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Sample records for proper mitochondrial functionality

  1. Specific degradation of phosphatidylglycerol is necessary for proper mitochondrial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, Lucia; Čermáková, Petra; Horváth, Anton; Baile, Matthew G; Claypool, Steven M; Griač, Peter; Malínský, Jan; Balážová, Mária

    2016-01-01

    In yeast, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) is a minor phospholipid under standard conditions; it can be utilized for cardiolipin (CL) biosynthesis by CL synthase, Crd1p, or alternatively degraded by the phospholipase Pgc1p. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants crd1Δ and pgc1Δ both accumulate PG. Based on analyses of the phospholipid content of pgc1Δ and crd1Δ yeast, we revealed that in yeast mitochondria, two separate pools of PG are present, which differ in their fatty acid composition and accessibility for Pgc1p-catalyzed degradation. In contrast to CL-deficient crd1Δ yeast, the pgc1Δ mutant contains normal levels of CL. This makes the pgc1Δ strain a suitable model to study the effect of accumulation of PG per se. Using fluorescence microscopy, we show that accumulation of PG with normal levels of CL resulted in increased fragmentation of mitochondria, while in the absence of CL, accumulation of PG led to the formation of large mitochondrial sheets. We also show that pgc1Δ mitochondria exhibited increased respiration rates due to increased activity of cytochrome c oxidase. Taken together, our results indicate that not only a lack of anionic phospholipids, but also excess PG, or unbalanced ratios of anionic phospholipids in mitochondrial membranes, have harmful consequences on mitochondrial morphology and function.

  2. Specific degradation of phosphatidylglycerol is necessary for proper mitochondrial morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Lucia; Čermáková, Petra; Horváth, Anton; Baile, Matthew G.; Claypool, Steven M.; Griač, Peter; Malínský, Jan; Balážová, Mária

    2015-01-01

    In yeast, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) is a minor phospholipid under standard conditions; it can be utilized for cardiolipin (CL) biosynthesis by CL synthase, Crd1p, or alternatively degraded by the phospholipase Pgc1p. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion mutants crd1Δ and pgc1Δ both accumulate PG. Based on analyses of the phospholipid content of pgc1Δ and crd1Δ yeast, we revealed that in yeast mitochondria, two separate pools of PG are present, which differ in their fatty acid composition and accessibility for Pgc1p-catalyzed degradation. In contrast to CL-deficient crd1Δ yeast, the pgc1Δ mutant contains normal levels of CL. This makes the pgc1Δ strain a suitable model to study the effect of accumulation of PG per se. Using fluorescence microscopy, we show that accumulation of PG with normal levels of CL resulted in increased fragmentation of mitochondria, while in the absence of CL, accumulation of PG led to the formation of large mitochondrial sheets. We also show that pgc1Δ mitochondria exhibited increased respiration rates due to increased activity of cytochrome c oxidase. Taken together, our results indicate that not only a lack of anionic phospholipids, but also excess PG, or unbalanced ratios of anionic phospholipids in mitochondrial membranes, have harmful consequences on mitochondrial morphology and function. PMID:26482708

  3. Rev1 contributes to proper mitochondrial function via the PARP-NAD(+)-SIRT1-PGC1α axis.

    PubMed

    Fakouri, Nima Borhan; Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Regnell, Christine Elisabeth; Angleys, Maria; Desler, Claus; Olive, Mahdi Hasan-; Martín-Pardillos, Ana; Tsaalbi-Shtylik, Anastasia; Thomsen, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin; Bohr, Vilhelm A; de Wind, Niels; Bergersen, Linda Hildegard; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2017-10-02

    Nucleic acids, which constitute the genetic material of all organisms, are continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous damaging agents, representing a significant challenge to genome stability and genome integrity over the life of a cell or organism. Unrepaired DNA lesions, such as single- and double-stranded DNA breaks (SSBs and DSBs), and single-stranded gaps can block progression of the DNA replication fork, causing replicative stress and/or cell cycle arrest. However, translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases, such as Rev1, have the ability to bypass some DNA lesions, which can circumvent the process leading to replication fork arrest and minimize replicative stress. Here, we show that Rev1-deficiency in mouse embryo fibroblasts or mouse liver tissue is associated with replicative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rev1-deficiency is associated with high poly(ADP) ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1) activity, low endogenous NAD(+), low expression of SIRT1 and PGC1α and low adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) activity. We conclude that replication stress via Rev1-deficiency contributes to metabolic stress caused by compromized mitochondrial function via the PARP-NAD(+)-SIRT1-PGC1α axis.

  4. Mitochondrial functionality in female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Gąsior, Łukasz; Daszkiewicz, Regina; Ogórek, Mateusz; Polański, Zbigniew

    2017-01-04

    In most animal species female germ cells are the source of mitochondrial genome for the whole body of individuals. As a source of mitochondrial DNA for future generations the mitochondria in the female germ line undergo dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes. In addition to maintaining the intact template of mitochondrial genome from one generation to another, mitochondrial role in oocytes is much more complex and pleiotropic. The quality of mitochondria determines the ability of meiotic divisions, fertilization ability, and activation after fertilization or sustaining development of a new embryo. The presence of normal number of functional mitochondria is also crucial for proper implantation and pregnancy maintaining. This article addresses issues of mitochondrial role and function in mammalian oocyte and presents new approaches in studies of mitochondrial function in female germ cells.

  5. Pharmacological approaches to restore mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, Pénélope A.; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is not only a hallmark of rare inherited mitochondrial disorders, but is also implicated in age-related diseases, including those that affect the metabolic and nervous system, such as type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Numerous pathways maintain and/or restore proper mitochondrial function, including mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. New and powerful phenotypic assays in cell-based models, as well as multicellular organisms, have been developed to explore these different aspects of mitochondrial function. Modulating mitochondrial function has therefore emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy for a range of diseases, which has spurred active drug discovery efforts in this area. PMID:23666487

  6. The Golgi α-1,6 mannosyltransferase KlOch1p of Kluyveromyces lactis is required for Ca2+/calmodulin-based signaling and for proper mitochondrial functionality

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein N-glycosylation is a relevant metabolic pathway in eukaryotes and plays key roles in cell processes. In yeasts, outer chain branching is initiated in the Golgi apparatus by the alpha-1,6-mannosyltransferase Och1p. Results Here we report that, in Kluyveromyces lactis, this glycosyltransferase is also required to maintain functional mitochondria and calcium homeostasis. Cells carrying a mutation in KlOCH1 gene showed altered mitochondrial morphology, increased accumulation of ROS and reduced expression of calcium signalling genes such as calmodulin and calcineurin. Intracellular calcium concentration was also reduced in the mutant cells with respect to the wild type counterparts. Phenotypes that occur in cells lacking the alpha-1,6-mannosyltransferase, including oxidative stress and impaired mitochondria functionality, were suppressed by increased dosage of KlCmd1p. This, in turn, acts through the action of calcineurin. Conclusions Proper functioning of the alpha-1,6-mannosyltransferase in the N-glycosylation pathway of K. lactis is required for maintaining normal calcium homeostasis; this is necessary for physiological mitochondria dynamics and functionality. PMID:20003441

  7. Modeling mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    The mitochondrion represents a unique opportunity to apply mathematical modeling to a complex biological system. Understanding mitochondrial function and control is important since this organelle is critical in energy metabolism as well as playing key roles in biochemical synthesis, redox control/signaling, and apoptosis. A mathematical model, or hypothesis, provides several useful insights including a rigorous test of the consensus view of the operation of a biological process as well as providing methods of testing and creating new hypotheses. The advantages of the mitochondrial system for applying a mathematical model include the relative simplicity and understanding of the matrix reactions, the ability to study the mitochondria as a independent contained organelle, and, most importantly, one can dynamically measure many of the internal reaction intermediates, on line. The developing ability to internally monitor events within the metabolic network, rather than just the inflow and outflow, is extremely useful in creating critical bounds on complex mathematical models using the individual reaction mechanisms available. However, many serious problems remain in creating a working model of mitochondrial function including the incomplete definition of metabolic pathways, the uncertainty of using in vitro enzyme kinetics, as well as regulatory data in the intact system and the unknown chemical activities of relevant molecules in the matrix. Despite these formidable limitations, the advantages of the mitochondrial system make it one of the best defined mammalian metabolic networks that can be used as a model system for understanding the application and use of mathematical models to study biological systems.

  8. Mitochondrial Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Schumacker, Paul T.; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are an essential part of the cellular infrastructure, being the primary site for high energy adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production through oxidative phosphorylation. Clearly, in severe systemic inflammatory states, like sepsis, cellular metabolism is usually altered and end organ dysfunction not only common but predictive of long term morbidity and mortality. Clearly, interest is mitochondrial function both as a target for intracellular injury and response to extrinsic stress have been a major focus of basic science and clinical research into the pathophysiology of acute illness. However, mitochondria have multiple metabolic and signaling functions that may be central in both the expression of sepsis and its ultimate outcome. In this review, the authors address five primary questions centered on the role of mitochondria in sepsis. This review should be used as both a summary source in placing mitochondrial physiology within the context of acute illness and as a focal point for addressing new research into diagnostic and treatment opportunities these insights provide. PMID:26871665

  9. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  10. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  11. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus; Ara, Ignacio; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn W

    2014-02-01

    It has been suggested that human mitochondrial variants influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Whether mitochondrial respiratory capacity per mitochondrion (intrinsic activity) in human skeletal muscle is affected by differences in mitochondrial variants is not known. We recruited 54 males and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present. © 2013.

  12. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element has...

  13. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element has...

  14. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element has...

  15. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526... element not functioning properly. When a roadway element except track circuit of automatic train stop... roadway element shall be caused manually to display its most restrictive aspect until such element has...

  16. Mitochondrial function, ornamentation, and immunocompetence.

    PubMed

    Koch, Rebecca E; Josefson, Chloe C; Hill, Geoffrey E

    2016-07-25

    Understanding the mechanisms that link ornamental displays and individual condition is key to understanding the evolution and function of ornaments. Immune function is an aspect of individual quality that is often associated with the expression of ornamentation, but a general explanation for why the expression of some ornaments seems to be consistently linked to immunocompetence remains elusive. We propose that condition-dependent ornaments may be linked to key aspects of immunocompetence through co-dependence on mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial involvement in immune function is rarely considered outside of the biomedical literature, but the role of mitochondria as the primary energy producers of the cell and the centres of biosynthesis, the oxidative stress response, and cellular signalling place them at the hub of a variety of immune pathways. A promising new mechanistic explanation for correlations between a wide range of ornamental traits and the properties of individual quality is that mitochondrial function may be the 'shared pathway' responsible for links between ornament production and individual condition. Herein, we first review the role of mitochondria as both signal transducers and metabolic regulators of immune function. We then describe connections between hormonal pathways and mitochondria, with implications for both immune function and the expression of ornamentation. Finally, we explore the possibility that ornament expression may link directly to mitochondrial function. Considering condition-dependent traits within the framework of mitochondrial function has the potential to unify central tenets within the study of sexual selection, eco-immunology, oxidative stress ecology, stress and reproductive hormone biology, and animal physiology.

  17. Disk Luminosity Function Based on the Lowell Proper Motion Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mee-Jeong; Lee, Sang-Gak

    1991-12-01

    Disk stellar luminosity function has been derived with stars in the Lowell Proper Motion Survey which contains about 9000 stars with mu => 0.27" of arc/yr, 8 < m_pg < 17 and with bright stars in the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) Star Catalogue. Luminosity function has been obtained with stars within 20 pc by Luyten's mean absolute magnitudes method using Reduced Proper Motion Diagram to select disk stars. Magnitudes and colors, in the SAO Star Catalogue as well as in the Lowell Proper Motion Survey have been transformed to the UBV system from the published UBV data. It has been found that stars which have higher proper motion than the original limit of the proper motion survey are missed, when the relation between the absolute magnitude and reduced proper motion is applied to sample stars without considering the dispersion in magnitude. Correction factors for missing stars have been estimated according to their limits of proper motion which are dependent on the absolute magnitude. Resulting lumi- nosity function shows Wielen's dip at M_B ~ 10, and systematic enhancement of stars on the average of about delta log Phi(M_B) ~ 0.2 compared with Luyten's luminosity function.

  18. Mitochondrial Function in Allergic Disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Divyaanka; Mishra, Navya; Agrawal, Anurag

    2017-05-01

    The connections between allergy, asthma and metabolic syndrome are becoming increasingly clear. Recent research suggests a unifying mitochondrial link between the diverse phenotypes of these interlinked morbidities. The scope of this review is to highlight cellular mechanisms, epidemiology and environmental allergens influencing mitochondrial function and its importance in allergy and asthma. We briefly also consider the potential of mitochondria-targeted therapies in prevention and cure. Recent research has shown allergy, asthma and metabolic syndrome to be linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Environmental pollutants and allergens are observed to cause mitochondrial dysfunction, primarily by inducing oxidative stress and ROS production. Malfunctioning mitochondria change the bioenergetics of the cell and its metabolic profile to favour systemic inflammation, which drives all three types of morbidities. Given the existing experimental evidence, approaches targeting mitochondria (e.g. antioxidant therapy and mitochondrial replacement) are being conducted in relevant disease models-with some progressing towards clinical trials, making mitochondrial function the focus of translational therapy research in asthma, allergy and linked metabolic syndrome.

  19. Master functional and proper formalism for quantum gauge field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2013-03-01

    We develop a general field-covariant approach to quantum gauge theories. Extending the usual set of integrated fields and external sources to "proper" fields and sources, which include partners of the composite fields, we define the master functional Ω, which collects one-particle irreducible diagrams and upgrades the usual Γ-functional in several respects. The functional Ω is determined from its classical limit applying the usual diagrammatic rules to the proper fields. Moreover, it behaves as a scalar under the most general perturbative field redefinitions, which can be expressed as linear transformations of the proper fields. We extend the Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism and the master equation. The master functional satisfies the extended master equation and behaves as a scalar under canonical transformations. The most general perturbative field redefinitions and changes of gauge-fixing can be encoded in proper canonical transformations, which are linear and do not mix integrated fields and external sources. Therefore, they can be applied as true changes of variables in the functional integral, instead of mere replacements of integrands. This property overcomes a major difficulty of the functional Γ. Finally, the new approach allows us to prove the renormalizability of gauge theories in a general field-covariant setting. We generalize known cohomological theorems to the master functional and show that when there are no gauge anomalies all divergences can be subtracted by means of parameter redefinitions and proper canonical transformations.

  20. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  1. Organism and artifact: Proper functions in Paley organisms.

    PubMed

    Holm, Sune

    2013-12-01

    In this paper I assess the explanatory powers of theories of function in the context of products that may result from synthetic biology. The aim is not to develop a new theory of functions, but to assess existing theories of function in relation to a new kind of biological and artifactual entity that might be produced in the not-too-distant future by means of synthetic biology. The paper thus investigates how to conceive of the functional nature of living systems that are not the result of evolution by natural selection, or instantly generated by cosmic coincidence, but which are products of intelligent design. The paper argues that the aetiological theory of proper functions in organisms and artifacts is inadequate as an account of proper functions in such 'Paley organisms' and defends an alternative organisational approach. The paper ends by considering the implications of the discussion of biological function for questions about the interests and moral status of non-sentient organisms.

  2. Subclinical hypothyroidism affects mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Kvetny, J; Wilms, L; Pedersen, P L; Larsen, J

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine mitochondrial function in cells from persons with subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls. The participating persons were examined clinically and had basal oxygen consumption (VO(2)) determined. The concentrations of thyroid hormones and thyrotropine stimulating hormone were determined, and mitochondrial function in isolated mononuclear blood cells was examined by enzymatic methods [citrate synthase activity (CS)] and by flow cytometry (mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM fluorescence and mitochondrial mass by MTG fluorescence). The ratio of T(4)/T(3) was lowered in subclinical hypothyroidism patients compared to controls (2.5+/-0.5 vs. 2.9+/-0.4, p=0.005). VO(2) was increased in persons with subclinical hypothyroidism compared to controls (adolescents: 134+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 119+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.006, adults: 139+/-14 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 121+/-17 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.001). The mitochondrial function, represented by citrate synthase activity, MTG, and TMRM fluorescence were all increased (CS in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 0.074+/-0.044 nmol/mg*min vs. 0.056+/-0.021 nmol/mg*min, p=0.005; MTG fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 7,482+/-1,733 a.u. vs. 6,391+/-2,171 a.u., p=0.027; TMRM fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 13,449+/-3,807 a.u. vs. 11,733+/-4,473 a.u, p=0.04). Our results indicate an increased mitochondrial stimulation, eventually caused by increased deiodination of T(4) to intracellular bioactive iodothyronines in adults and adolescents with subclinical hypothyroidism.

  3. 49 CFR 236.526 - Roadway element not functioning properly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roadway element not functioning properly. 236.526..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Automatic Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Roadway § 236.526 Roadway...

  4. Analysis of functional domains of rat mitochondrial Fis1, the mitochondrial fission-stimulating protein

    SciTech Connect

    Jofuku, Akihiro; Ishihara, Naotada; Mihara, Katsuyoshi . E-mail: mihara@cell.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2005-07-29

    In yeast, mitochondrial-fission is regulated by the cytosolic dynamin-like GTPase (Dnm1p) in conjunction with a peripheral protein, Mdv1p, and a C-tail-anchored outer membrane protein, Fis1p. In mammals, a dynamin-related protein (Drp1) and Fis1 are involved in the mitochondrial-fission reaction as Dnm1 and Fis1 orthologues, respectively. The involvement of other component(s), such as the Mdv1 homologue, and the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial-fission remain unclear. Here, we identified rat Fis1 (rFis1) and analyzed its structure-function relationship. Blue-native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that rFis1 formed a {approx}200-kDa complex in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Its expression in HeLa cells promoted extensive mitochondrial fragmentation, and gene knock-down by RNAi induced extension of the mitochondrial networks. Taking advantage of these properties, we analyzed functional domains of rFis1. These experiments revealed that the N-terminal and C-terminal segments are both essential for oligomeric rFis1 interaction, and the middle TPR-like domains regulate proper oligomer assembly. Any mutations that disturb the proper oligomeric assembly compromise mitochondrial division-stimulating activity of rFis1.

  5. Natural Compounds Modulating Mitochondrial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gibellini, Lara; Bianchini, Elena; De Biasi, Sara; Nasi, Milena; Cossarizza, Andrea; Pinti, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles responsible for several crucial cell functions, including respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of apoptosis; they are also the main intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the last years, a particular interest has been devoted to studying the effects on mitochondria of natural compounds of vegetal origin, quercetin (Qu), resveratrol (RSV), and curcumin (Cur) being the most studied molecules. All these natural compounds modulate mitochondrial functions by inhibiting organelle enzymes or metabolic pathways (such as oxidative phosphorylation), by altering the production of mitochondrial ROS and by modulating the activity of transcription factors which regulate the expression of mitochondrial proteins. While Qu displays both pro- and antioxidant activities, RSV and Cur are strong antioxidant, as they efficiently scavenge mitochondrial ROS and upregulate antioxidant transcriptional programmes in cells. All the three compounds display a proapoptotic activity, mediated by the capability to directly cause the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or indirectly by upregulating the expression of proapoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 family and downregulating antiapoptotic proteins. Interestingly, these effects are particularly evident on proliferating cancer cells and can have important therapeutic implications. PMID:26167193

  6. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology.

  7. Reductive stress impairs myoblasts mitochondrial function and triggers mitochondrial hormesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, François; Charles, Anne-Laure; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Piquard, François; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Geny, Bernard; Zoll, Joffrey

    2015-07-01

    Even though oxidative stress damage from excessive production of ROS is a well known phenomenon, the impact of reductive stress remains poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that cellular reductive stress could lead to mitochondrial malfunction, triggering a mitochondrial hormesis (mitohormesis) phenomenon able to protect mitochondria from the deleterious effects of statins. We performed several in vitro experiments on L6 myoblasts and studied the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at different exposure times. Direct NAC exposure (1mM) led to reductive stress, impairing mitochondrial function by decreasing maximal mitochondrial respiration and increasing H₂O₂production. After 24h of incubation, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased. The resulting mitochondrial oxidation activated mitochondrial biogenesis pathways at the mRNA level. After one week of exposure, mitochondria were well-adapted as shown by the decrease of cellular ROS, the increase of mitochondrial content, as well as of the antioxidant capacities. Atorvastatin (ATO) exposure (100μM) for 24h increased ROS levels, reduced the percentage of live cells, and increased the total percentage of apoptotic cells. NAC exposure during 3days failed to protect cells from the deleterious effects of statins. On the other hand, NAC pretreatment during one week triggered mitochondrial hormesis and reduced the deleterious effect of statins. These results contribute to a better understanding of the redox-dependant pathways linked to mitochondria, showing that reductive stress could trigger mitochondrial hormesis phenomenon.

  8. MITO-Porter for Mitochondrial Delivery and Mitochondrial Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-11-10

    Mitochondria are attractive organelles that have the potential to contribute greatly to medical therapy, the maintenance of beauty and health, and the development of the life sciences. Therefore, it would be expected that the further development of mitochondrial drug delivery systems (DDSs) would exert a significant impact on the medical and life sciences. To achieve such an innovative objective, it will be necessary to deliver various cargoes to mitochondria in living cells. However, only a limited number of approaches are available for accomplishing this. We recently proposed a new concept for mitochondrial delivery, a MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargoes into mitochondria via membrane fusion. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of mitochondrial therapeutic strategy by MITO-Porter using animal models of diseases. We also showed that the mitochondrial delivery of antisense oligo-RNA by the MITO-Porter results in mitochondrial RNA knockdown and has a functional impact on mitochondria. Here, we summarize the current state of mitochondrial DDS focusing on our research and show some examples of mitochondrial functional regulations using mitochondrial DDS.

  9. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM): roles in maintenance of mtDNA and cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongchon; Kim, Sang Ho; Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that mammalian mitochondrial DNA takes on higher structure called nucleoid or mitochromosome corresponding to that of nuclear DNA. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which was cloned as a transcription factor for mitochondrial DNA, has known to be essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. Human TFAM has an ability to bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner and is abundant enough to cover whole region of mitochondrial DNA, owing to which TFAM stabilizes mitochondrial DNA through formation of nucleoid and regulates (or titrates) the amount of mitochondrial DNA. Overexpression of human TFAM in mice increases the amount of mitochondrial DNA and dramatically ameliorates the cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. The maintenance of integrity of mitochondrial DNA is important for keeping proper cellular functions both under physiological and pathological conditions. TFAM may play a crucial role in maintaining mitochondrial DNA as a main component of the nucleoid.

  10. CARNITINE HOMEOSTASIS, MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitines are involved in mitochondrial transport of fatty acids and are of critical importance for maintaining normal mitochondrial function. This review summarizes recent experimental and clinical studies showing that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to a disruption of carnitine homeostasis may play a role in decreased NO signaling and the development of endothelial dysfunction. Future challenges include development of agents that can positively modulate L-carnitine homeostasis which may have high therapeutic potential. PMID:20648231

  11. Targeting mitochondrial function to treat optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gueven, Nuri; Nadikudi, Monila; Daniel, Abraham; Chhetri, Jamuna

    2016-07-28

    Many reports have illustrated a tight connection between vision and mitochondrial function. Not only are most mitochondrial diseases associated with some form of vision impairment, many ophthalmological disorders such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy also show signs of mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite a vast amount of evidence, vision loss is still only treated symptomatically, which is only partially a consequence of resistance to acknowledge that mitochondria could be the common denominator and hence a promising therapeutic target. More importantly, clinical support of this concept is only emerging. Moreover, only a few drug candidates and treatment strategies are in development or approved that selectively aim to restore mitochondrial function. This review rationalizes the currently developed therapeutic approaches that target mitochondrial function by discussing their proposed mode(s) of action and provides an overview on their development status with regards to optic neuropathies.

  12. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  13. Functional Properties of the Mitochondrial Carrier System.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Eric B

    2017-09-01

    The mitochondrial carrier system (MCS) transports small molecules between mitochondria and the cytoplasm. It is integral to the core mitochondrial function to regulate cellular chemistry by metabolism. The mammalian MCS comprises the transporters of the 53-member canonical SLC25A family and a lesser number of identified noncanonical transporters. The recent discovery and investigations of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) illustrate the diverse effects a single mitochondrial carrier may exert on cellular function. However, the transport selectivities of many carriers remain unknown, and most have not been functionally investigated in mammalian cells. The mechanisms coordinating their function as a unified system remain undefined. Increased accessibility to molecular genetic and metabolomic technologies now greatly enables investigation of the MCS. Continued investigation of the MCS may reveal how mitochondria encode complex regulatory information within chemical thermodynamic gradients. This understanding may enable precision modulation of cellular chemistry to counteract the dysmetabolism inherent in disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Methods for Assessing Mitochondrial Function in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Daniel A.; Lanza, Ian R.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research is investigating the potential contribution of mitochondrial function to the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Numerous in vitro, in situ, and in vivo methodologies are available to examine various aspects of mitochondrial function, each requiring an understanding of their principles, advantages, and limitations. This review provides investigators with a critical overview of the strengths, limitations and critical experimental parameters to consider when selecting and conducting studies on mitochondrial function. In vitro (isolated mitochondria) and in situ (permeabilized cells/tissue) approaches provide direct access to the mitochondria, allowing for study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox function under defined substrate conditions. Several experimental parameters must be tightly controlled, including assay media, temperature, oxygen concentration, and in the case of permeabilized skeletal muscle, the contractile state of the fibers. Recently developed technology now offers the opportunity to measure oxygen consumption in intact cultured cells. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides the most direct way of assessing mitochondrial function in vivo with interpretations based on specific modeling approaches. The continuing rapid evolution of these technologies offers new and exciting opportunities for deciphering the potential role of mitochondrial function in the etiology and treatment of diabetes. PMID:23520284

  15. Methods for assessing mitochondrial function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christopher G R; Kane, Daniel A; Lanza, Ian R; Neufer, P Darrell

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of research is investigating the potential contribution of mitochondrial function to the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Numerous in vitro, in situ, and in vivo methodologies are available to examine various aspects of mitochondrial function, each requiring an understanding of their principles, advantages, and limitations. This review provides investigators with a critical overview of the strengths, limitations and critical experimental parameters to consider when selecting and conducting studies on mitochondrial function. In vitro (isolated mitochondria) and in situ (permeabilized cells/tissue) approaches provide direct access to the mitochondria, allowing for study of mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox function under defined substrate conditions. Several experimental parameters must be tightly controlled, including assay media, temperature, oxygen concentration, and in the case of permeabilized skeletal muscle, the contractile state of the fibers. Recently developed technology now offers the opportunity to measure oxygen consumption in intact cultured cells. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides the most direct way of assessing mitochondrial function in vivo with interpretations based on specific modeling approaches. The continuing rapid evolution of these technologies offers new and exciting opportunities for deciphering the potential role of mitochondrial function in the etiology and treatment of diabetes.

  16. Computational Modeling of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of techniques with the ability to scan massive changes in cellular makeup (genomics, proteomics, etc.) has revealed the compelling need for analytical methods to interpret and make sense of those changes. Computational models built on sound physico-chemical mechanistic basis are unavoidable at the time of integrating, interpreting, and simulating high-throughput experimental data. Another powerful role of computational models is predicting new behavior provided they are adequately validated. Mitochondrial energy transduction has been traditionally studied with thermodynamic models. More recently, kinetic or thermo-kinetic models have been proposed, leading the path toward an understanding of the control and regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and its interaction with cytoplasmic and other compartments. In this work, we outline the methods, step-by-step, that should be followed to build a computational model of mitochondrial energetics in isolation or integrated to a network of cellular processes. Depending on the question addressed by the modeler, the methodology explained herein can be applied with different levels of detail, from the mitochondrial energy producing machinery in a network of cellular processes to the dynamics of a single enzyme during its catalytic cycle. PMID:22057575

  17. Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Function in Arabidopsis†

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Small, Ian D.; Day, David A.; Whelan, James

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria represent the powerhouse of cells through their synthesis of ATP. However, understanding the role of mitochondria in the growth and development of plants will rely on a much deeper appreciation of the complexity of this organelle. Arabidopsis research has provided clear identification of mitochondrial components, allowed wide-scale analysis of gene expression, and has aided reverse genetic manipulation to test the impact of mitochondrial component loss on plant function. Forward genetics in Arabidopsis has identified mitochondrial involvement in mutations with notable impacts on plant metabolism, growth and development. Here we consider the evidence for components involved in mitochondria biogenesis, metabolism and signalling to the nucleus. PMID:22303236

  18. Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain drug and non-functionalized nanosystems in delivering therapeutic agents to mitochondria. Although the field is in its infancy, studies to date suggest the superior therapeutic activity of functionalized nanosystems for treating mitochondrial defects. PMID:22138492

  19. Viruses as Modulators of Mitochondrial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanjeev K.; Tikoo, Suresh K.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles with diverse roles including energy production and distribution, apoptosis, eliciting host immune response, and causing diseases and aging. Mitochondria-mediated immune responses might be an evolutionary adaptation by which mitochondria might have prevented the entry of invading microorganisms thus establishing them as an integral part of the cell. This makes them a target for all the invading pathogens including viruses. Viruses either induce or inhibit various mitochondrial processes in a highly specific manner so that they can replicate and produce progeny. Some viruses encode the Bcl2 homologues to counter the proapoptotic functions of the cellular and mitochondrial proteins. Others modulate the permeability transition pore and either prevent or induce the release of the apoptotic proteins from the mitochondria. Viruses like Herpes simplex virus 1 deplete the host mitochondrial DNA and some, like human immunodeficiency virus, hijack the host mitochondrial proteins to function fully inside the host cell. All these processes involve the participation of cellular proteins, mitochondrial proteins, and virus specific proteins. This review will summarize the strategies employed by viruses to utilize cellular mitochondria for successful multiplication and production of progeny virus. PMID:24260034

  20. Are Medical Students Assigning Proper Global Assessment of Functioning Scores?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warsi, Mustafa K.; Sattar, S. Pirzada; Din, Amad U.; Petty, Frederick; Padala, Prasad R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article seeks to determine whether medical students can estimate the appropriate score for the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) compared with psychiatry residents and staff psychiatrists. The authors hypothesized that medical students' estimations of GAF scores for patients in clinical vignettes would differ from those…

  1. Are Medical Students Assigning Proper Global Assessment of Functioning Scores?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warsi, Mustafa K.; Sattar, S. Pirzada; Din, Amad U.; Petty, Frederick; Padala, Prasad R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article seeks to determine whether medical students can estimate the appropriate score for the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) compared with psychiatry residents and staff psychiatrists. The authors hypothesized that medical students' estimations of GAF scores for patients in clinical vignettes would differ from those…

  2. Selenoproteins Are Essential for Proper Keratinocyte Function and Skin Development

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Aniruddha; Lichti, Ulrike F.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Ryscavage, Andrew O.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Yuspa, Stuart H.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary selenium is known to protect skin against UV-induced damage and cancer and its topical application improves skin surface parameters in humans, while selenium deficiency compromises protective antioxidant enzymes in skin. Furthermore, skin and hair abnormalities in humans and rodents may be caused by selenium deficiency, which are overcome by dietary selenium supplementation. Most important biological functions of selenium are attributed to selenoproteins, proteins containing selenium in the form of the amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec). Sec insertion into proteins depends on Sec tRNA; thus, knocking out the Sec tRNA gene (Trsp) ablates selenoprotein expression. We generated mice with targeted removal of selenoproteins in keratin 14 (K14) expressing cells and their differentiated descendents. The knockout progeny had a runt phenotype, developed skin abnormalities and experienced premature death. Lack of selenoproteins in epidermal cells led to the development of hyperplastic epidermis and aberrant hair follicle morphogenesis, accompanied by progressive alopecia after birth. Further analyses revealed that selenoproteins are essential antioxidants in skin and unveiled their role in keratinocyte growth and viability. This study links severe selenoprotein deficiency to abnormalities in skin and hair and provides genetic evidence for the role of these proteins in keratinocyte function and cutaneous development. PMID:20805887

  3. Glucocorticoid Modulation of Mitochondrial Function in Hepatoma Cells Requires the Mitochondrial Fission Protein Drp1

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Paz, José C.; Sebastián, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Liesa, Marc; Segalés, Jessica; Palacín, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance hepatic energy metabolism and gluconeogenesis partly through changes in mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial function is influenced by the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission events. However, whether glucocorticoids modulate mitochondrial function through the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is currently unknown. Results: Here, we report that the effects of dexamethasone on mitochondrial function and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells are dependent on the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Dexamethasone increased routine oxygen consumption, maximal respiratory capacity, superoxide anion, proton leak, and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells. Under these conditions, dexamethasone altered mitochondrial morphology, which was paralleled by a large increase in Drp1 expression, and reduced mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2. In vivo dexamethasone treatment also enhanced Drp1 expression in mouse liver. On the basis of these observations, we analyzed the dependence on the Drp1 function of dexamethasone effects on mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis. We show that the increase in mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis induced by dexamethasone are hampered by the inhibition of Drp1 function. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that the effects of glucocorticoids on hepatic metabolism require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. Conclusion: In summary, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial effects of dexamethasone both on mitochondrial respiration and on the gluconeogenic pathway depend on Drp1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 366–378. PMID:22703557

  4. Disruption of mitochondrial function in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    Electron transport system (ETS) function in mitochondria is essential for the aerobic production of energy. Because ETS function requires extensive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear gene products, coadaptation between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may evolve within populations. Hybridization between allopatric populations may then expose functional incompatibilities between genomes that have not coevolved. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has high levels of nucleotide divergence among populations at mitochondrial loci and suffers F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation hybrids. We hypothesize that hybridization results in incompatibilities among subunits in ETS enzyme complexes and that these incompatibilities result in diminished mitochondrial function and fitness. To test this hypothesis, we measured fitness, mitochondrial function, and ETS enzyme activity in inbred recombinant hybrid lines of Tigriopus californicus. We found that (1) both fitness and mitochondrial function are reduced in hybrid lines, (2) only those ETS enzymes with both nuclear and mitochondrial subunits show a loss of activity in hybrid lines, and (3) positive relationships exist between ETS enzyme activity and mitochondrial function and between mitochondrial function and fitness. We also present evidence that hybrid lines harboring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRPOL) from the same parental source population have higher fitness than those with mtDNA and mtRPOL from different populations, suggesting that mitochondrial gene regulation may play a role in disruption of mitochondrial performance and fitness of hybrids. These results suggest that disruption of coadaptation between nuclear and mitochondrial genes contributes to the phenomenon of hybrid breakdown.

  5. Dynamic regulation of mitochondrial function by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Wang, Yun; Hunter, Richard; Wei, Yanling; Blumenthal, Rayah; Falke, Cynthia; Khairova, Rushaniya; Zhou, Rulun; Yuan, Peixiong; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; McEwen, Bruce S; Manji, Husseini K

    2009-03-03

    Glucocorticoids play an important biphasic role in modulating neural plasticity; low doses enhance neural plasticity and spatial memory behavior, whereas chronic, higher doses produce inhibition. We found that 3 independent measures of mitochondrial function-mitochondrial oxidation, membrane potential, and mitochondrial calcium holding capacity-were regulated by long-term corticosterone (CORT) treatment in an inverted "U"-shape. This regulation of mitochondrial function by CORT correlated with neuroprotection; that is, treatment with low doses of CORT had a neuroprotective effect, whereas treatment with high doses of CORT enhanced kainic acid (KA)-induced toxicity of cortical neurons. We then undertook experiments to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these biphasic effects and found that glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) formed a complex with the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in response to CORT treatment and translocated with Bcl-2 into mitochondria after acute treatment with low or high doses of CORT in primary cortical neurons. However, after 3 days of treatment, high, but not low, doses of CORT resulted in decreased GR and Bcl-2 levels in mitochondria. As with the in vitro studies, Bcl-2 levels in the mitochondria of the prefrontal cortex were significantly decreased, along with GR levels, after long-term treatment with high-dose CORT in vivo. These findings have the potential to contribute to a more complete understanding of the mechanisms by which glucocorticoids and chronic stress regulate cellular plasticity and resilience and to inform the future development of improved therapeutics.

  6. Common effects of lithium and valproate on mitochondrial functions: protection against methamphetamine-induced mitochondrial damage.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Rosilla F; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Peixiong; Zhou, Rulun; Li, Xiaoxia; Alesci, Salvatore; Du, Jing; Manji, Husseini K

    2009-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the progression of a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Thus, enhancing mitochondrial function could potentially help ameliorate the impairments of neural plasticity and cellular resilience associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. A series of studies was undertaken to investigate the effects of mood stabilizers on mitochondrial function, and against mitochondrially mediated neurotoxicity. We found that long-term treatment with lithium and valproate (VPA) enhanced cell respiration rate. Furthermore, chronic treatment with lithium or VPA enhanced mitochondrial function as determined by mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial oxidation in SH-SY5Y cells. In-vivo studies showed that long-term treatment with lithium or VPA protected against methamphetamine (Meth)-induced toxicity at the mitochondrial level. Furthermore, these agents prevented the Meth-induced reduction of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity. Oligoarray analysis demonstrated that the gene expression of several proteins related to the apoptotic pathway and mitochondrial functions were altered by Meth, and these changes were attenuated by treatment with lithium or VPA. One of the genes, Bcl-2, is a common target for lithium and VPA. Knock-down of Bcl-2 with specific Bcl-2 siRNA reduced the lithium- and VPA-induced increases in mitochondrial oxidation. These findings illustrate that lithium and VPA enhance mitochondrial function and protect against mitochondrially mediated toxicity. These agents may have potential clinical utility in the treatment of other diseases associated with impaired mitochondrial function, such as neurodegenerative diseases and schizophrenia.

  7. Common effects of lithium and valproate on mitochondrial functions: protection against methamphetamine-induced mitochondrial damage

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Rosilla F.; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Peixiong; Zhou, Rulun; Li, Xiaoxia; Alesci, Salvatore; Du, Jing; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the progression of a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Thus, enhancing mitochondrial function could potentially help ameliorate the impairments of neural plasticity and cellular resilience associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. A series of studies was undertaken to investigate the effects of mood stabilizers on mitochondrial function, and against mitochondrially mediated neurotoxicity. We found that long-term treatment with lithium and valproate (VPA) enhanced cell respiration rate. Furthermore, chronic treatment with lithium or VPA enhanced mitochondrial function as determined by mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial oxidation in SH-SY5Y cells. In-vivo studies showed that long-term treatment with lithium or VPA protected against methamphetamine (Meth)-induced toxicity at the mitochondrial level. Furthermore, these agents prevented the Meth-induced reduction of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity. Oligoarray analysis demonstrated that the gene expression of several proteins related to the apoptotic pathway and mitochondrial functions were altered by Meth, and these changes were attenuated by treatment with lithium or VPA. One of the genes, Bcl-2, is a common target for lithium and VPA. Knock-down of Bcl-2 with specific Bcl-2 siRNA reduced the lithium- and VPA-induced increases in mitochondrial oxidation. These findings illustrate that lithium and VPA enhance mitochondrial function and protect against mitochondrially mediated toxicity. These agents may have potential clinical utility in the treatment of other diseases associated with impaired mitochondrial function, such as neurodegenerative diseases and schizophrenia. PMID:19149911

  8. Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L10 Associates with Cyclin B1/Cdk1 Activity and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Bo; Wang, Ruo-Xi; Jiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, En-dong; Tan, Jie-Qiong; Xu, Hui-Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins are important for mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. In addition to their roles in mitoribosome assembly, several mitochondrial ribosome proteins are also implicated in cellular processes like cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial homeostasis regulation. Here, we demonstrate that MRPL10 regulates cyclin B1/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) activity and mitochondrial protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In Drosophila, inactivation of mRpL10 (the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian MRPL10) in eyes results in abnormal eye development. Furthermore, expression of human cyclin B1 suppresses eye phenotypes and mitochondrial abnormality of mRpL10 knockdown Drosophila. This study identified that the physiological regulatory pathway of MRPL10 and providing new insights into the role of MRPL10 in growth control and mitochondrial function. PMID:27726420

  9. OXPHOS-Dependent Cells Identify Environmental Disruptors of Mitochondrial Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with numerous chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome. Environmental chemicals can impair mitochondrial function through numerous mechanisms such as membrane disruption, complex inhibition and electron transport chain uncoupling. Curr...

  10. OXPHOS-Dependent Cells Identify Environmental Disruptors of Mitochondrial Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with numerous chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome. Environmental chemicals can impair mitochondrial function through numerous mechanisms such as membrane disruption, complex inhibition and electron transport chain uncoupling. Curr...

  11. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Supplementary Motor Area Proper: A Functional Connectivity Study of the Motor Network.

    PubMed

    Dinomais, Mickael; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Ricalens, Emmanuel; Aubé, Christophe; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Ter Minassian, Aram

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is a common feature of human functions. However, there are discrepancies in the literature about functional hemispheric asymmetries in the supplementary motor area (SMA), specifically in the posterior part (SMA-proper). We used resting state functional connectivity MRI to investigate the left-right asymmetries of the functional networks associated with primary motor cortex (M1) and SMA-proper using a "seed"-based correlation analysis in 30 healthy right-handed subjects. We showed that left M1 was more connected with areas involved in the motor system than right M1, and that right SMA-proper had more functional connections than its left counterpart. Our results are in agreement with a leftward asymmetry for M1 connectivity, whereas there is a rightward asymmetry of the SMA-proper connectivity.

  12. Cell cycle regulation of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; Fajas, Lluis

    2015-04-01

    Specific cellular functions, such as proliferation, survival, growth, or senescence, require a particular adaptive metabolic response, which is fine tuned by members of the cell cycle regulators families. Currently, proteins such as cyclins, CDKs, or E2Fs are being studied in the context of cell proliferation and survival, cell signaling, cell cycle regulation, and cancer. We show in this review that cellular, animal and molecular studies provided enough evidence to prove that these factors play, in addition, crucial roles in the control of mitochondrial function; finally resulting in a dual proliferative and metabolic response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. MITOCHONDRIAL DISEASES PART II: MOUSE MODELS OF OXPHOS DEFICIENCIES CAUSED BY DEFECTS IN REGULATORY FACTORS AND OTHER COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Iommarini, Luisa; Peralta, Susana; Torraco, Alessandra; Diaz, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are defined as defects that affect the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). They are characterized by a heterogeneous array of clinical presentations due in part to a wide variety of factors required for proper function of the components of the OXPHOS system. There is no cure for these disorders owing our poor knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms of disease. To understand the mechanisms of human disease numerous mouse models have been developed in recent years. Here we summarize the features of several mouse models of mitochondrial diseases directly related to those factors affecting mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, translation as well to other proteins that are involved in mitochondrial dynamics and quality control which affect mitochondrial OXPHOS function without been intrinsic components of the system. We discuss how these models have contributed to our understanding of mitochondrial diseases and their pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25640959

  14. Mitochondrial function and actin regulate dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Kurt J; Allan, Victoria J; Grierson, Andrew J; Sheetz, Michael P

    2005-04-12

    Mitochondria display a variety of shapes, ranging from small and spherical or the classical tubular shape to extended networks. Shape transitions occur frequently and include fusion, fission, and branching. It was reported that some mitochondrial shape transitions are developmentally regulated, whereas others were linked to disease or apoptosis. However, if and how mitochondrial function controls mitochondrial shape through regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion is unclear. Here, we show that inhibitors of electron transport, ATP synthase, or the permeability transition pore (mtPTP) induced reversible mitochondrial fission. Mitochondrial fission depended on dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) and F-actin: Disruption of F-actin attenuated fission and recruitment of DRP1 to mitochondria. In contrast, uncoupling of electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation caused mitochondria to adopt a distinct disk shape. This shape change was independent of the cytoskeleton and DRP1 and was most likely caused by swelling. Thus, disruption of mitochondrial function rapidly and reversibly altered mitochondrial shape either by activation of DRP1-dependent fission or by swelling, indicating a close relationship between mitochondrial fission, shape, and function. Furthermore, our results suggest that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in mitochondrial fission by facilitating mitochondrial recruitment of DRP1.

  15. The Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter: Structure, Function and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jyotsna; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen; O-Uchi, Jin; Csordás, György; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is crucial for an array of cellular functions while an imbalance can elicit cell death. In this chapter, we briefly reviewed the various modes of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and our current understanding of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis in regards to cell physiology and pathophysiology. Further, this chapter focuses on the molecular identities, intracellular regulators as well as the pharmacology of mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter complex. PMID:28194521

  16. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  17. Mitochondrial Respiration Controls Lysosomal Function during Inflammatory T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4(+) T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation, and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward proinflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD(+) levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bezafibrate improves mitochondrial function in the CNS of a mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Noe, Natalie; Dillon, Lloye; Lellek, Veronika; Diaz, Francisca; Hida, Aline; Moraes, Carlos T.; Wenz, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction frequently affects the central nervous system. Here, we investigated the effect of bezafibrate treatment on neuronal mitochondrial function and its impact on the progression of a mitochondrial encephalopathy. We used a murine model with a forebrain-specific cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by conditional deletion of the COX10 gene. In this mouse model, bezafibrate-administration improved the phenotype of the mice associated with an increase in mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial ATP generating capacity. Bezafibrate-treatment also attenuated astrogliosis and decreased the level of inflammatory markers in the affected tissues. Overall, bezafibrate had a neuroprotective effect in this mouse model of mitochondrial encephalopathy. These findings imply that bezafibrate might be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23261681

  19. Mitochondrial function is an inducible determinant of osmotic stress adaptation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Mar Martínez; Proft, Markus; Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo

    2009-10-30

    Hyperosmotic stress triggers a great variety of adaptive responses in eukaryotic cells that affect many different physiological functions. Here we investigate the role of the mitochondria during osmostress adaptation in budding yeast. Mitochondrial function is generally required for proper salt and osmotic stress adaptation because mutants with defects in many different mitochondrial components show hypersensitivity to increased NaCl and KCl concentrations. Mitochondrial protein abundance rapidly increases upon osmoshock in a selective manner, because it affects Calvin cycle enzymes (Sdh2 and Cit1) and components of the electron transport chain (Cox6) but not the ATP synthase complex (Atp5). Transcription of the SDH2, CIT1, and COX6 genes is severalfold induced within the first minutes of osmotic shock, dependent to various degree on the Hog1 and Snf1 protein kinases. Mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase enzyme activity is stimulated upon osmostress in a Snf1-dependent manner. The osmosensitivity of mitochondrial mutants is not caused by impaired stress-activated transcription or by a general depletion of the cellular ATP pool during osmostress. We finally show that the growth defect of mitochondrial mutants in high salt medium can be partially rescued by supplementation of glutathione. Additionally, mitochondrial defects cause the hyperaccumulation of reactive oxygen species during salt stress. Our results indicate that the antioxidant function of the mitochondria might play an important role in adaptation to hyperosmotic stress.

  20. Mitochondrial death functions of p53

    PubMed Central

    Marchenko, N D; Moll, U M

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor network plays a fundamental surveillance role in both homeostatic and adaptive cell biology. p53 is one of the most important barriers against malignant derailment of normal cells, orchestrating growth arrest, senescence, or cell death by linking many different pathways in response to genotoxic and non-genotoxic insults. p53 is the key broadband sensor for numerous cellular stresses such as DNA damage, hypoxia, oxidative stress, oncogenic signaling, and nucleolar stress. The crucial tumor suppressive and tissue homeostasis activity of p53 is its ability to activate cell death via multiple different pathways. A well-characterized biochemical function of p53 in the regulation of apoptosis is its role as a potent transcriptional regulator. p53 activates a panel of proapoptotic genes from the mitochondrial apoptotic and death receptor programs while repressing antiapoptotic Bcl2 family genes. In addition, over the last 10 y a growing body of evidence has also defined direct extranuclear non-transcriptional p53 activities within mitochondria-mediated cell death pathways that are based on p53 protein accumulation in cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments and protein-protein interactions. To date, transcription-independent p53-mediated cell death regulation has been described for apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. Because mitochondrial dysregulation is central to the development of a number of pathologic processes such as cancer and neurodegenerative and age-related diseases, understanding the direct roles of p53 protein in mitochondria has high translational impact and could facilitate the development of novel drug targets to combat these diseases. In this review we will mainly focus on mechanisms of p53-mediated transcription-independent cell death pathways at mitochondria. PMID:27308326

  1. New insights into the function and regulation of mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Otera, Hidenori; Ishihara, Naotada; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondrial morphology changes dynamically by coordinated fusion and fission and cytoskeleton-based transport. Cycles of outer and inner membrane fusion and fission are required for the exchange of damaged mitochondrial genome DNA, proteins, and lipids with those of healthy mitochondria to maintain robust mitochondrial structure and function. These dynamics are crucial for cellular life and death, because they are essential for cellular development and homeostasis, as well as apoptosis. Disruption of these functions leads to cellular dysfunction, resulting in neurologic disorders and metabolic diseases. The cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1 plays a key role in mitochondrial fission, while Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1 are involved in fusion reaction. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the regulation and physiologic relevance of Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission: the initial recruitment and assembly of Drp1 on the mitochondrial fission foci, regulation of Drp1 activity by post-translational modifications, and the role of mitochondrial fission in cell pathophysiology.

  2. Proteasome Modulates Mitochondrial Function During Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Claudio A.; Perez, Viviana I.

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome plays fundamental roles in the removal of oxidized proteins and in the normal degradation of short-lived proteins. Previously we have provided evidences that the impairment in proteasome observed during the replicative senescence of human fibroblasts has significant effects on MAPK signaling, proliferation, life span, senescent phenotype and protein oxidative status. These studies have demonstrated that proteasome inhibition and replicative senescence caused accumulation of intracellular protein carbonyl content. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms by which proteasome dysfunction modulates protein oxidation during cellular senescence. The results indicate that proteasome inhibition during replicative senescence have significant effects on the intra and extracellular ROS production in vitro. The data also show that ROS impaired the proteasome function, which is partially reversible by antioxidants. Increases in ROS after proteasome inhibition correlated with a significant negative effect on the activity of most mitochondrial electron transporters. We propose that failures in proteasome during cellular senescence lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production and oxidative stress. Furthermore, it is likely that changes in proteasome dynamics could generate a pro-oxidative condition at the immediate extracellular microenvironment that could cause tissue injury during aging, in vivo. PMID:17976388

  3. Lysosphingolipids and mitochondrial function. II. Deleterious effects of sphingosylphosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Strasberg, P M; Callahan, J W

    1988-12-01

    Psychosine, sphingosylphosphorylcholine (52-104 microM), and other glycosphingolipids stimulate mitochondrial respiration (up to 500%) and inhibit oxidative phosphorylation to varying degrees. Above 104 microM these functions as well as uptake of Ca2+ are prevented. At 104 microM sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits the mitochondrial ATPase reaction in submitochondrial particles by 48%. Both sphingosylphosphorylcholine and psychosine enhance the active phosphate-dependent swelling of mitochondria. Passive swelling occurs in the presence of rotenone (when swelling does not normally occur) and under hypotonic conditions. A direct interaction of sphingosylphosphorylcholine with membranes is demonstrated by a discharge of the proton gradient across mitochondrial membranes, hemolysis of red blood cells, and binding to inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. Thus lysosphingolipids bind strongly to mitochondrial membranes and markedly alter mitochondrial function. This alteration would affect the ATP levels, thereby altering a wide range of ATP-dependent cellular functions. These results offer a partial explanation for the pathogenesis of representative lysosomal storage diseases.

  4. Upstream Pathways Controlling Mitochondrial Function in Major Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Pan, Alexander Yongshuai; da Silva, Tatiane Morgana; Duong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is commonly observed in bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) and may be a central feature of psychosis. These illnesses are complex and heterogeneous, which is reflected by the complexity of the processes regulating mitochondrial function. Mitochondria are typically associated with energy production; however, dysfunction of mitochondria affects not only energy production but also vital cellular processes, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, cell cycle and survival, intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and neurotransmission. In this review, we characterize the upstream components controlling mitochondrial function, including 1) mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, 2) mitochondrial dynamics, and 3) intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Characterizing and understanding the upstream factors that regulate mitochondrial function is essential to understand progression of these illnesses and develop biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:27310240

  5. Intermittent hypoxia protects cerebral mitochondrial function from calcium overload.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Liao, Weigong; Gao, Wenxiang; Huang, Jian; Gao, Yuqi

    2013-12-01

    Hypoxia leads to Ca(2+) overload and results in mitochondrial uncoupling, decreased ATP synthesis, and neuronal death. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload protects mitochondrial function after hypoxia. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial tolerance to Ca(2+) overload. Wistar rats were divided into control and intermittent hypoxia (IH) groups. The IH group was subject to hypoxia for 4 h daily in a hypobaric cabin (5,000 m) for 7 days. Brain mitochondria were isolated on day 7 following hypoxia. The baseline mitochondrial functions, such as ST3, ST4, and respiratory control ratio (RCR = ST3/ST4), were measured using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide concentrations were measured by HPLC. Mitochondrial membrane potential was determined by measuring rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) fluorescence in the absence and presence of high Ca(2+) concentration (0.1 M), which simulates Ca(2+) overload. Our results revealed that IH did not affect mitochondrial respiratory functions, but led to a reduction in AMP and an increase in ADP concentrations in mitochondria. Both control and IH groups demonstrated decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of high Ca(2+) (0.1 M), while the IH group showed a relative higher mitochondrial membrane potential. These results indicated that the neuroprotective effect of intermittent hypoxia was resulted partly from preserving mitochondrial membrane potential, and increasing mitochondrial tolerance to high calcium levels. The increased ADP and decreased AMP in mitochondria following intermittent hypoxia may be a mechanism underlying this protection.

  6. Complex I function in mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Lenaz, Giorgio; Tioli, Gaia; Falasca, Anna Ida; Genova, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the functional properties of mitochondrial Complex I originating from its presence in an assembled form as a supercomplex comprising Complex III and Complex IV in stoichiometric ratios. In particular several lines of evidence are presented favouring the concept that electron transfer from Complex I to Complex III is operated by channelling of electrons through Coenzyme Q molecules bound to the supercomplex, in contrast with the hypothesis that the transfer of reducing equivalents from Complex I to Complex III occurs via random diffusion of the Coenzyme Q molecules in the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, another property provided by the supercomplex assembly is the control of generation of reactive oxygen species by Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  7. Cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis in endotoxemia is not accompanied by mitochondrial function recovery.

    PubMed

    Vanasco, Virginia; Saez, Trinidad; Magnani, Natalia D; Pereyra, Leonardo; Marchini, Timoteo; Corach, Alejandra; Vaccaro, María Inés; Corach, Daniel; Evelson, Pablo; Alvarez, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis emerges as a compensatory mechanism involved in the recovery process in endotoxemia and sepsis. The aim of this work was to analyze the time course of the cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis process occurring during endotoxemia, with emphasis on the quantitative analysis of mitochondrial function. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (45 days old) were ip injected with LPS (10 mg/kg). Measurements were performed at 0-24 h after LPS administration. PGC-1α and mtTFA expression for biogenesis and p62 and LC3 expression for autophagy were analyzed by Western blot; mitochondrial DNA levels by qPCR, and mitochondrial morphology by transmission electron microscopy. Mitochondrial function was evaluated as oxygen consumption and respiratory chain complex activity. PGC-1α and mtTFA expression significantly increased in every time point analyzed, and mitochondrial mass was increased by 20% (P<0.05) at 24 h. p62 expression was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner. LC3-II expression was significantly increased at all time points analyzed. Ultrastructurally, mitochondria displayed several abnormalities (internal vesicles, cristae disruption, and swelling) at 6 and 18 h. Structures compatible with fusion/fission processes were observed at 24 h. A significant decrease in state 3 respiration was observed in every time point analyzed (LPS 6h: 20%, P<0.05). Mitochondrial complex I activity was found decreased by 30% in LPS-treated animals at 6 and 24h. Complex II and complex IV showed decreased activity only at 24 h. The present results show that partial restoration of cardiac mitochondrial architecture is not accompanied by improvement of mitochondrial function in acute endotoxemia. The key implication of our study is that cardiac failure due to bioenergetic dysfunction will be overcome by therapeutic interventions aimed to restore cardiac mitochondrial function.

  8. Hydroxytyrosol promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiejie; Shen, Weili; Yu, Guangli; Jia, Haiqun; Li, Xuesen; Feng, Zhihui; Wang, Ying; Weber, Peter; Wertz, Karin; Sharman, Edward; Liu, Jiankang

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) in extra-virgin olive oil is considered one of the most important polyphenolic compounds responsible for the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet for lowering incidence of cardiovascular disease, the most common and most serious complication of diabetes. We propose that HT may prevent these diseases by a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis that leads to enhancement of mitochondrial function and cellular defense systems. In the present study, we investigated effects of HT that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and promote mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. HT over the concentration range of 0.1-10 micromol/L stimulated the promoter transcriptional activation and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1 alpha, the central factor for mitochondrial biogenesis) and its downstream targets; these included nuclear respiration factors 1 and 2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, which leads to an increase in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the number of mitochondria. Knockdown of Ppargc1 alpha by siRNA blocked HT's stimulating effect on Complex I expression and mtDNA copy number. The HT treatment resulted in an enhancement of mitochondrial function, including an increase in activity and protein expression of Mitochondrial Complexes I, II, III and V; increased oxygen consumption; and a decrease in free fatty acid contents in the adipocytes. The mechanistic study of the PPARGC1 alpha activation signaling pathway demonstrated that HT is an activator of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase and also up-regulates gene expression of PPAR alpha, CPT-1 and PPAR gamma. These data suggest that HT is able to promote mitochondrial function by stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sulforaphane is anticonvulsant and improves mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Borges, Karin

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway (Nrf2) has been previously identified to protect the brain against various impacts. Here, we investigated the effect of the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane in various seizure models and hippocampal mitochondrial bioenergetics. We found that daily injections of sulforaphane for 5 days elevated the seizure thresholds to 6 Hz stimulation and fluorothyl-, but not pentylenetetrazole-induced tonic seizures and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, sulforaphane increased the antioxidant defences within hippocampal formations and blood plasma. In addition, sulforaphane treatment reduced the extent of hippocampal lipid peroxidation 24 h post-SE and protected hippocampal mitochondria against SE-induced reduction in state 2 and uncoupler-stimulated state 3 respiration. SE-mediated partial loss of rotenone-sensitive and complex II-driven respiration was reduced, consistent with the enhanced activities of complexes I and II in sulforaphane-treated SE mice. In mitochondria isolated from both no SE and SE mice, sulforaphane increased state 3 respiration and respiration linked to ATP synthesis, which may contribute to its anticonvulsant and antioxidant effects by providing more ATP for cellular vital and protective functions. However, sulforaphane did not prevent SE-induced hippocampal cell death. In conclusion, sulforaphane and/or Nrf2 activation are viable anticonvulsant strategies, which are antioxidant and enhance mitochondrial function, especially the ability to produce ATP. Sulforaphane was anticonvulsant in two acute mouse models of epilepsy and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). We also found antioxidant effects of sulforaphane in mouse plasma and hippocampal formations, exhibited by increased catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as increased abilities of hippocampal mitochondria to produce ATP. These effects likely underlie

  10. GPA protects the nigrostriatal dopamine system by enhancing mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Tamas L.; Erion, Derek M.; Elsworth, John D.; Roth, Robert H.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Andrews, Zane B.

    2012-01-01

    Guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) increases AMPK activity, mitochondrial function and biogenesis in muscle and improves physiological function, for example during aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Here we tested whether GPA prevents neurodegeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system in MPTP-treated mice. Mice were fed a diet of 1% GPA or normal chow for 4 weeks and then treated with either MPTP or saline. Indices of nigrostriatal function were examined by HPLC, immunohistochemistry, stereology, electron microscopy and mitochondrial respiration. MPTP intoxication decreased TH neurons in the SNpc of normal chow-fed mice, however GPA-fed mice remarkably exhibited no loss of TH neurons in the SNpc. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine of both normal chow- and GPA-fed mice, although this effect was significantly attenuated in GPA-fed mice. GPA-fed mice showed increased AMPK activity, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial number in nigrostriatal TH neurons, suggesting the neuroprotective effects of GPA involved AMPK-dependent increases in mitochondrial function and biogenesis. MPTP treatment produced a decrease in mitochondrial number and volume in normal chow-fed mice but not GPA-fed mice. Our results show the neuroprotective properties of GPA in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease are partially mediated by AMPK and mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common problem in neurodegeneration and thus GPA may slow disease progression in other models of neurodegeneration. PMID:21406233

  11. GPA protects the nigrostriatal dopamine system by enhancing mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Tamas L; Erion, Derek M; Elsworth, John D; Roth, Robert H; Shulman, Gerald I; Andrews, Zane B

    2011-07-01

    Guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) increases AMPK activity, mitochondrial function and biogenesis in muscle and improves physiological function, for example during aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Here we tested whether GPA prevents neurodegeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system in MPTP-treated mice. Mice were fed a diet of 1% GPA or normal chow for 4 weeks and then treated with either MPTP or saline. Indices of nigrostriatal function were examined by HPLC, immunohistochemistry, stereology, electron microscopy and mitochondrial respiration. MPTP intoxication decreased TH neurons in the SNpc of normal chow-fed mice; however GPA-fed mice remarkably exhibited no loss of TH neurons in the SNpc. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine of both normal chow- and GPA-fed mice, although this effect was significantly attenuated in GPA-fed mice. GPA-fed mice showed increased AMPK activity, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial number in nigrostriatal TH neurons, suggesting that the neuroprotective effects of GPA involved AMPK-dependent increases in mitochondrial function and biogenesis. MPTP treatment produced a decrease in mitochondrial number and volume in normal chow-fed mice but not GPA-fed mice. Our results show the neuroprotective properties of GPA in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease are partially mediated by AMPK and mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common problem in neurodegeneration and thus GPA may slow disease progression in other models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Part II--IEPS Reports. The proper function of teaching hospitals within health systems.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The main points of the discussions from the international seminar organised by the World Health Organisation and the Institute for the Study of Health Policies (IEPS) were published in French by Flammarion Medecine-Sciences in the Collection entitled "The IEPS Reports" and in English by the WHO under the title "The Proper Function of Teaching Hospitals within Health Systems" (1995).

  13. Kif5 regulates mitochondrial movement, morphology, function and neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Iworima, Diepiriye G; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2016-04-01

    Due to the unique architecture of neurons, trafficking of mitochondria throughout processes to regions of high energetic demand is critical to sustain neuronal health. It has been suggested that compromised mitochondrial trafficking may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated the consequences of disrupted kif5c-mediated mitochondrial trafficking on mitochondrial form and function in primary rat cortical neurons. Morphological changes in mitochondria appeared to be due to remodelling, a phenomenon distinct from mitochondrial fission, which resulted in punctate-shaped mitochondria. We also demonstrated that neurons displaying punctate mitochondria exhibited relatively decreased ROS and increased cellular ATP levels using ROS-sensitive GFP and ATP FRET probes, respectively. Somewhat unexpectedly, neurons overexpressing the dominant negative form of kif5c exhibited enhanced survival following excitotoxicity, suggesting that the impairment of mitochondrial trafficking conferred some form of neuroprotection. However, when neurons were exposed to H2O2, disruption of kif5c exacerbated cell death indicating that the effect on cell viability was dependent on the mode of toxicity. Our results suggest a novel role of kif5c. In addition to mediating mitochondrial transport, kif5c plays a role in the mechanism of regulating mitochondrial morphology. Our results also suggest that kif5c mediated mitochondrial dynamics may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function and in turn cellular health. Moreover, our studies demonstrate an interesting interplay between the regulation of mitochondrial motility and morphology.

  14. Regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function: genes to proteins.

    PubMed

    Lanza, I R; Sreekumaran Nair, K

    2010-08-01

    The impact of ageing on mitochondrial function and the deterministic role of mitochondria on senescence continue to be topics of vigorous debate. Many studies report that skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and function are reduced with ageing and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. However, an accumulating body of literature suggests that physical inactivity typical of ageing may be a more important determinant of mitochondrial function than chronological age, per se. Reports of age-related declines in mitochondrial function have spawned a vast body of literature devoted to understanding the underlying mechanisms. These mechanisms include decreased abundance of mtDNA, reduced mRNA levels, as well as decreased synthesis and expression of mitochondrial proteins, ultimately resulting in decreased function of the whole organelle. Effective therapies to prevent, reverse or delay the onset of the aforementioned mitochondrial changes, regardless of their inevitability or precise underlying causes, require an intimate understanding of the processes that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, which necessitates the coordinated regulation of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Herein we review the current thinking on regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by transcription factors and transcriptional co-activators and the role of hormones and exercise in initiating this process. We review how exercise may help preserve mitochondrial content and functionality across the lifespan, and how physical inactivity is emerging as a major determinant of many age-associated changes at the level of the mitochondrion. We also review evidence that some mitochondrial changes with ageing are independent of exercise or physical activity and appear to be inevitable consequences of old age.

  15. Resistance Exercise Training Alters Mitochondrial Function in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Reidy, Paul T; Bhattarai, Nisha; Sidossis, Labros S; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2015-09-01

    Loss of mitochondrial competency is associated with several chronic illnesses. Therefore, strategies that maintain or increase mitochondrial function will likely be of benefit in numerous clinical settings. Endurance exercise has long been known to increase mitochondrial function in the skeletal muscle. Comparatively little is known regarding the effect of resistance exercise training (RET) on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of chronic resistance training on skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity and function. Here, we studied the effect of a 12-wk RET program on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in 11 young healthy men. Muscle biopsies were collected before and after the 12-wk training program, and mitochondrial respiratory capacity was determined in permeabilized myofibers by high-resolution respirometry. RET increased lean body mass and quadriceps muscle strength by 4% and 15%, respectively (P < 0.001). Coupled mitochondrial respiration supported by complex I, and complex I and II substrates increased by 2- and 1.4-fold, respectively (P < 0.01). The ratio of coupled complex I-supported respiration to maximal respiration increased with RET (P < 0.05), as did complex I protein abundance (P < 0.05), whereas the substrate control ratio for succinate was reduced after RET (P < 0.001). Transcripts responsible for proteins critical to electron transfer and NAD production increased with training (P < 0.05), whereas transcripts involved in mitochondrial biogenesis were unaltered. Collectively, 12 wk of RET resulted in qualitative and quantitative changes in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. This adaptation was accompanied by modest changes in mitochondrial proteins and transcript expression. RET seems to be a means to augment the respiratory capacity and intrinsic function of skeletal muscle mitochondria.

  16. Caveolin-1 controls mitochondrial function through regulation of m-AAA mitochondrial protease

    PubMed Central

    Volonte, Daniela; Liu, Zhongmin; Shiva, Sruti; Galbiati, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial proteases ensure mitochondrial integrity and function after oxidative stress by providing mitochondrial protein quality control. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate this basic biological function in eukaryotic cells remain largely unknown. Caveolin-1 is a scaffolding protein involved in signal transduction. We find that AFG3L2, a m-AAA type of mitochondrial protease, is a novel caveolin-1-interacting protein in vitro. We show that oxidative stress promotes the translocation of both caveolin-1 and AFG3L2 to mitochondria, enhances the interaction of caveolin-1 with AFG3L2 in mitochondria and stimulates mitochondrial protease activity in wild-type fibroblasts. Localization of AFG3L2 to mitochondria after oxidative stress is inhibited in fibroblasts lacking caveolin-1, which results in impaired mitochondrial protein quality control, an oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis switch and reduced ATP production. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that a lack of caveolin-1 does not alter either mitochondrial number or morphology but leads to the cytoplasmic and proteasome-dependent degradation of complexes I, III, IV and V upon oxidant stimulation. Restoration of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in caveolin-1 null fibroblasts reverts the enhanced glycolysis observed in these cells. Expression of a mutant form of AFG3L2, which has reduced affinity for caveolin-1, fails to localize to mitochondria and promotes degradation of complex IV after oxidative stress. Thus, caveolin-1 maintains mitochondrial integrity and function when cells are challenged with free radicals by promoting the mitochondrial localization of m-AAA protease and its quality control functions. PMID:27705926

  17. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function.

  18. Induction of Posttranslational Modifications of Mitochondrial Proteins by ATP Contributes to Negative Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Zhiyun; Ke, Bilun; Wan, Lin; Wang, Hui; Ye, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that ATP regulates mitochondrial function through the AMPK signaling pathway. However, the AMPK-independent pathway remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated ATP surplus in the negative regulation of mitochondrial function with a focus on pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation and protein acetylation. PDH phosphorylation was induced by a high fat diet in the liver of obese mice, which was associated with ATP elevation. In 1c1c7 hepatoma cells, the phosphorylation was induced by palmitate treatment through induction of ATP production. The phosphorylation was associated with a reduction in mitochondria oxygen consumption after 4 h treatment. The palmitate effect was blocked by etomoxir, which inhibited ATP production through suppression of fatty acid β-oxidation. The PDH phosphorylation was induced by incubation of mitochondrial lysate with ATP in vitro without altering the expression of PDH kinase 2 (PDK2) and 4 (PDK4). In addition, acetylation of multiple mitochondrial proteins was induced by ATP in the same conditions. Acetyl-CoA exhibited a similar activity to ATP in induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation. These data suggest that ATP elevation may inhibit mitochondrial function through induction of the phosphorylation and acetylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results suggest an AMPK-independent mechanism for ATP regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:26930489

  19. Mitochondrial genome acquisition restores respiratory function and tumorigenic potential of cancer cells without mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, An S; Baty, James W; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Endaya, Berwini; Goodwin, Jacob; Bajzikova, Martina; Kovarova, Jaromira; Peterka, Martin; Yan, Bing; Pesdar, Elham Alizadeh; Sobol, Margarita; Filimonenko, Anatolyj; Stuart, Shani; Vondrusova, Magdalena; Kluckova, Katarina; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Rohlena, Jakub; Hozak, Pavel; Truksa, Jaroslav; Eccles, David; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R; Neuzil, Jiri; Berridge, Michael V

    2015-01-06

    We report that tumor cells without mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) show delayed tumor growth, and that tumor formation is associated with acquisition of mtDNA from host cells. This leads to partial recovery of mitochondrial function in cells derived from primary tumors grown from cells without mtDNA and a shorter lag in tumor growth. Cell lines from circulating tumor cells showed further recovery of mitochondrial respiration and an intermediate lag to tumor growth, while cells from lung metastases exhibited full restoration of respiratory function and no lag in tumor growth. Stepwise assembly of mitochondrial respiratory (super)complexes was correlated with acquisition of respiratory function. Our findings indicate horizontal transfer of mtDNA from host cells in the tumor microenvironment to tumor cells with compromised respiratory function to re-establish respiration and tumor-initiating efficacy. These results suggest pathophysiological processes for overcoming mtDNA damage and support the notion of high plasticity of malignant cells.

  20. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yajin; Dong, Yuan; Cheng, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU)—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28208618

  1. Mitochondrial function as a therapeutic target in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David A.; Perry, Justin B.; Allen, Mitchell E.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Cleland, John G. F.; Colucci, Wilson S.; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A.; Anker, Stefan D.; Pitt, Bertram; Pieske, Burkert; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greene, Stephen J.; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is a pressing worldwide public-health problem with millions of patients having worsening heart failure. Despite all the available therapies, the condition carries a very poor prognosis. Existing therapies provide symptomatic and clinical benefit, but do not fully address molecular abnormalities that occur in cardiomyocytes. This shortcoming is particularly important given that most patients with heart failure have viable dysfunctional myocardium, in which an improvement or normalization of function might be possible. Although the pathophysiology of heart failure is complex, mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be an important target for therapy to improve cardiac function directly. Mitochondrial abnormalities include impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, shifted metabolic substrate utilization, aberrant mitochondrial dynamics, and altered ion homeostasis. In this Consensus Statement, insights into the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure are presented, along with an overview of emerging treatments with the potential to improve the function of the failing heart by targeting mitochondria. PMID:28004807

  2. Impaired Mitochondrial Function and Dynamics in the Pathogenesis of FXTAS.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Mora, M I; Rodriguez-Revenga, L; Madrigal, I; Guitart-Mampel, M; Garrabou, G; Milà, M

    2016-10-22

    Mitochondrial involvement plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. At least one-third of adult carriers of a FMR1 premutation (55-200 CGG repeats) are at risk of presenting an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder known as fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). In an attempt to provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of FXTAS, we characterized mitochondrial function and dynamics by the assessment of oxidative respiratory chain function, mitochondrial content, oxidative stress levels, and mitochondrial network complexity. Regarding mitochondrial function, we found that mitochondrial respiratory capacity is compromised in skin fibroblasts whereas in blood, no differences were observed between the FXTAS and control groups. Furthermore, fibroblasts from FXTAS patients presented altered mitochondrial architecture, with more circular and less interconnected mitochondria being observed. Mitochondrial function and dynamics deregulation and characteristic of neurological disorders are present in FXTAS patients. These features might be limiting temporal and spatial bioenergetics cells supply and thus contributing to disease pathogenesis.

  3. Effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cano-Ramírez, D; Torres-Vargas, C E; Guerrero-Castillo, S; Uribe-Carvajal, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Pedraza-Chaverri, J; Orozco-Ibarra, M

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enhances the neural vulnerability to excitotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro through an unknown mechanism possibly related to mitochondrial failure. However, as the effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in brain has not been studied, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of glycolysis inhibition induced by iodoacetate on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in brain. Mitochondria were isolated from brain cortex, striatum and cerebellum of rats treated systemically with iodoacetate (25 mg/kg/day for 3 days). Oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis, transmembrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, lipoperoxidation, glutathione levels, and aconitase activity were assessed. Oxygen consumption and aconitase activity decreased in the brain cortex and striatum, showing that glycolysis inhibition did not trigger severe mitochondrial impairment, but a slight mitochondrial malfunction and oxidative stress were present.

  4. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  5. Functional dissociation of pre-SMA and SMA-proper in temporal processing.

    PubMed

    Schwartze, Michael; Rothermich, Kathrin; Kotz, Sonja A

    2012-03-01

    The ability to assess temporal structure is crucial in order to adapt to an ever-changing environment. Increasing evidence suggests that the supplementary motor area (SMA) is involved in both sensory and sensorimotor processing of temporal structure. However, it is not entirely clear whether the structural differentiation of the SMA translates into functional specialization, and how the SMA relates to other systems that engage in temporal processing, namely the cerebellum and cortico-striatal circuits. Anatomically, the SMA comprises at least two subareas, the rostral pre-SMA and the caudal SMA-proper. Each displays a characteristic pattern of connections to motor and non-motor structures. Crucially, these connections establish a potential hub among cerebellar and cortico-striatal systems, possibly forming a dedicated subcortico-cortical temporal processing network. To further explore the functional role of each SMA subarea, we performed a meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies by contrasting activations according to whether they linked with either sensory, sensorimotor, sequential, non-sequential, explicit, non-explicit, subsecond, or suprasecond temporal processing. This procedure yielded a set of functional differences, which mirror the rostro-caudal anatomical dimension. Activations associated with sensory, non-sequential, and suprasecond temporal processing tend to locate to the rostral SMA, while the opposite is true for the caudal SMA. These findings confirm a functional dissociation of pre-SMA and SMA-proper in temporal processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting the mitochondrial genome via a dual function MITO-Porter: evaluation of mtDNA levels and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with certain types of mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in the occurrence of a variety of human diseases. For an effective mitochondrial gene therapy, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents to the innermost mitochondrial space (the mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We recently developed a MITO-Porter, a liposome-based nano-carrier that delivers cargo to mitochondria via a membrane-fusion mechanism. Using propidium iodide, as a probe to detect mtDNA, we were able to confirm that the MITO-Porter delivered cargoes to mitochondrial matrices in living cells. More recently, we constructed a Dual Function (DF)-MITO-Porter, a liposome-based nanocarrier for mitochondrial delivery via a stepwise process. In this chapter, we describe the methodology used to deliver bioactive molecules to the mitochondrial matrix using the above DF-MITO-Porter, and the evaluation of mtDNA levels and mitochondrial activities in living cells.

  7. Altered Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Proteome As the Basis of Disruption of Mitochondrial Function in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zabielski, Piotr; Lanza, Ian R.; Gopala, Srinivas; Holtz Heppelmann, Carrie J.; Bergen, H. Robert; Dasari, Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin plays pivotal role in cellular fuel metabolism in skeletal muscle. Despite being the primary site of energy metabolism, the underlying mechanism on how insulin deficiency deranges skeletal muscle mitochondrial physiology remains to be fully understood. Here we report an important link between altered skeletal muscle proteome homeostasis and mitochondrial physiology during insulin deficiency. Deprivation of insulin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice decreased mitochondrial ATP production, reduced coupling and phosphorylation efficiency, and increased oxidant emission in skeletal muscle. Proteomic survey revealed that the mitochondrial derangements during insulin deficiency were related to increased mitochondrial protein degradation and decreased protein synthesis, resulting in reduced abundance of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and β-oxidation. However, a paradoxical upregulation of proteins involved in cellular uptake of fatty acids triggered an accumulation of incomplete fatty acid oxidation products in skeletal muscle. These data implicate a mismatch of β-oxidation and fatty acid uptake as a mechanism leading to increased oxidative stress in diabetes. This notion was supported by elevated oxidative stress in cultured myotubes exposed to palmitate in the presence of a β-oxidation inhibitor. Together, these results indicate that insulin deficiency alters the balance of proteins involved in fatty acid transport and oxidation in skeletal muscle, leading to impaired mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. PMID:26718503

  8. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  9. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  10. Functional role of mitochondrial respiratory supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Genova, Maria Luisa; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2014-04-01

    Recent experimental evidence has replaced the random diffusion model of electron transfer with a model of supramolecular organisation based upon specific interactions between individual respiratory complexes. These supercomplexes were found to be functionally relevant by flux control analysis and to confer a kinetic advantage to NAD-linked respiration (channelling). However, the Coenzyme Q pool is still required for FAD-linked oxidations and for the proper equilibrium with Coenzyme Q bound in the supercomplex. Channelling in the cytochrome c region probably also occurs but does not seem to confer a particular kinetic advantage. The supramolecular association of individual complexes strongly depends on membrane lipid amount and composition and is affected by lipid peroxidation; it also seems to be modulated by membrane potential and protein phosphorylation. Additional properties of supercomplexes are stabilisation of Complex I, as evidenced by the destabilising effect on Complex I of mutations in either Complex III or IV, and prevention of excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. The dynamic character of the supercomplexes allows their involvement in metabolic adaptations and in control of cellular signalling pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Dynamic and ultrastructure of bioenergetic membranes and their components.

  11. Adenine Nucleotide Translocator as a Regulator of Mitochondrial Function: Implication in the Pathogenesis of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Hee; Koh, Eun Hee; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria play key roles in energy production and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Lines of evidence have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome. The causes of mitochondrial dysfunction are complex, but overnutrition and sedentary living are among the best known causes of mitochondrial dysfunction. ATP synthesized in the mitochondria is exchanged for cytosolic ADP by adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) to provide a continuous supply of ADP to mitochondria. We recently found that ANT function is essential for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α)'s action on endothelial cells. PGC-1α is a transcriptional coactivator of nuclear receptors, playing an important role in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis. Recent studies have shown that PGC-1α decreases intracellular ROS generation by increasing the expression of antioxidant genes. In our study, PGC-1α reduced cell apoptosis and ROS generation in endothelial cells by increasing ATP/ADP translocase activity of ANT and ANT1 expression. Here we review the role of ANT in maintaining proper mitochondrial function, and possible role of ANT dysfunction in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. PMID:20617074

  12. Regulation of mitochondrial function and endoplasmic reticulum stress by nitric oxide in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Terron-Bautista, José; Beltrán-Povea, Amparo; Cahuana, Gladys M; Soria, Bernat; Nabil, Hajji; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2017-02-26

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are global processes that are interrelated and regulated by several stress factors. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional biomolecule with many varieties of physiological and pathological functions, such as the regulation of cytochrome c inhibition and activation of the immune response, ERS and DNA damage; these actions are dose-dependent. It has been reported that in embryonic stem cells, NO has a dual role, controlling differentiation, survival and pluripotency, but the molecular mechanisms by which it modulates these functions are not yet known. Low levels of NO maintain pluripotency and induce mitochondrial biogenesis. It is well established that NO disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain and causes changes in mitochondrial Ca(2+) flux that induce ERS. Thus, at high concentrations, NO becomes a potential differentiation agent due to the relationship between ERS and the unfolded protein response in many differentiated cell lines. Nevertheless, many studies have demonstrated the need for physiological levels of NO for a proper ERS response. In this review, we stress the importance of the relationships between NO levels, ERS and mitochondrial dysfunction that control stem cell fate as a new approach to possible cell therapy strategies.

  13. Regulation of mitochondrial function and endoplasmic reticulum stress by nitric oxide in pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Terron-Bautista, José; Beltrán-Povea, Amparo; Cahuana, Gladys M; Soria, Bernat; Nabil, Hajji; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are global processes that are interrelated and regulated by several stress factors. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional biomolecule with many varieties of physiological and pathological functions, such as the regulation of cytochrome c inhibition and activation of the immune response, ERS and DNA damage; these actions are dose-dependent. It has been reported that in embryonic stem cells, NO has a dual role, controlling differentiation, survival and pluripotency, but the molecular mechanisms by which it modulates these functions are not yet known. Low levels of NO maintain pluripotency and induce mitochondrial biogenesis. It is well established that NO disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain and causes changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ flux that induce ERS. Thus, at high concentrations, NO becomes a potential differentiation agent due to the relationship between ERS and the unfolded protein response in many differentiated cell lines. Nevertheless, many studies have demonstrated the need for physiological levels of NO for a proper ERS response. In this review, we stress the importance of the relationships between NO levels, ERS and mitochondrial dysfunction that control stem cell fate as a new approach to possible cell therapy strategies. PMID:28289506

  14. Mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity: A new role for mitochondrial function in aging

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Shauna; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are principal regulators of cellular function and metabolism through production of ATP for energy homeostasis, maintenance of calcium homeostasis, regulation of apoptosis and fatty acid oxidation to provide acetyl CoA for fueling the electron transport chain. In addition, mitochondria play a key role in cell signaling through production of reactive oxygen species that modulate redox signaling. Recent findings support an additional mechanism for control of cellular and tissue function by mitochondria through complex mitochondrial–nuclear communication mechanisms and potentially through extracellular release of mitochondrial components that can act as signaling molecules. The activation of stress responses including mitophagy, mitochondrial number, fission and fusion events, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRMT) requires mitochondrial–nuclear communication for the transcriptional activation of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial quality control and metabolism. The induction of these signaling pathways is a shared feature in long-lived organisms spanning from yeast to mice. As a result, the role of mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity has been expansively studied. Current and exciting studies provide evidence that mitochondria can also signal among tissues to up-regulate cytoprotective activities to promote healthy aging. Alternatively, mitochondria release signals to modulate innate immunity and systemic inflammatory responses and could consequently promote inflammation during aging. In this review, established and emerging models of mitochondrial stress response pathways and their potential role in modulating longevity are discussed. PMID:25180170

  15. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-07-15

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria.

  16. Mitochondrial cereblon functions as a Lon-type protease

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Nakamura, China; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Lon protease plays a major role in the protein quality control system in mammalian cell mitochondria. It is present in the mitochondrial matrix, and degrades oxidized and misfolded proteins, thereby protecting the cell from various extracellular stresses, including oxidative stress. The intellectual disability-associated and thalidomide-binding protein cereblon (CRBN) contains a large, highly conserved Lon domain. However, whether CRBN has Lon protease-like function remains unknown. Here, we determined if CRBN has a protective function against oxidative stress, similar to Lon protease. We report that CRBN partially distributes in mitochondria, suggesting it has a mitochondrial function. To specify the mitochondrial role of CRBN, we mitochondrially expressed CRBN in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The resulting stable SH-SY5Y cell line showed no apparent effect on the mitochondrial functions of fusion, fission, and membrane potential. However, mitochondrially expressed CRBN exhibited protease activity, and was induced by oxidative stress. In addition, stably expressed cells exhibited suppressed neuronal cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide. These results suggest that CRBN functions specifically as a Lon-type protease in mitochondria. PMID:27417535

  17. Desmin Cytoskeleton Linked to Muscle Mitochondrial Distribution and Respiratory Function

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Derek J.; Mavroidis, Manolis; Weisleder, Noah; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies have previously suggested potential association of intermediate filaments (IFs) with mitochondria. Thus, we have investigated mitochondrial distribution and function in muscle lacking the IF protein desmin. Immunostaining of skeletal muscle tissue sections, as well as histochemical staining for the mitochondrial marker enzymes cytochrome C oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase, demonstrate abnormal accumulation of subsarcolemmal clumps of mitochondria in predominantly slow twitch skeletal muscle of desmin-null mice. Ultrastructural observation of desmin-null cardiac muscle demonstrates in addition to clumping, extensive mitochondrial proliferation in a significant fraction of the myocytes, particularly after work overload. These alterations are frequently associated with swelling and degeneration of the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial abnormalities can be detected very early, before other structural defects become obvious. To investigate related changes in mitochondrial function, we have analyzed ADP-stimulated respiration of isolated muscle mitochondria, and ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration in situ using saponin skinned muscle fibers. The in vitro maximal rates of respiration in isolated cardiac mitochondria from desmin-null and wild-type mice were similar. However, mitochondrial respiration in situ is significantly altered in desmin-null muscle. Both the maximal rate of ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption and the dissociation constant (Km) for ADP are significantly reduced in desmin-null cardiac and soleus muscle compared with controls. Respiratory parameters for desmin-null fast twitch gastrocnemius muscle were unaffected. Additionally, respiratory measurements in the presence of creatine indicate that coupling of creatine kinase and the adenine translocator is lost in desmin-null soleus muscle. This coupling is unaffected in cardiac muscle from desmin-null animals. All of these studies indicate that desmin IFs play a significant

  18. SUMO-regulated mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Guerra de Souza, Ana Cristina; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Cimarosti, Helena

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cardinal motor signs such as rigidity, bradykinesia or rest tremor that arise from a significant death of dopaminergic neurons. Non-dopaminergic degeneration also occurs and it seems to induce the deficits in olfactory, emotional, and memory functions that precede the classical motor symptoms in PD. Despite the majority of PD cases being sporadic, several genes have previously been associated with the hereditary forms of the disease. The proteins encoded by some of these genes, including α-synuclein, DJ-1, and parkin, are modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), a post-translational modification that regulates a variety of cellular processes. Among the several pathogenic mechanisms proposed for PD is mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent studies suggest that SUMOylation can interfere with mitochondrial dynamics, which is essential for neuronal function, and may play a pivotal role in PD pathogenesis. Here, we present an overview of recent studies on mitochondrial disturbance in PD and the potential SUMO-modified proteins and pathways involved in this process. SUMOylation, a post-translational modification, interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, and may play a pivotal role in Parkinson's disease (PD). SUMOylation maintains α-synuclein (α-syn) in a soluble form and activates DJ-1, decreasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. SUMOylation may reduce the amount of parkin available for mitochondrial recruitment and decreases mitochondrial biogenesis through suppression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator 1 α (PGC-1α). Mitochondrial fission can be regulated by dynamin-related protein 1 SUMO-1- or SUMO-2/3-ylation. A fine balance for the SUMOylation/deSUMOylation of these proteins is required to ensure adequate mitochondrial function in PD. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic.

  20. Impaired mitochondrial function in human placenta with increased maternal adiposity.

    PubMed

    Mele, James; Muralimanoharan, Sribalasubashini; Maloyan, Alina; Myatt, Leslie

    2014-09-01

    The placenta plays a key role in regulation of fetal growth and development and in mediating in utero developmental programming. Obesity, which is associated with chronic inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in many tissues, exerts a programming effect in pregnancy. We determined the effect of increasing maternal adiposity and of fetal sex on placental ATP generation, mitochondrial biogenesis, expression of electron transport chain subunits, and mitochondrial function in isolated trophoblasts. Placental tissue was collected from women with prepregnancy BMI ranging from 18.5 to 45 following C-section at term with no labor. Increasing maternal adiposity was associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen species and a significant reduction in placental ATP levels in placentae with male and female fetuses. To explore the potential mechanism of placental mitochondrial dysfunction, levels of transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in electron transport and mitochondrial biogenesis were measured. Our in vitro studies showed significant reduction in mitochondrial respiration in cultured primary trophoblasts with increasing maternal obesity along with an abnormal metabolic flexibility of these cells. This reduction in placental mitochondrial respiration in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity could compromise placental function and potentially underlie the increased susceptibility of these pregnancies to fetal demise in late gestation and to developmental programming.

  1. Nitric oxide affects plant mitochondrial functionality in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zottini, Michela; Formentin, Elide; Scattolin, Michela; Carimi, Francesco; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Terzi, Mario

    2002-03-27

    In this report, we show that nitric oxide affects mitochondrial functionality in plant cells and reduces total cell respiration due to strong inhibition of the cytochrome pathway. The residual respiration depends on the alternative pathway and novel synthesis of alternative oxidase occurs. These modifications are associated with depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, suggesting a conserved signalling pathway in plants and animals. This signal cascade is triggered at the mitochondrial level and induces about 20% of cell death. In order to achieve a higher level of cell death, the addition of H(2)O(2) is necessary.

  2. Monocyte Mitochondrial Function in Calcium Oxalate Stone Formers.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer; Holmes, Ross P; Assimos, Dean G; Mitchell, Tanecia

    2016-07-01

    To investigate whether mitochondrial function is altered in circulating immune cells from calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers compared to healthy subjects. Adult healthy subjects (n = 18) and CaOx stone formers (n = 12) were included in a pilot study. Data collection included demographic and clinical values from electronic medical records. Bioenergetic function was assessed in monocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets isolated from blood samples using the Seahorse XF96 Analyzer. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All participants were age matched (44.5 ± 3.0 years for healthy subjects vs 42.3 ± 4.8 years for CaOx stone formers, P = .6905). CaOx stone formers did not have urinary tract infection, ureteral stones, or obstructing renal stones. Monocyte mitochondrial function was decreased in CaOx stone formers compared to healthy subjects. Specifically, mitochondrial maximal respiration (P = .0011) and reserve capacity (P < .0001) were significantly lower. In contrast, lymphocyte and platelet mitochondrial function was similar between the 2 groups. The bioenergetic health index, an integrated value of mitochondrial function, was significantly lower in monocytes from CaOx stone formers compared to healthy subjects (P = .0041). Lastly, plasma IL-6 levels were significantly increased (P = .0324). The present pilot study shows that CaOx stone formers have decreased monocyte mitochondrial function. Plasma IL-6 was also increased in this cohort. These data suggest that impaired monocyte mitochondrial function and inflammation may be linked to CaOx kidney stone formation. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings in a larger cohort of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial genome function and maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Allen, John F; de Paula, Wilson B M

    2013-10-01

    The persistence of mtDNA to encode a small subset of mitochondrial proteins reflects the selective advantage of co-location of key respiratory chain subunit genes with their gene products. The disadvantage of this co-location is exposure of mtDNA to mutagenic ROS (reactive oxygen species), which are by-products of aerobic respiration. The resulting 'vicious circle' of mitochondrial mutation has been proposed to underlie aging and its associated degenerative diseases. Recent evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that oocyte mitochondria escape the aging process by acting as quiescent genetic templates, transcriptionally and bioenergetically repressed. Transmission of unexpressed mtDNA in the female germline is considered as a reason for the existence of separate sexes, i.e. male and female. Maternal inheritance then circumvents incremental accumulation of age-related disease in each new generation.

  4. The Effects of Fentanyl on Hepatic Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Djafarzadeh, Siamak; Vuda, Madhusudanarao; Jeger, Victor; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M

    2016-08-01

    Remifentanil interferes with hepatic mitochondrial function. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether hepatic mitochondrial function is affected by fentanyl, a more widely used opioid than remifentanil. Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were exposed to fentanyl or pretreated with naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) or 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD, an inhibitor of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium [mitoKATP] channels), followed by incubation with fentanyl. Mitochondrial function and metabolism were then analyzed. Fentanyl marginally reduced maximal mitochondrial complex-specific respiration rates using exogenous substrates (decrease in medians: 11%-18%; P = 0.003-0.001) but did not affect basal cellular respiration rates (P = 0.834). The effect on stimulated respiration was prevented by preincubation with naloxone or 5-HD. Fentanyl reduced cellular ATP content in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.001), an effect that was not significantly prevented by 5-HD and not explained by increased total ATPase concentration. However, in vitro ATPase activity of recombinant human permeability glycoprotein (an ATP-dependent drug efflux transporter) was significantly stimulated by fentanyl (P = 0.004). Our data suggest that fentanyl reduces stimulated mitochondrial respiration of cultured human hepatocytes by a mechanism that is blocked by a mitoKATP channel antagonist. Increased energy requirements for fentanyl efflux transport may offer an explanation for the substantial decrease in cellular ATP concentration.

  5. Is an orthorhombic lateral packing and a proper lamellar organization important for the skin barrier function?

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Poole, Dana S; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-06-01

    The lipid organization in the stratum corneum (SC), plays an important role in the barrier function of the skin. SC lipids form two lamellar phases with a predominantly orthorhombic packing. In previous publications a lipid model was presented, referred to as the stratum corneum substitute (SCS), that closely mimics the SC lipid organization and barrier function. Therefore, the SCS serves as a unique tool to relate lipid organization with barrier function. In the present study we examined the effect of the orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition on the barrier function of human SC and SCS. In addition, the SCS was modified by changing the free fatty acid composition, resulting in a hexagonal packing and perturbed lamellar organization. By measuring the permeability to benzoic acid as function of temperature, Arrhenius plots were constructed from which activation energies were calculated. The results suggest that the change from orthorhombic to hexagonal packing in human SC and SCS, does not have an effect on the permeability. However, the modified SCS revealed an increased permeability to benzoic acid, which we related to its perturbed lamellar organization. Thus, a proper lamellar organization is more crucial for a competent barrier function than the presence of an orthorhombic lateral packing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong; Jin, Shao-Bo; Han, Liwei; Lendahl, Urban; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  7. Impact of various exercise modalities on hepatic mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Justin A; Meers, Grace M; Linden, Melissa A; Kearney, Monica L; Morris, E Matthew; Thyfault, John P; Rector, R Scott

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic mitochondrial adaptations to exercise are largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of various exercise modalities on measures of hepatic mitochondrial function and metabolism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned (n = 8-10 per group) into sedentary (SED), voluntary wheel running (VWR), VWR with food pulled during the dark cycle (VMR-OF), treadmill endurance exercise (TM-END; 30 m·min, 12% gradient, 60 min·d, 5 d·wk), or treadmill interval sprint training (TM-IST; 50 m·min, 12% gradient, 6 × 2.5 min bouts, 5 d·wk) groups for a 4-wk intervention. Hepatic mitochondrial state 3 and maximal uncoupled respiration were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in all four exercise groups compared with SED animals. In addition, hepatic mitochondrial [1-C] pyruvate oxidation to CO2, an index of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, was significantly increased in VWR-OF, TM-END, and TM-IST rats (P < 0.05), whereas exercise-induced increases in [2-C] pyruvate oxidation and [1-C] palmitate oxidation to CO2 did not reach statistical significance. Hepatic mitochondrial sirtuin 3 protein content, which putatively increases activity of mitochondrial proteins, was elevated in the VWR, VWR-OF, and TM-END groups (P < 0.05). In addition, only VWR-OF animals experienced increases in hepatic cytochrome c protein content and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA, whereas PGC-1α mRNA expression and phospho-CREB protein content was increased in VWR-OF and TM-END groups. Four weeks of exercise training, regardless of exercise modality, significantly increased hepatic mitochondrial respiration and evoked other unique improvements in mitochondrial metabolism that do not appear to be dependent on increases in mitochondrial content.

  8. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  9. Dynamics, Structure, and Function are Coupled in the Mitochondrial Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalettar, Bethe A.; Abney, James R.; Hackenbrock, Charles R.

    1991-09-01

    The coupling between molecular diffusion and the structure and function of the rat liver mitochondrial matrix was explored using fluorescence anisotropy techniques and electron microscopy. The results confirm that matrix ultrastructure and the concentration of matrix protein are influenced by the respiratory state of mitochondria and the osmolarity of the external medium. At physiological osmolarity, a fluorescent metabolite-sized probe was found to diffuse slowly in the mitochondrial matrix but not to be completely immobile. In addition, significant differences in diffusion rates were found to exist between different mitochondrial respiratory states, with the slowest diffusion occurring in states with the highest matrix protein concentration. These data support the concept of a matrix structure in which diffusion is considerably hindered due to limited probe-accessible water and further suggest that volume-dependent regulation of matrix protein packing may modulate metabolite diffusion and, in turn, mitochondrial metabolism.

  10. A functional circadian clock is required for proper insulin secretion by human pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, C; Petrenko, V; Pulimeno, P; Giovannoni, L; Berney, T; Hebrok, M; Howald, C; Dermitzakis, E T; Dibner, C

    2016-04-01

    To determine the impact of a functional human islet clock on insulin secretion and gene transcription. Efficient circadian clock disruption was achieved in human pancreatic islet cells by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CLOCK. Human islet secretory function was assessed in the presence or absence of a functional circadian clock by stimulated insulin secretion assays, and by continuous around-the-clock monitoring of basal insulin secretion. Large-scale transcription analysis was accomplished by RNA sequencing, followed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis of selected targets. Circadian clock disruption resulted in a significant decrease in both acute and chronic glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Moreover, basal insulin secretion by human islet cells synchronized in vitro exhibited a circadian pattern, which was perturbed upon clock disruption. RNA sequencing analysis suggested alterations in 352 transcript levels upon circadian clock disruption. Among them, key regulators of the insulin secretion pathway (GNAQ, ATP1A1, ATP5G2, KCNJ11) and transcripts required for granule maturation and release (VAMP3, STX6, SLC30A8) were affected. Using our newly developed experimental approach for efficient clock disruption in human pancreatic islet cells, we show for the first time that a functional β-cell clock is required for proper basal and stimulated insulin secretion. Moreover, clock disruption has a profound impact on the human islet transcriptome, in particular, on the genes involved in insulin secretion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Off-cycle exhaust emissions from modern passenger cars with properly-functioning emissions controls

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.W.; Ross, M.H.

    1996-09-01

    Real-world tailpipe emissions from properly-functioning, model year 1991--94 conventional gasoline-fueled cars associated with vehicle operations not emphasized in the FTP are analyzed. Tailpipe emissions are expressed as the product of three factors: fuel rate, engine-out emissions index, and catalyst pass fraction, which are modeled using empirical data from the FTP-Revision Project and applied to in-use driving survey data to estimate real-world emissions. Average tailpipe emissions due to fuel enrichment in warmed-up vehicles are estimated to be 8 g/mile for CO, and 0.3 g/mile for HC. For NO{sub x}, the contribution due to incremental loads on the engine (i.e. air conditioner, grade, high acceleration, and high speed) that are not accounted for in the FTP but are encountered in real-world driving are estimated to be roughly 0.3 g/mile.

  12. Tissue-specific DNA demethylation is required for proper B-cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Orlanski, Shari; Labi, Verena; Reizel, Yitzhak; Spiro, Adam; Lichtenstein, Michal; Levin-Klein, Rena; Koralov, Sergei B.; Skversky, Yael; Rajewsky, Klaus; Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2016-01-01

    There is ample evidence that somatic cell differentiation during development is accompanied by extensive DNA demethylation of specific sites that vary between cell types. Although the mechanism of this process has not yet been elucidated, it is likely to involve the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC by Tet enzymes. We show that a Tet2/Tet3 conditional knockout at early stages of B-cell development largely prevents lineage-specific programmed demethylation events. This lack of demethylation affects the expression of nearby B-cell lineage genes by impairing enhancer activity, thus causing defects in B-cell differentiation and function. Thus, tissue-specific DNA demethylation appears to be necessary for proper somatic cell development in vivo. PMID:27091986

  13. Transcriptional Control of Cardiac Fuel Metabolism and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Leone, T.C.; Kelly, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    As a persistent pump, the mammalian heart demands a high-capacity mitochondrial system. Significant progress has been made in delineating the gene regulatory networks that control mitochondrial biogenesis and function in striated muscle. The PPARγ coactivator-1 (PGC-1) coactivators serve as inducible boosters of downstream transcription factors that control the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy transduction, ATP synthesis, and biogenesis. PGC-1 gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies targeting two PGC-1 family members, PGC-1α and PGC-1β, have provided solid evidence that these factors are both necessary and sufficient for perinatal mitochondrial biogenesis and maintenance of high-capacity mitochondrial function in postnatal heart. In humans, during the development of heart failure owing to hypertension or obesity-related diabetes, the activity of the PGC-1 coactivators, and several downstream target transcription factors, is altered. Gene targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that loss of PGC-1α and PGC-1β in heart leads to heart failure. Interestingly, the pattern of dysregulation within the PGC-1 transcriptional regulatory circuit distinguishes the heart disease caused by hypertension from that caused by diabetes. This transcriptional regulatory cascade and downstream metabolic pathways should be considered as targets for novel etiology-specific therapeutics aimed at the early stages of heart failure. PMID:22096028

  14. Cryopreservation of human skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S; Wright-Paradis, C; Gnaiger, E; Helge, J W; Boushel, R

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated if cryopreservation is a viable approach for functional mitochondrial analysis. Different tissues have been studied, and conflicting results have been published. The aim of the present study was to investigate if mitochondria in human skeletal muscle maintain functionality after long term cryopreservation (1 year). Skeletal muscle samples were preserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for later analysis. Human skeletal muscle fibres were thawed and permeabilised with saponin, and mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry. The capacity of oxidative phosphorylation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples. Cryopreservation impaired respiration with substrates linked to Complex I more than for Complex II (P < 0.05). Addition of cytochrome c revealed an increase in respiration indicating cytochrome c loss from the mitochondria. The results from this study demonstrate that normal mitochondrial functionality is not maintained in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples.

  15. Resveratrol Rescues Kidney Mitochondrial Function Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Guan, Yuxia; Karamercan, Mehmet Akif; Ye, Lan; Bhatti, Tricia; Becker, Lance B.; Baur, Joseph A.; Sims, Carrie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic shock may contribute to acute kidney injury by profoundly altering renal mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) activator, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative damage in a variety of aging-related disease states. We hypothesized that RSV treatment during resuscitation would ameliorate kidney mitochondrial dysfunction and decrease oxidative damage following hemorrhagic shock. Method Using a decompensated hemorrhagic shock model, male Long-Evans rats (n=6 per group) were sacrificed prior to hemorrhage (Sham), at severe shock, and following either lactated Ringer’s (LR) Resuscitation or LR+RSV Resuscitation (RSV: 30mg/kg). At each time point, blood samples were assayed for arterial blood gases, lactate, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine. Mitochondria were also isolated from kidney samples in order to assess individual electron transport complexes (CI, CII, and CIV) using high-resolution respirometry. Total mitochondria reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using fluorometry and lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring 4-hydroxynonenal by Western blot. qPCR was used quantify mRNA from PGC1-α, SIRT1, and proteins known to mitigate oxidative damage and promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Results RSV supplementation during resuscitation restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity, decreased mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation. Compared to standard LR resuscitation, RSV treatment significantly increased SIRT1 and PGC1-α expression and significantly increased both SOD2 and catalase expression. Although RSV was associated with decreased lactate production, pH, BUN and serum creatinine values did not differ between resuscitation strategies. Conclusions Resuscitation with RSV significantly restored renal mitochondrial function and decreased oxidative damage following hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25895148

  16. Resveratrol Rescues Kidney Mitochondrial Function Following Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Guan, Yuxia; Karamercan, Mehmet Akif; Ye, Lan; Bhatti, Tricia; Becker, Lance B; Baur, Joseph A; Sims, Carrie A

    2015-08-01

    Hemorrhagic shock may contribute to acute kidney injury (AKI) by profoundly altering renal mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activator, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and reduce oxidative damage in a variety of aging-related disease states. We hypothesized that RSV treatment during resuscitation would ameliorate kidney mitochondrial dysfunction and decrease oxidative damage following hemorrhagic shock. Using a decompensated hemorrhagic shock model, male Long-Evans rats (n = 6 per group) were killed prior to hemorrhage (sham), at severe shock, and following either lactated Ringer's (LR) resuscitation or LR + RSV resuscitation (RSV: 30 mg/kg). At each time point, blood samples were assayed for arterial blood gases, lactate, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine. Mitochondria were also isolated from kidney samples in order to assess individual electron transport complexes (complexes I, II, and IV) using high-resolution respirometry. Total mitochondria reactive oxygen species were measured using fluorometry, and lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring 4-hydroxynonenal by Western blot. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used quantify mRNA from peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC1-α) SIRT1, and proteins known to mitigate oxidative damage and promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Resveratrol supplementation during resuscitation restored mitochondrial respiratory capacity and decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. Compared with standard LR resuscitation, RSV treatment significantly increased SIRT1 and PGC1-α expression and significantly increased both superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase expression. Although RSV was associated with decreased lactate production, pH, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine values did not differ between resuscitation strategies. Resuscitation with RSV significantly restored renal mitochondrial

  17. The role of vasculature in bone development, regeneration and proper systemic functioning.

    PubMed

    Filipowska, Joanna; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Niedźwiedzki, Łukasz; Walocha, Jerzy A; Niedźwiedzki, Tadeusz

    2017-02-13

    Bone is a richly vascularized connective tissue. As the main source of oxygen, nutrients, hormones, neurotransmitters and growth factors delivered to the bone cells, vasculature is indispensable for appropriate bone development, regeneration and remodeling. Bone vasculature also orchestrates the process of hematopoiesis. Blood supply to the skeletal system is provided by the networks of arteries and arterioles, having distinct molecular characteristics and localizations within the bone structures. Blood vessels of the bone develop through the process of angiogenesis, taking place through different, bone-specific mechanisms. Impaired functioning of the bone blood vessels may be associated with the occurrence of some skeletal and systemic diseases, i.e., osteonecrosis, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis or diabetes mellitus. When a disease or trauma-related large bone defects appear, bone grafting or bone tissue engineering-based strategies are required. However, a successful bone regeneration in both approaches largely depends on a proper blood supply. In this paper, we review the most recent data on the functions, molecular characteristics and significance of the bone blood vessels, with a particular emphasis on the role of angiogenesis and blood vessel functioning in bone development and regeneration, as well as the consequences of its impairment in the course of different skeletal and systemic diseases.

  18. Mitochondrial function in the brain links anxiety with social subordination.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Fiona; van der Kooij, Michael A; Zanoletti, Olivia; Lozano, Laura; Cantó, Carles; Sandi, Carmen

    2015-12-15

    Dominance hierarchies are integral aspects of social groups, yet whether personality traits may predispose individuals to a particular rank remains unclear. Here we show that trait anxiety directly influences social dominance in male outbred rats and identify an important mediating role for mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens. High-anxious animals that are prone to become subordinate during a social encounter with a low-anxious rat exhibit reduced mitochondrial complex I and II proteins and respiratory capacity as well as decreased ATP and increased ROS production in the nucleus accumbens. A causal link for these findings is indicated by pharmacological approaches. In a dyadic contest between anxiety-matched animals, microinfusion of specific mitochondrial complex I or II inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens reduced social rank, mimicking the low probability to become dominant observed in high-anxious animals. Conversely, intraaccumbal infusion of nicotinamide, an amide form of vitamin B3 known to enhance brain energy metabolism, prevented the development of a subordinate status in high-anxious individuals. We conclude that mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens is crucial for social hierarchy establishment and is critically involved in the low social competitiveness associated with high anxiety. Our findings highlight a key role for brain energy metabolism in social behavior and point to mitochondrial function in the nucleus accumbens as a potential marker and avenue of treatment for anxiety-related social disorders.

  19. Dietary restriction, mitochondrial function and aging: from yeast to humans

    PubMed Central

    Ruetenik, Andrea; Barrientos, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Dietary restriction (DR) attenuates many detrimental effects of aging and consequently promotes health and increases longevity across organisms. While over the last 15 years extensive research has been devoted towards understanding the biology of aging, the precise mechanistic aspects of DR are yet to be settled. Abundant experimental evidence indicates that the DR effect on stimulating health impinges several metabolic and stress-resistance pathways. Downstream effects of these pathways include a reduction in cellular damage induced by oxidative stress, enhanced efficiency of mitochondrial functions and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics and quality control, thereby attenuating age-related declines in mitochondrial function. However, the literature also accumulates conflicting evidence regarding how DR ameliorates mitochondrial performance and whether that is enough to slow age-dependent cellular and organismal deterioration. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge about how and to which extent the influence of different DR regimes on mitochondrial biogenesis and function contribute to postpone the detrimental effects of aging on healthspan and lifespan. PMID:25979234

  20. Developmental plasticity of mitochondrial function in American alligators, Alligator mississippiensis

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Janna; Elsey, Ruth M.; Dzialowski, Edward M.; Shiels, Holly A.; Crossley, Dane A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hypoxia on cellular metabolism is well documented in adult vertebrates, but information is entirely lacking for embryonic organisms. The effect of hypoxia on embryonic physiology is particularly interesting, as metabolic responses during development may have life-long consequences, due to developmental plasticity. To this end, we investigated the effects of chronic developmental hypoxia on cardiac mitochondrial function in embryonic and juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Alligator eggs were incubated in 21% or 10% oxygen from 20 to 90% of embryonic development. Embryos were either harvested at 90% development or allowed to hatch and then reared in 21% oxygen for 3 yr. Ventricular mitochondria were isolated from embryonic/juvenile alligator hearts. Mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic activities of electron transport chain complexes were measured with a microrespirometer and spectrophotometer, respectively. Developmental hypoxia induced growth restriction and increased relative heart mass, and this phenotype persisted into juvenile life. Embryonic mitochondrial function was not affected by developmental hypoxia, but at the juvenile life stage, animals from hypoxic incubations had lower levels of Leak respiration and higher respiratory control ratios, which is indicative of enhanced mitochondrial efficiency. Our results suggest developmental hypoxia can have life-long consequences for alligator morphology and metabolic function. Further investigations are necessary to reveal the adaptive significance of the enhanced mitochondrial efficiency in the hypoxic phenotype. PMID:27707718

  1. Developmental plasticity of mitochondrial function in American alligators, Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Galli, Gina L J; Crossley, Janna; Elsey, Ruth M; Dzialowski, Edward M; Shiels, Holly A; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-12-01

    The effect of hypoxia on cellular metabolism is well documented in adult vertebrates, but information is entirely lacking for embryonic organisms. The effect of hypoxia on embryonic physiology is particularly interesting, as metabolic responses during development may have life-long consequences, due to developmental plasticity. To this end, we investigated the effects of chronic developmental hypoxia on cardiac mitochondrial function in embryonic and juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Alligator eggs were incubated in 21% or 10% oxygen from 20 to 90% of embryonic development. Embryos were either harvested at 90% development or allowed to hatch and then reared in 21% oxygen for 3 yr. Ventricular mitochondria were isolated from embryonic/juvenile alligator hearts. Mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic activities of electron transport chain complexes were measured with a microrespirometer and spectrophotometer, respectively. Developmental hypoxia induced growth restriction and increased relative heart mass, and this phenotype persisted into juvenile life. Embryonic mitochondrial function was not affected by developmental hypoxia, but at the juvenile life stage, animals from hypoxic incubations had lower levels of Leak respiration and higher respiratory control ratios, which is indicative of enhanced mitochondrial efficiency. Our results suggest developmental hypoxia can have life-long consequences for alligator morphology and metabolic function. Further investigations are necessary to reveal the adaptive significance of the enhanced mitochondrial efficiency in the hypoxic phenotype. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  3. The yeast dynamin-like protein, Mgm1p, functions on the mitochondrial outer membrane to mediate mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Shepard, K A; Yaffe, M P

    1999-02-22

    The mdm17 mutation causes temperature-dependent defects in mitochondrial inheritance, mitochondrial morphology, and the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Defects in mitochondrial transmission to daughter buds and changes in mitochondrial morphology were apparent within 30 min after shifting cells to 37 degrees C, while loss of the mitochondrial genome occurred after 4-24 h at the elevated temperature. The mdm17 lesion mapped to MGM1, a gene encoding a dynamin-like GTPase previously implicated in mitochondrial genome maintenance, and the cloned MGM1 gene complements all of the mdm17 mutant phenotypes. Cells with an mgm1-null mutation displayed aberrant mitochondrial inheritance and morphology. A version of mgm1 mutated in a conserved residue in the putative GTP-binding site was unable to complement any of the mutant defects. It also caused aberrant mitochondrial distribution and morphology when expressed at high levels in cells that also contained a wild-type copy of the gene. Mgm1p was localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane and fractionated as a component of a high molecular weight complex. These results indicate that Mgm1p is a mitochondrial inheritance and morphology component that functions on the mitochondrial surface.

  4. Relaxation of yeast mitochondrial functions after whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huifeng; Guan, Wenjun; Pinney, David; Wang, Wen; Gu, Zhenglong

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for cellular energy production in most eukaryotic organisms. However, when glucose is abundant, yeast species that underwent whole-genome duplication (WGD) mostly conduct fermentation even under aerobic conditions, and most can survive without a functional mitochondrial genome. In this study, we show that the rate of evolution for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes was greater in post-WGD species than pre-WGD species. Furthermore, codon usage bias was relaxed for these genes in post-WGD yeast species. The codon usage pattern and the distribution of a particular transcription regulatory element suggest that the change to an efficient aerobic fermentation lifestyle in this lineage might have emerged after WGD between the divergence of Kluyveromyces polysporus and Saccharomyces castellii from their common ancestor. This new energy production strategy could have led to the relaxation of mitochondrial function in the relevant yeast species. PMID:18669479

  5. Impaired mitochondrial functions in organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Anwar; Kiran, Ravi; Sandhir, Rajat

    2009-12-01

    Acute exposure to organophosphates induces a delayed neurodegenerative condition known as organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). The mechanism of OPIDN has not been fully understood as it does not involve cholinergic crisis. The present study has been designed to evaluate the role of mitochondrial dysfunctions in the development of OPIDN. OPIDN was induced in rats by administering acute dose of monocrotophos (MCP, 20 mg/kg body weight, orally) or dichlorvos (DDVP, 200 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously), 15-20 min after treatment with antidotes [atropine (20 mg/kg body weight) and 2-PAM (100 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally]. MDA levels were observed to be higher and thiol content was lower in mitochondria from brain regions of OP exposed animals. This was accompanied by decreased activities of the mitochondrial enzymes; NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and cytochrome oxidase. In addition, mitochondrial functions assessed by MTT reduction also confirmed mitochondrial dysfunctions following development of OPIDN. The spatial long-term memory evaluated using elevated plus-maze test was observed to be deficit in OPIDN. The results suggest impaired mitochondrial functions as a mechanism involved in the development of organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy.

  6. Mitochondrial O-GlcNAc Transferase (mOGT) Regulates Mitochondrial Structure, Function, and Survival in HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Sacoman, Juliana L; Dagda, Raul Y; Burnham-Marusich, Amanda R; Dagda, Ruben K; Berninsone, Patricia M

    2017-03-17

    O-Linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) catalyzes O-GlcNAcylation of target proteins and regulates numerous biological processes. OGT is encoded by a single gene that yields nucleocytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms. To date, the role of the mitochondrial isoform of OGT (mOGT) remains largely unknown. Using high throughput proteomics, we identified 84 candidate mitochondrial glycoproteins, of which 44 are novel. Notably, two of the candidate glycoproteins identified (cytochrome oxidase 2 (COX2) and NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase core subunit 4 (MT-ND4)) are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Using siRNA in HeLa cells, we found that reducing endogenous mOGT expression leads to alterations in mitochondrial structure and function, including Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation, reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, and a significant loss of mitochondrial content in the absence of mitochondrial ROS. These defects are associated with a compensatory increase in oxidative phosphorylation per mitochondrion. mOGT is also critical for cell survival; siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous mOGT protected cells against toxicity mediated by rotenone, a complex I inhibitor. Conversely, reduced expression of both nucleocytoplasmic (ncOGT) and mitochondrial (mOGT) OGT isoforms is associated with increased mitochondrial respiration and elevated glycolysis, suggesting that ncOGT is a negative regulator of cellular bioenergetics. Last, we determined that mOGT is probably involved in the glycosylation of a restricted set of mitochondrial targets. We identified four proteins implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism regulation as candidate substrates of mOGT, including leucine-rich PPR-containing protein and mitochondrial aconitate hydratase. Our findings suggest that mOGT is catalytically active in vivo and supports mitochondrial structure, health, and survival, whereas ncOGT predominantly regulates cellular bioenergetics.

  7. I function, therefore I am: overcoming skepticism about mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Antoni; Ugalde, Cristina

    2013-08-06

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain is believed to dynamically arrange in suprastructures known as supercomplexes or respirasomes, though their function remains elusive. A recent study in Science (Lapuente-Brun et al., 2013) now reports that dynamic supercomplex assembly determines electron flux from different substrates through the respiratory chain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ion-selective electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors: prerequisites for proper functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofler, Johannes; Schmoltner, Kerstin; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2014-10-01

    Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors (EGOFETs) used as transducers and amplifiers in potentiometric sensors have recently attracted a significant amount of scientific interest. For that reason, the fundamental prerequisites to achieve a proper potentiometric signal amplification and transduction are examined. First, polarizable as well as non-polarizable semiconductor- and gate-electrolyte- interface combinations are investigated by normal pulse voltammetry. The results of these measurements are correlated with the corresponding transistor characteristics, clarifying the functional principle of EGOFETs and the requirements for high signal amplification. In addition to a good electrical performance, the EGOFET-transducers should also be compatible with the targeted sensing application. Accordingly, the influence of different gate materials and electrolytes on the sensing abilities, are discussed. Even though all physical requirements are met, EGOFETs typically exhibit irreversible degradation, if the gate potential exceeds a certain level. For that reason, EGOFETs have to be operated using a constant source-drain operation mode which is presented by means of an H+ (pH) sensitive ion-sensor.

  9. Modulation of mitochondrial proteome and improved mitochondrial function by biventricular pacing of dyssynchronous failing hearts.

    PubMed

    Agnetti, Giulio; Kaludercic, Nina; Kane, Lesley A; Elliott, Steven T; Guo, Yurong; Chakir, Khalid; Samantapudi, Daya; Paolocci, Nazareno; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Kass, David A; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves chamber mechanoenergetics and morbidity and mortality of patients manifesting heart failure with ventricular dyssynchrony; however, little is known about the molecular changes underlying CRT benefits. We hypothesized that mitochondria may play an important role because of their involvement in energy production. Mitochondria isolated from the left ventricle in a canine model of dyssynchronous or resynchronized (CRT) heart failure were analyzed by a classical, gel-based, proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that 31 mitochondrial proteins where changed when controlling the false discovery rate at 30%. Key enzymes in anaplerotic pathways, such as pyruvate carboxylation and branched-chain amino acid oxidation, were increased. These concerted changes, along with others, suggested that CRT may increase the pool of Krebs cycle intermediates and fuel oxidative phosphorylation. Nearly 50% of observed changes pertained to subunits of the respiratory chain. ATP synthase-beta subunit of complex V was less degraded, and its phosphorylation modulated by CRT was associated with increased formation (2-fold, P=0.004) and specific activity (+20%, P=0.05) of the mature complex. The importance of these modifications was supported by coordinated changes in mitochondrial chaperones and proteases. CRT increased the mitochondrial respiratory control index with tightened coupling when isolated mitochondria were reexposed to substrates for both complex I (glutamate and malate) and complex II (succinate), an effect likely related to ATP synthase subunit modifications and complex quantity and activity. CRT potently affects both the mitochondrial proteome and the performance associated with improved cardiac function.

  10. Mitochondrial targeting functional peptides as potential devices for the mitochondrial delivery of a DF-MITO-Porter.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Eriko; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2013-11-01

    To achieve mitochondrial therapy, we previously reported on the use of an octaarginine (R8) modified Dual Function (DF)-MITO-Porter for delivering molecules to mitochondria in living cells. In this study, using isolated mitochondria, homogenates and living cells, we evaluated the utility of mitochondrial targeting functional peptides as a ligand for delivering carriers. The S2 peptide modified carrier showed a high mitochondrial targeting activity in homogenates and living cells. In addition, the S2 peptide had a lower cell toxicity compared to R8 modified liposomes. The S2 peptide represents a potentially useful moiety for constructing an efficient and safe mitochondrial delivery system.

  11. Mitochondrial respiratory chain function in skeletal muscle of ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Zoll, Joffrey; Ribera, Florence; Tranchant, Christine; Warter, Jean-Marie; Lonsdorfer, Jean; Lampert, Eliane

    2002-11-01

    Evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the central nervous system of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS) has recently been accumulating. In contrast, data on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in SALS are scarce and controversial. We investigated the in situ properties of muscle mitochondria in patients with early-stage SALS and sedentary (SED) controls using the skinned fiber technique to determine whether respiration of muscle tissue is altered in early-stage SALS in comparison with SED. Musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from 7 SED group members and 14 patients with early-stage SALS (mean disease duration, 9 months). Muscle fibers were permeabilized with saponine and then skinned and placed in an oxygraphic chamber to measure basal (V(0)) and maximal (V(max)) adenosine diphosphate-stimulated respiration rates and to assess mitochondrial regulation by adenosine diphosphate. Muscle oxidative capacity, evaluated with V(max), was identical in patients in the SALS and SED groups (V(0): SALS, 1.1 +/- 0.1; SED, 0.8 +/- 0.1, micromol 0(2). min(-1). gm(-1)dw and V(max): SALS, 3.1 +/- 0.3; SED, 2.5 +/- 0.3, micromol 0(2). min(-1). gm(-1)dw). This study shows an absence of large mitochondrial damage in skeletal muscle of patients with early-stage SALS, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction in the earlier stages of SALS is almost certainly not systemic.

  12. Functional relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pushpa Raj; Vetterke, Mirjam; Hauburger, Anja; Tacik, Pawel; Stoltenburg, Gisela; Hanisch, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient fibers and multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are frequent findings in sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). However, the functional impact of these defects is not known. We investigated oxygen desaturation during exercise using the forearm exercise test, accumulation of lactate during exercise using a cycle ergometry test and mitochondrial changes (COX-deficient fibers, biochemical activities of respiratory chain complexes, multiple mtDNA deletions by long-range polymerase chain reaction) in 10 patients with s-IBM and compared the findings with age and sex-matched normal and diseased controls (without mitochondrial disorders) as well as patients with mitochondrial disorder due to nuclear gene defects resulting in multiple mtDNA deletions (MITO group). The mean age of the s-IBM patients was 68.2 ± 5.7 years (range: 56-75). Patients with s-IBM had statistically significantly reduced oxygen desaturation (ΔsO2) during the handgrip exercise (p<0.05) and elevated peak serum lactate levels during cycle ergometry compared to normal controls (p<0.05). The percentage of COX-deficient fibers in s-IBM and MITO patients was significantly increased compared to normal controls (p<0.01). Five out of nine s-IBM patients had multiple mtDNA deletions. Thirty-three percent of s-IBM patients showed an increased citrate synthase content and decreased activities of complex IV (COX). The biochemical pattern of respiratory chain complexes in patients with s-IBM and MITO was similar. Histopathological analysis showed similar changes in s-IBM and MITO due to nuclear gene defects. Functional tests reflecting mitochondrial impairment suggest a contribution of mitochondrial defects to disease-related symptoms such as fatigue and exertion-induced symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitochondrial function in ageing: coordination with signalling and transcriptional pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Fei; Sancheti, Harsh; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial dysfunction entailing decreased energy‐transducing capacity and perturbed redox homeostasis is an early and sometimes initiating event in ageing and age‐related disorders involving tissues with high metabolic rate such as brain, liver and heart. In the central nervous system (CNS), recent findings from our and other groups suggest that the mitochondrion‐centred hypometabolism is a key feature of ageing brains and Alzheimer's disease. This hypometabolic state is manifested by lowered neuronal glucose uptake, metabolic shift in the astrocytes, and alternations in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle function. Similarly, in liver and adipose tissue, mitochondrial capacity around glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thermogenesis is found to decline with age and is implicated in age‐related metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These mitochondrion‐related disorders in peripheral tissues can impact on brain functions through metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory signals. At the cellular level, studies in CNS and non‐CNS tissues support the notion that instead of being viewed as autonomous organelles, mitochondria are part of a dynamic network with close interactions with other cellular components through energy‐ or redox‐sensitive cytosolic kinase signalling and transcriptional pathways. Hence, it would be critical to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the communication between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. Therapeutic strategies that effectively preserves or improve mitochondrial function by targeting key component of these signalling cascades could represent a novel direction for numerous mitochondrion‐implicated, age‐related disorders. PMID:26293414

  14. Protecting Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Function during Resuscitation from Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Gazmuri, Raúl J.; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest requires reestablishment of aerobic metabolism by reperfusion with oxygenated blood of tissues that have been deprived of oxygen for variables periods of time. However, reperfusion concomitantly activates pathogenic mechanisms known as “reperfusion injury.” At the core of reperfusion injury are mitochondria, playing a critical role as effectors and targets of such injury. Mitochondrial injury compromises oxidative phosphorylation and also prompts release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and bloodstream where it correlates with severity of injury. Main drivers of such injury include Ca2+ overload and oxidative stress. Preclinical work shows that limiting myocardial cytosolic Na+ overload at the time of reperfusion attenuates mitochondrial Ca2+ overload and maintains oxidative phosphorylation yielding functional myocardial benefits that include preservation of left ventricular distensibility. Preservation of left ventricular distensibility enables hemodynamically more effective chest compression. Similar myocardial effect have been reported using erythropoietin hypothesized to protect mitochondrial bioenergetic function presumably through activation of pathways similar to those activated during preconditioning. Incorporation of novel and clinical relevant strategies to protect mitochondrial bioenergetic function are expected to attenuate injury at the time of reperfusion and enhance organ viability ultimately improving resuscitation and survival from cardiac arrest. PMID:22433486

  15. Mitochondrial function controls intestinal epithelial stemness and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Emanuel; Rath, Eva; Yuan, Detian; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Khaloian, Sevana; Allgäuer, Michael; Staszewski, Ori; Lobner, Elena M.; Schöttl, Theresa; Giesbertz, Pieter; Coleman, Olivia I.; Prinz, Marco; Weber, Achim; Gerhard, Markus; Klingenspor, Martin; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Haller, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Control of intestinal epithelial stemness is crucial for tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in epithelial function are implicated in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report that mitochondrial function plays a critical role in maintaining intestinal stemness and homeostasis. Using intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific mouse models, we show that loss of HSP60, a mitochondrial chaperone, activates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (MT-UPR) and results in mitochondrial dysfunction. HSP60-deficient crypts display loss of stemness and cell proliferation, accompanied by epithelial release of WNT10A and RSPO1. Sporadic failure of Cre-mediated Hsp60 deletion gives rise to hyperproliferative crypt foci originating from OLFM4+ stem cells. These effects are independent of the MT-UPR-associated transcription factor CHOP. In conclusion, compensatory hyperproliferation of HSP60+ escaper stem cells suggests paracrine release of WNT-related factors from HSP60-deficient, functionally impaired IEC to be pivotal in the control of the proliferative capacity of the stem cell niche. PMID:27786175

  16. The impact of severe burns on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Porter, Craig; Herndon, David N; Sidossis, Labros S; Børsheim, Elisabet

    2013-09-01

    Severe burns induce a pathophysiological response that affects almost every physiological system within the body. Inflammation, hypermetabolism, muscle wasting, and insulin resistance are all hallmarks of the pathophysiological response to severe burns, with perturbations in metabolism known to persist for several years post injury. Skeletal muscle is the principal depot of lean tissue within the body and as the primary site of peripheral glucose disposal, plays an important role in metabolic regulation. Following a large burn, skeletal muscle functions as and endogenous amino acid store, providing substrates for more pressing functions, such as the synthesis of acute phase proteins and the deposition of new skin. Subsequently, burn patients become cachectic, which is associated with poor outcomes in terms of metabolic health and functional capacity. While a loss of skeletal muscle contractile proteins per se will no doubt negatively impact functional capacity, detriments in skeletal muscle quality, i.e. a loss in mitochondrial number and/or function may be quantitatively just as important. The goal of this review article is to summarise the current understanding of the impact of thermal trauma on skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and function, to offer direction for future research concerning skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in patients with severe burns, and to renew interest in the role of these organelles in metabolic dysfunction following severe burns.

  17. 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 located on the mitochondrial membrane and functionally regulated mitochondrial functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingyi; Zhang, Huiyuan; Xu, Hao; Guo, Dongqing; Shi, Hui; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Weiwei; Gu, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    5-HT has been reported to possess significant effects on cardiac activities, but activation of 5-HTR on the cell membrane failed to illustrate the controversial cardiac reaction. Because 5-HT constantly comes across the cell membrane via 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) into the cytoplasm, whether 5-HTR is functional present on the cellular organelles is unknown. Here we show 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 were located in cardiac mitochondria, and regulated mitochondrial activities and cellular functions. Knock down 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in significant increase of cell damage in response to hypoxia, and also led to alternation in heart beating. Activation of 5-HTR4 attenuated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake under the both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, whereas 5-HTR3 augmented Ca2+ uptake only under hypoxia. 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 exerted the opposite effects on the mitochondrial respiration: 5-HTR3 increased RCR (respiration control ratio), but 5-HTR4 reduced RCR. Moreover, activation of 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 both significantly inhibited the opening of mPTP. Our results provided the first evidence that 5-HTR as a GPCR and an ion channel, functionally expressed in mitochondria and participated in the mitochondria function and regulation to maintain homeostasis of mitochondrial [Ca2+], ROS, and ATP generation efficiency in cardiomyocytes in response to stress and O2 tension. PMID:27874067

  18. PEDF improves mitochondrial function in RPE cells during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Leung, Kar Wah; Ren, Yuan; Pei, Jinzhi; Ge, Jian; Tombran-Tink, Joyce

    2014-09-11

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in health and aging. We have shown that oxidative stress impairs mitochondrial function and promotes RPE cell death in an age-dependent manner. This study investigates the role of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) in limiting oxidative stress-induced damage to RPE cells through mitochondrial pathways. Three groups of early-passaged RPE cells from donors 50 to 55, 60 to 65, and 70 to 75 years old (yo) were either preconditioned with PEDF followed by exposure to sublethal doses of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or post-treated with PEDF after H2O2 treatment. Effects of PEDF on mitochondrial function and cell viability were examined. Oxidative stress induced an age-dependent increase in LDH release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and cell death and a decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in human RPE cells. Preconditioning or poststressed treatment with PEDF resulted in increased cell viability, inhibition of cytochrome c release and caspase 3 cleavage, and improved mitochondria function denoted by a decrease in ROS generation and increases in ATP production and ΔΨm. Oxidative stress also disrupted the reticular network, trafficking, and distribution of the mitochondria and blocked activation of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, and Erk signaling in the cells. These effects were more pronounced in RPE cells from individuals>60 yo compared to the 50 to 55 yo age group. Pigment epithelium-derived factor mitigated negative effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial remodeling and cellular distribution and unblocked its control of PI3K/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Although PEDF potentiated both PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling in the cells, stabilization of mitochondrial networks and function was dependent on its activation of PI3K/Akt. Specificity of PEDF's activity was confirmed using the pharmacological inhibitors LY294002

  19. Ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production accompanied by upregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain function and mitochondrial content under control of the cell cycle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamazumi, Masayuki; Wada, Yusuke; Nakamura, Yoshinari; Nakamura, Hideo; Inanami, Osamu

    2012-07-15

    Whereas ionizing radiation (Ir) instantaneously causes the formation of water radiolysis products that contain some reactive oxygen species (ROS), ROS are also suggested to be released from biological sources in irradiated cells. It is now becoming clear that these ROS generated secondarily after Ir have a variety of biological roles. Although mitochondria are assumed to be responsible for this Ir-induced ROS production, it remains to be elucidated how Ir triggers it. Therefore, we conducted this study to decipher the mechanism of Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, Ir (10 Gy of X-rays) induced a time-dependent increase in the mitochondrial ROS level. Ir also increased mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial ATP production, suggesting upregulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) function after Ir. Although we found that Ir slightly enhanced mitochondrial ETC complex II activity, the complex II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid failed to reduce Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. Meanwhile, we observed that the mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA level were upregulated after Ir, indicating that Ir increased the mitochondrial content of the cell. Because irradiated cells are known to undergo cell cycle arrest under control of the checkpoint mechanisms, we examined the relationships between cell cycle and mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. We found that the cells in the G2/M phase had a higher mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level than cells in the G1 or S phase, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated. We also found that Ir-induced accumulation of the cells in the G2/M phase led to an increase in cells with a high mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. This suggested that Ir upregulated mitochondrial ETC function and mitochondrial content, resulting in mitochondrial ROS production, and that

  20. Sphingolipids and mitochondrial function, lessons learned from yeast

    PubMed Central

    Spincemaille, Pieter; Cammue, Bruno P.; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, but also of cancer, diabetes and rare diseases such as Wilson’s disease (WD) and Niemann Pick type C1 (NPC). Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying human pathologies has often been associated with an aberrant cellular sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids (SLs) are important membrane constituents that also act as signaling molecules. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been pivotal in unraveling mammalian SL metabolism, mainly due to the high degree of conservation of SL metabolic pathways. In this review we will first provide a brief overview of the major differences in SL metabolism between yeast and mammalian cells and the use of SL biosynthetic inhibitors to elucidate the contribution of specific parts of the SL metabolic pathway in response to for instance stress. Next, we will discuss recent findings in yeast SL research concerning a crucial signaling role for SLs in orchestrating mitochondrial function, and translate these findings to relevant disease settings such as WD and NPC. In summary, recent research shows that S. cerevisiae is an invaluable model to investigate SLs as signaling molecules in modulating mitochondrial function, but can also be used as a tool to further enhance our current knowledge on SLs and mitochondria in mammalian cells. PMID:28357246

  1. Aging and male reproductive function: a mitochondrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Sandra; Amaral, Alexandra; Ramalho-Santos, Joao

    2013-01-01

    Researching the effects of aging in the male reproductive system is not trivial. Not only are multiple changes at molecular, cellular and endocrine levels involved, but any findings must be discussed with variable individual characteristics, as well as with lifestyle and environmental factors. Age-related changes in the reproductive system include any aspect of reproductive function, from deregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and of local auto/paracrine interactions, to effects on testicular stem cells, defects in testicular architecture and spermatogenesis, or sperm with decreased functionality. Several theories place mitochondria at the hub of cellular events related to aging, namely regarding the accumulation of oxidative damage to cells and tissues, a process in which these organelles play a prominent role, although alternative theories have also emerged. However, oxidative stress is not the only process involved in mitochondrial-related aging; mitochondrial energy metabolism, changes in mitochondrial DNA or in mitochondrial-dependent testosterone production are also important. Crucially, all these issues are likely interdependent. We will review evidence that suggests that mitochondria constitute a common link between aging and fertility loss.

  2. Diabetes and mitochondrial function: Role of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M. . E-mail: palmeira@ci.uc.pt

    2006-04-15

    Hyperglycemia resulting from uncontrolled glucose regulation is widely recognized as the causal link between diabetes and diabetic complications. Four major molecular mechanisms have been implicated in hyperglycemia-induced tissue damage: activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms via de novo synthesis of the lipid second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG), increased hexosamine pathway flux, increased advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation, and increased polyol pathway flux. Hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of superoxide is the causal link between high glucose and the pathways responsible for hyperglycemic damage. In fact, diabetes is typically accompanied by increased production of free radicals and/or impaired antioxidant defense capabilities, indicating a central contribution for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the onset, progression, and pathological consequences of diabetes. Besides oxidative stress, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated a link between various disturbances in mitochondrial functioning and type 2 diabetes. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and decreases in mtDNA copy number have been linked to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The study of the relationship of mtDNA to type 2 diabetes has revealed the influence of the mitochondria on nuclear-encoded glucose transporters, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, and nuclear-encoded uncoupling proteins (UCPs) in {beta}-cell glucose toxicity. This review focuses on a range of mitochondrial factors important in the pathogenesis of diabetes. We review the published literature regarding the direct effects of hyperglycemia on mitochondrial function and suggest the possibility of regulation of mitochondrial function at a transcriptional level in response to hyperglycemia. The main goal of this review is to include a fresh consideration of pathways involved in hyperglycemia-induced diabetic complications.

  3. Effect of a polymorphism in the ND1 mitochondrial gene on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Matthew R; Ravussin, E; Rowe, M J; Pratley, R; Milner, M R; Willis, W T

    2008-02-01

    A non-silent polymorphism in the mitochondrial coding region of the ND1 gene, a subunit of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is associated with resting metabolic rate (RMR) in 245 non-diabetic Pima Indians. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of the ND1 gene polymorphism on mitochondrial function in 14 male Pima Indians. Seven subjects with an A at site 3547 of the ND1 gene (Ile at amino acid 81), and seven with a G at this site (Val) were studied. Mitochondria were isolated from 0.8 to 1.5 g of skeletal muscle obtained by needle biopsy of the lateral quadriceps muscle. In intact mitochondria, maximal (state-3) and resting (state-4) respiration rates were measured polarographically at 37 degrees C with a variety of single substrates or substrate combinations. Disrupted mitochondria were analyzed for maximal capacities through the entire electron transport chain (ETC) (NADH oxidase (NADHOX)), as well as through a segment of Complex I that is independent of the ND1 component (NADH-ferricyanide (NADH-FeCN) reductase). Mitochondria were well coupled and exhibited higher respiratory control ratios (RCRs) than rodent muscle. There were no differences between the two groups for any of the measured parameters. These results indicate that the cause of the observed association between RMR and the ND1 polymorphism is not related to in vitro mitochondrial function.

  4. Impairment of striatal mitochondrial function by acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Czerniczyniec, Analía; Lanza, E M; Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are essential for survival. Their primary function is to support aerobic respiration and to provide energy for intracellular metabolic pathways. Paraquat is a redox cycling agent capable of generating reactive oxygen species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in cortical and striatal mitochondrial function in an experimental model of acute paraquat toxicity and to compare if the brain areas and the molecular mechanisms involved were similar to those observed after chronic exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received paraquat (25 mg/Kg i.p.) or saline and were sacrificed after 24 h. Paraquat treatment decreased complex I and IV activity by 37 and 21 % respectively in striatal mitochondria. Paraquat inhibited striatal state 4 and state 3 KCN-sensitive respiration by 80 % and 62 % respectively, indicating a direct effect on respiratory chain. An increase of 2.2 fold in state 4 and 2.3 fold in state 3 in KCN-insensitive respiration was observed in striatal mitochondria from paraquat animals, suggesting that paraquat redox cycling also consumed oxygen. Paraquat treatment increased hydrogen peroxide production (150 %), TBARS production (42 %) and cardiolipin oxidation/depletion (12 %) in striatal mitochondria. Also, changes in mitochondrial polarization was induced after paraquat treatment. However, no changes were observed in any of these parameters in cortical mitochondria from paraquat treated-animals. These results suggest that paraquat treatment induced a clear striatal mitochondrial dysfunction due to both paraquat redox cycling reactions and impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport, causing oxidative damage. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction could probably lead to alterations in cellular bioenergetics.

  5. Mitochondrial Ceramide-Rich Macrodomains Functionalize Bax upon Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunmi; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Mesicek, Judith; Penate-Medina, Tuula; Rimner, Andreas; Liao, Wen-Chieh; Yin, Xianglei; Ragupathi, Govind; Ehleiter, Desiree; Gulbins, Erich; Zhai, Dayong; Reed, John C.; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that Bax functions as a “lipidic” pore to regulate mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), the apoptosis commitment step, through unknown membrane elements. Here we show mitochondrial ceramide elevation facilitates MOMP-mediated cytochrome c release in HeLa cells by generating a previously-unrecognized mitochondrial ceramide-rich macrodomain (MCRM), which we visualize and isolate, into which Bax integrates. Methodology/Principal Findings MCRMs, virtually non-existent in resting cells, form upon irradiation coupled to ceramide synthase-mediated ceramide elevation, optimizing Bax insertion/oligomerization and MOMP. MCRMs are detected by confocal microscopy in intact HeLa cells and isolated biophysically as a light membrane fraction from HeLa cell lysates. Inhibiting ceramide generation using a well-defined natural ceramide synthase inhibitor, Fumonisin B1, prevented radiation-induced Bax insertion, oligomerization and MOMP. MCRM deconstruction using purified mouse hepatic mitochondria revealed ceramide alone is non-apoptogenic. Rather Bax integrates into MCRMs, oligomerizing therein, conferring 1–2 log enhanced cytochrome c release. Consistent with this mechanism, MCRM Bax isolates as high molecular weight “pore-forming” oligomers, while non-MCRM membrane contains exclusively MOMP-incompatible monomeric Bax. Conclusions/Significance Our recent studies in the C. elegans germline indicate that mitochondrial ceramide generation is obligate for radiation-induced apoptosis, although a mechanism for ceramide action was not delineated. Here we demonstrate that ceramide, generated in the mitochondrial outer membrane of mammalian cells upon irradiation, forms a platform into which Bax inserts, oligomerizes and functionalizes as a pore. We posit conceptualization of ceramide as a membrane-based stress calibrator, driving membrane macrodomain organization, which in mitochondria regulates intensity of Bax-induced MOMP, and is

  6. Characterization of mitochondrial function in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function.

    PubMed

    Atlante, Anna; Favia, Maria; Bobba, Antonella; Guerra, Lorenzo; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-06-01

    Evidence supporting the occurrence of oxidative stress in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is well established and the literature suggests that oxidative stress is inseparably linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we have characterized mitochondrial function, in particular as it regards the steps of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS production, in airway cells either homozygous for the F508del-CFTR allele or stably expressing wt-CFTR. We find that oxygen consumption, ΔΨ generation, adenine nucleotide translocator-dependent ADP/ATP exchange and both mitochondrial Complex I and IV activities are impaired in CF cells, while both mitochondrial ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation increase. Importantly, treatment of CF cells with the small molecules VX-809 and 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin, which act as "correctors" for F508del CFTR by rescuing the F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion, while having no effect per sè on mitochondrial function in wt-CFTR cells, significantly improved all the above mitochondrial parameters towards values found in the airway cells expressing wt-CFTR. This novel study on mitochondrial bioenergetics provides a springboard for future research to further understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the involvement of mitochondria in CF and identify the proteins primarily responsible for the F508del-CFTR-dependent mitochondrial impairment and thus reveal potential novel targets for CF therapy.

  7. Large-scale chemical dissection of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Bridget K; Kitami, Toshimori; Gilbert, Tamara J; Peck, David; Ramanathan, Arvind; Schreiber, Stuart L; Golub, Todd R; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2008-03-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is under the control of both mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear genomes and is central to energy homeostasis. To investigate how its function and regulation are integrated within cells, we systematically combined four cell-based assays of OXPHOS physiology with multiplexed measurements of nuclear and mtDNA gene expression across 2,490 small-molecule perturbations in cultured muscle. Mining the resulting compendium revealed, first, that protein synthesis inhibitors can decouple coordination of nuclear and mtDNA transcription; second, that a subset of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, combined with propranolol, can cause mitochondrial toxicity, yielding potential clues about the etiology of statin myopathy; and, third, that structurally diverse microtubule inhibitors stimulate OXPHOS transcription while suppressing reactive oxygen species, via a transcriptional mechanism involving PGC-1alpha and ERRalpha, and thus may be useful in treating age-associated degenerative disorders. Our screening compendium can be used as a discovery tool both for understanding mitochondrial biology and toxicity and for identifying novel therapeutics.

  8. Regulation of mitochondrial functions by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangbin; Smith, Kelly R; Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve; Tian, Rong; Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria are double membrane-bound organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. They generate most of the cell's energy supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are critical mechanisms in the regulation of cell signaling networks and are essential for almost all the cellular functions. For many decades, mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles merely functioning to generate energy for cells to survive and proliferate, and were thought to be independent of the cellular signaling networks. Consequently, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation processes of mitochondrial kinases and phosphatases were largely neglected. However, evidence accumulated in recent years on mitochondria-localized kinases/phosphatases has changed this longstanding view. Mitochondria are increasingly recognized as a hub for cell signaling, and many kinases and phosphatases have been reported to localize in mitochondria and play important functions. However, the strength of the evidence on mitochondrial localization and the activities of the reported kinases and phosphatases vary greatly, and the detailed mechanisms on how these kinases/phosphatases translocate to mitochondria, their subsequent function, and the physiological and pathological implications of their localization are still poorly understood. Here, we provide an updated perspective on the recent advancement in this area, with an emphasis on the implications of mitochondrial kinases/phosphatases in cancer and several other diseases.

  9. Structure-function analysis of the yeast mitochondrial Rho GTPase, Gem1p: implications for mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Takumi; Holman, Holly A; Kubara, Kenji; Yasukawa, Kai; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Okamoto, Koji; MacFarlane, Jane; Shaw, Janet M

    2011-01-07

    Mitochondria undergo continuous cycles of homotypic fusion and fission, which play an important role in controlling organelle morphology, copy number, and mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Because mitochondria cannot be generated de novo, the motility and distribution of these organelles are essential for their inheritance by daughter cells during division. Mitochondrial Rho (Miro) GTPases are outer mitochondrial membrane proteins with two GTPase domains and two EF-hand motifs, which act as receptors to regulate mitochondrial motility and inheritance. Here we report that although all of these domains are biochemically active, only the GTPase domains are required for the mitochondrial inheritance function of Gem1p (the yeast Miro ortholog). Mutations in either of the Gem1p GTPase domains completely abrogated mitochondrial inheritance, although the mutant proteins retained half the GTPase activity of the wild-type protein. Although mitochondrial inheritance was not dependent upon Ca(2+) binding by the two EF-hands of Gem1p, a functional N-terminal EF-hand I motif was critical for stable expression of Gem1p in vivo. Our results suggest that basic features of Miro protein function are conserved from yeast to humans, despite differences in the cellular machinery mediating mitochondrial distribution in these organisms.

  10. Regulation and quantification of cellular mitochondrial morphology and content.

    PubMed

    Tronstad, Karl J; Nooteboom, Marco; Nilsson, Linn I H; Nikolaisen, Julie; Sokolewicz, Maciek; Grefte, Sander; Pettersen, Ina K N; Dyrstad, Sissel; Hoel, Fredrik; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in signal transduction, redox homeostasis and cell survival, which extends far beyond their classical functioning in ATP production and energy metabolism. In living cells, mitochondrial content ("mitochondrial mass") depends on the cell-controlled balance between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation. These processes are intricately linked to changes in net mitochondrial morphology and spatiotemporal positioning ("mitochondrial dynamics"), which are governed by mitochondrial fusion, fission and motility. It is becoming increasingly clear that mitochondrial mass and dynamics, as well as its ultrastructure and volume, are mechanistically linked to mitochondrial function and the cell. This means that proper quantification of mitochondrial morphology and content is of prime importance in understanding mitochondrial and cellular physiology in health and disease. This review first presents how cellular mitochondrial content is regulated at the level of mitochondrial biogenesis, degradation and dynamics. Next we discuss how mitochondrial dynamics and content can be analyzed with a special emphasis on quantitative live-cell microscopy strategies.

  11. Mitochondrial function in Antarctic nototheniids with ND6 translocation.

    PubMed

    Mark, Felix C; Lucassen, Magnus; Strobel, Anneli; Barrera-Oro, Esteban; Koschnick, Nils; Zane, Lorenzo; Patarnello, Tomaso; Pörtner, Hans O; Papetti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6), an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system.This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH) and complex II (Succinate DH) to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH:Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts.During acute thermal challenge (0-15°C), capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase) was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish.

  12. Mitochondrial Function in Antarctic Nototheniids with ND6 Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Felix C.; Lucassen, Magnus; Strobel, Anneli; Barrera-Oro, Esteban; Koschnick, Nils; Zane, Lorenzo; Patarnello, Tomaso; Pörtner, Hans O.; Papetti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6), an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system. This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH) and complex II (Succinate DH) to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH∶Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts. During acute thermal challenge (0–15°C), capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase) was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish. PMID

  13. Reye's syndrome: salicylate and mitochondrial monoamine oxidase function

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Caplan, D.; Lolies, P.

    1986-03-01

    It has been suggested that aspirin is somehow linked with the onset of Reye's syndrome (RS). A general feature of Reye's syndrome is severe impairment of mitochondrial monoamine oxidase (MAO) function. The main objective of this investigation was to study the effect of salicylate on platelet mitochondrial MAO activity in three groups: group A (healthy children, n = 21) and group C (healthy adults, n = 10). Platelet MAO was measured by radio-enzymatic technique with /sup 14/C-tyramine as a substrate. The results showed that salicyclate (10 mM) had a 20 to 60 percent inhibitory effect on platelet MAO function in only 1, 3 and 2 of the subjects in group A, B and C. Furthermore, there was an association between low enzyme activity and salicylate MAO inhibitory effect in these subjects. These preliminary findings suggest that salicylate may induce deterioration in mitochondrial function in susceptible individuals and that the assessment of salicylate MAO inhibitory effect may identify those who may be at risk to develop aspirin poisoning and Reye's syndrome.

  14. Quercetin Affects Erythropoiesis and Heart Mitochondrial Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Paula A.; Barreto, Marlen; Elorza, Alvaro A.

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid used as a food supplement, showed powerful antioxidant effects in different cellular models. However, recent in vitro and in vivo studies in mammals have suggested a prooxidant effect of quercetin and described an interaction with mitochondria causing an increase in O2 ∙− production, a decrease in ATP levels, and impairment of respiratory chain in liver tissue. Therefore, because of its dual actions, we studied the effect of quercetin in vivo to analyze heart mitochondrial function and erythropoiesis. Mice were injected with 50 mg/kg of quercetin for 15 days. Treatment with quercetin decreased body weight, serum insulin, and ceruloplasmin levels as compared with untreated mice. Along with an impaired antioxidant capacity in plasma, quercetin-treated mice showed a significant delay on erythropoiesis progression. Heart mitochondrial function was also impaired displaying more protein oxidation and less activity for IV, respectively, than no-treated mice. In addition, a significant reduction in the protein expression levels of Mitofusin 2 and Voltage-Dependent Anion Carrier was observed. All these results suggest that quercetin affects erythropoiesis and mitochondrial function and then its potential use as a dietary supplement should be reexamined. PMID:26106459

  15. Improving Mitochondrial Function Protects Bumblebees from Neonicotinoid Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Powner, Michael B; Salt, Thomas E; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Global pollination is threatened by declining insect pollinator populations that may be linked to neonicotinoid pesticide use. Neonicotinoids over stimulate neurons and depolarize their mitochondria, producing immobility and death. However, mitochondrial function can be improved by near infrared light absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondrial respiration. In flies, daily exposure to 670nm light throughout life increases average lifespan and aged mobility, and reduces systemic inflammation. Here we treat bumble bees with Imidacloprid a common neonicotinoid. This undermined ATP and rapidly induced immobility and reduced visual function and survival. Bees exposed to insecticide and daily to 670nm light showed corrected ATP levels and significantly improved mobility allowing them to feed. Physiological recordings from eyes revealed that light exposure corrected deficits induced by the pesticide. Overall, death rates in bees exposed to insecticide but also given 670nm light were indistinguishable from controls. When Imidacloprid and light exposure were withdrawn, survival was maintained. Bees and insects generally cannot see deep red light so it does not disturb their behaviour. Hence, we show that deep red light exposure that improves mitochondrial function, reverses the sensory and motor deficits induced by Imidacloprid. These results may have important implications as light delivery is economic and can be placed in hives/colonies.

  16. Hyperforin promotes mitochondrial function and development of oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanlin; Zhang, Yanbo; He, Jue; Zhang, Handi; Xiao, Lan; Nazarali, Adil; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Dai; Tan, Qingrong; Kong, Jiming; Li, Xin-Min

    2011-11-01

    St. John's wort has been found to be an effective and safe herbal treatment for depression in several clinical trials. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects is unclear. Recent studies show that the loss and malfunction of oligodendrocytes are closely related to the neuropathological changes in depression, which can be reversed by antidepressant treatment. In this study, we evaluated the effects of hyperforin, a major active component of St. John's wort, on the proliferation, development and mitochondrial function of oligodendrocytes. The study results revealed that hyperforin promotes maturation of oligodendrocytes and increases mitochondrial function without affecting proliferation of an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line and neural stem/progenitor cells. Hyperforin also prevented mitochondrial toxin-induced cytotoxicity in an oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line. These findings suggest that hyperforin may stimulate the development and function of oligodendrocytes, which could be a mechanism of its effect in depression. Future in vitro and in vivo studies are required to further characterize the mechanisms of hyperforin.

  17. Improving Mitochondrial Function Protects Bumblebees from Neonicotinoid Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Powner, Michael B.; Salt, Thomas E.; Hogg, Chris; Jeffery, Glen

    2016-01-01

    Global pollination is threatened by declining insect pollinator populations that may be linked to neonicotinoid pesticide use. Neonicotinoids over stimulate neurons and depolarize their mitochondria, producing immobility and death. However, mitochondrial function can be improved by near infrared light absorbed by cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondrial respiration. In flies, daily exposure to 670nm light throughout life increases average lifespan and aged mobility, and reduces systemic inflammation. Here we treat bumble bees with Imidacloprid a common neonicotinoid. This undermined ATP and rapidly induced immobility and reduced visual function and survival. Bees exposed to insecticide and daily to 670nm light showed corrected ATP levels and significantly improved mobility allowing them to feed. Physiological recordings from eyes revealed that light exposure corrected deficits induced by the pesticide. Overall, death rates in bees exposed to insecticide but also given 670nm light were indistinguishable from controls. When Imidacloprid and light exposure were withdrawn, survival was maintained. Bees and insects generally cannot see deep red light so it does not disturb their behaviour. Hence, we show that deep red light exposure that improves mitochondrial function, reverses the sensory and motor deficits induced by Imidacloprid. These results may have important implications as light delivery is economic and can be placed in hives/colonies. PMID:27846310

  18. Effects of exercise and ethanol on liver mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Ardies, C.M.; Morris, G.S.; Erickson, C.K.; Farrar, R.P.

    1987-03-16

    Rates of ADP stimulated respiration for various substrates were determined in mitochondria isolated from the livers of female Sprague-Dawley rats following 8 weeks of treatment with daily swimming, ethanol consumption, or both. All rats were fed an American Institute of Nutrition (AIN) type liquid diet with the ethanol treated rats receiving 35% of the calories as ethanol. Chronic exposure to ethanol depressed both state 3 respiration with glutamate as a substrate and cytochrome oxidase activity. Respiratory control ratios and P:O ratios, however, were unaffected by the ethanol exposure. Exercise alone had no effect on hepatic mitochondrial function. There were also no significant alterations in oxidative function of hepatic mitochondria from rats which were endurance-trained by swimming while receiving the ethanol diet. This lack of alteration in mitochondrial function was in spite of the fact that these rats consumed an identical amount of ethanol as those which incurred mitochondrial dysfunction. These results indicate that regular exercise has the potential to attenuate the ethanol induced decline in hepatic mitochondria. 32 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-10-22

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K(+) ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K(+) ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K(+) ionophore) and nigericin (K(+)/H(+) exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K(+)/H(+) exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary

  20. The emerging role of Nrf2 in mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2; gene name NFE2L2) allows adaptation and survival under conditions of stress by regulating the gene expression of diverse networks of cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification enzymes as well as proteins that assist in the repair or removal of damaged macromolecules. Nrf2 has a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the biosynthesis, utilization, and regeneration of glutathione, thioredoxin, and NADPH and by controlling the production of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria and NADPH oxidase. Under homeostatic conditions, Nrf2 affects the mitochondrial membrane potential, fatty acid oxidation, availability of substrates (NADH and FADH2/succinate) for respiration, and ATP synthesis. Under conditions of stress or growth factor stimulation, activation of Nrf2 counteracts the increased reactive oxygen species production in mitochondria via transcriptional upregulation of uncoupling protein 3 and influences mitochondrial biogenesis by maintaining the levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, as well as by promoting purine nucleotide biosynthesis. Pharmacological Nrf2 activators, such as the naturally occurring isothiocyanate sulforaphane, inhibit oxidant-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and mitochondrial swelling. Curiously, a synthetic 1,4-diphenyl-1,2,3-triazole compound, originally designed as an Nrf2 activator, was found to promote mitophagy, thereby contributing to the overall mitochondrial homeostasis. Thus, Nrf2 is a prominent player in supporting the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondria, and this role is particularly crucial under conditions of stress. PMID:25975984

  1. Early effects of the antineoplastic agent salinomycin on mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Managò, A; Leanza, L; Carraretto, L; Sassi, N; Grancara, S; Quintana-Cabrera, R; Trimarco, V; Toninello, A; Scorrano, L; Trentin, L; Semenzato, G; Gulbins, E; Zoratti, M; Szabò, I

    2015-01-01

    Salinomycin, isolated from Streptomyces albus, displays antimicrobial activity. Recently, a large-scale screening approach identified salinomycin and nigericin as selective apoptosis inducers of cancer stem cells. Growing evidence suggests that salinomycin is able to kill different types of non-stem tumor cells that usually display resistance to common therapeutic approaches, but the mechanism of action of this molecule is still poorly understood. Since salinomycin has been suggested to act as a K+ ionophore, we explored its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic performance at an early time point following drug application. In contrast to the K+ ionophore valinomycin, salinomycin induced a rapid hyperpolarization. In addition, mitochondrial matrix acidification and a significant decrease of respiration were observed in intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in cancer stem cell-like HMLE cells within tens of minutes, while increased production of reactive oxygen species was not detected. By comparing the chemical structures and cellular effects of this drug with those of valinomycin (K+ ionophore) and nigericin (K+/H+ exchanger), we conclude that salinomycin mediates K+/H+ exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Compatible with its direct modulation of mitochondrial function, salinomycin was able to induce cell death also in Bax/Bak-less double-knockout MEF cells. Since at the concentration range used in most studies (around 10 μM) salinomycin exerts its effect at the level of mitochondria and alters bioenergetic performance, the specificity of its action on pathologic B cells isolated from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) versus B cells from healthy subjects was investigated. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), proposed to mimic the tumor environment, attenuated the apoptotic effect of salinomycin on B-CLL cells. Apoptosis occurred to a significant extent in healthy B cells as well as in MSCs and human primary fibroblasts. The

  2. The emerging role of Nrf2 in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2015-11-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2; gene name NFE2L2) allows adaptation and survival under conditions of stress by regulating the gene expression of diverse networks of cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification enzymes as well as proteins that assist in the repair or removal of damaged macromolecules. Nrf2 has a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the biosynthesis, utilization, and regeneration of glutathione, thioredoxin, and NADPH and by controlling the production of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria and NADPH oxidase. Under homeostatic conditions, Nrf2 affects the mitochondrial membrane potential, fatty acid oxidation, availability of substrates (NADH and FADH2/succinate) for respiration, and ATP synthesis. Under conditions of stress or growth factor stimulation, activation of Nrf2 counteracts the increased reactive oxygen species production in mitochondria via transcriptional upregulation of uncoupling protein 3 and influences mitochondrial biogenesis by maintaining the levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, as well as by promoting purine nucleotide biosynthesis. Pharmacological Nrf2 activators, such as the naturally occurring isothiocyanate sulforaphane, inhibit oxidant-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and mitochondrial swelling. Curiously, a synthetic 1,4-diphenyl-1,2,3-triazole compound, originally designed as an Nrf2 activator, was found to promote mitophagy, thereby contributing to the overall mitochondrial homeostasis. Thus, Nrf2 is a prominent player in supporting the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondria, and this role is particularly crucial under conditions of stress. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The relationship between mitochondrial shape and function and the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Anesti, Vasiliki; Scorrano, Luca

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial organelles for life and death of the cell. They are prominent players in energy conversion and integrated signaling pathways including regulation of Ca2+ signals and apoptosis. Their functional versatility is matched by their morphological plasticity and by their high mobility, allowing their transport at specialized cellular sites. This transport occurs by interactions with a variety of cytoskeletal proteins that also have the ability to influence shape and function of the organelle. A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondria use cytoskeletal proteins as tracks for their movement; in turn, mitochondrial morphology and function is regulated via mostly uncharacterized pathways, by the cytoskeleton.

  4. Defining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC DifferentiationDefining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC Differentiation Differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) undergo mitochondrial maturation leading to a switch from a system dependent upon glycolysis to a re...

  5. Defining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC DifferentiationDefining a Model for Mitochondrial Function in mESC Differentiation Differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) undergo mitochondrial maturation leading to a switch from a system dependent upon glycolysis to a re...

  6. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Excitable Cells: Modulators of Mitochondrial and Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrion is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide (O2•−) is generated under specific bioenergetic conditions at several sites within the electron-transport system; most is converted to H2O2 inside and outside the mitochondrial matrix by superoxide dismutases. H2O2 is a major chemical messenger that, in low amounts and with its products, physiologically modulates cell function. The redox state and ROS scavengers largely control the emission (generation scavenging) of O2•−. Cell ischemia, hypoxia, or toxins can result in excess O2•− production when the redox state is altered and the ROS scavenger systems are overwhelmed. Too much H2O2 can combine with Fe2+ complexes to form reactive ferryl species (e.g., Fe(IV) = O•). In the presence of nitric oxide (NO•), O2•− forms the reactant peroxynitrite (ONOO−), and ONOOH-induced nitrosylation of proteins, DNA, and lipids can modify their structure and function. An initial increase in ROS can cause an even greater increase in ROS and allow excess mitochondrial Ca2+ entry, both of which are factors that induce cell apoptosis and necrosis. Approaches to reduce excess O2•− emission include selectively boosting the antioxidant capacity, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation to reduce generation of O2•− by inducing proton leak, and reversibly inhibiting electron transport. Mitochondrial cation channels and exchangers function to maintain matrix homeostasis and likely play a role in modulating mitochondrial function, in part by regulating O2•− generation. Cell-signaling pathways induced physiologically by ROS include effects on thiol groups and disulfide linkages to modify posttranslationally protein structure to activate/inactivate specific kinase/phosphatase pathways. Hypoxia-inducible factors that stimulate a cascade of gene transcription may be mediated physiologically by ROS. Our knowledge of the role played by ROS and their scavenging systems in

  7. Impaired cortical mitochondrial function following TBI precedes behavioral changes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, William D.; Buonora, John E.; Yarnell, Angela M.; Lucky, Jessica J.; D’Acchille, Michaela I.; McMullen, David C.; Boston, Andrew G.; Kuczmarski, Andrew V.; Kean, William S.; Verma, Ajay; Grunberg, Neil E.; Cole, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathophysiology can be attributed to either the immediate, primary physical injury, or the delayed, secondary injury which begins minutes to hours after the initial injury and can persist for several months or longer. Because these secondary cascades are delayed and last for a significant time period post-TBI, they are primary research targets for new therapeutics. To investigate changes in mitochondrial function after a brain injury, both the cortical impact site and ipsilateral hippocampus of adult male rats 7 and 17 days after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury were examined. State 3, state 4, and uncoupler-stimulated rates of oxygen consumption, respiratory control ratios (RCRs) were measured and membrane potential quantified, and all were significantly decreased in 7 day post-TBI cortical mitochondria. By contrast, hippocampal mitochondria at 7 days showed only non-significant decreases in rates of oxygen consumption and membrane potential. NADH oxidase activities measured in disrupted mitochondria were normal in both injured cortex and hippocampus at 7 days post-CCI. Respiratory and phosphorylation capacities at 17 days post-CCI were comparable to naïve animals for both cortical and hippocampus mitochondria. However, unlike oxidative phosphorylation, membrane potential of mitochondria in the cortical lining of the impact site did not recover at 17 days, suggesting that while diminished cortical membrane potential at 17 days does not adversely affect mitochondrial capacity to synthesize ATP, it may negatively impact other membrane potential-sensitive mitochondrial functions. Memory status, as assessed by a passive avoidance paradigm, was not significantly impaired until 17 days after injury. These results indicate pronounced disturbances in cortical mitochondrial function 7 days after CCI which precede the behavioral impairment observed at 17 days. PMID:24550822

  8. Dietary nitrate does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve muscle mitochondrial function in mitochondrial myopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Nabben, Miranda; Schmitz, Joep P J; Ciapaite, Jolita; Le Clercq, Carlijn M P; van Riel, Natal A; Haak, Harm R; Nicolay, Klaas; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Smeets, Hubert J M; Praet, Stephan F; van Loon, Luc J C; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2017-02-08

    Muscle weakness and exercise intolerance negatively affect the quality of life of mitochondrial myopathy patients. Short-term dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to improve exercise performance and reduce oxygen cost of exercise in healthy humans and trained athletes. We investigated if 1 week of dietary inorganic nitrate supplementation decreases the oxygen cost of exercise and improves mitochondrial function in mitochondrial myopathy patients. Ten mitochondrial myopathy patients (40 ± 5 years, maximal whole-body oxygen uptake = 21.2 ± 3.2 mL/min/kg body weight, maximal workload = 122 ± 26 W) received 8.5 mg/kg body weight/day of inorganic nitrate (~7 mmol) for 8 days. Whole-body oxygen consumption at 50% of the maximal workload, in vivo skeletal muscle oxidative capacity (evaluated from post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy) and ex vivo mitochondrial oxidative capacity in permeabilized skinned muscle fibers (measured with high-resolution respirometry) were determined before and after nitrate supplementation. Despite a 6-fold increase in plasma nitrate levels, nitrate supplementation did not affect whole-body oxygen cost during submaximal exercise. Additionally, no beneficial effects of nitrate were found on in vivo or ex vivo muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity. This is the first time that the therapeutic potential of dietary nitrate for mitochondrial myopathy patients was evaluated. We conclude that 1 week of dietary nitrate supplementation does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve mitochondrial function in the group of patients tested.

  9. Mitochondrial delivery of antisense RNA by MITO-Porter results in mitochondrial RNA knockdown, and has a functional impact on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ryo; Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial genome-targeting nucleic acids are promising therapeutic candidates for treating mitochondrial diseases. To date, a number of systems for delivering genetic information to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported, and several successful gene therapies involving gene delivery targeted to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported. However, much less progress has been made concerning mitochondrial gene delivery systems, and mitochondrial gene therapy has never been achieved. Here, we report on the mitochondrial delivery of an antisense RNA oligonucleotide (ASO) to perform mitochondrial RNA knockdown to regulate mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO was achieved using a combination of a MITO-Porter system, which contains mitochondrial fusogenic lipid envelopes for mitochondrial delivery via membrane fusion and D-arm, a mitochondrial import signal of tRNA to the matrix. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO induces the knockdown of the targeted mitochondria-encoded mRNA and protein, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential was depolarized by the down regulation of the respiratory chain as the result of the mitochondrial delivery of ASO. This finding constitutes the first report to demonstrate that the nanocarrier-mediated mitochondrial genome targeting of antisense RNA effects mitochondrial function.

  10. Characteristics and Possible Functions of Mitochondrial Ca2+ Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Thomas E.; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria produce around 92% of the ATP used in the typical animal cell by oxidative phosphorylation using energy from their electrochemical proton gradient. Intramitochondrial free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m) has been found to be an important component of control of the rate of this ATP production. In addition, [Ca2+]m also controls the opening of a large pore in the inner mitochondrial membrane, the permeability transition pore (PTP), which plays a role in mitochondrial control of programmed cell death or apoptosis. Therefore, [Ca2+]m can control whether the cell has sufficient ATP to fulfill its functions and survive or is condemned to death. Ca2+ is also one of the most important second messengers within the cytosol, signaling changes in cellular response through Ca2+ pulses or transients. Mitochondria can also sequester Ca2+ from these transients so as to modify the shape of Ca2+ signaling transients or control their location within the cell. All of this is controlled by the action of four or five mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mechanisms and the PTP. The characteristics of these mechanisms of Ca2+ transport and a discussion of how they might function are described in this paper. PMID:19161975

  11. Sex differences in mitochondrial (dys)function: Implications for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research have revealed numerous differences in brain structure size, connectivity and metabolism between males and females. Sex differences in neurobehavioral and cognitive function after various forms of central nervous system (CNS) injury are observed in clinical practice and animal research studies. Sources of sex differences include early life exposure to gonadal hormones, chromosome compliment and adult hormonal modulation. It is becoming increasingly apparent that mitochondrial metabolism and cell death signaling are also sexually dimorphic. Mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of CNS injury. Evidence suggests males predominantly utilize proteins while females predominantly use lipids as a fuel source within mitochondria and that these differences may significantly affect cellular survival following injury. These fundamental biochemical differences have a profound impact on energy production and many cellular processes in health and disease. This review will focus on the accumulated evidence revealing sex differences in mitochondrial function and cellular signaling pathways in the context of CNS injury mechanisms and the potential implications for neuroprotective therapy development. PMID:25293493

  12. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hansong; O’Farrell, Patrick H.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection1. Contrastingly, matchups between distant genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes revealed that the non-coding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, within each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission. PMID:27270106

  13. Selfish drive can trump function when animal mitochondrial genomes compete.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hansong; O'Farrell, Patrick H

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial genomes compete for transmission from mother to progeny. We explored this competition by introducing a second genome into Drosophila melanogaster to follow transmission. Competitions between closely related genomes favored those functional in electron transport, resulting in a host-beneficial purifying selection. In contrast, matchups between distantly related genomes often favored those with negligible, negative or lethal consequences, indicating selfish selection. Exhibiting powerful selfish selection, a genome carrying a detrimental mutation displaced a complementing genome, leading to population death after several generations. In a different pairing, opposing selfish and purifying selection counterbalanced to give stable transmission of two genomes. Sequencing of recombinant mitochondrial genomes showed that the noncoding region, containing origins of replication, governs selfish transmission. Uniparental inheritance prevents encounters between distantly related genomes. Nonetheless, in each maternal lineage, constant competition among sibling genomes selects for super-replicators. We suggest that this relentless competition drives positive selection, promoting change in the sequences influencing transmission.

  14. ASB9 interacts with ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase and inhibits mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ankyrin repeat and suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) box proteins (Asbs) are a large protein family implicated in diverse biological processes including regulation of proliferation and differentiation. The SOCS box of Asb proteins is important in a ubiquitination-mediated proteolysis pathway. Here, we aimed to evaluate expression and function of human Asb-9 (ASB9). Results We found that a variant of ASB9 that lacks the SOCS box (ASB9ΔSOCS) was naturally detected in human cell lines but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells or normal hepatocytes. We also identified ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase (uMtCK) as a new target of ASB9 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. The ankyrin repeat domains of ASB9 can associate with the substrate binding site of uMtCK in a SOCS box-independent manner. The overexpression of ASB9, but not ASB9ΔSOCS, induces ubiquitination of uMtCK. ASB9 and ASB9ΔSOCS can interact and colocalise with uMtCK in the mitochondria. However, only expression of ASB9 induced abnormal mitochondrial structure and a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, the creatine kinase activities and cell growth were significantly reduced by ASB9 but not by ASB9ΔSOCS. Conclusions ASB9 interacts with the creatine kinase system and negatively regulates cell growth. The differential expression and function of ASB9 and ASB9ΔSOCS may be a key factor in the growth of human cell lines and primary cells. PMID:20302626

  15. Acidosis overrides oxygen deprivation to maintain mitochondrial function and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Khacho, Mireille; Tarabay, Michelle; Patten, David; Khacho, Pamela; MacLaurin, Jason G.; Guadagno, Jennifer; Bergeron, Richard; Cregan, Sean P.; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Park, David S.; Slack, Ruth S.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained cellular function and viability of high-energy demanding post-mitotic cells rely on the continuous supply of ATP. The utilization of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for efficient ATP generation is a function of oxygen levels. As such, oxygen deprivation, in physiological or pathological settings, has profound effects on cell metabolism and survival. Here we show that mild extracellular acidosis, a physiological consequence of anaerobic metabolism, can reprogramme the mitochondrial metabolic pathway to preserve efficient ATP production regardless of oxygen levels. Acidosis initiates a rapid and reversible homeostatic programme that restructures mitochondria, by regulating mitochondrial dynamics and cristae architecture, to reconfigure mitochondrial efficiency, maintain mitochondrial function and cell survival. Preventing mitochondrial remodelling results in mitochondrial dysfunction, fragmentation and cell death. Our findings challenge the notion that oxygen availability is a key limiting factor in oxidative metabolism and brings forth the concept that mitochondrial morphology can dictate the bioenergetic status of post-mitotic cells. PMID:24686499

  16. Metalloprotease OMA1 Fine-tunes Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Function and Respiratory Supercomplex Stability

    PubMed Central

    Bohovych, Iryna; Fernandez, Mario R.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Stackley, Krista D.; Bestman, Jennifer E.; Anandhan, Annadurai; Franco, Rodrigo; Claypool, Steven M.; Lewis, Robert E.; Chan, Sherine S. L.; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in key cellular functions including energy production, metabolic homeostasis, and apoptosis. Normal mitochondrial function is preserved by several interrelated mechanisms. One mechanism – intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) – is represented by conserved proteases distributed across mitochondrial compartments. Many aspects and physiological roles of IMQC components remain unclear. Here, we show that the IMQC protease Oma1 is required for the stability of the respiratory supercomplexes and thus balanced and tunable bioenergetic function. Loss of Oma1 activity leads to a specific destabilization of respiratory supercomplexes and consequently to unbalanced respiration and progressive respiratory decline in yeast. Similarly, experiments in cultured Oma1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts link together impeded supercomplex stability and inability to maintain proper respiration under conditions that require maximal bioenergetic output. Finally, transient knockdown of OMA1 in zebrafish leads to impeded bioenergetics and morphological defects of the heart and eyes. Together, our biochemical and genetic studies in yeast, zebrafish and mammalian cells identify a novel and conserved physiological role for Oma1 protease in fine-tuning of respiratory function. We suggest that this unexpected physiological role is important for cellular bioenergetic plasticity and may contribute to Oma1-associated disease phenotypes in humans. PMID:26365306

  17. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  18. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L; Lu, Baisong; Li, P Andy

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial protein cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2l(Tg(Tyr)979Ove) or Immp2l(-/-)) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (O(2)(-)) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2l(+/-)) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l(+/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l(+/-) mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l(+/-) mice was associated with early increase in O(2)(-) production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l(+/-) mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that Immp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing O(2)(-) production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. DJ-1 Null Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells Exhibit Defects in Mitochondrial Function and Structure: Involvement of Mitochondrial Complex I Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jun Young; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soung Jung; Seo, Kang Sik; Han, Jeong Su; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung Kiel; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung Doo; Shong, Minho; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a Parkinson's disease-associated gene whose protein product has a protective role in cellular homeostasis by removing cytosolic reactive oxygen species and maintaining mitochondrial function. However, it is not clear how DJ-1 regulates mitochondrial function and why mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by DJ-1 deficiency. In a previous study we showed that DJ-1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells exhibit defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity. In the present article we investigated the role of DJ-1 in complex I formation by using blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 2-dimensional gel analysis to assess native complex status. On the basis of these experiments, we concluded that DJ-1 null cells have a defect in the assembly of complex I. Concomitant with abnormal complex I formation, DJ-1 null cells show defective supercomplex formation. It is known that aberrant formation of the supercomplex impairs the flow of electrons through the channels between respiratory chain complexes, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. We took two approaches to study these mitochondrial defects. The first approach assessed the structural defect by using both confocal microscopy with MitoTracker staining and electron microscopy. The second approach assessed the functional defect by measuring ATP production, O2 consumption, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, we showed that the assembly defect as well as the structural and functional abnormalities in DJ-1 null cells could be reversed by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of DJ-1, demonstrating the specificity of DJ-1 on these mitochondrial properties. These mitochondrial defects induced by DJ-1mutation may be a pathological mechanism for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22403686

  20. Mitochondrial function and toxicity: role of the B vitamin family on mitochondrial energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Depeint, Flore; Bruce, W Robert; Shangari, Nandita; Mehta, Rhea; O'Brien, Peter J

    2006-10-27

    The B vitamins are water-soluble vitamins required as coenzymes for enzymes essential for cell function. This review focuses on their essential role in maintaining mitochondrial function and on how mitochondria are compromised by a deficiency of any B vitamin. Thiamin (B1) is essential for the oxidative decarboxylation of the multienzyme branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes of the citric acid cycle. Riboflavin (B2) is required for the flavoenzymes of the respiratory chain, while NADH is synthesized from niacin (B3) and is required to supply protons for oxidative phosphorylation. Pantothenic acid (B5) is required for coenzyme A formation and is also essential for alpha-ketoglutarate and pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes as well as fatty acid oxidation. Biotin (B7) is the coenzyme of decarboxylases required for gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. Pyridoxal (B6), folate and cobalamin (B12) properties are reviewed elsewhere in this issue. The experimental animal and clinical evidence that vitamin B therapy alleviates B deficiency symptoms and prevents mitochondrial toxicity is also reviewed. The effectiveness of B vitamins as antioxidants preventing oxidative stress toxicity is also reviewed.

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in heart failure restores mitochondrial function and improves ventricular function and remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Katia M.S.; Campos, Juliane C.; Bechara, Luiz R.G.; Queliconi, Bruno; Lima, Vanessa M.; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Magno, Paulo; Chen, Che-Hong; Brum, Patricia C.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C.B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims We previously demonstrated that pharmacological activation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) protects the heart against acute ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Here, we determined the benefits of chronic activation of ALDH2 on the progression of heart failure (HF) using a post-myocardial infarction model. Methods and results We showed that a 6-week treatment of myocardial infarction-induced HF rats with a selective ALDH2 activator (Alda-1), starting 4 weeks after myocardial infarction at a time when ventricular remodelling and cardiac dysfunction were present, improved cardiomyocyte shortening, cardiac function, left ventricular compliance and diastolic function under basal conditions, and after isoproterenol stimulation. Importantly, sustained Alda-1 treatment showed no toxicity and promoted a cardiac anti-remodelling effect by suppressing myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis. Moreover, accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE)-protein adducts and protein carbonyls seen in HF was not observed in Alda-1-treated rats, suggesting that increasing the activity of ALDH2 contributes to the reduction of aldehydic load in failing hearts. ALDH2 activation was associated with improved mitochondrial function, including elevated mitochondrial respiratory control ratios and reduced H2O2 release. Importantly, selective ALDH2 activation decreased mitochondrial Ca2+-induced permeability transition and cytochrome c release in failing hearts. Further supporting a mitochondrial mechanism for ALDH2, Alda-1 treatment preserved mitochondrial function upon in vitro aldehydic load. Conclusions Selective activation of mitochondrial ALDH2 is sufficient to improve the HF outcome by reducing the toxic effects of aldehydic overload on mitochondrial bioenergetics and reactive oxygen species generation, suggesting that ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, have a potential therapeutic value for treating HF patients. PMID:24817685

  2. Genetically enhancing mitochondrial antioxidant activity improves muscle function in aging.

    PubMed

    Umanskaya, Alisa; Santulli, Gaetano; Xie, Wenjun; Andersson, Daniel C; Reiken, Steven R; Marks, Andrew R

    2014-10-21

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is a leading cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 or greater. Here we tested the effects of increased mitochondrial antioxidant activity on age-dependent skeletal muscle dysfunction using transgenic mice with targeted overexpression of the human catalase gene to mitochondria (MCat mice). Aged MCat mice exhibited improved voluntary exercise, increased skeletal muscle specific force and tetanic Ca(2+) transients, decreased intracellular Ca(2+) leak and increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load compared with age-matched wild type (WT) littermates. Furthermore, ryanodine receptor 1 (the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release channel required for skeletal muscle contraction; RyR1) from aged MCat mice was less oxidized, depleted of the channel stabilizing subunit, calstabin1, and displayed increased single channel open probability (Po). Overall, these data indicate a direct role for mitochondrial free radicals in promoting the pathological intracellular Ca(2+) leak that underlies age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle function. This study harbors implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, including mitochondria-targeted antioxidants for treatment of mitochondrial myopathies and other healthspan-limiting disorders.

  3. Mitochondrial activity and brain functions during cortical depolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, Avraham; Sonn, Judith

    2008-12-01

    Cortical depolarization (CD) of the cerebral cortex could be developed under various pathophysiological conditions. In animal models, CD was recorded under partial or complete ischemia as well as when cortical spreading depression (SD) was induced externally or by internal stimulus. The development of CD in patients and the changes in various metabolic parameters, during CD, was rarely reported. Brain metabolic, hemodynamic, ionic and electrical responses to the CD event are dependent upon the O2 balance in the tissue. When the O2 balance is negative (i.e. ischemia), the CD process will be developed due to mitochondrial dysfunction, lack of energy and the inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase. In contradiction, when oxygen is available (i.e. normoxia) the development of CD after induction of SD will accelerate mitochondrial respiration for retaining ionic homeostasis and normal brain functions. We used the multiparametric monitoring approach that enable real time monitoring of mitochondrial NADH redox state, microcirculatory blood flow and oxygenation, extracellular K+, Ca2+, H+ levels, DC steady potential and electrocorticogram (ECoG). This monitoring approach, provide a unique tool that has a significant value in analyzing the pathophysiology of the brain when SD developed under normoxia, ischemia, or hypoxia. We applied the same monitoring approach to patients suffered from severe head injury or exposed to neurosurgical procedures.

  4. A histidine-rich motif mediates mitochondrial localization of ZnT2 to modulate mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Ah; Lopez, Veronica; Kelleher, Shannon L

    2011-06-01

    Female reproductive tissues such as mammary glands, ovaries, uterus, and placenta are phenotypically dynamic, requiring tight integration of bioenergetic and apoptotic mechanisms. Mitochondrial zinc (Zn) pools have emerged as a central player in regulating bioenergetics and apoptosis. Zn must first be imported into mitochondria to modulate mitochondrion-specific functions; however, mitochondrial Zn import mechanisms have not been identified. Here we documented that the Zn transporter ZnT2 is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane and acts as an auxiliary Zn importer into mitochondria in mammary cells. We found that attenuation of ZnT2 expression significantly reduced mitochondrial Zn uptake and total mitochondrial Zn pools. Moreover, expression of a ZnT2-hemagglutinin (HA) fusion protein was localized to mitochondria and significantly increased Zn uptake and mitochondrial Zn pools, directly implicating ZnT2 in Zn import into mitochondria. Confocal microscopy of truncated and point mutants of ZnT2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins revealed a histidine-rich motif ((51)HHXH(54)) in the NH(2) terminus that is important for mitochondrial targeting of ZnT2. More importantly, the expansion of mitochondrial Zn pools by ZnT2 overexpression significantly reduced ATP biogenesis and mitochondrial oxidation concurrent with increased apoptosis, suggesting a functional role for ZnT2-mediated Zn import into mitochondria. These results identify the first Zn transporter directly associated with mitochondria and suggest that unique secretory tissues such as the mammary gland require novel mechanisms to modulate mitochondrion-specific functions.

  5. Actin-dependent mitochondrial internalization in cardiomyocytes: evidence for rescue of mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Pacak, Christina A.; Preble, Janine M.; Kondo, Hiroshi; Seibel, Peter; Levitsky, Sidney; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas B.; McCully, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that the transplantation of viable, structurally intact, respiration competent mitochondria into the ischemic myocardium during early reperfusion significantly enhanced cardioprotection by decreasing myocellular damage and enhancing functional recovery. Our in vitro and in vivo studies established that autologous mitochondria are internalized into cardiomyocytes following transplantation; however, the mechanism(s) modulating internalization of these organelles were unknown. Here, we show that internalization of mitochondria occurs through actin-dependent endocytosis and rescues cell function by increasing ATP content and oxygen consumption rates. We also show that internalized mitochondria replace depleted mitochondrial (mt)DNA. These results describe the mechanism for internalization of mitochondria within host cells and provide a basis for novel therapeutic interventions allowing for the rescue and replacement of damaged or impaired mitochondria. PMID:25862247

  6. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin functions as crucial chaperone reservoir in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Filipa; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Tânia; Tse, Eric; Koldewey, Philipp; Southworth, Daniel R.; Tomás, Ana M.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic eukaryotic 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins have been widely reported to act as dual-function proteins, either detoxifying reactive oxygen species or acting as chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. Several stimuli, including peroxide-mediated sulfinic acid formation at the active site cysteine, have been proposed to trigger the chaperone activity. However, the mechanism underlying this activation and the extent to which the chaperone function is crucial under physiological conditions in vivo remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that in the vector-borne protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx) exerts intrinsic ATP-independent chaperone activity, protecting a wide variety of different proteins against heat stress-mediated unfolding in vitro and in vivo. Activation of the chaperone function appears to be induced by temperature-mediated restructuring of the reduced decamers, promoting binding of unfolding client proteins in the center of Prx’s ringlike structure. Client proteins are maintained in a folding-competent conformation until restoration of nonstress conditions, upon which they are released and transferred to ATP-dependent chaperones for refolding. Interference with client binding impairs parasite infectivity, providing compelling evidence for the in vivo importance of Prx’s chaperone function. Our results suggest that reduced Prx provides a mitochondrial chaperone reservoir, which allows L. infantum to deal successfully with protein unfolding conditions during the transition from insect to the mammalian hosts and to generate viable parasites capable of perpetuating infection. PMID:25646478

  7. Mitochondrial peroxiredoxin functions as crucial chaperone reservoir in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Filipa; Castro, Helena; Cruz, Tânia; Tse, Eric; Koldewey, Philipp; Southworth, Daniel R; Tomás, Ana M; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-02-17

    Cytosolic eukaryotic 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins have been widely reported to act as dual-function proteins, either detoxifying reactive oxygen species or acting as chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. Several stimuli, including peroxide-mediated sulfinic acid formation at the active site cysteine, have been proposed to trigger the chaperone activity. However, the mechanism underlying this activation and the extent to which the chaperone function is crucial under physiological conditions in vivo remained unknown. Here we demonstrate that in the vector-borne protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, mitochondrial peroxiredoxin (Prx) exerts intrinsic ATP-independent chaperone activity, protecting a wide variety of different proteins against heat stress-mediated unfolding in vitro and in vivo. Activation of the chaperone function appears to be induced by temperature-mediated restructuring of the reduced decamers, promoting binding of unfolding client proteins in the center of Prx's ringlike structure. Client proteins are maintained in a folding-competent conformation until restoration of nonstress conditions, upon which they are released and transferred to ATP-dependent chaperones for refolding. Interference with client binding impairs parasite infectivity, providing compelling evidence for the in vivo importance of Prx's chaperone function. Our results suggest that reduced Prx provides a mitochondrial chaperone reservoir, which allows L. infantum to deal successfully with protein unfolding conditions during the transition from insect to the mammalian hosts and to generate viable parasites capable of perpetuating infection.

  8. Inhibition of reductase systems by 2-AAPA modulates peroxiredoxin oxidation and mitochondrial function in A172 glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Luiz Felipe; Schmitz, Ariana Ern; da Silva, Luana Caroline Schüler; de Oliveira, Karen Andrinéia; Nedel, Cláudia Beatriz; Tasca, Carla Inês; de Bem, Andreza Fabro; Farina, Marcelo; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2017-08-01

    Thiol homeostasis has a critical role in the maintenance of proper cellular functions and survival, being coordinated by the action of several reductive enzymes, including glutathione (GSH)/glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin (Trx)/thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) systems. Here, we investigated the effects of the GR inhibitor 2-acetylamino-3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthiocarbonylamino)phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyl]propionic acid (2-AAPA) on the activity of thiol reductases (GR and TrxR), redox balance and mitochondrial function of A172 glioblastoma cells. 2-AAPA inhibited cell GR (IC50=6.7μM) and TrxR (IC50=8.7μM). A significant decrease in the cellular ability to decompose cumene hydroperoxide was observed and associated to a greater susceptibility to this peroxide. The redox state of peroxiredoxins (Prx1, Prx2 and Prx3) was markedly shifted to dimer 30min after treatment with 100μM 2-AAPA, an event preceding 2-AAPA-induced decrease in cell viability. Furthermore, mitochondrial function was also severely impaired, leading to a decrease in the respiratory control ratio, reserve capacity, and ATP synthesis-coupled respiration, as well as an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Our results indicate that inhibition of GR and TrxR activities, disruption of the ability to detoxify peroxides, increased oxidation of Prxs, as well as compromised mitochondrial function represent early events mediating 2-AAPA toxicity to A172 glioblastoma cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Su Jin; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR)-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT), single strand binding protein (SSBP) and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM). In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25196935

  10. Mitochondrial transfer from Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells to mitochondria-defective cells recaptures impaired mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shang-Der; Hsu, Te-Yao; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Jin-Bor; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conducted mitochondrial transfer has been recently shown to rescue cellular bioenergetics and prevent cell death caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJMSCs) harvested from postpartum umbilical cords are an accessible and abundant source of stem cells. This study aimed to determine the capability of WJMSCs to transfer their own mitochondria and rescue impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and bioenergetics caused by mitochondrial DNA defects. To do this, WJMSCs were co-cultured with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted ρ(0) cells and the recapture of mitochondrial function was evaluated. WJMSCs were shown to be capable of transferring their own mitochondria into ρ(0) cells and underwent interorganellar mixture within these cells. Permissive culture media (BrdU-containing and pyruvate- and uridine-free) sieved out a survival cell population from the co-cultured WJMSCs (BrdU-sensitive) and ρ(0) cells (pyruvate/uridine-free). The survival cells had mtDNA identical to that of WJMSCs, whereas they expressed cellular markers identical to that of ρ(0) cells. Importantly, these ρ(0)-plus -WJMSC-mtDNA (ρ(+W)) cells recovered the expression of mtDNA-encoded proteins and exhibited functional oxygen consumption and respiratory control, as well as the activity of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, II, III and IV. In addition, ETC complex V-inhibitor-sensitive ATP production and metabolic shifting were also recovered. Furthermore, cellular behaviors including attachment-free proliferation, aerobic viability and OXPHOS-reliant cellular motility were also regained after mitochondrial transfer by WJMSCs. The therapeutic effect of WJMSCs-derived mitochondrial transfer was able to stably sustain for at least 45 passages. In conclusion, this study suggests that WJMSCs may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases linked to mitochondrial dysfunction through the donation of healthy

  11. Mitochondrial quality control and communications with the nucleus are important in maintaining mitochondrial function and cell health☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Kotiadis, Vassilios N.; Duchen, Michael R.; Osellame, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The maintenance of cell metabolism and homeostasis is a fundamental characteristic of living organisms. In eukaryotes, mitochondria are the cornerstone of these life supporting processes, playing leading roles in a host of core cellular functions, including energy transduction, metabolic and calcium signalling, and supporting roles in a number of biosynthetic pathways. The possession of a discrete mitochondrial genome dictates that the maintenance of mitochondrial ‘fitness’ requires quality control mechanisms which involve close communication with the nucleus. Scope of review This review explores the synergistic mechanisms that control mitochondrial quality and function and ensure cellular bioenergetic homeostasis. These include antioxidant defence mechanisms that protect against oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species, while regulating signals transduced through such free radicals. Protein homeostasis controls import, folding, and degradation of proteins underpinned by mechanisms that regulate bioenergetic capacity through the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Autophagic machinery is recruited for mitochondrial turnover through the process of mitophagy. Mitochondria also communicate with the nucleus to exact specific transcriptional responses through retrograde signalling pathways. Major conclusions The outcome of mitochondrial quality control is not only reliant on the efficient operation of the core homeostatic mechanisms but also in the effective interaction of mitochondria with other cellular components, namely the nucleus. General significance Understanding mitochondrial quality control and the interactions between the organelle and the nucleus will be crucial in developing therapies for the plethora of diseases in which the pathophysiology is determined by mitochondrial dysfunction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Frontiers of Mitochondrial Research. PMID:24211250

  12. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs. PMID:25938092

  13. Ras proteins control mitochondrial biogenesis and function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hlavatá, L; Nyström, T

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Ras proteins function as a point of convergence for different signaling pathways in eukaryotes and have been implicated in both aging and cancer development. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the plasma membrane proteins Ras1 and Ras2 are sensing the nutritional status of the environments, e.g., the abundance and quality of available carbon sources. The cAMP-protein kinase A pathway is the most explored signaling pathway controlled by Ras proteins; it affects a large number of genes, some of which are important to defend the cell against oxidative stress. In addition, recent analysis has shown that the Ras system of yeast is involved in the development of mitochondria and in regulating their activity. As a sensor of environmental status and an effector of mitochondrial activity, Ras serves as a Rosetta stone of cellular energy transduction. This review summarizes the physical and functional involvement of Ras proteins and Ras-dependent signaling pathways in mitochondrial function in S. cerevisiae. Since mitochondria produce harmful reactive oxygen species as an inevitable byproduct and are partly under control of Ras, illuminating these regulatory interactions may improve our understanding of both cancer and aging.

  14. Are patients with hormonally functional phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma initially receiving a proper adrenoceptor blockade? A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Luiz, Henrique Vara; Tanchee, Mary Jane; Pavlatou, Maria G; Yu, Run; Nambuba, Joan; Wolf, Katherine; Prodanov, Tamara; Wesley, Robert; Adams, Karen; Fojo, Tito; Pacak, Karel

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacological treatment is mandatory in patients with hormonally functional phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PHAEO/PGL). We evaluated if patients initially diagnosed with hormonally functional PHAEO/PGL by various medical subspecialties received proper adrenoceptor blockade, and analysed factors predicting the prescription of adequate treatment. In a retrospective cohort study, we reviewed data from patients initially diagnosed with hormonally functional PHAEO/PGL outside the National Institutes of Health and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, who were referred to these institutions between January 2001 and April 2015. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with proper adrenoceptor blockade. A total of 381 patients were included. Adequate pharmacological treatment was prescribed to 69·3%, of which 93·1% received α-adrenoceptor blockers. Regarding patients who were inappropriately treated, 53% did not receive any medication. Independent predictors of the prescription of a proper blockade were the diagnosis by endocrinologists [odds ratio (OR) 4·14; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2·51-6·85; P < 0·001], the presence of high blood pressure (OR 5·94; 95% CI, 3·11-11·33; P < 0·001) and the evidence of metastasis (OR 5·96; 95% CI, 1·93-18·46; P = 0·002). Although most patients received adequate pharmacological treatment, almost one-third were either not treated or received inappropriate medications. The diagnosis by endocrinologists, the presence of high blood pressure and the evidence of metastatic disease were identified as independent predictors of a proper blockade. These results highlight the need to educate physicians about the importance of starting adequate adrenoceptor blockade in all patients with hormonally functional PHAEO/PGL. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function by nuclear receptors: implications for health and disease.

    PubMed

    Perez-Schindler, Joaquin; Philp, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal muscle metabolism is highly dependent on mitochondrial function, with impaired mitochondrial biogenesis associated with the development of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Mitochondria display substantial plasticity in skeletal muscle, and are highly sensitive to levels of physical activity. It is thought that physical activity promotes mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle through increased expression of genes encoded in both the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome; however, how this process is co-ordinated at the cellular level is poorly understood. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key signalling proteins capable of integrating environmental factors and mitochondrial function, thereby providing a potential link between exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis. The aim of this review is to highlight the function of NRs in skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and discuss the therapeutic potential of NRs for the management and treatment of chronic metabolic disease.

  16. Tomato EF-Ts(mt), a functional mitochondrial translation elongation factor from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Benichou, Mohamed; Li, Zhengguo; Tournier, Barthélémy; Chaves, Ana; Zegzouti, Hicham; Jauneau, Alain; Delalande, Corinne; Latché, Alain; Bouzayen, Mondher; Spremulli, Linda L; Pech, Jean-Claude

    2003-10-01

    Ethylene-induced ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) resulted in the accumulation of a transcript designated LeEF-Ts(mt) that encodes a protein with significant homology to bacterial Ts translational elongation factor (EF-Ts). Transient expression in tobacco and sunflower protoplasts of full-length and truncated LeEF-Ts(mt)-GFP fusion constructs and confocal microscopy observations clearly demonstrated the targeting of LeEF-Ts(mt) to mitochondria and not to chloroplasts and the requirement for a signal peptide for the proper sorting of the protein. Escherichia coli recombinant LeEF-Ts(mt) co-eluted from Ni-NTA resins with a protein corresponding to the molecular weight of the elongation factor EF-Tu of E. coli, indicating an interaction with bacterial EF-Tu. Increasing the GDP concentration in the extraction buffer reduced the amount of EF-Tu in the purified LeEF-Ts(mt) fraction. The purified LeEF-Ts(mt) stimulated the poly(U)-directed polymerization of phenylalanine 10-fold in the presence of EF-Tu. Furthermore, LeEF-Ts(mt) was capable of catalysing the nucleotide exchange reaction with E. coli EF-Tu. Altogether, these data demonstrate that LeEF-Ts(mt) encodes a functional mitochondrial EF-Ts. LeEF-Ts(mt) represents the first mitochondrial elongation factor to be isolated and functionally characterized in higher plants.

  17. PHOSPHOLIPIDS ARE NEEDED FOR PROPER FORMATION, STABILITY AND FUNCTION OF THE PHOTOACTIVATED RHODOPSIN-TRANSDUCIN COMPLEX

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Goc, Anna; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins become activated after they form a catalytically active complex with activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GTP replaces GDP on the G protein α subunit. This transient coupling can be stabilized by nucleotide depletion, resulting in an empty-nucleotide G-protein-GPCR complex. Efficient and reproducible formation of conformationally homogenous GPCR-Gt complexes is a prerequisite for structural studies. Herein, we report isolation conditions that enhance the stability, and preserve activity and proper stoichiometry of productive complexes between the purified prototypical GPCR, rhodopsin (Rho), and the rod cell-specific G protein, transducin (Gt). Binding of purified Gt to photoactivated Rho (Rho*) in n-dodecyl-β-maltoside (DDM) examined by gel filtration chromatography was generally modest and purified complexes provided heterogeneous ratios of protein components, most likely because of excess detergent. Rho*-Gt complex stability and activity was greatly increased by addition of phospholipids such as DOPC, DOPE and DOPS, and asolectin to detergent-containing solutions of these proteins. In contrast, native Rho*-Gt complexes purified directly from light-exposed bovine ROS membranes by sucrose gradient centrifugation exhibited improved stability and the expected 2:1 stoichiometry between Rho* and Gt. The above results strongly indicate a lipid requirement for stable complex formation wherein the likely oligomeric structure of Rho provides a superior platform for coupling to Gt, and phospholipids likely form a matrix to which Gt can anchor through its myristoyl and farnesyl groups. Our findings also demonstrate that the choice of detergent and purification method is critical for obtaining highly purified, stable, and active complexes with appropriate stoichiometry between GPCRs and G proteins needed for structural studies. PMID:19413332

  18. Mitochondrial function in pluripotent stem cells and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bukowiecki, Raul; Adjaye, James; Prigione, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles playing pivotal roles in a range of diverse cellular functions, from energy generation to redox homeostasis and apoptosis regulation. Their loss of functionality may indeed contribute to the development of aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, mitochondria have been shown to exhibit peculiar features in pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). Moreover, an extensive restructuring of mitochondria has been observed during the process of cellular reprogramming, i.e. the conversion of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). These transformation events impact mitochondrial number, morphology, activity, cellular metabolism, and mtDNA integrity. PSCs retain the capability to self-renew indefinitely and to give rise to virtually any cell type of the body and thus hold great promise in medical research. Understanding the mitochondrial properties of PSCs, and how to modulate them, may thus help to shed light on the features of stemness and possibly increase our knowledge on cellular identity and differentiation pathways. Here, we review these recent findings and discuss their implications in the context of stem cell biology, aging research, and regenerative medicine.

  19. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress.

  20. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  1. The proper weighting function for retrieving temperatures from satellite measured radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, A.

    1976-01-01

    One class of methods for converting satellite measured radiances into atmospheric temperature profiles, involves a linearization of the radiative transfer equation: delta r = the sum of (W sub i) (delta T sub i) where (i=1...s) and where delta T sub i is the deviation of the temperature in layer i from that of a reference atmosphere, delta R is the difference in the radiance at satellite altitude from the corresponding radiance for the reference atmosphere, and W sub i is the discrete (or vector) form of the T-weighting (i.e., temperature weighting) function W(P), where P is pressure. The top layer of the atmosphere corresponds to i = 1, the bottom layer to i = s - 1, and i = s refers to the surface. Linearization in temperature (or some function of temperature) is at the heart of all linear or matrix methods. The weighting function that should be used is developed.

  2. Is the use of diffuse functions essential for the properly description of noncovalent interactions involving anions?

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Quiñonero, David; Deyà, Pere M; Frontera, Antonio

    2013-03-28

    It is commonly assumed that theoretical DFT or ab initio calculations involving anions require the utilization of diffuse functions in order to obtain reliable results. In large systems, the use of diffuse functions in the calculations increases the computational cost and, more importantly, sometimes provokes self-consistent-field (SCF) convergence problems, especially in open shell systems. Nowadays, the popular and often used bases for studying noncovalent interactions are the correlation-consistent polarized basis sets of Dunning and co-workers, denoted as cc-pVXZ (X = D, T, etc.), and the Turbomole def2 basis set family (def2-SVP and def2-TZVP). In this paper we study the effect of the utilization of diffuse functions on the energetic and geometric features of several noncovalent complexes, including hydrogen, halogen, and pnicogen bonding, lithium bonds, anion-π interactions, and van der Waals interactions.

  3. Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Disrupts Cardiac Progenitor Cell Function and Reduces Survival.

    PubMed

    Orogo, Amabel M; Gonzalez, Eileen R; Kubli, Dieter A; Baptista, Igor L; Ong, Sang-Bing; Prolla, Tomas A; Sussman, Mark A; Murphy, Anne N; Gustafsson, Åsa B

    2015-09-04

    Transfer of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) improves cardiac function in heart failure patients. However, CPC function is reduced with age, limiting their regenerative potential. Aging is associated with numerous changes in cells including accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, but it is unknown how this impacts CPC function. Here, we demonstrate that acquisition of mtDNA mutations disrupts mitochondrial function, enhances mitophagy, and reduces the replicative and regenerative capacities of the CPCs. We show that activation of differentiation in CPCs is associated with expansion of the mitochondrial network and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Interestingly, mutant CPCs are deficient in mitochondrial respiration and rely on glycolysis for energy. In response to differentiation, these cells fail to activate mitochondrial respiration. This inability to meet the increased energy demand leads to activation of cell death. These findings demonstrate the consequences of accumulating mtDNA mutations and the importance of mtDNA integrity in CPC homeostasis and regenerative potential.

  4. Anthropometric characteristics of the pubic arch and proper function of the defense mechanisms against hernia formation.

    PubMed

    López-Cano, M; Munhequete, E G; Hermosilla-Pérez, E; Armengol-Carrasco, M; Rodríguez-Baeza, A

    2005-03-01

    In 33 inguinal regions, we determined the anthropometric characteristics of the pubic arch and the anatomic structures of the suprainguinal space and assessed whether there is a relationship between anatomic features and function of the defense mechanisms. There was a low position of the pubic arch (pubic tubercle and interspinal line distance >75 mm) in 23 cases. The low-pubic-arch group showed a significantly longer inguinal ligament and a greater angle made by the superior border of the suprainguinal space and the inguinal ligament at its medial insertion. The position of the pubic arch correlated significantly with the diameter of the internal ring, the length of the inguinal ligament, and the angle made by the superior border of the suprainguinal space and the medial insertion of the inguinal ligament. A low pubic arch would represent an unfavorable condition for an adequate function of the anatomic defense mechanism against hernia.

  5. Intracellular shuttling and mitochondrial function of thioredoxin-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Geetu; Chen, Junqin; Shalev, Anath

    2010-02-05

    The thioredoxin-interacting protein TXNIP is a ubiquitously expressed redox protein that promotes apoptosis. Recently, we found that TXNIP deficiency protects against type 1 and 2 diabetes by inhibiting beta cell apoptosis and maintaining pancreatic beta cell mass, indicating that TXNIP plays a key role in beta cell biology. However, very little is known about the intracellular localization and function of TXNIP, and although TXNIP has been thought to be a cytoplasmic protein, our immunohistochemistry studies in beta cells surprisingly revealed a nuclear TXNIP localization, suggesting that TXNIP may shuttle within the cell. Using immunohistochemistry/confocal imaging and cell fractionation/co-immunoprecipitation, we found that, under physiological conditions, TXNIP is localized primarily in the nucleus of pancreatic beta cells, whereas oxidative stress leads to TXNIP shuttling into the mitochondria. In mitochondria, TXNIP binds to and oxidizes Trx2, thereby reducing Trx2 binding to ASK1 and allowing for ASK1 phosphorylation/activation, resulting in induction of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis with cytochrome c release and caspase-3 cleavage. TXNIP overexpression and Trx2 (but not cytosolic Trx1) silencing mimic these effects. Thus, we discovered that TXNIP shuttles between subcellular compartments in response to oxidative stress and identified a novel redox-sensitive mitochondrial TXNIP-Trx2-ASK1 signaling cascade.

  6. Tridecanoin is anticonvulsant, antioxidant, and improves mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kah Ni; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; McDonald, Tanya S; Puchowicz, Michelle; Borges, Karin

    2017-06-01

    The hypothesis that chronic feeding of the triglycerides of octanoate (trioctanoin) and decanoate (tridecanoin) in "a regular non-ketogenic diet" is anticonvulsant was tested and possible mechanisms of actions were subsequently investigated. Chronic feeding of 35E% of calories from tridecanoin, but not trioctanoin, was reproducibly anticonvulsant in two acute CD1 mouse seizure models. The levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate in plasma and brain were not significantly increased by either treatment relative to control diet. The respective decanoate and octanoate levels are 76 µM and 33 µM in plasma and 1.17 and 2.88 nmol/g in brain. Tridecanoin treatment did not alter the maximal activities of several glycolytic enzymes, suggesting that there is no reduction in glycolysis contributing to anticonvulsant effects. In cultured astrocytes, 200 µM of octanoic and decanoic acids increased basal respiration and ATP turnover, suggesting that both medium chain fatty acids are used as fuel. Only decanoic acid increased mitochondrial proton leak which may reduce oxidative stress. In mitochondria isolated from hippocampal formations, tridecanoin increased respiration linked to ATP synthesis, indicating that mitochondrial metabolic functions are improved. In addition, tridecanoin increased the plasma antioxidant capacity and hippocampal mRNA levels of heme oxygenase 1, and FoxO1.

  7. Mitochondrial Function and Maize Kernel Development Requires Dek2, a Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Involved in nad1 mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weiwei; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xuzhen; Zhang, Mingliang; Song, Rentao

    2017-01-01

    In flowering plants, many respiration-related proteins are encoded by the mitochondrial genome and the splicing of mitochondrion-encoded messenger RNA (mRNA) involves a complex collaboration with nuclear-encoded proteins. Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins have been implicated in these RNA-protein interactions. Maize defective kernel 2 (dek2) is a classic mutant with small kernels and delayed development. Through positional cloning and allelic confirmation, we found Dek2 encodes a novel P-type PPR protein that targets mitochondria. Mitochondrial transcript analysis indicated that dek2 mutation causes reduced splicing efficiency of mitochondrial nad1 intron 1. Mitochondrial complex analysis in dek2 immature kernels showed severe deficiency of complex I assembly. Dramatically up-regulated expression of alternative oxidases (AOXs), transcriptome data, and TEM analysis results revealed that proper splicing of nad1 is critical for mitochondrial functions and inner cristaes morphology. This study indicated that Dek2 is a new PPR protein that affects the splicing of mitochondrial nad1 intron 1 and is required for mitochondrial function and kernel development. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Boer, Magdalena; Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-02-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part - stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function.

  9. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function. PMID:26985171

  10. Ethanolamine and phosphoethanolamine inhibit mitochondrial function in vitro: implications for mitochondrial dysfunction hypothesis in depression and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S; Renshaw, Perry F

    2004-02-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, including alterations in phospholipid metabolism, might be involved in the pathophysiology of affective illnesses, such as depression and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the phosphomonoester phosphoethanolamine (PE) and the lipid metabolite choline (Cho), which are known to be altered in depression and bipolar disorder, and/or their precursors/metabolites, might directly affect mitochondrial bioenergetic function in vitro. To this end, rates of oxygen consumption in freshly isolated, intact mitochondria were determined polarographically in the presence and absence of PE, Cho, ethanolamine (Etn), glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE), and glycerophosphocholine (GPC). The data demonstrate that PE and Etn inhibit mitochondrial respiratory activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas Cho, GPC, and GPE have no measurable effect on bioenergetic function. This reflects a specific inhibition by Etn and PE on mitochondrial function rather than a more generalized phenomenon induced by similarities in structure between the lipid metabolites. These results also suggest a possible relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and altered phospholipid metabolism in the brains of patients with depression and bipolar disorder.

  11. Functional photosystem I maintains proper energy balance during nitrogen depletion in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, promoting triacylglycerol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Bates, Philip D; Park, Jeong-Jin; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Gang, David R

    2017-01-01

    Nutrient deprivation causes significant stress to the unicellular microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which responds by significantly altering its metabolic program. Following N deprivation, the accumulation of starch and triacylglycerols (TAGs) is significantly altered following massive reprogramming of cellular metabolism. One protein that was found to change dramatically and early to this stress was TAB2, a photosystem I (PSI) translation initiation factor, whose transcript and protein levels increased significantly after only 30 min of N deprivation. A detailed physiological and omics-based analysis of an insertional mutant of Chlamydomonas with reduced TAB2 function was conducted to determine what role the functional PSI plays in regulating the cellular response to N deprivation. The tab2 mutant displayed increased acetate assimilation and elevated starch levels during the first 6 h of N deprivation, followed by a shift toward altered amino acid synthesis, reduced TAG content and altered fatty acid profiles. These results suggested a central role for PSI in controlling cellular metabolism and its implication in regulation of lipid/starch partitioning. Time course analyses of the tab2 mutant versus wild type under N-deprived versus N replete conditions revealed changes in the ATP/NADPH ratio and suggested that TAG biosynthesis may be associated with maintaining the redox state of the cell during N deprivation. The loss of ability to accumulate TAG in the tab2 mutant co-occurred with an up-regulation of photo-protective mechanisms, suggesting that the synthesis of TAG in the wild type occurs not only as a temporal energy sink, but also as a protective electron sink. By exploiting the tab2 mutation in the cells of C. reinhardtii cultured under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions during nitrogen replete growth and for the first 8 days of nitrogen deprivation, we showed that TAG accumulation and lipid/starch partitioning are dynamically

  12. Functional photosystem I maintains proper energy balance during nitrogen depletion in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, promoting triacylglycerol accumulation

    DOE PAGES

    Gargouri, Mahmoud; Bates, Philip D.; Park, Jeong-Jin; ...

    2017-04-13

    Nutrient deprivation causes significant stress to the unicellular microalga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which responds by significantly altering its metabolic program. In following N deprivation, the accumulation of starch and triacylglycerols (TAGs) is significantly altered following massive reprogramming of cellular metabolism. One protein that was found to change dramatically and early to this stress was TAB2, a photosystem I (PSI) translation initiation factor, whose transcript and protein levels increased significantly after only 30 min of N deprivation. A detailed physiological and omics-based analysis of an insertional mutant of Chlamydomonas with reduced TAB2 function was conducted to determine what role the functional PSImore » plays in regulating the cellular response to N deprivation. The tab2 mutant displayed increased acetate assimilation and elevated starch levels during the first 6 h of N deprivation, followed by a shift toward altered amino acid synthesis, reduced TAG content and altered fatty acid profiles. Our results suggested a central role for PSI in controlling cellular metabolism and its implication in regulation of lipid/starch partitioning. Time course analyses of the tab2 mutant versus wild type under N-deprived versus N replete conditions revealed changes in the ATP/NADPH ratio and suggested that TAG biosynthesis may be associated with maintaining the redox state of the cell during N deprivation. The loss of ability to accumulate TAG in the tab2 mutant co-occurred with an up-regulation of photo-protective mechanisms, suggesting that the synthesis of TAG in the wild type occurs not only as a temporal energy sink, but also as a protective electron sink. By exploiting the tab2 mutation in the cells of C. reinhardtii cultured under autotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic conditions during nitrogen replete growth and for the first 8 days of nitrogen deprivation, we showed that TAG accumulation and lipid/starch partitioning are

  13. Effects of methyl and inorganic mercury exposure on genome homeostasis and mitochondrial function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Lauren H; Luz, Anthony L; Cao, Xiou; Maurer, Laura L; Blawas, Ashley M; Aballay, Alejandro; Pan, William K Y; Meyer, Joel N

    2017-04-01

    Mercury toxicity mechanisms have the potential to induce DNA damage and disrupt cellular processes, like mitochondrial function. Proper mitochondrial function is important for cellular bioenergetics and immune signaling and function. Reported impacts of mercury on the nuclear genome (nDNA) are conflicting and inconclusive, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) impacts are relatively unknown. In this study, we assessed genotoxic (mtDNA and nDNA), metabolic, and innate immune impacts of inorganic and organic mercury exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans. Genotoxic outcomes measured included DNA damage, DNA damage repair (nucleotide excision repair, NER; base excision repair, BER), and genomic copy number following MeHg and HgCl2 exposure alone and in combination with known DNA damage-inducing agents ultraviolet C radiation (UVC) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which cause bulky DNA lesions and oxidative DNA damage, respectively. Following exposure to both MeHg and HgCl2, low-level DNA damage (∼0.25 lesions/10kb mtDNA and nDNA) was observed. Unexpectedly, a higher MeHg concentration reduced damage in both genomes compared to controls. However, this observation was likely the result of developmental delay. In co-exposure treatments, both mercury compounds increased initial DNA damage (mtDNA and nDNA) in combination with H2O2 exposure, but had no impact in combination with UVC exposure. Mercury exposure both increased and decreased DNA damage removal via BER. DNA repair after H2O2 exposure in mercury-exposed nematodes resulted in damage levels lower than measured in controls. Impacts to NER were not detected. mtDNA copy number was significantly decreased in the MeHg-UVC and MeHg-H2O2 co-exposure treatments. Mercury exposure had metabolic impacts (steady-state ATP levels) that differed between the compounds; HgCl2 exposure decreased these levels, while MeHg slightly increased levels or had no impact. Both mercury species reduced mRNA levels for immune signaling-related genes, but

  14. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  15. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A M; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I; Rodenburg, Richard J T; Buydens, Lutgarde M C; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2015-01-26

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  16. N-Glycosylation Is Important for Proper Haloferax volcanii S-Layer Stability and Function.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Adi; Eichler, Jerry

    2017-03-15

    N-Glycosylation, the covalent linkage of glycans to select Asn residues of target proteins, is an almost universal posttranslational modification in archaea. However, whereas roles for N-glycosylation have been defined in eukarya and bacteria, the function of archaeal N-glycosylation remains unclear. Here, the impact of perturbed N-glycosylation on the structure and physiology of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii was considered. Cryo-electron microscopy was used to examine right-side-out membrane vesicles prepared from cells of a parent strain and from strains lacking genes encoding glycosyltransferases involved in assembling the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the surface layer (S-layer) glycoprotein, the sole component of the S-layer surrounding H. volcanii cells. Whereas a regularly repeating S-layer covered the entire surface of vesicles prepared from parent strain cells, vesicles from the mutant cells were only partially covered. To determine whether such N-glycosylation-related effects on S-layer assembly also affected cell function, the secretion of a reporter protein was addressed in the parent and N-glycosylation mutant strains. Compromised S-layer glycoprotein N-glycosylation resulted in impaired transfer of the reporter past the S-layer and into the growth medium. Finally, an assessment of S-layer glycoprotein susceptibility to added proteases in the mutants revealed that in cells lacking AglD, which is involved in adding the final pentasaccharide sugar, a distinct S-layer glycoprotein conformation was assumed in which the N-terminal region was readily degraded. Perturbed N-glycosylation thus affects S-layer glycoprotein folding. These findings suggest that H. volcanii could adapt to changes in its surroundings by modulating N-glycosylation so as to affect S-layer architecture and function.IMPORTANCE Long held to be a process unique to eukaryotes, it is now accepted that bacteria and archaea also perform N-glycosylation, namely, the covalent

  17. Impact of Resistance Training on Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis, Content, and Function.

    PubMed

    Groennebaek, Thomas; Vissing, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metabolic and contractile properties are reliant on muscle mitochondrial and myofibrillar protein turnover. The turnover of these specific protein pools is compromised during disease, aging, and inactivity. Oppositely, exercise can accentuate muscle protein turnover, thereby counteracting decay in muscle function. According to a traditional consensus, endurance exercise is required to drive mitochondrial adaptations, while resistance exercise is required to drive myofibrillar adaptations. However, concurrent practice of traditional endurance exercise and resistance exercise regimens to achieve both types of muscle adaptations is time-consuming, motivationally demanding, and contended to entail practice at intensity levels, that may not comply with clinical settings. It is therefore of principle interest to identify effective, yet feasible, exercise strategies that may positively affect both mitochondrial and myofibrillar protein turnover. Recently, reports indicate that traditional high-load resistance exercise can stimulate muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial respiratory function. Moreover, fatiguing low-load resistance exercise has been shown capable of promoting muscle hypertrophy and expectedly entails greater metabolic stress to potentially enhance mitochondrial adaptations. Consequently, fatiguing low-load resistance exercise regimens may possess the ability to stimulate muscle mitochondrial adaptations without compromising muscle myofibrillar accretion. However, the exact ability of resistance exercise to drive mitochondrial adaptations is debatable, not least due to some methodological challenges. The current review therefore aims to address the evidence on the effects of resistance exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, content and function. In prolongation, a perspective is taken on the specific potential of low-load resistance exercise on promoting mitochondrial adaptations.

  18. Structural requirements of chromokinesin Kif4A for its proper function in mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Guikai; Chen, P.-L.

    2008-08-01

    Human Kif4A is a member of the Kinesin-4 family of kinesins. Kif4A is thought to be a bona fide chromokinesin because it possesses a motor domain and associates with condensed chromosomes during mitosis. Genetic deletion of Kif4A promotes tumorigenic phenotypes in mouse embryonic cells. Kif4A is critical for mitotic regulation including chromosome condensation, spindle organization and cytokinesis. However, the precise chromatin-binding domain of Kif4A has not been characterized. Herein, we report the identification of two conserved motifs critical for chromatin-binding: the first leucine Zip motif (Zip1) of a leucine Zip/Basic/leucine Zip region (ZBZ) previously thought to be a nuclear localization signal (NLS), and a cysteine-rich (CR) motif within the C-terminal region of Kif4A. Furthermore, by depleting endogenous Kif4A via RNAi and concurrently expressing RNAi-resistant Kif4A versions, we observed that wild type Kif4A, but not the mutants deficient in DNA-binding (Zip1 or CR deleted) or ATPase activity (K94A point mutant), was able to rescue the RNAi-elicited abnormal mitotic profile. Taken together, our results show that both the Zip1 and CR motifs are important for Kif4A chromatin-binding and its mitotic function.

  19. Dystrophin Is Required for Proper Functioning of Luminance and Red-Green Cone Opponent Mechanisms in the Human Retina.

    PubMed

    Barboni, Mirella Telles Salgueiro; Martins, Cristiane Maria Gomes; Nagy, Balázs Vince; Tsai, Tina; Damico, Francisco Max; da Costa, Marcelo Fernandes; de Cassia, Rita; Pavanello, M; Lourenço, Naila Cristina Vilaça; de Cerqueira, Antonia Maria Pereira; Zatz, Mayana; Kremers, Jan; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-07-01

    Visual information is processed in parallel pathways in the visual system. Parallel processing begins at the synapse between the photoreceptors and their postreceptoral neurons in the human retina. The integrity of this first neural connection is vital for normal visual processing downstream. Of the numerous elements necessary for proper functioning of this synaptic contact, dystrophin proteins in the eye play an important role. Deficiency of muscle dystrophin causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked disease that affects muscle function and leads to decreased life expectancy. In DMD patients, postreceptoral retinal mechanisms underlying scotopic and photopic vision and ON- and OFF-pathway responses are also altered. In this study, we recorded the electroretinogram (ERG) while preferentially activating the (red-green) opponent or the luminance pathway, and compared data from healthy participants (n = 16) with those of DMD patients (n = 10). The stimuli were heterochromatic sinusoidal modulations at a mean luminance of 200 cd/m2. The recordings allowed us also to analyze ON and OFF cone-driven retinal responses. We found significant differences in 12-Hz response amplitudes and phases between controls and DMD patients, with conditions with large luminance content resulting in larger response amplitudes in DMD patients compared to controls, whereas responses of DMD patients were smaller when pure chromatic modulation was given. The results suggest that dystrophin is required for the proper function of luminance and red-green cone opponent mechanisms in the human retina.

  20. Hijacking mitochondria: bacterial toxins that modulate mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Tong, Janette; Gabriel, Kipros

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial infection has enormous global social and economic impacts stemming from effects on human health and agriculture. Although there are still many unanswered questions, decades of research has uncovered many of the pathogenic mechanisms at play. It is now clear that bacterial pathogens produce a plethora of proteins known as "toxins" and "effectors" that target a variety of physiological host processes during the course of infection. One of the targets of host targeted bacterial toxins and effectors are the mitochondria. The mitochondrial organelles are major players in many biological functions, including energy conversion to ATP and cell death pathways, which inherently makes them targets for bacterial proteins. We present a summary of the toxins targeted to mitochondria and for those that have been studied in finer detail, we also summarize what we know about the mechanisms of targeting and finally their action at the organelle. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effect of fluoroquinolones on mitochondrial function in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, Hany; Jörns, Anne; Rustenbeck, Ingo

    2014-02-14

    Hyper- and hypoglycaemias are known side effects of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, resulting in a number of fatalities. Fluoroquinolone-induced hypoglycaemias are due to stimulated insulin release by the inhibition of the KATP channel activity of the beta cell. Recently, it was found that fluoroquinolones were much less effective on metabolically intact beta cells than on open cell preparations. Thus the intracellular effects of gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin were investigated by measuring NAD(P)H- and FAD-autofluorescence, the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the adenine nucleotide content of isolated pancreatic islets and beta cells. 100 μM of moxifloxacin abolished the NAD(P)H increase elicited by 20mM glucose, while gatifloxacin diminished it and ciprofloxacin had no significant effect. This pattern was also seen with islets from SUR1 Ko mice, which have no functional KATP channels. Moxifloxacin also diminished the glucose-induced decrease of FAD-fluorescence, which reflects the intramitochondrial production of reducing equivalents. Moxifloxacin, but not ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin significantly reduced the effect of 20mM glucose on the ATP/ADP ratio. The mitochondrial hyperpolarization caused by 20mM glucose was partially antagonized by moxifloxacin, but not by ciprofloxacin or gatifloxacin. Ultrastructural analyses after 20 h tissue culture showed that all three compounds (at 10 and 100 μM) diminished the number of insulin secretory granules and that gatifloxacin and ciprofloxacin, but not moxifloxacin induced fission/fusion configurations of the beta cell mitochondria. In conclusion, fluoroquinolones affect the function of the mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells which may diminish the insulinotropic effect of KATP channel closure and contribute to the hyperglycaemic episodes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Glutamatergic Neurotransmission Links Sensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics with Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zimin, Pavel I; Woods, Christian B; Quintana, Albert; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Morgan, Philip G; Sedensky, Margaret M

    2016-08-22

    An enigma of modern medicine has persisted for over 150 years. The mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics (VAs) produce their effects (loss of consciousness, analgesia, amnesia, and immobility) remain an unsolved mystery. Many attractive putative molecular targets have failed to produce a significant effect when genetically tested in whole-animal models [1-3]. However, mitochondrial defects increase VA sensitivity in diverse organisms from nematodes to humans [4-6]. Ndufs4 knockout (KO) mice lack a subunit of mitochondrial complex I and are strikingly hypersensitive to VAs yet resistant to the intravenous anesthetic ketamine [7]. The change in VA sensitivity is the largest reported for a mammal. Limiting NDUFS4 loss to a subset of glutamatergic neurons recapitulates the VA hypersensitivity of Ndufs4(KO) mice, while loss in GABAergic or cholinergic neurons does not. Baseline electrophysiologic function of CA1 pyramidal neurons does not differ between Ndufs4(KO) and control mice. Isoflurane concentrations that anesthetize only Ndufs4(KO) mice (0.6%) decreased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) only in Ndufs4(KO) CA1 neurons, while concentrations effective in control mice (1.2%) decreased sEPSC frequencies in both control and Ndufs4(KO) CA1 pyramidal cells. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) were not differentially affected between genotypes. The effects of isoflurane were similar on evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and paired pulse facilitation (PPF) in KO and control hippocampal slices. We propose that CA1 presynaptic excitatory neurotransmission is hypersensitive to isoflurane in Ndufs4(KO) mice due to the inhibition of pre-existing reduced complex I function, reaching a critical reduction that can no longer meet metabolic demands.

  3. Calcium trafficking integrates endoplasmic reticulum function with mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Randal J.; Malhotra, Jyoti D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is central to all cellular functions and has been studied for decades. Calcium acts as a critical second messenger for both extracellular and intracellular signaling and is fundamental in cell life and death decisions [1]. The calcium gradient in the cell is coupled with an inherent ability of the divalent cation to reversibly bind multiple target biological molecules to generate an extremely versatile signaling system [2]. Calcium signals are used by the cell to control diverse processes as development, neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, metabolism, autophagy and cell death. “Cellular calcium overload” is detrimental to cellular health, resulting in massive activation of proteases and phospholipases leading to cell death [3]. Historically, cell death associated with calcium ion perturbations has been primarily recognized as necrosis. Recent evidence clearly associate changes in calcium ion concentrations with more sophisticated forms of cellular demise, including apoptosis [4] [5] [6] [7]. Although the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves as the primary calcium store in the metazoan cell, dynamic calcium release to the cytosol, mitochondria, nuclei and other organelles orchestrate diverse coordinated responses. Most evidence supports that calcium transport from the ER to mitochondria plays a significant role in regulating cellular bioenergetics, production of reactive oxygen species, induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Recently, molecular identities that mediate calcium traffic between the ER and mitochondria have been discovered [8] [9] [10]. The next questions are how they are regulated for exquisite tight control of ER – mitochondrial calcium dynamics. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in the role of calcium in regulation of ER and mitochondrial function. PMID:24690484

  4. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Charli D.; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non–bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non–bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER–mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non–bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. PMID:27226479

  5. Effects of antiepileptic drugs on mitochondrial functions, morphology, kinetics, biogenesis, and survival.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Scorza, Fulvio A

    2017-10-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) exhibit adverse and beneficial effects on mitochondria, which have a strong impact on the treatment of patients with a mitochondrial disorder (MID) with epilepsy (mitochondrial epilepsy). This review aims at summarizing and discussing recent findings concerning the effect of AEDs on mitochondrial functions and the clinical consequences with regard to therapy of mitochondrial epilepsy and of MIDs in general. Literature review. AEDs may interfere with the respiratory chain, with non-respiratory chain enzymes, carrier proteins, or mitochondrial biogenesis, with carrier proteins, membrane-bound channels or receptors and the membrane potential, with anti-oxidative defense mechanisms, with morphology, dynamics and survival of mitochondria, and with the mtDNA. There are AEDs of which adverse effects outweigh beneficial effects, such as valproic acid, carbamazepine, phenytoin, or phenobarbital and there are AEDs in which beneficial effects dominate over mitochondrial toxic effects, such as lamotrigine, levetiracetam, gabapentin, or zonisamide. However, from most AEDs only little is known about their interference with mitochondria. Mitochondrial epilepsy might be initially treated with AEDs with low mitochondrial toxic potential. Only in case mitochondrial epilepsy is refractory to these AEDs, AEDs with higher mitochondrial toxic potential might be tried. In patients carrying POLG1 mutations AEDs with high mitochondrial toxic potential are contraindicated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics and function of cardiac mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Dedkova, Elena N; Blatter, Lothar A

    2009-02-15

    We used laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive fluorescent dye DAF-2 and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive dyes CM-H(2)DCF and MitoSOX Red to characterize NO and ROS production by mitochondrial NO synthase (mtNOS) in permeabilized cat ventricular myocytes. Stimulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake by exposure to different cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i) = 1, 2 and 5 microm) resulted in a dose-dependent increase of NO production by mitochondria when L-arginine, a substrate for mtNOS, was present. Collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential with the protonophore FCCP or blocking the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter with Ru360 as well as blocking the respiratory chain with rotenone or antimycin A in combination with oligomycin inhibited mitochondrial NO production. In the absence of L-arginine, mitochondrial NO production during stimulation of Ca(2+) uptake was significantly decreased, but accompanied by increase in mitochondrial ROS production. Inhibition of mitochondrial arginase to limit L-arginine availability resulted in 50% inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced ROS production. Both mitochondrial NO and ROS production were blocked by the nNOS inhibitor (4S)-N-(4-amino-5[aminoethyl]aminopentyl)-N'-nitroguanidine and the calmodulin antagonist W-7, while the eNOS inhibitor L-N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)ornithine (L-NIO) or iNOS inhibitor N-(3-aminomethyl)benzylacetamidine, 2HCl (1400W) had no effect. The superoxide dismutase mimetic and peroxynitrite scavenger MnTBAP abolished Ca(2+)-induced ROS generation and increased NO production threefold, suggesting that in the absence of MnTBAP either formation of superoxide radicals suppressed NO production or part of the formed NO was transformed quickly to peroxynitrite. In the absence of L-arginine, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake induced opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which was blocked by the PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A and Mn

  7. Mitochondrial proteolytic stress induced by loss of mortalin function is rescued by Parkin and PINK1

    PubMed Central

    Burbulla, L F; Fitzgerald, J C; Stegen, K; Westermeier, J; Thost, A-K; Kato, H; Mokranjac, D; Sauerwald, J; Martins, L M; Woitalla, D; Rapaport, D; Riess, O; Proikas-Cezanne, T; Rasse, T M; Krüger, R

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial chaperone mortalin was implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) because of its reduced levels in the brains of PD patients and disease-associated rare genetic variants that failed to rescue impaired mitochondrial integrity in cellular knockdown models. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying mortalin-related neurodegeneration, we dissected the cellular surveillance mechanisms related to mitochondrial quality control, defined the effects of reduced mortalin function at the molecular and cellular levels and investigated the functional interaction of mortalin with Parkin and PINK1, two PD-related proteins involved in mitochondrial homeostasis. We found that reduced mortalin function leads to: (1) activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), (2) increased susceptibility towards intramitochondrial proteolytic stress, (3) increased autophagic degradation of fragmented mitochondria and (4) reduced mitochondrial mass in human cells in vitro and ex vivo. These alterations caused increased vulnerability toward apoptotic cell death. Proteotoxic perturbations induced by either partial loss of mortalin or chemical induction were rescued by complementation with native mortalin, but not disease-associated mortalin variants, and were independent of the integrity of autophagic pathways. However, Parkin and PINK1 rescued loss of mortalin phenotypes via increased lysosomal-mediated mitochondrial clearance and required intact autophagic machinery. Our results on loss of mortalin function reveal a direct link between impaired mitochondrial proteostasis, UPR(mt) and PD and show that effective removal of dysfunctional mitochondria via either genetic (PINK1 and Parkin overexpression) or pharmacological intervention (rapamycin) may compensate mitochondrial phenotypes. PMID:24743735

  8. A Deep Proper Motion Catalog Within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Footprint. II. The White Dwarf Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; von Hippel, Ted; Kilic, Mukremin; Liebert, James W.; Williams, Kurtis A.; DeGennaro, Steven; Jeffery, Elizabeth; Dame, Kyra; Gianninas, A.; Brown, Warren R.

    2017-01-01

    A catalog of 8472 white dwarf (WD) candidates is presented, selected using reduced proper motions from the deep proper motion catalog of Munn et al. Candidates are selected in the magnitude range 16< r< 21.5 over 980 square degrees, and 16< r< 21.3 over an additional 1276 square degrees, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging footprint. Distances, bolometric luminosities, and atmospheric compositions are derived by fitting SDSS ugriz photometry to pure hydrogen and helium model atmospheres (assuming surface gravities {log} {\\text{}}g=8). The disk white dwarf luminosity function (WDLF) is constructed using a sample of 2839 stars with 5.5< {M}{bol}< 17, with statistically significant numbers of stars cooler than the turnover in the luminosity function. The WDLF for the halo is also constructed, using a sample of 135 halo WDs with 5< {M}{bol}< 16. We find space densities of disk and halo WDs in the solar neighborhood of 5.5+/- 0.1× {10}-3 {{pc}}-3 and 3.5+/- 0.7× {10}-5 {{pc}}-3, respectively. We resolve the bump in the disk WDLF due to the onset of fully convective envelopes in WDs, and see indications of it in the halo WDLF as well.

  9. Functional, Metabolic, and Dynamic Mitochondrial Changes in the Rat Cirrhosis-Hepatocellular Carcinoma Model and the Protective Effect of IFC-305.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Enrique; Lozano-Rosas, María Guadalupe; Domínguez-López, Mariana; Velasco-Loyden, Gabriela; Rodríguez-Aguilera, Jesús Rafael; José-Nuñez, Concepción; Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, Marietta; Chagoya de Sánchez, Victoria

    2017-05-01

    Background: Mitochondrion is an important metabolic and energetic organelle that regulates several cellular processes. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been related to liver diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. As a result, the energetic demand is not properly supplied and mitochondrial morphologic changes have been observed, resulting in an altered metabolism. We previously demonstrated the chemopreventive effect of the hepatoprotector IFC-305. Aim: In this work we aimed to evaluate the functional, metabolic, and dynamic mitochondrial alterations in the sequential model of cirrhosis-hepatocellular carcinoma induced by diethylnitrosamine in rats and the possible beneficial effect of IFC-305. Methods: Experimental groups of rats were formed to induce cirrhosis-hepatocellular carcinoma and to assess the IFC-305 effect during cancer development and progression through the evaluation of functional, metabolic, and dynamic mitochondrial parameters. Results: In this experimental model, dysfunctional mitochondria were observed and suspension of the diethylnitrosamine treatment was not enough to restore them. Administration of IFC-305 maintained and restored the mitochondrial function and regulated parameters implicated in metabolism as well as the mitochondrial dynamics modified by diethylnitrosamine intoxication. Conclusion: This study supports IFC-305 as a potential hepatocellular carcinoma treatment or as an adjuvant in chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Effect of L-arginine on synaptosomal mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Koji; Akita, Yukihiro; Povalko, Nataliya; Nishioka, Junko; Yatsuga, Shuichi; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Koga, Yasutoshi

    2008-04-01

    Specific aim of this study is to elucidate the direct effects of L-arginine on the synaptosomal neurotransmission related to the mitochondrial respiratory function. Using isolated endbrains from wild-type mice (ICR), crude synaptosome was analyzed for their concentration of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) with/without addition of L-arginine. We analyzed the contents of releasing amino acids evoked by high potassium condition and uptake of them in three separated fractions (cytosol, vesicles, and intact mitochondria). The oxygen consumption was also measured by oxygen electrode. The entire uptakes of GABA and Glu were inhibited by rotenone (about 30 nmol/mg protein) with dose-dependent manner and showed a plateau at about 70% of total uptake. L-arginine inhibited the uptake of Glu logarithmically, however it showed no change in uptake of GABA. The contents of GABA and Glu in synaptosome were decreased in the presence of L-arginine. L-arginine enhanced the respiration of state II by succinate on synaptosomal respiration, although the respiration of synaptosomal mitochondrial fraction and the respiratory chains enzyme activities were almost unaffected by L-arginine. In the presence of rotenone, L-arginine decreased the uptake of Glu without changing the uptake of GABA, increased the releasing of GABA, and may modulate the excitability of neuronal state on the cytosol, cytomembrane, and/or organelles except for mitochondria. L-arginine may modulate excitation by neurotransmitters at nerve endings, in relation to potentiated respiratory metabolism of succinate in synaptosomes. Such effects might contribute to alleviation of stroke-like symptoms in MELAS.

  11. Functional Specialization of Maize Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenases1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2002-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) rf2a and rf2b genes both encode homotetrameric aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs). The RF2A protein was shown previously to accumulate in the mitochondria. In vitro import experiments and ALDH assays on mitochondrial extracts from rf2a mutant plants established that the RF2B protein also accumulates in the mitochondria. RNA gel-blot analyses and immunohistolocation experiments revealed that these two proteins have only partially redundant expression patterns in organs and cell types. For example, RF2A, but not RF2B, accumulates to high levels in the tapetal cells of anthers. Kinetic analyses established that RF2A and RF2B have quite different substrate specificities; although RF2A can oxidize a broad range of aldehydes, including aliphatic aldehydes and aromatic aldehydes, RF2B can oxidize only short-chain aliphatic aldehydes. These two enzymes also have different pH optima and responses to changes in substrate concentration. In addition, RF2A, but not RF2B or any other natural ALDHs, exhibits positive cooperativity. These functional specializations may explain why many species have two mitochondrial ALDHs. This study provides data that serve as a basis for identifying the physiological pathway by which the rf2a gene participates in normal anther development and the restoration of Texas cytoplasm-based male sterility. For example, the observations that Texas cytoplasm anthers do not accumulate elevated levels of reactive oxygen species or lipid peroxidation and the kinetic features of RF2A make it unlikely that rf2a restores fertility by preventing premature programmed cell death. PMID:12481049

  12. Protocatechuic acid protects brain mitochondrial function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Semaming, Yoswaris; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Pintana, Hiranya; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in diabetic animals with neurodegeneration. Protocatechuic acid (PCA), a major metabolite of anthocyanin, has been shown to exert glycemic control and oxidative stress reduction in the heart. However, its effects on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in the brain under diabetic condition have never been investigated. We found that PCA exerted glycemic control, attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction, and contributes to the prevention of brain oxidative stress in diabetic rats.

  13. Effects of various physical stress factors on mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species in rat spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suhee; Agca, Cansu; Agca, Yuksel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of various physical interventions on the function of epididymal rat spermatozoa and determine whether there are correlations among these functional parameters. Epididymal rat spermatozoa were subjected to various mechanical (pipetting, centrifugation and Percoll gradient separation) and anisotonic conditions, and sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity (PMI), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated. Repeated pipetting caused a loss in motility, PMI and MMP (P<0.05). Minimal centrifugation force (200 g) had no effect on motility, PMI and MMP, whereas an increase in the centrifugation force to 400 g or 600 g decreased sperm function (P<0.005). Percoll gradient separation increased total motility, PMI and MMP (P<0.05). However, the spermatozoa that were subjected to mechanical interventions showed high susceptibility to a ROS stimulant (P<0.005). Anisotonic conditions decreased motility, PMI and MMP, and hypotonic conditions in particular increased basal ROS (P<0.05). In correlation tests, there were strong positive correlations among total motility, PMI and MMP, whereas ROS showed no or negatively weak correlations with the other parameters. In conclusion, the physical interventions may act as important variables, affecting functional parameters of epididymal rat spermatozoa. Therefore, careful consideration and proper protocols for handling of rat spermatozoa and osmotic conditions are required to achieve reliable results and minimise damage.

  14. Effects of various physical stress factors on mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species in rat spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suhee; Agca, Cansu; Agca, Yuksel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of various physical interventions on the function of epididymal rat spermatozoa and determine whether there are correlations among these functional parameters. Epididymal rat spermatozoa were subjected to various mechanical (pipetting, centrifugation and Percoll gradient separation) and anisotonic conditions, and sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity (PMI), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated. Repeated pipetting caused a loss in motility, PMI and MMP (P < 0.05). Minimal centrifugation force (200g) had no effect on motility, PMI and MMP, whereas an increase in the centrifugation force to 400g or 600g decreased sperm function (P < 0.005). Percoll gradient separation increased total motility, PMI and MMP (P < 0.05). However, the spermatozoa that were subjected to mechanical interventions showed high susceptibility to a ROS stimulant (P < 0.005). Anisotonic conditions decreased motility, PMI and MMP, and hypotonic conditions in particular increased basal ROS (P < 0.05). In correlation tests, there were strong positive correlations among total motility, PMI and MMP, whereas ROS showed no or negatively weak correlations with the other parameters. In conclusion, the physical interventions may act as important variables, affecting functional parameters of epididymal rat spermatozoa. Therefore, careful consideration and proper protocols for handling of rat spermatozoa and osmotic conditions are required to achieve reliable results and minimise damage. PMID:23140582

  15. Loss of parkin or PINK1 function increases Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Lutz, A Kathrin; Exner, Nicole; Fett, Mareike E; Schlehe, Julia S; Kloos, Karina; Lämmermann, Kerstin; Brunner, Bettina; Kurz-Drexler, Annerose; Vogel, Frank; Reichert, Andreas S; Bouman, Lena; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela; Wurst, Wolfgang; Tatzelt, Jörg; Haass, Christian; Winklhofer, Konstanze F

    2009-08-21

    Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene (PARK2) and PINK1 gene (PARK6) are associated with autosomal recessive parkinsonism. PINK1 deficiency was recently linked to mitochondrial pathology in human cells and Drosophila melanogaster, which can be rescued by parkin, suggesting that both genes play a role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity. Here we demonstrate that an acute down-regulation of parkin in human SH-SY5Y cells severely affects mitochondrial morphology and function, a phenotype comparable with that induced by PINK1 deficiency. Alterations in both mitochondrial morphology and ATP production caused by either parkin or PINK1 loss of function could be rescued by the mitochondrial fusion proteins Mfn2 and OPA1 or by a dominant negative mutant of the fission protein Drp1. Both parkin and PINK1 were able to suppress mitochondrial fragmentation induced by Drp1. Moreover, in Drp1-deficient cells the parkin/PINK1 knockdown phenotype did not occur, indicating that mitochondrial alterations observed in parkin- or PINK1-deficient cells are associated with an increase in mitochondrial fission. Notably, mitochondrial fragmentation is an early phenomenon upon PINK1/parkin silencing that also occurs in primary mouse neurons and Drosophila S2 cells. We propose that the discrepant findings in adult flies can be explained by the time of phenotype analysis and suggest that in mammals different strategies may have evolved to cope with dysfunctional mitochondria.

  16. Mitofusin 2 regulates the oocytes development and quality by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lingjuan; Zhang, Ling; Xiang, Wenpei

    2016-01-01

    Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), one of the mitochondrial dynamic proteins plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of mitochondrial morphology and function. However, it is unknown if Mfn2 influences the quality of oocytes in the process of development by modulating mitochondrial function in vitro. In this study, immature oocytes were transfected with Mfn2-siRNA for 16 h. We found that the expression level of the Mfn2 gene was significantly lower than those of the control group. The rates of maturation and fertility were also found to have declined. Moreover, mitochondrial structure and function, especially the morphogenesis of spindles, were observed as abnormal during meiosis. Thus, the above findings indicate that down-regulation of Mfn2 may have an impact on the maturation and fertilization of immature oocytes in vitro by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function. PMID:27469431

  17. Ciprofloxacin does not inhibit mitochondrial functions but other antibiotics do.

    PubMed Central

    Riesbeck, K; Bredberg, A; Forsgren, A

    1990-01-01

    At clinical concentrations, ciprofloxacin did not inhibit mitochondrial DNA replication, oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, or mitochondrial mass (transmembrane potential). No difference in supercoiled forms of DNA was observed. The tetracyclines and chloramphenicol inhibited protein synthesis at clinically achievable concentrations, while rifampin, fusidic acid, and clindamycin did not. PMID:2327755

  18. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L M; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-05-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. AlthoughatRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whetheratRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity.atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrialβ-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally,atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1αand 1βand nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification.atRA also increasedβ-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδrevealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis andβ-oxidation byatRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice,atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition ofatRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects ofatRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show thatatRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasingatRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acidβ-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Formoterol restores mitochondrial and renal function after ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Jesinkey, Sean R; Funk, Jason A; Stallons, L Jay; Wills, Lauren P; Megyesi, Judit K; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis may be an adaptive response necessary for meeting the increased metabolic and energy demands during organ recovery after acute injury, and renal mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AKI. We proposed that stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis 24 hours after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced AKI, when renal dysfunction is maximal, would accelerate recovery of mitochondrial and renal function in mice. We recently showed that formoterol, a potent, highly specific, and long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, induces renal mitochondrial biogenesis in naive mice. Animals were subjected to sham or I/R-induced AKI, followed by once-daily intraperitoneal injection with vehicle or formoterol beginning 24 hours after surgery and continuing through 144 hours after surgery. Treatment with formoterol restored renal function, rescued renal tubules from injury, and diminished necrosis after I/R-induced AKI. Concomitantly, formoterol stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis and restored the expression and function of mitochondrial proteins. Taken together, these results provide proof of principle that a novel drug therapy to treat AKI, and potentially other acute organ failures, works by restoring mitochondrial function and accelerating the recovery of renal function after injury has occurred.

  20. Health Literacy, Cognitive Function, Proper Use, and Adherence to Inhaled Asthma Controller Medications Among Older Adults With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Smith, Samuel G.; Martynenko, Melissa; Vicencio, Daniel P.; Sano, Mary; Wisnivesky, Juan P.; Federman, Alex D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to investigate the degree to which cognitive skills explain associations between health literacy and asthma-related medication use among older adults with asthma. METHODS: Patients aged ≥ 60 years receiving care at eight outpatient clinics (primary care, geriatrics, pulmonology, allergy, and immunology) in New York, New York, and Chicago, Illinois, were recruited to participate in structured, in-person interviews as part of the Asthma Beliefs and Literacy in the Elderly (ABLE) study (n = 425). Behaviors related to medication use were investigated, including adherence to prescribed regimens, metered-dose inhaler (MDI) technique, and dry powder inhaler (DPI) technique. Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Cognitive function was assessed in terms of fluid (working memory, processing speed, executive function) and crystallized (verbal) ability. RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 68 years; 40% were Hispanic and 30% non-Hispanic black. More than one-third (38%) were adherent to their controller medication, 53% demonstrated proper DPI technique, and 38% demonstrated correct MDI technique. In multivariable analyses, limited literacy was associated with poorer adherence to controller medication (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.29-4.08) and incorrect DPI (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.81-6.83) and MDI (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.01-2.65) techniques. Fluid and crystallized abilities were independently associated with medication behaviors. However, when fluid abilities were added to the model, literacy associations were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Among older patients with asthma, interventions to promote proper medication use should simplify tasks and patient roles to overcome cognitive load and suboptimal performance in self-care. PMID:25275432

  1. Improvement of mitochondrial function and dynamics by the metabolic enhancer piracetam.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, Carola; Kurz, Christopher; Koch, Konrad A; Eckert, Schamim H; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2013-10-01

    The metabolic enhancer piracetam is used in many countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging, brain injuries, as well as dementia such as AD (Alzheimer's disease). As a specific feature of piracetam, beneficial effects are usually associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In previous studies we were able to show that piracetam enhanced ATP production, mitochondrial membrane potential as well as neurite outgrowth in cell and animal models for aging and AD. To investigate further the effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function, especially mitochondrial fission and fusion events, we decided to assess mitochondrial morphology. Human neuroblastoma cells were treated with the drug under normal conditions and under conditions imitating aging and the occurrence of ROS (reactive oxygen species) as well as in stably transfected cells with the human wild-type APP (amyloid precursor protein) gene. This AD model is characterized by expressing only 2-fold more human Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) compared with control cells and therefore representing very early stages of AD when Aβ levels gradually increase over decades. Interestingly, these cells exhibit an impaired mitochondrial function and morphology under baseline conditions. Piracetam is able to restore this impairment and shifts mitochondrial morphology back to elongated forms, whereas there is no effect in control cells. After addition of a complex I inhibitor, mitochondrial morphology is distinctly shifted to punctate forms in both cell lines. Under these conditions piracetam is able to ameliorate morphology in cells suffering from the mild Aβ load, as well as mitochondrial dynamics in control cells.

  2. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  3. Carbon monoxide improves cardiac function and mitochondrial population quality in a mouse model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lancel, Steve; Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Marciniak, Camille; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Decoster, Brigitte; Ballot, Caroline; Blazejewski, Caroline; Corseaux, Delphine; Lescure, Bernadette; Motterlini, Roberto; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome induces cardiac dysfunction associated with mitochondria abnormalities. As low levels of carbon monoxide (CO) may improve myocardial and mitochondrial activities, we tested whether a CO-releasing molecule (CORM-3) reverses metabolic syndrome-induced cardiac alteration through changes in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy. Mice were fed with normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for twelve weeks. Then, mice received two intraperitoneal injections of CORM-3 (10 mg x kg(-1)), with the second one given 16 hours after the first. Contractile function in isolated hearts and mitochondrial parameters were evaluated 24 hours after the last injection. Mitochondrial population was explored by electron microscopy. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and autophagy were assessed by western-blot and RT-qPCR. Left ventricular developed pressure was reduced in HFD hearts. Mitochondria from HFD hearts presented reduced membrane potential and diminished ADP-coupled respiration. CORM-3 restored both cardiac and mitochondrial functions. Size and number of mitochondria increased in the HFD hearts but not in the CORM-3-treated HFD group. CORM-3 modulated HFD-activated mitochondrial fusion and biogenesis signalling. While autophagy was not activated in the HFD group, CORM-3 increased the autophagy marker LC3-II. Finally, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine abolished the cardioprotective effects of CORM-3. CORM-3 may modulate pathways controlling mitochondrial quality, thus leading to improvements of mitochondrial efficiency and HFD-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Improves Cardiac Function and Mitochondrial Population Quality in a Mouse Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lancel, Steve; Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Marciniak, Camille; Hassoun, Sidi Mohamed; Decoster, Brigitte; Ballot, Caroline; Blazejewski, Caroline; Corseaux, Delphine; Lescure, Bernadette; Motterlini, Roberto; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Aims Metabolic syndrome induces cardiac dysfunction associated with mitochondria abnormalities. As low levels of carbon monoxide (CO) may improve myocardial and mitochondrial activities, we tested whether a CO-releasing molecule (CORM-3) reverses metabolic syndrome-induced cardiac alteration through changes in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy. Methods and Results Mice were fed with normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD) for twelve weeks. Then, mice received two intraperitoneal injections of CORM-3 (10 mg.kg−1), with the second one given 16 hours after the first. Contractile function in isolated hearts and mitochondrial parameters were evaluated 24 hours after the last injection. Mitochondrial population was explored by electron microscopy. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and autophagy were assessed by western-blot and RT-qPCR. Left ventricular developed pressure was reduced in HFD hearts. Mitochondria from HFD hearts presented reduced membrane potential and diminished ADP-coupled respiration. CORM-3 restored both cardiac and mitochondrial functions. Size and number of mitochondria increased in the HFD hearts but not in the CORM-3–treated HFD group. CORM-3 modulated HFD-activated mitochondrial fusion and biogenesis signalling. While autophagy was not activated in the HFD group, CORM-3 increased the autophagy marker LC3-II. Finally, ex vivo experiments demonstrated that autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine abolished the cardioprotective effects of CORM-3. Conclusion CORM-3 may modulate pathways controlling mitochondrial quality, thus leading to improvements of mitochondrial efficiency and HFD-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:22870253

  5. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  6. Effect of leptin treatment on mitochondrial function in obese leptin-deficient ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Maria H; Tom, Robby Zachariah; Björnholm, Marie; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2013-09-01

    Leptin stimulates peripheral lipid oxidation, but the influence on mitochondrial function is partly unknown. We investigated tissue-specific mitochondrial function in leptin-deficient obese C57BL/6J-ob/ob mice compared to lean littermates following leptin treatment. Lean and obese ob/ob mice were treated with saline or leptin for 5 days. At day six, liver, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle were dissected and mitochondrial respiration analyzed in freshly dissected tissues. Expression of key proteins in the regulation of mitochondrial function was determined. In liver, mitochondrial respiration was reduced in ob/ob mice compared to lean mice. Expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) was decreased in ob/ob mice, but increased with leptin treatment. In glycolytic EDL muscle, mitochondrial respiration was increased in ob/ob mice. Protein markers of complex II, IV and ATP synthase were increased in EDL muscle from both saline- and leptin-treated ob/ob mice. TFAM protein abundance was decreased, while dynamin-1-like protein was increased in EDL muscle from saline-treated ob/ob mice and restored by leptin treatment. In oxidative soleus muscle, mitochondrial respiration and electron transport system protein abundance were unchanged, while TFAM was reduced in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice display tissue-specific mitochondrial adaptations under basal conditions and in response to leptin treatment. Mitochondrial respiration was decreased in liver, increased in glycolytic muscle and unaltered in oxidative muscle from ob/ob mice. Insight into the tissue-specific regulation of mitochondrial function in response to energy supply and demand may provide new opportunities for the treatment of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Artificial Reaction Promoter Modulates Mitochondrial Functions via Chemically Promoting Protein Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yutaka; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hotta, Kohji; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation, which modulates protein function, is an important process in intracellular signalling. In mitochondria, protein acetylation regulates a number of enzymatic activities and, therefore, modulates mitochondrial functions. Our previous report showed that tributylphosphine (PBu3), an artificial reaction promoter that promotes acetylransfer reactions in vitro, also promotes the reaction between acetyl-CoA and an exogenously introduced fluorescent probe in mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that PBu3 induces the acetylation of mitochondrial proteins and a decrease in acetyl-CoA concentration in PBu3-treated HeLa cells. This indicates that PBu3 can promote the acetyltransfer reaction between acetyl-CoA and mitochondrial proteins in living cells. PBu3-induced acetylation gradually reduced mitochondrial ATP concentrations in HeLa cells without changing the cytoplasmic ATP concentration, suggesting that PBu3 mainly affects mitochondrial functions. In addition, pyruvate, which is converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and transiently increases ATP concentrations in the absence of PBu3, elicited a further decrease in mitochondrial ATP concentrations in the presence of PBu3. Moreover, the application and removal of PBu3 reversibly alternated mitochondrial fragmentation and elongation. These results indicate that PBu3 enhances acetyltransfer reactions in mitochondria and modulates mitochondrial functions in living cells. PMID:27374857

  8. InsP3R, the calcium whisperer: Maintaining mitochondrial function in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lovy, Alenka; Foskett, J Kevin; Cárdenas, César

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is essential to fulfill the large demand for macromolecule biosynthesis in cancer. We recently identified low-level InsP3R-mediated Ca(2+) transfer to mitochondria as an unexpected requirement for mitochondrial function. Here we reveal that its absence specifically targets cancer cells and causes necrosis at daughter cell separation during ongoing proliferation.

  9. Regulation of mitochondrial morphology and function by stearoylation of TFR1.

    PubMed

    Senyilmaz, Deniz; Virtue, Sam; Xu, Xiaojun; Tan, Chong Yew; Griffin, Julian L; Miller, Aubry K; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Teleman, Aurelio A

    2015-09-03

    Mitochondria are involved in a variety of cellular functions, including ATP production, amino acid and lipid biogenesis and breakdown, signalling and apoptosis. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and ageing. Although transcriptional mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial abundance are known, comparatively little is known about how mitochondrial function is regulated. Here we identify the metabolite stearic acid (C18:0) and human transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1; also known as TFRC) as mitochondrial regulators. We elucidate a signalling pathway whereby C18:0 stearoylates TFR1, thereby inhibiting its activation of JNK signalling. This leads to reduced ubiquitination of mitofusin via HUWE1, thereby promoting mitochondrial fusion and function. We find that animal cells are poised to respond to both increases and decreases in C18:0 levels, with increased C18:0 dietary intake boosting mitochondrial fusion in vivo. Intriguingly, dietary C18:0 supplementation can counteract the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by genetic defects such as loss of the Parkinson's disease genes Pink or Parkin in Drosophila. This work identifies the metabolite C18:0 as a signalling molecule regulating mitochondrial function in response to diet.

  10. Application of proper orthogonal decomposition and radial basis functions for crack size estimation using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaissa, B.; Köppen, M.; Abdel Wahab, M.; Khatir, S.

    2017-05-01

    Complex engineering problems require simulations, which are computationally expensive in cases of inverse identification tasks since they commonly requires hundreds of thousands of simulations. This paper propose a method based on model reduction for crack size estimation, combining the proper orthogonal decomposition method with radial basis functions. The reduced model is validated by comparing the obtained boundary displacements with the corresponding results from a finite element model. This inverse procedure is formulated as the minimization of the difference between the measured and computed values of displacement at selected boundary nodes, called sensor points, using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Convex and a non-convex specimens have been considered for investigations of crack presence, and identification of its size, different crack sizes have been tested to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  11. ChChd3, an Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Protein, Is Essential for Maintaining Crista Integrity and Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Darshi, Manjula; Mendiola, Vincent L.; Mackey, Mason R.; Murphy, Anne N.; Koller, Antonius; Perkins, Guy A.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane (IM) serves as the site for ATP production by hosting the oxidative phosphorylation complex machinery most notably on the crista membranes. Disruption of the crista structure has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we characterize ChChd3, a previously identified PKA substrate of unknown function (Schauble, S., King, C. C., Darshi, M., Koller, A., Shah, K., and Taylor, S. S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 14952–14959), and show that it is essential for maintaining crista integrity and mitochondrial function. In the mitochondria, ChChd3 is a peripheral protein of the IM facing the intermembrane space. RNAi knockdown of ChChd3 in HeLa cells resulted in fragmented mitochondria, reduced OPA1 protein levels and impaired fusion, and clustering of the mitochondria around the nucleus along with reduced growth rate. Both the oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates were severely restricted. Ultrastructural analysis of these cells revealed aberrant mitochondrial IM structures with fragmented and tubular cristae or loss of cristae, and reduced crista membrane. Additionally, the crista junction opening diameter was reduced to 50% suggesting remodeling of cristae in the absence of ChChd3. Analysis of the ChChd3-binding proteins revealed that ChChd3 interacts with the IM proteins mitofilin and OPA1, which regulate crista morphology, and the outer membrane protein Sam50, which regulates import and assembly of β-barrel proteins on the outer membrane. Knockdown of ChChd3 led to almost complete loss of both mitofilin and Sam50 proteins and alterations in several mitochondrial proteins, suggesting that ChChd3 is a scaffolding protein that stabilizes protein complexes involved in maintaining crista architecture and protein import and is thus essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and function. PMID:21081504

  12. Mitochondrial regulation of β-cell function: maintaining the momentum for insulin release

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    All forms of diabetes share the common etiology of insufficient pancreatic β-cell function to meet peripheral insulin demand. In pancreatic β-cells, mitochondria serve to integrate the metabolism of exogenous nutrients into energy output, which ultimately leads to insulin release. As such, mitochondrial dysfunction underlies β-cell failure and the development of diabetes. Mitochondrial regulation of β-cell function occurs through many diverse pathways, including metabolic coupling, generation of reactive oxygen species, maintenance of mitochondrial mass, and through interaction with other cellular organelles. In this chapter, we will focus on the importance of enzymatic regulators of mitochondrial fuel metabolism and control of mitochondrial mass to pancreatic β-cell function, describing how defects in these pathways ultimately lead to diabetes. Furthermore, we will examine the factors responsible for mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation and their roles in the balance of mitochondrial mass in β-cells. Clarifying the causes of β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction may inform new approaches to treat the underlying etiologies of diabetes. PMID:25659350

  13. Nutrition and reproduction: is there evidence to support a "Fertility Diet" to improve mitochondrial function?

    PubMed

    Shaum, Katherine M; Polotsky, Alex J

    2013-04-01

    Normal function of mitochondria plays an essential role in enabling reproductive capacity. To date, few studies have investigated the role of promoting mitochondrial health in relation to fertility in humans. Selected nutritional interventions have demonstrated a potential to enhance mitochondrial function, suggesting a promise for future research for fertility treatment. This review summarizes the extant literature and highlights a putative role of particular nutrients in promotion of mitochondrial function, including in vitro, animal and human studies. Strong basis exists to advocate for further investigation of nutritional treatments for infertility patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of the Czech Propolis on Sperm Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Miklikova, Michaela; Stachova, Lenka; Grundmanova, Martina; Tuma, Zdenek; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Zech, Nicolas; Kralickova, Milena; Kuncova, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II) was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII) and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility. PMID:25104965

  15. Requirement of hCenexin for Proper Mitotic Functions of Polo-Like Kinase 1 at the Centrosomes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Soung, Nak-Kyun; Kang, Young Hwi; Kim, Keetae; Kamijo, Keiju; Yoon, Heejeong; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Miki, Toru; Kim, Seung R.; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Giam, Chou-Zen; Ahn, Chang H.; Lee, Kyung S.

    2006-01-01

    Outer dense fiber 2 (Odf2) was initially identified as a major component of sperm tail cytoskeleton and later was suggested to be a widespread component of centrosomal scaffold that preferentially associates with the appendages of the mother centrioles in somatic cells. Here we report the identification of two Odf2-related centrosomal components, hCenexin1 and hCenexin1 variant 1, that possess a unique C-terminal extension. Our results showed that hCenexin1 is the major isoform expressed in HeLa cells, whereas hOdf2 is not detectably expressed. Mammalian polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is critical for proper mitotic progression, and its association with the centrosome is important for microtubule nucleation and function. Interestingly, depletion of hCenexin1 by RNA interference (RNAi) delocalized Plk1 from the centrosomes and the C-terminal extension of hCenexin1 was crucial to recruit Plk1 to the centrosomes through a direct interaction with the polo-box domain of Plk1. Consistent with these findings, the hCenexin1 RNAi cells exhibited weakened γ-tubulin localization and chromosome segregation defects. We propose that hCenexin1 is a critical centrosomal component whose C-terminal extension is required for proper recruitment of Plk1 and other components crucial for normal mitosis. Our results further suggest that the anti-Odf2 immunoreactive centrosomal antigen previously detected in non-germ line cells is likely hCenexin1. PMID:16966375

  16. Requirement of hCenexin for proper mitotic functions of polo-like kinase 1 at the centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Soung, Nak-Kyun; Kang, Young Hwi; Kim, Keetae; Kamijo, Keiju; Yoon, Heejeong; Seong, Yeon-Sun; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Miki, Toru; Kim, Seung R; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Giam, Chou-Zen; Ahn, Chang H; Lee, Kyung S

    2006-11-01

    Outer dense fiber 2 (Odf2) was initially identified as a major component of sperm tail cytoskeleton and later was suggested to be a widespread component of centrosomal scaffold that preferentially associates with the appendages of the mother centrioles in somatic cells. Here we report the identification of two Odf2-related centrosomal components, hCenexin1 and hCenexin1 variant 1, that possess a unique C-terminal extension. Our results showed that hCenexin1 is the major isoform expressed in HeLa cells, whereas hOdf2 is not detectably expressed. Mammalian polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is critical for proper mitotic progression, and its association with the centrosome is important for microtubule nucleation and function. Interestingly, depletion of hCenexin1 by RNA interference (RNAi) delocalized Plk1 from the centrosomes and the C-terminal extension of hCenexin1 was crucial to recruit Plk1 to the centrosomes through a direct interaction with the polo-box domain of Plk1. Consistent with these findings, the hCenexin1 RNAi cells exhibited weakened gamma-tubulin localization and chromosome segregation defects. We propose that hCenexin1 is a critical centrosomal component whose C-terminal extension is required for proper recruitment of Plk1 and other components crucial for normal mitosis. Our results further suggest that the anti-Odf2 immunoreactive centrosomal antigen previously detected in non-germ line cells is likely hCenexin1.

  17. Impact of cold ischemia on mitochondrial function in porcine hearts and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Schachner, Thomas; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Dorn, Melissa; Andreas, Martin; Kocher, Alfred; Kuznetsov, Andrey V

    2013-11-07

    The effects of cold storage using Custodiol® (Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate, HTK) or isotonic saline solution on mitochondrial function in hearts (left and rights ventricles) and various blood vessels of pigs were investigated. Hearts, saphenous veins, internal-mammary-arteries and aortas of male landrace pigs were harvested and exposed to cold ischemia in either saline or Custodiol-HTK solution. Mitochondrial function was measured in situ in permeabilized fibers by high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (maximal respiration rates) were similar in the right and left ventricle in controls and after 14 h of cold storage were significantly better preserved in Custodiol-HTK than in saline solution. Mitochondrial respiration rates in various blood vessels including aorta, arteries and veins were less than 5% of myocardium rates. In contrast to the pig heart, in some blood vessels, like veins, mitochondrial function remained stable even after 24 h of cold ischemia. HTK-Custodiol protection of mitochondrial function after prolonged cold ischemia was observed in the myocardium but not in blood vessels. HTK-Custodiol solution thus offers significant protection of myocardial mitochondria against cold ischemic injury and can be used as efficient preservation solution in organ transplantation but probably has no benefit for blood vessels preservation. Analysis of mitochondrial function can be used as a valuable approach for the assessment of cold ischemic injury in various tissues including pig heart and various blood vessels.

  18. Impact of Cold Ischemia on Mitochondrial Function in Porcine Hearts and Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Schachner, Thomas; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Dorn, Melissa; Andreas, Martin; Kocher, Alfred; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of cold storage using Custodiol® (Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate, HTK) or isotonic saline solution on mitochondrial function in hearts (left and rights ventricles) and various blood vessels of pigs were investigated. Hearts, saphenous veins, internal-mammary-arteries and aortas of male landrace pigs were harvested and exposed to cold ischemia in either saline or Custodiol-HTK solution. Mitochondrial function was measured in situ in permeabilized fibers by high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (maximal respiration rates) were similar in the right and left ventricle in controls and after 14 h of cold storage were significantly better preserved in Custodiol-HTK than in saline solution. Mitochondrial respiration rates in various blood vessels including aorta, arteries and veins were less than 5% of myocardium rates. In contrast to the pig heart, in some blood vessels, like veins, mitochondrial function remained stable even after 24 h of cold ischemia. HTK-Custodiol protection of mitochondrial function after prolonged cold ischemia was observed in the myocardium but not in blood vessels. HTK-Custodiol solution thus offers significant protection of myocardial mitochondria against cold ischemic injury and can be used as efficient preservation solution in organ transplantation but probably has no benefit for blood vessels preservation. Analysis of mitochondrial function can be used as a valuable approach for the assessment of cold ischemic injury in various tissues including pig heart and various blood vessels. PMID:24213604

  19. Disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain function potentiates the pro-apoptotic effects of MAPK inhibition.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Andrew P; Gelles, Jesse D; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Loi, Patrick; Arbiser, Jack L; Chipuk, Jerry E

    2017-07-14

    The mitochondrial network is a major site of ATP production through the coupled integration of the electron transport chain (ETC) with oxidative phosphorylation. In melanoma arising from the V600E mutation in the kinase v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF(V600E)), oncogenic signaling enhances glucose-dependent metabolism while reducing mitochondrial ATP production. Likewise, when BRAF(V600E) is pharmacologically inhibited by targeted therapies (e.g. PLX-4032/vemurafenib), glucose metabolism is reduced, and cells increase mitochondrial ATP production to sustain survival. Therefore, collateral inhibition of oncogenic signaling and mitochondrial respiration may help enhance the therapeutic benefit of targeted therapies. Honokiol (HKL) is a well tolerated small molecule that disrupts mitochondrial function; however, its underlying mechanisms and potential utility with targeted anticancer therapies remain unknown. Using wild-type BRAF and BRAF(V600E) melanoma model systems, we demonstrate here that HKL administration rapidly reduces mitochondrial respiration by broadly inhibiting ETC complexes I, II, and V, resulting in decreased ATP levels. The subsequent energetic crisis induced two cellular responses involving cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). First, loss of CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of the mitochondrial division GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 promoted mitochondrial fusion, thus coupling mitochondrial energetic status and morphology. Second, HKL decreased CDK2 activity, leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, although pharmacological inhibition of oncogenic MAPK signaling increased ETC activity, co-treatment with HKL ablated this response and vastly enhanced the rate of apoptosis. Collectively, these findings integrate HKL action with mitochondrial respiration and shape and substantiate a pro-survival role of mitochondrial function in melanoma cells after oncogenic MAPK inhibition.

  20. Yeast mitochondrial protein-protein interactions reveal diverse complexes and disease-relevant functional relationships.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ke; Musso, Gabriel; Vlasblom, James; Jessulat, Matthew; Deineko, Viktor; Negroni, Jacopo; Mosca, Roberto; Malty, Ramy; Nguyen-Tran, Diem-Hang; Aoki, Hiroyuki; Minic, Zoran; Freywald, Tanya; Phanse, Sadhna; Xiang, Qian; Freywald, Andrew; Aloy, Patrick; Zhang, Zhaolei; Babu, Mohan

    2015-02-06

    Although detailed, focused, and mechanistic analyses of associations among mitochondrial proteins (MPs) have identified their importance in varied biological processes, a systematic understanding of how MPs function in concert both with one another and with extra-mitochondrial proteins remains incomplete. Consequently, many questions regarding the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of human disease remain unanswered. To address this, we compiled all existing mitochondrial physical interaction data for over 1200 experimentally defined yeast MPs and, through bioinformatic analysis, identified hundreds of heteromeric MP complexes having extensive associations both within and outside the mitochondria. We provide support for these complexes through structure prediction analysis, morphological comparisons of deletion strains, and protein co-immunoprecipitation. The integration of these MP complexes with reported genetic interaction data reveals substantial crosstalk between MPs and non-MPs and identifies novel factors in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial organization, membrane structure, and mitochondrial lipid homeostasis. More than one-third of these MP complexes are conserved in humans, with many containing members linked to clinical pathologies, enabling us to identify genes with putative disease function through guilt-by-association. Although still remaining incomplete, existing mitochondrial interaction data suggests that the relevant molecular machinery is modular, yet highly integrated with non-mitochondrial processes.

  1. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    MARCOVINA, SANTICA M.; SIRTORI, CESARE; PERACINO, ANDREA; GHEORGHIADE, MIHAI; BORUM, PEGGY; REMUZZI, GIUSEPPE; ARDEHALI, HOSSEIN

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential. PMID:23138103

  2. Cyclophilin D deficiency improves mitochondrial function and learning/memory in aging Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Du, Heng; Guo, Lan; Zhang, Wensheng; Rydzewska, Monika; Yan, Shidu

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondrial stress is one of the early features of Alzheimer disease (AD). Mitochondrial Aβ has been linked to mitochondrial toxicity. Our recent study demonstrated that cyclophilin D (CypD) mediated mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) is an important mechanism for neuronal and synaptic stress induced by both Aβ and oxidative stress. In transgenic AD-type mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ (mAPP), CypD deficiency improves mitochondrial and synaptic function and learning/memory up to 12 months old. Here we provide evidence of the protective effects of CypD deficiency in aged AD mice (22-24 months). Cyp D deficient mAPP mice demonstrate less calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling, increased mitochondrial calcium uptake capacity, preserved mitochondrial respiratory function and improved spatial learning/memory even in old age (known to be the age for late stage AD pathology and synaptic dysfunction). These data demonstrate that abrogation of CypD results in persistent life-long protection against Aβ toxicity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, thereby suggesting that blockade of CypD may be of benefit for Alzheimer disease treatment. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Translating the basic knowledge of mitochondrial functions to metabolic therapy: role of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Marcovina, Santica M; Sirtori, Cesare; Peracino, Andrea; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Borum, Peggy; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in human physiological processes, and therefore, their dysfunction can lead to a constellation of metabolic and nonmetabolic abnormalities such as a defect in mitochondrial gene expression, imbalance in fuel and energy homeostasis, impairment in oxidative phosphorylation, enhancement of insulin resistance, and abnormalities in fatty acid metabolism. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, vascular disease, and chronic heart failure. The increased knowledge on mitochondria and their role in cellular metabolism is providing new evidence that these disorders may benefit from mitochondrial-targeted therapies. We review the current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to chronic diseases, the outcomes of experimental studies on mitochondrial-targeted therapies, and explore the potential of metabolic modulators in the treatment of selected chronic conditions. As an example of such modulators, we evaluate the efficacy of the administration of L-carnitine and its analogues acetyl and propionyl L-carnitine in several chronic diseases. L-carnitine is intrinsically involved in mitochondrial metabolism and function as it plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and energy metabolism. In addition to the transportation of free fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane, L-carnitine modulates their oxidation rate and is involved in the regulation of vital cellular functions such as apoptosis. Thus, L-carnitine and its derivatives show promise in the treatment of chronic conditions and diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but further translational studies are needed to fully explore their potential.

  4. Dynein mutations associated with hereditary motor neuropathies impair mitochondrial morphology and function with age.

    PubMed

    Eschbach, Judith; Sinniger, Jérôme; Bouitbir, Jamal; Fergani, Anissa; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard; René, Frédérique; Larmet, Yves; Marion, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H; Harms, Matthew B; Shy, Michael E; Messadeq, Nadia; Weydt, Patrick; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in the DYNC1H1 gene encoding for dynein heavy chain cause two closely related human motor neuropathies, dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, and lead to sensory neuropathy and striatal atrophy in mutant mice. Dynein is the molecular motor carrying mitochondria retrogradely on microtubules, yet the consequences of dynein mutations on mitochondrial physiology have not been explored. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts bearing heterozygous or homozygous point mutation in Dync1h1, similar to human mutations, show profoundly abnormal mitochondrial morphology associated with the loss of mitofusin 1. Furthermore, heterozygous Dync1h1 mutant mice display progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle and mitochondria progressively increase in size and invade sarcomeres. As a likely consequence of systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, Dync1h1 mutant mice develop hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia and progress to glucose intolerance with age. Similar defects in mitochondrial morphology and mitofusin levels are observed in fibroblasts from patients with SMA-LED. Last, we show that Dync1h1 mutant fibroblasts show impaired perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in response to mitochondrial uncoupling. Our results show that dynein function is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function with aging and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to dynein-dependent neurological diseases, such as SMA-LED.

  5. hsa-miR-4485 regulates mitochondrial functions and inhibits the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Lakshmi; Singh, Kritarth; Lipatova, Anastasiya V; Singh, Aru; Prajapati, Paresh; Tomar, Dhanendra; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Godbole, Madan M; Chumakov, Peter M; Singh, Rajesh

    2017-02-20

    The modulation of mitochondrial functions is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Mitochondria essentially depend on the import of RNAs and proteins encoded by the nuclear genome. MicroRNAs encoded in the nucleus can translocate to mitochondria and target the genome, affecting mitochondrial function. Here, we analyzed the role of miR-4485 in the regulation of mitochondrial functions. We showed that miR-4485 translocated to mitochondria where its levels varied in response to different stress conditions. A direct binding of miR-4485 to mitochondrial 16S rRNA was demonstrated. MiR-4485 regulated the processing of pre-rRNA at the 16S rRNA-ND1 junction and the translation of downstream transcripts. MiR-4485 modulated mitochondrial complex I activity, the production of ATP, ROS levels, caspase-3/7 activation, and apoptosis. Transfection of a miR-4485 mimic downregulated the expression of regulatory glycolytic pathway genes and reduced the clonogenic ability of breast cancer cells. Ectopic expression of miR-4485 in MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells decreased the tumorigenicity in a nude mouse xenograft model. Furthermore, levels of both precursor and mature miR-4485 are decreased in tumor tissue of breast cancer patients. We conclude that the mitochondria-targeted miR-4485 may act as a tumor suppressor in breast carcinoma cells by negatively regulating mitochondrial RNA processing and mitochondrial functions.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G; Brown, Jamelle A; Feeley, Kyle P; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Weisbrod, Robert M; Widlansky, Michael E; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2016-03-31

    Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We assessed non-invasive vascular function and mitochondrial DNA damage in 275 patients (age 57 ± 9 years, 60 % women) with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease alone (N = 55), diabetes mellitus alone (N = 74), combined atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus (N = 48), and controls age >45 without diabetes mellitus or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (N = 98). Mitochondrial DNA damage measured by quantitative PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher with clinical atherosclerosis alone (0.55 ± 0.65), diabetes mellitus alone (0.65 ± 1.0), and combined clinical atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus (0.89 ± 1.32) as compared to control subjects (0.23 ± 0.64, P < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for age, sex, and relevant cardiovascular risk factors, clinical atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus remained associated with higher mitochondrial DNA damage levels (β = 0.14 ± 0.13, P = 0.04 and β = 0.21 ± 0.13, P = 0.002, respectively). Higher mitochondrial DNA damage was associated with higher baseline pulse amplitude, a measure of arterial pulsatility, but not with flow-mediated dilation or hyperemic response, measures of vasodilator function. We found greater mitochondrial DNA damage in patients with diabetes mellitus and clinical atherosclerosis. The association of mitochondrial DNA damage and baseline pulse amplitude may suggest a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive small artery pulsatility with potentially adverse microvascular impact.

  7. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  8. Calcium-dependent mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurons.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-09-01

    Calcium is an extraordinarily versatile signaling ion, encoding cellular responses to a wide variety of external stimuli. In neurons, mitochondria can accumulate enormous amounts of calcium, with the consequence that mitochondrial calcium uptake, sequestration and release play pivotal roles in orchestrating calcium-dependent responses as diverse as gene transcription and cell death. In this review, we consider the basic chemistry of calcium as a 'sticky' cation, which leads to extremely high bound/free ratios, and discuss areas of current interest or controversy. Topics addressed include methodologies for measuring local intracellular calcium, mitochondrial calcium buffering and loading capacity, mitochondrially directed spatial calcium gradients, and the role of calcium overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in glutamate-evoked excitotoxic injury and neurodegeneration. Finally, we consider the relationship between delayed calcium de-regulation, the mitochondrial permeability transition and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and propose a unified view of the 'source specificity' and 'calcium overload' models of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent excitotoxicity. Non-NMDA receptor mechanisms of excitotoxicity are discussed briefly. Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS. No claim to original US government works.

  9. Calcium-dependent mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pivovarova, Natalia B.; Andrews, S. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Calcium is an extraordinarily versatile signaling ion, encoding cellular responses to a wide variety of external stimuli. In neurons, mitochondria can accumulate enormous amounts of calcium, with the consequence that mitochondrial calcium uptake, sequestration and release play pivotal roles in orchestrating calcium-dependent responses as diverse as gene transcription and cell death. In this review, we consider the basic chemistry of calcium as a ‘sticky’ cation, which leads to extremely high bound/free ratios, and discuss areas of current interest or controversy. Topics addressed include methodologies for measuring local intracellular calcium, mitochondrial calcium buffering and loading capacity, mitochondrially directed spatial calcium gradients, and the role of calcium overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in glutamate-evoked excitotoxic injury and neurodegeneration. Finally, we consider the relationship between delayed calcium de-regulation, the mitochondrial permeability transition and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and propose a unified view of the ‘source specificity’ and ‘calcium overload’ models of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent excitotoxicity. Non-NMDA receptor mechanisms of excitotoxicity are discussed briefly. PMID:20659161

  10. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Charli D; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N; Gohil, Vishal M

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non-bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non-bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER-mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non-bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. © 2016 Baker et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. A MACROMOLECULAR REPEATING UNIT OF MITOCHONDRIAL STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Morán, H.; Oda, T.; Blair, P. V.; Green, D. E.

    1964-01-01

    A repeating particle associated with the cristae and the inner membrane of the external envelope has been recognized and characterized in beef heart mitochondria by correlated electron microscopic and biochemical studies. Many thousands (ca. 104 to 105) of these particles, disposed in regular arrays, are present in a single mitochondrion. The repeating particle, called the elementary particle (EP), consists of three parts: (1) a spherical or polyhedral head piece (80 to 100 A in diameter); (2) a cylindrical stalk (about 50 A long and 30 to 40 A wide); and (3) a base piece (40 x 110 A). The base pieces of the elementary particles form an integral part of the outer dense layers of the cristae. The elementary particles can be seen in electron micrographs of mitochondria in situ, of isolated mitochondria, and of submitochondrial particles with a complete electron transfer chain. Negative staining with phosphotungstate is only one of several techniques that can be used for reproducible demonstration of the repeating particles and underlying subunit organization of mitochondrial membranes. A particulate unit containing a complete electron transfer chain can be isolated from beef heart mitochondria. The isolated unit approximates in size that of the elementary particle in situ. The molecular weight of the particle in situ is calculated to be 1.3 x 106. Evidence is presented for identifying the isolated unit with the elementary particle visualized in situ. The elementary particle of the mitochondrion is believed to be a prototype of a class of functional particles or macromolecular assemblies of similar size found in association with membranes generally. PMID:14195622

  12. Selective propagation of functional mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis restricts the transmission of a deleterious mitochondrial variant.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jahda H; Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is prone to mutation and few mtDNA repair mechanisms exist, crippling mitochondrial mutations are exceedingly rare. Recent studies have demonstrated strong purifying selection in the mouse female germline. However, the mechanisms underlying positive selection of healthy mitochondria remain to be elucidated. We visualized mtDNA replication during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis, finding that mtDNA replication commenced before oocyte determination during the late germarium stage and was dependent on mitochondrial fitness. We isolated a temperature-sensitive lethal mtDNA allele, mt:CoI(T300I), which resulted in reduced mtDNA replication in the germarium at the restrictive temperature. Additionally, the frequency of the mt:CoI(T300I) allele in heteroplasmic flies was decreased, both during oogenesis and over multiple generations, at the restrictive temperature. Furthermore, we determined that selection against mt:CoI(T300I) overlaps with the timing of selective replication of mtDNA in the germarium. These findings establish a previously uncharacterized developmental mechanism for the selective amplification of wild-type mtDNA, which may be evolutionarily conserved to limit the transmission of deleterious mutations.

  13. Oxidative stress modulates mitochondrial failure and cyclophilin D function in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Bianchi, Patrizia; Fourcade, Stéphane; Andreu, Antoni L; Ferrer, Isidre; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Pujol, Aurora

    2012-12-01

    A common process associated with oxidative stress and severe mitochondrial impairment is the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, as described in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening represents a potential target for inhibiting mitochondrial-driven cell death. Among the mitochondrial permeability transition pore components, cyclophilin D is the most studied and has been found increased under pathological conditions. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo models of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to investigate the relationship between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and redox homeostasis. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative condition caused by loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter, in which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. In this study, we provide evidence of impaired mitochondrial metabolism in a peroxisomal disease, as fibroblasts in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cannot survive when forced to rely on mitochondrial energy production, i.e. on incubation in galactose. Oxidative stress induced under galactose conditions leads to mitochondrial damage in the form of mitochondrial inner membrane potential dissipation, ATP drop and necrotic cell death, together with increased levels of oxidative modifications in cyclophilin D protein. Moreover, we show increased expression levels of cyclophilin D in the affected zones of brains in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy, in spinal cord of a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd1-null mice) and in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Notably, treatment with antioxidants rescues mitochondrial damage markers in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, including cyclophilin D oxidative modifications, and reverses cyclophilin D induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the

  14. Oxidative stress modulates mitochondrial failure and cyclophilin D function in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    López-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Bianchi, Patrizia; Fourcade, Stéphane; Andreu, Antoni L.; Ferrer, Isidre; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    A common process associated with oxidative stress and severe mitochondrial impairment is the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, as described in many neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening represents a potential target for inhibiting mitochondrial-driven cell death. Among the mitochondrial permeability transition pore components, cyclophilin D is the most studied and has been found increased under pathological conditions. Here, we have used in vitro and in vivo models of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy to investigate the relationship between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and redox homeostasis. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative condition caused by loss of function of the peroxisomal ABCD1 transporter, in which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. In this study, we provide evidence of impaired mitochondrial metabolism in a peroxisomal disease, as fibroblasts in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy cannot survive when forced to rely on mitochondrial energy production, i.e. on incubation in galactose. Oxidative stress induced under galactose conditions leads to mitochondrial damage in the form of mitochondrial inner membrane potential dissipation, ATP drop and necrotic cell death, together with increased levels of oxidative modifications in cyclophilin D protein. Moreover, we show increased expression levels of cyclophilin D in the affected zones of brains in patients with adrenomyeloneuropathy, in spinal cord of a mouse model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (Abcd1-null mice) and in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. Notably, treatment with antioxidants rescues mitochondrial damage markers in fibroblasts from patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, including cyclophilin D oxidative modifications, and reverses cyclophilin D induction in vitro and in vivo. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the

  15. Gata6-Dependent GLI3 Repressor Function is Essential in Anterior Limb Progenitor Cells for Proper Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Akiyama, Ryutaro; Wong, Julia; Tahara, Naoyuki; Kawakami, Hiroko; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Gli3 is a major regulator of Hedgehog signaling during limb development. In the anterior mesenchyme, GLI3 is proteolytically processed into GLI3R, a truncated repressor form that inhibits Hedgehog signaling. Although numerous studies have identified mechanisms that regulate Gli3 function in vitro, it is not completely understood how Gli3 function is regulated in vivo. In this study, we show a novel mechanism of regulation of GLI3R activities in limb buds by Gata6, a member of the GATA transcription factor family. We show that conditional inactivation of Gata6 prior to limb outgrowth by the Tcre deleter causes preaxial polydactyly, the formation of an anterior extra digit, in hindlimbs. A recent study suggested that Gata6 represses Shh transcription in hindlimb buds. However, we found that ectopic Hedgehog signaling precedes ectopic Shh expression. In conjunction, we observed Gata6 and Gli3 genetically interact, and compound heterozygous mutants develop preaxial polydactyly without ectopic Shh expression, indicating an additional prior mechanism to prevent polydactyly. These results support the idea that Gata6 possesses dual roles during limb development: enhancement of Gli3 repressor function to repress Hedgehog signaling in the anterior limb bud, and negative regulation of Shh expression. Our in vitro and in vivo studies identified that GATA6 physically interacts with GLI3R to facilitate nuclear localization of GLI3R and repressor activities of GLI3R. Both the genetic and biochemical data elucidates a novel mechanism by Gata6 to regulate GLI3R activities in the anterior limb progenitor cells to prevent polydactyly and attain proper development of the mammalian autopod. PMID:27352137

  16. 3′-Daidzein sulfonate sodium improves mitochondrial functions after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wa; Chen, Qin; Zeng, Jing; Xiao, Hai; Huang, Zhi-hua; Li, Xiao; Lei, Qiong

    2017-01-01

    3′-Daidzein sulfonate sodium is a new synthetic water-soluble compound derived from daidzein (an active ingredient of the kudzu vine root). It has been shown to have a protective effect on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. We plan to study the mechanism of its protective effect. 3′-Daidzein sulfonate sodium was injected in rats after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Results showed that 3′-daidzein sulfonate sodium significantly reduced mitochondrial swelling, significantly elevated the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased mitochondrial superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, and decreased mitochondrial malondialdehyde levels. 3′-Daidzein sulfonate sodium improved the structural integrity of the blood-brain barrier and reduced blood-brain barrier permeability. These findings confirmed that 3′-daidzein sulfonate sodium has a protective effect on mitochondrial functions after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, improves brain energy metabolism, and provides protection against blood-brain barrier damage. PMID:28400805

  17. A new role for ATM: regulating mitochondrial function and mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Valentin-Vega, Yasmine A; Kastan, Michael B

    2012-05-01

    The various pathologies in ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients including T-cell lymphomagenesis have been attributed to defects in the DNA damage response pathway because ATM, the gene mutated in this disease, is a key mediator of this process. Analysis of Atm-deficient thymocytes in mice reveals that the absence of this gene results in altered mitochondrial homeostasis, a phenomenon that appears to result from abnormal mitophagy engagement. Interestingly, allelic loss of the autophagic gene Becn1 delays tumorigenesis in Atm-null mice presumably by reversing the mitochondrial abnormalities and not by improving the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Thus, ATM plays a critical role in modulating mitochondrial homeostasis perhaps by regulating mitophagy.

  18. Functional Differences between Mitochondrial Haplogroup T and Haplogroup H in HEK293 Cybrid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Edith E.; Brunner, Susanne M.; Mayr, Johannes A.; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological case-control studies have revealed associations between mitochondrial haplogroups and the onset and/or progression of various multifactorial diseases. For instance, mitochondrial haplogroup T was previously shown to be associated with vascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and diabetic retinopathy. In contrast, haplogroup H, the most frequent haplogroup in Europe, is often found to be more prevalent in healthy control subjects than in patient study groups. However, justifications for the assumption that haplogroups are functionally distinct are rare. Therefore, we attempted to compare differences in mitochondrial function between haplogroup H and T cybrids. Methodology/Principal Findings Mitochondrial haplogroup H and T cybrids were generated by fusion of HEK293 cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA with isolated thrombocytes of individuals with the respective haplogroups. These cybrid cells were analyzed for oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme activities, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, growth rate and susceptibility to reactive oxygen species (ROS). We observed that haplogroup T cybrids have higher survival rate when challenged with hydrogen peroxide, indicating a higher capability to cope with oxidative stress. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study show that functional differences exist between HEK293 cybrid cells which differ in mitochondrial genomic background. PMID:23300652

  19. Functional differences between mitochondrial haplogroup T and haplogroup H in HEK293 cybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edith E; Brunner, Susanne M; Mayr, Johannes A; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological case-control studies have revealed associations between mitochondrial haplogroups and the onset and/or progression of various multifactorial diseases. For instance, mitochondrial haplogroup T was previously shown to be associated with vascular diseases, including coronary artery disease and diabetic retinopathy. In contrast, haplogroup H, the most frequent haplogroup in Europe, is often found to be more prevalent in healthy control subjects than in patient study groups. However, justifications for the assumption that haplogroups are functionally distinct are rare. Therefore, we attempted to compare differences in mitochondrial function between haplogroup H and T cybrids. Mitochondrial haplogroup H and T cybrids were generated by fusion of HEK293 cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA with isolated thrombocytes of individuals with the respective haplogroups. These cybrid cells were analyzed for oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzyme activities, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, growth rate and susceptibility to reactive oxygen species (ROS). We observed that haplogroup T cybrids have higher survival rate when challenged with hydrogen peroxide, indicating a higher capability to cope with oxidative stress. The results of this study show that functional differences exist between HEK293 cybrid cells which differ in mitochondrial genomic background.

  20. Triglyceride depletion of brown adipose tissue enables analysis of mitochondrial respiratory function in permeabilized biopsies.

    PubMed

    Dechandt, Carlos R P; Couto-Lima, Carlos A; Alberici, Luciane C

    2016-12-15

    The research on mitochondrial functions in adipocytes has increasingly evidenced that mitochondria plays an important role in the onset and/or progression of obesity and related pathologies. Mitochondrial function in brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been classically assessed by measuring either the levels/activity of mitochondrial enzymes, or the respiration in isolated mitochondria. Isolation of mitochondria is not advantageous because it demands significant time and amount of tissue and, as tissue homogenates, disrupts biochemical and physical connections of mitochondria within the cell. Here, we described a new and efficient protocol to analyze the mitochondrial respiratory states in BAT biopsies that relies on intracellular triglyceride depletion followed by tissue permeabilization. In addition to minimizing tissue requirements to ∼17 mg wet weight, the proposed protocol enabled analysis of all mitochondrial respiratory states, including phosphorylation (OXPHOS), no-phosphorylation (LEAK), and uncoupled (ETS) states, as well as the use of substrates for complex I, complex II, and cytochrome c; together, these features demonstrated mitochondrial integrity and validated the preparation efficacy. Therefore, the protocol described here increases the possibilities of answering physiological questions related to small BAT regions of human and animal models, which shall help to unravel the mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial function in health and disease.

  1. Impaired cerebral mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation function in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Fang, Xiangshao; Fu, Yue; Xu, Wen; Jiang, Longyuan; Huang, Zitong

    2014-01-01

    Postcardiac arrest brain injury significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity in patients suffering from cardiac arrest (CA). Evidence that shows that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to be a key factor in tissue damage after ischemia/reperfusion is accumulating. However, limited data are available regarding the cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and its relationship to the alterations of high-energy phosphate. Here, we sought to identify alterations of mitochondrial morphology and oxidative phosphorylation function as well as high-energy phosphates during CA and CPR in a rat model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). We found that impairment of mitochondrial respiration and partial depletion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) developed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus following a prolonged cardiac arrest. Optimal CPR might ameliorate the deranged phosphorus metabolism and preserve mitochondrial function. No obvious ultrastructural abnormalities of mitochondria have been found during CA. We conclude that CA causes cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction along with decay of high-energy phosphates, which would be mitigated with CPR. This study may broaden our understanding of the pathogenic processes underlying global cerebral ischemic injury and provide a potential therapeutic strategy that aimed at preserving cerebral mitochondrial function during CA.

  2. Prediction of mitochondrial protein function by comparative physiology and phylogenetic profiling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yiming; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    According to the endosymbiotic theory, mitochondria originate from a free-living alpha-proteobacteria that established an intracellular symbiosis with the ancestor of present-day eukaryotic cells. During the bacterium-to-organelle transformation, the proto-mitochondrial proteome has undergone a massive turnover, whereby less than 20 % of modern mitochondrial proteomes can be traced back to the bacterial ancestor. Moreover, mitochondrial proteomes from several eukaryotic organisms, for example, yeast and human, show a rather modest overlap, reflecting differences in mitochondrial physiology. Those differences may result from the combination of differential gain and loss of genes and retargeting processes among lineages. Therefore, an evolutionary signature, also called "phylogenetic profile", could be generated for every mitochondrial protein. Here, we present two evolutionary biology approaches to study mitochondrial physiology: the first strategy, which we refer to as "comparative physiology," allows the de novo identification of mitochondrial proteins involved in a physiological function; the second, known as "phylogenetic profiling," allows to predict protein functions and functional interactions by comparing phylogenetic profiles of uncharacterized and known components.

  3. The circadian clock maintains cardiac function by regulating mitochondrial metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Kohsaka, Akira; Das, Partha; Hashimoto, Izumi; Nakao, Tomomi; Deguchi, Yoko; Gouraud, Sabine S; Waki, Hidefumi; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Maeda, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac function is highly dependent on oxidative energy, which is produced by mitochondrial respiration. Defects in mitochondrial function are associated with both structural and functional abnormalities in the heart. Here, we show that heart-specific ablation of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 results in cardiac mitochondrial defects that include morphological changes and functional abnormalities, such as reduced enzymatic activities within the respiratory complex. Mice without cardiac Bmal1 function show a significant decrease in the expression of genes associated with the fatty acid oxidative pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the heart and develop severe progressive heart failure with age. Importantly, similar changes in gene expression related to mitochondrial oxidative metabolism are also observed in C57BL/6J mice subjected to chronic reversal of the light-dark cycle; thus, they show disrupted circadian rhythmicity. These findings indicate that the circadian clock system plays an important role in regulating mitochondrial metabolism and thereby maintains cardiac function.

  4. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  5. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on mitochondrial function of tomato seedling roots under salinity-alkalinity stress].

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiong-bo; Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Xiao-hui; Ren, Wen-qi; Zhang, Li; Ni, Xin-xin

    2016-02-01

    Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cvs. 'Jinpengchaoguan' and 'Zhongza No. 9', with the former being more tolerant to saline-alkaline stress) seedlings grown hydroponically were subjected to salinity-alkalinity stress condition (NaCl: Na2SO4:NaHCO3:Na2CO3 = 1:9:9:1) without or with foliar application of 0.25 mmol . L-1 spermidine (Spd), and the root morphology and physiological characteristics of mitochondrial membrane were analyzed 8 days after treatment, to explore the protective effects of exogenous Spd on mitochondrial function in tomato roots under salinity-alkalinity stress. The results showed that the salinity-alkalinity stress increased the concentrations of both mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA as well as the mitochondrial membrane permeability in the roots of the two cultivars, while it decreased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity, which impaired the mitochondria and therefore inhibited the root growth; and these effects were more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengechaoguan'. Under the salinity-alkalinity stress, foliar application Spd could effectively decrease the concentrations of mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA and mitochondrial membrane permeability, while increased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could effectively mitigate the damage on mitochondria induced by salinity-alkalinity stress, and the alleviation effect was more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengchaoguan'.

  6. Regulation of mitochondrial function by voltage dependent anion channels in ethanol metabolism and the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, John J; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Czerny, Christoph; Zhong, Zhi; Maldonado, Eduardo N

    2012-06-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDAC) are highly conserved proteins that are responsible for permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane to hydrophilic metabolites like ATP, ADP and respiratory substrates. Although previously assumed to remain open, VDAC closure is emerging as an important mechanism for regulation of global mitochondrial metabolism in apoptotic cells and also in cells that are not dying. During hepatic ethanol oxidation to acetaldehyde, VDAC closure suppresses exchange of mitochondrial metabolites, resulting in inhibition of ureagenesis. In vivo, VDAC closure after ethanol occurs coordinately with mitochondrial uncoupling. Since acetaldehyde passes through membranes independently of channels and transporters, VDAC closure and uncoupling together foster selective and more rapid oxidative metabolism of toxic acetaldehyde to nontoxic acetate by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. In single reconstituted VDAC, tubulin decreases VDAC conductance, and in HepG2 hepatoma cells, free tubulin negatively modulates mitochondrial membrane potential, an effect enhanced by protein kinase A. Tubulin-dependent closure of VDAC in cancer cells contributes to suppression of mitochondrial metabolism and may underlie the Warburg phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: VDAC structure, function, and regulation of mitochondrial metabolism.

  7. The rescue of microtubule-dependent traffic recovers mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Esteves, A R; Gozes, I; Cardoso, S M

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease mitochondrial dysfunction can lead to a deficient ATP supply to microtubule protein motors leading to mitochondrial axonal transport disruption. Compromised axonal transport will then lead to a disorganized distribution of mitochondria and other organelles in the cell, as well as, the accumulation of aggregated proteins like alpha-synuclein. Moreover, axonal transport disruption can trigger synaptic accumulation of autophagosomes packed with damaged mitochondria and protein aggregates promoting synaptic failure. We previously observed that neuronal-like cells with an inherent mitochondrial impairment derived from PD patients contain a disorganized microtubule network, as well as, alpha-synuclein oligomer accumulation. In this work we provide new evidence that an agent that promotes microtubule network assembly, NAP (davunetide), improves microtubule-dependent traffic, restores the autophagic flux and potentiates autophagosome-lysosome fusion leading to autophagic vacuole clearance in Parkinson's disease cells. Moreover, NAP is capable of efficiently reducing alpha-synuclein oligomer content and its sequestration by the mitochondria. Most interestingly, NAP decreases mitochondrial ubiquitination levels, as well as, increases mitochondrial membrane potential indicating a rescue in mitochondrial function. Overall, we demonstrate that by improving microtubule-mediated traffic, we can avoid mitochondrial-induced damage and thus recover cell homeostasis. These results prove that NAP may be a promising therapeutic lead candidate for neurodegenerative diseases that involve axonal transport failure and mitochondrial impairment as hallmarks, like Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

  8. Chronic mild stress damages mitochondrial ultrastructure and function in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Chai, Yi; Ding, Jian-Hua; Sun, Xiu-Lan; Hu, Gang

    2011-01-13

    Increasing evidence implicates mitochondrial failure as a crucial factor in the pathogenesis of mental disorders, such as depression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS), a paradigm developed in the late 1980s as an animal model of depression, on the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial ultrastructure in the mouse brain. The results showed that the CMS regime induced depressive-like symptoms in mice characterized by reduced sucrose preference and body weight. Moreover, CMS exposure was associated with a significant increase in immobility time in the tail suspension test. Exposure to the CMS paradigm inhibited mitochondrial respiration rates and dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential in hippocampus, cortex and hypothalamus of mice. In addition, we found a damaged mitochondrial ultrastructure in brains of mice exposed to CMS. These findings provide evidence for brain mitochondrial dysfunction and ultrastructural damage in a mouse model of depression. Moreover, these findings suggest that mitochondrial malfunction-induced oxidative injury could play a role in stress-related disorders such as depression.

  9. AMPK dysregulation promotes diabetes-related reduction of superoxide and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Laura L; You, Young-Hyun; Ali, Sameh S; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie; Miyamoto, Satoshi; DeCleves, Anne-Emilie; Andreyev, Aleksander; Quach, Tammy; Ly, San; Shekhtman, Grigory; Nguyen, William; Chepetan, Andre; Le, Thuy P; Wang, Lin; Xu, Ming; Paik, Kacie P; Fogo, Agnes; Viollet, Benoit; Murphy, Anne; Brosius, Frank; Naviaux, Robert K; Sharma, Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic microvascular complications have been considered to be mediated by a glucose-driven increase in mitochondrial superoxide anion production. Here, we report that superoxide production was reduced in the kidneys of a steptozotocin-induced mouse model of type 1 diabetes, as assessed by in vivo real-time transcutaneous fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. Reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis and phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were observed in kidneys from diabetic mice. These observations were consistent with an overall reduction of mitochondrial glucose oxidation. Activity of AMPK, the major energy-sensing enzyme, was reduced in kidneys from both diabetic mice and humans. Mitochondrial biogenesis, PDH activity, and mitochondrial complex activity were rescued by treatment with the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR treatment induced superoxide production and was linked with glomerular matrix and albuminuria reduction in the diabetic kidney. Furthermore, diabetic heterozygous superoxide dismutase 2 (Sod2(+/-)) mice had no evidence of increased renal disease, and Ampka2(-/-) mice had increased albuminuria that was not reduced with AICAR treatment. Reduction of mitochondrial superoxide production with rotenone was sufficient to reduce AMPK phosphorylation in mouse kidneys. Taken together, these results demonstrate that diabetic kidneys have reduced superoxide and mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of AMPK enhances superoxide production and mitochondrial function while reducing disease activity.

  10. Mitochondrial function is altered in horse atypical myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Boemer, François; van Galen, Gaby; Serteyn, Didier; Amory, Hélène; Baise, Etienne; Cassart, Dominique; van Loon, Gunther; Marcillaud-Pitel, Christel; Votion, Dominique-M

    2016-09-01

    Equine atypical myopathy in Europe is a fatal rhabdomyolysis syndrome that results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple). Acylcarnitine concentrations in serum and muscle OXPHOS capacity were determined in 15 atypical myopathy cases. All but one acylcarnitine were out of reference range and mitochondrial respiratory capacity was severely decreased up to 49% as compared to 10 healthy controls. The hallmark of atypical myopathy thus consists of a severe alteration in the energy metabolism including a severe impairment in muscle mitochondrial respiration that could contribute to its high death rate.

  11. Mitochondrial dynamics and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Baloh, Robert H

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is perhaps the archetypal disease of axonal degeneration, characteristically involving degeneration of the longest axons in the body. Evidence from both inherited and acquired forms of peripheral neuropathy strongly supports that the primary pathology is in the axons themselves and points to disruption of axonal transport as an important disease mechanism. Recent studies in human genetics have further identified abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics--the fusion, fission, and movement of mitochondria--as a player in the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathy. This review provides an update on the mechanisms of mitochondrial trafficking in axons and the emerging relationship between the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics and axonal degeneration. Evidence suggests mitochondria are a "critical cargo" whose transport is necessary for proper axonal and synaptic function. Importantly, understanding the regulation of mitochondrial movement and the consequences of decreased axonal mitochondrial function may define new paths for therapeutic agents in peripheral neuropathy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-09

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  14. N-acetylcysteine amide preserves mitochondrial bioenergetics and improves functional recovery following spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir P; Sullivan, Patrick G; Pandya, Jignesh D; Goldstein, Glenn A; VanRooyen, Jenna L; Yonutas, Heather M; Eldahan, Khalid C; Morehouse, Johnny; Magnuson, David S K; Rabchevsky, Alexander G

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is becoming a pivotal target for neuroprotective strategies following contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) and the pharmacological compounds that maintain mitochondrial function confer neuroprotection and improve long-term hindlimb function after injury. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of cell-permeating thiol, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a precursor of endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH), on mitochondrial function acutely, and long-term tissue sparing and hindlimb locomotor recovery following upper lumbar contusion SCI. Some designated injured adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=120) received either vehicle or NACA (75, 150, 300 or 600mg/kg) at 15min and 6h post-injury. After 24h the total, synaptic, and non-synaptic mitochondrial populations were isolated from a single 1.5cm spinal cord segment (centered at injury site) and assessed for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Results showed compromised total mitochondrial bioenergetics following acute SCI that was significantly improved with NACA treatment in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum effects at 300mg/kg (n=4/group). For synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria, only 300mg/kg NACA dosage showed efficacy. Similar dosage (300mg/kg) also maintained mitochondrial GSH near normal levels. Other designated injured rats (n=21) received continuous NACA (150 or 300mg/kg/day) treatment starting at 15min post-injury for one week to assess long-term functional recovery over 6weeks post-injury. Locomotor testing and novel gait analyses showed significantly improved hindlimb function with NACA that were associated with increased tissue sparing at the injury site. Overall, NACA treatment significantly maintained acute mitochondrial bioenergetics and normalized GSH levels following SCI, and prolonged delivery resulted in significant tissue sparing and improved recovery of hindlimb function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. N-acetylcysteineamide Preserves Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Improves Functional Recovery Following Spinal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Samir P.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Goldstein, Glenn A.; VanRooyen, Jenna L.; Yonutas, Heather M.; Eldahan, Khalid C.; Morehouse, Johnny; Magnuson, David S. K.; Rabchevsky, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is becoming a pivotal target for neuroprotective strategies following contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) and the pharmacological compounds that maintain mitochondrial function confer neuroprotection and improve long-term hindlimb function after injury. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of cell-permeating thiol, N-acetylcysteineamide (NACA), a precursor of endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH), on mitochondrial function acutely, and long-term tissue sparing and hindlimb locomotor recovery following upper lumbar contusion SCI. Some designated injured adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=120) received either Vehicle or NACA (75, 150, 300 or 600 mg/kg) at 15min and 6hrs post-injury. After 24hr the total, synaptic, and non-synaptic mitochondrial populations were isolated from a single 1.5cm spinal cord segment (centered at injury site) and assessed for mitochondrial bioenergetics. Results showed compromised total mitochondrial bioenergetics following acute SCI that was significantly improved with NACA treatment in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum effects at 300 mg/kg (n=4/group). For synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria, only 300 mg/kg NACA dosage showed efficacy. Similar dosage (300mg/kg) also maintained mitochondrial GSH near normal levels. Other designated injured rats (n=21) received continuous NACA (150 or 300mg/kg/day) treatment starting at 15min post-injury for one week to assess long-term functional recovery over 6 weeks post-injury. Locomotor testing and novel gait analyses showed significantly improved hindlimb function with NACA that were associated with increased tissue sparing at the injury site. Overall, NACA treatment significantly maintained acute mitochondrial bioenergetics and normalized GSH levels following SCI, and prolonged delivery resulted in significant tissue sparing and improved recovery of hindlimb function. PMID:24805071

  16. Effect of eccentric versus concentric exercise training on mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Rasseneur, Laurence; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, Evelyne; Dufour, Stéphane Pascal; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Bouitbir, Jamal; Zoll, Joffrey; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Geny, Bernard; Daussin, Frédéric Nicolas; Burelle, Yan; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-11-01

    The effect of eccentric (ECC) versus concentric (CON) training on metabolic properties in skeletal muscle is understood poorly. We determined the responses in oxidative capacity and mitochondrial H2 O2 production after eccentric (ECC) versus concentric (CON) training performed at similar mechanical power. Forty-eight rats performed 5- or 20-day eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CON) training programs. Mitochondrial respiration, H2 O2 production, citrate synthase activity (CS), and skeletal muscle damage were assessed in gastrocnemius (GAS), soleus (SOL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles. Maximal mitochondrial respiration improved only after 20 days of concentric (CON) training in GAS and SOL. H2 O2 production increased specifically after 20 days of eccentric ECC training in VI. Skeletal muscle damage occurred transiently in VI after 5 days of ECC training. Twenty days of ECC versus CON training performed at similar mechanical power output do not increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacities, but it elevates mitochondrial H2 O2 production in VI, presumably linked to transient muscle damage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Downregulation of mitochondrial lon protease impairs mitochondrial function and causes hepatic insulin resistance in human liver SK-HEP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Chung, K; Lee, H; Lee, K; Lim, J H; Song, J

    2011-06-01

    Lon protease degrades oxidatively damaged proteins in mitochondrial matrix. To examine the relationships between mitochondrial quality control, mitochondrial functions and diabetes, we investigated whether lon protease deficiency influences insulin resistance by affecting mitochondrial function. Lon protease-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into human liver SK-HEP-1 cells and changes in molecules related to insulin resistance were analysed. Reduction in lon protease was achieved using specific siRNA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in human liver SK-HEP-1 cells. Concurrently, insulin signalling and subsequent insulin action were impaired and levels of gluconeogenic enzymes were increased by lon protein deficiency. Moreover, the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases and transcription factors related to hepatic gluconeogenesis were elevated in LON (also known as LONP1) siRNA-transfected cells via increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production. Overproduction of lon protease restored mitochondrial function and also diminished the insulin resistance induced by treatment with cholesterol and palmitate. In addition, levels of lon protease decreased dramatically in livers of diabetic db/db mice compared with their lean mice counterparts. Here we have demonstrated that reduction of lon protease induced hepatic insulin resistance by lowering mitochondrial function. This is the first study to report that defects in mitochondrial protein quality control could cause insulin resistance and diabetes.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial function in insulin resistant muscle cells: effect of catalase overexpression.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marina R; Sampaio, Igor H; Teodoro, Bruno G; Sousa, Thais A; Zoppi, Claudio C; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Alberici, Luciane C; Teixeira, Felipe R; Manfiolli, Adriana O; Batista, Thiago M; Cappelli, Ana Paula Gameiro; Reis, Rosana I; Frasson, Danúbia; Kettelhut, Isis C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Carneiro, Everardo M; Curi, Rui; Silveira, Leonardo R

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial redox state plays a central role in the link between mitochondrial overloading and insulin resistance. However, the mechanism by which the ROS induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells is not completely understood. We examined the association between mitochondrial function and H2O2 production in insulin resistant cells. Our hypothesis is that the low mitochondrial oxygen consumption leads to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with reduced PGC1α transcription and low content of phosphorylated CREB. The cells were transfected with either the encoded sequence for catalase overexpression or the specific siRNA for catalase inhibition. After transfection, myotubes were incubated with palmitic acid (500μM) and the insulin response, as well as mitochondrial function and fatty acid metabolism, was determined. The low mitochondrial oxygen consumption led to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with β-oxidation of fatty acids. Rotenone was observed to reduce the ratio of ROS production. The elevated H2O2 production markedly decreased the PGC1α transcription, an effect that was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Akt and CREB. The catalase transfection prevented the reduction in the phosphorylated level of Akt and upregulated the levels of phosphorylated CREB. The mitochondrial function was elevated and H2O2 production reduced, thus increasing the insulin sensitivity. The catalase overexpression improved mitochondrial respiration protecting the cells from fatty acid-induced, insulin resistance. This effect indicates that control of hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial respiration preventing the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism associated with CREB phosphorylation and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  19. Effects of troglitazone on HepG2 viability and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Tirmenstein, Mark A; Hu, Catherine X; Gales, Tracy L; Maleeff, Beverly E; Narayanan, Padma K; Kurali, Edit; Hart, Timothy K; Thomas, Heath C; Schwartz, Lester W

    2002-09-01

    Troglitazone (TRO), a member of the thiazolidinedione class of drugs, has been associated with hepatotoxicity in patients. The following in vitro study was conducted to investigate the effects of TRO on mitochondrial function and viability in a human hepatoma cell line, HepG2. TRO induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in cell death, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release. Exposure to 50 or 100 micro M TRO produced total loss of cell viability within 5 h. Preincubation of HepG2 cells with P450 inhibitors did not significantly protect against TRO-induced cell death suggesting that P450 metabolism was not required to induce cell death. Preincubation with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor, cyclosporin A, provided complete protection against TRO-induced cell death. Our results also indicated that TRO produced concentration-dependent decreases in cellular ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that TRO induced mitochondrial changes at concentrations of > or =10 micro M after 2 h. Decreased MMP and altered mitochondrial morphology occurred at time points that preceded cell death and at sublethal concentrations of TRO. These observations in HepG2 cells suggest that TRO disrupts mitochondrial function, leading to mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death.

  20. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  1. Honokiol protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity via improving mitochondrial function in mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lizhen; Zhang, Kailiang; Guo, Yingying; Huang, Fengyuan; Yang, Kevin; Chen, Long; Huang, Kai; Zhang, Fengxue; Long, Qinqiang; Yang, Qinglin

    2017-09-20

    Honokiol is a key component of a medicinal herb, Magnolia bark. Honokiol possesses potential pharmacological benefits for many disease conditions, especially cancer. Recent studies demonstrate that Honokiol exerts beneficial effects on cardiac hypertrophy and doxorubicin (Dox)-cardiotoxicity via deacetylation of mitochondrial proteins. However, the effects and mechanisms of Honokiol on cardiac mitochondrial respiration remain unclear. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Honokiol on cardiac mitochondrial respiration in mice subjected to Dox treatment. Oxygen consumption in freshly isolated mitochondria from mice treated with Honokiol showed enhanced mitochondrial respiration. The Dox-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiration was less pronounced in honokiol-treated than control mice. Furthermore, Luciferase reporter assay reveals that Honokiol modestly increased PPARγ transcriptional activities in cultured embryonic rat cardiomyocytes (H9c2). Honokiol upregulated the expression of PPARγ in the mouse heart. Honokiol repressed cardiac inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in mice subjected to Dox treatment. As a result, Honokiol alleviated Dox-cardiotoxicity with improved cardiac function and reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. We conclude that Honokiol protects the heart from Dox-cardiotoxicity via improving mitochondrial function by not only repressing mitochondrial protein acetylation but also enhancing PPARγ activity in the heart. This study further supports Honokiol as a promising therapy for cancer patients receiving Dox treatment.

  2. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  3. The effects of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function after glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2014-11-07

    NAD+ is an essential co-enzyme for cellular energy metabolism and is also involved as a substrate for many cellular enzymatic reactions. It has been shown that NAD+ has a beneficial effect on neuronal survival and brain injury in in vitro and in vivo ischemic models. However, the effect of NAD+ on mitochondrial biogenesis and function in ischemia has not been well investigated. In the present study, we used an in vitro glutamate excitotoxicity model of primary cultured cortical neurons to study the effect of NAD+ on apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Our results show that supplementation of NAD+ could effectively reduce apoptotic neuronal death, and apoptotic inducing factor translocation after neurons were challenged with excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Using different approaches including confocal imaging, mitochondrial DNA measurement and Western blot analysis of PGC-1 and NRF-1, we also found that NAD+ could significantly attenuate glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and the impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, NAD+ treatment effectively inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and NADH redistribution after excitotoxic glutamate stimulation. Taken together, our results demonstrated that NAD+ is capable of inhibiting apoptotic neuronal death after glutamate excitotoxicity via preserving mitochondrial biogenesis and integrity. Our findings provide insights into potential neuroprotective strategies in ischemic stroke.

  4. Assessment of mitochondrial function and control in normal and diseased states.

    PubMed

    Radda, G K; Odoom, J; Kemp, G; Taylor, D J; Thompson, C; Styles, P

    1995-05-24

    Mitochondrial function in muscle in vivo can be quantitatively evaluated using 31-phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance. In resting muscle, the concentrations of ions (e.g. H+, Na+) and two of the major bioenergetic components (inorganic phosphate and creatine) are determined by regulated transcellular transport processes. During recovery after exercise the kinetics and control of mitochondrial ATP synthesis can be established. During exercise the relative contributions to ATP synthesis of phosphocreatine (using creatine kinase), anaerobic glycogenolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are dissected and have been shown to change with time. The consequences of mitochondrial lesions and dysfunctions on these processes have been summarised.

  5. FOXO3a regulates BNIP3 and modulates mitochondrial calcium, dynamics, and function in cardiac stress.

    PubMed

    Chaanine, Antoine H; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Gamb, Scott I; Guenzel, Adam J; Klaus, Katherine; Fayyaz, Ahmed U; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Hajjar, Roger J; Redfield, Margaret M

    2016-12-01

    The forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) transcription factor has been shown to regulate glucose metabolism, muscle atrophy, and cell death in postmitotic cells. Its role in regulation of mitochondrial and myocardial function is not well studied. Based on previous work, we hypothesized that FOXO3a, through BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), modulates mitochondrial morphology and function in heart failure (HF). We modulated the FOXO3a-BNIP3 pathway in normal and phenylephrine (PE)-stressed adult cardiomyocytes (ACM) in vitro and developed a cardiotropic adeno-associated virus serotype 9 encoding dominant-negative FOXO3a (AAV9.dn-FX3a) for gene delivery in a rat model of HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We found that FOXO3a upregulates BNIP3 expression in normal and PE-stressed ACM, with subsequent increases in mitochondrial Ca(2+), leading to decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial fragmentation, and apoptosis. Whereas dn-FX3a attenuated the increase in BNIP3 expression and its consequences in PE-stressed ACM, AAV9.dn-FX3a delivery in an experimental model of HFpEF decreased BNIP3 expression, reversed adverse left ventricular remodeling, and improved left ventricular systolic and, particularly, diastolic function, with improvements in mitochondrial structure and function. Moreover, AAV9.dn-FX3a restored phospholamban phosphorylation at S16 and enhanced dynamin-related protein 1 phosphorylation at S637. Furthermore, FOXO3a upregulates maladaptive genes involved in mitochondrial apoptosis, autophagy, and cardiac atrophy. We conclude that FOXO3a activation in cardiac stress is maladaptive, in that it modulates Ca(2+) cycling, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and mitochondrial dynamics and function. Our results suggest an important role of FOXO3a in HF, making it an attractive potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  7. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporter 3 Severely Hampers Plant Development through Regulating Mitochondrial Function in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Fengjuan; Wan, Xiaomin; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Dan; Zheng, Chengchao; Liu, Pei; Huang, Jinguang

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are abundant and important organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells, which maintain metabolic communication with the cytosol through mitochondrial carriers. The mitochondrial membrane localized phosphate transporter (MPT) plays vital roles in diverse development and signaling processes, especially the ATP biosynthesis. Among the three MPT genes in Arabidopsis genome, AtMPT3 was proven to be a major member, and its overexpression gave rise to multiple developmental defects including curly leaves with deep color, dwarfed stature, and reduced fertility. Transcript profiles revealed that genes involved in plant metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, alternative respiration pathway, and leaf and flower development were obviously altered in AtMPT3 overexpression (OEMPT3) plants. Moreover, OEMPT3 plants also accumulated higher ATP content, faster respiration rate and more reactive oxygen species (ROS) than wild type plants. Overall, our studies showed that AtMPT3 was indispensable for Arabidopsis normal growth and development, and provided new sights to investigate its possible regulation mechanisms. PMID:26076137

  8. Caffeine increases mitochondrial function and blocks melatonin signaling to mitochondria in Alzheimer's mice and cells.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, Natasa; Delic, Vedad; Cao, Chuanhai; Copes, Neil; Lin, Xiaoyang; Mamcarz, Maggie; Wang, Li; Arendash, Gary W; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2012-12-01

    Caffeine and melatonin have been shown to protect the Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP(sw)) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease from cognitive dysfunction. But their mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. These Alzheimer's mice have extensive mitochondrial dysfunction, which likely contributes to their cognitive decline. To further explore the mechanism through which caffeine and melatonin protect cognitive function in these mice, we monitored the function of isolated mitochondria from APP(sw) mice treated with caffeine, melatonin, or both in their drinking water for one month. Melatonin treatment yielded a near complete restoration of mitochondrial function in assays of respiratory rate, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, and ATP levels. Caffeine treatment by itself yielded a small increase in mitochondrial function. However, caffeine largely blocked the large enhancement of mitochondrial function provided by melatonin. Studies with N2a neuroblastoma cells stably expressing APP(sw) showed that specific inhibition of cAMP-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 or cGMP-dependent PDE5 also blocked melatonin protection of mitochondrial function, but A(2a) and A₁ adenosine receptor antagonists were without effect. Melatonin or caffeine at the concentrations used to modulate mitochondrial function in the cells had no effect on cAMP-dependent PDE activity or cellular cAMP or cGMP levels. Therefore, caffeine and increased cyclic nucleotide levels likely block melatonin signaling to mitochondria by independent mechanisms that do not involve adenosine receptor antagonism. The results of this study indicate that melatonin restores mitochondrial function much more potently than caffeine in APP(sw) transgenic mouse and cell models of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Emerging role of Lon protease as a master regulator of mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Pinti, Marcello; Gibellini, Lara; Nasi, Milena; De Biasi, Sara; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Lon protease is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease highly conserved throughout the evolution, crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis. Lon acts as a chaperone of misfolded proteins, and is necessary for maintaining mitochondrial DNA. The impairment of these functions has a deep impact on mitochondrial functionality and morphology. An altered expression of Lon leads to a profound reprogramming of cell metabolism, with a switch from respiration to glycolysis, which is often observed in cancer cells. Mutations of Lon, which likely impair its chaperone properties, are at the basis of a genetic inherited disease named of the cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal (CODAS) syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dexamethasone provoked mitochondrial perturbations in thymus: Possible role of N-acetylglucosamine in restoration of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Santhosh Kumar; T S, Shanmugarajan; V, Navaratnam; S M, Mansor; S, Ramanathan

    2016-10-01

    Thymus mitochondria play a crucial role in immune function. This study identifies the novel protective role of N-Acetylglucosamine (NAG) in dexamethasone (DEX) induced mitochondrial perturbations in mice thymus. Mice were induced with DEX (5mg/kg) and treated with NAG i.p. (266μg/kg, 400μg/kg and 800μg/kg) for 14 days, Withanolide A (800μg/kg) has been used as positive control. Dose dependent treatment of NAG against DEX significantly restored the mitochondrial enzyme levels (ICDH, KDH, SDH and MDH) and elevated the mitochondrial glutathione antioxidants defense (GSH, SOD, GPX and GST) thus improving the ATP status which was confirmed by ultrastructural alterations in mitochondria and nucleus using TEM studies. Further histopathological studies also revealed that NAG attenuate DEX induced thymotoxicity. Finally, the study concludes that dose dependent treatment of NAG supports a potential role in preventing DEX induced thymotoxicity and NAG acts as a beneficial pharmacological intervention in the DEX induced thymic repercussions.

  11. Pyrvinium selectively induces apoptosis of lymphoma cells through impairing mitochondrial functions and JAK2/STAT5.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meifang; Zhang, Liming; Zhou, Yizheng; Rajoria, Pasupati; Wang, Changfu

    2016-01-15

    Targeting mitochondrial respiration has emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy in blood cancer due to their unique metabolic dependencies. In this study, we show that pyrvinium, a FDA-approved anthelmintic drug, selectively targets lymphoma T-cells though inhibition of mitochondrial functions and JAK2/STAT5. Pyrvinium induces apoptosis of malignant T-cell line Jurkat and primary T-cells from lymphoma patients while sparing T-cells from healthy donors. Increased level of active caspase-3 and decreased levels of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 were also observed in Jurkat and lymphoma T-cells but not normal T-cells treated with pyrvinium. In addition, pyrvinium impairs mitochondrial functions by inhibit mitochondrial respiration, suppressing mitochondrial respiratory complex I activity, increasing ROS and decreasing ATP levels. However, the effects of pyrvinium were abolished in mitochondrial respiration-deficient Jurkat ρ(0) cells, confirming that pyrvinium acts on lymphoma T-cells via targeting mitochondrial respiration. We further show that lymphoma T-cells derived from patients depend more on mitochondrial respiration than normal T-cells, and this explains the selective toxicity of pyrvinium in lymphoma versus normal T-cells. Finally, we demonstrate that pyrvinium also suppresses JAK2/STAT5 signaling pathway in Jurkat cells. Our study suggests that pyrvinium is a useful addition to T-cell lymphoma treatment, and emphasizes the potential therapeutic value of the differences in the mitochondrial characteristics between malignant and normal T-cells in blood cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Eric AF; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits the analysis of mitochondrial function in multiple subregions within a single mouse brain. Here this technique was applied to assess regional variation in brain mitochondrial function with acute ischaemia–reperfusion injuries and to determine the role of reactive oxygen species in exacerbating dysfunction through the application of a transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria. Through creating accessibility to small regions for the investigation of mitochondrial function, the permeabilized brain preparation enhances the capacity for examining regional differences in mitochondrial regulation within the brain, as the majority of genetic models used for unique approaches exist in the mouse model. PMID:25529987

  13. Nuclear genomic control of naturally occurring variation in mitochondrial function in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Bu, Su; Harbison, Susan T; Slaughter, Juanita C; Mackay, Trudy F C; Moellering, Douglas R; De Luca, Maria

    2012-11-22

    Mitochondria are organelles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells that play a crucial role in cellular survival and function. Mitochondrial function is under the control of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. While the latter has been the focus of most genetic research, we remain largely ignorant about the nuclear-encoded genomic control of inter-individual variability in mitochondrial function. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism to address this question. We quantified mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration rates and P:O ratio in mitochondria isolated from the thoraces of 40 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. We found significant within-population genetic variability for all mitochondrial traits. Hence, we performed genome-wide association mapping and identified 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in mitochondrial respiration and efficiency (P ≤1 × 10-5). Gene-centered regression models showed that 2-3 SNPs can explain 31, 13, and 18% of the phenotypic variation in state 3, state 4, and P:O ratio, respectively. Most of the genes tagged by the SNPs are involved in organ development, second messenger-mediated signaling pathways, and cytoskeleton remodeling. One of these genes, sallimus (sls), encodes a component of the muscle sarcomere. We confirmed the direct effect of sls on mitochondrial respiration using two viable mutants and their coisogenic wild-type strain. Furthermore, correlation network analysis revealed that sls functions as a transcriptional hub in a co-regulated module associated with mitochondrial respiration and is connected to CG7834, which is predicted to encode a protein with mitochondrial electron transfer flavoprotein activity. This latter finding was also verified in the sls mutants. Our results provide novel insights into the genetic factors regulating natural variation in mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster. The integrative genomic

  14. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p < 0.05]. More than 11% of the structural clusters that constitute the Tox21 library (76 of 651 clusters) were significantly enriched for compounds that decreased the MMP. Conclusions: Our multiplexed qHTS approach allowed us to generate a robust and reliable data set to evaluate the ability of thousands of drugs and environmental compounds to decrease MMP. The use of structure-based clustering analysis allowed us to identify molecular features that are likely responsible for the observed activity. Citation: Attene-Ramos MS, Huang R, Michael S, Witt KL, Richard A, Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox

  15. Fas cell surface death receptor controls hepatic lipid metabolism by regulating mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Item, Flurin; Wueest, Stephan; Lemos, Vera; Stein, Sokrates; Lucchini, Fabrizio C; Denzler, Rémy; Fisser, Muriel C; Challa, Tenagne D; Pirinen, Eija; Kim, Youngsoo; Hemmi, Silvio; Gulbins, Erich; Gross, Atan; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Stoffel, Markus; Auwerx, Johan; Konrad, Daniel

    2017-09-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders and it tightly associates with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Reduced mitochondrial lipid oxidation contributes to hepatic fatty acid accumulation. Here, we show that the Fas cell surface death receptor (Fas/CD95/Apo-1) regulates hepatic mitochondrial metabolism. Hepatic Fas overexpression in chow-fed mice compromises fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial respiration, and the abundance of mitochondrial respiratory complexes promoting hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. In line, hepatocyte-specific ablation of Fas improves mitochondrial function and ameliorates high-fat-diet-induced hepatic steatosis, glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. Mechanistically, Fas impairs fatty acid oxidation via the BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID). Mice with genetic or pharmacological inhibition of BID are protected from Fas-mediated impairment of mitochondrial oxidation and hepatic steatosis. We suggest Fas as a potential novel therapeutic target to treat obesity-associated fatty liver and insulin resistance.Hepatic steatosis is a common disease closely associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Here Item et al. show that Fas, a member of the TNF receptor superfamily, contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction, steatosis development, and insulin resistance under high fat diet.

  16. In Vivo Quantification Reveals Extensive Natural Variation in Mitochondrial Form and Function in Caenorhabditis briggsae

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Kiley A.; Howe, Dana K.; Leung, Aubrey; Denver, Dee R.; Estes, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    We have analyzed natural variation in mitochondrial form and function among a set of Caenorhabditis briggsae isolates known to harbor mitochondrial DNA structural variation in the form of a heteroplasmic nad5 gene deletion (nad5Δ) that correlates negatively with organismal fitness. We performed in vivo quantification of 24 mitochondrial phenotypes including reactive oxygen species level, membrane potential, and aspects of organelle morphology, and observed significant among-isolate variation in 18 traits. Although several mitochondrial phenotypes were non-linearly associated with nad5Δ levels, most of the among-isolate phenotypic variation could be accounted for by phylogeographic clade membership. In particular, isolate-specific mitochondrial membrane potential was an excellent predictor of clade membership. We interpret this result in light of recent evidence for local adaptation to temperature in C. briggsae. Analysis of mitochondrial-nuclear hybrid strains provided support for both mtDNA and nuclear genetic variation as drivers of natural mitochondrial phenotype variation. This study demonstrates that multicellular eukaryotic species are capable of extensive natural variation in organellar phenotypes and highlights the potential of integrating evolutionary and cell biology perspectives. PMID:22952781

  17. Revisiting Mitochondrial Function and Metabolism in Pluripotent Stem Cells: Where Do We Stand in Neurological Diseases?

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla; Rego, A Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are powerful cellular tools that can generate all the different cell types of the body, and thus overcome the often limited access to human disease tissues; this becomes highly relevant when aiming to investigate cellular (dys)function in diseases affecting the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated that PSC and differentiated cells show altered mitochondrial function and metabolic profiles and production of reactive oxygen species. This raises an emerging paradigm about the role of mitochondria in stem cell biology and urges the need to identify mitochondrial pathways involved in these processes. In this respect, this review focuses on the metabolic profile of PSC and how mitochondrial function can influence the reprogramming and differentiation processes. Indeed, both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) favor the glycolytic pathway as a major source of energy production over oxidative phosphorylation. PSC mitochondria are characterized by a spherical shape, low copy number of mitochondrial DNA, and a hyperpolarized state. Indeed, mitochondria appear to have a crucial role in reprogramming iPSC, in the maintenance of a pluripotent state, and in differentiation. Moreover, an increase in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation has to occur for differentiation to succeed. Therefore, in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into neurons can be compromised if those mechanisms are impaired. Future research should shed light on how mitochondrial impairment occurring in pre differentiation neural stages (e.g., in NSC or premature neurons) may contribute for the etiopathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and neurological disorders.

  18. Blood cells from Friedreich ataxia patients harbor frataxin deficiency without a loss of mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Selak, Mary A.; Lyver, Elise; Micklow, Elizabeth; Deutsch, Eric C.; Önder, Özlem; Selamoglu, Nur; Yager, Claire; Knight, Simon; Carroll, Martin; Daldal, Fevzi; Dancis, Andrew; Lynch, David R.; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA triplet expansions or point mutations in the FXN gene on chromosome 9q13. The gene product called frataxin, a mitochondrial protein that is severely reduced in FRDA patients, leads to mitochondrial iron accumulation, FeS cluster deficiency and oxidative damage. The tissue specificity of this mitochondrial disease is complex and poorly understood. While frataxin is ubiquitously expressed, the cellular phenotype is most severe in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Here, we conducted comprehensive proteomic, metabolic and functional studies to determine whether subclinical abnormalities exist in mitochondria of blood cells from FRDA patients. Frataxin protein levels were significantly decreased in platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from FRDA patients. Furthermore, the most significant differences associated with frataxin deficiency in FRDA blood cell mitochondria were the decrease of two mitochondrial heat shock proteins. We did not observe profound changes in frataxin-targeted mitochondrial proteins or mitochondrial functions or an increase of apoptosis in peripheral blood cells, suggesting that functional defects in these mitochondria are not readily apparent under resting conditions in these cells. PMID:21147271

  19. A vital function for mitochondrial DNA in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Clark-Walker, G D; Chen, X J

    1996-10-28

    Petite-negative yeasts do not form viable respiratory-deficient mutants on treatment with DNA-targeting drugs that readily eliminate the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from petite-positive yeasts. However, in the petite-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, specific mutations in the nuclear genes MG12 and MG15 encoding the alpha- and gamma-subunits of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase, allow mtDNA to be lost. In this study we show that wild-type K. lactis does not survive in the absence of its mitochondrial genome and that the function of mgi mutations is to suppress lethality caused by loss of mtDNA. Firstly, we find that loss of a multicopy plasmid bearing a mgi allele readily occurs from a wild-type strain with functional mtDNA but is not tolerated in the absence of mtDNA. Secondly, we cloned the K. lactis homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial genome maintenance gene MGM101, and disrupted one of the two copies in a diploid. Following sporulation, we find that segregants containing the disrupted gene form minicolonies containing 6-8000 inviable cells. By contrast, disruption of MGM101 is not lethal in a haploid mgi strain with a specific mutation in a subunit of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase. These observations suggest that mtDNA in K. lactis encodes a vital function which may reside in one of the three mitochondrially encoded subunits of Fo.

  20. In vivo imaging of mitochondrial function in methamphetamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Takeshi; Yamato, Mayumi; Kudo, Wataru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Utsumi, Hideo; Yamada, Ken-ichi

    2011-08-01

    Abuse of the powerfully addictive psychostimulant, methamphetamine, occurs worldwide. Recent studies have suggested that methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is related to oxidative stress. In response to nerve activation, the mitochondrial respiratory chain is rapidly activated. The enhancement of mitochondrial respiratory chain activation may induce oxidative stress in the brain. However, there is little experimental evidence regarding the mitochondrial function after methamphetamine administration in vivo. Here, we evaluated whether a single administration of methamphetamine induces ATP consumption and overactivation of mitochondria. We measured mitochondrial function in two different ways: by monitoring oxygen partial pressure using an oxygen-selective electrode, and by imaging of redox reactions using a nitroxyl radical (i.e., nitroxide) coupled with Overhauser-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI). A single administration of methamphetamine to Wistar rats induced dopaminergic nerve activation, ATP consumption and an increase in mitochondrial respiratory chain function in both the striatum and cortex. Furthermore, antioxidant TEMPOL prevented the increase in mitochondrial oxidative damage and methamphetamine-induced sensitization. These findings suggest that energy-supplying reactions after dopaminergic nerve activation are associated with oxidative stress in both the striatum and cortex, leading to abnormal behavior.

  1. Echinochrome A Protects Mitochondrial Function in Cardiomyocytes against Cardiotoxic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Seon Joong; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoryev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a naphthoquinoid pigment from sea urchins that possesses antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and chelating abilities. Although Ech A is the active substance in the ophthalmic and cardiac drug Histochrome®, its underlying cardioprotective mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the protective role of Ech A against toxic agents that induce death of rat cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells and isolated rat cardiomyocytes. We found that the cardiotoxic agents tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP, organic reactive oxygen species (ROS) inducer), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; anti-hypertension drug), and doxorubicin (anti-cancer drug) caused mitochondrial dysfunction such as increased ROS level and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Co-treatment with Ech A, however, prevented this decrease in membrane potential and increase in ROS level. Co-treatment of Ech A also reduced the effects of these cardiotoxic agents on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate level. These findings indicate the therapeutic potential of Ech A for reducing cardiotoxic agent-induced damage. PMID:24828295

  2. Insights on altered mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, mitochondria are enriched to provide energy and calcium buffering required for synaptic transmission. Additionally, mitochondria localize to the synapse, where they are critical for the mobilization of reserve pool vesicles and for neurotransmitter release. Previously, functional defects in mitochondria were considered to be downstream effects of neurodegenerative diseases. However, more recent findings suggest mitochondria may serve as key mediators in the onset and progression of some types of neurodegeneration. In this review, we explore the possible roles of altered mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, with a particular focus on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD), which have highlighted the important role of mitochondria in neurodegeneration. While inheritable diseases like Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A are concretely linked to gene mutations affecting mitochondrial function, the cause of mitochondrial dysfunction in primarily sporadic diseases such as AD and PD is less clear. Neuronal death in PD is associated with defects in mitochondrial function and dynamics arising from mutations in proteins affecting these processes, including α-synuclein, DJ-1, LRRK2, Parkin and Pink1. In the case of AD, however, the connection between mitochondria and the onset of neurodegeneration has been less clear. Recent findings, however, have implicated altered function of ER-mitochondria contact sites and amyloid beta- and/or tau-induced defects in mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of AD, suggesting that mitochondrial defects may act as key mediators in the pathogenesis of AD as well. With recent findings at hand, it may be postulated that defects in mitochondrial processes comprise key events in the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:23711354

  3. Hormone deprivation alters mitochondrial function and lipid profile in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zárate, Sandra; Astiz, Mariana; Magnani, Natalia; Imsen, Mercedes; Merino, Florencia; Álvarez, Silvia; Reinés, Analía; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common hallmark in aging. In the female, reproductive senescence is characterized by loss of ovarian hormones, many of whose neuroprotective effects converge upon mitochondria. The functional integrity of mitochondria is dependent on membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition, which are also affected during aging. The effect of long-term ovarian hormone deprivation upon mitochondrial function and its putative association with changes in mitochondrial membrane lipid profile in the hippocampus, an area primarily affected during aging and highly responsive to ovarian hormones, is unknown. To this aim, Wistar adult female rats were ovariectomized or sham-operated. Twelve weeks later, different parameters of mitochondrial function (O2 uptake, ATP production, membrane potential and respiratory complex activities) as well as membrane phospholipid content and composition were evaluated in hippocampal mitochondria. Chronic ovariectomy reduced mitochondrial O2 uptake and ATP production rates and induced membrane depolarization during active respiration without altering the activity of respiratory complexes. Mitochondrial membrane lipid profile showed no changes in cholesterol levels but higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids and a higher peroxidizability index in mitochondria from ovariectomized rats. Interestingly, ovariectomy also reduced cardiolipin content and altered cardiolipin fatty acid profile leading to a lower peroxidizability index. In conclusion, chronic ovarian hormone deprivation induces mitochondrial dysfunction and changes in the mitochondrial membrane lipid profile comparable to an aging phenotype. Our study provides insights into ovarian hormone loss-induced early lipidomic changes with bioenergetic deficits in the hippocampus that may contribute to the increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and other age-associated disorders observed in postmenopause.

  4. Adipocyte mitochondrial function is reduced in human obesity independent of fat cell size.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao; Lanza, Ian R; Swain, James M; Sarr, Michael G; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Jensen, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    It has been suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction in adipocytes contributes to obesity-related metabolic complications. However, obesity results in adipocyte hypertrophy, and large and small adipocytes from the same depot have different characteristics, raising the possibility that obesity-related mitochondrial defects are an inherent function of large adipocytes. Our goal was to examine whether obesity, independent of fat cell size and fat depot, is associated with mitochondria dysfunction. We compared adipocyte mitochondrial function using a cross-sectional comparison study design. The studies were performed at Mayo Clinic, an academic medical center. Omental and/or abdominal subcutaneous adipose samples were collected from 20 age-matched obese and nonobese nondiabetic men and women undergoing either elective abdominal surgery or research needle biopsy. Interventions were not conducted as part of these studies. We measured mitochondrial DNA abundance, oxygen consumption rates, and citrate synthase activity from populations of large and small adipocytes (separated with differential floatation). For both omental and subcutaneous adipocytes, at the cell and organelle level, oxygen consumption rates and citrate synthase activity were significantly reduced in cells from obese compared with nonobese volunteers, even when matched for cell size by comparing large adipocytes from nonobese and small adipocytes from obese. Adipocyte mitochondrial content was not significantly different between obese and nonobese volunteers. Mitochondrial function and content parameters were not different between small and large cells, omental, and subcutaneous adipocytes from the same person. Adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity is reduced in obese compared with nonobese adults and this difference is not due to cell size differences. Adipocyte mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity is therefore related to overall adiposity rather than adipocyte hypertrophy.

  5. IL-15Rα deficiency in skeletal muscle alters respiratory function and the proteome of mitochondrial subpopulations independent of changes to the mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grant C.; Nichols, Cody; Guo, Ge; Croston, Tara L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Hollander, John M.; Pistilli, Emidio E.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-15 receptor alpha knockout (IL15RαKO) mice exhibit a greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial density with an altered mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism and functional impact of these changes have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the functional, proteomic, and genomic alterations in mitochondrial subpopulations isolated from the skeletal muscles of IL15RαKO mice and B6129 background control mice. State 3 respiration was greater in interfibrillar mitochondria and whole muscle ATP levels were greater in IL15RαKO mice supporting the increases in respiration rate. However, the state 3/state 4 ratio was lower, suggesting some degree of respiratory uncoupling. Proteomic analyses identified several markers independently in mitochondrial subpopulations that are associated with these functional alterations. Next Generation Sequencing of mtDNA revealed a high degree of similarity between the mitochondrial genomes of IL15RαKO mice and controls in terms of copy number, consensus coding and the presence of minor alleles, suggesting that the functional and proteomic alterations we observed occur independent of alterations to the mitochondrial genome. These data provide additional evidence to implicate IL-15Rα as a regulator of skeletal muscle phenotypes through effects on the mitochondrion, and suggest these effects are driven by alterations to the mitochondrial proteome. PMID:26458787

  6. IL-15Rα deficiency in skeletal muscle alters respiratory function and the proteome of mitochondrial subpopulations independent of changes to the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Grant C; Nichols, Cody; Guo, Ge; Croston, Tara L; Thapa, Dharendra; Hollander, John M; Pistilli, Emidio E

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin-15 receptor alpha knockout (IL15RαKO) mice exhibit a greater skeletal muscle mitochondrial density with an altered mitochondrial morphology. However, the mechanism and functional impact of these changes have not been determined. In this study, we characterized the functional, proteomic, and genomic alterations in mitochondrial subpopulations isolated from the skeletal muscles of IL15RαKO mice and B6129 background control mice. State 3 respiration was greater in interfibrillar mitochondria and whole muscle ATP levels were greater in IL15RαKO mice supporting the increases in respiration rate. However, the state 3/state 4 ratio was lower, suggesting some degree of respiratory uncoupling. Proteomic analyses identified several markers independently in mitochondrial subpopulations that are associated with these functional alterations. Next Generation Sequencing of mtDNA revealed a high degree of similarity between the mitochondrial genomes of IL15RαKO mice and controls in terms of copy number, consensus coding and the presence of minor alleles, suggesting that the functional and proteomic alterations we observed occurred independent of alterations to the mitochondrial genome. These data provide additional evidence to implicate IL-15Rα as a regulator of skeletal muscle phenotypes through effects on the mitochondrion, and suggest these effects are driven by alterations to the mitochondrial proteome.

  7. Mitochondria: a kinase anchoring protein 1, a signaling platform for mitochondrial form and function.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ronald A; Strack, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are best known for their role as cellular power plants, but they also serve as signaling hubs, regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A kinase anchoring protein 1 (AKAP1) is a scaffold protein that recruits protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins, as well as RNA, to the outer mitochondrial membrane. AKAP1 thereby integrates several second messenger cascades to modulate mitochondrial function and associated physiological and pathophysiological outcomes. Here, we review what is currently known about AKAP1's macromolecular interactions in health and disease states, including obesity. We also discuss dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), the enzyme that catalyzes mitochondrial fission, as one of the key substrates of the PKA/AKAP1 signaling complex in neurons. Recent evidence suggests that AKAP1 has critical roles in neuronal development and survival, which are mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of Drp1 and maintenance of mitochondrial integrity.

  8. Mitochondria: mitochondrial OXPHOS (dys) function ex vivo--the use of primary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Saada, Ann

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles present in all nucleated cells. They perform a number of vital metabolic processes but their main function is to generate energy in the form of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), performed by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Mitochondrial diseases affecting oxidative phosphorylation are a common group of inherited disorders with variable clinical manifestations. They are caused by mutations either in the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome. In order to study this group of heterogeneous diseases, they are often modeled in animal and microbial systems. However, these are complex, time consuming and unavailable for each specific mutation. Conversely, skin fibroblasts derived from patients provide a feasible alternative. The usefulness of fibroblasts in culture to verify and study the pathomechanism of new mitochondrial diseases and to evaluate the efficacy of individual treatment options is summarized in this review.

  9. Advances in the quantification of mitochondrial function in primary human immune cells through extracellular flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Dequina; Proctor, Elizabeth A; Raval, Forum M; Ip, Blanche C; Habib, Chloe; Ritou, Eleni; Grammatopoulos, Tom N; Steenkamp, Devin; Dooms, Hans; Apovian, Caroline M; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies show that mitochondrial energy generation determines the effectiveness of immune responses. Furthermore, changes in mitochondrial function may regulate lymphocyte function in inflammatory diseases like type 2 diabetes. Analysis of lymphocyte mitochondrial function has been facilitated by introduction of 96-well format extracellular flux (XF96) analyzers, but the technology remains imperfect for analysis of human lymphocytes. Limitations in XF technology include the lack of practical protocols for analysis of archived human cells, and inadequate data analysis tools that require manual quality checks. Current analysis tools for XF outcomes are also unable to automatically assess data quality and delete untenable data from the relatively high number of biological replicates needed to power complex human cell studies. The objectives of work presented herein are to test the impact of common cellular manipulations on XF outcomes, and to develop and validate a new automated tool that objectively analyzes a virtually unlimited number of samples to quantitate mitochondrial function in immune cells. We present significant improvements on previous XF analyses of primary human cells that will be absolutely essential to test the prediction that changes in immune cell mitochondrial function and fuel sources support immune dysfunction in chronic inflammatory diseases like type 2 diabetes.

  10. Advances in the quantification of mitochondrial function in primary human immune cells through extracellular flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Blanche C.; Habib, Chloe; Ritou, Eleni; Grammatopoulos, Tom N.; Steenkamp, Devin; Dooms, Hans; Apovian, Caroline M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies show that mitochondrial energy generation determines the effectiveness of immune responses. Furthermore, changes in mitochondrial function may regulate lymphocyte function in inflammatory diseases like type 2 diabetes. Analysis of lymphocyte mitochondrial function has been facilitated by introduction of 96-well format extracellular flux (XF96) analyzers, but the technology remains imperfect for analysis of human lymphocytes. Limitations in XF technology include the lack of practical protocols for analysis of archived human cells, and inadequate data analysis tools that require manual quality checks. Current analysis tools for XF outcomes are also unable to automatically assess data quality and delete untenable data from the relatively high number of biological replicates needed to power complex human cell studies. The objectives of work presented herein are to test the impact of common cellular manipulations on XF outcomes, and to develop and validate a new automated tool that objectively analyzes a virtually unlimited number of samples to quantitate mitochondrial function in immune cells. We present significant improvements on previous XF analyses of primary human cells that will be absolutely essential to test the prediction that changes in immune cell mitochondrial function and fuel sources support immune dysfunction in chronic inflammatory diseases like type 2 diabetes. PMID:28178278

  11. miR-27b overexpression improves mitochondrial function in a Sirt1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xihong; Zuo, Shengnan; Xin, Wu

    2015-12-01

    Resveratrol improves mitochondrial function, and recent evidences demonstrate that miRNAs play important roles in certain effects of resveratrol. In the current study, we found that a microRNA, miR-27b, was significantly induced in a dose-dependent way in skeletal muscle and C2C12 myoblast treated with resveratrol. Our results showed that overexpression of miR-27b could mimic the effects of resveratrol on improving mitochondrial function and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells. Subsequently, we found that FOXO1 was a potential target of miR-27b, and the effects of resveratrol on mitochondrial function were significantly affected after inhibition of miR-27b. Moreover, the effects of miR-27b on mitochondrial function were lost after inhibition of Sirt1, although miR-27b and FOXO1 expression were not influenced. Taken together, these data suggested that overexpression of miR-27b could benefit mitochondrial function, while the effects of overexpressed miR-27b were Sirt1-dependent.

  12. Pharmacological Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerases Improves Fitness and Mitochondrial Function in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pirinen, Eija; Canto, Carles; Jo, Young-Suk; Morato, Laia; Zhang, Hongbo; Menzies, Keir; Williams, Evan G.; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Moullan, Norman; Hagberg, Carolina; Li, Wei; Timmers, Silvie; Imhof, Ralph; Verbeek, Jef; Pujol, Aurora; van Loon, Barbara; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Schrauwen, Patrick; Sauve, Anthony; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We previously demonstrated that the deletion of the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (Parp)-1 gene in mice enhances oxidative metabolism, thereby protecting against diet-induced obesity. However, the therapeutic use of PARP inhibitors to enhance mitochondrial function remains to be explored. Here, we show tight negative correlation between Parp-1 expression and energy expenditure in heterogeneous mouse populations, indicating that variations in PARP-1 activity have an impact on metabolic homeostasis. Notably, these genetic correlations can be translated into pharmacological applications. Long-term treatment with PARP inhibitors enhances fitness in mice by increasing the abundance of mitochondrial respiratory complexes and boosting mitochondrial respiratory capacity. Furthermore, PARP inhibitors reverse mitochondrial defects in primary myotubes of obese humans and attenuate genetic defects of mitochondrial metabolism in human fibroblasts and C. elegans. Overall, our work validates in worm, mouse and human models that PARP inhibition may be used to treat both genetic and acquired muscle dysfunction linked to defective mitochondrial function. PMID:24814482

  13. An Essential Role for COPI in mRNA Localization to Mitochondria and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Zabezhinsky, Dmitry; Slobodin, Boris; Rapaport, Doron; Gerst, Jeffrey E

    2016-04-19

    Nuclear-encoded mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins (mMPs) can localize directly to the mitochondrial surface, yet how mMPs target mitochondria and whether RNA targeting contributes to protein import into mitochondria and cellular metabolism are unknown. Here, we show that the COPI vesicle coat complex is necessary for mMP localization to mitochondria and mitochondrial function. COPI inactivation leads to reduced mMP binding to COPI itself, resulting in the dissociation of mMPs from mitochondria, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, a decrease in protein import in vivo and in vitro, and severe deficiencies in mitochondrial respiration. Using a model mMP (OXA1), we observed that COPI inactivation (or mutation of the potential COPI-interaction site) led to altered mRNA localization and impaired cellular respiration. Overall, COPI-mediated mMP targeting is critical for mitochondrial protein import and function, and transcript delivery to the mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum is regulated by cis-acting RNA sequences and trans-acting proteins.

  14. Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the Absence of a Functional Mitochondrial Genome

    PubMed Central

    Küenzi, Martin T.; Tingle, Marjorie A.; Halvorson, Harlyn O.

    1974-01-01

    The role of the mitochondrial system during sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. Addition of ethidium bromide (EthBr) to cells growing in acetate medium resulted in the quantitative (>98%) conversion of the culture to the petite genotype in one generation. The cells were respiratory active (derepressed) but contained no mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) as demonstrated by analytical ultracentrifugation in CsCl. When transferred to acetate sporulation medium, the culture sporulated. Ascus production was only slightly below that of the control culture. Synthesis of mtDNA occurred during sporulation in the control but not in the EthBr-treated culture. Mitochondrial protein synthesis was virtually eliminated in the EthBr-treated culture. Therefore, completely derepressed cells can sporulate without a functional mitochondrial genetic system. When partially repressed cells were treated with EthBr, no ascus formation was observed after transfer to sporulation medium. Control cultures underwent respiratory adaptation in sporulation medium and then sporulated. Extensive derepression of the respiratory system is thus required for sporulation, and this adaptation is dependent on a functional mitochondrial system. Our results suggest that once the cells are fully derepressed no mitochondrial genetic information has to be expressed during meiosis and ascus formation. PMID:4358046

  15. GASZ and mitofusin-mediated mitochondrial functions are crucial for spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Mingsong; Jiang, Manxi; Wang, Yongsheng; Sun, Yun; Wang, Junpeng; Xie, Taorong; Tang, Chao; Tang, Nannan; Song, Huili; Cui, Di; Chao, Ruihua; Ding, Shuzhe; Ni, Bing; Chen, Xuejin; Wang, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Nuage is an electron-dense cytoplasmic structure in germ cells that contains ribonucleoproteins and participates in piRNA biosynthesis. Despite the observation that clustered mitochondria are associated with a specific type of nuage called intermitochondrial cement (pi-body), the importance of mitochondrial functions in nuage formation and spermatogenesis is yet to be determined. We show that a germ cell-specific protein GASZ contains a functional mitochondrial targeting signal and is largely localized at mitochondria both endogenously in germ cells and in somatic cells when ectopically expressed. In addition, GASZ interacts with itself at the outer membrane of mitochondria and promotes mitofusion in a mitofusin/MFN-dependent manner. In mice, deletion of the mitochondrial targeting signal reveals that mitochondrial localization of GASZ is essential for nuage formation, mitochondrial clustering, transposon repression, and spermatogenesis. MFN1 deficiency also leads to defects in mitochondrial activity and male infertility. Our data thus reveal a requirement for GASZ and MFN-mediated mitofusion during spermatogenesis.

  16. Altered Mitochondrial Function and Energy Metabolism Is Associated with a Radioresistant Phenotype in Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Maher, Stephen G.; Maguire, Aoife; Phelan, James; Muldoon, Cian; Reynolds, John V.; O’Sullivan, Jacintha

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R) demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC. PMID:24968221

  17. Altered mitochondrial function and energy metabolism is associated with a radioresistant phenotype in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Maher, Stephen G; Maguire, Aoife; Phelan, James; Muldoon, Cian; Reynolds, John V; O'Sullivan, Jacintha

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. A complete pathological response to CRT is associated with a favourable outcome. Radiation therapy is important for local tumour control, however, radioresistance remains a substantial clinical problem. We hypothesise that alterations in mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are involved in the radioresistance of oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). To investigate this, we used an established isogenic cell line model of radioresistant OAC. Radioresistant cells (OE33 R) demonstrated significantly increased levels of random mitochondrial mutations, which were coupled with alterations in mitochondrial function, size, morphology and gene expression, supporting a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the radioresistance of this model. OE33 R cells also demonstrated altered bioenergetics, demonstrating significantly increased intracellular ATP levels, which was attributed to enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Radioresistant cells also demonstrated metabolic plasticity, efficiently switching between the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation energy metabolism pathways, which were accompanied by enhanced clonogenic survival. This data was supported in vivo, in pre-treatment OAC tumour tissue. Tumour ATP5B expression, a marker of oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly increased in patients who subsequently had a poor pathological response to neoadjuvant CRT. This suggests for the first time, a role for specific mitochondrial alterations and metabolic remodelling in the radioresistance of OAC.

  18. Evidence for a Direct Effect of the NAD+ Precursor Acipimox on Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Phielix, Esther; Bilet, Lena; Williams, Evan G.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Livingstone, Roshan; Nowotny, Peter; Sparks, Lauren M.; Paglialunga, Sabina; Szendroedi, Julia; Havekes, Bas; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies showed the potential of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursors to increase oxidative phosphorylation and improve metabolic health, but human data are lacking. We hypothesize that the nicotinic acid derivative acipimox, an NAD+ precursor, would directly affect mitochondrial function independent of reductions in nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. In a multicenter randomized crossover trial, 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57.7 ± 1.1 years, BMI 33.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2) received either placebo or acipimox 250 mg three times daily dosage for 2 weeks. Acipimox treatment increased plasma NEFA levels (759 ± 44 vs. 1,135 ± 97 μmol/L for placebo vs. acipimox, P < 0.01) owing to a previously described rebound effect. As a result, skeletal muscle lipid content increased and insulin sensitivity decreased. Despite the elevated plasma NEFA levels, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle increased. Subsequently, we showed that acipimox treatment resulted in a robust elevation in expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene sets and a mitonuclear protein imbalance, which may indicate activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Further studies in C2C12 myotubes confirmed a direct effect of acipimox on NAD+ levels, mitonuclear protein imbalance, and mitochondrial oxidative capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NAD+ boosters can also directly affect skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in humans. PMID:25352640

  19. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable.

  20. The formation and functional consequences of heterogeneous mitochondrial distributions in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pathi, B.; Kinsey, S. T.; Howdeshell, M. E.; Priester, C.; McNeill, R. S.; Locke, B. R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Diffusion plays a prominent role in governing both rates of aerobic metabolic fluxes and mitochondrial organization in muscle fibers. However, there is no mechanism to explain how the non-homogeneous mitochondrial distributions that are prevalent in skeletal muscle arise. We propose that spatially variable degradation with dependence on O2 concentration, and spatially uniform signals for biogenesis, can account for observed distributions of mitochondria in a diversity of skeletal muscle. We used light and transmission electron microscopy and stereology to examine fiber size, capillarity and mitochondrial distribution in fish red and white muscle, fish white muscle that undergoes extreme hypertrophic growth, and four fiber types in mouse muscle. The observed distributions were compared with those generated using a coupled reaction-diffusion/cellular automata (CA) mathematical model of mitochondrial function. Reaction-diffusion analysis of metabolites such as oxygen, ATP, ADP and PCr involved in energy metabolism and mitochondrial function were considered. Coupled to the reaction-diffusion approach was a CA approach governing mitochondrial life cycles in response to the metabolic state of the fiber. The model results were consistent with the experimental observations and showed higher mitochondrial densities near the capillaries because of the sometimes steep gradients in oxygen. The present study found that selective removal of mitochondria in the presence of low prevailing local oxygen concentrations is likely the primary factor dictating the spatial heterogeneity of mitochondria in a diversity of fibers. The model results also suggest decreased diffusional constraints corresponding to the heterogeneous mitochondrial distribution assessed using the effectiveness factor, defined as the ratio of the reaction rate in the system with finite rates of diffusion to that in the absence of any diffusion limitation. Thus, the non-uniform distribution benefits the

  1. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Tikka, Saara

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  2. Assessment of mitochondrial function in vivo with a breath test utilizing alpha-ketoisocaproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Michaletz, P.A.; Cap, L.; Alpert, E.; Lauterburg, B.H. )

    1989-11-01

    A breath test to assess hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo was evaluated in rats. Following the i.p. administration of (1-{sup 14}C)-alpha-ketoisocaproic acid, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} exhalation reached a peak within 10 to 20 min and then declined exponentially, with a half-life of 14.3 min. Control animals exhaled 38.6% of the administered radioactivity within 1 hr. In functionally anhepatic animals, {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in breath amounted to 23% of that in control animals, indicating that alpha-ketoisocaproic acid decarboxylation reflects mainly hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo. Ethanol (3 gm per kg) significantly decreased alpha-ketoisocaproic acid decarboxylation (21.8% of the dose appearing in breath in 1 hr), probably due to the ethanol-induced shift in the NAD+:NADH ratio. In contrast, an uncoupler of mitochondrial respiration, sodium salicylate (375 mg per kg), increased the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid (56.3% of the dose recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in 1 hr). Mitochondrial damage induced by 4-pentenoic acid decreased the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoisocaproic acid but did not affect the microsomal metabolism of antipyrine. The present data indicate that the alpha-ketoisocaproic acid breath test provides a noninvasive estimate of hepatic mitochondrial function in vivo which, when applied to man, might yield clinically useful information.

  3. Insulin Stimulates Mitochondrial Fusion and Function in Cardiomyocytes via the Akt-mTOR-NFκB-Opa-1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Valentina; Verdejo, Hugo E.; Iglewski, Myriam; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Jones, Deborah; Zhu, Yi; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Pennanen, Christian; Lopez‑Crisosto, Camila; Jaña, Fabián; Ferreira, Jorge; Noguera, Eduard; Chiong, Mario; Bernlohr, David A.; Klip, Amira; Hill, Joseph A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Abel, Evan Dale; Zorzano, Antonio; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Insulin regulates heart metabolism through the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Studies have indicated that insulin can also regulate mitochondrial function. Relevant to this idea, mitochondrial function is impaired in diabetic individuals. Furthermore, the expression of Opa-1 and mitofusins, proteins of the mitochondrial fusion machinery, is dramatically altered in obese and insulin-resistant patients. Given the role of insulin in the control of cardiac energetics, the goal of this study was to investigate whether insulin affects mitochondrial dynamics in cardiomyocytes. Confocal microscopy and the mitochondrial dye MitoTracker Green were used to obtain three-dimensional images of the mitochondrial network in cardiomyocytes and L6 skeletal muscle cells in culture. Three hours of insulin treatment increased Opa-1 protein levels, promoted mitochondrial fusion, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, and elevated both intracellular ATP levels and oxygen consumption in cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, the silencing of Opa-1 or Mfn2 prevented all the metabolic effects triggered by insulin. We also provide evidence indicating that insulin increases mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes through the Akt-mTOR-NFκB signaling pathway. These data demonstrate for the first time in our knowledge that insulin acutely regulates mitochondrial metabolism in cardiomyocytes through a mechanism that depends on increased mitochondrial fusion, Opa-1, and the Akt-mTOR-NFκB pathway. PMID:24009260

  4. Rat liver mitochondrial membrane characteristics and mitochondrial functions are more profoundly altered by dietary lipid quantity than by dietary lipid quality: effect of different nutritional lipid patterns.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Manar; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Chabi, Béatrice; Crouzier, David; Ferreri, Carla; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Cristol, Jean Paul; Carbonneau, Marie-Annette; Coudray, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Dietary lipids are known to affect the composition of the biological membrane and functions that are involved in cell death and survival. The mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes are membrane protein complexes whose function depends on the composition and fluidity of the mitochondrial membrane lipid. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of different nutritional patterns of dietary lipids on liver mitochondrial functions. A total of forty-eight Wistar male rats were divided into six groups and fed for 12 weeks with a basal diet, lard diet or fish oil diet, containing either 50 or 300 g lipid/kg. The 30 % lipid intake increased liver NEFA, TAG and cholesterol levels, increased mitochondrial NEFA and TAG, and decreased phospholipid (PL) levels. SFA, PUFA and unsaturation index (UI) increased, whereas MUFA and trans-fatty acids (FA) decreased in the mitochondrial membrane PL in 30 % fat diet-fed rats compared with 5 % lipid diet-fed rats. PL UI increased with fish oil diet v. basal and lard-rich diets, and PL trans-FA increased with lard diet v. basal and fish oil diets. The 30 % lipid diet intake increased mitochondrial membrane potential, membrane fluidity, mitochondrial respiration and complex V activity, and decreased complex III and IV activities. With regard to lipid quality effects, β-oxidation decreased with the intake of basal or fish oil diets compared with that of the lard diet. The intake of a fish oil diet decreased complex III and IV activities compared with both the basal and lard diets. In conclusion, the characteristics and mitochondrial functions of the rat liver mitochondrial membrane are more profoundly altered by the quantity of dietary lipid than by its quality, which may have profound impacts on the pathogenesis and development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  5. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes: From Molecular Mechanisms to Functional Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Yorek, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Given their essential function in aerobic metabolism, mitochondria are intuitively of interest in regard to the pathophysiology of diabetes. Qualitative, quantitative, and functional perturbations in mitochondria have been identified and affect the cause and complications of diabetes. Moreover, as a consequence of fuel oxidation, mitochondria generate considerable reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence is accumulating that these radicals per se are important in the pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. In this review, we first present basic concepts underlying mitochondrial physiology. We then address mitochondrial function and ROS as related to diabetes. We consider different forms of diabetes and address both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. We also address the role of mitochondrial uncoupling and coenzyme Q. Finally, we address the potential for targeting mitochondria in the therapy of diabetes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 537–577. PMID:19650713

  6. Mitochondrial tRNA-lookalikes in nuclear chromosomes: could they be functional?

    PubMed

    Telonis, Aristeidis G; Kirino, Yohei; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2015-01-01

    The presence in human nuclear chromosomes of multiple sequences that are highly similar to human mitochondrial tRNAs (tRNA-lookalikes) raises intriguing questions about the possible functionality of these genomic loci. In this perspective, we explore the significance of the mitochondrial tRNA-lookalikes based on a series of properties that argue for their non-accidental nature. We particularly focus on the possibility of transcription as well as on potential functional roles for these sequences that can range from their acting as DNA regulatory elements to forming functional mature tRNAs or tRNA-derived fragments. Extension of our analysis to other simians (chimp, gorilla, rhesus, and squirrel monkey), 2 rodents (mouse and rat), a marsupial (opossum) and 3 invertebrates (fruit-fly, worm, and sponge) revealed that mitochondrial tRNA-lookalikes are prevalent in primates and the opossum but absent from the other analyzed organisms.

  7. Mitochondrial calcium function and dysfunction in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, David G.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of isolated brain mitochondria to accumulate, store and release calcium has been extensively characterized. Extrapolation to the intact neuron led to predictions that the in situ mitochondria would reversibly accumulate Ca2+ when the concentration of the cation in the vicinity of the mitochondria rose above the ‘set-point’ at which uptake and efflux were in balance, storing Ca2+ as a complex with phosphate, and slowly releasing the cation when plasma membrane ion pumps lowered the cytoplasmic free Ca2+. Excessive accumulation of the cation was predicted to lead to activation of the permeability transition, with catastrophic consequences for the neuron. Each of these predictions has been confirmed with intact neurons, and there is convincing evidence for the permeability transition in cellular Ca2+ overload associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and stroke, while the neurodegenerative disease in which possible defects in mitochondrial Ca2+ handling have been most intensively investigated is Huntington's Disease. In this brief review evidence that mitochondrial Ca2+ transport is relevant to neuronal survival in these conditions will be discussed. PMID:19298790

  8. Muscle-specific function of the centronuclear myopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy-associated dynamin 2 is required for proper lipid metabolism, mitochondria, muscle fibers, neuromuscular junctions and peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Tinelli, Elisa; Pereira, Jorge A; Suter, Ueli

    2013-11-01

    The ubiquitously expressed large GTPase Dynamin 2 (DNM2) plays a critical role in the regulation of intracellular membrane trafficking through its crucial function in membrane fission, particularly in endocytosis. Autosomal-dominant mutations in DNM2 cause tissue-specific human disorders. Different sets of DNM2 mutations are linked to dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type B, a motor and sensory neuropathy affecting primarily peripheral nerves, or autosomal-dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) presenting with primary damage in skeletal muscles. To understand the underlying disease mechanisms, it is imperative to determine to which degree the primary affected cell types require DNM2. Thus, we used cell type-specific gene ablation to examine the consequences of DNM2 loss in skeletal muscle cells, the major relevant cell type involved in CNM. We found that DNM2 function in skeletal muscle is required for proper mouse development. Skeletal muscle-specific loss of DNM2 causes a reduction in muscle mass and in the numbers of muscle fibers, altered muscle fiber size distributions, irregular neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and isolated degenerating intramuscular peripheral nerve fibers. Intriguingly, a lack of muscle-expressed DNM2 triggers an increase of lipid droplets (LDs) and mitochondrial defects. We conclude that loss of DNM2 function in skeletal muscles initiates a chain of harmful parallel and serial events, involving dysregulation of LDs and mitochondrial defects within altered muscle fibers, defective NMJs and peripheral nerve degeneration. These findings provide the essential basis for further studies on DNM2 function and malfunction in skeletal muscles in health and disease, potentially including metabolic diseases such as diabetes.

  9. A Trypanosomatid Iron Transporter that Regulates Mitochondrial Function Is Required for Leishmania amazonensis Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Mittra, Bidyottam; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Perrone Bezerra de Menezes, Juliana; Jensen, Jennifer; Michailowsky, Vladimir; Andrews, Norma W.

    2016-01-01

    Iron, an essential co-factor of respiratory chain proteins, is critical for mitochondrial function and maintenance of its redox balance. We previously reported a role for iron uptake in differentiation of Leishmania amazonensis into virulent amastigotes, by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and is independent of the classical pH and temperature cues. Iron import into mitochondria was proposed to be essential for this process, but evidence supporting this hypothesis was lacking because the Leishmania mitochondrial iron transporter was unknown. Here we describe MIT1, a homolog of the mitochondrial iron importer genes mrs3 (yeast) and mitoferrin-1 (human) that is highly conserved among trypanosomatids. MIT1 expression was essential for the survival of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic but not bloodstream forms, which lack functional respiratory complexes. L. amazonensis LMIT1 null mutants could not be generated, suggesting that this mitochondrial iron importer is essential for promastigote viability. Promastigotes lacking one LMIT1 allele (LMIT1/Δlmit1) showed growth defects and were more susceptible to ROS toxicity, consistent with the role of iron as the essential co-factor of trypanosomatid mitochondrial superoxide dismutases. LMIT1/Δlmit1 metacyclic promastigotes were unable to replicate as intracellular amastigotes after infecting macrophages or cause cutaneous lesions in mice. When induced to differentiate axenically into amastigotes, LMIT1/Δlmit1 showed strong defects in iron content and function of mitochondria, were unable to upregulate the ROS-regulatory enzyme FeSOD, and showed mitochondrial changes suggestive of redox imbalance. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial iron uptake in trypanosomatid parasites, and highlight the role of LMIT1 in the iron-regulated process that orchestrates differentiation of L. amazonensis into infective amastigotes. PMID:26741360

  10. Sustained Early Disruption of Mitochondrial Function Contributes to Arsenic-Induced Prostate Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, B; Kulawiec, M; Owens, K M; Singh, A; Singh, K K

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen that affects millions of people worldwide, but the underlying mechanisms of carcinogenesis are unclear. Several epidemiological studies have suggested increased prostate cancer incidence and mortality due to exposure to arsenic. Due to lack of an animal model of arsenic-induced carcinogenesis, we used a prostate epithelial cell culture model to identify a role for mitochondria in arsenic-induced prostate cancer. Mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential was impacted within a few hours of arsenic exposure of non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells. Chronic arsenic treatment induced mutations in mitochondrial genes and altered mitochondrial functions. Human non-neoplastic prostate epithelial cells continuously cultured for seven months in the presence of 5 µM arsenite showed tumorigenic properties in vitro and induced tumors in SCID mice, which indicated transformation of these cells. Protein and mRNA expression of subunits of mtOXPHOS complex I were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Alterations in complex I, a main site for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as increased expression of ROS-producing NOX4 in arsenic-transformed cells suggested a role of oxidative stress in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells. Whole genome cGH array analyses of arsenic-transformed prostate cells identified extensive genomic instability. Our study revealed mitochondrial dysfunction induced oxidative stress and decreased expression of p53 in arsenic-transformed cells as an underlying mechanism of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomic instability. These studies suggest that early changes in mitochondrial functions are sustained during prolong arsenic exposure. Overall, our study provides evidence that arsenic disruption of mitochondrial function is an early and key step in tumorigenic transformation of prostate epithelial cells.

  11. Analysis of mitochondrial structure and function in the Drosophila larval musculature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zong-Heng; Clark, Cheryl; Geisbrecht, Erika R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that change their architecture in normal physiological conditions. Mutations in genes that control mitochondrial fission or fusion, such as dynamin-related protein (Drp1), Mitofusins 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2), and Optic atrophy 1 (Opa1), result in neuropathies or neurodegenerative diseases. It is increasingly clear that altered mitochondrial dynamics also underlie the pathology of other degenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thus, understanding mitochondrial distribution, shape, and dynamics in all cell types is a prerequisite for developing and defining treatment regimens that may differentially affect tissues. The majority of Drosophila genes implicated in mitochondrial dynamics have been studied in the adult indirect flight muscle (IFM). Here, we discuss the utility of Drosophila third instar larvae (L3) as an alternative model to analyze and quantify mitochondrial behaviors. Advantages include large muscle cell size, a stereotyped arrangement of mitochondria that is conserved in mammalian muscles, and the ability to analyze muscle-specific gene function in mutants that are lethal prior to adult stages. In particular, we highlight methods for sample preparation and analysis of mitochondrial morphological features. PMID:26611999

  12. Epicatechin regulation of mitochondrial structure and function is opioid receptor dependent

    PubMed Central

    Panneerselvam, Mathivadhani; Ali, Sameh S.; Finley, J. Cameron; Kellerhals, Sarah E.; Migita, Michael Y.; Head, Brian P.; Patel, Piyush M.; Roth, David M.; Patel, Hemal H.

    2013-01-01

    Scope The flavanol (-)-epicatechin (Epi), a component of cacao, has cardiac protective benefits in humans. Our previous study demonstrated Epi has δ-opioid receptor (DOR) binding activity and promotes cardiac protection. Here we examined the effects of 10 days of Epi treatment on: cardiac mitochondrial respiration, ROS production, calcium swelling, and mitochondrial membrane fluidity. Methods & Results Mice were randomized into four groups: (1) Control (Saline), (2) Naltrindole (Nalt; DOR antagonist), (3) Epi, and (4) Epi+Nalt and received 1 mg kg−1 Epi or water via oral gavage. Nalt groups received 5 mg kg−1 ip per day for 10 days. Significant increases in mitochondrial respiration and enhanced free radical production during state 3 respiration were observed with Epi. Additionally, we observed significant increases in rigidity of mitochondrial membranes and resistance to calcium induced mitochondrial swelling with Epi treatment. Blocking the DOR with Nalt resulted in decreases in all of the observed parameters by Epi treatment. Conclusion These findings indicate that Epi induces an integrated response that includes metabolic and structural changes in cardiac mitochondria resulting in greater functional capacity via DOR. Mitochondrial targeted effects of epicatechin may explain the physiologic benefit observed on cardiac protection and support epicatechin’s potential clinical application as a cardiac protective mimetic. PMID:23625721

  13. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    SciTech Connect

    Moepert, Kristin; Hajek, Petr; Frank, Stephan; Chen, Christiane; Kaufmann, Joerg; Santel, Ansgar

    2009-08-01

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  14. Melatonin enhances neural stem cell differentiation and engraftment by increasing mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Fernandez-Gil, Beatriz I; Florido, Javier; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Tejada, Miguel A; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Rusanova, Iryna; Garcia-Verdugo, José M; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; López, Luis Carlos; Velez-Pardo, Carlos; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Ferrer, José M; Escames, Germaine

    2017-09-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are regarded as a promising therapeutic approach to protecting and restoring damaged neurons in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (PD and AD, respectively). However, new research suggests that NSC differentiation is required to make this strategy effective. Several studies have demonstrated that melatonin increases mature neuronal markers, which reflects NSC differentiation into neurons. Nevertheless, the possible involvement of mitochondria in the effects of melatonin during NSC differentiation has not yet been fully established. We therefore tested the impact of melatonin on NSC proliferation and differentiation in an attempt to determine whether these actions depend on modulating mitochondrial activity. We measured proliferation and differentiation markers, mitochondrial structural and functional parameters as well as oxidative stress indicators and also evaluated cell transplant engraftment. This enabled us to show that melatonin (25 μM) induces NSC differentiation into oligodendrocytes and neurons. These effects depend on increased mitochondrial mass/DNA/complexes, mitochondrial respiration, and membrane potential as well as ATP synthesis in NSCs. It is also interesting to note that melatonin prevented oxidative stress caused by high levels of mitochondrial activity. Finally, we found that melatonin enriches NSC engraftment in the ND mouse model following transplantation. We concluded that a combined therapy involving transplantation of NSCs pretreated with pharmacological doses of melatonin could efficiently restore neuronal cell populations in PD and AD mouse models depending on mitochondrial activity promotion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Survival and mitochondrial function in septic patients according to mitochondrial DNA haplogroup

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We recently found that platelet cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activities and quantities in 6-month-survival septic patients are significantly higher than those of patients who died before 6 months. Other studies suggested that the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genotype could play a major role in sepsis survival. Given that COX catalytic subunits are encoded by mtDNA, the objective of the present study was to explore whether mtDNA population genetic variation could affect COX activity and quantity and favors sepsis survival. Methods A prospective, multicenter, observational study was carried out in six Spanish ICUs. We included 96 patients with severe sepsis. We determined the mtDNA haplogroup, the COX specific activity/citrate synthase specific activity (COXa/CSa) ratio and the COX quantity/citrate synthase specific activity (COXq/CSa) ratio in circulating platelets at the time of diagnosis, day 4 and day 8. We used survival at 1 and 6 months as endpoints. Results Patients with the JT mtDNA haplogroup (n = 15) showed higher COXq/CSa ratio at day 4 (P = 0.04) and day 8 (P = 0.02) than those with other haplogroups (n = 81). Logistic regression analysis showed that the JT mtDNA haplogroup (odds ratio = 0.18; 95% confidence interval = 0.04 to 0.94; P = 0.04) and COXq/CSa ratio (odds ratio = 0.53; 95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.93; P = 0.03) were associated with 1-month survival after controlling for age and lactic acid levels. Conclusions The novel findings of our study are that 1-month surviving septic patients showed higher COXq/CSa ratio than nonsurviving individuals, that patients from the JT mtDNA haplogroup showed a higher COXq/CSa ratio and that JT patients had a higher 1-month survival than patients from other mtDNA haplogroups. PMID:22251664

  16. Survival and mitochondrial function in septic patients according to mitochondrial DNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Iceta, Ruth; Martín, María M; López-Gallardo, Esther; Solé-Violán, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Labarta, Lorenzo; Díaz, César; Jiménez, Alejandro; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2012-01-17

    We recently found that platelet cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activities and quantities in 6-month-survival septic patients are significantly higher than those of patients who died before 6 months. Other studies suggested that the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genotype could play a major role in sepsis survival. Given that COX catalytic subunits are encoded by mtDNA, the objective of the present study was to explore whether mtDNA population genetic variation could affect COX activity and quantity and favors sepsis survival. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was carried out in six Spanish ICUs. We included 96 patients with severe sepsis. We determined the mtDNA haplogroup, the COX specific activity/citrate synthase specific activity (COXa/CSa) ratio and the COX quantity/citrate synthase specific activity (COXq/CSa) ratio in circulating platelets at the time of diagnosis, day 4 and day 8. We used survival at 1 and 6 months as endpoints. Patients with the JT mtDNA haplogroup (n=15) showed higher COXq/CSa ratio at day 4 (P=0.04) and day 8 (P=0.02) than those with other haplogroups (n=81). Logistic regression analysis showed that the JT mtDNA haplogroup (odds ratio=0.18; 95% confidence interval=0.04 to 0.94; P=0.04) and COXq/CSa ratio (odds ratio=0.53; 95% confidence interval=0.30 to 0.93; P=0.03) were associated with 1-month survival after controlling for age and lactic acid levels. The novel findings of our study are that 1-month surviving septic patients showed higher COXq/CSa ratio than nonsurviving individuals, that patients from the JT mtDNA haplogroup showed a higher COXq/CSa ratio and that JT patients had a higher 1-month survival than patients from other mtDNA haplogroups.

  17. Part I--IEPS (Institute for the Study of Health Policies) reports. The proper function of teaching hospitals within health systems.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The main points of the discussions from the international seminar organised by the World Health Organisation and the Institute for the Study of Health Policies (IEPS) were published in French by Flammarion Medecine-Sciences in the Collection entitled "The IEPS Reports" and in English by the WHO under the title "The Proper Function of Teaching Hospitals within Health Systems" (1995).

  18. Diurnal Changes in Mitochondrial Function Reveal Daily Optimization of Light and Dark Respiratory Metabolism in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun Pong; Eubel, Holger; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity. PMID:20601493

  19. Thioredoxin-interacting protein and myocardial mitochondrial function in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Jun; Lee, Richard T

    2014-02-01

    Cellular metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation are interrelated processes in mitochondria and are implicated in a variety of human diseases including ischemic heart disease. During ischemia, mitochondrial respiration rates fall. Though seemingly paradoxical, reduced respiration has been observed to be cardioprotective due in part to reduced generation of ROS. Enhanced myocardial glucose uptake is considered beneficial for the myocardium under stress, as glucose is the primary substrate to support anaerobic metabolism. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation can protect the myocardium from irreversible ischemic damage. Growing evidence now positions the TXNIP/thioredoxin system at a nodal point linking pathways of antioxidant defense, cell survival, and energy metabolism. This emerging picture reveals TXNIP's function as a regulator of glucose homeostasis and may prove central to regulation of mitochondrial function during ischemia. In this review, we summarize how TXNIP and its binding partner thioredoxin act as regulators of mitochondrial metabolism. While the precise mechanism remains incompletely defined, the TXNIP-thioredoxin interaction has the potential to affect signaling that regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics and respiratory function with potential cardioprotection against ischemic injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity and mitochondrial function in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Fujii, Wataru; Hori, Hisako; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2016-04-01

    The manifestation of coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity may differ and depends on the frequency of administration to rats. A single coumarin dose induces hepatocellular necrosis while repeated doses induce only hepatocyte degeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism of coumarin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Coumarin was administered to male rats as a single dose or for 4 consecutive days, and samples were obtained 4 or 24 h after a single dose or 24 h after the repeated doses. A single coumarin dose significantly induced hepatocellular necrosis in rats; however, toxicity was attenuated after repeated dosing. With a single dose, hepatocellular necrosis was preceded by increased mitochondrial number and size and decreased mitochondrial function. An increased expression of granular cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 protein was observed in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of coumarin-treated rats compared to the expression in the untreated controls. Nevertheless, repeated dosing showed mitochondrial function that was equivalent to that of the control while enlarged CYP2E1 protein droplets were distributed outside the mitochondria. These results suggest that mitochondrial function and CYP2E1 expression might be involved in coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity in rats. A reduction in mitochondrial CYP2E1 might be implicated in the acquisition of coumarin resistance after repeated doses.

  1. Genistein modulates proliferation and mitochondrial functionality in breast cancer cells depending on ERalpha/ERbeta ratio.

    PubMed

    Pons, Daniel Gabriel; Nadal-Serrano, Mercedes; Blanquer-Rossello, M Mar; Sastre-Serra, Jorge; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women of developed countries. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genistein, a soy phytoestrogen, and 17β-estradiol (E2) could have effects on the cell cycle and mitochondrial function and dynamics. Three human breast cancer cell lines with different estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) ratio were used: MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio), T47D (low ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative). Cell proliferation, cell cycle, mitochondrial functionality, and mitochondrial dynamics parameters were analyzed. E2 and genistein treatment induced cell proliferation and apoptosis inhibition in MCF-7, but not in T47D and MDA-MB-231. Moreover, genistein treatment produced an up-regulation of ERβ and a rise in cytochrome c oxidase activity in T47D cells, decreasing the ATP synthase/cytochrome c oxidase ratio. Finally, genistein treatment produced a drop in mitochondrial dynamics only in MCF-7 cells. In summary, the beneficial effects of genistein consumption depend on the ERα/ERβ ratio in breast cells. Therefore, genistein treatment produces cell cycle arrest and an improvement of mitochondrial functionality in T47D cells with a low ERα/ERβ ratio, but not in MCF-7 (high ERα/ERβ ratio) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-negative) ones.

  2. Mzm1 Influences a Labile Pool of Mitochondrial Zinc Important for Respiratory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Aaron; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Smith, Pamela; Sabic, Hana; Eide, David; Winge, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is essential for function of mitochondria as a cofactor for several matrix zinc metalloproteins. We demonstrate that a labile cationic zinc component of low molecular mass exists in the yeast mitochondrial matrix. This zinc pool is homeostatically regulated in response to the cellular zinc status. This pool of zinc is functionally important because matrix targeting of a cytosolic zinc-binding protein reduces the level of labile zinc and interferes with mitochondrial respiratory function. We identified a series of proteins that modulate the matrix zinc pool, one of which is a novel conserved mitochondrial protein designated Mzm1. Mutant mzm1Δ cells have reduced total and labile mitochondrial zinc, and these cells are hypersensitive to perturbations of the labile pool. In addition, mzm1Δ cells have a destabilized cytochrome c reductase (Complex III) without any effects on Complexes IV or V. Thus, we have established that a link exists between Complex III integrity and the labile mitochondrial zinc pool. PMID:20404342

  3. Diurnal changes in mitochondrial function reveal daily optimization of light and dark respiratory metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun Pong; Eubel, Holger; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-10-01

    Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity.

  4. Pleiotropic regulation of mitochondrial function by adipose triglyceride lipase-mediated lipolysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Kratky, Dagmar; Obrowsky, Sascha; Kolb, Dagmar; Radovic, Branislav

    2014-01-01

    Lipolysis is defined as the catabolism of triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in cellular lipid droplets. Recent discoveries of essential lipolytic enzymes and characterization of numerous regulatory proteins and mechanisms have fundamentally changed our perception of lipolysis and its impact on cellular metabolism. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme for TG catabolism in most cells and tissues. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding the (patho)physiological impact due to defective lipolysis by ATGL deficiency on mitochondrial (dys)function. Depending on the type of cells and tissues investigated, absence of ATGL has pleiotropic roles in mitochondrial function. PMID:23827855

  5. Sex effect on insulin secretion and mitochondrial function in pancreatic beta cells of elderly Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Jiao, Wenjun; Li, Weifang; Li, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Glucose tolerance progressively declines with age, and there is a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the elderly people. Previous studies have reported the sex differences in risk for type 2 diabetes, especially in the elderly people, whereas reasons for these sex differences remain poorly understood. This study aims to evaluate the effect of sex on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial function in pancreatic beta cells of Wistar rats. 3-month-old and 18-month-old Wistar rats of both sexes were used. Insulin secretion of islets was analyzed by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and islet perifusion assays; ATP content and oxygen consumption rate of islets were determined to evaluate the mitochondrial function. Insulin secretion of islets under high glucose conditions declined significantly with age in both sexes. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of elderly female groups was markedly higher than that of male groups under high glucose conditions. Importantly, islets from elderly female groups showed higher mitochondrial function compared with male counterparts, evidenced by higher ATP content and oxygen consumption rate under high glucose conditions. It was also noted that mitochondrial biogenesis of islets from elderly female rats was significant higher compared with male rats. There were notable increases in expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in islets from elderly female rats compared with male rats. This study demonstrates a sex dimorphism in the age-associated impairment of pancreatic beta cell function in elderly rats, while the potential mechanism may be related to the sexual differences in mitochondrial biogenesis and function.

  6. Exercise efficiency relates with mitochondrial content and function in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Broskey, Nicholas T; Boss, Andreas; Fares, Elie-Jacques; Greggio, Chiara; Gremion, Gerald; Schlüter, Leo; Hans, Didier; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris; Amati, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Chronic aerobic exercise has been shown to increase exercise efficiency, thus allowing less energy expenditure for a similar amount of work. The extent to which skeletal muscle mitochondria play a role in this is not fully understood, particularly in an elderly population. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of exercise efficiency with mitochondrial content and function. We hypothesized that the greater the mitochondrial content and/or function, the greater would be the efficiencies. Thirty-eight sedentary (S, n = 23, 10F/13M) or athletic (A, n = 15, 6F/9M) older adults (66.8 ± 0.8 years) participated in this cross sectional study. O2peak was measured with a cycle ergometer graded exercise protocol (GXT). Gross efficiency (GE, %) and net efficiency (NE, %) were estimated during a 1-h submaximal test (55% O2peak). Delta efficiency (DE, %) was calculated from the GXT. Mitochondrial function was measured as ATPmax (mmol/L/s) during a PCr recovery protocol with 31P-MR spectroscopy. Muscle biopsies were acquired for determination of mitochondrial volume density (MitoVd, %). Efficiencies were 17% (GE), 14% (NE), and 16% (DE) higher in A than S. MitoVD was 29% higher in A and ATPmax was 24% higher in A than in S. All efficiencies positively correlated with both ATPmax and MitoVd. Chronically trained older individuals had greater mitochondrial content and function, as well as greater exercise efficiencies. GE, NE, and DE were related to both mitochondrial content and function. This suggests a possible role of mitochondria in improving exercise efficiency in elderly athletic populations and allowing conservation of energy at moderate workloads. PMID:26059033

  7. DPP4-inhibitor improves neuronal insulin receptor function, brain mitochondrial function and cognitive function in rats with insulin resistance induced by high-fat diet consumption.

    PubMed

    Pipatpiboon, Noppamas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2013-03-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) consumption has been demonstrated to cause peripheral and neuronal insulin resistance, and brain mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Although the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, is known to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity, its effects on neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction caused by a HFD are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that vildagliptin prevents neuronal insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, learning and memory deficit caused by HFD. Male rats were divided into two groups to receive either a HFD or normal diet (ND) for 12 weeks, after which rats in each group were fed with either vildagliptin (3 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 21 days. The cognitive function was tested by the Morris Water Maze prior to brain removal for studying neuronal insulin receptor (IR) and brain mitochondrial function. In HFD rats, neuronal insulin resistance and brain mitochondrial dysfunction were demonstrated, with impaired learning and memory. Vildagliptin prevented neuronal insulin resistance by restoring insulin-induced long-term depression and neuronal IR phosphorylation, IRS-1 phosphorylation and Akt/PKB-ser phosphorylation. It also improved brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive function. Vildagliptin effectively restored neuronal IR function, increased glucagon-like-peptide 1 levels and prevented brain mitochondrial dysfunction, thus attenuating the impaired cognitive function caused by HFD. © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. TSPO: functions and applications of a mitochondrial stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Michelangelo; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane protein TSPO (translocator protein) lies in a privileged position at the interface between mitochondrion and cytosol. Since the initially discovery, nearly forty years ago, it has generated major interest among various disciplines of modern experimental and applied biomedicine. The focused meeting we have organized aimed at summarizing the state of the art knowledge on TSPO and the discipline-based segregated concepts that have made this an exciting and active field of science. The scientists who have generously contributed the event have agreed to generate a special issue here published--stemmed from the discussion of the vent. This consists in a series of contributions via which the know-how is shared aiming to inspire current and future endeavours to validate and accelerate the impact of TSPO science in human pathophysiology and clinical applications.

  9. S-glutathionylation reactions in mitochondrial function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Willmore, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly efficient energy-transforming organelles that convert energy stored in nutrients into ATP. The production of ATP by mitochondria is dependent on oxidation of nutrients and coupling of exergonic electron transfer reactions to the genesis of transmembrane electrochemical potential of protons. Electrons can also prematurely “spin-off” from prosthetic groups in Krebs cycle enzymes and respiratory complexes and univalently reduce di-oxygen to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2•−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), important signaling molecules that can be toxic at high concentrations. Production of ATP and ROS are intimately linked by the respiratory chain and the genesis of one or the other inherently depends on the metabolic state of mitochondria. Various control mechanisms converge on mitochondria to adjust ATP and ROS output in response to changing cellular demands. One control mechanism that has gained a high amount of attention recently is S-glutathionylation, a redox sensitive covalent modification that involves formation of a disulfide bridge between glutathione and an available protein cysteine thiol. A number of S-glutathionylation targets have been identified in mitochondria. It has also been established that S-glutathionylation reactions in mitochondria are mediated by the thiol oxidoreductase glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2). In the following review, emerging knowledge on S-glutathionylation reactions and its importance in modulating mitochondrial ATP and ROS production will be discussed. Major focus will be placed on Complex I of the respiratory chain since (1) it is a target for reversible S-glutathionylation by Grx2 and (2) deregulation of Complex I S-glutathionylation is associated with development of various disease states particularly heart disease. Other mitochondrial enzymes and how their S-glutathionylation profile is affected in different disease states will also be discussed. PMID:25453035

  10. Honokiol inhibits lung tumorigenesis through inhibition of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Qian; Komas, Steven M; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Lubet, Ronald A; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2014-11-01

    Honokiol is an important bioactive compound found in the bark of Magnolia tree. It is a nonadipogenic PPARγ agonist and capable of inhibiting the growth of a variety of tumor types both in vitro and in xenograft models. However, to fully appreciate the potential chemopreventive activity of honokiol, a less artificial model system is required. To that end, this study examined the chemopreventive efficacy of honokiol in an initiation model of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This model system uses the carcinogen N-nitroso-trischloroethylurea (NTCU), which is applied topically, reliably triggering the development of SCC within 24 to 26 weeks. Administration of honokiol significantly reduced the percentage of bronchial that exhibit abnormal lung SCC histology from 24.4% bronchial in control to 11.0% bronchial in honokiol-treated group (P = 0.01) while protecting normal bronchial histology (present in 20.5% of bronchial in control group and 38.5% of bronchial in honokiol-treated group. P = 0.004). P63 staining at the SCC site confirmed the lung SCCs phenotype. In vitro studies revealed that honokiol inhibited lung SCC cells proliferation, arrested cells at the G1-S cell-cycle checkpoint, while also leading to increased apoptosis. Our study showed that interfering with mitochondrial respiration is a novel mechanism by which honokiol changed redox status in the mitochondria, triggered apoptosis, and finally leads to the inhibition of lung SCC. This novel mechanism of targeting mitochondrial suggests honokiol as a potential lung SCC chemopreventive agent. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Genetic ablation of calcium-independent phospholipase A2gamma leads to alterations in mitochondrial lipid metabolism and function resulting in a deficient mitochondrial bioenergetic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, David J; Sims, Harold F; Han, Xianlin; Jenkins, Christopher M; Guan, Shao Ping; Yang, Kui; Moon, Sung Ho; Pietka, Terri; Abumrad, Nada A; Schlesinger, Paul H; Gross, Richard W

    2007-11-30

    Previously, we identified a novel calcium-independent phospholipase, designated calcium-independent phospholipase A(2) gamma (iPLA(2)gamma), which possesses dual mitochondrial and peroxisomal subcellular localization signals. To identify the roles of iPLA(2)gamma in cellular bioenergetics, we generated mice null for the iPLA(2)gamma gene by eliminating the active site of the enzyme through homologous recombination. Mice null for iPLA(2)gamma display multiple bioenergetic dysfunctional phenotypes, including 1) growth retardation, 2) cold intolerance, 3) reduced exercise endurance, 4) greatly increased mortality from cardiac stress after transverse aortic constriction, 5) abnormal mitochondrial function with a 65% decrease in ascorbate-induced Complex IV-mediated oxygen consumption, and 6) a reduction in myocardial cardiolipin content accompanied by an altered cardiolipin molecular species composition. We conclude that iPLA(2)gamma is essential for maintaining efficient bioenergetic mitochondrial function through tailoring mitochondrial membrane lipid metabolism and composition.

  12. Permeabilization of brain tissue in situ enables multiregion analysis of mitochondrial function in a single mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-02-15

    Mitochondrial function in the brain is traditionally assessed through analysing respiration in isolated mitochondria, a technique that possesses significant tissue and time requirements while also disrupting the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum. We permeabilized brain tissue in situ to permit analysis of mitochondrial respiration with the native mitochondrial morphology intact, removing the need for isolation time and minimizing tissue requirements to ∼2 mg wet weight. The permeabilized brain technique was validated against the traditional method of isolated mitochondria and was then further applied to assess regional variation in the mouse brain with ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. A transgenic mouse model overexpressing catalase within mitochondria was applied to show the contribution of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species to ischaemia-reperfusion injuries in different brain regions. This technique enhances the accessibility of addressing physiological questions in small brain regions and in applying transgenic mouse models to assess mechanisms regulating mitochondrial function in health and disease. Mitochondria function as the core energy providers in the brain and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases are often attributed to their dysregulation. Assessing mitochondrial function is classically performed in isolated mitochondria; however, this process requires significant isolation time, demand for abundant tissue and disruption of the cooperative mitochondrial reticulum, all of which reduce reliability when attempting to assess in vivo mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here we introduce a method that advances the assessment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain by permeabilizing existing brain tissue to grant direct access to the mitochondrial reticulum in situ. The permeabilized brain preparation allows for instant analysis of mitochondrial function with unaltered mitochondrial morphology using significantly small sample sizes (∼2 mg), which permits

  13. Protection of mitochondrial and heart function by amino acids after ischemia and cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Shug, A L; Madsen, D; Dobbie, R; Paulson, D J

    1994-01-01

    The effects of amino acids in protecting against ischemic/reperfusion injury were tested in two experimental models: the isolated perfused rat heart subjected to 21 min of zero flow ischemia (37 degrees) followed by 40 min of reperfusion and the isolated perfused rabbit heart subjected to 300 min of cardioplegic arrest (29 degrees) followed by 60 min of reperfusion. In both cases, the addition of amino acids to the perfusion medium significantly improved the recovery of cardiac contractile function. The protective effects of amino acids were associated with a preservation of mitochondrial respiratory activity. These findings suggest that amino acids by replenishing mitochondrial matrix levels of critical TCA cycle substrates, such as malate, stimulate mitochondrial respiration and thereby enhance the recovery of heart function.

  14. Apoptotic transition of senescent cells accompanied with mitochondrial hyper-function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Danli; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Fen; Sui, Weihao; Chen, Li; Zheng, Ran; Chen, Xiaowen; Wen, Feiqiu; Ouyang, Hong-Wei; Ji, Junfeng

    2016-01-01

    Defined as stable cell-cycle arrest, cellular senescence plays an important role in diverse biological processes including tumorigenesis, organismal aging, and embryonic development. Although increasing evidence has documented the metabolic changes in senescent cells, mitochondrial function and its potential contribution to the fate of senescent cells remain largely unknown. Here, using two in vitro models of cellular senescence induced by doxorubicin treatment and prolonged passaging of neonatal human foreskin fibroblasts, we report that senescent cells exhibited high ROS level and augmented glucose metabolic rate concomitant with both morphological and quantitative changes of mitochondria. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarized at late stage of senescent cells which eventually led to apoptosis. Our study reveals that mitochondrial hyper-function contributes to the implementation of cellular senescence and we propose a model in which the mitochondrion acts as the key player in promoting fate-determination in senescent cells. PMID:27056883

  15. Nitrotyrosine impairs mitochondrial function in fetal lamb pulmonary artery endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzong-Jin; Afolayan, Adeleye J.; Konduri, Girija G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitration of both protein-bound and free tyrosine by reactive nitrogen species results in the formation of nitrotyrosine (NT). We previously reported that free NT impairs microtubule polymerization and uncouples endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC). Because microtubules modulate mitochondrial function, we hypothesized that increased NT levels during inflammation and oxidative stress will lead to mitochondrial dysfunction in PAEC. PAEC isolated from fetal lambs were exposed to varying concentrations of free NT. At low concentrations (1–10 μM), NT increased nitration of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) protein subunit complexes I–V and state III oxygen consumption. Higher concentrations of NT (50 μM) caused decreased microtubule acetylation, impaired eNOS interactions with mitochondria, and decreased ETC protein levels. We also observed increases in heat shock protein-90 nitration, mitochondrial superoxide formation, and fragmentation of mitochondria in PAEC. Our data suggest that free NT accumulation may impair microtubule polymerization and exacerbate reactive oxygen species-induced cell damage by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26491046

  16. Carboxyl-terminal modulator protein induces apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial function in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Kee-Ho; Park, Jongsun; Beck, George R; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-05-01

    Serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is involved in cell survival and growth. Carboxyl-terminal modulator protein (CTMP), a novel Akt binding partner, prevents Akt activation at the plasma membrane in response to various stimuli, and thus possesses a tumor suppressor-like function. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that CTMP inhibits tumor progression by facilitating apoptosis in a mouse lung cancer model. However, the precise mechanism of CTMP-induced apoptosis remains to be elucidated. The present study was performed to examine the role of CTMP in mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and regulation of mitochondrial function in human lung carcinoma cells. Our results showed that CTMP altered mitochondrial morphology and caused the release of cytochrome c by inhibiting OPA1 expression. Additionally, CTMP facilitated mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis by inhibiting heat-shock protein 27 and preventing cytochrome c interaction with Apaf-1. Our data suggest that CTMP may therefore play a critical role in mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in lung cancer cells.

  17. Mitochondrial remnant organelles of Giardia function in iron-sulphur protein maturation.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Jorge; León-Avila, Gloria; Sánchez, Lidya B; Sutak, Robert; Tachezy, Jan; van der Giezen, Mark; Hernández, Manuel; Müller, Miklós; Lucocq, John M

    2003-11-13

    Giardia intestinalis (syn. lamblia) is one of the most widespread intestinal protozoan pathogens worldwide, causing hundreds of thousands of cases of diarrhoea each year. Giardia is a member of the diplomonads, often described as an ancient protist group whose primitive nature is suggested by the lack of typical eukaryotic organelles (for example, mitochondria, peroxisomes), the presence of a poorly developed endomembrane system and by their early branching in a number of gene phylogenies. The discovery of nuclear genes of putative mitochondrial ancestry in Giardia and the recent identification of mitochondrial remnant organelles in amitochondrial protists such as Entamoeba histolytica and Trachipleistophora hominis suggest that the eukaryotic amitochondrial state is not a primitive condition but is rather the result of reductive evolution. Using an in vitro protein reconstitution assay and specific antibodies against IscS and IscU--two mitochondrial marker proteins involved in iron-sulphur cluster biosynthesis--here we demonstrate that Giardia contains mitochondrial remnant organelles (mitosomes) bounded by double membranes that function in iron-sulphur protein maturation. Our results indicate that Giardia is not primitively amitochondrial and that it has retained a functional organelle derived from the original mitochondrial endosymbiont.

  18. Invadolysin, a conserved lipid-droplet-associated metalloproteinase, is required for mitochondrial function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Di Cara, Francesca; Duca, Edward; Dunbar, Donald R.; Cagney, Gerard; Heck, Margarete M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are the main producers of ATP, the principal energy source of the cell, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules. Mitochondrial morphogenesis and function depend on a hierarchical network of mechanisms in which proteases appear to be center stage. The invadolysin gene encodes an essential conserved metalloproteinase of the M8 family that is necessary for mitosis and cell migration during Drosophila development. We previously demonstrated that invadolysin is found associated with lipid droplets in cells. Here, we present data demonstrating that invadolysin interacts physically with three mitochondrial ATP synthase subunits. Our studies have focused on the genetic phenotypes of invadolysin and bellwether, the Drosophila homolog of ATP synthase α, mutants. The invadolysin mutation presents defects in mitochondrial physiology similar to those observed in bellwether mutants. The invadolysin and bellwether mutants have parallel phenotypes that affect lipid storage and mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, which result in a reduction in ATP production and an accumulation of ROS. As a consequence, invadolysin mutant larvae show lower energetic status and higher oxidative stress. Our data demonstrate an essential role for invadolysin in mitochondrial function that is crucial for normal development and survival. PMID:23943867

  19. Tetracycline antibiotics impair mitochondrial function and its experimental use confounds research.

    PubMed

    Chatzispyrou, Iliana A; Held, Ntsiki M; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Auwerx, Johan; Houtkooper, Riekelt H

    2015-11-01

    Tetracyclines, a class of antibiotics that target bacterial translation, are commonly used in research for inducible gene expression using Tet-ON/Tet-OFF systems. However, such tetracycline-inducible systems carry a risk. Given that mitochondria have a "bacterial" ancestry, these antibiotics also target mitochondrial translation and impair mitochondrial function. Indeed, treatment with doxycycline-a tetracycline derivative-disturbs mitochondrial proteostasis and metabolic activity, and induces widespread gene-expression changes. Together, this affects physiology in well-established model systems ranging from cultured cells to simple organisms and to mice and plants. These changes are observed with doxycycline doses that are widely used to regulate gene expression. In light of these findings, and bearing in mind the conserved role of mitochondria in metabolism and whole organism homeostasis, we caution against the use of tetracyclines in experimental approaches. The use of newly developed tetracycline-based systems that are more sensitive could be an alternative; however, even if no overt mitochondrial toxicity is detected, widespread changes in gene expression may sensitize cells to the intended tetracycline-controlled loss or gain of function, thereby introducing a "two-hit model." This is highly relevant for cancer research, as mitochondrial metabolism holds a central position in the reallocation of nutrients for biomass production known as the Warburg effect.

  20. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-06

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX's cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  1. Cannabidiol Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy by Modulating Mitochondrial Function and Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Enkui; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cao, Zongxian; Erdélyi, Katalin; Holovac, Eileen; Liaudet, Lucas; Lee, Wen-Shin; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely used, potent chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical application is limited because of its dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX’s cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative/nitrative stress, impaired mitochondrial function in cardiomyocytes/endothelial cells and cell death. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotropic constituent of marijuana, which is well tolerated in humans, with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and recently discovered antitumor properties. We aimed to explore the effects of CBD in a well-established mouse model of DOX-induced cardiomyopathy. DOX-induced cardiomyopathy was characterized by increased myocardial injury (elevated serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels), myocardial oxidative and nitrative stress (decreased total glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase 1 activity, increased lipid peroxidation, 3-nitrotyrosine formation and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), myocardial cell death (apoptotic and poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 [PARP]-dependent) and cardiac dysfunction (decline in ejection fraction and left ventricular fractional shortening). DOX also impaired myocardial mitochondrial biogenesis (decreased mitochondrial copy number, mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-alpha, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, estrogen-related receptor alpha), reduced mitochondrial function (attenuated complex I and II activities) and decreased myocardial expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase mRNA. Treatment with CBD markedly improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death. CBD also enhanced the DOX-induced impaired cardiac mitochondrial function and biogenesis. These data suggest that CBD may represent a novel cardioprotective strategy against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and the above-described effects on mitochondrial function and biogenesis may

  2. THE MITOCHONDRIAL PARADIGM FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY AND CELLULAR FUNCTION: A COMPLEMENTARY CONCEPT TO MENDELIAN GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Kryzwanski, David M.; Moellering, Douglas; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J.; Sammy, Melissa J.; Ballinger, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    While there is general agreement that cardiovascular disease (CVD) development is influenced by a combination of genetic, environmental, and behavioral contributors, the actual mechanistic basis of how these factors initiate or promote CVD development in some individuals while others with identical risk profiles do not, is not clearly understood. This review considers the potential role for mitochondrial genetics and function in determining CVD susceptibility from the standpoint that the original features that molded cellular function were based upon mitochondrial-nuclear relationships established millions of years ago and were likely refined during prehistoric environmental selection events that today, are largely absent. Consequently, contemporary risk factors that influence our susceptibility to a variety of age-related diseases, including CVD were probably not part of the dynamics that defined the processes of mitochondrial – nuclear interaction, and thus, cell function. In this regard, the selective conditions that contributed to cellular functionality and evolution should be given more consideration when interpreting and designing experimental data and strategies. Finally, future studies that probe beyond epidemiologic associations are required. These studies will serve as the initial steps for addressing the provocative concept that contemporary human disease susceptibility is the result of selection events for mitochondrial function that increased chances for prehistoric human survival and reproductive success. PMID:21647091

  3. Multifunctional Mitochondrial AAA Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Steven E.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria perform numerous functions necessary for the survival of eukaryotic cells. These activities are coordinated by a diverse complement of proteins encoded in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that must be properly organized and maintained. Misregulation of mitochondrial proteostasis impairs organellar function and can result in the development of severe human diseases. ATP-driven AAA+ proteins play crucial roles in preserving mitochondrial activity by removing and remodeling protein molecules in accordance with the needs of the cell. Two mitochondrial AAA proteases, i-AAA and m-AAA, are anchored to either face of the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they engage and process an array of substrates to impact protein biogenesis, quality control, and the regulation of key metabolic pathways. The functionality of these proteases is extended through multiple substrate-dependent modes of action, including complete degradation, partial processing, or dislocation from the membrane without proteolysis. This review discusses recent advances made toward elucidating the mechanisms of substrate recognition, handling, and degradation that allow these versatile proteases to control diverse activities in this multifunctional organelle. PMID:28589125

  4. Genetics of Mitochondrial Disease.

    PubMed

    Saneto, Russell P

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles responsible for adenosine triphosphate production. The strict control of intracellular energy needs require proper mitochondrial functioning. The mitochondria are under dual controls of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mitochondrial dysfunction can arise from changes in either mtDNA or nDNA genes regulating function. There are an estimated ∼1500 proteins in the mitoproteome, whereas the mtDNA genome has 37 proteins. There are, to date, ∼275 genes shown to give rise to disease. The unique physiology of mitochondrial functioning contributes to diverse gene expression. The onset and range of phenotypic expression of disease is diverse, with onset from neonatal to seventh decade of life. The range of dysfunction is heterogeneous, ranging from single organ to multisystem involvement. The complexity of disease expression has severely limited gene discovery. Combining phenotypes with improvements in gene sequencing strategies are improving the diagnosis process. This chapter focuses on the interplay of the unique physiology and gene discovery in the current knowledge of genetically derived mitochondrial disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like gene (Immp2l) affects mitochondrial function and impairs fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baisong; Poirier, Christophe; Gaspar, Tamas; Gratzke, Christian; Harrison, Wilbur; Busija, David; Matzuk, Martin M; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Overbeek, Paul A; Bishop, Colin E

    2008-04-01

    The mitochondrion is involved in energy generation, apoptosis regulation, and calcium homeostasis. Mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial processes often result in a severe phenotype or embryonic lethality, making the study of mitochondrial involvement in aging, neurodegeneration, or reproduction challenging. Using a transgenic insertional mutagenesis strategy, we generated a mouse mutant, Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove, with a mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene. The mutation affected the signal peptide sequence processing of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The inefficient processing of mitochondrial membrane proteins perturbed mitochondrial function so that mitochondria from mutant mice manifested hyperpolarization, higher than normal superoxide ion generation, and higher levels of ATP. Homozygous Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove females were infertile due to defects in folliculogenesis and ovulation, whereas mutant males were severely subfertile due to erectile dysfunction. The data suggest that the high superoxide ion levels lead to a decrease in the bioavailability of nitric oxide and an increase in reactive oxygen species stress, which underlies these reproductive defects. The results provide a novel link between mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility and suggest that superoxide ion targeting agents may prove useful for treating infertility in a subpopulation of infertile patients.

  6. Pink1 forms a multiprotein complex with Miro and Milton, linking Pink1 function to mitochondrial trafficking.

    PubMed

    Weihofen, Andreas; Thomas, Kelly Jean; Ostaszewski, Beth L; Cookson, Mark R; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2009-03-10

    Recessive mutations in Pink1 lead to a selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that is characteristic of Parkinson disease. Pink1 is a kinase that is targeted in part to mitochondria, and loss of Pink1 function can alter mitochondrial morphology and dynamics, thus supporting a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and Parkinson disease etiology. Here, we report the unbiased identification and confirmation of a mitochondrial multiprotein complex that contains Pink1, the atypical GTPase Miro, and the adaptor protein Milton. Our screen also identified an interaction between Pink1 and Mitofilin. Based on previously established functions for Miro and Milton in the trafficking of mitochondria along microtubules, we postulate here a role for Pink1 in mitochondrial trafficking. Using subcellular fractionation, we show that the overexpression of Miro and Milton, both of which are known to reside at the outer mitochondrial membrane, increases the mitochondrial Pink1 pool, suggesting a function of Pink1 at the outer membrane. Further, we document that Pink1 expressed without a mitochondrial targeting sequence can still be targeted to a mitochondria-enriched subcellular fraction via Miro and Milton. The latter finding is important for the interpretation of a previously reported protective effect of Pink1 expressed without a mitochondrial targeting sequence. Finally, we find that Miro and Milton expression suppresses altered mitochondrial morphology induced by loss of Pink1 function in cell culture. Our findings suggest that Pink1 functions in the trafficking of mitochondria in cells.

  7. Targeted expression of catalase to mitochondria prevents age-associated reductions in mitochondrial function and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Young; Choi, Cheol Soo; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Alves, Tiago C; Jornayvaz, Francois R; Jurczak, Michael J; Zhang, Dongyan; Woo, Dong Kyun; Shadel, Gerald S; Ladiges, Warren; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Santos, Janine H; Petersen, Kitt F; Samuel, Varman T; Shulman, Gerald I

    2010-12-01

    Aging-associated muscle insulin resistance has been hypothesized to be due to decreased mitochondrial function, secondary to cumulative free radical damage, leading to increased intramyocellular lipid content. To directly test this hypothesis, we examined both in vivo and in vitro mitochondrial function, intramyocellular lipid content, and insulin action in lean healthy mice with targeted overexpression of the human catalase gene to mitochondria (MCAT mice). Here, we show that MCAT mice are protected from age-induced decrease in muscle mitochondrial function (∼30%), energy metabolism (∼7%), and lipid-induced muscle insulin resistance. This protection from age-induced reduction in mitochondrial function was associated with reduced mitochondrial oxidative damage, preserved mitochondrial respiration and muscle ATP synthesis, and AMP-activated protein kinase-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Taken together, these data suggest that the preserved mitochondrial function maintained by reducing mitochondrial oxidative damage may prevent age-associated whole-body energy imbalance and muscle insulin resistance.

  8. Myocardial contractile dysfunction is associated with impaired mitochondrial function and dynamics in type 2 diabetic but not in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Coisne, Augustin; Debry, Nicolas; Modine, Thomas; Fayad, Georges; Potelle, Charlotte; El Arid, Jean-Marc; Mouton, Stéphanie; Sebti, Yasmine; Duez, Hélène; Preau, Sébastien; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Zerimech, Farid; Koussa, Mohamed; Richard, Vincent; Neviere, Remi; Edme, Jean-Louis; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2014-08-12

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are independently associated with the development of heart failure. In this study, we determined the respective effects of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes mellitus on the intrinsic contraction and mitochondrial function of the human myocardium before the onset of cardiomyopathy. Right atrial myocardium was obtained from 141 consecutive patients presenting no sign of cardiomyopathy. We investigated ex vivo isometric contraction, mitochondrial respiration and calcium retention capacity, and respiratory chain complex activities and oxidative stress status. Diabetes mellitus was associated with a pronounced impairment of intrinsic contraction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased myocardial oxidative stress, regardless of weight status. In contrast, obesity was associated with less pronounced contractile dysfunction without any significant perturbation of mitochondrial function or oxidative stress status. Tested as continuous variables, glycated hemoglobin A1C, but neither body mass index nor the insulin resistance index (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance), was independently associated with cardiac mitochondrial function. Furthermore, diabetes mellitus was associated with cardiac mitochondrial network fragmentation and significantly decreased expression of the mitochondrial fusion related protein MFN1. Myocardial MFN1 content was inversely proportional to hemoglobin A1C. Worsening of intrinsic myocardial contraction in the transition from obesity to diabetes mellitus is likely related to worsening of cardiac mitochondrial function because impaired mitochondrial function and dynamics and contractile dysfunction are observed in diabetic patients but not in "metabolically healthy" obese patients at early stage in insulin resistance. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Theophylline treatment improves mitochondrial function after upper cervical spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Hüttemann, Maik; Nantwi, Kwaku D; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Mohiuddin, Syed; Petrov, Theodor

    2010-06-01

    The importance of mitochondria in spinal cord injury has mainly been attributed to their participation in apoptosis at the site of injury. But another aspect of mitochondrial function is the generation of more than 90% of cellular energy in the form of ATP, mediated by the oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) process. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a central OxPhos component and changes in its activity reflect changes in energy demand. A recent study suggests that respiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is compromised via alterations in mitochondrial function. In an animal model of cervical spinal cord hemisection (C2HS) respiratory dysfunction, we have shown that theophylline improves respiratory function. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that theophylline improves respiratory function at the cellular level via improved mitochondrial function in the C2HS model. We demonstrate that CcO activity was significantly (33%) increased in the spinal cord adjacent to the site of injury (C3-C5), and that administration of theophylline (20mg/kg 3x daily orally) after C2HS leads to an even more pronounced increase in CcO activity of 62% compared to sham-operated animals. These results are paralleled by a significant increase in cellular ATP levels (51% in the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to the hemisection). We conclude that C2HS increases energy demand and activates mitochondrial respiration, and that theophylline treatment improves energy levels through activation of the mitochondrial OxPhos process to provide energy for tissue repair and functional recovery after paralysis in the C2HS model.

  10. Theophylline treatment improves mitochondrial function after upper cervical spinal cord hemisection

    PubMed Central

    Hüttemann, Maik; Nantwi, Kwaku D.; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Mohiuddin, Syed; Petrov, Theodor

    2010-01-01

    The importance of mitochondria in spinal cord injury has mainly been attributed to their participation in apoptosis at the site of injury. But another aspect of mitochondrial function is the generation of more than 90% of cellular energy in the form of ATP, mediated by the oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) process. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a central OxPhos component and changes in its activity reflect changes in energy demand. A recent study suggests that respiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is compromised via alterations in mitochondrial function. In an animal model of cervical spinal cord hemisection (C2HS) respiratory dysfunction, we have shown that theophylline improves respiratory function. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that theophylline improves respiratory function at the cellular level via improved mitochondrial function in the C2HS model. We demonstrate that CcO activity was significantly (33%) increased in the spinal cord adjacent to the site of injury (C3–C5), and that administration of theophylline (20 mg/kg 3× daily orally) after C2HS leads to an even more pronounced increase in CcO activity of 62% compared to sham-operated animals. These results are paralleled by a significant increase in cellular ATP levels (51% in the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to the hemisection). We conclude that C2HS increases energy demand and activates mitochondrial respiration, and that theophylline treatment improves energy levels through activation of the mitochondrial OxPhos process to provide energy for tissue repair and functional recovery after paralysis in the C2HS model. PMID:20144890

  11. Developmental regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the mouse mammary gland during a prolonged lactation cycle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the lactating mammary cell is poorly understood. The goal of this study was to use proteomics to relate temporal changes in mammary cell mitochondrial function during lactation to changes in the proteins that make up this organelle. The hypo...

  12. Hyaluronan Upregulates Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Reduces Adenoside Triphosphate Production for Efficient Mitochondrial Function in Slow-Proliferating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Solis, Mairim Alexandra; Wei, Yau-Huei; Chang, Chiung-Hsin; Yu, Chen-Hsiang; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Huang, Lynn L H

    2016-10-01

    Hyaluronan-coated surfaces preserve the proliferation and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells by prolonging their G1-phase transit, which maintains cells in a slow-proliferative mode. Mitochondria are known to play a crucial role in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. In this study, for the first time, the metabolic mechanism underlying the hyaluronan-regulated slow-proliferative maintenance of stem cells was investigated by evaluating mitochondrial functions. Human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PDMSCs) cultured on hyaluronan-coated surfaces at 0.5, 3.0, 5.0, and 30 µg/cm(2) were found to have an average 58% higher mitochondrial mass and an increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number compared to noncoated tissue culture surfaces (control), as well as a threefold increase in the gene expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis-related gene PGC-1α. Increase in mitochondrial biogenesis led to a hyaluronan dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP content, and oxygen consumption rate, with reactive oxygen species levels shown to be at least three times lower compared to the control. Although hyaluronan seemed to favor mitochondrial function, cell entry into a hyaluronan-regulated slow-proliferative mode led to a fivefold reduction in ATP production and coupling efficiency levels. Together, these results suggest that hyaluronan-coated surfaces influence the metabolic proliferative state of stem cells by upregulating mitochondrial biogenesis and function with controlled ATP production. This more efficiently meets the energy requirements of slow-proliferating PDMSCs. A clear understanding of the metabolic mechanism induced by hyaluronan in stem cells will allow future applications that may overcome the current limitations faced in stem cell culture. Stem Cells 2016;34:2512-2524. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Nuclear HMGA1 nonhistone chromatin proteins directly influence mitochondrial transcription, maintenance, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Dement, Gregory A.; Maloney, Scott C.; Reeves, Raymond . E-mail: reevesr@mail.wsu.edu

    2007-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that HMGA1 proteins translocate from the nucleus to mitochondria and bind to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) at the D-loop control region [G.A. Dement, N.R. Treff, N.S. Magnuson, V. Franceschi, R. Reeves, Dynamic mitochondrial localization of nuclear transcription factor HMGA1, Exp. Cell Res. 307 (2005) 388-401.] [11]. To elucidate possible physiological roles for such binding, we employed methods to analyze mtDNA transcription, mitochondrial maintenance, and other organelle functions in transgenic human MCF-7 cells (HA7C) induced to over-express an HA-tagged HMGA1 protein and control (parental) MCF-7 cells. Quantitative real-time (RT) PCR analyses demonstrated that mtDNA levels were reduced approximately 2-fold in HMGA1 over-expressing HA7C cells and flow cytometric analyses further revealed that mitochondrial mass was significantly reduced in these cells. Cellular ATP levels were also reduced in HA7C cells and survival studies showed an increased sensitivity to killing by 2-deoxy-D-glucose, a glycolysis-specific inhibitor. Flow cytometric analyses revealed additional mitochondrial abnormalities in HA7C cells that are consistent with a cancerous phenotype: namely, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}). Additional RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that gene transcripts from both the heavy (ND2, COXI, ATP6) and light (ND6) strands of mtDNA were up-regulated approximately 3-fold in HA7C cells. Together, these mitochondrial changes are consistent with many previous reports and reveal several possible mechanisms by which HMGA1 over-expression, a common feature of naturally occurring cancers, may affect tumor progression.

  14. Lipid Peroxidation-Derived Reactive Aldehydes Directly and Differentially Impair Spinal Cord and Brain Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Singh, Indrapal N.; Miller, Darren M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction in traumatic spinal cord and brain injury is associated with post-traumatic free radical–mediated oxidative damage to proteins and lipids. Lipid peroxidation by-products, such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein, can form adducts with proteins and exacerbate the effects of direct free radical–induced protein oxidation. The aim of the present investigation was to determine and compare the direct contribution of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein to spinal cord and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. Ficoll gradient–isolated mitochondria from normal rat spinal cords and brains were treated with carefully selected doses of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal or acrolein, followed by measurement of complex I– and complex II–driven respiratory rates. Both compounds were potent inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal significantly compromised spinal cord mitochondrial respiration at a 0.1-μM concentration, whereas 10-fold greater concentrations produced a similar effect in brain. Acrolein was more potent than 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, significantly decreasing spinal cord and brain mitochondrial respiration at 0.01 μM and 0.1 μM concentrations, respectively. The results of this study show that 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein can directly and differentially impair spinal cord and brain mitochondrial function, and that the targets for the toxic effects of aldehydes appear to include pyruvate dehydrogenase and complex I–associated proteins. Furthermore, they suggest that protein modification by these lipid peroxidation products may directly contribute to post-traumatic mitochondrial damage, with spinal cord mitochondria showing a greater sensitivity than those in brain. PMID:20392143

  15. Comparative mitochondrial genomics of snakes: extraordinary substitution rate dynamics and functionality of the duplicate control region

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi J; Castoe, Todd A; Austin, Christopher C; Burbrink, Frank T; Herron, Matthew D; McGuire, Jimmy A; Parkinson, Christopher L; Pollock, David D

    2007-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genomes of snakes are characterized by an overall evolutionary rate that appears to be one of the most accelerated among vertebrates. They also possess other unusual features, including short tRNAs and other genes, and a duplicated control region that has been stably maintained since it originated more than 70 million years ago. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of evolutionary dynamics in snake mitochondrial genomes to better understand the basis of these extreme characteristics, and to explore the relationship between mitochondrial genome molecular evolution, genome architecture, and molecular function. We sequenced complete mitochondrial genomes from Slowinski's corn snake (Pantherophis slowinskii) and two cottonmouths (Agkistrodon piscivorus) to complement previously existing mitochondrial genomes, and to provide an improved comparative view of how genome architecture affects molecular evolution at contrasting levels of divergence. Results We present a Bayesian genetic approach that suggests that the duplicated control region can function as an additional origin of heavy strand replication. The two control regions also appear to have different intra-specific versus inter-specific evolutionary dynamics that may be associated with complex modes of concerted evolution. We find that different genomic regions have experienced substantial accelerated evolution along early branches in snakes, with different genes having experienced dramatic accelerations along specific branches. Some of these accelerations appear to coincide with, or subsequent to, the shortening of various mitochondrial genes and the duplication of the control region and flanking tRNAs. Conclusion Fluctuations in the strength and pattern of selection during snake evolution have had widely varying gene-specific effects on substitution rates, and these rate accelerations may have been functionally related to unusual changes in genomic architecture. The among-lineage and

  16. Intravenous (−)-epicatechin reduces myocardial ischemic injury by protecting mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Katrina Go; Andreyev, Aleksander Y.; Ortiz-Vilchis, Pilar; Petrosyan, Susanna; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Wiley, Sandra E.; Fuente, Christine De La; Perkins, Guy; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco; Murphy, Anne N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Targeting the mitochondria during ischemia/reperfusion (IR) can confer cardioprotection leading to improved clinical outcomes. The cardioprotective potential of (−)-epicatechin (EPI) during IR via modulation of mitochondrial function was evaluated. Methods and Results Ischemia was induced in rats via a 45 min occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by 1 h, 48 h, or 3 weeks (wk) reperfusion. EPI (10 mg/kg) was administered IV 15 min prior to reperfusion for the single dose group and again 12 h later for the double dose group. Controls received water. Experiments also utilized cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and myoblasts. A single dose of EPI reduced infarct size by 27% at 48 hours and 28% at 3 week. Double dose treatment further decreased infarct size by 80% at 48 h, and 52% by 3 weeks. The protective effect of EPI on mitochondrial function was evident after 1 hr of reperfusion when mitochondria demonstrated less respiratory inhibition, lower mitochondrial Ca2+ load, and a preserved pool of NADH that correlated with higher tissue ATP levels. Mechanistic studies in NRVM revealed that EPI acutely stimulated maximal rates of respiration, an effect that was blocked by inhibitors of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier, nitric oxide synthase, or soluble guanylyl cyclase. In myoblasts, knockdown of components of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier blocked EPI-induced respiratory stimulation. Conclusions IV EPI confers cardioprotection via preservation of mitochondrial function potentially through enhanced substrate provision. These provocative results document a novel mechanism of a natural product with potential clinical utility. PMID:24908200

  17. Cardiac contractile function and mitochondrial respiration in diabetes-related mouse models.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Camille; Marechal, Xavier; Montaigne, David; Neviere, Remi; Lancel, Steve

    2014-08-21

    Pathophysiological processes underlying diabetic-related cardiomyopathies are complex. Mitochondria dysfunction is often described as a cause of cardiac impairment but its extent may depend on the type of experimental diabetes. Here we proposed to compare drug- or diet-induced models of diabetes in terms of metabolic features, cardiac and mitochondrial functions. Mice were fed with regular chow or fat-enriched diet. After three weeks, they received either citrate or streptozotocin injections for five consecutive days. Metabolic parameters, myocardial contractile function and mitochondrial respiration were measured after three more weeks. Fat mass volumes were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Oral glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test, triglyceride and adipocytokine quantification were evaluated to establish metabolic profiles. Cardiac function was assessed ex vivo onto a Langendorff column. Isolated cardiac mitochondria respiration was obtained using high-resolution oxygraphy. Mice fed with the fat-enriched regimen presented abdominal obesity, increased blood glucose, elevated leptin level, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Mice treated with streptozotocin, independently of the regimen, lost their capacity to release insulin in response to glucose ingestion. Mice fed with regular chow diet and injected with streptozotocin developed cardiac dysfunction without mitochondrial respiration defect. However, both groups of high-fat diet fed mice developed cardiac alterations associated with reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, despite an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis signalling. We explored three animal models mimicking type 1 and 2 diabetes. While cardiac dysfunction was present in the three groups of mice, mitochondrial respiration impairment was only obvious in models reproducing features of type 2 diabetes.

  18. The role of recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in desiccation tolerance of pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Møller, Ian M; Song, Song-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial repair is of fundamental importance for seed germination. When mature orthodox seeds are imbibed and germinated, they lose their desiccation tolerance in parallel. To gain a better understanding of this process, we studied the recovery of mitochondrial structure and function in pea (Pisum sativum cv. Jizhuang) seeds with different tolerance to desiccation. Mitochondria were isolated and purified from the embryo axes of control and imbibed-dehydrated pea seeds after (re-)imbibition for various times. Recovery of mitochondrial structure and function occurred both in control and imbibed-dehydrated seed embryo axes, but at different rates and to different maximum levels. The integrity of the outer mitochondrial membrane reached 96% in all treatments. However, only the seeds imbibed for 12 h and then dehydrated recovered the integrity of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) and State 3 (respiratory state in which substrate and ADP are present) respiration (with NADH and succinate as substrate) to the control level after re-imbibition. With increasing imbibition time, the degree to which each parameter recovered decreased in parallel with the decrease in desiccation tolerance. The tolerance of imbibed seeds to desiccation increased and decreased when imbibed in CaCl(2) and methylviologen solution, respectively, and the recovery of the IMM integrity similarly improved and weakened in these two treatments, respectively. Survival of seeds after imbibition-dehydration linearly increased with the increase in ability to recover the integrity of IMM and State 3 respiration, which indicates that recovery of mitochondrial structure and function during germination has an important role in seed desiccation tolerance.

  19. Effect of resveratrol on mitochondrial function: implications in parkin-associated familiar Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferretta, Anna; Gaballo, Antonio; Tanzarella, Paola; Piccoli, Claudia; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Nico, Beatrice; Annese, Tiziana; Di Paola, Marco; Dell'aquila, Claudia; De Mari, Michele; Ferranini, Ermanno; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Pacelli, Consiglia; Cocco, Tiziana

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the molecular mechanisms controlling these events are not completely understood. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator known as master regulator of mitochondrial functions and oxidative metabolism. Recent studies, including one from our group, have highlighted altered PGC-1α activity and transcriptional deregulation of its target genes in PD pathogenesis suggesting it as a new potential therapeutic target. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound proved to improve mitochondrial activity through the activation of several metabolic sensors resulting in PGC-1α activation. Here we have tested in vitro the effect of resveratrol treatment on primary fibroblast cultures from two patients with early-onset PD linked to different Park2 mutations. We show that resveratrol regulates energy homeostasis through activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and raise of mRNA expression of a number of PGC-1α's target genes resulting in enhanced mitochondrial oxidative function, likely related to a decrease of oxidative stress and to an increase of mitochondrial biogenesis. The functional impact of resveratrol treatment encompassed an increase of complex I and citrate synthase activities, basal oxygen consumption, and mitochondrial ATP production and a decrease in lactate content, thus supporting a switch from glycolytic to oxidative metabolism. Moreover, resveratrol treatment caused an enhanced macro-autophagic flux through activation of an LC3-independent pathway. Our results, obtained in early-onset PD fibroblasts, suggest that resveratrol may have potential clinical application in selected cases of PD-affected patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulated microgravity enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Nguyen, Kevin; Kumar, Shalini; Toshimasa, Ochiai; Hirose, Ryuji; Reue, Karen; Vergnes, Laurent; Kinchen, Jason; Vellis, Jean de

    2016-12-01

    The primary energy sources of mammalian cells are proteins, fats, and sugars that are processed by well-known biochemical mechanisms that have been discovered and studied in 1G (terrestrial gravity). Here we sought to determine how simulated microgravity (sim-µG) impacts both energy and lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelin-forming cells in the central nervous system. We report increased mitochondrial respiration and increased glycolysis 24 hr after exposure to sim-µG. Moreover, examination of the secretome after 3 days' exposure of OLs to sim-µG increased the Krebs cycle (Krebs and Weitzman, ) flux in sim-µG. The secretome study also revealed a significant increase in the synthesis of fatty acids and complex lipids such as 1,2-dipalmitoyl-GPC (5.67); lysolipids like 1-oleoyl-GPE (4.48) were also increased by microgravity. Although longer-chain lipids were not observed in this study, it is possible that at longer time points OLs would have continued moving forward toward the synthesis of lipids that constitute myelin. For centuries, basic developmental biology research has been the pillar of an array of discoveries that have led to clinical applications; we believe that studies using microgravity will open new avenues to our understanding of the brain in health and disease-in particular, to the discovery of new molecules and mechanisms impossible to unveil while in 1G. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Poyhonen, Minna; Tikka, Saara; Behbahani, Homira

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology.

  2. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report I: placental mitochondrial function, transport systems and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Bianco-Miotto, T; Blundell, C; Buckberry, S; Chamley, L; Chong, S; Cottrell, E; Dawson, P; Hanna, C; Holland, O; Lewis, R M; Moritz, K; Myatt, L; Perkins, A V; Powell, T; Saffery, R; Sferruzzi-Perri, A; Sibley, C; Simmons, D; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2016-12-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2015 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered areas of placental regulation and nutrient handling: 1) placental epigenetics; 2) placental mitochondrial function; 3) placental transport systems.

  3. Integrative functions of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system.

    PubMed

    Schorr, Stefan; van der Laan, Martin

    2017-09-28

    Mitochondria are complex double-membrane-bound organelles of eukaryotic cells that function as energy-converting powerhouses, metabolic factories and signaling centers. The outer membrane controls the exchange of material and information with other cellular compartments. The inner membrane provides an extended, highly folded surface for selective transport and energy-coupling reactions. It can be divided into an inner boundary membrane and tubular or lamellar cristae membranes that accommodate the oxidative phosphorylation units. Outer membrane, inner boundary membrane and cristae come together at crista junctions, where the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) acts as a membrane-shaping and -connecting scaffold. This peculiar architecture is of pivotal importance for multiple mitochondrial functions. Many elaborate studies in the past years have shed light on the subunit composition and organization of MICOS. In this review article, we summarize these insights and then move on to discuss exciting recent discoveries on the integrative functions of MICOS. Multi-faceted connections to other major players of mitochondrial biogenesis and physiology, like the protein import machineries, the oxidative phosphorylation system, carrier proteins and phospholipid biosynthesis enzymes, are currently emerging. Therefore, we propose that MICOS acts as a central hub in mitochondrial membrane architecture and functionality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neonatal diet composition modulates ileum mitochondrial function in a neonatal pig model Eugenia Carvalho1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The composition of postnatal diet (i.e., breastmilk vs. formula) has a strong influence on a variety of physiological outcomes in infants, but the impact on bioenergetics and mitochondrial function remains an open question. In a published study (1), early ingestion of dairy-based infant formula vs....

  5. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  6. Mitochondrial protein functions elucidated by multi-omic mass spectrometry profiling

    PubMed Central

    Freiberger, Elyse C.; Richards, Alicia L.; Jochem, Adam; Rush, Matthew J. P.; Ulbrich, Arne; Robinson, Kyle P.; Hutchins, Paul D.; Veling, Mike T.; Guo, Xiao; Kemmerer, Zachary A.; Connors, Kyle J.; Trujillo, Edna A.; Sokol, Jacob; Marx, Harald; Westphall, Michael S.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many human diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration, that are often linked to proteins and pathways that are not well-characterized. To begin defining the functions of such poorly characterized proteins, we used mass spectrometry to map the proteomes, lipidomes and metabolomes of 174 yeast strains, each lacking a single gene related to mitochondrial biology. 144 of these genes have human homologs, 60 of which are associated with disease and 39 of which are uncharacterized. We present a multi-omic data analysis and visualization tool that we use to find covariance networks that can predict molecular functions, correlations between profiles of related gene deletions, gene-specific perturbations that reflect protein functions, and a global respiration deficiency response. Using this multi-omic approach, we link seven proteins including Hfd1p and its human homolog ALDH3A1 to mitochondrial coenzyme Q (CoQ) biosynthesis, an essential pathway disrupted in many human diseases. This Resource should provide broad molecular insights into mitochondrial protein functions. PMID:27669165

  7. Identification and functional prediction of mitochondrial complex III and IV mutations associated with glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Rhiannon E.; Keatley, Kathleen; Littlewood, D. Timothy J.; Meunier, Brigitte; Holt, William V.; An, Qian; Higgins, Samantha C.; Polyzoidis, Stavros; Stephenson, Katie F.; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Fillmore, Helen L.; Pilkington, Geoffrey J.; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumor in adults, with a dismal prognosis. Treatment is hampered by GBM's unique biology, including differential cell response to therapy. Although several mitochondrial abnormalities have been identified, how mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contribute to GBM biology and therapeutic response remains poorly described. We sought to determine the spectrum of functional complex III and IV mtDNA mutations in GBM. Methods The complete mitochondrial genomes of 10 GBM cell lines were obtained using next-generation sequencing and combined with another set obtained from 32 GBM tissues. Three-dimensional structural mapping and analysis of all the nonsynonymous mutations identified in complex III and IV proteins was then performed to investigate functional importance. Results Over 200 mutations were identified in the mtDNAs, including a significant proportion with very low mutational loads. Twenty-five were nonsynonymous mutations in complex III and IV, 9 of which were predicted to be functional and affect mitochondrial respiratory chain activity. Most of the functional candidates were GBM specific and not found in the general population, and 2 were present in the germ-line. Patient-specific maps reveal that 43% of tumors carry at least one functional candidate. Conclusions We reveal that the spectrum of GBM-associated mtDNA mutations is wider than previously thought, as well as novel structural-functional links between specific mtDNA mutations, abnormal mitochondria, and the biology of GBM. These results could provide tangible new prognostic indicators as well as targets with which to guide the development of patient-specific mitochondrially mediated chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25731774

  8. A combination of nutriments improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weili; Hao, Jiejie; Tian, Chuan; Ren, Jinmin; Yang, Lu; Li, Xuesen; Luo, Cheng; Cotma, Carl W; Liu, Jiankang

    2008-06-04

    Recent evidence indicates that insulin resistance in skeletal muscle may be related to reduce mitochondrial number and oxidation capacity. However, it is not known whether increasing mitochondrial number and function improves insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a combination of nutrients on insulin resistance and mitochondrial biogenesis/function in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. We demonstrated that defect of glucose and lipid metabolism is associated with low mitochondrial content and reduced mitochondrial enzyme activity in skeletal muscle of the diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats. The treatment of combination of R-alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, nicotinamide, and biotin effectively improved glucose tolerance, decreased the basal insulin secretion and the level of circulating free fatty acid (FFA), and prevented the reduction of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. The nutrients treatment also significantly increased mRNA levels of genes involved in lipid metabolism, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (Ppar alpha), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (Ppar delta), and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (Mcpt-1) and activity of mitochondrial complex I and II in skeletal muscle. All of these effects of mitochondrial nutrients are comparable to that of the antidiabetic drug, pioglitazone. In addition, the treatment with nutrients, unlike pioglitazone, did not cause body weight gain. These data suggest that a combination of mitochondrial targeting nutrients may improve skeletal mitochondrial dysfunction and exert hypoglycemic effects, without causing weight gain.

  9. Diet influences the intake target and mitochondrial functions of Drosophila melanogaster males.

    PubMed

    Pichaud, Nicolas; Messmer, Marie; Correa, Carolina C; Ballard, J William O

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we examine the dietary protein to carbohydrate ratio (P:C) on the mitochondrial functions of two Drosophila melanogaster mtDNA haplotypes. We investigated multiple physiological parameters on flies fed with either 1:12 P:C or 1:3 P:C diets. Our results provide experimental evidence that a specific haplotype has a reduction of complex I activity when the flies are fed with the 1:12 P:C diet. This study is of particular importance to understand the influence of diet on mitochondrial evolution in invasive and broadly distributed species including humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Resveratrol alleviates diabetic cardiomyopathy in rats by improving mitochondrial function through PGC-1α deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wei-Jin; Wang, Chun-Jiang; He, Yang; Zhou, Yu-Lu; Peng, Xiang-Dong; Liu, Shi-Kun

    2017-08-03

    Recent evidence shows that resveratrol (RSV) may ameliorate high-glucose-induced cardiac oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial fibrosis in diabetes. However, the mechanisms by which RSV regu¬lates mitochondrial function in diabetic cardiomyopathy have not been fully elucidated. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cardiac dysfunction in diabetic patients, which is associated with dysregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). In this study we examined whether resveratrol alleviated cardiac dysfunction in diabetes by improving mitochondrial function via SIRT1-mediated PGC-1α deacetylation. T2DM was induced in rats by a high-fat diet combined with STZ injection. Diabetic rats were orally administered RSV (50 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 16 weeks. RSV administration significantly attenuated diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy evidenced by increasing ejection fraction (EF%), fraction shortening (FS%), ratio of early diastolic peak velocity (E velocity) and late diastolic peak velocity (A velocity) of the LV inflow (E/A ratio) and reducing expression levels of pro-hypertrophic markers ANP, BNP and β-MHC. Furthermore, manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, ATP content, mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial membrane potential and the expression of nuclear respiration factor (NRF) were all significantly increased in diabetic hearts by RSV administration, whereas the levels of malondialdehvde (MDA) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were significantly decreased. Moreover, RSV administration significantly activated SIRT1 expression and increased PGC-1α deacetylation. H9C2 cells cultured in a high glucose (HG, 30 mmol/L) condition were used for further analyzing the role of SIRT1/PGC-1α pathway in RSV regulation of mitochondrial function. RSV (20 μmol/L) caused similar beneficial effects in HG-treated H9C2 cells in vitro as in diabetic rats, but these protective effects were

  11. Disturbed mitochondrial function restricts glutamate uptake in the human Müller glia cell line, MIO-M1.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariyaraja Sridevi; Henriksen, Ulrik; Bergersen, Linda Hildegaard; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Desler, Claus; Skytt, Dorte Marie; Kolko, Miriam

    2017-09-01

    Using the human Müller cell line, MIO-M1, the aim was to study the impact of mitochondrial inhibition in Müller glia through antimycin A treatment. MIO-M1 cell survival, levels of released lactate, mitochondrial function, and glutamate uptake were studied in response to mitochondrial inhibition and glucose restriction. Lactate release decreased in response to glucose restriction. Combined glucose restriction and blocked mitochondrial activity decreased survival and caused collapse of the respiratory chain measured by oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate. Mitochondrial inhibition caused impaired glutamate uptake and decreased mRNA expression of the glutamate transporter, EAAT1. Over all, we show important roles of mitochondrial activity in MIO-M1 cell function and survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  12. The mitochondrial uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol improves mitochondrial function, attenuates oxidative damage, and increases white matter sparing in the contused spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ying; McEwen, Melanie L; Nottingham, Stephanie A; Maragos, William F; Dragicevic, Natasha B; Sullivan, Patrick G; Springer, Joe E

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective efficacy of the mitochondrial uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) in rats following a mild to moderate spinal cord contusion injury. Animals received intraperitoneal injections of vehicle (DMSO) or 5 mg/mL of DNP prior to injury. Twenty-four hours following surgery, mitochondrial function was assessed in mitochondria isolated from spinal cord synaptosomes. In addition, synaptosomes were used to measure indicators of reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. Relative to vehicle-treated animals, pretreatment with DNP maintained mitochondrial bioenergetics and significantly decreased reactive oxygen species levels, lipid peroxidation, and protein carbonyl content following spinal cord injury. Furthermore, pretreatment with DNP significantly increased the amount of remaining white matter at the injury epicenter 6 weeks after injury. These results indicate that treatment with mitochondrial uncoupling agents may provide a novel approach for the treatment of secondary injury following spinal cord contusion.

  13. Resveratrol preserves mitochondrial function, stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis, and attenuates oxidative stress in regulatory T cells of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Sun, Jin; Ma, Yuhua; Wu, Guirong; Tian, Yingjie; Shi, Yonghui; Le, Guowei

    2014-09-01

    Consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) is related with increased oxidative stress and dysfunctional mitochondria in many organs. The effects of resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) that can protect T lymphocytes in various disease conditions on the HFD-induced apoptosis of CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low/-) regulatory T cells (Tregs) were studied, and the possible mechanism was postulated. Resveratrol significantly decreased Tregs death induced by 20-wk HFD, being associated with the reduction of reactive oxygen species production and the alleviation of HFD-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in Tregs. Furthermore, resveratrol increased the expression of factors that regulated mitochondrial biogenesis in Tregs. Finally, resveratrol recovered the HFD-induced activation of apoptotic markers in Tregs. Resveratrol protected Tregs against HFD-induced apoptosis by reducing oxidative stress, restoring mitochondrial functional activities, and stimulating mitochondrial biogenesis. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. A high-throughput screen for mitochondrial function reveals known and novel mitochondrial toxicants in a library of environmental agents.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Sahdeo, Sunil; Gray, Jennifer A; Morriseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is emerging as a major mechanism underlying serious human health consequences. This work performs a high-throughput screen (HTS) of 176 environmental chemicals for mitochondrial toxicity utilizing a previously reported biosensor platform. This established HTS confirmed known mitochondrial toxins and identified novel mitotochondrial uncouplers such as 2, 2'-Methylenebis(4-chlorophenol) and pentachlorophenol. It also identified a mitochondrial 'structure activity relationship' (SAR) in the sense that multiple environmental chlorophenols are mitochondrial inhibitors and uncouplers. This study demonstrates proof-of-concept that a mitochondrial HTS assay detects known and novel environmental mitotoxicants, and could be used to quickly evaluate human health risks from mitotoxicants in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Postnatal Hyperoxia Exposure Durably Impairs Right Ventricular Function and Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goss, Kara N; Kumari, Santosh; Tetri, Laura H; Barton, Greg; Braun, Rudolf K; Hacker, Timothy A; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2017-05-01

    Prematurity complicates 12% of births, and young adults with a history of prematurity are at risk to develop right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy and impairment. The long-term risk for pulmonary vascular disease, as well as mechanisms of RV dysfunction and ventricular-vascular uncoupling after prematurity, remain poorly defined. Using an established model of prematurity-related lung disease, pups from timed-pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to normoxia or hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen, 0.85) exposure for the first 14 days of life. After aging to 1 year in standard conditions, rats underwent hemodynamic assessment followed by tissue harvest for biochemical and histological evaluation. Aged hyperoxia-exposed rats developed significantly greater RV hypertrophy, associated with a 40% increase in RV systolic pressures. Although cardiac index was similar, hyperoxia-exposed rats demonstrated a reduced RV ejection fraction and significant RV-pulmonary vascular uncoupling. Hyperoxia-exposed RV cardiomyocytes demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial dysregulation and mitochondrial DNA damage, suggesting potential mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of RV dysfunction. Aged rats exposed to postnatal hyperoxia recapitulate many features of young adults born prematurely, including increased RV hypertrophy and decreased RV ejection fraction. Our data suggest that postnatal hyperoxia exposure results in mitochondrial dysregulation that persists into adulthood with eventual RV dysfunction. Further evaluation of long-term mitochondrial function is warranted in both animal models of premature lung disease and in human adults who were born preterm.

  16. Mutant desmin substantially perturbs mitochondrial morphology, function and maintenance in skeletal muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lilli; Wittig, Ilka; Peeva, Viktoriya; Eggers, Britta; Heidler, Juliana; Chevessier, Frederic; Kley, Rudolf A; Barkovits, Katalin; Strecker, Valentina; Berwanger, Carolin; Herrmann, Harald; Marcus, Katrin; Kornblum, Cornelia; Kunz, Wolfram S; Schröder, Rolf; Clemen, Christoph S

    2016-09-01

    Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction is a feature in a wide variety of human protein aggregate diseases caused by mutations in different proteins, both in the central nervous system and in striated muscle. The functional relationship between the expression of a mutated protein and mitochondrial dysfunction is largely unknown. In particular, the mechanism how this dysfunction drives the disease process is still elusive. To address this issue for protein aggregate myopathies, we performed a comprehensive, multi-level analysis of mitochondrial pathology in skeletal muscles of human patients with mutations in the intermediate filament protein desmin and in muscles of hetero- and homozygous knock-in mice carrying the R349P desmin mutation. We demonstrate that the expression of mutant desmin causes disruption of the extrasarcomeric desmin cytoskeleton and extensive mitochondrial abnormalities regarding subcellular distribution, number and shape. At the molecular level, we uncovered changes in the abundancy and assembly of the respiratory chain complexes and supercomplexes. In addition, we revealed a marked reduction of mtDNA- and nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial proteins in parallel with large-scale deletions in mtDNA and reduced mtDNA copy numbers. Hence, our data demonstrate that the expression of mutant desmin causes multi-level damage of mitochondria already in early stages of desminopathies.

  17. Coordinated changes in mitochondrial function and biogenesis in healthy and diseased human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Anne; Fortin, Dominique; Zoll, Joffrey; N'Guessan, Benoit; Mettauer, Bertrand; Lampert, Eliane; Veksler, Vladimir; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2005-01-01

    We examined the transcriptional signaling cascade involved in the changes of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle and of the exercise capacity of humans in response to long-term physical activity and chronic heart failure (CHF). Biopsy samples of vastus lateralis muscle were obtained from 18 healthy subjects with different fitness levels (assessed by maximal oxygen uptake, VO2 peak). We compared 9 sedentary subjects with 10 CHF patients undergoing transplantation. Muscle oxidative capacity was measured in permeabilized fibers (Vmax). Transcript levels of target genes were quantified by RT-PCR. In healthy subjects, VO2 peak was linearly related to Vmax (P<0.01) and to the gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and of the coactivator PGC-1alpha and its downstream transcription factors. A coordinate increase in PGC-1alpha and mRNA levels of proteins involved in degradation, fusion, and fission of mitochondria was observed associated with calcineurin activation. Despite decreased VO2 peak, in CHF patients skeletal muscles showed preserved Vmax in accordance with preserved markers and transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics, with no calcineurin activation. The results provide strong support for a central role for PGC-1alpha and calcineurin activation in mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy and diseased human skeletal muscles.

  18. Impaired Autophagy and Defective Mitochondrial Function: Converging Paths on the Road to Motor Neuron Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Edens, Brittany M.; Miller, Nimrod; Ma, Yong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Selective motor neuron degeneration is a hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Around 10% of all cases present as familial ALS (FALS), while sporadic ALS (SALS) accounts for the remaining 90%. Diverse genetic mutations leading to FALS have been identified, but the underlying causes of SALS remain largely unknown. Despite the heterogeneous and incompletely understood etiology, different types of ALS exhibit overlapping pathology and common phenotypes, including protein aggregation and mitochondrial deficiencies. Here, we review the current understanding of mechanisms leading to motor neuron degeneration in ALS as they pertain to disrupted cellular clearance pathways, ATP biogenesis, calcium buffering and mitochondrial dynamics. Through focusing on impaired autophagic and mitochondrial functions, we highlight how the convergence of diverse cellular processes and pathways contributes to common pathology in motor neuron degeneration. PMID:26973461

  19. Does any yeast mitochondrial carrier have a native uncoupling protein function?

    PubMed

    Roussel, Damien; Harding, Marilyn; Runswick, Michael J; Walker, John E; Brand, Martin D

    2002-06-01

    In this study, we explore the hypothesis that some member of the mitochondrial carrier family has specific uncoupling activity that is responsible for the basal proton conductance of mitochondria. Twenty-seven of the 35 yeast mitochondrial carrier genes were independently disrupted in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Six knockout strains did not grow on nonfermentable carbon sources such as lactate. Mitochondria were isolated from the remaining 21 strains, and their proton conductances were measured. None of the 21 carriers contributed significantly to the basal proton leak of yeast mitochondria. A possible exception was the succinate/fumarate carrier encoded by the Xc2 gene, but deletion of this gene also affected yeast growth and respiratory chain activity, suggesting a more general alteration in mitochondrial function. If a specific protein is responsible for the basal proton conductance of yeast mitochondria, its identity remains unknown.

  20. Impact of dispersed fuel oil on cardiac mitochondrial function in polar cod Boreogadus saida.

    PubMed

    Dussauze, Matthieu; Camus, Lionel; Le Floch, Stéphane; Pichavant-Rafini, Karine; Geraudie, Perrine; Coquillé, Nathalie; Amérand, Aline; Lemaire, Philippe; Theron, Michael

    2014-12-01

    In this study, impact of dispersed oil on cardiac mitochondrial function was assessed in a key species of Arctic marine ecosystem, the polar cod Boreogadus saida. Mature polar cod were exposed during 48 h to dispersed oil (mechanically and chemically) and dispersants alone. The increase observed in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites in bile indicated no difference in contamination level between fish exposed to chemical or mechanical dispersion of oil. Oil induced alterations of O2 consumption of permeabilised cardiac fibres showing inhibitions of complexes I and IV of the respiratory chain. Oil did not induce any modification of mitochondrial proton leak. Dispersants did not induce alteration of mitochondrial activity and did not increase oil toxicity. These data suggest that oil exposure may limit the fitness of polar cod and consequently could lead to major disruption in the energy flow of polar ecosystem.

  1. Tetracyclines disturb mitochondrial function across eukaryotic models: a call for caution in biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Moullan, Norman; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Wang, Xu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Williams, Evan G.; Mottis, Adrienne; Jovaisaite, Virginija; Frochaux, Michael V.; Quiros, Pedro M.; Deplancke, Bart; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Summary In recent years, tetracyclines, such as doxycycline, have become broadly used to control gene expression by virtue of the Tet-On/Tet-Off systems. The wide range of direct effects of tetracycline use has, however, not been fully appreciated. We show here that these antibiotics induce a mitonuclear protein imbalance through their effects on mitochondrial translation, an effect that likely reflects the evolutionary relationship between mitochondria and proteobacteria. Tetracyclines, Even at low concentrations, tetracyclines induce mitochondrial proteotoxic stress, leading to changes in nuclear gene expression and altered mitochondrial dynamics and function in commonly used cell types, as well as worms, flies, mice, and plants. Since tetracyclines are so widely applied in research, scientists should be aware of their potentially confounding effects on experimental results. Furthermore, these results caution against extensive use of tetracyclines in livestock due to potential downstream impacts on the environment and human health. PMID:25772356

  2. Evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in broilers with pulmonary hypertension syndrome (Ascites): effect of t-butyl hydroperoxide on hepatic mitochondrial function, glutathione, and related thiols.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, D; McNew, R; Beers, K W; Bottje, W G

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function and glutathione (a mitochondrial antioxidant) in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria in vitro obtained from broilers with and without pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS). Liver mitochondria from Control and PHS broilers were incubated with 0, 1, and 5-mM tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH). Indices of mitochondrial function [the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and the adenosine diphosphate to oxygen ratio (ADP:O)], and levels of mitochondrial and extra-mitochondrial reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, cysteine, cystine, glutamate and cysteinyl-glycine were determined following tBH treatment. Lower RCR and ADP:O values were observed in PHS mitochondria than in controls. Whereas control mitochondria remained coupled (RCR > 2.0), only 3 PHS preparations remained coupled after 60 min of incubation with 5 mM tBH, indicating a greater susceptibility to oxidative stress in PHS mitochondria. The lower RCR in PHS mitochondria was due to increased oxygen consumption during State IV respiration. Oxidative stress following tBH treatment (decreased GSH and increased GSSG) was observed, but there were no differences in GSH or GSSG between control and PHS mitochondria. The PHS mitochondria did exhibit elevated mitochondrial and extramitochondrial cystine than controls, however. The results indicate that PHS mitochondria do not lack antioxidant protection from GSH, but lower RCR and ADP:O ratios in PHS mitochondria indicate a dysfunction that may contribute to the pathophysiology of this metabolic disease in broilers.

  3. Silencing the KCNK9 potassium channel (TASK-3) gene disturbs mitochondrial function, causes mitochondrial depolarization, and induces apoptosis of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Dénes; Gönczi, Mónika; Dienes, Beatrix; Szöőr, Árpád; Fodor, János; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Tóth, Adrienn; Fodor, Tamás; Bai, Péter; Szücs, Géza; Rusznák, Zoltán; Csernoch, László

    2014-12-01

    TASK-3 (KCNK9 or K2P9.1) channels are thought to promote proliferation and/or survival of malignantly transformed cells, most likely by increasing their hypoxia tolerance. Based on our previous results that suggested mitochondrial expression of TASK-3 channels, we hypothesized that TASK-3 channels have roles in maintaining mitochondrial activity. In the present work we studied the effect of reduced TASK-3 expression on the mitochondrial function and survival of WM35 and A2058 melanoma cells. TASK-3 knockdown cells had depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential and contained a reduced amount of mitochondrial DNA. Compared to their scrambled shRNA-transfected counterparts, they demonstrated diminished responsiveness to the application of the mitochondrial uncoupler [(3-chlorophenyl)hydrazono]malononitrile (CCCP). These observations indicate impaired mitochondrial function. Further, TASK-3 knockdown cells presented reduced viability, decreased total DNA content, altered cell morphology, and reduced surface area. In contrast to non- and scrambled shRNA-transfected melanoma cell lines, which did not present noteworthy apoptotic activity, almost 50 % of the TASK-3 knockdown cells exhibited strong Annexin-V-specific immunofluorescence signal. Sequestration of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, increased caspase 3 activity, and translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria to cell nuclei were also demonstrated in TASK-3 knockdown cells. Interference with TASK-3 channel expression, therefore, induces caspase-dependent and -independent apoptosis of melanoma cells, most likely via causing mitochondrial depolarization. Consequently, TASK-3 channels may be legitimate targets of future melanoma therapies.

  4. Distinct Functional Roles of Cardiac Mitochondrial Subpopulations Revealed by a 3D Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial