassi, F.; Gould, I.; Shock, E.; Lorance, E. D.; Bockisch, C.; Fecteau, K.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitously present in volcanic and hydrothermal gases. Their relative abundances have been demonstrated to be sensitive to physical and chemical parameters, suggesting VOCs as potential tools for evaluating deep reservoir conditions. Nevertheless, reaction pathways for VOC production at hydrothermal conditions are still poorly understood. Reversible catalytic reforming may be responsible for the high abundance of benzene observed in hydrothermal gases relative to saturated hydrocarbons. The dehydrogenation of n-hexane to benzene could proceed with C6 cyclic hydrocarbons as intermediates, as suggested by the relative enrichment in cyclic hydrocarbons observed in gases originating at T <150 °C. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the production of benzene from cyclic hydrocarbons at 300°C and 85 bar. At these conditions in pure water, negligible benzene is produced from cyclohexane after 10 days. The presence of a mineral phase, especially sphalerite, favored the formation of both benzene and cyclohexene. The efficiency of dehydroaromatization reaction increased at increasing mineral/cyclohexane ratio, pointing to a surface catalyzed reaction. The catalytic action of sphalerite on the C-H bonds was confirmed by the large abundance of deuterated cyclohexane resulted in D2O experiments. The same experiment carried out using cyclohexene in pure water mainly produced methyl-cyclopentenes (via isomerization) and cyclohexanol (via oxygenation). In presence of sphalerite, the production of significant amounts of benzene confirmed the critical role of this mineral for the aromatization of cyclic compounds under hydrothermal conditions. Contrarily, products from cyclohexene solution phase oxidation using Cu(II) mainly consisted of oxygenated VOCs.

  5. Aerobic dehydrogenation of cyclohexanone to cyclohexenone catalyzed by Pd(DMSO)2(TFA)2: evidence for ligand-controlled chemoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Diao, Tianning; Pun, Doris; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-06-05

    The dehydrogenation of cyclohexanones affords cyclohexenones or phenols via removal of 1 or 2 equiv of H2, respectively. We recently reported several Pd(II) catalyst systems that effect aerobic dehydrogenation of cyclohexanones with different product selectivities. Pd(DMSO)2(TFA)2 is unique in its high chemoselectivity for the conversion of cyclohexanones to cyclohexenones, without promoting subsequent dehydrogenation of cyclohexenones to phenols. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of these reactions reveal the key role of the dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) ligand in controlling this chemoselectivity. DMSO has minimal kinetic influence on the rate of Pd(TFA)2-catalyzed dehydrogenation of cyclohexanone to cyclohexenone, while it strongly inhibits the second dehydrogenation step, conversion of cyclohexenone to phenol. These contrasting kinetic effects of DMSO provide the basis for chemoselective formation of cyclohexenones.

  6. Lewis acid-assisted formic acid dehydrogenation using a pincer-supported iron catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bielinski, Elizabeth A; Lagaditis, Paraskevi O; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Mercado, Brandon Q; Würtele, Christian; Bernskoetter, Wesley H; Hazari, Nilay; Schneider, Sven

    2014-07-23

    Formic acid (FA) is an attractive compound for H2 storage. Currently, the most active catalysts for FA dehydrogenation use precious metals. Here, we report a homogeneous iron catalyst that, when used with a Lewis acid (LA) co-catalyst, gives approximately 1,000,000 turnovers for FA dehydrogenation. To date, this is the highest turnover number reported for a first-row transition metal catalyst. Preliminary studies suggest that the LA assists in the decarboxylation of a key iron formate intermediate and can also be used to enhance the reverse process of CO2 hydrogenation.

  7. Porous Mg formation upon dehydrogenation of MgH2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dura, J. A.; Kelly, S. T.; Kienzle, P. A.; Her, J.-H.; Udovic, T. J.; Majkrzak, C. F.; Chung, C.-J.; Clemens, B. M.

    2011-05-01

    The hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of a thin film of Mg with a Pd cap layer was measured using neutron reflectometry. Upon hydrogenation, (at 373 K and 0.2 MPa H2), the Mg film swelled in the surface normal direction by an amount roughly equal to the difference in volume between MgH2 and Mg. After dehydrogenation (at 343-423 K), the Mg film returned to a composition of Mg but retained the swelled thickness by incorporating voids. The presence of the voids is confirmed by SEM micrographs. The voids may explain some of the changes in absorption kinetics after full cycling of Mg films.

  8. Propane-1,3-diammonium dichromate(VI).

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Sonia; Marouani, Houda; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Rzaigui, Mohamed

    2012-08-01

    The title compound, (C(3)H(12)N(2))[Cr(2)O(7)], consists of a discrete dichromate anion with an eclipsed conformation and a propane-1,3-diammonium cation. Both kinds of ions have a mirror plane passing through the bridging O atom and the central methyl-ene C atom of the Cr(2)O(7) (2-) and C(3)H(12)N(2) (2+) moieties, respectively. Anions and cations are alternately stacked to form columns parallel to the b axis. Ions are linked by intra- and inter-column hydrogen bonds of types N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O, involving O atoms of the dichromate anions as acceptors, and ammonium or methyl-ene groups as donors.

  9. Exhaust gas measurements in a propane fueled swirl stabilized combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aanad, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Exhaust gas temperature, velocity, and composition are measured and combustor efficiencies are calculated in a lean premixed swirl stabilized laboratory combustor. The radial profiles of the data between the co- and the counter swirl cases show significant differences. Co-swirl cases show evidence of poor turbulent mixing across the combustor in comparison to the counter-swirl cases. NO sub x levels are low in the combustor but substantial amounts of CO are present. Combustion efficiencies are low and surprisingly constant with varying outer swirl in contradiction to previous results under a slightly different inner swirl condition. This difference in the efficiency trends is expected to be a result of the high sensitivity of the combustor to changes in the inner swirl. Combustor operation is found to be the same for propane and methane fuels. A mechanism is proposed to explain the combustor operation and a few important characteristics determining combustor efficiency are identified.

  10. Chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jachimowski, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the combustion of propane is presented and discussed. The mechanism consists of 27 chemical species and 83 elementary chemical reactions. Ignition and combustion data as determined in shock tube studies were used to evaluate the mechanism. Numerical simulation of the shock tube experiments showed that the kinetic behavior predicted by the mechanism for stoichiometric mixtures is in good agrement with the experimental results over the entire temperature range examined (1150-2600K). Sensitivity and theoretical studies carried out using the mechanism revealed that hydrocarbon reactions which are involved in the formation of the HO2 radical and the H2O2 molecule are very important in the mechanism and that the observed nonlinear behavior of ignition delay time with decreasing temperature can be interpreted in terms of the increased importance of the HO2 and H2O2 reactions at the lower temperatures.

  11. An analysis of US propane markets, winter 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    In late summer 1996, in response to relatively low inventory levels and tight world oil markets, prices for crude oil, natural gas, and products derived from both began to increase rapidly ahead of the winter heating season. Various government and private sector forecasts indicated the potential for supply shortfalls and sharp price increases, especially in the event of unusually severe winter weather. Following a rapid runup in gasoline prices in the spring of 1996, public concerns were mounting about a possibly similar situation in heating fuels, with potentially more serious consequences. In response to these concerns, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) participated in numerous briefings and meetings with Executive Branch officials, Congressional committee members and staff, State Energy Offices, and consumers. EIA instituted a coordinated series of actions to closely monitor the situation and inform the public. This study constitutes one of those actions: an examination of propane supply, demand, and price developments and trends.

  12. Propane spectral resolution enhancement by the maximum entropy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Stewart, K. P.; Hurley, E. J.; Yeh, K. C.; Inguva, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Burg algorithm for maximum entropy power spectral density estimation is applied to a time series of data obtained from a Michelson interferometer and compared with a standard FFT estimate for resolution capability. The propane transmittance spectrum was estimated by use of the FFT with a 2 to the 18th data sample interferogram, giving a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.06/cm. This estimate was then interpolated by zero filling an additional 2 to the 18th points, and the final resolution was taken to be 0.06/cm. Comparison of the maximum entropy method (MEM) estimate with the FFT was made over a 45/cm region of the spectrum for several increasing record lengths of interferogram data beginning at 2 to the 10th. It is found that over this region the MEM estimate with 2 to the 16th data samples is in close agreement with the FFT estimate using 2 to the 18th samples.

  13. [1,3-Bis(diphenylphosphino)propane]trichlorooxorhenium(V).

    PubMed

    Suescun, L; Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Pardo, H; Russi, S; Kremer, C; Rivero, M; Kremer, E

    2000-08-01

    Trichlorooxo[1,3-propanediylbis(diphenylphosphine)-P,P ']rhenium(V), [ReCl(3)O(C(27)H(26)P(2))], crystallizes with four formula units per unit cell. The crystal structure consists of neutral complexes of [ReOCl(3)(dppp)] [dppp is 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane] packed by H.pi-ring interactions. The Re atom is octahedrally coordinated to the oxo anion, three Cl atoms and two P atoms from the dppp ligand. The six-membered ring formed by the bidentate dppp ligand and the rhenium metal centre is in a chair conformation. The title compound is an intermediate in the synthesis of bis(dppp) complexes of rhenium.

  14. Propane spectral resolution enhancement by the maximum entropy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonavito, N. L.; Stewart, K. P.; Hurley, E. J.; Yeh, K. C.; Inguva, R.

    1990-01-01

    The Burg algorithm for maximum entropy power spectral density estimation is applied to a time series of data obtained from a Michelson interferometer and compared with a standard FFT estimate for resolution capability. The propane transmittance spectrum was estimated by use of the FFT with a 2 to the 18th data sample interferogram, giving a maximum unapodized resolution of 0.06/cm. This estimate was then interpolated by zero filling an additional 2 to the 18th points, and the final resolution was taken to be 0.06/cm. Comparison of the maximum entropy method (MEM) estimate with the FFT was made over a 45/cm region of the spectrum for several increasing record lengths of interferogram data beginning at 2 to the 10th. It is found that over this region the MEM estimate with 2 to the 16th data samples is in close agreement with the FFT estimate using 2 to the 18th samples.

  15. Low-Temperature Vapor Pressures of Ethylene and Propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. N.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Harris, B., Sr.

    1997-07-01

    Mass spectra from the Galileo probe exhibit a cluster of peaks associated with two- and three-carbon hydrocarbons and two have been identified as ethylene and propane (Niemann et al. 1996). These molecules are important in the photochemical cycle of methane and are expected to be present in the atmospheres of the outer planets and Titan. To properly model related physical and chemical processes, e.g., cloud formation, it is important to have accurate thermodynamic data for these and other light hydrocarbons over the appropriate temperature and pressure range. The apparatus developed to determine the vapor pressures of gases and gas mixtures (Allen, Nelson, and Harris 1996) has been modified to provide a greater temperature range. Using this new system we have measured the vapor pressure of propane which, besides its role as a constituent in outer-planet atmospheres, is also a good calibration source since its vapor pressure is well determined over the temperature range of interest. The vapor pressure of ethylene was then determined. Little data are available for ethylene below its triple point (104 K); however we were able to extend our measurements past that point into the solid-phase region. The results of our vapor pressure measurements for these gases are presented along with comparisons with existing data sets. Allen, J.E., Jr., Nelson, R.N., Harris, B.C, Sr. 1996, B.A.A.S. underline {28}, 1157. Niemann, H.B. et al. 1996, Science 272, underline {842} and P.R. Mahaffy (private communication).

  16. Performance of an Experimental Annular Turbojet Combustor with Methane and Propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, Carl T

    1957-01-01

    Combustion efficiencies obtained with gaseous methane were compared with reported data obtained with gaseous propane for the same experimental combustor configuration. The combustion efficiencies obtained with methane were 98, 91, and 77 percent at simulated flight altitudes of 56,000, 70,000 and 80,000 feet, corresponding to combustor inlet-air pressures from 15 to 5 inches of mercury absolute. Combustion efficiencies with propane were equivalent to those with methane up to a simulated altitude of 70,000 feet. At the most severe conditions investigated propane operated with a higher efficiency and over a wider range of fuel-air ratio than methane.

  17. Variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for propane-air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belles, Frank E; Simon, Dorothy M

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made of the variation of the pressure limits of flame propagation with tube diameter for quiescent propane with tube diameter for quiescent propane-air mixtures. Pressure limits were measured in glass tubes of six different inside diameters, with a precise apparatus. Critical diameters for flame propagation were calculated and the effect of pressure was determined. The critical diameters depended on the pressure to the -0.97 power for stoichiometric mixtures. The pressure dependence decreased with decreasing propane concentration. Critical diameters were related to quenching distance, flame speeds, and minimum ignition energy.

  18. Role of Sn in the Regeneration of Pt/γ-Al2O3 Light Alkane Dehydrogenation Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Alumina-supported Pt is one of the major industrial catalysts for light alkane dehydrogenation. This catalyst loses activity during reaction, with coke formation often considered as the reason for deactivation. As we show in this study, the amount and nature of carbon deposits do not directly correlate with the loss of activity. Rather, it is the transformation of subnanometer Pt species into larger Pt nanoparticles that appears to be responsible for the loss of catalytic activity. Surprisingly, a portion of the Sn remains atomically dispersed on the alumina surface in the spent catalyst and helps in the redispersion of the Pt. In the absence of Sn on the alumina support, the larger Pt nanoparticles formed during reaction are not redispersed during oxidative regeneration. It is known that Sn is added as a promoter in the industrial catalyst to help in achieving high propene selectivity and to minimize coke formation. This work shows that an important role of Sn is to help in the regeneration of Pt, by providing nucleation sites on the alumina surface. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy helps to provide unique insights into the operating characteristics of an industrially important catalyst by demonstrating the role of promoter elements, such as Sn, in the oxidative regeneration of Pt on γ-Al2O3. PMID:27076991

  19. Role of Sn in the regeneration of Pt/γ-Al2O3 light alkane dehydrogenation catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Pham, Hien N.; Sattler, Jesper J. H. B.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; ...

    2016-02-23

    Alumina-supported Pt is one of the major industrial catalysts for light alkane dehydrogenation. This catalyst loses activity during reaction, with coke formation often considered as the reason for deactivation. As we show in this study, the amount and nature of carbon deposits do not directly correlate with the loss of activity. Rather, it is the transformation of subnanometer Pt species into larger Pt nanoparticles that appears to be responsible for the loss of catalytic activity. Surprisingly, a portion of the Sn remains atomically dispersed on the alumina surface in the spent catalyst and helps in the redispersion of the Pt.more » In the absence of Sn on the alumina support, the larger Pt nanoparticles formed during reaction are not redispersed during oxidative regeneration. It is known that Sn is added as a promoter in the industrial catalyst to help in achieving high propene selectivity and to minimize coke formation. This work shows that an important role of Sn is to help in the regeneration of Pt, by providing nucleation sites on the alumina surface. Finally aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy helps to provide unique insights into the operating characteristics of an industrially important catalyst by demonstrating the role of promoter elements, such as Sn, in the oxidative regeneration of Pt on γ-Al2O3.« less

  20. Role of Sn in the Regeneration of Pt/γ-Al2O3 Light Alkane Dehydrogenation Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hien N; Sattler, Jesper J H B; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Datye, Abhaya K

    2016-04-01

    Alumina-supported Pt is one of the major industrial catalysts for light alkane dehydrogenation. This catalyst loses activity during reaction, with coke formation often considered as the reason for deactivation. As we show in this study, the amount and nature of carbon deposits do not directly correlate with the loss of activity. Rather, it is the transformation of subnanometer Pt species into larger Pt nanoparticles that appears to be responsible for the loss of catalytic activity. Surprisingly, a portion of the Sn remains atomically dispersed on the alumina surface in the spent catalyst and helps in the redispersion of the Pt. In the absence of Sn on the alumina support, the larger Pt nanoparticles formed during reaction are not redispersed during oxidative regeneration. It is known that Sn is added as a promoter in the industrial catalyst to help in achieving high propene selectivity and to minimize coke formation. This work shows that an important role of Sn is to help in the regeneration of Pt, by providing nucleation sites on the alumina surface. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy helps to provide unique insights into the operating characteristics of an industrially important catalyst by demonstrating the role of promoter elements, such as Sn, in the oxidative regeneration of Pt on γ-Al2O3.

  1. Effect of Oxygen Enrichment in Propane Laminar Diffusion Flames under Microgravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Pramod; Singh, Ravinder

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion flames are the most common type of flame which we see in our daily life such as candle flame and match-stick flame. Also, they are the most used flames in practical combustion system such as industrial burner (coal fired, gas fired or oil fired), diesel engines, gas turbines, and solid fuel rockets. In the present study, steady-state global chemistry calculations for 24 different flames were performed using an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics code (UNICORN). Computation involved simulations of inverse and normal diffusion flames of propane in earth and microgravity condition with varying oxidizer compositions (21, 30, 50, 100 % O2, by mole, in N2). 2 cases were compared with the experimental result for validating the computational model. These flames were stabilized on a 5.5 mm diameter burner with 10 mm of burner length. The effect of oxygen enrichment and variation in gravity (earth gravity and microgravity) on shape and size of diffusion flames, flame temperature, flame velocity have been studied from the computational result obtained. Oxygen enrichment resulted in significant increase in flame temperature for both types of diffusion flames. Also, oxygen enrichment and gravity variation have significant effect on the flame configuration of normal diffusion flames in comparison with inverse diffusion flames. Microgravity normal diffusion flames are spherical in shape and much wider in comparison to earth gravity normal diffusion flames. In inverse diffusion flames, microgravity flames were wider than earth gravity flames. However, microgravity inverse flames were not spherical in shape.

  2. Cool Flames in Propane-Oxygen Premixtures at Low and Intermediate Temperatures at Reduced-Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Foster, Michael; Karabacak, Devrez

    2003-01-01

    The Cool Flame Experiment aims to address the role of diffusive transport on the structure and the stability of gas-phase, non-isothermal, hydrocarbon oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignition fronts in an unstirred, static reactor. These reactions cannot be studied on Earth where natural convection due to self-heating during the course of slow reaction dominates diffusive transport and produces spatio-temporal variations in the thermal and thus species concentration profiles. On Earth, reactions with associated Rayleigh numbers (Ra) less than the critical Ra for onset of convection (Ra(sub cr) approx. 600) cannot be achieved in laboratory-scale vessels for conditions representative of nearly all low-temperature reactions. In fact, the Ra at 1g ranges from 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) (or larger), while at reduced-gravity, these values can be reduced two to six orders of magnitude (below Ra(sub cr)), depending on the reduced-gravity test facility. Currently, laboratory (1g) and NASA s KC-135 reduced-gravity (g) aircraft studies are being conducted in parallel with the development of a detailed chemical kinetic model that includes thermal and species diffusion. Select experiments have also been conducted at partial gravity (Martian, 0.3gearth) aboard the KC-135 aircraft. This paper discusses these preliminary results for propane-oxygen premixtures in the low to intermediate temperature range (310- 350 C) at reduced-gravity.

  3. Effect of Oxygen Enrichment in Propane Laminar Diffusion Flames under Microgravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Pramod; Singh, Ravinder

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion flames are the most common type of flame which we see in our daily life such as candle flame and match-stick flame. Also, they are the most used flames in practical combustion system such as industrial burner (coal fired, gas fired or oil fired), diesel engines, gas turbines, and solid fuel rockets. In the present study, steady-state global chemistry calculations for 24 different flames were performed using an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics code (UNICORN). Computation involved simulations of inverse and normal diffusion flames of propane in earth and microgravity condition with varying oxidizer compositions (21, 30, 50, 100 % O2, by mole, in N2). 2 cases were compared with the experimental result for validating the computational model. These flames were stabilized on a 5.5 mm diameter burner with 10 mm of burner length. The effect of oxygen enrichment and variation in gravity (earth gravity and microgravity) on shape and size of diffusion flames, flame temperature, flame velocity have been studied from the computational result obtained. Oxygen enrichment resulted in significant increase in flame temperature for both types of diffusion flames. Also, oxygen enrichment and gravity variation have significant effect on the flame configuration of normal diffusion flames in comparison with inverse diffusion flames. Microgravity normal diffusion flames are spherical in shape and much wider in comparison to earth gravity normal diffusion flames. In inverse diffusion flames, microgravity flames were wider than earth gravity flames. However, microgravity inverse flames were not spherical in shape.

  4. FeCl3-Catalyzed Cross-Dehydrogenative Coupling between Imidazoheterocycles and Oxoaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sadhanendu; Mondal, Susmita; Santra, Sougata; Kibriya, Golam; Hajra, Alakananda

    2016-10-21

    An Fe(III)-catalyzed efficient dicarbonylation of imidazoheterocycles has been developed through cross-dehydrogenative coupling between imidazoheterocycles and oxoaldehydes under ambient air in high yields. The present protocol is also applicable to indolizines. Imidazopyridine produced bisimidazopyridine with arylaldehyde. Experimental results suggest that the reactions proceed through the nonradical pathway.

  5. Application of Heterogeneous Copper Catalyst in a Continuous Flow Process: Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glin´ski, Marek; Ulkowska, Urszula; Iwanek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, the synthesis of a supported solid catalyst (Cu/SiO2) and its application in the dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol performed under flow conditions was studied. The experiment was planned for a group of two or three students for two 6 h long sessions. The copper catalyst was synthesized using incipient wetness…

  6. Non-precious bimetallic catalysts for selective dehydrogenation of an organic chemical hydride system.

    PubMed

    Al-ShaikhAli, Anaam H; Jedidi, Abdesslem; Cavallo, Luigi; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-21

    Methylcyclohexane (MCH)-toluene (TOL) chemical hydride cycles as hydrogen carrier systems are successful with the selective dehydrogenation of MCH to TOL, which has been achieved only using precious Pt-based catalysts. Herein, we report improved selectivity using non-precious metal nickel-based bimetallic catalysts, where the second metal occupies the unselective step sites.

  7. Homogeneous catalytic transfer dehydrogenation of alkanes with a group 10 metal center.

    PubMed

    Khaskin, Eugene; Lew, Daniel L; Pal, Shrinwantu; Vedernikov, Andrei N

    2009-11-07

    Unambiguous catalytic homogeneous alkane transfer dehydrogenation was observed with a group 10 metal complex catalyst, LPt(II)(cyclo-C6H10)H, supported by a lipophilic dimethyl-di(4-tert-butyl-2-pyridyl)borate anionic ligand and tert-butylethene as the sacrificial hydrogen acceptor.

  8. Application of Heterogeneous Copper Catalyst in a Continuous Flow Process: Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glin´ski, Marek; Ulkowska, Urszula; Iwanek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, the synthesis of a supported solid catalyst (Cu/SiO2) and its application in the dehydrogenation of cyclohexanol performed under flow conditions was studied. The experiment was planned for a group of two or three students for two 6 h long sessions. The copper catalyst was synthesized using incipient wetness…

  9. Palladium-catalyzed aerobic dehydrogenative aromatization of cyclohexanone imines to arylamines.

    PubMed

    Hajra, Alakananda; Wei, Ye; Yoshikai, Naohiko

    2012-11-02

    Dehydrogenative aromatization of cyclohexanone imines to arylamines has been achieved using a palladium catalyst under aerobic conditions. The reaction is applicable to a variety of imines that are either preformed or generated in situ from cyclohexanone derivatives and aryl or alkylamines.

  10. State heating oil and propane program: Final report. Survey of No.2 heating oil and propane prices at the retail level, October 1997 through March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The Energy Efficiency Division of the Vermont Department of Public Service (DPS) monitored the price and inventory of residential heating oil and propane during the 1997--98 heating season under a grant from the US Department of Energy`s Energy Information Administration (EIA). DPS staff collected data biweekly between October 5, 1997 and March 16, 1998 on the retail price of {number_sign}2 home heating oil and propane by telephone survey. Propane price quoted was based on the rate for a residential home heating customer using 1,000+ per year. The survey included a sample of fuel dealers selected by the EIA, plus additional dealers and fuels selected by the DPS. The EIA weighted, analyzed, and reported the data collected from their sample.

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  12. School Districts Move to the Head of the Class with Propane

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    Propane has been a proven fuel for buses for decades. For the first time in 2007, Blue Bird rolled out a propane school bus using direct liquid injection, which was later followed by Thomas Built Buses and Navistar. Because this new technology is much more reliable than previous designs, it is essentially reintroducing propane buses to many school districts. During this same time period, vehicle emissions standards have tightened. To meet them, diesel engine manufacturers have added diesel particulate filters (DPF) and, more recently, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems. As an alternative to diesel buses with these systems, many school districts have looked to other affordable, clean alternatives, and they've found that propane fits the bill.

  13. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES AS ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical property measurements are presented for 24 fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether. These measurements include melting point, boiling point, vapor pressure below the boiling point, heat of vaporization at the boiling point, critical propertie...

  14. Burning of the Supersonic Propane-Air Mixture in the Aerodynamic Channel With the Stagnant Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    V.Chernikov, V.Shibkov, O.Surkont. Mechanisms of transversal electric discharge sustention in supersonic air and propane-air flows. -American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, AIAA Paper, 2003, No.03-0872, p. 1 -6 .

  15. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES AS ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical property measurements are presented for 24 fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether. These measurements include melting point, boiling point, vapor pressure below the boiling point, heat of vaporization at the boiling point, critical propertie...

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  17. Effect of preprocessing and compressed propane extraction on quality of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Jasreen K; Maness, Niels O; Jones, Carol L

    2015-05-15

    Dehydration leads to quality defects in cilantro such as loss in structure, color, aroma and flavor. Solvent extraction with compressed propane may improve the dehydrated quality. In the present study, effect of drying temperature, particle size, and propane extraction on color, volatile composition, and fatty acid composition of cilantro was evaluated. Cilantro was dehydrated (40°C or 60°C), size reduced and separated into three particles sizes, and extracted with compressed propane at 21-27°C. Major volatile compounds found in dried cilantro were E-2-tetradecenal, dodecanal, E-2-dodecenal, and tetradecanal. Major fatty acids were linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid. Drying at 60°C compared to 40°C resulted in better preservation of color (decrease in browning index values) and volatile compounds. Propane extraction led to a positive change in color values and a decrease in volatile composition, oil content, and fatty acid composition.

  18. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels with an evaluation of a propane heat transfer correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, P. A.; Aukerman, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A high pressure fuel coking testing apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition limits and carbon decomposition rates in heated copper tubes for hydrocarbon fuels. A commercial propane (90% grade) and chemically pure (CP) propane were tested. Heat transfer to supercritical propane was evaluated at 136 atm, bulk fluid velocities of 6 to 30 m/s, and tube wall temperatures in the range of 422 to 811 K. A forced convection heat transfer correlation developed in a previous test effort verified a prediction of most of the experimental data within a + or - 30% range, with good agreement for the CP propane data. No significant differences were apparent in the predictions derived from the correlation when the carbon resistance was included with the film resistance. A post-test scanning electron microprobe analysis indicated occurrences of migration and interdiffusion of copper into the carbon deposit.

  19. CHARACTERIZING THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF SMALL, NEUTRAL, FULLY DEHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, C. J.; Peeters, E.; Cami, J.; Bauschlicher, C. W. Jr.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of a computational study to investigate the infrared spectroscopic properties of a large number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules and their fully dehydrogenated counterparts. We constructed a database of fully optimized geometries for PAHs that is complete for eight or fewer fused benzene rings, thus containing 1550 PAHs and 805 fully dehydrogenated aromatics. A large fraction of the species in our database have clearly non-planar or curved geometries. For each species, we determined the frequencies and intensities of their normal modes using density functional theory calculations. Whereas most PAH spectra are fairly similar, the spectra of fully dehydrogenated aromatics are much more diverse. Nevertheless, these fully dehydrogenated species show characteristic emission features at 5.2 μm, 5.5 μm, and 10.6 μm; at longer wavelengths, there is a forest of emission features in the 16-30 μm range that appears as a structured continuum, but with a clear peak centered around 19 μm. We searched for these features in Spitzer-IRS spectra of various positions in the reflection nebula NGC 7023. We find a weak emission feature at 10.68 μm in all positions except that closest to the central star. We also find evidence for a weak 19 μm feature at all positions that is not likely due to C{sub 60}. We interpret these features as tentative evidence for the presence of a small population of fully dehydrogenated PAHs, and discuss our results in the framework of PAH photolysis and the formation of fullerenes.

  20. School Districts Move to the Head of the Class with Propane

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-12

    School districts across the country are under pressure to reduce their cost of operations and ensure their budgets are spent wisely. School bus fleets operate more than 675,000 buses in the United States, and many school districts have found the answer to their budget woes in the form of propane, or liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Propane is a reliable, domestic fuel, and it's used in approximately 2% of school buses nationwide.

  1. Measurement of position-specific 13C isotopic composition of propane at the nanomole level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Alexis; Yamada, Keita; Suda, Konomi; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a novel method for analyzing intramolecular carbon isotopic distribution of propane as a potential new tracer of its origin. The method is based on on-line pyrolysis of propane followed by analysis of carbon isotope ratios of the pyrolytic products methane, ethylene and ethane. Using propane samples spiked with 13C at the terminal methyl carbon, we characterize the origin of the pyrolytic fragments. We show that the exchange between C-atoms during the pyrolytic process is negligible, and thus that relative intramolecular isotope composition can be calculated. Preliminary data from 3 samples show that site-preference (SP) values, defined as the difference of δ13C values between terminal and sub-terminal C-atom positions of propane, range from -1.8‰ to -12.9‰. In addition, SP value obtained using our method for a thermogenic natural gas sample is consistent with that expected from theoretical models of thermal cracking, suggesting that the isotope fractionation associated with propane pyrolysis is negligible. The method will provide novel insights into the characterization of the origin of propane and will help better understand the biogeochemistry of natural gas deposits.

  2. Dynamics of Cl + propane, butanes revisited: a crossed beam slice imaging study.

    PubMed

    Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Patel, Nitin; Van Camp, Richard; Suits, Arthur G

    2014-01-14

    We report velocity-flux contour maps for H-D abstraction in selected Cl + alkane reactions measured by means of crossed beam scattering combined with universal DC slice imaging. The studied hydrocarbons are propane and its two selectively deuterated isotopologues, namely 1,1,1,3,3,3-propane-d6 and 2,2-propane-d2, n-butane and isobutane (2-methyl-propane), with detection of the hydrocarbon radical product by 157 nm single photon ionization. Data are obtained at collision energies of 12-13 kcal mol(-1) using a high-density atomic chlorine radical source combining Cl2 photolysis with ablation. All presented scattering distributions involving secondary and tertiary abstractions show distinct differences. Their comparisons allow for revisiting the dynamical picture of these reactions in terms of the nature of the abstraction sites, radical product energy disposal, and H vs. D abstraction. Results are discussed in the light of previous work and ab initio thermochemical calculations, along with proposals to future directions for investigation.

  3. On the minimum ignition energy (MIE) for propane/air.

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, R K; Ngo, M; Olsen, W

    2010-03-15

    A copy of the standard ASTM spark generator for determination of MIEs of gases and vapours was built and measurements to determine MIE of propane/air at normal atmospheric conditions were performed. However, the ASTM standard does not prescribe any statistical procedure for deriving MIE values from primary test data. We therefore adopted the "highest-possible-border-line" procedure proposed by Moorhouse et al. in 1974, and obtained a MIE of 0.48 mJ, which is very close to the 0.46 mJ found by these workers, as opposed to the classical Lewis and von Elbe value of only 0.25 mJ. One possible reason for the discrepancy could be the very low ignition probability of only 1% used by Lewis and von Elbe as their MIE criterion. However, when applying both linear and logistic regression analysis to our experimental data, the spark energies yielding 1% probability of ignition were found to be 0.40+/-0.06 and 0.45+/-0.08 mJ, respectively, which are both significantly higher than 0.25 mJ. This may indicate that the classical MIE values for gases and vapours published by Lewis and von Elbe (1961) are perhaps unnecessarily conservative. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of cryogenic fluids: Benzene in propane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, R.; Bernstein, E. R.

    1987-03-01

    Energy shifts and bandwidths for the 1B2u↔1A1g optical absorption and emission transitions of benzene dissolved in propane are presented as a function of pressure, temperature, and density. Both absorption and emission spectra exhibit shifts to lower energy as a function of density, whereas no shifts are observed if density is kept constant and temperature and pressure are varied simultaneously. Density is thus the fundamental microscopic parameter for energy shifts of optical transitions. The emission half-width is a linear function of both temperature and pressure but the absorption half-width is dependent only upon pressure. These results are interpreted qualitatively in terms of changes occurring in the intermolecular potentials of the ground and excited states. Both changes in shape of and separation between the ground and excited state potentials are considered as a function of density. Classical dielectric (Onsager-Böttcher), microscopic dielectric (Wertheim) and microscopic quantum statistical mechanical (Schweizer-Chandler) theories of solvent effects on solute electronic spectra are compared with the experimental results. Calculations suggest limited applicability of dielectric theories but good agreement between experiment and microscopic theory. The results demonstrate the usefulness of cryogenic solutions for high pressure, low temperature spectroscopic studies of liquids.

  5. Preparation of zwitterionic hydroquinone-fused [1,4]oxazinium derivatives via a photoinduced intramolecular dehydrogenative-coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chenyi; Liu, Shi-Xia; Neels, Antonia; Renaud, Philippe; Decurtins, Silvio

    2009-12-03

    A simple and efficient photochemical reaction can be performed to construct functionalized [1,4]oxazinium derivatives via a direct dehydrogenative coupling between sp(3)- and sp(2)-hybridized C-atoms, starting from easily accessible stable semiquinone radicals.

  6. Tailored formation of N-doped nanoarchitectures by diffusion-controlled on-surface (cyclo)dehydrogenation of heteroaromatics.

    PubMed

    Pinardi, Anna Lisa; Otero-Irurueta, Gonzalo; Palacio, Irene; Martinez, Jose Ignacio; Sanchez-Sanchez, Carlos; Tello, Marta; Rogero, Celia; Cossaro, Albano; Preobrajenski, Alexei; Gómez-Lor, Berta; Jancarik, Andrej; Stará, Irena G; Starý, Ivo; Lopez, M Francisca; Méndez, Javier; Martin-Gago, Jose Angel

    2013-04-23

    Surface-assisted cyclodehydrogenation and dehydrogenative polymerization of polycyclic (hetero)aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are among the most important strategies for bottom-up assembly of new nanostructures from their molecular building blocks. Although diverse compounds have been formed in recent years using this methodology, a limited knowledge on the molecular machinery operating at the nanoscale has prevented a rational control of the reaction outcome. We show that the strength of the PAH-substrate interaction rules the competitive reaction pathways (cyclodehydrogenation versus dehydrogenative polymerization). By controlling the diffusion of N-heteroaromatic precursors, the on-surface dehydrogenation can lead to monomolecular triazafullerenes and diazahexabenzocoronenes (N-doped nanographene), to N-doped oligomeric or polymeric networks, or to carbonaceous monolayers. Governing the on-surface dehydrogenation process is a step forward toward the tailored fabrication of molecular 2D nanoarchitectures distinct from graphene and exhibiting new properties of fundamental and technological interest.

  7. Catalytic effect of Ti and Ni on dehydrogenation of AlH3: A first principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. Z.; Dai, J. H.; Song, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Ab initio calculations were performed for the M-doped (M = Ti or Ni) AlH3 to investigate influence of dopants Ti and Ni on the dehydrogenation properties of AlH3. It was found that Ti and Ni prefer to substitute for Al atom in both the bulk phase and the slab surface. However a large amount of energy was needed for Ni to dope into AlH3 making that Ni might not a suitable catalyst for AlH3. Mechanisms that Ti improved the dehydrogenation properties of AlH3 were clarified. Ti greatly decreased the dehydrogenation energy of AlH3 by weakening the interaction between Al and H atoms, its influence on the dehydrogenation of AlH3 was however sensitive to the occupation behavior. The calculations indicated that the catalytic effect of Ti was weaker if Ti substitutes for Al than its interstitial occupation.

  8. Mechanisms for dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of N-heterocycles using PNP-pincer-supported iron catalysts: a density functional study.

    PubMed

    Sawatlon, Boodsarin; Surawatanawong, Panida

    2016-10-14

    The catalytic dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of N-heterocycles have potential applications in organic hydrogen storage. Recently, Fe(HPNP)(CO)(H)(HBH3) (cp1) and Fe(HPNP)(CO)(H)(Br) (cp2), the iron(ii) complexes supported by bis(phosphino)amine pincer (Fe-PNP) (PNP = N(CH2CH2P(i)Pr2)2), have been reported to be the starting complexes which can catalyze the dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of N-heterocycles. The active species were proposed to be the trans-dihydride complexes, Fe(HPNP)(CO)(H)2 (cp4) and Fe(PNP)(CO)(H) (cp3), which can be interconverted. Here, our density functional study revealed that the N-heterocyclic substrate plays a role in the formation of cp4 from cp1, while the tert-butoxide base assists with the formation of cp3 from cp2. The mechanism for cp3 catalyzed dehydrogenation of a 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) substrate to quinoline (Q) involves two main steps: (i) dehydrogenation of THQ to 3,4-dihydroquinoline (34DHQ) and (ii) dehydrogenation of 34DHQ to Q. In each dehydrogenation step, the proton is transferred from the substrate to the N of the PNP ligand of cp3. An ion-pair complex between Fe-PNP and the deprotonated substrate is then formed before the hydride at the adjacent C is transferred to Fe. Notably, the isomerization of 34DHQ to 14DHQ or 12DHQ is not necessary, as the bifunctionality of Fe-PNP in cp3 can stabilize the ion-pair complex and facilitate direct dehydrogenation of the C3-C4 bond in 34DHQ. On the other hand, the mechanism for hydrogenation of Q involves the initial formation of 14DHQ, which can easily isomerize to 34DHQ with the assistance of a tert-butoxide base. Finally, 34DHQ is dehydrogenated to THQ. As the overall energy barriers for cp3 catalyzed dehydrogenation of THQ (+27.6 kcal mol(-1)) and cp4 catalyzed hydrogenation of Q (+23.8 kcal mol(-1)) are only slightly different, reaction conditions can be conveniently adjusted to favor either the dehydrogenation or hydrogenation process. Insights into the role of

  9. Triazolylidene-Iridium Complexes with a Pendant Pyridyl Group for Cooperative Metal-Ligand Induced Catalytic Dehydrogenation of Amines.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Marta; Pereira, Ana; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Belderraín, Tomás R; Pérez, Pedro J; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-07-03

    Two iridium(III) complexes containing a C,N-bidentate pyridyl-triazolylidene ligand were prepared that are structurally very similar but differ in their pendant substituent. Whereas complex 1 contains a non-coordinating pyridyl unit, complex 2 has a phenyl group on the triazolylidene substituent. The presence of the basic pyridyl unit has distinct effects on the catalytic activity of the complex in the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylic amines, inducing generally higher rates, higher selectivity towards formation of imines versus secondary amines, and notable quantities of tertiary amines when compared to the phenyl-functionalized analogue. The role of the pyridyl functionality has been elucidated from a set of stoichiometric experiments, which demonstrate hydrogen bonding between the pendant pyridyl unit and the amine protons of the substrate. Such Npyr ⋅⋅⋅H-N interactions are demonstrated by X-ray diffraction analysis, (1) H NMR, and IR spectroscopy, and suggest a pathway of substrate bond-activation that involves concerted substrate binding through the Lewis acidic iridium center and the Lewis basic pyridyl site appended to the triazolylidene ligand, in agreement with ligand-metal cooperative substrate activation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene using Pt, Mo, and Pt-Mo catalysts supported on clay nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Morán, Cesar; González, Eduardo; Sánchez, Jorge; Solano, Roger; Carruyo, Gabriela; Moronta, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    A synthetic clay (TS-1) was modified with a nonionic surfactant (IGEPAL CO-720) and magnesium oxide. The resulting solid was used as a support of Pt, Mo, and Pt-Mo catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of H(2)PtCl(6)6H(2)O and (NH(4))(6)-Mo(7)O(24)4H(2)O. In both monometallic and bimetallic catalysts, the molybdenum content was 3 wt% and the platinum content was 0.5 or 1 wt%. The surface area of the starting material was 454 m(2)/g and after the modification treatment with IGEPAL it increased up to 649 m(2)/g, while platinum and molybdenum catalysts showed surface areas between 495 and 550 m(2)/g. The reduction profiles showed different Pt and Mo species and the existence of metal-support interactions. The reduced catalysts were more active than those in the unreduced form. The most active catalysts for the ethylbenzene dehydrogenation were those of monometallic Pt (0.5 and 1 wt%) with a maximum styrene conversion around 50%. The presence of Mo species masked Pt atoms and reduced the activity.

  11. Assessment of the risk of transporting propane by truck and train

    SciTech Connect

    Geffen, C.A.

    1980-03-01

    The risk of shipping propane is discussed and the risk assessment methodology is summarized. The risk assessment model has been constructed as a series of separate analysis steps to allow the risk to be readily reevaluated as additional data becomes available or as postulated system characteristics change. The transportation system and accident environment, the responses of the shipping system to forces in transportation accidents, and release sequences are evaluated to determine both the likelihood and possible consequences of a release. Supportive data and analyses are given in the appendices. The risk assessment results are related to the year 1985 to allow a comparison with other reports in this series. Based on the information presented, accidents involving tank truck shipments of propane will be expected to occur at a rate of 320 every year; accidents involving bobtails would be expected at a rate of 250 every year. Train accidents involving propane shipments would be expected to occur at a rate of about 60 every year. A release of any amount of material from propane trucks, under both normal transportation and transport accident conditions, is to be expected at a rate of about 110 per year. Releases from propane rail tank cars would occur about 40 times a year. However, only those releases that occur during a transportation accident or involve a major tank defect will include sufficient propane to present the potential for danger to the public. These significant releases can be expected at the lower rate of about fourteen events per year for truck transport and about one event every two years for rail tank car transport. The estimated number of public fatalities resulting from these significant releases in 1985 is fifteen. About eleven fatalities per year result from tank truck operation, and approximately half a death per year stems from the movement of propane in rail tank cars.

  12. Size-controllable APTS stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles catalyst for the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zahmakıran, Mehmet; Philippot, Karine; Özkar, Saim; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-01-14

    Dimethylamine-borane, (CH(3))(2)NHBH(3), has been considered as one of the attractive materials for the efficient storage of hydrogen, which is still one of the key issues in the "Hydrogen Economy". In a recent communication we have reported the synthesis and characterization of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles with the preliminary results for their catalytic performance in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature. Herein, we report a complete work including (i) effect of initial [APTS]/[Ru] molar ratio on both the size and the catalytic activity of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles, (ii) collection of extensive kinetic data under non-MTL conditions depending on the substrate and catalyst concentrations to define the rate law of Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (iii) determination of activation parameters (E(a), ΔH(#) and ΔS(#)) for Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane; (iv) demonstration of the catalytic lifetime of Ru(0)/APTS nanoparticles in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (v) testing the bottlability and reusability of Ru(0)/APTS nanocatalyst in the room-temperature dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane, (vi) quantitative carbon disulfide (CS(2)) poisoning experiments to find a corrected TTO and TOF values on a per-active-ruthenium-atom basis, (vii) a summary of extensive literature review for the catalysts tested in the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane as part of the results and discussions.

  13. Lean and ultralean stretched propane-air counterflow flames

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Zhongxian; Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    2006-06-15

    Stretched laminar flame structures for a wide range of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air mixtures vs hot products are investigated by laser-based diagnostics and numerical simulation. The hot products are produced by a lean H{sub 2}-air premixed flame. The effect of stretch rate and equivalence ratio on four groups of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structures is studied in detail by Raman scattering measurements and by numerical calculations of the major species concentration and temperature profiles. The equivalence ratio, f, is varied from a near-stoichiometric condition (f=0.86) to the sublean limit (f=0.44) and the stretch rate varies from 90 s{sup -1} to near extinction. For most of these C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air lean mixtures, hot products are needed to maintain the flame. The significant feature of these flames is the relatively low flame temperatures (1200-1800 K). For this temperature range, the predicted C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structure is sensitive to the specific chemical kinetic mechanism. Two types of flame structures (a lean self-propagating flame and a lean diffusion-controlled flame) are obtained based on the combined effect of stretch and equivalence ratio. Three different mechanisms, the M5 mechanism, the Optimized mechanism, and the San Diego mechanism, are chosen for the numerical simulations. None of the propane chemical mechanisms give good agreement with the data over the entire range of flame conditions. (author)

  14. Dehydrogenation of N2HX (X=2-4) by nitrogen atoms: thermochemical and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Spada, Rene Felipe Keidel; Ferrão, Luiz Fernando de Araujo; Roberto-Neto, Orlando; Machado, Francisco Bolivar Correto

    2013-11-21

    Thermochemical and kinetics of sequential hydrogen abstraction reactions from hydrazine by nitrogen atoms were studied. The dehydrogenation was divided in three steps, N2H4 + N, N2H3 + N, and N2H2 + N. The thermal rate constants were calculated within the framework of canonical variational theory, with zero and small curvature multidimensional tunnelling corrections. The reaction paths were computed with the BB1K/aug-cc-pVTZ method and the thermochemical properties were improved with the CCSD(T)/CBS//BB1K/aug-cc-pVTZ approach. The first dehydrogenation step presents the lowest rate constants, equal to 1.22 × 10(-20) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at 298 K.

  15. A dehydrogenation mechanism of metal hydrides based on interactions between Hdelta+ and H-.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2006-10-16

    This paper describes a reaction mechanism that explains the dehydrogenation reactions of alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydrides. These light metal hydrides, e.g., lithium-based compounds such as LiH, LiAlH4, and LiNH2, are the focus of intense research recently as the most promising candidate materials for on-board hydrogen storage applications. Although several interesting and promising reactions and materials have been reported, most of these reported reactions and materials have been discovered by empirical means because of a general lack of understanding of any underlying principles. This paper describes an understanding of the dehydrogenation reactions on the basis of the interaction between negatively charged hydrogen (H-, electron donor) and positively charged hydrogen (Hdelta+, electron acceptor) and experimental evidence that captures and explains many observations that have been reported to date. This reaction mechanism can be used as a guidance for screening new material systems for hydrogen storage.

  16. The dehydrogenation and cracking reactions of isobutane over the ZSM-5 zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milas, Ivan; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer

    2003-05-01

    The dehydrogenation and cracking reactions of isobutane over zeolite HZMS-5 were studied at the DFT/B3LYP level of calculation. The zeolite was represented by the'double-ring' 20T cluster. The activation energies for the reactions were 9-12 kcal/mol lower than those obtained with the linear 5T cluster. In both cases the attack of the acid site proton was directly on a carbon atom of the substrate, and not on the C-H and C-C bonds, evidencing carbonium-ion-type transition states. The results suggest that the reactions should be competitive, although the more hindered acid sites should favor the dehydrogenation over the cracking reaction.

  17. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  18. Reversible Dehydrogenation of Magnesium Borohydride to Magnesium Triborane in the Solid State Under Moderate Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, Marina; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jalisatgi, Satish; Jensen, Craig M.

    2011-02-17

    Thermal decomposition of magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2, in the solid state was studied by a combination of PCT, TGA/MS and NMR spectroscopy. Dehydrogenation of Mg(BH4)2 at 200 °C, results in the highly selective formation of magnesium triborane, Mg(B3H8)2. This process is reversible at 250 °C under 120 atm H2. Dehydrogenation at higher temperature, > 300 °C, produces a complex mixture of polyborane species. Solution phase 11B NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed decomposition products reveals the formation of the B3H8 anion, boric acid from hydrolysis of the unstable polyboranes (BnHx) (n = 3-11, x >8), and the closoborane B12H12 dianion as a minor product. A BH condensation mechanism involving metal hydride formation is proposed to explain the limited reversible hydrogen storage in magnesium borohydride.

  19. Cobalt-catalysed site-selective intra- and intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xuesong; Yang, Ke; Zhao, Yan; Sun, Hao; Li, Guigen; Ge, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-catalysed sp2 C–H bond functionalization has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of the low cost of cobalt complexes and interesting modes of action in the process. In comparison, much less efforts have been devoted to the sp3 carbons. Here we report the cobalt-catalysed site-selective dehydrogenative cyclization of aliphatic amides via a C–H bond functionalization process on unactivated sp3 carbons with the assistance of a bidentate directing group. This method provides a straightforward synthesis of monocyclic and spiro β- or γ-lactams with good to excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. In addition, a new procedure has been developed to selectively remove the directing group, which enables the synthesis of free β- or γ-lactam compounds. Furthermore, the first cobalt-catalysed intermolecular dehydrogenative amination of unactivated sp3 carbons is also realized. PMID:25753366

  20. Excellent catalytic effects of highly crumpled graphene nanosheets on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of magnesium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guang; Wang, Yijing; Xu, Changchang; Qiu, Fangyuan; An, Cuihua; Li, Li; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2013-01-01

    Highly crumpled graphene nanosheets (GNS) with a BET surface area as high as 1159 m2 g-1 was fabricated by a thermal exfoliation method. A systematic investigation was performed on the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH2-5 wt% GNS nanocomposites acquired by ball-milling. It was found that the as-synthesized GNS exhibited a superior catalytic effect on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of MgH2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal hydrogenation/dehydrogenation measurements indicated that both hydrogen sorption capacity and dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics of the composites improved with increasing milling time. The composites MgH2-GNS milled for 20 h can absorb 6.6 wt% H2 within 1 min at 300 °C and 6.3 wt% within 40 min at 200 °C, even at 150 °C, it can also absorb 6.0 wt% H2 within 180 min. It was also demonstrated that MgH2-GNS-20 h could release 6.1 wt% H2 at 300 °C within 40 min. In addition, microstructure measurements based on XRD, SEM, TEM as well as Raman spectra revealed that the grain size of thus-prepared MgH2-GNS nanocomposites decreased with increasing milling time, moreover, the graphene layers were broken into smaller graphene nanosheets in a disordered and irregular manner during milling. It was confirmed that these smaller graphene nanosheets on the composite surface, providing more edge sites and hydrogen diffusion channels, prevented the nanograins from sintering and agglomerating, thus, leading to promotion of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics of MgH2.Highly crumpled graphene nanosheets (GNS) with a BET surface area as high as 1159 m2 g-1 was fabricated by a thermal exfoliation method. A systematic investigation was performed on the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH2-5 wt% GNS nanocomposites acquired by ball-milling. It was found that the as-synthesized GNS exhibited a superior catalytic effect on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of MgH2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal hydrogenation/dehydrogenation

  1. Role of catalysts in dehydrogenation of MgH2 nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Peter; Araújo, C. Moysés; Larsson, J. Andreas; Jena, Puru; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the role of catalysts in dehydrogenation of MgH2 nanoclusters is provided by carrying out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. It is shown that the transition metal atoms Ti, V, Fe, and Ni not only lower desorption energies significantly but also continue to attract at least four hydrogen atoms even when the total hydrogen content of the cluster decreases. In particular, Fe is found to migrate from the surface sites to the interior sites during the dehydrogenation process, releasing more hydrogen as it diffuses. This diffusion mechanism may account for the fact that a small amount of catalysts is sufficient to improve the kinetics of MgH2, which is essential for the use of this material for hydrogen storage in fuel-cell applications. PMID:18550815

  2. Role of catalysts in dehydrogenation of MgH2 nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Peter; Araújo, C Moysés; Larsson, J Andreas; Jena, Puru; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2008-06-17

    A fundamental understanding of the role of catalysts in dehydrogenation of MgH(2) nanoclusters is provided by carrying out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. It is shown that the transition metal atoms Ti, V, Fe, and Ni not only lower desorption energies significantly but also continue to attract at least four hydrogen atoms even when the total hydrogen content of the cluster decreases. In particular, Fe is found to migrate from the surface sites to the interior sites during the dehydrogenation process, releasing more hydrogen as it diffuses. This diffusion mechanism may account for the fact that a small amount of catalysts is sufficient to improve the kinetics of MgH(2), which is essential for the use of this material for hydrogen storage in fuel-cell applications.

  3. Watching the dehydrogenation of alane (AlH3) in a TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Shane; Humphries, Terry; Weaver, Louise; McGrady, Sean

    2008-03-01

    Alane (AlH3) is a promising candidate for on-board hydrogen storage applications. Its theoretical gravimetric capacity is 10.1 percent and decomposition is achieved with modest heating (60-200 deg C). We studied the dehydrogenation of alane, insitu, in a TEM. Alane powder was loaded into the TEM and heated at 80 deg C. We were able to `watch' the dehydrogenation of the alane to aluminum. Electron diffraction and dark fiend images are used to show how and where the aluminum crystallites grow. Although crystalline aluminum phases were successfully identified, some of the sample remained amorphous. We will discuss the nature of the amorphous material and present images clearly identifying the nature of the aluminum crystallites.

  4. Oxygen vacancy promoted methane partial oxidation over iron oxide oxygen carriers in the chemical looping process.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Lang; Guo, Mengqing; Xu, Mingyuan; Fan, Jonathan A; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2016-11-30

    We perform ab initio DFT+U calculations and experimental studies of the partial oxidation of methane to syngas on iron oxide oxygen carriers to elucidate the role of oxygen vacancies in oxygen carrier reactivity. In particular, we explore the effect of oxygen vacancy concentration on sequential processes of methane dehydrogenation, and oxidation with lattice oxygen. We find that when CH4 adsorbs onto Fe atop sites without neighboring oxygen vacancies, it dehydrogenates with CHx radicals remaining on the same site and evolves into CO2via the complete oxidation pathway. In the presence of oxygen vacancies, on the other hand, the formed methyl (CH3) prefers to migrate onto the vacancy site while the H from CH4 dehydrogenation remains on the original Fe atop site, and evolves into CO via the partial oxidation pathway. The oxygen vacancies created in the oxidation process can be healed by lattice oxygen diffusion from the subsurface to the surface vacancy sites, and it is found that the outward diffusion of lattice oxygen atoms is more favorable than the horizontal diffusion on the same layer. Based on the proposed mechanism and energy profile, we identify the rate-limiting steps of the partial oxidation and complete oxidation pathways. Also, we find that increasing the oxygen vacancy concentration not only lowers the barriers of CH4 dehydrogenation but also the cleavage energy of Fe-C bonds. However, the barrier of the rate-limiting step cannot further decrease when the oxygen vacancy concentration reaches 2.5%. The fundamental insight into the oxygen vacancy effect on CH4 oxidation with iron oxide oxygen carriers can help guide the design and development of more efficient oxygen carriers and CLPO processes.

  5. Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling Reaction between N-Aryl α-Amino Acid Esters and Phenols or Phenol Derivative for Synthesis of α-Aryl α-Amino Acid Esters.

    PubMed

    Salman, Muhammad; Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Zhi-Zhen

    2016-04-01

    A novel dehydrogenative cross-coupling (DCC) reaction between N-arylglycine esters and phenols or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene was developed by copper catalysis using di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP) as an oxidant. Under optimized conditions, a range of N-arylglycine esters 1 underwent the DCC reaction smoothly with various phenols 2 or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene 4 to give desired α-aryl α -amino acid esters 3 or 5, respectively, with high ortho regioselectivities in a moderate to excellent yield. A possible mechanism involving aromatic electrophilic substitution is proposed.

  6. A Cu‐Catalysed Radical Cross‐Dehydrogenative Coupling Approach to Acridanes and Related Heterocycles

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of acridanes and related compounds through a Cu‐catalysed radical cross‐dehydrogenative coupling of simple 2‐[2‐(arylamino)aryl]malonates is reported. This method can be further streamlined to a one‐pot protocol involving the in situ fomation of the 2‐[2‐(arylamino)aryl]malonate by α‐arylation of diethyl malonate with 2‐bromodiarylamines under Pd catalysis, followed by Cu‐catalysed cyclisation. PMID:28479872

  7. Dehydrogenative desulfurization of thiourea derivatives to give carbodiimides, using hydrosilane and an iron complex.

    PubMed

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Fukumoto, Kozo; Nakazawa, Hiroshi

    2013-07-28

    Dehydrogenative desulfurization of thiourea derivatives (RNHC(S)NHR') has been achieved, to give carbodiimides (RN=C=NR'), in the reaction with hydrosilane and (η(5)-C5H5)Fe(CO)2Me. The obtained carbodiimide reacted with (η(5)-C5H5)Fe(CO)(SiR3) formed in the reaction to give an N-silylated η(2)-amidino iron complex, which was isolated and then characterized by X-ray analysis.

  8. State Heating Oil & Propane Program. Final report 1997/98 heating season

    SciTech Connect

    Hunton, G.

    1998-06-01

    The following is a summary report of the New Hampshire Governor`s Office of Energy and Community Services (ECS) participation in the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP) for the 1997/98 heating season. SHOPP is a cooperative effort, linking energy offices in East Coast and Midwest states, with the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the purpose of collecting retail price data for heating oil and propane. The program is funded by the participating state with a matching grant from DOE. SHOPP was initiated in response to congressional inquires into supply difficulties and price spikes of heating oil and propane associated with the winter of 1989/90. This is important to New Hampshire because heating oil controls over 55% of the residential heating market statewide. Propane controls 10% of the heating market statewide and is widely used for water heating and cooking in areas of the state where natural gas is not available. Lower installation cost, convenience, lower operating costs compared to electricity, and its perception as a clean heating fuel have all worked to increase the popularity of propane in New Hampshire and should continue to do so in the future. Any disruption in supply of these heating fuels to New Hampshire could cause prices to skyrocket and leave many residents in the cold.

  9. No. 2 heating oil/propane program 1994--1995. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McBrien, J.

    1995-05-01

    During the 1994--95 heating season, the Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources (DOER) participated in a joint data collection program between several state energy offices and the federal Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). The purpose of the program was to collect and monitor retail and wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories from October 1994 through March 1995. This program augmented the existing Massachusetts data collection system and served several important functions. The information helped the federal and state governments respond to consumer, congressional and media inquiries regarding No. 2 oil and propane. The information also provided policy decision-makers with timely, accurate and consistent data to monitor current heating oil and propane markets and develop appropriate state responses when necessary. In addition, the communication network between states and the DOE was strengthened through this program. This final report begins with an overview of the unique events that had an impact on the petroleum markets prior to and during the reporting period. Next, the report summarizes the results from residential heating oil and propane price surveys conducted by DOER over the 1994--95 heating season. The report also incorporates the wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories collected by EIA and distributed to the states. Finally, the report outlines DOER`s use of the data.

  10. Heteroepitaxially grown zeolitic imidazolate framework membranes with unprecedented propylene/propane separation performances.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Taek; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Lee, Albert S; An, He Seong; Lee, Jong Suk

    2015-09-30

    Propylene/propane separation is one of the most challenging separations, currently achieved by energy-intensive cryogenic distillation. Despite the great potential for energy-efficient membrane-based separations, no commercial membranes are currently available due to the limitations of current polymeric materials. Zeolitic imidazolate framework, ZIF-8, with the effective aperture size of ∼4.0 Å, has been shown to be very promising for propylene/propane separation. Despite the extensive research on ZIF-8 membranes, only a few reported ZIF-8 membranes have displayed good propylene/propane separation performances presumably due to the challenges of controlling the microstructures of polycrystalline membranes. Here we report the first well-intergrown membranes of ZIF-67 (Co-substituted ZIF-8) by heteroepitaxially growing ZIF-67 on ZIF-8 seed layers. The ZIF-67 membranes exhibited impressively high propylene/propane separation capabilities. Furthermore, when a tertiary growth of ZIF-8 layers was applied to heteroepitaxially grown ZIF-67 membranes, the membranes exhibited unprecedentedly high propylene/propane separation factors of ∼200 possibly due to enhanced grain boundary structure.

  11. Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature by o-aminophenol-based photocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Wakizaka, Masanori; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryota; Chang, Ho-Chol

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol is of great importance, given its ubiquity as an intermediate for the production of a large number of industrial chemicals. Since dehydrogenation of methanol is an endothermic reaction, heterogeneous or homogeneous precious-metal-based catalysts and high temperatures are usually required for this reaction to proceed. Here we report the photochemical dehydrogenation of anhydrous methanol at room temperature catalysed by o-aminophenol (apH2), o-aminophenolate (apH−) and the non-precious metal complex trans-[FeII(apH)2(MeOH)2]. Under excitation at 289±10 nm and in the absence of additional photosensitizers, these photocatalysts generate hydrogen and formaldehyde from anhydrous methanol with external quantum yields of 2.9±0.15%, 3.7±0.19% and 4.8±0.24%, respectively, which are the highest values reported so far to the best of our knowledge. Mechanistic investigations reveal that the photo-induced formation of hydrogen radicals triggers the reaction. PMID:27457731

  12. Solid-State NMR Study of Li-Assisted Dehydrogenation of Ammonia Borane

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Hlova, Ihor; Singh, Niraj; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Pruski, Marek

    2012-03-21

    The mechanism of thermochemical dehydrogenation of the 1:3 mixture of Li3AlH6 and NH3BH3 (AB) has been studied by the extensive use of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The activation energy for the dehydrogenation is estimated to be 110 kJ mol–1, which is lower than for pristine AB (184 kJ mol–1). The major hydrogen release from the mixture occurs at 60 and 72 °C, which compares favorably with pristine AB and related hydrogen storage materials, such as lithium amidoborane (LiNH2BH3, LiAB). The NMR studies suggest that Li3AlH6 improves the dehydrogenation kinetics of AB by forming an intermediate compound (LiAB)x(AB)1–x. A part of AB in the mixture transforms into LiAB to form this intermediate, which accelerates the subsequent formation of branched polyaminoborane species and further release of hydrogen. The detailed reaction mechanism, in particular the role of lithium, revealed in the present study highlights new opportunities for using ammonia borane and its derivatives as hydrogen storage materials.

  13. Synthesis of Nanoflower-Shaped MXene Derivative with Unexpected Catalytic Activity for Dehydrogenation of Sodium Alanates.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guodong; Liu, Baozhong; Guo, Jianxin; Zhang, Qingrui; Fernandez, Carlos; Peng, Qiuming

    2017-03-01

    Surface group modification and functionalization of two-dimensional materials in many cases are deemed as effective approaches to achieve some distinctive properties. Herein, we present a new nanoflower-shaped TiO2/C composite which was synthesized by in situ alcoholysis of two-dimensional layered MXene (Ti3C2(OHxF1-x)2) in a dilute HF solution (0.5 wt %) for the first time. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that it bestows a strong catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of NaAlH4. The results show that the NaAlH4 containing 10 wt % A0.9R0.1-TiO2/C (containing 90% anatase TiO2 and 10% rutile TiO2) composite merely took ∼85 min to reach a stable and maximum dehydrogenation capacity of ∼3.08 wt % at 100 °C, and it maintains stable after ten cycles, which is the best Ti-based catalyst for the dehydrogenation of NaAlH4 reported so far. Theoretical calculation confirms that this C-doping TiO2 crystals remarkably decreases desorption energy barrier of Al-H bonding in NaAlH4, accelerating the breakdown of Al-H bonding. This finding raises the potential for development and application of new fuel cells.

  14. Dehydrogenation Properties of Magnesium Hydride Loaded with Fe, Fe-C, and Fe-Mg Additives.

    PubMed

    Pukazhselvan, D; Nasani, Narendar; Yang, Tao; Bdikin, Igor; Kovalevsky, Andrei V; Fagg, Duncan P

    2017-02-02

    This study highlights that Fe additives offer better catalytic properties than carbon, Fe-C (iron carbide/carbon composites), and Fe-Mg (Mg2 FeH6 ) additives for the low-temperature dehydrogenation of magnesium hydride. The in situ X-ray diffraction measurements prove the formation of a Mg2 FeH6 phase in iron additive loaded MgH2 . Nonetheless, differential scanning calorimetry data suggest that this Mg2 FeH6 phase does not have any influence on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2 . On the other hand, the composite system Mg2 FeH6 /MgH2 shows significantly improved dehydrogenation properties even in absence of further additives. It is suggested that the improved system performance of Fe loaded MgH2 is attributed to restrictions on crystal growth of MgH2 and the catalytic behavior of Fe nanoparticles, rather than any intrinsic catalytic properties offered by the formed mixed metal phase Mg2 FeH6 .

  15. Electrode properties and the dehydrogenation process of amorphous Mg-Ni-La alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lin-Jun; Wang, Yan-Xin; Wu, Dong-Chang; Tang, Jian-Guo; Wang, Yao; Liu, Ji-Xian; Huang, Zhen; Jiao, Ji-Qing; Liu, Jing-Quan

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous Mg-Ni-La hydrogen-storage alloys were prepared by melt-spinning. The phase structures of the ribbons before and after charge/discharge cycling were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis, respectively. The effects of different contents of La are discussed on the basis of discharge-capacity, the morphology, limiting current density and electrochemical impedance spectra of the Mg-Ni-La electrodes. The Mg65Ni27La8 alloy exhibits the best reaction kinetics performance, the lowest contact resistance and a maximum discharge capacity of 582 mAh g-1 at room temperature. The non-isothermal dehydrogenation process of Mg65Ni27La8 alloy was analyzed in detail by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The experimental results showed a maximum 4.0 wt.% of released hydrogen at a heating rate of 5 °C min-1. The non-isothermal dehydrogenation process of the alloy can be divided in two steps, corresponding to the dehydrogenation of amorphous phase (1.45 wt.% H) and Mg2NiH4 (2.55 wt.% H), respectively. It indicated that the amorphous structure was a key factor to achieve high discharge capacity and good cycling stability.

  16. Catalytic Dehydrogenation of Dimethylamine Borane by Highly Active Thorium and Uranium Metallocene Complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Erickson, Karla A.; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L.

    2017-05-19

    In the thorium and uranium complexes (C5Me5)2AnMe2, [(C5Me5)2An(H)(μ-H)]2 (An = Th, U) and [(C5Me5)2U(H)]2 dehydrogenate dimethylamine borane (Me2NH·BH3) at room temperature. Upon mild heating at 45 °C, turnover frequencies (TOFs) of 400 h–1 are obtained, which is comparable to some of the fastest Me2NH·BH3 dehydrogenation catalysts known in the literature. We propose a β-hydride elimination mechanism for dehydrogenation because of the observation of Me2N=BH2, Me2N=BMe2, and Me2N=BHMe in the 11B NMR spectra of catalytic and stoichiometric reactions. The similar catalytic metrics between the actinide dimethyl and hydride complexes with Me2NH·BH3 indicate that the actinide hydride complexes are the active catalystsmore » in this chemistry.« less

  17. Dehydration and Dehydrogenation of Ethylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2013-08-07

    The interactions of ethylene glycol (EG) with partially reduced rutile TiO2(110) surface have been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The saturation coverage on the surface Ti rows is determined to be 0.43 monolayer (ML), slightly less than one EG per two Ti sites. Most of the adsorbed ethanol (~80%) undergoes further reactions to other products. Two major channels are observed, dehydration yielding ethylene and water and dehydrogenation yielding acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Hydrogen formation is rather surprising as it has not been observed previously on TiO2(110) from simple organic molecules. The coverage dependent yields of ethylene and acetaldehyde correlate well with that of water and hydrogen, respectively. Dehydration dominates at lower EG coverages (< 0.2 ML) and plateaus as the coverage is increased to saturation. Dehydrogenation is observed primarily at higher EG coverages (>0.2 ML). Our results suggest that the observed dehydration and dehydrogenation reactions proceed via different surface intermediates.

  18. Dehydration and dehydrogenation of ethylene glycol on rutile TiO2(110).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenjun; Kay, Bruce D; Dohnálek, Zdenek

    2013-08-07

    The interactions of ethylene glycol with a partially reduced rutile TiO2(110) surface have been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The saturation coverage on surface Ti rows is determined to be 0.43 monolayer (ML), slightly less than one ethylene glycol per two Ti sites. Most of the adsorbed ethylene glycol (∼80%) undergoes further reactions to yield other products. Two major channels are observed, dehydration yielding ethylene and water and dehydrogenation yielding acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Hydrogen formation is rather surprising as it has not been observed previously on TiO2(110) from simple organic molecules. The coverage dependent yields of ethylene and acetaldehyde correlate well with those of water and hydrogen, respectively. Dehydration dominates at lower ethylene glycol coverages (<0.2 ML) and plateaus as the coverage is increased to saturation. Dehydrogenation is observed primarily at higher ethylene glycol coverages (>0.2 ML). Our results suggest that the observed dehydration and dehydrogenation reactions proceed via different surface intermediates.

  19. A theoretical study on the complete dehydrogenation of methanol on Pd (100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao; Wang, Bin; Fang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) method was employed to investigate the adsorption and decomposition mechanisms of CH3OH on Pd (100) surface. Different kinds of possible adsorption modes of relevant intermediates on the surface were identified. It was found that CH3OH and CH2OH prefers to adsorb on the top site, CH3O, CHOH and CO occupy preferentially on the bridge site, while CH2O, CHO, COH and H species adsorb on the hollow site. The adsorption energies of all species exhibit the following trend: CH3OH < CH2O < CH3O < CO < CH2OH < H < CHO < CHOH < COH. Subsequently, four possible dissociation pathways of CH3OH via initial Osbnd H and Csbnd H bond scissions were proposed and studied systematically. The transition states, energy barriers and reaction energies were calculated to explore the dehydrogenation mechanisms of CH3OH on Pd (100) surface. It was indicated that the scission of Csbnd H bond is more favorable for CH3OH and CH2OH and the Hsbnd O bond cleavage is easier for CHOH. The path 2 (CH3OHsbnd CH2OHsbnd CHOHsbnd CHOsbnd CO) is the most possible dehydrogenation pathway, where the highest energy barrier of CH3OH dissociation makes it to be the rate-determining step of the whole dehydrogenation reaction.

  20. Microwave Spectrum and Structure of the Methane-Propane Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Karen I.; Lin, Wei; Arsenault, Eric A.; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Novick, Stewart E.

    2017-06-01

    Methane is exceptional in its solid-phase orientational disorder that persists down to 24 K. Only below that temperature does the structure become partially ordered, and full crystallinity requires even lower temperatures and high pressures. Not surprisingly, methane appears to freely rotate in most van der Waals complexes, although two notable exceptions are CH_4-HF and CH_4-C_5H_5N. Of interest to us is how alkane interactions affect the methane rotation. Except for CH_4-CH_4, rotationally-resolved spectra of alkane-alkane complexes have not been studied. To fill this void, we present the microwave spectrum of CH_4-C_3H_8 which is the smallest alkane complex with a practical dipole moment. The microwave spectrum of CH_4-C_3H_8 was measured using the Fourier Transform microwave spectrometer at Wesleyan University. In the region between 7100 and 25300 MHz, we observed approximately 70 transitions that could plausibly be attributed to the CH_4-C_3H_8 complex (requiring high power and the proper mixture of gases). Of these, 16 were assigned to the A-state (lowest internal rotor state of methane) and four to the F-state. The A-state transitions were fitted with a Watson Hamiltonian using nine spectroscopic constants of which A = 7553.8144(97) MHz, B = 2483.9183(35) MHz, and C = 2041.8630(21) MHz. The A rotational constant is only 1.5 MHz higher than that of Ar-C_3H_8 and, since the a-axis of the complex passes approximately through the centers of mass of the subunits, this indicates a similar relative orientation. Thus, we find that the CH_4 is located above the plane of the propane. The center-of-mass separation of the subunits in CH_4-C_3H_8 is calculated to be 3.993 Å, 0.16 Å longer than the Ar-C_3H_8 distance of 3.825 Å, a reasonable difference considering the larger van der Waals radius of CH_4. The four F-state lines, which were about twice as strong as the A-state lines, could be fitted to A, B, and C rotational constants, and further analysis is in progress.

  1. Explosive-driven shock wave and vortex ring interaction with a propane flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannuzzi, P. M.; Hargather, M. J.; Doig, G. C.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments were performed to analyze the interaction of an explosively driven shock wave and a propane flame. A 30 g explosive charge was detonated at one end of a 3-m-long, 0.6-m-diameter shock tube to produce a shock wave which propagated into the atmosphere. A propane flame source was positioned at various locations outside of the shock tube to investigate the effect of different strength shock waves. High-speed retroreflective shadowgraph imaging visualized the shock wave motion and flame response, while a synchronized color camera imaged the flame directly. The explosively driven shock tube was shown to produce a repeatable shock wave and vortex ring. Digital streak images show the shock wave and vortex ring propagation and expansion. The shadowgrams show that the shock wave extinguishes the propane flame by pushing it off of the fuel source. Even a weak shock wave was found to be capable of extinguishing the flame.

  2. No. 2 heating oil/propane program. Final report, 1992/93

    SciTech Connect

    McBrien, J.

    1993-05-01

    During the 1992--93 heating season, the Massachusetts Division Energy Resources (DOER) participated in a joint data collection program between several state energy offices and the federal Department of Energy`s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA). The purpose of the program was to collect and monitor retail and wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories from October, 1992 through March, 1993. This final report begins with an overview of the unique events which had an impact on the petroleum markets prior to and during the reporting period. Next, the report summarizes the results from residential heating oil and propane price surveys conducted by DOER over the 1992--93 heating season. The report also incorporates the wholesale heating oil and propane prices and inventories collected by the EIA and distributed to the states. Finally, the report outlines DOER`s use of the data.

  3. Raman and IR Spectroscopy Studies on Propane at Pressures of Up to 40 GPa.

    PubMed

    Kudryavtsev, Daniil; Serovaiskii, Alexander; Mukhina, Elena; Kolesnikov, Anton; Gasharova, Biliana; Kutcherov, Vladimir; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2017-08-17

    Raman and IR spectroscopy studies on propane were performed at pressures of up to 40 GPa at ambient temperatures using the diamond anvil cell technique. Propane undergoes three phase transitions at 6.4(5), 14.5(5), and 26.5(5) GPa in Raman spectroscopy and at 7.0(5), 14.0(5), and 27.0(5) GPa in IR spectroscopy. The phase transitions were identified using the Raman and IR splitting modes and the appearance or disappearance of peaks, which clearly corresponded to the changes in the frequencies of the modes as the pressure changed. Our results demonstrate the complex high-pressure behavior of solid propane.

  4. Enthalpies and entropies of vaporization of propan-2-ol-2-methylpropan-1-ol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, A. A.; Baev, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    P-T-x dependences are measured for the solutions of a propan-2-ol-2-methylpropan-1-ol binary system and the enthalpies and entropies of vaporization are determined. Dimerization in propan-2-ol and 2-methylpropan-1-ol is rationalized and the contribution from energy introduced by isostructural methyl groups to the enthalpy of vaporization is determined. Structural and energy analyses of solutions with networks of specific interactions are performed. The formation of heterodimers in solutions and vapors with reduced hydrogen bond energies and specific interactions with the 2 s 2(C) unshared electron pairs of the carbon atoms of terminal methyl groups in ethyl and propyl fragments of propan-2-ol and 2-methylpropan-1-ol, respectively, is substantiated. The hydrogen bond energy of heterodimers is estimated.

  5. Concentration of mechanical pulp mill effluents and NaCl solutions through propane hydrate formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ngan, Y.T.; Englezos, P.

    1996-06-01

    In this work, recovery of water from mechanical pulp mill effluents and 2.5 wt% NaCl solutions through propane hydrate formation was investigated. A new apparatus in which hydrate nucleation, growth, separation, and melting occur in one vessel was designed and built. The emphasis of the work was on crystal separation. The average reduction in the salt content of the recovered water from the NaCl solutions was found to be 31%. Displacement with propane could increase the amount of recovered water at the same purity level. Further improvement in the purity could be accomplished with washing with water. The results with the effluents showed that the total organic carbon and the salt content of the recovered water were lower by 23 and 26%, respectively, from the levels in the effluent. Improved separation could be achieved by displacement with liquid propane.

  6. Extraction of Lutein Diesters from Tagetes Erecta using Supercritical CO2 and Liquid Propane.

    PubMed

    Skerget, Mojca; Bezjak, Miran; Makovšek, Katja; Knez, Zeljko

    2010-03-01

    The efficiency of high pressure extraction of lutein diesters from marigold (Tagetes erecta) flower petals has been investigated. The solvents used for extraction were supercritical carbon dioxide and liquid propane. Operating parameters were 300 bar and 40, 60 and 80 °C for CO2 and 100, 150, 200 bar and 40 and 60 °C for propane, respectively. The influence of process parameters on the total yield of extraction and content of lutein diesters in the extracts was investigated. The results show, that solvent power of propane for lutein diesters is approximately 3.5 times higher than of CO2. The calculation procedure based on the Fick's second law was applied to determine the diffusivities of lutein diesters during extraction from marigold flower petals for both extraction stages: a constant rate stage followed by a stage of decreasing rate. The mathematical model based on the Fick's second law well described the experimental extraction results.

  7. Photochemical dehydrogenation of ethanol in dilute aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handman, J.; Harriman, A.; Porter, G.

    1984-02-01

    The cyclic photodissociation of water has not yet been achieved in a homogeneous solution using visible light. The replacement of the sacrificial electron donor with such waste materials as sulfide is suggested as a method for improving homogeneous systems. Attention is given to the efficient photogeneration of H2 by means of a system that employs a low grade fermentation product, aqueous ethanol, as electron donor. The photoproduction of H2 is coupled to the oxidation of the ethanol by means of NADH/alcohol dehydrogenase as a relay.

  8. Toxicological investigation of liquid petroleum gas explosion: human model for propane/ethyl mercaptan exposures.

    PubMed

    Lowry, W T; Gamse, B; Armstrong, A T; Corn, J M; Juarez, L; McDowell, J L; Owens, R

    1991-03-01

    Four individuals died as the result of a propane explosion. As with many propane explosions, the question was raised as to the adequacy of the product's odorization after the autopsy studies had been conducted. In most cases, this question leads to litigation. Ethyl mercaptan is a widely used odorant for propane and was used in this instance. Three of the four victims had blood available at autopsy for study. Quantitative analyses of the victims' blood, obtained during autopsy, were performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, without subjecting the samples to hydrolysis. These analyses determined the relative amounts of propane and ethyl mercaptan in the blood to be 90, 63, and 175 mL/m3 headspace, and 0.36, 0.34, and 0.77 microgram/L blood, respectively. Since mercaptans have been reported in human blood as products of metabolism, modeling studies were conducted to establish the validity of the autopsy data and to develop an autopsy toxicology protocol for investigating explosion deaths. When subjects were not exposed to an atmosphere containing ethyl mercaptan, dimethylsulfide was the only mercaptan detectable in their blood without severe hydrolysis prior to analysis. Metabolic ethyl mercaptan is sufficiently bound to be undetectable by the methods used without hydrolysis. Human subjects were exposed to a flammable mixture of air and propane odorized with ethyl mercaptan. The analyses of the blood from these subjects produced results which were comparable with those for the explosion victims, establishing that the question of odorant adequacy can be addressed at the autopsy of propane explosion victims. It is extremely important that the pathologist and toxicologist investigating gas explosion deaths recognize the valuable evidence existing in the victim's blood.

  9. Design and Operation of the Synthesis Gas Generator System for Reformed Propane and Glycerin Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Derek Kyle

    Due to an increased interest in sustainable energy, biodiesel has become much more widely used in the last several years. Glycerin, one major waste component in biodiesel production, can be converted into a hydrogen rich synthesis gas to be used in an engine generator to recover energy from the biodiesel production process. This thesis contains information detailing the production, testing, and analysis of a unique synthesis generator rig at the University of Kansas. Chapter 2 gives a complete background of all major components, as well as how they are operated. In addition to component descriptions, methods for operating the system on pure propane, reformed propane, reformed glycerin along with the methodology of data acquisition is described. This chapter will serve as a complete operating manual for future students to continue research on the project. Chapter 3 details the literature review that was completed to better understand fuel reforming of propane and glycerin. This chapter also describes the numerical model produced to estimate the species produced during reformation activities. The model was applied to propane reformation in a proof of concept and calibration test before moving to glycerin reformation and its subsequent combustion. Chapter 4 first describes the efforts to apply the numerical model to glycerin using the calibration tools from propane reformation. It then discusses catalytic material preparation and glycerin reformation tests. Gas chromatography analysis of the reformer effluent was completed to compare to theoretical values from the numerical model. Finally, combustion of reformed glycerin was completed for power generation. Tests were completed to compare emissions from syngas combustion and propane combustion.

  10. Palladium/Copper-Cocatalyzed Oxidative Amidobrominations of Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao Yun; Bohmann, Rebekka Anna; Wang, Long; Dong, Shunxi; Räuber, Christoph; Bolm, Carsten

    2015-07-13

    In the presence of LiBr, a palladium/copper combination catalyzes dehydrogenative amidobrominations of acrylates with NH-sulfoximines, leading to N-vinylated products by dual NH/CH coupling, followed by oxidative enamide bromination. Mechanistically, the domino process is proposed to involve palladium(II) species as key intermediates. First synthetic applications of the products have been demonstrated.

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.280 - Are privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking facilities? 102-74.280 Section... underground parking facilities? Federal agencies must not permit privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion to enter underground parking facilities unless the owner provides to the...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.280 - Are privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... vehicles converted for propane carburetion permitted in underground parking facilities? 102-74.280 Section... underground parking facilities? Federal agencies must not permit privately owned vehicles converted for propane carburetion to enter underground parking facilities unless the owner provides to the...

  13. Transition Metal-Catalyzed Aerobic Dehydrogenation of Heterocycles and Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Student-Generated ChemWiki and its Impact on Student Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jaclyn R.

    Section I describes progress towards the dehydrogenation of heterocycles, specifically tetrahydroquinolines and imidazolines. Chapter 1 details the development of an aerobic Pd catalyst system capable of aromatizing substituted tetrahydroquinolines in moderate to good yields. This catalyst system generally works well for substituted tetrahydroquinolines, although elimination of heteroatom substituents remains problematic. Chapter 2 describes the development of a copper-based catalyst system for the dehydrogenation of substituted imidazolines to imidazoles. This catalyst system is based upon the CuI/bpy/TEMPO/NMI system developed by the Stahl group, which has shown excellent reactivity towards alcohol oxidation. Efforts to adapt this system to imidazolines are described herein. Section II details the development, implementation, and evaluation of a student-generated chemistry wiki in large general chemistry courses. Chapter 3 describes a theoretical framework based in constructivist epistemology for the use of wikis in chemical education and presents previous examples and limitations of wiki usage in chemistry and non-chemistry environments. Chapter 4 details the process of designing the ChemWiki experiment and the ChemWiki website itself. A detailed description of the assessments used to evaluate student performance is also presented. Chapter 5 describes two surveys designed to assess the qualitative aspects of the second generation wiki design. Additionally, an overview of participants' perception of the chemistry wiki and its utility as well as data tracking logs of participants' interactions with the ChemWiki are presented. Chapter 6 presents a quantitative analysis of the efficacy of the chemistry wiki on student posttest scores. Chapter 7 summarizes the findings of this thesis and includes recommended future directions for the use of ChemWikis in chemical education environments.

  14. Influence of Particle Size on Reaction Selectivity in Cyclohexene Hydrogenation and Dehydrogenation over Silica-Supported Monodisperse Pt Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rioux, R. M.; Hsu, B. B.; Grass, M. E.; Song, H.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-11

    The role of particle size during the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of cyclohexene (10 Torr C{sub 6}H{sub 10}, 200-600 Torr H{sub 2}, and 273-650 K) was studied over a series of monodisperse Pt/SBA-15 catalysts. The conversion of cyclohexene in the presence of excess H{sub 2} (H{sub 2}:C{sub 6}H{sub 10} ratio = 20-60) is characterized by three regimes: hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane at low temperature (< 423 K), an intermediate temperature range in which both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation occur; and a high temperature regime in which the dehydrogenation of cyclohexene dominates (> 573 K). The rate of both reactions demonstrated maxima with temperature, regardless of Pt particle size. For the hydrogenation of cyclohexene, a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence (apparent negative activation energy) was observed. Hydrogenation is structure insensitive at low temperatures, and apparently structure sensitive in the non-Arrhenius regime; the origin of the particle-size dependent reactivity with temperature is attributed to a change in the coverage of reactive hydrogen. Small particles were more active for dehydrogenation and had lower apparent activation energies than large particles. The selectivity can be controlled by changing the particle size, which is attributed to the structure sensitivity of both reactions in the temperature regime where hydrogenation and dehydrogenation are catalyzed simultaneously.

  15. Promotion of Ag/H-BEA by Mn for lean NO reduction with propane at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hua; Su, Qingfa; Chen, Jie; Ye, Qing; Liu, Yiting; Shi, Yao

    2009-12-15

    Effects of adding manganese to Ag/H-BEA for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with propane (C(3)H(8)-SCR) were investigated under a lean-burn condition. Mn addition significantly promotes the catalytic performance of Ag/H-BEA below 673 K. A Ag-Mn/H-BEA catalyst with equal metal weight of 3 wt % has the highest activity for C(3)H(8)-SCR among samples with a different bimetal loading. Manganese is mainly present in the 3+ and 4+ oxidation states in Ag-Mn/H-BEA catalysts. The major contributions of manganese suggested by the data presented in this paper are to catalyze the NO oxidation and stabilize silver in a dispersed Ag(+) state. The presence of silver enforces the transformation of a certain amount of Mn(3+) ions to Mn(4+) ions. The activity of Ag-Mn/H-BEA decreases slightly at low SO(2) concentrations (0-200 ppm) but decreases significantly at high SO(2) concentrations (400-800 ppm). In the presence of 10% H(2)O and 200 ppm SO(2), the inhibition of C(3)H(8)-SCR below 673 K is more significant than that at high temperature above 673 K. Ag-Mn/H-BEA is a promising catalyst for the removal of NO(x) from diesel engine exhaust.

  16. Analysis of U.S. Propane Markets Winter 1996-97, An

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    This study constitutes an examination of propane supply, demand, and price developments and trends. The Energy Information Administration's approach focused on identifying the underlying reasons for the tight supply/demand balance in the fall of 1996, and on examining the potential for a recurrence of these events next year.

  17. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt. 1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1633 - Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elements of Propane Flow Control for Each Burner 7 Figure 7 to Part 1633 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY (OPEN FLAME) OF MATTRESS SETS Pt.1633, Fig. 7 Figure...

  2. Synthesis and characterization of energetic salts based on the new propan-2-ylidene methanetriamium cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Long; Li, Chunshan; Zhang, Yanqiang; Li, Zengxi; Zhang, Suojiang

    2014-06-01

    Development of new hypergolic ionic liquids is the key in replacing toxic N,N-dimethylhydrazine as green liquids propellants. Three salts based on the new propan-2-ylidene methanetriamium cations and dicyanamide anion were synthesized and characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and Raman spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and TG/DTA. In addition, their crystal structures were determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction. N-(propan-2-ylidene) methanetriamium dicyanamide (1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/n, N,N‧-bi(propan-2-ylidene) methanetriamium dicyanamide (2) in triclinic P - 1, and N,N‧,N″-tri(propan-2-ylidene) methanetriamium dicyanamide (3) in monoclinic C2/c. With heats of formation (from 1.56 to 1.80 kJ g-1) and densities (from 1.19 to 1.31 g cm-3) in hand, the detonation pressure (P) and velocity (D), and specific impulse (Isp) values of salts were calculated as 8.94 GPa, 4989 m s-1 and 174.3 s (1), 7.91 GPa, 4815 m s-1 and 179.0 s (2), and 7.33 GPa, 4693 m s-1 and 180.6 s (3), respectively. Impact sensitivities of 1, 2 and 3 were measured to be no less than 40 J by hammer tests, which places these salts in the insensitive class. Moreover, the resulting salts are hypergolic with white fuming nitric acid and exhibit potential as bipropellants.

  3. Zinc-substituted ZIF-67 nanocrystals and polycrystalline membranes for propylene/propane separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongqing; Yang, Fan; Sheng, Luqian; Yu, Jian; Yao, Kexin; Zhang, Lixiong; Pan, Yichang

    2016-10-18

    Continuous ZIF-67 polycrystalline membranes with effective propylene/propane separation performances were successfully fabricated through the incorporation of zinc ions into the ZIF-67 framework. The separation factor increases from 1.4 for the pure ZIF-67 membrane to 50.5 for the 90% zinc-substituted ZIF-67 membrane.

  4. THE HEAT CAPACITY OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES BY DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement (to 3% accuracy) of the constant-pressure liquid-phase heat capacities of 21 hydrogen-containing fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether (CF3OCF2H) with boiling points ranging from -34.6 to 76.7 C, using diff...

  5. RETENTION OF HALOCARBONS ON A HEXAFLUOROPROPYLENE EPOXIDE-MODIFIED GRAPHITIZED CARBON BLACK - IV. PROPANE- BASED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The retention characteristics of 25 propane-based bromofluorocarbon, chlorocarbon, chlorofluorocarbon, and fluorocarbon fluids have been studied as a function of temperature on a stationary phase consisting of a 5% (m/m) coating of a low-molecular-mass polymer of hexafluoropropyl...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related... from the piping configuration upstream of the flow meter adversely affect the flow measurement. (7... measurements and CVS flow rate measurements with the reference value. (c) Prepare for the propane check...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS, PFD, and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow... from the piping configuration upstream of the flow meter adversely affect the flow measurement. (7... measurements and CVS flow rate measurements with the reference value. (c) Prepare for the propane check...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.341 - CVS and batch sampler verification (propane check).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Flow-Related... from the piping configuration upstream of the flow meter adversely affect the flow measurement. (7... measurements and CVS flow rate measurements with the reference value. (c) Prepare for the propane check...

  9. Metallurgical failure analysis of a propane tank boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE).

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, Alice C.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall; Susan, Donald Francis

    2005-01-01

    A severe fire and explosion occurred at a propane storage yard in Truth or Consequences, N.M., when a truck ran into the pumping and plumbing system beneath a large propane tank. The storage tank emptied when the liquid-phase excess flow valve tore out of the tank. The ensuing fire engulfed several propane delivery trucks, causing one of them to explode. A series of elevated-temperature stress-rupture tears developed along the top of a 9800 L (2600 gal) truck-mounted tank as it was heated by the fire. Unstable fracture then occurred suddenly along the length of the tank and around both end caps, along the girth welds connecting the end caps to the center portion of the tank. The remaining contents of the tank were suddenly released, aerosolized, and combusted, creating a powerful boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE). Based on metallography of the tank pieces, the approximate tank temperature at the onset of the BLEVE was determined. Metallurgical analysis of the ruptured tank also permitted several hypotheses regarding BLEVE mechanisms to be evaluated. Suggestions are made for additional work that could provide improved predictive capabilities regarding BLEVEs and for methods to decrease the susceptibility of propane tanks to BLEVEs.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10360 - 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (generic). 721.10360... Substances § 721.10360 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol...)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (PMN P-09-628) is subject...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10360 - 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (generic). 721.10360... Substances § 721.10360 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol...)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (PMN P-09-628) is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10360 - 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (generic). 721.10360... Substances § 721.10360 1-Substituted propane, 3-(triethoxysilyl)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol...)-, reaction products with polyethylene glycol mono-(branched tridecyl) ether (PMN P-09-628) is subject...

  13. Performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor with propane, diesel, and Jet A fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the performance and emissions of a catalytic reactor operated with propane, No. 2 diesel, and Jet A fuels. A 12-cm diameter and 16-cm long catalytic reactor using a proprietary noble metal catalyst was operated at an inlet temperature of 800 K, a pressure of 300,000 Pa and reference velocities of 10 to 15 m/s. No significant differences between the performance of the three fuels were observed when 98.5 percent purity propane was used. The combustion efficiency for 99.8-percent purity propane tested later was significantly lower, however. The diesel fuel contained 135 ppm of bound nitrogen and consequently produced the highest NOx emissions of the three fuels. As much as 85 percent of the bound nitrogen was converted to NOx. Steady-state emissions goals based on half the most stringent proposed automotive standards were met when the reactor was operated at an adiabatic combustion temperature higher than 1350 K with all fuels except the 99.8-percent purity propane. With that fuel, a minimum temperature of 1480 K was required.

  14. Evaluation of propane combustion traps for collection of Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in southern Israel.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traps used for mosquitoes can possibly used to capture phlebotomine sand flies as well, but little testing has been done. Traps powered by propane could be extremely useful because most produce their own carbon dioxide (CO2), which can increase the number of sand flies captured. Scientists at the US...

  15. A Theoretical Study of the Methyl and Aldehyde Torsion FIR Spectra in Symmetric Propanal Isotopomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeyers, Y. G.; Villa, M.; Uc, V. H.; Vivier-Bunge, A.

    2000-05-01

    This paper is an extension of the techniques developed by us [A. Vivier-Bunge, V. H. Uc, and Y. G. Smeyers, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 2279 (1998)] for standard propanal. In that paper the potential energy surface for the simultaneous methyl and asymmetric aldehydic torsions was calculated at RHF/MP2 level using the 6-311(3df,p) basis set for propanal. The fit of the energy values to symmetry-adapted functional forms was carried out by using the 28 energy values which retain the C3 dynamical symmetry of the methyl group in the optimization procedure. With this potential, as well as with the kinetic parameters and the electric dipole moment variations, the FIR frequencies and intensities for the methyl and aldehyde torsions of seven symmetric isotopomers of propanal were determined theoretically using two-dimensional calculations. The calculated spectra of propanal and three of its isotopomers were compared with the available experimental data. It is found that the calculations for the cis conformer satisfactorily reproduce the aldehyde and methyl torsion spectra and furnish also methyl torsionally excited progressions for the aldehyde torsion modes. The methyl torsion frequencies agree especially well whenever the methyl group is nondeuterated. The small deviations encountered for the deuterated compound are probably due to some mass effect, such as the zero-point vibrational energy correction, which is not taken into account in the present calculations. Finally, the influence of the deuteration on the intensities is discussed.

  16. THE HEAT CAPACITY OF FLUORINATED PROPANE AND BUTANE DERIVATIVES BY DIFFERENTIAL SCANNING CALORIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement (to 3% accuracy) of the constant-pressure liquid-phase heat capacities of 21 hydrogen-containing fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and one fluorinated ether (CF3OCF2H) with boiling points ranging from -34.6 to 76.7 C, using diff...

  17. RETENTION OF HALOCARBONS ON A HEXAFLUOROPROPYLENE EPOXIDE-MODIFIED GRAPHITIZED CARBON BLACK - IV. PROPANE- BASED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The retention characteristics of 25 propane-based bromofluorocarbon, chlorocarbon, chlorofluorocarbon, and fluorocarbon fluids have been studied as a function of temperature on a stationary phase consisting of a 5% (m/m) coating of a low-molecular-mass polymer of hexafluoropropyl...

  18. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of 0-A12O3- Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts for Butane Dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Kim, Hack-Sung; Stair, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction; Structure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Quantification of Surface VOx Species on Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Conclusion; Acknowledgements; and References.

  19. Developing synthesis techniques for zeolitic-imidazolate framework membranes for high resolution propylene/propane separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk Taek

    Propylene/propane separation is one of the most challenging separations, currently achieved by energy-intensive cryogenic distillation. Despite the great potentials for energy-efficient membrane-based propylene/propane separation processes, no commercial membranes are available due to the limitations (i.e., low selectivity) of current polymeric materials. Zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are promising membrane materials primarily due to their well-defined ultra-micropores with controllable surface chemistry along with their relatively high thermal/chemical stabilities. In particular, ZIF-8 with the effective aperture size of ~ 4.0 A has been shown very promising for propylene/propane separation. Despite the extensive research on ZIF-8 membranes, only a few of ZIF-8 membranes have displayed good propylene/propane separation performances presumably due to the challenges of controlling the microstructures of polycrystalline membranes. Since the membrane microstructures are greatly influenced by processing techniques, it is critically important to develop new techniques. In this dissertation, three state-of-the-art ZIF membrane synthesis techniques are developed. The first is a one-step in-situ synthesis technique based on the concept of counter diffusion. The technique enabled us to obtain highly propylene selective ZIF-8 membranes in less than a couple of hours with exceptional mechanical strength. Most importantly, due to the nature of the counter-diffusion concept, the new method offered unique opportunities such as healing defective membranes (i.e., poorly-intergrown) as well as significantly reducing the consumption of costly ligands and organic solvents. The second is a microwave-assisted seeding technique. Using this new seeding technique, we were able to prepare seeded supports with a high packing density in a couple of minutes, which subsequently grown into highly propylene-selective ZIF-8 membranes with an average propylene/propane selectivity of ~40

  20. ON THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF ISOLATED MONO-DEHYDROGENATED POLYAROMATIC HYDROCARBON IONS AND THEIR ASTROPHYSICAL RELEVANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Alvaro Galue, Hector; Oomens, Jos

    2012-02-10

    The attribution of the unidentified infrared bands to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules is a key argument for their abundant occurrence in interstellar environments, which has important implications for interstellar chemistry. In contrast to terrestrial conditions, their transient forms are of importance in the low-density astrophysical environments. Here, the gas-phase IR spectra of three PAH molecules in a carbocation state (naphthyl{sup +}, C{sub 10}H{sub 7}{sup +}; phenanthryl{sup +}, C{sub 14}H{sub 9}{sup +}; and pyrenyl{sup +}, C{sub 16}H{sub 9}{sup +}) are investigated by action spectroscopy methods using an infrared free electron laser and an ion-trap mass spectrometer. The IR spectra of the mono-dehydrogenated PAH{sup +} (aryl) ions in the 6-18 {mu}m spectral range are compared to computed IR spectra for various structural isomers of the aryl ions; the comparison indicates that the most stable structures under isolated conditions have a triplet electronic configuration. Electronic structure calculations on systems as large as the mono-dehydrogenated circumcoronene cation (C{sub 54}H{sub 17}{sup +}) provide further evidence for the higher stability of a triplet state as compared with the singlet state. Moreover, the gas-phase IR spectra reveal that the IR signatures of a PAH cation before and after H-atom loss are very similar, in particular in the 6-9 {mu}m region involving the skeletal CC stretching modes, so that triplet mono-dehydrogenated PAH ions are similarly compliant with the general match between PAH mid-IR features and the interstellar unidentified infrared emissions. The establishment of a triplet electronic ground state suggests that interstellar scenarios should consider the possible influence of triplet aromatic chemistry as well as the possible influence of the altered optical properties of triplet PAH species.

  1. Monodisperse gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles and their composition-controlled catalysis in formic acid dehydrogenation under mild conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metin, Önder; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2013-01-01

    Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(iii) hydrate and palladium(ii) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h-1) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives.Monodisperse 4 nm AuPd alloy nanoparticles with controlled composition were synthesized by co-reduction of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(iii) hydrate and palladium(ii) acetylacetonate with a borane-morpholine complex in oleylamine. These NPs showed high activity (TOF = 230 h-1) and stability in catalyzing formic acid dehydrogenation and hydrogen production in water at 50 °C without any additives. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures (NP synthesis, characterization and catalytic FA dehydrogenation) and figures (Fig. S1-S5). See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33637e

  2. Vacuum Surface Science Meets Heterogeneous Catalysis: Dehydrogenation of a Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carrier in the Liquid State.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takashi; Taccardi, Nicola; Schwegler, Johannes; Wasserscheid, Peter; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Maier, Florian

    2015-06-22

    Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface science techniques are used to study the heterogeneous catalytic dehydrogenation of a liquid organic hydrogen carrier in its liquid state close to the conditions of real catalysis. For this purpose, perhydrocarbazole (PH), otherwise volatile under UHV, is covalently linked as functional group to an imidazolium cation, forming a non-volatile ionic liquid (IL). The catalysed dehydrogenation of the PH unit as a function of temperature is investigated for a Pt foil covered by a macroscopically thick PH-IL film and for Pd particles suspended in the PH-IL film, and for PH-IL on Au as inert support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy allows us to follow in situ the catalysed transition of perhydrocarbazole to carbazole at technical reaction temperatures. The data demonstrate the crucial role of the Pt and Pd catalysts in order to shift the dehydrogenation temperature below the critical temperature of thermal decomposition.

  3. Ultrasound promoted catalytic liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol for Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Xin, Fang; Li, Xunfeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The apparent kinetic of the ultrasound assisted liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over Raney nickel catalyst was determined in the temperature range of 346-353 K. Comparison of the effects of ultrasound and mechanical agitation on the isopropanol dehydrogenation was investigated. The ultrasound assisted dehydrogenation rate was significantly improved when relatively high power density was used. Moreover, the Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump (IAH-CHP) with ultrasound irradiation, in which the endothermic reaction is exposure to ultrasound, was proposed. A mathematical model was established to evaluate its energy performance in term of the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency, into which the apparent kinetic obtained in this work was incorporated. The operating performances between IAH-CHP with ultrasound and mechanical agitation were compared. The results indicated that the superiority of the IAH-CHP system with ultrasound was present even if more than 50% of the power of the ultrasound equipment was lost.

  4. Ammonia-Borane and Amine-Borane Dehydrogenation Mediated by Complex Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Rossin, Andrea; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2016-08-10

    This review is a comprehensive survey of the last 10 years of research on ammonia-borane and amine-borane dehydrogenation mediated by complex metal hydrides (CMHs), within the broader context of chemical hydrogen storage. The review also collects those cases where CMHs are the catalyst spent form or its resting state. Highlights on the reaction mechanism (strictly dependent on the CMH of choice) and the catalysts efficiency (in terms of equivalents of H2 produced and relative reaction rates) are provided throughout the discussion.

  5. Palladium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Coupling: An Efficient Synthetic Strategy for the Construction of the Quinoline Core

    PubMed Central

    Carral-Menoyo, Asier; Ortiz-de-Elguea, Verónica; Martinez-Nunes, Mikel; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Palladium-catalyzed dehydrogenative coupling is an efficient synthetic strategy for the construction of quinoline scaffolds, a privileged structure and prevalent motif in many natural and biologically active products, in particular in marine alkaloids. Thus, quinolines and 1,2-dihydroquinolines can be selectively obtained in moderate-to-good yields via intramolecular C–H alkenylation reactions, by choosing the reaction conditions. This methodology provides a direct method for the construction of this type of quinoline through an efficient and atom economical procedure, and constitutes significant advance over the existing procedures that require preactivated reaction partners. PMID:28867803

  6. Palladium-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Coupling: An Efficient Synthetic Strategy for the Construction of the Quinoline Core.

    PubMed

    Carral-Menoyo, Asier; Ortiz-de-Elguea, Verónica; Martinez-Nunes, Mikel; Sotomayor, Nuria; Lete, Esther

    2017-08-30

    Palladium-catalyzed dehydrogenative coupling is an efficient synthetic strategy for the construction of quinoline scaffolds, a privileged structure and prevalent motif in many natural and biologically active products, in particular in marine alkaloids. Thus, quinolines and 1,2-dihydroquinolines can be selectively obtained in moderate-to-good yields via intramolecular C-H alkenylation reactions, by choosing the reaction conditions. This methodology provides a direct method for the construction of this type of quinoline through an efficient and atom economical procedure, and constitutes significant advance over the existing procedures that require preactivated reaction partners.

  7. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-Jun; Nguyen, Luan; Wang, Ziyun; Zhang, Shiran; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Huang, Weixin; Zeng, Shibi; Hu, P.

    2015-08-01

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. In situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show that methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.

  8. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-Jun; Nguyen, Luan; Wang, Ziyun; Zhang, Shiran; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Huang, Weixin; Zeng, Shibi; Hu, P

    2015-08-04

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. In situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show that methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O; a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.

  9. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-jun; Nguyen, Luan; Wang, Ziyun; Zhang, Shiran; Zhang, Li; Wu, Zili; Huang, Weixin; Zeng, Shibi; Hu, P.

    2015-08-04

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. Finally, in situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show that methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O; a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.

  10. Understanding complete oxidation of methane on spinel oxides at a molecular level

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Shan, Jun-jun; Nguyen, Luan; ...

    2015-08-04

    It is crucial to develop a catalyst made of earth-abundant elements highly active for a complete oxidation of methane at a relatively low temperature. NiCo2O4 consisting of earth-abundant elements which can completely oxidize methane in the temperature range of 350-550 °C. Being a cost-effective catalyst, NiCo2O4 exhibits activity higher than precious-metal-based catalysts. Here we report that the higher catalytic activity at the relatively low temperature results from the integration of nickel cations, cobalt cations and surface lattice oxygen atoms/oxygen vacancies at the atomic scale. Finally, in situ studies of complete oxidation of methane on NiCo2O4 and theoretical simulations show thatmore » methane dissociates to methyl on nickel cations and then couple with surface lattice oxygen atoms to form -CH3O with a following dehydrogenation to -CH2O; a following oxidative dehydrogenation forms CHO; CHO is transformed to product molecules through two different sub-pathways including dehydrogenation of OCHO and CO oxidation.« less

  11. Mechanistic Insights into the Catalytic Oxidation of Carboxylic Acids on Au/TiO2: Partial Oxidation of Propionic and Butyric Acid to Gold Ketenylidene through Unsaturated Acids

    DOE PAGES

    McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; ...

    2014-12-12

    Here, the partial oxidation of model C2–C4 (acetic, propionic, and butyric) carboxylic acids on Au/TiO2 catalysts consisting of Au particles ~3 nm in size was investigated using transmission infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory. All three acids readily undergo oxidative dehydrogenation on Au/TiO2. Propionic and butyric acid dehydrogenate at the C2–C3 positions, whereas acetic acid dehydrogenates at the C1–C2 position. The resulting acrylate and crotonate intermediates are subsequently oxidized to form β-keto acids that decarboxylate. All three acids form a gold ketenylidene intermediate, Au2C=C=O, along the way to their full oxidation to form CO2. Infrared measurements of Au2C=C=O formation asmore » a function of time provides a surface spectroscopic probe of the kinetics for the activation and oxidative dehydrogenation of the alkyl groups in the carboxylate intermediates that form.« less

  12. Comparison of combustion characteristics of ASTM A-1, propane, and natural-gas fuels in an annular turbojet combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Jones, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of an annular turbojet combustor using natural-gas fuel is compared with that obtained using ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Propane gas was used to simulate operation with vaporized kerosene fuels. The results obtained at severe operating conditions and altitude relight conditions show that natural gas is inferior to both ASTM A-1 and propane fuels. Combustion efficiencies were significantly lower and combustor pressures for relight were higher with natural-gas fuel than with the other fuels. The inferior performance of natural gas is shown to be caused by the chemical stability of the methane molecule.

  13. Transfer hydrogenation over sodium-modified ceria: Enrichment of redox sites active for alcohol dehydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas C.; Boote, Brett W.; Naik, Pranjali; ...

    2017-01-17

    Ceria (CeO2) and sodium-modified ceria (Ce-Na) were prepared through combustion synthesis. Palladium was deposited onto the supports (Pd/CeO2 and Pd/Ce-Na) and their activity for the aqueous-phase transfer hydrogenation of phenol using 2-propanol under liquid flow conditions was studied. Pd/Ce-Na showed a marked increase (6×) in transfer hydrogenation activity over Pd/CeO2. Material characterization indicated that water-stable sodium species were not doped into the ceria lattice, but rather existed as subsurface carbonates. Modification of ceria by sodium provided more adsorption and redox active sites (i.e. defects) for 2-propanol dehydrogenation. This effect was an intrinsic property of the Ce-Na support and independent ofmore » Pd. The redox sites active for 2-propanol dehydrogenation were thermodynamically equivalent on both supports/catalysts. At high phenol concentrations, the reaction was limited by 2-propanol adsorption. Furthermore, the difference in catalytic activity was attributed to the different numbers of 2-propanol adsorption and redox active sites on each catalyst.« less

  14. Carbon Nanotubes as Support in the Platinum-Catalyzed Hydrolytic Dehydrogenation of Ammonia Borane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenyao; Duan, Xuezhi; Qian, Gang; Chen, De; Zhou, Xinggui

    2015-09-07

    We report remarkable support effects for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the Pt/CNT-catalyzed hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. The origin of the support-dependent activity and durability is elucidated by combining the catalytic and durability testing with characterization by a range of spectroscopy and high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques and ICP analysis. The effects mainly arise from different electronic properties and different abilities for the adsorption of boron-containing species on platinum surfaces and changes in size and shape of the platinum particles during the reaction. Defect-rich CNTs in particular are a promising support material, as it not only enhances the platinum binding energy, leading to the highest hydrogen generation rate, but also inhibits the adsorption of boron-containing species and stabilizes the platinum nanoparticles to resist the agglomeration during the reaction, leading to the highest durability. The insights revealed herein may pave the way for the rational design of highly active and durable metal/carbon catalysts for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane.

  15. Computational Study of Formic Acid Dehydrogenation Catalyzed by Al(III)-Bis(imino)pyridine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qian-Qian; Yu, Hai-Zhu; Fu, Yao

    2016-03-18

    The mechanism of formic acid dehydrogenation catalyzed by the bis(imino)pyridine-ligated aluminum hydride complex (PDI(2-))Al(THF)H (PDI=bis(imino)pyridine) was studied by density functional theory calculations. The overall transformation is composed of two stages: catalyst activation and the catalytic cycle. The catalyst activation begins with O-H bond cleavage of HCOOH promoted by aluminum-ligand cooperation, followed by HCOOH-assisted Al-H bond cleavage, and protonation of the imine carbon atom of the bis(imino)pyridine ligand. The resultant doubly protonated complex ((H,H) PDI)Al(OOCH)3 is the active catalyst for formic acid dehydrogenation. Given this, the catalytic cycle includes β-hydride elimination of ((H,H) PDI)Al(OOCH)3 to produce CO2, and the formed ((H,H) PDI)Al(OOCH)2 H mediates HCOOH to release H2. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effect of transition-metal additives on dehydrogenation kinetics of MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Anindya; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2013-03-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on hybrid density functional theory we study the (de)hydrogenation process in MgH2, an important solid-state hydrogen storage material. This reaction proceeds through diffusion processes, mediated by native point defects such as vacancies and interstitials. Reducing the formation energy of relevant defects increases their concentrations, resulting in higher diffusion rates and an enhancement in kinetics. We investigate the formation energies of native point defects in MgH2 and determine the position of the Fermi level in the band gap using the charge neutrality condition. The presence of transition-metal (TM) impurities (Ti, Fe, Co and Ni) causes the Fermi level to shift according to the position of the TM acceptor/donor levels in the band gap. This shift can bring down the formation energy of native defects. Our calculations predict that all of the TM additives, in either interstitial or substitutional configurations, may cause such a shift in the Fermi level and thus increase the concentration of the hydrogen vacancies that govern hydrogen diffusion. Our proposed mechanism explains the experimentally observed enhancement in the rate of dehydrogenation of MgH2 upon addition of TM impurities. U.S. Department of Energy (Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER46434), National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

  17. Chemical and hydrogen isotope evidence for in situ dehydrogenation of biotite in silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, T. C.; Sharp, Z. D.

    1996-11-01

    To examine the potential for volatile fluxing of magma chambers by in situ degassing of hydrous minerals, we obtained complete chemical analyses for biotite separates from silicic lavas. The separates exhibit unusually low H2O contents that inversely correlate with host lava temperatures, high Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios that inversely correlate with host lava oxygen fugacities, and the highest δ D values yet reported for biotite from any silicic igneous rock (up to -19‰). These results are direct evidence for selective loss of protium (1H) from biotite during dehydrogenation in magma chambers heated from below by intrusion of mafic magma. The maximum PΔV energy generated from dehydrogenation alone can approach 2 × 103 joules per kilogram of magma. This finding provides support for the concept that injection of mafic magma coupled with sudden degassing of hydrous minerals in a volatile-rich magma chamber can increase pressure, and thus enhance the possibility of initiating a volcanic eruption.

  18. Reactivity of a Ruthenium–Carbonyl Complex in the Methanol Dehydrogenation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    van de Watering, Fenna F.; Lutz, Martin; Dzik, Wojciech I.; de Bruin, Bas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding new catalysts for the release of molecular hydrogen from methanol is of high relevance in the context of the development of sustainable energy carriers. Herein, we report that the ruthenium complex Ru(salbinapht)(CO)(Pi‐Pr3) {salbinapht=2‐[({2′‐[(2‐hydroxybenzyl)amino]‐[1,1′‐binaphthalen]‐2‐yl}imino)methyl]phenolato} (2) catalyzes the methanol dehydrogenation reaction in the presence of base and water to yield H2, formate, and carbonate. Dihydrogen is the only gas detected and a turnover frequency up to 55 h−1 at 82 °C is reached. Complex 2 bears a carbonyl ligand that is derived from methanol, as is demonstrated by labeling experiments. The carbonyl ligand can be treated with base to form formate (HCOO−) and hydrogen. The nature of the active species is further shown not to contain a CO ligand but likely still possesses a salen‐derived ligand. During catalysis, formation of Ru(CO)2(H)2(P‐iPr3)2 is occasionally observed, which is also an active methanol dehydrogenation catalyst. PMID:27917245

  19. ENHANCEMENT OF EQUILIBRIUMSHIFT IN DEHYDROGENATION REACTIONS USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias, Ph.d., P.E.; Franklin G. King, D.Sc.

    2001-02-13

    With the advances in new inorganic materials and processing techniques, there has been renewed interest in exploiting the benefits of membranes in many industrial applications. Inorganic and composite membranes are being considered as potential candidates for use in membrane-reactor configuration for effectively increasing reaction rate, selectivity and yield of equilibrium limited reactions. To investigate the usefulness of a palladium-ceramic composite membrane in a membrane reactor-separator configuration, we investigated the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane by equilibrium shift. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane by equilibrium shift in a tubular membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was considered to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to permeation through the membrane. For a dehydrogenation reaction, the feed stream to the reaction side contained cyclohexane and argon, while the separation side used argon as the sweep gas. Equilibrium conversion for dehydrogenation of cyclohexane is 18.7%. The present study showed that 100% conversion could be achieved by equilibrium shift using Pd-ceramic membrane reactor. For a feed containing cyclohexane and argon of 1.64 x 10{sup -6} and 1.0 x 10{sup -3} mol/s, over 98% conversion could be readily achieved. The dehydrogenation of cyclohexane was also experimentally investigated in a palladium-ceramic membrane reactor. The Pd-ceramic membrane was fabricated by electroless deposition of palladium on ceramic substrate. The performance of Pd-ceramic membrane was compared with a commercially available hydrogen-selective ceramic membrane. From limited experimental data it was observed that by appropriate choice of feed flow rate and sweep gas rate, the conversion of cyclohexane to benzene and hydrogen can increased to 56% at atmospheric pressure and 200 C in a Pd-ceramic membrane reactor. In the commercial ceramic membrane

  20. Research on the nanocrystal FeVxOy catalysts for new reaction from propane to propylene and CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhua; Chen, Shu; Xu, Aixin; Ma, Fei; Chen, Fang; Lu, Weimin

    2014-11-01

    The FeVxOy catalysts, used for selective oxidation of propane to propylene and CO, were prepared via sol-gel method using F-127 as chelating agent. And the catalyst with V/Fe (molar ratio) = 0.1 showed quite good selectivity of propylene and CO and the sum of them can be more than 90%. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman, H2-TPR and NH3-TPD. The relationship between the structure and catalytic properties was also preliminarily discussed. The results indicated that chemical interaction took place between the vanadium and iron, which could be referred to Vsbnd Osbnd Fe bonds and the formation of Fe(VO4). Meanwhile, with the increase of vanadium content, the distribution of all the elements proportion and valence state on the surface of the catalysts as well as the acid amount and acid sites changed immensely. All of these affected the catalytic performance and improve the selectivity of CO and inhibit that of CO2.