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Sample records for prospective audit comparing

  1. A prospective study of the practical issues of local involvement in national audit of COPD.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Lowe, D; Barnes, S; Pearson, M G

    2004-05-01

    Variation in quality of local services is of great concern to the government and public. National audit is an important means of providing data of comparative performance but is hampered at local level by poor methodology including audit design, standard setting and data collection tools. A pilot audit of the hospital care of patients admitted with acute chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was performed in preparation for a national audit programme and was designed and supported by experts. It was hoped to overcome these barriers. We report a prospective evaluation of the practical issues involved in local participation of hospital audit of COPD care within a national framework. Hospitals were recruited to the study by random selection and voluntary participation. A clinical audit study was completed over an 8-week period immediately followed by a survey of clinicians and audit staff to identify positive and negative issues of participation and the process required to achieve a successful outcome. Forty-one hospitals were invited to participate, 26 (63%) accepted, and four others volunteered to meet the target of 30 enrolled centres. Reasons cited for non-participation were of inadequate resources amongst either clinicians or audit departments or prior engagement in other national or local audit schemes. Following completion of the audit most (81%) participating units reported it was a useful exercise and were willing to be involved in future audits. Negative aspects of involvement included the lack of dedicated time and manpower for audit, poor information technology and inadequate systems for identifying patient diagnoses either at admission or at discharge and incomplete case note entries. Methodological issues such as study design and data collection tools were not cited as important barriers to participation. There is local willingness to be involved in national audit of hospital care of COPD and central provision of expert design of methods and tools

  2. A multicenter prospective study of surgical audit systems.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yoshio; Ikejiri, Koji; Wada, Yasuo; Takahashi, Tadateru; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Akiyama, Noriyoshi; Koike, Shoichiro; Koseki, Masato; Saitoh, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a modified form of Estimation of Physiologic Ability and Surgical Stress (E-PASS) for surgical audit comparing with other existing models. Although several scoring systems have been devised for surgical audit, no nation-wide survey has been performed yet. We modified our previous E-PASS surgical audit system by computing the weights of 41 procedures, using data from 4925 patients who underwent elective digestive surgery, designated it as mE-PASS. Subsequently, a prospective cohort study was conducted in 43 national hospitals in Japan from April 1, 2005, to April 8, 2007. Variables for the E-PASS and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) status-based model were collected for 5272 surgically treated patients. Of the 5272 patients, we also collected data for the Portsmouth modification of Physiologic and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and morbidity (P-POSSUM) in 3128 patients. The area under the receiver operative characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate discrimination performance to detect in-hospital mortality. The ratio of observed to estimated in-hospital mortality rates (OE ratio) was defined as a measure of quality. The numbers of variables required were 10 for E-PASS, 7 for mE-PASS, 20 for P-POSSUM, and 4 for the ASA status-based model. The AUC (95% confidence interval) values were 0.86 (0.79-0.93) for E-PASS, 0.86 (0.79-0.92) for mE-PASS, 0.81 (0.75-0.88) for P-POSSUM, and 0.73 (0.63-0.83) for the ASA status-based model. The OE ratios for mE-PASS among large-volume hospitals significantly correlated with those for E-PASS (R = 0.93, N = 9, P = 0.00026), P-POSSUM (R = 0.96, N = 6, P = 0.0021), and ASA status-based model (R = 0.83, N = 9, P = 0.0051). Because of its features of easy use, accuracy, and generalizability, mE-PASS is a candidate for a nation-wide survey.

  3. Forensic Accounting and Auditing: Compared and Contrasted to Traditional Accounting and Auditing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Dahli

    2008-01-01

    Forensic versus traditional accounting and auditing are compared and contrasted. Evidence gathering is detailed. Forensic science and fraud symptoms are explained. Criminalists, expert testimony and corporate governance are presented.

  4. Long-term outcome of patients with acute non-specific abdominal pain compared to acute appendicitis: prospective symptom audit after two decades.

    PubMed

    Fagerström, A; Miettinen, P; Valtola, J; Juvonen, P; Tarvainen, R; Ilves, I; Paajanen, H

    2014-01-01

    Non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP) and acute appendicitis (AA) are the two most frequent diagnoses of acute abdomen in the emergency wards. The long-term morbidity, mortality and quality of life of the patients with NSAP compared to AA are unknown. The study group consisted of 186 patients with acute NSAP compared to 147 patients with AA initially treated during 1985-1986. Medical history, social background, quality of life and abdominal symptoms were assessed with standardized questionnaires in both groups during 2006-2009. The patients who continued to have abdominal symptoms were invited to a check-up visit. During 1985-6, the NSAP group had more previous abdominal symptoms and operations than the AA group. Some 29% of patients with NSAP and 11% of patients with AA had still abdominal symptoms at long-term check-up (p < 0.0001). Chronic abdominal pain (38 vs 17) and peptic ulcer disease (18 vs 2) occurred more often in the NSAP group than in the controls, respectively (p = 0.001). After five years of follow-up, 11 patients in the NSAP group and 6 patients in the AA group had died (ns). During the twenty years of follow-up, mortality was higher (46/22, 25/15%) in the patients with NSAP than in controls (p = 0.013). Ischaemic heart disease was the leading cause of death in both groups (18 NSAP vs 5 AA, p = 0.017). The quality of life scores were comparable in both study groups. Over 70% of NSAP- and almost 90% of AA-patients were free of symptoms after 20 years of follow-up. Mortality was higher and various alimentary track diseases were more frequent in patients with NSAP than in AA.

  5. A prospective audit of regional anaesthesia for hand surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A prospective audit has been carried out of 153 consecutive regional anaesthetics for hand surgery, using intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA), axillary block or multiple peripheral nerve blocks in the upper limb. Surgery was carried out successfully in 147 patients. Apart from two patients, who complained of paraesthesia after regional nerve blocks, there were no side-effects. A total of 13 patients said that they would have preferred a general anaesthetic. Regional anaesthesia was found to be suitable for use by members of the surgical staff, but success was only assured by meticulous attention to detail and by careful safety precautions. Regional anaesthesia should not be attempted by inexperienced, unsupervised hand surgeons. PMID:1567149

  6. Readmissions after general surgery: a prospective multicenter audit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew J; Daniels, Sarah L; Wild, Jonathan R L; Wilson, Timothy R

    2017-03-01

    Readmission rates after surgical procedures are viewed as a marker of quality of care and as a driver to improve outcomes in the United Kingdom, they are not remunerated. However, readmissions are not wholly avoidable. The aim of this study was to develop a regional overview of readmissions to determine the proportion that might be avoidable and to examine predictors of readmissions at a unit level. We undertook a prospective multicenter audit of readmissions following National Health Service funded general surgical procedures in five National Health Service hospitals and three independent sector providers over a 2-wk period. Basic demographic and procedure data were captured. Readmissions to hospitals were identified through acute admissions lists. Reason for readmission was identified, and the readmission data assessed by a senior surgical doctor as to whether it was avoidable. We identified 752 operations in the study period with all followed up to 30 d. The overall rate of readmissions was 4.7%, with 40% of these judged as being potentially avoidable. Pain and wound problems accounted for the vast majority of avoidable readmissions. The number of unavoidable readmissions was correlated with the workload of each center (r = 0.63, P = 0.06) and as with the higher (British United Provident Association) complexity of surgery (r = 0.90, P = 0.01). Patient and demographic factors were not associated with readmissions. This prospective audit describes readmission rates after general surgery. Volume and complexity of work are associated with readmission rates. A large proportion of readmissions could be reduced by attention to analgesia and outpatient arrangements for wound management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patientsmate©: the implementation and evaluation of an online prospective audit system.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Loh, Kah Poh; Corrigan, Mark Anthony; Sheikh, Athar; Lehane, Elaine; Hill, Arnold David Konrad

    2012-04-01

    Inaccuracy in Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE)/Casemix-based data has been reported as high as 26%. This results in financial waste and makes effective audit impossible. We aimed to develop a novel web-based outcome audit system. A web-based online audit system, Patientsmate©, was developed using an integrated database system written in the programme language PHP. Data were inputted by the surgical team responsible for the patients care. A prospective comparison study of the new Patientsmate© and the standard HIPE systems, was performed over a 1-month period and involving two general surgical teams in April 2010. In addition, a Likert-scale based questionnaire was designed and hosted within the Patientsmate© system. A focus group of those clinicians directly involved in data accessing and input were then invited to complete the questionnaire in order to assess usability of the system. During the study period there were a total of 108 patients and 88 procedures. Our study confirms the accuracy of clinician derived data, with the Patientsmate© system more accurately recording number of patients (83% vs. 80.6%), number of procedures (85.2% vs. 68.1%) and hospital day case rate (52% vs. 47.1%). Inputting data using Patientsmate© for a single patient took 6-7 minutes. Of those using the system, 75% reported feeling comfortable after using it once only and 100% were satisfied with the layout of the online interface. The Patientsmate© system allows for increased accuracy in outcome-based data as compared with the HIPE system, facilitating audit, financial savings and the appropriate allocation of services. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Nationwide prospective audit of pancreatic surgery: design, accuracy, and outcomes of the Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit.

    PubMed

    van Rijssen, L Bengt; Koerkamp, Bas G; Zwart, Maurice J; Bonsing, Bert A; Bosscha, Koop; van Dam, Ronald M; van Eijck, Casper H; Gerhards, Michael F; van der Harst, Erwin; de Hingh, Ignace H; de Jong, Koert P; Kazemier, Geert; Klaase, Joost; van Laarhoven, Cornelis J; Molenaar, I Quintus; Patijn, Gijs A; Rupert, Coen G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Scheepers, Joris J; van der Schelling, George P; Busch, Olivier R; Besselink, Marc G

    2017-07-25

    Auditing is an important tool to identify practice variation and 'best practices'. The Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit is mandatory in all 18 Dutch centers for pancreatic surgery. Performance indicators and case-mix factors were identified by a PubMed search for randomized controlled trials (RCT's) and large series in pancreatic surgery. In addition, data dictionaries of two national audits, three institutional databases, and the Dutch national cancer registry were evaluated. Morbidity, mortality, and length of stay were analyzed of all pancreatic resections registered during the first two audit years. Case ascertainment was cross-checked with the Dutch healthcare inspectorate and key-variables validated in all centers. Sixteen RCT's and three large series were found. Sixteen indicators and 20 case-mix factors were included in the audit. During 2014-2015, 1785 pancreatic resections were registered including 1345 pancreatoduodenectomies. Overall in-hospital mortality was 3.6%. Following pancreatoduodenectomy, mortality was 4.1%, Clavien-Dindo grade ≥ III morbidity was 29.9%, median (IQR) length of stay 12 (9-18) days, and readmission rate 16.0%. In total 97.2% of >40,000 variables validated were consistent with the medical charts. The Dutch Pancreatic Cancer Audit, with high quality data, reports good outcomes of pancreatic surgery on a national level. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Prospective Multi-Center Audit of Nutrition Support Parameters Following Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Kurmis, Rochelle; Heath, Kathryn; Ooi, Selena; Munn, Zachary; Forbes, Sharon; Young, Vicki; Rigby, Paul; Wood, Kate; Phillips, Frances; Greenwood, John

    2015-01-01

    The importance of nutrition support delivery to the severe burn-injured patient is well recognized, however, nutrition provision to the patient may be sub optimal in practice. The aim of this study was to conduct a prospective multi-center audit across Australia and New Zealand using the Joanna Briggs Institute Burns Node Nutrition audit criteria. Thirty-four patients with severe burn injury (≥20% TBSA in adults and ≥10% TBSA in children) were identified on admission or on referral to the Dietitian at the eight participating Burn Units between February 1, 2012 and April 30, 2012 for inclusion in the study. De-identified patient data was analyzed using the Joanna Briggs Institute, Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System. Compliance with individual audit criterion ranged from 33 to 100%. Provision of prescribed enteral feed volumes and weekly weighing of patients were highlighted as key areas for clinical improvement. Clinical audit is a valuable tool for evaluating current practice against best evidence to ensure that quality patient care is delivered. The use of the Joanna Briggs Institute Burns Node audit criteria has allowed for a standardized multi-center audit to be conducted. Improving nutrition support delivery in burn patients was identified as a key area requiring ongoing clinical improvement across Australia and New Zealand. Clinician feedback on use of the audit criteria will allow for future refinement of individual criterion, and presentation of results of this audit has resulted in a review of the Bi-National Burns Registry nutrition quality indicators.

  10. Antimicrobial stewardship: a review of prospective audit and feedback systems and an objective evaluation of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Gladys W; Wu, Jia En; Yeo, Chay Leng; Chan, Douglas; Hsu, Li Yang

    2013-02-15

    Antimicrobial stewardship is an emerging field currently defined by a series of strategies and interventions aimed toward improving appropriate prescription of antibiotics in humans in all healthcare settings. The ultimate goal is the preservation of current and future antibiotics against the threat of antimicrobial resistance, although improving patient safety and reducing healthcare costs are important concurrent aims. Prospective audit and feedback interventions are probably the most widely practiced of all antimicrobial stewardship strategies. Although labor-intensive, they are more easily accepted by physicians compared with formulary restriction and preauthorization strategies and have a higher potential for educational opportunities. Objective evaluation of antimicrobial stewardship is critical for determining the success of such programs. Nonetheless, there is controversy over which outcomes to measure and there is a pressing need for novel study designs that can objectively assess antimicrobial stewardship interventions despite the limitations inherent in the structure of most such programs.

  11. Study protocol: first nationwide comparative audit of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Kathryn; Guy, Richard; Uberoi, Raman; Seeney, Frances; Collins, Gary; Grant-Casey, John; Mortensen, Neil; Murphy, Mike; Jairath, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common indication for emergency hospitalisation worldwide. In contrast to upper GIB, patient characteristics, modes of investigation, transfusion, treatment and outcomes are poorly described. There are minimal clinical guidelines to inform care pathways and the use of endoscopy, including (diagnostic and therapeutic yields), interventional radiology and surgery are poorly defined. As a result, there is potential for wide variation in practice and clinical outcomes. Methods and analysis The UK Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding Audit is a large nationwide audit of adult patients acutely admitted with LGIB or those who develop LGIB while hospitalised for another reason. Consecutive, unselected presentations with LGIB will be enrolled prospectively over a 2-month period at the end of 2015 and detailed data will be collected on patient characteristics, comorbidities, use of anticoagulants, transfusion, timing and modalities of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, clinical outcome, length of stay and mortality. These will be audited against predefined minimum standards of care for LGIB. It is anticipated that over 80% of all acute hospitals in England and some hospitals in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will participate. Data will be collected on the availability and organisation of care, provision of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy, interventional radiology, surgery and transfusion protocols. Ethics and dissemination This audit will be conducted as part of the national comparative audit programme of blood transfusion through collaboration with specialists in gastroenterology, surgery and interventional radiology. Individual reports will be provided to each participant site as well as an overall report and disseminated through specialist societies. Results will also be published in peer-reviewed journals. The study has been funded by National Health Services (NHS) Blood and Transplant and the

  12. Childhood obesity in secondary care: national prospective audit of Australian pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michele; Bryson, Hannah E; Price, Anna M H; Wake, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    In many countries, pediatricians offer skilled secondary care for children with conditions more challenging than can readily be managed in the primary care sector, but the extent to which this sector engages with the detection and management of obesity remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to audit the prevalence, diagnosis, patient, and consultation characteristics of obesity in Australian pediatric practices. This was a national prospective patient audit in Australia. During the course of 2 weeks, members of the Australian Paediatric Research Network prospectively recorded consecutive outpatient consultations by using a brief standardized data collection form. Measures included height, weight, demographics, child and parent health ratings, diagnoses, referrals, investigations, and consultation characteristics. We compared the prevalence of pediatrician-diagnosed and measured obesity (body mass index ≥95th percentile) and top-ranked diagnoses, patient, and consultation characteristics in (a) obese and nonobese children, and (b) obese children with and without a diagnosis. A total of 198 pediatricians recorded 5466 consultations with 2-17 year olds, with body mass index z-scores calculated for 3436 (62.9%). Of the 12.6% obese children, only one-third received an "overweight/obese" diagnosis. Obese children diagnosed as overweight/obese were heavier, older, and in poorer health than those not diagnosed and incurred more Medicare (government-funded health system) cost and referrals. Obesity is infrequently clinically diagnosed by Australian pediatricians and measurement practices vary widely. Further research could focus on supporting and normalizing clinical obesity activities from which pediatricians and parents could see clear benefits. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Auditing orthopaedic audit.

    PubMed

    Guryel, E; Acton, K; Patel, S

    2008-11-01

    Clinical audit plays an important role in the drive to improve the quality of patient care and thus forms a cornerstone of clinical governance. Assurance that the quality of patient care has improved requires completion of the audit cycle. A considerable sum of money and time has been spent establishing audit activity in the UK. Failure to close the loop undermines the effectiveness of the audit process and wastes resources. We analysed the effectiveness of audit in trauma and orthopaedics at a local hospital by comparing audit projects completed over a 6-year period to criteria set out in the NHS National Audit and Governance report. Of the 25 audits performed since 1999, half were presented to the relevant parties and only 20% completed the audit cycle. Only two of these were audits against national standards and 28% were not based on any standards at all. Only a third of the audits led by junior doctors resulted in implementation of their action plan compared to 75% implementation for consultant-led and 67% for nurse-led audits. A remarkably large proportion of audits included in this analysis failed to meet accepted criteria for effective audit. Audits completed by junior doctors were found to be the least likely to complete the cycle. This may relate to the lack of continuity in modern medical training and little incentive to complete the cycle. Supervision by permanent medical staff, principally consultants, and involvement of the audit department may play the biggest role in improving implementation of change.

  14. Prospective memory: A comparative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Wilson, A. George

    2014-01-01

    Prospective memory consists of forming a representation of a future action, temporarily storing that representation in memory, and retrieving it at a future time point. Here we review the recent development of animal models of prospective memory. We review experiments using rats that focus on the development of time-based and event-based prospective memory. Next, we review a number of prospective-memory approaches that have been used with a variety of non-human primates. Finally, we review selected approaches from the human literature on prospective memory to identify targets for development of animal models of prospective memory. PMID:25101562

  15. Automated Comparative Auditing of NCIT Genomic Roles Using NCBI

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Barry; Oren, Marc; Min, Hua; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical research has identified many human genes and various knowledge about them. The National Cancer Institute Thesaurus (NCIT) represents such knowledge as concepts and roles (relationships). Due to the rapid advances in this field, it is to be expected that the NCIT’s Gene hierarchy will contain role errors. A comparative methodology to audit the Gene hierarchy with the use of the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s (NCBI’s) Entrez Gene database is presented. The two knowledge sources are accessed via a pair of Web crawlers to ensure up-to-date data. Our algorithms then compare the knowledge gathered from each, identify discrepancies that represent probable errors, and suggest corrective actions. The primary focus is on two kinds of gene-roles: (1) the chromosomal locations of genes, and (2) the biological processes in which genes plays a role. Regarding chromosomal locations, the discrepancies revealed are striking and systematic, suggesting a structurally common origin. In regard to the biological processes, difficulties arise because genes frequently play roles in multiple processes, and processes may have many designations (such as synonymous terms). Our algorithms make use of the roles defined in the NCIT Biological Process hierarchy to uncover many probable gene-role errors in the NCIT. These results show that automated comparative auditing is a promising technique that can identify a large number of probable errors and corrections for them in a terminological genomic knowledge repository, thus facilitating its overall maintenance. PMID:18486558

  16. Automated comparative auditing of NCIT genomic roles using NCBI.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Barry; Oren, Marc; Min, Hua; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Biomedical research has identified many human genes and various knowledge about them. The National Cancer Institute Thesaurus (NCIT) represents such knowledge as concepts and roles (relationships). Due to the rapid advances in this field, it is to be expected that the NCIT's Gene hierarchy will contain role errors. A comparative methodology to audit the Gene hierarchy with the use of the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI's) Entrez Gene database is presented. The two knowledge sources are accessed via a pair of Web crawlers to ensure up-to-date data. Our algorithms then compare the knowledge gathered from each, identify discrepancies that represent probable errors, and suggest corrective actions. The primary focus is on two kinds of gene-roles: (1) the chromosomal locations of genes, and (2) the biological processes in which genes play a role. Regarding chromosomal locations, the discrepancies revealed are striking and systematic, suggesting a structurally common origin. In regard to the biological processes, difficulties arise because genes frequently play roles in multiple processes, and processes may have many designations (such as synonymous terms). Our algorithms make use of the roles defined in the NCIT Biological Process hierarchy to uncover many probable gene-role errors in the NCIT. These results show that automated comparative auditing is a promising technique that can identify a large number of probable errors and corrections for them in a terminological genomic knowledge repository, thus facilitating its overall maintenance.

  17. Critical incident reporting in anaesthesia: a prospective internal audit.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sunanda; Naithani, Udita; Brajesh, Saroj Kumar; Pathania, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Apoorva

    2009-08-01

    Critical incident monitoring is useful in detecting new problems, identifying 'near misses' and analyzing factors or events leading to mishaps, which can be instructive for trainees. This study was aimed at investigating potential risk factors and analyze events leading to peri-operative critical incidents in order to develop a critical incident reporting system. We conducted a one year prospective analysis of voluntarily reported 24- hour-perioperative critical incidents, occurring in patients subjected to anaesthesia. During a one year period from December 2006 to December 2007, 14,134 anaesthetics were administered and 112(0.79%) critical incidents were reported with complete recovery in 71.42%(n=80) and mortality in 28.57% (n=32) cases. Incidents occurred maximally in 0-10 years age (23.21%), ASA 1(61.61%), in general surgery patients (43.75%), undergoing emergency surgery (52.46%) and during day time (75.89%). Incidence was more in the operating theatre (77.68%), during maintenance (32.04%) and post-operative phase (25.89%) and in patients who received general anaesthesia (75.89%). Critical incidents occurred clue to factors related to anaesthesia (42.85%), patient (37.50%) and surgery (16.96%). Among anaesthesia related critical incidents (42.85% n=48/112), respiratory events were maximum (66.66%) mainly at induction (37.5%) and emergence (43.75%), and factors responsible were human error (85.41%), pharmacological factors (10.41%) and equipment error (4.17%). Incidence of mortality was 22.6 per 10, 000 anaesthetics (32/14,314), mostly attributable to risk factors in patient (59.38%) as compared to anaesthesia (25%) and surgery (9.38%). There were 8 anaesthesia related deaths (5.6 per 10, 000 anaesthetics) where human error (75%) attributed to lack of judgment (67.50%) was an important causative factor. We conclude that critical incident reporting system may be a valuable part of quality assurance to develop policies to prevent recurrence and enhance patient

  18. Patient's experiences and satisfaction with preanesthesia services: A prospective audit.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anju; Gupta, Nishkarsh

    2011-10-01

    Patient satisfaction with the medical services is an important indicator of quality of healthcare but is seldom given importance in our country. It is difficult to measure patient satisfaction, especially in pre- and perioperative period. We conducted this audit by means of a questionnaire designed to assess preanesthetic clinic services in a large government hospital. A total of 200 patients were randomly selected to respond to a multiple item questionnaire. A database was created and analyzed using Microsoft Excel. 95% patients filled the proforma. Most of the patients (60%) were not aware of the purpose of visit to preanesthetic clinic. Majority of them were attended in time by the doctors but most of them (60%) received fitness after 2 to 3 visits. Majority was not explained about the preanesthesia instructions. Most of them were not satisfied by amenities in hospital. Several studies have shown that a thorough preoperative examination can be as effective as an anxiolytic premedication and can increase quality of care. In our study, location of preanesthetic clinic and unable to get fitness in first visit (because of lack of coordination between doctors of various specialties) were the major hindrances. Measures should be taken to improve the functioning of preanesthesia clinic and patient satisfaction.

  19. Comparing short versions of the AUDIT in a community-based survey of young people.

    PubMed

    Bowring, Anna L; Gouillou, Maelenn; Hellard, Margaret; Dietze, Paul

    2013-04-04

    The 10-item Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-10) is commonly used to monitor harmful alcohol consumption among high-risk groups, including young people. However, time and space constraints have generated interest for shortened versions. Commonly used variations are the AUDIT-C (three questions) and the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) (four questions), but their utility in screening young people in non-clinical settings has received little attention. We examined the performance of established and novel shortened versions of the AUDIT in relation to the full AUDIT-10 in a community-based survey of young people (16-29 years) attending a music festival in Melbourne, Australia (January 2010).Among those reporting drinking alcohol in the previous 12 months, the following statistics were systematically assessed for all possible combinations of three or four AUDIT items and established AUDIT variations: Cronbach's alpha (internal consistency), variance explained (R2) and Pearson's correlation coefficient (concurrent validity). For our purposes, novel shortened AUDIT versions considered were required to represent all three AUDIT domains and include item 9 on alcohol-related injury. We recruited 640 participants (68% female) reporting drinking in the previous 12 months. Median AUDIT-10 score was 10 in males and 9 in females, and 127 (20%) were classified as having at least high-level alcohol problems according to WHO classification.The FAST scored consistently high across statistical measures; it explained 85.6% of variance in AUDIT-10, correlation with AUDIT-10 was 0.92, and Cronbach's alpha was 0.66. A number of novel four-item AUDIT variations scored similarly high. Comparatively, the AUDIT-C scored substantially lower on all measures except internal consistency. Numerous abbreviated variations of the AUDIT may be a suitable alternative to the AUDIT-10 for classifying high-level alcohol problems in a community-based population of young Australians. Four

  20. Comparing short versions of the AUDIT in a community-based survey of young people

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The 10-item Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-10) is commonly used to monitor harmful alcohol consumption among high-risk groups, including young people. However, time and space constraints have generated interest for shortened versions. Commonly used variations are the AUDIT-C (three questions) and the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) (four questions), but their utility in screening young people in non-clinical settings has received little attention. Methods We examined the performance of established and novel shortened versions of the AUDIT in relation to the full AUDIT-10 in a community-based survey of young people (16–29 years) attending a music festival in Melbourne, Australia (January 2010). Among those reporting drinking alcohol in the previous 12 months, the following statistics were systematically assessed for all possible combinations of three or four AUDIT items and established AUDIT variations: Cronbach’s alpha (internal consistency), variance explained (R2) and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (concurrent validity). For our purposes, novel shortened AUDIT versions considered were required to represent all three AUDIT domains and include item 9 on alcohol-related injury. Results We recruited 640 participants (68% female) reporting drinking in the previous 12 months. Median AUDIT-10 score was 10 in males and 9 in females, and 127 (20%) were classified as having at least high-level alcohol problems according to WHO classification. The FAST scored consistently high across statistical measures; it explained 85.6% of variance in AUDIT-10, correlation with AUDIT-10 was 0.92, and Cronbach’s alpha was 0.66. A number of novel four-item AUDIT variations scored similarly high. Comparatively, the AUDIT-C scored substantially lower on all measures except internal consistency. Conclusions Numerous abbreviated variations of the AUDIT may be a suitable alternative to the AUDIT-10 for classifying high-level alcohol problems in a

  1. Analgesics administered during minor painful procedures in a cohort of hospitalized infants: a prospective clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Denise; Loughnan, Peter; Manias, Elizabeth; Johnston, Linda

    2009-07-01

    A number of evidence-based consensus statements relating to pain in infants include recommendations concerning effective pain management during painful procedures. Yet numerous studies have shown that procedural pain remains poorly managed in neonatal intensive care units. The aim of this prospective clinical audit was to ascertain analgesics administered during skin-breaking, minor painful procedures occurring over the entire course of a hospitalization in a cohort of infants with a length of stay of 28 days or more. Data were collected on aspects relating to utilization of oral sucrose specifically for minor painful procedures as well as administration of opioid analgesics or other strong analgesics on the day the procedures were performed. A total of 3605 minor painful procedures were recorded for 55 infants during the study period, a mean of 65 minor procedures per infant. The majority of procedures recorded were heel lance (71%), followed by intravenous catheter insertion or venepuncture (14%). Either oral sucrose was specifically administered or background opioid analgesics were being administered during 85% of all minor painful procedures. These results show considerably higher frequency of analgesic use during acute minor painful procedures compared with similar studies of pain management practices in neonatal intensive care units. This study ascertained analgesics administered to sick infants during minor painful procedures during a prolonged hospitalization. Oral sucrose or morphine was administered during the most painful procedures, whereas 15% of procedures were performed with no analgesics. This illustrates a vast improvement compared with similar studies.

  2. Surgical audit: A prospective study of the morbidity and mortality of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Malatani, T S; Latif, A A; Al-Saigh, A; Cheema, M A; Abu-Eshy, S

    1991-03-01

    Between March and September 1989, acute apendicitis was clinically diagnosed in 317 patients who were studied as part of a prospective surgical audit. The study was designed to determine the accuracy of diagnosis, comparison of the macroscopic appearance of the appendix at operation, and subsequent histopathology and complications associated with the morbidity and mortality of emergency appendectomy. The clinical diagnosis was correct in 278 patients (88%). Thirty-nine (12%) of the patients had a negative laparotomy. There was no mortality, and wound infection was the source of increased morbidity in 37 (12%) patients. The highest incidence of wound infection was among those who had pus in the peritoneum (20%) or had a perforated or gangrenous appendix (25%). When the macroscopic appearance of the appendix was compared with the subsequent histopathological findings, a false positive error of 7% and a false negative error of 42% was found. During appendectomy the gross appearance of the appendix must be carefully noted so that a meticulous surgical technique can be complemented by appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis against wound infection, started at the time of surgery.

  3. Auditing Orthopaedic Audit

    PubMed Central

    Guryel, E; Acton, K; Patel, S

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Clinical audit plays an important role in the drive to improve the quality of patient care and thus forms a cornerstone of clinical governance. Assurance that the quality of patient care has improved requires completion of the audit cycle. A considerable sum of money and time has been spent establishing audit activity in the UK. Failure to close the loop undermines the effectiveness of the audit process and wastes resources. PATIENTS AND METHODS We analysed the effectiveness of audit in trauma and orthopaedics at a local hospital by comparing audit projects completed over a 6-year period to criteria set out in the NHS National Audit and Governance report. RESULTS Of the 25 audits performed since 1999, half were presented to the relevant parties and only 20% completed the audit cycle. Only two of these were audits against national standards and 28% were not based on any standards at all. Only a third of the audits led by junior doctors resulted in implementation of their action plan compared to 75% implementation for consultant-led and 67% for nurse-led audits. CONCLUSIONS A remarkably large proportion of audits included in this analysis failed to meet accepted criteria for effective audit. Audits completed by junior doctors were found to be the least likely to complete the cycle. This may relate to the lack of continuity in modern medical training and little incentive to complete the cycle. Supervision by permanent medical staff, principally consultants, and involvement of the audit department may play the biggest role in improving implementation of change. PMID:18828963

  4. Comparative audit of clinical research in pediatric neurology.

    PubMed

    Al-Futaisi, Amna; Shevell, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Clinical research involves direct observation or data collection on human subjects. This study was conducted to evaluate the profile of pediatric neurology clinical research over a decade. Trends in pediatric neurology clinical research were documented through a systematic comparative review of articles published in selected journals. Eleven journals (five pediatric neurology, three general neurology, three general pediatrics) were systematically reviewed for articles involving a majority of human subjects less than 18 years of age for the years 1990 and 2000. Three hundred thirty-five clinical research articles in pediatric neurology were identified in the 11 journals for 1990 and 398 for 2000, a 19% increase. A statistically significant increase in analytic design (21.8% vs 39.5%; P = .01), statistical support (6% vs 16.6%; P < .0001), and multidisciplinary team (69.9% vs 87%; P = .003) was observed. In terms of specific study design, a significant decline in case reports (34.3% vs 10.3%; P < .0001) and an increase in case-control studies (11.3% vs 22.9%; P = .02) were evident over the 10-year interval. This comparative audit revealed that there has been a discernible change in the methodology profile of clinical research in child neurology over a decade. Trends apparently suggest a more rigorous approach to study design and investigation in this field.

  5. Critical steps in fluoroquinolones and carbapenems prescriptions: results from a prospective clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Seligman, B G S; Ribeiro, R A; Kuchenbecker, R de S; Grings, A O; Dos Santos, R P; Machado, A R L; Casali, F C; Guzatto, F; Morais, V D; Schroeder, G; Küplich, N M; Pires, M R; Konkewicz, L R; Jacoby, T

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotic misuse is associated with emergence of resistance and high expenditures. Fluoroquinolones (FQ) and carbapenems (CP) are drugs with considerable potential of resistance development and its disseminated use is a concern. We undertook a prospective clinical audit to evaluate prescriptions of FQ and CP in a multistep process. Each prescription was unfolded in the following steps: indication for antimicrobial therapy; adequacy of initial prescription, dosage and route; previous cultures; and parenteral-oral transition. There was no antibiotics indication in 8.9% of FQ and 1.5% of CP group (p = 0.07). In CP 25.8% of initial schemes were inappropriate (21% in FQ). Lack of switch to oral therapy comprised 25% of monthly costs of FQ. Inadequacy in initial choice accounted for 13.6% of CP expenses. We concluded that, in spite of infection control restrictive policies, inappropriateness of antibiotic usage is worrisome. Clinical audit in a multistep approach may identify possible flaws in this process.

  6. Nonoperative management of penetrating kidney injuries: a prospective audit.

    PubMed

    Moolman, C; Navsaria, P H; Lazarus, J; Pontin, A; Nicol, A J

    2012-07-01

    The role of nonoperative management for penetrating kidney injuries is unknown. Therefore, we review the management and outcome of penetrating kidney injuries at a center with a high incidence of penetrating trauma. Data from all patients presenting with hematuria and/or kidney injury discovered on imaging or at surgery admitted to the trauma center at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa during a 19-month period (January 2007 to July 2008) were prospectively collected and reviewed. These data were analyzed for demographics, injury mechanism, perioperative management, nephrectomy rate and nonoperative success. Patients presenting with hematuria and with an acute abdomen underwent a single shot excretory urogram. Those presenting with hematuria without an indication for laparotomy underwent computerized tomography with contrast material. A total of 92 patients presented with hematuria following penetrating abdominal trauma. There were 75 (80.4%) proven renal injuries. Of the patients 84 were men and the median age was 26 years (range 14 to 51). There were 50 stab wounds and 42 gunshot renal injuries. Imaging modalities included computerized tomography in 60 cases and single shot excretory urography in 18. There were 9 patients brought directly to the operating room without further imaging. A total of 47 patients with 49 proven renal injuries were treated nonoperatively. In this group 4 patients presented with delayed hematuria, of whom 1 had a normal angiogram and 3 underwent successful angioembolization of arteriovenous fistula (2) and false aneurysm (1). All nonoperatively managed renal injuries were successfully treated without surgery. There were 18 nephrectomies performed for uncontrollable bleeding (11), hilar injuries (2) and shattered kidney (3). Post-nephrectomy complications included 1 infected renal bed hematoma requiring percutaneous drainage. Of the injuries found at laparotomy 12 were not explored, 2 were drained and 5 were treated with

  7. Prospective audit to evaluate the potential of the coronial system to increase solid organ donation

    PubMed Central

    Twamley, Huw; Haigh, Andrew; Williment, Claire; Hudson, Cara; Whitney, Julie; Neuberger, James

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Anecdotal evidence suggests that organ donation from deceased donors referred to the Coroner/Procurator Fiscal (PF) could be increased if all followed best practice. The aim of this prospective audit was to establish how referrals affected organ donation and to develop evidence-based guidelines to ensure that organ donation can be facilitated safely without interfering in the Coroner/PF's investigative process. Design Prospective audit. Setting All acute National Health Service Hospitals in the UK where deceased organ donation was considered. Participants 1437 deceased patients who met the eligibility criteria for organ donation and were referred to Coroner/PF. Main outcome measures Number of cases where permission for transplantation was given, number of organs where permission was refused and number of organs which might have been transplanted if all had followed best practice. Results Full permission for organ retrieval was given in 87% cases and partial permission in 9%. However, if full permission had been given where no autopsy was performed or restrictions seemed unjustified, up to 77 organs (22 lungs, 22 kidneys, 9 pancreases, 9 livers, 8 hearts and 7 small bowels) could have been available for transplant. Conclusions Coroners/PFs and their officers show strong support for transplantation but improvement in practice could result in a small but significant increase in life-saving and life-enhancing transplants. PMID:27401356

  8. Prospective audit to evaluate the potential of the coronial system to increase solid organ donation.

    PubMed

    Twamley, Huw; Haigh, Andrew; Williment, Claire; Hudson, Cara; Whitney, Julie; Neuberger, James

    2016-07-08

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that organ donation from deceased donors referred to the Coroner/Procurator Fiscal (PF) could be increased if all followed best practice. The aim of this prospective audit was to establish how referrals affected organ donation and to develop evidence-based guidelines to ensure that organ donation can be facilitated safely without interfering in the Coroner/PF's investigative process. Prospective audit. All acute National Health Service Hospitals in the UK where deceased organ donation was considered. 1437 deceased patients who met the eligibility criteria for organ donation and were referred to Coroner/PF. Number of cases where permission for transplantation was given, number of organs where permission was refused and number of organs which might have been transplanted if all had followed best practice. Full permission for organ retrieval was given in 87% cases and partial permission in 9%. However, if full permission had been given where no autopsy was performed or restrictions seemed unjustified, up to 77 organs (22 lungs, 22 kidneys, 9 pancreases, 9 livers, 8 hearts and 7 small bowels) could have been available for transplant. Coroners/PFs and their officers show strong support for transplantation but improvement in practice could result in a small but significant increase in life-saving and life-enhancing transplants. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Requests for electroencephalography in a district general hospital: retrospective and prospective audit

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D; Bartolo, R; Pickles, R M; Tedman, B M

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To determine the number of inappropriate requests for electroencephalography (EEG) and whether guidelines on use could reduce this number. Design Audit with retrospective and prospective components. Setting EEG department in district general hospital and centre for neurology and neurosurgery. Participants Retrospective: 368 at the general hospital and 143 patients at the neurology centre. Prospective: 241 patients undergoing EEG at the general hospital. Interventions Guidelines for EEG issued to users of service at the general hospital. Outcomes Retrospective: differences in requesting practice, result in different clinical scenarios, relative roles of procedure, clinical acumen in establishing diagnosis, usefulness of procedure. Prospective: change of requesting practice, impact on use. Results There were considerable differences in requesting practice. Non-specialists seem to use EEG as a diagnostic tool, especially in patients with “funny turns,” when it is much more likely to yield potentially misleading than clinically useful information. The overall proportion of procedures considered to influence management, to be justifiable, and to be inappropriate were 16% (59), 28.3% (104), and 55.7% (205), respectively. In the prospective study the total number of requests was significantly reduced (χ2=33.85, df=5, P<0.0001), mainly because of fewer requests in patients with non-specific “funny turns” (χ2=21.90, df=6, P=0.0013). There was a concomitant change in the usefulness of EEG (χ2 =26.99, df=2, P<0.0001). Conclusions This original audit informed clinical practice and had potential benefits for patients, clinicians, and provision of service. Systematic replication of this project, possibly on a regional basis, could result in financial savings, which would allow development of accessible local neurophysiology services. What is already known on this topicThere is unrestricted access to EEG in most district general hospitals throughout the

  10. Findings of a national comparative audit of mastectomy and breast reconstruction surgery in England.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, Ranjeet; Cromwell, David A; Browne, John P; Caddy, Christopher M; Pereira, Jerome; Sheppard, Carmel; Greenaway, Kimberley; van der Meulen, Jan H P

    2014-10-01

    This paper summarises the findings of a national audit of mastectomy and breast reconstruction surgery carried out in England. It describes patterns of treatment, and the clinical and patient-reported quality of life outcomes associated with these types of procedure. Prospective cohort study. All 150 National Health Service hospital groups (NHS trusts) in England that provided mastectomy or breast reconstruction surgery, along with six NHS trusts in Wales and Scotland and 114 independent hospitals. Women aged 16 years and over undergoing mastectomy with or without immediate breast reconstruction, or primary delayed breast reconstruction, between 1st January 2008 and 31st March 2009. Reconstructive utilisation, post-operative complications and sequelae, and patient-reported satisfaction and quality of life. Overall, 21% of the 16,485 women who had mastectomy underwent immediate reconstruction. However, the proportion varied between regions from 9% to 43% (p < 0.001). Levels of patient satisfaction with information, choice and the quality of care were high. The proportion of women who experienced local complications was 10.30% (95% CI 9.78-10.84) for mastectomy surgery, ranged from 11.02% (9.31-12.92) to 18.24% (14.80-22.10) for different immediate reconstructive procedures, and from 5.00% (2.76-8.25) to 19.86% (16.21-23.94) for types of delayed reconstruction. Breast appearance and overall well-being scores reported 18 months after surgery were higher among women having immediate breast reconstruction compared to mastectomy only. Postoperative outcomes were similar across providers.. The Audit found women were highly satisfied with their peri-operative care, with hospital providers achieving similar outcomes. English providers should examine how to reduce the variation in rates of immediate reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative dosimetry study of three UK centres implementing total skin electron treatment through external audit.

    PubMed

    Misson-Yates, S; Gonzalez, R; McGovern, M; Greener, A

    2015-05-01

    This article describes the external audit measurements conducted in two UK centres implementing total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) and the results obtained. Measurements of output, energy, beam flatness and symmetry at a standard distance (95 or 100 cm SSD) were performed using a parallel plate chamber in solid water. Similarly, output and energy measurements were also performed at the treatment plane for single and dual fields. Clinical simulations were carried out using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic® film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) on an anthropomorphic phantom. Extended distance measurements confirmed that local values for the beam dosimetry at Centres A and B were within 2% for outputs and 1-mm agreement of the expected depth at which the dose is 50% of the maximum for the depth-dose curve in water (R50,D) value. Clinical simulation using TLDs) showed an agreement of -1.6% and -6.7% compared with the expected mean trunk dose for each centre, respectively, and a variation within 10% (±1 standard deviation) across the trunk. The film results confirmed that the delivery of the treatment technique at each audited centre complies with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations. This audit methodology has proven to be a successful way to confirm the agreement of dosimetric parameters for TSEBT treatments at both audited centres and could serve as the basis for an audit template to be used by other audit groups. TSEBT audits are not established in the UK owing to a limited number of centres carrying out the treatment technique. This article describes the audits performed at two UK centres prior to their clinical implementation.

  12. A prospective audit of a nurse independent prescribing within critical care.

    PubMed

    Carberry, Martin; Connelly, Sarah; Murphy, Jennifer

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prescribing activity of different staff groups within intensive care unit (ICU) and combined high dependency unit (HDU), namely trainee and consultant medical staff and advanced nurse practitioners in critical care (ANPCC); to determine the number and type of prescription errors; to compare error rates between prescribing groups and to raise awareness of prescribing activity within critical care. The introduction of government legislation has led to the development of non-medical prescribing roles in acute care. This has facilitated an opportunity for the ANPCC working in critical care to develop a prescribing role. The audit was performed over 7 days (Monday-Sunday), on rolling days over a 7-week period in September and October 2011 in three ICUs. All drug entries made on the ICU prescription by the three groups, trainee medical staff, ANPCCs and consultant anaesthetists, were audited once for errors. Data were collected by reviewing all drug entries for errors namely, patient data, drug dose, concentration, rate and frequency, legibility and prescriber signature. A paper data collection tool was used initially; data was later entered onto a Microsoft Access data base. A total of 1418 drug entries were audited from 77 patient prescription Cardexes. Error rates were reported as, 40 errors in 1418 prescriptions (2·8%): ANPCC errors, n = 2 in 388 prescriptions (0·6%); trainee medical staff errors, n = 33 in 984 (3·4%); consultant errors, n = 5 in 73 (6·8%). The error rates were significantly different for different prescribing groups (p < 0·01). This audit shows that prescribing error rates were low (2·8%). Having the lowest error rate, the nurse practitioners are at least as effective as other prescribing groups within this audit, in terms of errors only, in prescribing diligence. National data is required in order to benchmark independent nurse prescribing practice in critical care. These findings could be used to inform research and role

  13. A prospective audit on the effect of training and educational workshops on the incidence of urethral catheterization injuries.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Nikita R; Davis, Niall F; Quinlan, Mark R; Flynn, Robert J; McDermott, T E D; Manecksha, Rustom P; Thornhill, John A

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of iatrogenic urethral catheterization (UC) injuries is approximately 0.3%. Resultant complications are associated with patient morbidity and unnecessary healthcare costs. Our aim was to investigate whether educational training workshops decreased the incidence of UC-related injuries. A prospective audit was performed to calculate incidence, morbidity, and costs associated with iatrogenic UC injury from January to July 2015. Educational workshops were then conducted with healthcare staff and training modules for junior doctors. UC-related incidence, morbidity, and costs in the subsequent six-month period were recorded prospectively and compared with the previous data. The incidence of iatrogenic UC injuries was reduced from 4.3/1000 catheters inserted to 3.8/1000 catheters after the intervention (p=0.59). Morbidity from UC increased in the second half in the form of increase in cumulative additional inpatient hospital stay (22 to 79 days; p=0.25), incidence of urosepsis (n=2 to n=4), and need for operative intervention (n=1 to n=2). The cost of managing UC injuries almost doubled in the period after the training intervention (€50 449 to €90 100). Current forms of educational and training interventions for UC did not significantly change morbidity or cost of iatrogenic UC injuries despite a decrease in incidence. Improved and intensive training protocols are necessary for UC to prevent avoidable iatrogenic complications, as well as a safer urethral catheter design.

  14. A prospective audit on the effect of training and educational workshops on the incidence of urethral catheterization injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Nikita R.; Davis, Niall F.; Quinlan, Mark R.; Flynn, Robert J.; McDermott, T.E.D.; Manecksha, Rustom P.; Thornhill, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of iatrogenic urethral catheterization (UC) injuries is approximately 0.3%. Resultant complications are associated with patient morbidity and unnecessary healthcare costs. Our aim was to investigate whether educational training workshops decreased the incidence of UC-related injuries. Methods A prospective audit was performed to calculate incidence, morbidity, and costs associated with iatrogenic UC injury from January to July 2015. Educational workshops were then conducted with healthcare staff and training modules for junior doctors. UC-related incidence, morbidity, and costs in the subsequent six-month period were recorded prospectively and compared with the previous data. Results The incidence of iatrogenic UC injuries was reduced from 4.3/1000 catheters inserted to 3.8/1000 catheters after the intervention (p=0.59). Morbidity from UC increased in the second half in the form of increase in cumulative additional inpatient hospital stay (22 to 79 days; p=0.25), incidence of urosepsis (n=2 to n=4), and need for operative intervention (n=1 to n=2). The cost of managing UC injuries almost doubled in the period after the training intervention (€50 449 to €90 100). Conclusions Current forms of educational and training interventions for UC did not significantly change morbidity or cost of iatrogenic UC injuries despite a decrease in incidence. Improved and intensive training protocols are necessary for UC to prevent avoidable iatrogenic complications, as well as a safer urethral catheter design. PMID:28761592

  15. Optimising measurement of health-related characteristics of the built environment: Comparing data collected by foot-based street audits, virtual street audits and routine secondary data sources.

    PubMed

    Pliakas, Triantafyllos; Hawkesworth, Sophie; Silverwood, Richard J; Nanchahal, Kiran; Grundy, Chris; Armstrong, Ben; Casas, Juan Pablo; Morris, Richard W; Wilkinson, Paul; Lock, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The role of the neighbourhood environment in influencing health behaviours continues to be an important topic in public health research and policy. Foot-based street audits, virtual street audits and secondary data sources are widespread data collection methods used to objectively measure the built environment in environment-health association studies. We compared these three methods using data collected in a nationally representative epidemiological study in 17 British towns to inform future development of research tools. There was good agreement between foot-based and virtual audit tools. Foot based audits were superior for fine detail features. Secondary data sources measured very different aspects of the local environment that could be used to derive a range of environmental measures if validated properly. Future built environment research should design studies a priori using multiple approaches and varied data sources in order to best capture features that operate on different health behaviours at varying spatial scales.

  16. Safety Auditing and Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

    2005-01-01

    Safety professionals typically do not engage in audits and independent assessments with the vigor as do our quality brethren. Taking advantage of industry and government experience conducting value added Independent Assessments or Audits benefits a safety program. Most other organizations simply call this process "internal audits." Sources of audit training are presented and compared. A relation of logic between audit techniques and mishap investigation is discussed. An example of an audit process is offered. Shortcomings and pitfalls of auditing are covered.

  17. Safety Auditing and Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodin, Ronnie

    2005-12-01

    Safety professionals typically do not engage in audits and independent assessments with the vigor as do our quality brethren. Taking advantage of industry and government experience conducting value added Independent Assessments or Audits benefits a safety program. Most other organizations simply call this process "internal audits." Sources of audit training are presented and compared. A relation of logic between audit techniques and mishap investigation is discussed. An example of an audit process is offered. Shortcomings and pitfalls of auditing are covered.

  18. Significant reduction in red blood cell transfusions in a general hospital after successful implementation of a restrictive transfusion policy supported by prospective computerized order auditing.

    PubMed

    Yerrabothala, Swaroopa; Desrosiers, Kevin P; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; Dunbar, Nancy M

    2014-10-01

    Our hospital transfusion policy was recently revised to recommend single-unit red blood cell transfusion (RBC TXN) for nonbleeding inpatients when the hemoglobin (Hb) level is not more than 7 g/dL. Our computerized provider order entry system was reconfigured to provide real-time decision support using prospective computerized order auditing based on the most recent Hb level and to remove the single-click ordering option for 2-unit RBC TXNs to enhance compliance. This study was undertaken to assess the impact of these changes on hospital transfusion practice. This study analyzed the total number of transfusion events, proportion of single and 2-unit transfusions and the Hb transfusion trigger in the preimplementation period (October 2011-March 2012) compared to the postimplementation period (October 2012-March 2013). In the postimplementation period the total number of RBC units transfused/1000 patient-days decreased from 60.8 to 44.2 (p < 0.0001). The proportion of 2-unit TXNs decreased from 47% to 15% (p < 0.0001). We also observed significant decreases in pretransfusion Hb triggers. Implementation of restrictive transfusion policy supported by prospective computerized order auditing has resulted in significantly decreased RBC utilization at our institution. © 2014 AABB.

  19. The consent and counselling of patients for cataract surgery: a prospective audit.

    PubMed

    Cheung, D; Sandramouli, S

    2005-09-01

    The aims of ideal preoperative informed consent include educating the patient adequately to enable an autonomous decision to be made without causing undue anxiety. We study how the paternalistic and nonpaternalistic approaches meet this ideal. The influence of the new patient consent forms is also assessed. Two cycles of a prospective clinical audit are presented. An assessment of relevant patient knowledge was performed by patient interview. Visual analogue scales were used to quantify patient anxiety. The first cycle, examining a paternalistic approach, demonstrated: 37% of patients understood what a cataract was and 48% understood what surgery involved. 48% misunderstood that cataract surgery was completely risk free. In total, 80% of patients undergoing second eye surgery believed that it was completely risk-free. Average anxiety visual analogue scores (VAS) for cataract surgery were low (2.89). The second cycle, examining the nonpaternalistic approach combined with the implementation of new consent forms showed that, despite more explicit repeated preoperative consent: 39% of patients understood correctly what a cataract was, 28% understood what surgery involved and 43% misunderstood that surgery was completely risk-free. All patients undergoing second eye surgery thought that it was risk-free. The average anxiety VAS for cataract surgery were moderate (5.00). Both paternalistic and non-paternalistic approaches to informed consent are inadequate in meeting the demands of the ideal informed consent. The new patient consent forms appear to have little effect in influencing patient knowledge about their surgery. Patients undergoing second eye surgery often have an overoptimistic view of cataract surgery.

  20. Traumatic brain injury in England and Wales: prospective audit of epidemiology, complications and standardised mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, T; Bouamra, O; Woodford, M; Lecky, F; Hutchinson, P J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To provide a comprehensive assessment of the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) relating to epidemiology, complications and standardised mortality across specialist units. Design The Trauma Audit and Research Network collects data prospectively on patients suffering trauma across England and Wales. We analysed all data collected on patients with TBI between April 2014 and June 2015. Setting Data were collected on patients presenting to emergency departments across 187 hospitals including 26 with specialist neurosurgical services, incorporating factors previously identified in the Ps14 multivariate logistic regression (Ps14n) model multivariate TBI outcome prediction model. The frequency and timing of secondary transfer to neurosurgical centres was assessed. Results We identified 15 820 patients with TBI presenting to neurosurgical centres directly (6258), transferred from a district hospital to a neurosurgical centre (3682) and remaining in a district general hospital (5880). The commonest mechanisms of injury were falls in the elderly and road traffic collisions in the young, which were more likely to present in coma. In severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) ≤8), the median time from admission to imaging with CT scan is 0.5 hours. Median time to craniotomy from admission is 2.6 hours and median time to intracranial pressure monitoring is 3 hours. The most frequently documented complication of severe TBI is bronchopneumonia in 5% of patients. Risk-adjusted W scores derived from the Ps14n model indicate that no neurosurgical unit fell outside the 3 SD limits on a funnel plot. Conclusions We provide the first comprehensive report of the management of TBI in England and Wales, including data from all neurosurgical units. These data provide transparency and suggests equity of access to high-quality TBI management provided in England and Wales. PMID:27884843

  1. AUDIT OF THE AUDITS.

    PubMed

    Alam, Malik Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Audits play an important role in improving the services to patient care. Our department was involved in carrying out Audits by the trainees on regular basis as suggested by the Royal college and each House officer or the Registrar rotating through was doing an Audit in his/her tenure. Ninteen Audits were done in 3 years in the Pediatric department. We used the criteria suggested for evaluating the quality of Audits and put into the category of full Audits, Partial Audits, Potential Audits and planning Audits. Six of our Audits were full Audits, eleven were partial Audits, two were Potential Audits and none were Planning Audits. We think that as a general trend we had similar shortcomings in quality of our Audits which need to be improved by involving seniors specially in implementing the changes suggested in the Audits otherwise it will not fulfill the Aims and objectives.

  2. [Audits of the quality management system and safety in radiotherapy: Lessons learned and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Leroy, E; Marque, A

    2016-10-01

    The external audit of the management system of quality and safety in radiotherapy by quality managers of the French Association of Quality and Safety in Radiotherapy (AFQSR) is an opportunity to exchange good practices, returns of experience, effectiveness and weaknesses of the quality system, and its perceptions by all the teams. We present the results of the first audits conducted, and the results of a survey on the perception of quality at national level. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Comparing Resident Self-Report to Chart Audits for Quality Improvement Projects: Accurate Reflection or Cherry-Picking?

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, Ethan F.; Tobin, Kristen; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resident engagement in quality improvement is a requirement for graduate medical education, but the optimal means of instruction and evaluation of resident progress remain unknown. Objective To determine the accuracy of self-reported chart audits in measuring resident adherence to primary care clinical practice guidelines. Methods During the 2010–2011 academic year, second- and third-year internal medicine residents at a single, university hospital–based program performed chart audits on 10 patients from their primary care clinic to determine adherence to 16 US Preventive Services Task Force primary care guidelines. We compared residents' responses to independent audits of randomly selected patient charts by a single external reviewer. Results Self-reported data were collected by 18 second-year and 15 third-year residents for 330 patients. Independently, 70 patient charts were randomly selected for review by an external auditor. Overall guideline compliance was significantly higher on self-reported audits compared to external audits (82% versus 68%, P < .001). Of 16 guidelines, external audits found significantly lower rates of adherence for 5 (tetanus vaccination, osteoporosis screening, colon cancer screening, cholesterol screening, and obesity screening). Chlamydia screening was more common in audited charts than in self-reported data. Although third-year residents self-reported higher guideline adherence than second-year residents (86% versus 78%, P < .001), external audits for third-year residents found lower overall adherence (64% versus 72%, P  =  .040). Conclusions Residents' self-reported chart audits may significantly overestimate guideline adherence. Increased supervision and independent review appear necessary to accurately evaluate resident performance. PMID:26140117

  4. Surgical time out checklist with debriefing and multidisciplinary feedback improves venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in thoracic surgery: a prospective audit.

    PubMed

    Berrisford, Richard G; Wilson, Iain H; Davidge, Mike; Sanders, David

    2012-06-01

    There is a significant global burden of preventable morbidity and mortality after surgery caused by avoidable adverse events. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis, despite evidence for its efficacy, is not reliably and consistently prescribed, and is currently a serious concern for patient safety. The aim of this study was to prospectively audit errors captured by an extended surgical time out checklist and relate them to the introduction of a safety culture. The use of an extended surgical time out checklist was prospectively audited, in consecutive patients in one operating theatre over a period of two years. Errors captured were analysed and related to other improvements to safety culture; human factors training, debriefing and regular departmental meetings. Time out was performed in 959 patients of 990 (96.8%) undergoing thoracic surgery. Performance was consistent over time. Errors were categorized as VTE prophylaxis (n = 53, 6%), blood products (n = 11), clerical (n = 5), imaging (n = 2) and miscellaneous (n = 2). After a lag period of 15 months, during which the team underwent human factors training, introduced debriefing and escalated VTE prophylaxis to regular departmental meetings, VTE prophylaxis errors were substantially reduced. The temporal relationship between error capture and error elimination is explored. Use of checklists alongside appropriate human factors training, debriefing and regular multidisciplinary communication can substantially improve VTE prophylaxis in patients undergoing surgery.

  5. A prospective audit of regional anaesthesia failure in 5080 Caesarean sections.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M

    2008-08-01

    Anaesthesia for Caesarean section was audited over a 5 year period: 5080 cases were performed using spinal 63%, epidural top-up 26%, combined spinal-epidural 5% and primary general anaesthesia 5%. The rate of general anaesthesia conversion of regional anaesthesia was 0.8% for elective and 4.9% for emergency Caesarean section compared to Royal College of Anaesthetists targets of 1% and 3%. The rate of conversion of regional to general anaesthesia in category 1 Caesarean section was 20%. A total of 8% of women had general anaesthesia when both primary general and conversion of regional anaesthesia were combined. The rate of failure to achieve a pain-free operation was 6% with spinals, 24% with epidural top-up and 18% with combined spinal-epidural. Besides the type of anaesthesia and operative urgency, other factors associated with pre-operative failure of regional anaesthesia included body mass index, no previous Caesareans, and indication for Caesarean of acute fetal distress or maternal medical condition. Inadequacy of pre-operative anaesthetic block and duration of surgery were important risk factors for intra-operative failure. For spinal anaesthesia, use of a spinal opioid was associated with less pre-operative failure. For epidural top-up anaesthesia, lower epidural top-up volume was associated with less pre-operative failure, and use of adrenaline was associated with both less pre-operative and intra-operative failure. The rate of serious adverse incidents was 1 : 126 with general anaesthesia and 1 : 501 with regional anaesthesia.

  6. Sea lice monitoring on Atlantic salmon farms in New Brunswick, Canada: comparing audit and farm staff counts.

    PubMed

    Elmoslemany, A; Whyte, S K; Revie, C W; Hammell, K L

    2013-03-01

    Sea lice audits were performed by the Atlantic Veterinary College on commercial aquaculture sites in New Brunswick, Canada, in 2011. Although the primary objective was to verify that farms were reporting similar lice counts to third-party counts, more detailed comparisons were made to identify when lice counts were more likely to differ between the audit team and farm employees. A total of 28 sea lice audits were conducted on 16 sites between June and December 2011. During each audit, 10 cages were evaluated per site where possible, with ten fish per cage being evaluated by an audit technician and a further ten by a farm employee. Data analysis included descriptive statistics of lice counts by stage and limits of agreement plots. A random effects negative binomial model that accounted for clustering of cages within sites was applied to assess the effect of counter type and season on lice counts by stage. The results indicate that farms counts were generally in agreement with audit counts. However, when the average counts for chalimus and preadult (male and female) and adult male lice stages were high, farm counters were more likely to report a lower value. Higher lice counts were observed during autumn compared to summer especially for the adult female stage. Finally, there was a significant clustering effect for site and cage, with most of the variation attributable to site. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Prospective Audit of Blood Donor Selection Process in a Tertiary Care Hospital of a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Raza, Naila

    2016-06-05

    The aim of this study was to emphasize the significance of internal audits of the blood donor selection process and documentation in a resource-limited country by assessing compliance with the established protocols, and to identify weak areas in the process. This audit reviewed the donor selection process at the blood bank of Liaquat National Hospital & Medical College, Karachi, over a 6-month period. Seven variables selected as performance indicators were graded as very good (%90-100%), good (80%-89%), satisfactory (70%-79%), or unacceptable (<70%). Blood bank staff was asked for feedback and suggestions. Documentation of donor demographics was not within the acceptable range (documentation rates of 65.14%), donor status records were satisfactory (77.64%), and donor physical exam records were graded as good (86.34%). Five performance indicators were graded as very good (90%-100%). The audit proved productive in identifying major causes of irregularities in documentation and in making valuable suggestions for their rectification.

  8. Prospective Audit of Blood Donor Selection Process in a Tertiary Care Hospital of a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Naila

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to emphasize the significance of internal audits of the blood donor selection process and documentation in a resource-limited country by assessing compliance with the established protocols, and to identify weak areas in the process. Materials and Methods: This audit reviewed the donor selection process at the blood bank of Liaquat National Hospital & Medical College, Karachi, over a 6-month period. Seven variables selected as performance indicators were graded as very good (%90-100%), good (80%-89%), satisfactory (70%-79%), or unacceptable (<70%). Blood bank staff was asked for feedback and suggestions. Results: Documentation of donor demographics was not within the acceptable range (documentation rates of 65.14%), donor status records were satisfactory (77.64%), and donor physical exam records were graded as good (86.34%). Five performance indicators were graded as very good (90%-100%). Conclusion: The audit proved productive in identifying major causes of irregularities in documentation and in making valuable suggestions for their rectification. PMID:26376585

  9. A two-cycle prospective audit of temporal bone computed tomography scan requests: improving the clinical applicability of radiology reports.

    PubMed

    Qureishi, A; Garas, G; Shah, J; Birchall, J

    2014-01-01

    Radiologists require accurate clinical information to formulate reports. This is particularly relevant to computed tomography of the temporal bone, in which previous surgery can mimic disease. The information provided with temporal bone computed tomography scan requests was evaluated. The study aimed to minimise inappropriate requests and improve the clinical value of reports. A two-cycle prospective audit was undertaken using a proforma designed on the basis of national guidelines. Following the first cycle (in which the requests and reports of 100 scans were evaluated), new guidelines and training were implemented. A follow-up audit (of 50 scans) was then performed. Following intervention, the percentage of clinically relevant reports increased from 52 to 94 (p < 0.01), whilst unnecessary or inappropriate scan requests decreased from 11 to 2 per cent (p < 0.05). Optimising the clinical value of temporal bone computed tomography scan requests will have positive implications for patient care, time management and cost. The quality of the clinical information provided can have a significant impact on the clinical value of radiology reports, and can mean that unnecessary irradiation is avoided.

  10. Prospective effectiveness of stapes surgery for otosclerosis in a multicenter audit setting: feasibility of the Common Otology Database as a benchmark database.

    PubMed

    Van Rompaey, Vincent; Yung, Matthew; Claes, Jozef; Häusler, Rudolf; Martin, Christian; Somers, Thomas; Offeciers, Erwin; Pytel, Jozsef; Skladzien, Jacek; de Heyning, Paul Van

    2009-12-01

    The Common Otology Database (COD) is a joint effort by an international group of otologists to organize audit with a standardized reporting method in middle ear surgery. The first results on hearing outcome of the COD are presented in this article. The primary objective was to confirm the validity of the benchmark group by comparing hearing outcome results with previously reported results. The secondary objective was to describe the population, technical aspects, and hearing outcomes of stapes surgery. Nonrandomized prospective multicenter audit. Twenty tertiary-referral otologic centers. Primary and revision stapes operations in patients with otosclerosis. Air-bone gap (ABG), bone-conduction (BC) thresholds, and air-conduction (AC) thresholds were evaluated at 3 and 12 months according to the guidelines of the Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium for the evaluation of conductive hearing loss. Raw data were displayed in an Amsterdam Hearing Evaluation Plot. In primary stapes surgeries, the postoperative ABG was closed to 10 dB or less in 63.6% and to 20 dB or less in 92.6% (median, 8.75 dB). In revision stapes surgeries, the postoperative ABG was closed to 10 dB in 41.2% and to 20 dB in 76.5% of cases (median, 11.25 dB). The overall mean postoperative ABG at 12 months was 10.38 dB compared with 28.75 dB preoperatively. Using laser to perform the fenestration results in a less pronounced BC improvement when compared with procedures without laser assistance. No statistically significant difference in ABG pure-tone average at 3 months could be demonstrated between the different prosthesis types. Results of hearing outcome are similar to previous, primarily retrospective, single-center studies. Our data confirm the effectiveness of stapes surgery in patients with otosclerosis.

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Internal Communication and Public Relations Audits. State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, David M.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    A review of current literature regarding the state of the art in the conduct of internal communication and public relations audits by public relations practitioners reveals that these two related measurement activities are of considerable importance to the practice of public relations. Public relations audits are concerned with exploratory…

  12. Prospective audit of a dedicated ear, nose and throat emergency department and 24-year comparison.

    PubMed

    Woods, R S R; Keane, E; Timon, C V; Hone, S

    2017-02-01

    The Royal Victoria Eye and Ear Hospital provides a specialised ear, nose and throat (ENT) Emergency department (ED) service open to patients from the entire country, operating from 9 am to 5 pm on weekdays. Recently, this has been under threat of closure. We analyse and determine the role of this ED in the current context and compare results to a previous study from June 1990. A prospective study over a 1-month period (March 2014) was conducted. A questionnaire was used, adapted from the study in 1990. Comparative figures from June 1990 are in parentheses. During the study period, there were 945 (1167) consultations from 887 (779) patients. 57 % (45 %) were new patients and 43 % (55 %) were return patients. Repeat attendances were necessary in 54 (325) patients during this month. 56 % (35 %) were referred by their General Practitioner (GP), 38 % (52 %) self-referred, 2 % (8 %) by other hospitals and 4 % (5 %) from other sources. Diagnoses included otitis externa in 24 % (21 %), cerumen in 20 % (15 %), epistaxis in 6 % (9 %), Eustachian tube dysfunction in 12 %, foreign body removal in 4 % (5 %) and four new cases of head and neck cancer. Attendance numbers vary during the year but demand has risen over time. A dedicated ED provides an important role for ENT in Ireland and offers valuable experience for trainees. The loss of such a department may lead to an overwhelming burden on services in other hospitals.

  13. Measuring surgical outcomes in neurosurgery: implementation, analysis, and auditing a prospective series of more than 5000 procedures.

    PubMed

    Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Ringer, Andrew J; McPherson, Christopher M; Warnick, Ronald E; Kuntz, Charles; Zuccarello, Mario; Tew, John M

    2012-11-01

    Health care reform debate includes discussions regarding outcomes of surgical interventions. Yet quality of medical care, when judged as a health outcome, is difficult to define because of impediments affecting accuracy in data collection, analysis, and reporting. In this prospective study, the authors report the outcomes for neurosurgical treatment based on point-of-care interactions recorded in the electronic medical record (EMR). The authors' neurosurgery practice collected outcome data for 19 physicians and ancillary personnel using the EMR. Data were analyzed for 5361 consecutive surgical cases, either elective or emergency procedures, performed during 2009 at multiple hospitals, offices, and an ambulatory spine surgery center. Main outcomes included complications, length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition for all patients and for certain frequently performed procedures. Physicians, nurses, and other medical staff used validated scales to record the hospital LOS, complications, disposition at discharge, and return to work. Of the 5361 surgical procedures performed, two-thirds were spinal procedures and one-third were cranial procedures. Organization-wide compliance with reporting rates of major complications improved throughout the year, from 80.7% in the first quarter to 90.3% in the fourth quarter. Auditing showed that rates of unreported complications decreased from 11% in the first quarter to 4% in the fourth quarter. Complication data were available for 4593 procedures (85.7%); of these, no complications were reported in 4367 (95.1%). Discharge dispositions reported were home in 86.2%, rehabilitation center in 8.9%, and nursing home in 2.5%. Major complications included culture-proven infection in 0.61%, CSF leak in 0.89%, reoperation within the same hospitalization in 0.38%, and new neurological deficits in 0.77%. For the commonly performed procedures, the median hospital LOS was 3 days for craniotomy for aneurysm or intraaxial tumor and less than

  14. Misuse of antibiotics reserved for hospital settings in outpatients: a prospective clinical audit in a university hospital in Southern France.

    PubMed

    Roche, Manon; Bornet, Charléric; Monges, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Gensollen, Sophie; Seng, Piseth

    2016-07-01

    Some antibiotics are reserved essentially for hospital settings owing to cost effectiveness and in order to fight the emerging antibiotic resistance crisis. In some cases, antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals may be prescribed in outpatients for serious infections or in the absence of a therapeutic alternative. A 30-day prospective audit of outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals was performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relevance of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions by measuring appropriateness according to guidelines. During the study period, 53 prescriptions were included, only 40% of which were appropriate. Among the 32 inappropriate prescriptions, 4 cases lacked microbial arguments, 1 case was not adequate for the infection type, 1 case involved an incorrect antibiotic dosage, 1 case involved an incorrect interval of dose administration, 3 cases had a therapeutic alternative and 22 cases were not recommended. Of the 53 prescriptions, 66% were started in hospital and 34% in outpatients. Only 25% of cases were prescribed with infectious diseases specialist (IDS) advice, 64% were based on microbiological documentation and 13% had a negative bacterial culture. Inappropriate prescriptions were usually observed in antibiotic lock therapy, skin infections, Clostridium difficile colitis, intra-abdominal infections and intravascular catheter-related infections. Outpatient prescriptions of antimicrobial drugs reserved exclusively for use in hospitals are frequently inappropriate. We recommend a real-time analysis algorithm with the involvement of an IDS for monitoring prescriptions to improve the quality of these prescriptions and possibly to prevent antibiotic resistance.

  15. Jurisprudence and business management course content taught at accredited chiropractic colleges: A comparative audit

    PubMed Central

    Gleberzon, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: the purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative audit of the jurisprudence and business management courses offered at a number of different accredited chiropractic colleges. Methods: Faculty members responsible for teaching students jurisprudence and/or business management courses at a number of accredited colleges were contacted and asked to electronically submit their course outlines for review. Results: Of the 62 different topics delivered at the 11 chiropractic colleges surveyed, not one topic was taught at all of them. The following topics were taught at 10 of the 11 respondent chiropractic colleges: business plan development; ethics and codes of conduct and; office staff/employees. Several topics were only taught at one accredited chiropractic college. Conclusion: While most chiropractic colleges provide some education in the areas of jurisprudence and business management, it would appear that there is no consensus opinion or ‘model curriculum’ on these topics towards which chiropractic programs may align themselves. Based on a literature search, this study is the first of its kind. A more extensive study is required, as well as a Delphi process to determine what should be taught to chiropractic students with respect to jurisprudence and business management in order to protect the public interest. PMID:20195426

  16. Jurisprudence and business management course content taught at accredited chiropractic colleges: A comparative audit.

    PubMed

    Gleberzon, Brian J

    2010-03-01

    the purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative audit of the jurisprudence and business management courses offered at a number of different accredited chiropractic colleges. Faculty members responsible for teaching students jurisprudence and/or business management courses at a number of accredited colleges were contacted and asked to electronically submit their course outlines for review. Of the 62 different topics delivered at the 11 chiropractic colleges surveyed, not one topic was taught at all of them. The following topics were taught at 10 of the 11 respondent chiropractic colleges: business plan development; ethics and codes of conduct and; office staff/employees. Several topics were only taught at one accredited chiropractic college. While most chiropractic colleges provide some education in the areas of jurisprudence and business management, it would appear that there is no consensus opinion or 'model curriculum' on these topics towards which chiropractic programs may align themselves. Based on a literature search, this study is the first of its kind. A more extensive study is required, as well as a Delphi process to determine what should be taught to chiropractic students with respect to jurisprudence and business management in order to protect the public interest.

  17. National comparative audit of the use of platelet transfusions in the UK.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, H; Lowe, D; Dobson, P; Grant-Casey, J; Parris, E; Dalton, D; Hickling, K; Waller, F; Howell, C; Murphy, M F

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this national audit was to examine the use of platelet transfusions against audit standards developed from national guidelines. Hospitals were asked to provide data on 40 consecutive patients receiving platelet transfusions (15 haematology patients, 10 cardiac, 10 critical care and five in other clinical specialties). One hundred and eighty-seven UK hospitals participated, including 168/263 (64%) hospitals in England. A total of 4421 patients receiving platelet transfusions were audited. The reason for transfusion was documented in the medical records for 93% of transfusions and 57% were used for prophylaxis (in the absence of bleeding). Overall 3726/4421 (84%) of the transfusions were evaluable and 43% (1601/3726) were found to be non-compliant with the audit standards. A major non-compliance was failure to measure the platelet count before transfusion (29% of transfusions). Other non-compliances included the use of platelet transfusion in the absence of bleeding in 11% of cardiac surgery patients receiving platelet transfusions, the use of a threshold platelet count more than 10 x 10(9)/L for 60% of prophylactic platelet transfusions in haematology patients without risk factors indicating the need for a higher threshold, and a threshold platelet count more than 30 x 10(9)/L for 59% of prophylactic platelet transfusions in critical care. The reasons for the high rate of non-compliance were not explored in this audit, but this is a topic worthy of further study. The main recommendations were that hospitals should ensure there are written local guidelines for platelet transfusions, clinicians must be provided with training about their appropriate use, and hospitals should carry out regular audits of practice. More research should be carried out to develop the evidence base for the use of platelet transfusions, more detailed guidelines should be developed for platelet transfusions in critical care and cardiac surgery, and the audit should be repeated

  18. Current ventilation practice during general anaesthesia: a prospective audit in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Karalapillai, Dharshi; Weinberg, Laurence; Galtieri, Jonathan; Glassford, Neil; Eastwood, Glenn; Darvall, Jai; Geertsema, Jake; Bangia, Ravi; Fitzgerald, Jane; Phan, Tuong; OHallaran, Luke; Cocciante, Adriano; Watson, Stuart; Story, David; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the use of low tidal volume ventilation with the application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) may benefit patients at risk of respiratory complications during general anaesthesia. However current Australian practice in this area is unknown. To describe current practice of intraoperative ventilation with regard to tidal volume and application of PEEP, we performed a multicentre audit in patients undergoing general anaesthesia across eight teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. We obtained information including demographic characteristics, type of surgery, tidal volume and the use of PEEP in a consecutive cohort of 272 patients. The median age was 56 (IQR 42-69) years; 150 (55%) were male. Most common diagnostic groups were general surgery (31%), orthopaedic surgery (20%) and neurosurgery (9.6%). Mean FiO2 was 0.6 (IQR 0.5-0.7). Median tidal volume was 500 ml (IQR 450-550). PEEP was used in 54% of patients with a median value of 5.0 cmH2O (IQR 4.0-5.0) and median tidal volume corrected for predicted body weight was 9.5 ml/kg (IQR 8.5-10.4). Median peak inspiratory pressure was 18 cmH2O (IQR 15-22). In a cohort of patients considered at risk for respiratory complications, the median tidal volume was still 9.8 ml/kg (IQR 8.6-10.7) and PEEP was applied in 66% of patients with a median value of 5 cmH20 (IQR 4-5). On multivariate analyses positive predictors of tidal volume size included male sex (p < 0.01), height (p = 0.04) and weight (p < 0.001). Positive predictors of the use of PEEP included surgery in a tertiary hospital (OR = 3.11; 95% CI: 1.05 to 9.23) and expected prolonged duration of surgery (OR = 2.47; 95% CI: 1.04 to 5.84). In mechanically ventilated patients under general anaesthesia, tidal volume was high and PEEP was applied to the majority of patients, but at modest levels. The findings of our study suggest that the control groups of previous randomized controlled trials do not closely

  19. Quality assurance audit: a prospective non-randomised trial of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma (TROG 99.04/ALLG LY02).

    PubMed

    Christie, D; Le, T; Watling, K; Cornes, D; O'Brien, P; Hitchins, R

    2009-04-01

    A quality assurance (QA) audit of the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group and Australasian Lymphoma and Leukaemia Group trial (TROG 99.04/ALLG LY02) began after accrual of 25 patients. The trial is a prospective non-randomized study of standard treatment for osteolymphoma. Data relating to informed consent, eligibility, chemotherapy and radiotherapy were reviewed. The audit showed a relatively low level of major variations from the protocol, with an overall rate of 3.6%. As this trial has accrued slowly over a long period, the concept of QA has also developed. Amendments were made to the protocol accordingly. In the future, QA procedures should be predetermined, conducted rapidly in real time, and appropriately funded in order to be relevant to the ongoing conduct of the trial.

  20. The foot-health of people with diabetes in a regional Australian population: a prospective clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is limited understanding of the foot-health of people with diabetes in Australian regional areas. The aim of this study was to document the foot-health of people with diabetes who attend publically funded podiatric services in a regional Australian population. Methods A three month prospective clinical audit was undertaken by the publically-funded podiatric services of a large regional area of Victoria, Australia. The primary variables of interest were the University of Texas (UT) diabetic foot risk classification of each patient and the incidence of new foot ulceration during the study period. Age, gender, diabetes type, duration of diabetes and the podiatric service the patients attended were the other variables of interest. Results Five hundred and seventy six patients were seen during the three month period. Over 49% had a UT risk classification at a level at least peripheral neuropathy or more serious diabetes-related foot morbidity. Higher risk at baseline was associated with longer duration of diabetes (F = 31.7, p < 0.001), male gender (χ2 = 40.3, p <0.001) and type 1 diabetes (χ2 = 37.3, p <0.001). A prior history of foot pathology was the overwhelming predictor for incident ulceration during the time period (OR 8.1 (95% CI 3.6 to 18.2), p < 0.001). Conclusions The publically funded podiatric services of this large regional area of Australia deal with a disproportionally large number of people with diabetes at high risk of future diabetes-related foot complications. These findings may be useful in ensuring appropriate allocation of resources for future public health services involved in diabetic foot health service delivery in regional areas. PMID:22400802

  1. An audit comparing the reporting of staging MRI scans for rectal cancer with the London Cancer Alliance (LCA) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, M R S; Shanmuganandan, A P; Rasheed, S; Tekkis, P; Brown, G; Abulafi, A M

    2017-09-13

    This article focuses on the audit and assessment of clinical practice before and after introduction of MRI reporting guidelines. Standardised proforma based reporting may improve quality of MRI reports. Uptake of the use may be facilitated by endorsement from regional and national cancer organisations. This audit was divided into 2 phases. MRI reports issued between April 2014 and June 2014 were included in the first part of our audit. Phase II included MRI reports issued between April 2015 and June 2015. 14 out of 15 hospitals that report MRI scans in the LCA responded to our audit proposal. The completion rate of key MRI metrics/metrics was better in proforma compared to prose reports both before (98% vs 73%; p < 0.05) and after introduction of the guidelines (98% vs 71%; p < 0.05). There was an approximate doubling of proforma reporting after the introduction of guidelines and workshop interventions (39% vs 65%; p < 0.05). Evaluation of locally advanced cancers (tumours extending to or beyond the circumferential resection margin) for beyond TME surgery was reported in 3% of prose reports vs. 42% in proformas. Incorporation of standardised reporting in official guidelines improved the uptake of proforma based reporting. Proforma based reporting captured more MRI reportable items compared to prose summaries, before and after the implementation of guidelines. MRI reporting of advanced cancers for beyond TME surgery falls short of acceptable standards but is more detailed in proforma based reports. Further work to improve completion especially in beyond TME reporting is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative Performance of the AUDIT-C in Screening for DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah A.; Smith, Sharon M.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Rubinsky, Anna D.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Under the proposed DSM-5 revision to the criteria for alcohol use disorder (AUD), a substantial proportion of DSM-IV AUD cases will be lost or shifted in terms of severity, with some new cases added. Accordingly, the performance of the AUDIT-C in screening for DSM-IV AUD cannot be assumed to extend to DSM-5 AUD. The objective of this paper is to compare the AUDIT-C in screening for DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD. Methods Using a broad range of performance metrics, the AUDIT-C was tested and contrasted as a screener for DSM-IV AUD (any AUD, abuse and dependence) and DSM-5 AUD (any AUD, moderate AUD and severe AUD) in a representative sample of U.S. adults aged 21 and older and among past-year drinkers. Results Optimal AUDIT-C cutpoints were identical for DSM-IV and DSM-5 AUD: ≥4 for any AUD, ≥3 or ≥4 for abuse/moderate AUD and ≥4 or ≥5 for dependence/severe AUD. Screening performance was slightly better for DSM-5 severe AUD than DSM-IV dependence but did not differ for other diagnoses. At optimal screening cutpoints, positive predictive values were slightly higher for DSM-5 overall AUD and moderate AUD than for their DSM-IV counterparts. Sensitivities were slightly higher for DSM-5 severe AUD than DSM-IV dependence. Optimal screening cutpoints shifted upwards for past-year drinkers but continued to be identical for DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders. Conclusions Clinicians should not face any major overhaul of their current screening procedures as a result of the DSM-5 revision and should benefit from fewer false positive screening results. PMID:22728044

  3. Reducing co-administration of proton pump inhibitors and antibiotics using a computerized order entry alert and prospective audit and feedback.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Christopher E; Gill, Suzanne; McCready, Janine; Matelski, John; Powis, Jeff E

    2016-07-22

    Antibiotics and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Both a computer order entry alert to highlight this association as well as antimicrobial stewardship directed prospective audit and feedback represent novel interventions to reduce the co-administration of antibiotics and PPIs among hospitalized patients. Consecutive patients admitted to two General Internal Medicine wards from October 1, 2010 until March 31, 2013 at a teaching hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada were evaluated. The baseline observation period was followed by the first phase, which involved the creation of a computerized order entry alert that was triggered when either a PPI or an antibiotic was ordered in the presence of the other. The second phase consisted of the introduction of an antibiotic stewardship-initiated prospective audit and feedback strategy. The primary outcome was the co-administration of antibiotics and PPIs during each phase. This alert led to a significant reduction in the co-administration of antibiotics and PPIs adjusted for month and secular trends, expressed as days of therapy per 100 patient days (4.99 vs. 3.14, p < 0.001) The subsequent introduction of the antibiotic stewardship program further reduced the co-administration (3.14 vs. 1.80, p <0.001). No change was observed in adjusted monthly CDI rates per 100 patient care days between the baseline and alert cohorts (0.12 vs. 0.12, p = 0.99) or the baseline and antibiotic stewardship phases (0.12 vs. 0.13, p = 0.97). Decreasing the co-administration of PPIs and antibiotics can be achieved using a simple automatic alert followed by prospective audit and feedback.

  4. Endoscopic versus transcranial procurement of allograft tympano-ossicular systems: a prospective double-blind randomized controlled audit.

    PubMed

    Caremans, Jeroen; Hamans, Evert; Muylle, Ludo; Van de Heyning, Paul; Van Rompaey, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Allograft tympano-ossicular systems (ATOS) have proven their use over many decades in tympanoplasty and reconstruction after resection of cholesteatoma. The transcranial bone plug technique has been used in the past 50 years to procure en bloc ATOS (tympanic membrane with malleus, incus and stapes attached). Recently, our group reported the feasibility of the endoscopic procurement technique. The aim of this study was to assess whether clinical outcome is equivalent in ATOS acquired by using the endoscopic procurement technique compared to ATOS acquired by using the transcranial technique. A double-blind randomized controlled audit was performed in a tertiary referral center in patients that underwent allograft tympanoplasty because of chronic otitis media with and without cholesteatoma. Allograft epithelialisation was evaluated at the short-term postoperative visit by microscopic examination. Failures were reported if reperforation was observed. Fifty patients underwent allograft tympanoplasty: 34 received endoscopically procured ATOS and 16 received transcranially procured ATOS. One failed case was observed, in the endoscopic procurement group. We did not observe a statistically significant difference between the two groups in failure rate. This study demonstrates equivalence of the clinical outcome of allograft tympanoplasty using either endoscopic or transcranial procured ATOS and therefore indicates that the endoscopic technique can be considered the new standard procurement technique. Especially because the endoscopic procurement technique has several advantages compared to the former transcranial procurement technique: it avoids risk of prion transmission and it is faster while lacking any noticeable incision.

  5. Comparing Prospectively Recorded Posttraumatic Amnesia Duration With Retrospective Accounts.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Caroline M; Spitz, Gershon; Ponsford, Jennie L

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has been conducted comparing different methods for determining the duration of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA). This study compared prospectively recorded PTA duration (P-PTA) with retrospective reports of the return of continuous memory (R-PTA). Fifty-nine individuals admitted to a head injury rehabilitation unit with a traumatic brain injury who had their PTA duration recorded using the Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale. Participants were between 6 months and 6 years postinjury at the time of study. P-PTA was determined on the basis of Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale responses. R-PTA was ascertained using a semistructured telephone interview. Although the PTA measures were significantly positively correlated (r = 0.76), mean R-PTA was significantly longer than mean P-PTA. In 34 cases (57.6%), R-PTA was longer than P-PTA (13 participants moved to a higher injury severity band), and in 22 cases (37.3%), R-PTA was shorter than P-PTA (8 participants moved to a lower injury severity band). The difference between P-PTA and R-PTA was not significantly associated with age, Glasgow Coma Scale score, overall PTA duration, or the number of days postinjury of the retrospective interview. Prospective and retrospective estimates of PTA duration were not comparable within the present sample. Further research comparing the two methods is needed.

  6. PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY COMPARING TWO ANESTHETIC METHODS FOR SHOULDER SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Prata Nascimento, Luis Gustavo; Bueno, Rogerio Serpone; Oliveira Almeida, Luiz Henrique; Strose, Eric; de Mello, Sérgio Cabral; Saletti, Deise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of suprascapular nerve block in combination with infusion of anesthetic into the subacromial space, compared with interscalene block. Methods: Forty-five patients with small or medium-sized isolated supraspinatus tendon lesions who underwent arthroscopic repair were prospectively and comparatively evaluated through random assignation to three groups of 15, each with a different combination of anesthetic methods. The efficacy of postoperative analgesia was measured using the visual analogue scale for pain and the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and opioid drug consumption. Inhalation anesthetic consumption during surgery was also compared between the groups. Results: The statistical analysis did not find any statistically significant differences among the groups regarding anesthetic consumption during surgery or postoperative analgesic efficacy during the first 48 hours. Conclusion: Suprascapular nerve block with infusion of anesthetic into the subacromial space is an excellent alternative to interscalene block, particularly in hospitals in which an electrical nerve stimulating device is unavailable. PMID:27022569

  7. Prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning provision for Australian community aged care clients.

    PubMed

    Detering, Karen Margaret; Carter, Rachel Zoe; Sellars, Marcus William; Lewis, Virginia; Sutton, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-09-16

    Conduct a prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning (ACP) provision in community aged care: ACP conducted by the client's case manager (CM) ('Facilitator') and ACP conducted by an external ACP service ('Referral') over a 6-month period. This Australian study involved CMs and their clients. Eligible CM were English speaking, ≥18 years, had expected availability for the trial and worked ≥3 days per week. CMs were recruited via their organisations, sequentially allocated to a group and received education based on the group allocation. They were expected to initiate ACP with all clients and to facilitate ACP or refer for ACP. Outcomes were quantity of new ACP conversations and quantity and quality of new advance care directives (ACDs). 30 CMs (16 Facilitator, 14 Referral) completed the study; all 784 client's files (427 Facilitator, 357 Referral) were audited. ACP was initiated with 508 (65%) clients (293 Facilitator, 215 Referral; p<0.05); 89 (18%) of these (53 Facilitator, 36 Referral) and 41 (46%) (13 Facilitator, 28 Referral; p<0.005) completed ACDs. Most ACDs (71%) were of poor quality/not valid. A further 167 clients (facilitator 124; referral 43; p<0.005) reported ACP was in progress at study completion. While there were some differences, overall, models achieved similar outcomes. ACP was initiated with 65% of clients. However, fewer clients completed ACP, there was low numbers of ACDs and document quality was generally poor. The findings raise questions for future implementation and research into community ACP provision. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Comparing electronic recording with a diagrammatic template versus traditional handwritten recording of tympanomastoid procedures: third audit cycle of 95 cases.

    PubMed

    Fang, S; Habeeb, A; Gluckman, P; Kanegoankar, R

    2017-05-01

    The middle ear and mastoid are complex three-dimensional structures and therefore tympanomastoid procedures require detailed documentation. Traditional written accounts can be inaccurate and difficult to interpret. This audit of 95 patients compares the completion of essential operative details using: an all-electronic version of a standardised proforma with a diagrammatic template, a non-electronic version with a diagrammatic template, and a traditional handwritten template. The electronic template resulted in 81 per cent of essential operative items being recorded, compared to 78 per cent (p = 0.3) with a previous non-electronic template and 50 per cent (p = 0.0004) when using simple handwritten recording. An electronic proforma with a diagrammatic template improves the documentation and interpretation of tympanomastoid procedures compared to traditional handwritten records.

  9. Endodontic 'Solutions'. Part 2: An audit comparing current practice in Belfast with UK and Republic of Ireland Dental Schools.

    PubMed

    Good, Melissa; El Karim, Ikhlas A; Hussey, David L

    2012-06-01

    Endodontic lubricants, irrigating solutions and medicaments help reduce the microbial load within root canals. Primary and secondary cases involve different microbes. Each'solution'or combinations thereof could play a significant role but no detailed guidelines exist on their use. An audit was undertaken to compare current practice in Belfast Dental School to the others across the UK and Republic of Ireland (ROI). This audit highlighted three main differences between Belfast and other dental schools. Many other institutions utilized other irrigants besides sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), different intracanal medicaments, including calcium hydroxide, and higher concentrations of NaOCl. Having gathered this information, we ask, 'Is there sufficient evidence to change the endodontic regime currently used at Belfast Dental School?'. Using the findings from the literature review (Part 1), we introduce new evidence-based protocols for primary and secondary cases for use in Belfast Dental School. In the absence of detailed clinical guidelines on the use of endodontic lubricants, irrigants and medicaments in primary and secondary cases, it is important to be aware of current practice in UK and ROI dental schools where dentists and specialists are trained.

  10. Incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in Australasian intensive care units: use of a consensus-developed clinical surveillance checklist in a multisite prospective audit

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Doug; Elliott, Rosalind; Burrell, Anthony; Harrigan, Peter; Murgo, Margherita; Rolls, Kaye; Sibbritt, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives With disagreements on diagnostic criteria for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) hampering efforts to monitor incidence and implement preventative strategies, the study objectives were to develop a checklist for clinical surveillance of VAP, and conduct an audit in Australian/New Zealand intensive care units (ICUs) using the checklist. Setting Online survey software was used for checklist development. The prospective audit using the checklist was conducted in 10 ICUs in Australia and New Zealand. Participants Checklist development was conducted with members of a bi-national professional society for critical care physicians using a modified Delphi technique and survey. A 30-day audit of adult patients mechanically ventilated for >72 h. Primary and secondary outcome measures Presence of items on the screening checklist; physician diagnosis of VAP, clinical characteristics, investigations, treatments and patient outcome. Results A VAP checklist was developed with five items: decreasing gas exchange, sputum changes, chest X-ray infiltrates, inflammatory response, microbial growth. Of the 169 participants, 17% (n=29) demonstrated characteristics of VAP using the checklist. A similar proportion had an independent physician diagnosis (n=30), but in a different patient subset (only 17% of cases were identified by both methods). The VAP rate per 1000 mechanical ventilator days for the checklist and clinician diagnosis was 25.9 and 26.7, respectively. The item ‘inflammatory response’ was most associated with the first episode of physician-diagnosed VAP. Conclusions VAP rates using the checklist and physician diagnosis were similar to ranges reported internationally and in Australia. Of note, different patients were identified with VAP by the checklist and physicians. While the checklist items may assist in identifying patients at risk of developing VAP, and demonstrates synergy with the recently developed Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines

  11. Audit in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Modayil, Prince Cheriyan; Panchikkeel, Ragesh Kuyyattil; Alex, Nisha

    2009-06-01

    Audit dates back to as early as 1750 BC when king Hammurabi of Babylon instigated audit for clinicians with regard to outcome. Clinical audit is a way of fi nding out whether we are doing what we should be doing. It also verifi es whether we are applying the best practice. An audit cycle involves setting-up of standards, measuring current practice, comparing results with standards (criteria), changing practice and re-auditing to make sure practice has improved A 'clinical audit' is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and clinical outcomes through a systematic review of care against explicit criteria, and the implementation of change. Changes are implemented at an individual, team or service level and a subsequent re-audit is done to confi rm improvement in health care delivery. The importance of audit in healthcare sector needs to be appreciated by the relevant authorities. The most frequently cited barrier to successful audit is the failure of organizations to provide suffi cient fund and protected time for healthcare teams.

  12. 25 CFR 571.12 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Audit standards. 571.12 Section 571.12 Indians NATIONAL... INVESTIGATIONS Audits § 571.12 Audit standards. (a) Each tribe shall prepare comparative financial statements... provide an annual audit of the financial statements of each class II and class III gaming operation on...

  13. Vitreous Microparticle Shedding in Retinal Detachment: A Prospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Tumahai, Perle; Saas, Philippe; Ricouard, Fanny; Biichlé, Sabéha; Puyraveau, Marc; Laheurte, Caroline; Delbosc, Bernard; Saleh, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are membrane-derived vesicles measuring less than 1 μm in diameter. They are shed from nearly every activated or preapoptotic cell and may exhibit biologic activities in inflammation or apoptosis settings. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether MP shedding was higher in the vitreous of patients with retinal detachment (RD). This was a prospective, comparative study. Levels of vitreous MPs (including phosphatidylserine [PS]-expressing MPs, photoreceptor cell-derived MPs, and photoreceptor cell-derived MPs expressing PS) and soluble proinflammatory factors (i.e., monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and IL-6) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Samples were obtained from 49 eyes undergoing RD surgery and 41 control eyes. Vitreous levels of all the MPs studied were significantly increased in the RD group. Vitreous MP levels were correlated with levels of at least one proinflammatory factor depending on MP subsets. Concerning clinical parameters, vitreous PS-expressing MP and PS-expressing photoreceptor cell-derived MP levels were higher depending on the duration of RD at surgery, the detached retina surface, and the macula status and were found more sensitive than proinflammatory factors only for the duration of RD at surgery. Vitreous concentrations of MPs (mainly derived from photoreceptor cells) are higher after rhegmatogenous RD and found to be correlated with soluble proinflammatory factors.

  14. A Comparative Study of Financial Data Sources for Critical Access Hospitals: Audited Financial Statements, the Medicare Cost Report, and the Internal Revenue Service Form 990

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmeral, Alisha Bhadelia; Reiter, Kristin L.; Holmes, George M.; Pink, George H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Medicare Cost Reports (MCR), Internal Revenue Service Form 990s (IRS 990), and Audited Financial Statements (AFS) vary in their content, detail, purpose, timeliness, and certification. The purpose of this study was to compare selected financial data elements and characterize the extent of differences in financial data and ratios across…

  15. A Comparative Study of Financial Data Sources for Critical Access Hospitals: Audited Financial Statements, the Medicare Cost Report, and the Internal Revenue Service Form 990

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmeral, Alisha Bhadelia; Reiter, Kristin L.; Holmes, George M.; Pink, George H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Medicare Cost Reports (MCR), Internal Revenue Service Form 990s (IRS 990), and Audited Financial Statements (AFS) vary in their content, detail, purpose, timeliness, and certification. The purpose of this study was to compare selected financial data elements and characterize the extent of differences in financial data and ratios across…

  16. Methylphenidate in Pregnancy: A Multicenter, Prospective, Comparative, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Diav-Citrin, Orna; Shechtman, Svetlana; Arnon, Judy; Wajnberg, Rebecka; Borisch, Cornelia; Beck, Evelin; Richardson, Jonathan Luke; Bozzo, Pina; Nulman, Irena; Ornoy, Asher

    2016-09-01

    Methylphenidate is a central nervous system stimulant medicinally used in the treatment of attention-deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity (ADD/ADHD). Data on its use in human pregnancy are limited. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the risk of major congenital anomalies after pregnancy exposure to methylphenidate for medical indications. In a prospective, comparative, multicenter observational study performed in 4 participating Teratology Information Services (in Jerusalem, Berlin, Newcastle upon Tyne, and Toronto) between 1996 and 2013, methylphenidate-exposed pregnancies were compared with pregnancies counseled for nonteratogenic exposure (NTE) after matching by maternal age, gestational age, and year at initial contact. 382 methylphenidate-exposed pregnancies (89.5% in the first trimester) were followed up. The overall rate of major congenital anomalies was similar between the groups (10/309 = 3.2% [methylphenidate] vs 13/358 = 3.6% [NTE], P = .780). The rates of major congenital anomalies (6/247 = 2.4% [methylphenidate] vs 12/358 = 3.4% [NTE], P = .511) and cardiovascular anomalies (2/247 = 0.8% [methylphenidate] vs 3/358 = 0.8% [NTE], P = .970) were also similar after exclusion of genetic or cytogenetic anomalies and limiting methylphenidate exposure to the period of organogenesis (weeks 4-13 after the last menstrual period). There was a higher rate of miscarriages and elective terminations of pregnancy in the methylphenidate group. Significant predictors for the miscarriages using Cox proportional hazards model were methylphenidate exposure (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.98; 95% CI, 1.23-3.20; P = .005) and past miscarriage (adjusted HR = 1.35; 95% CI, 1.18-1.55; P < .001). The present study suggests that methylphenidate does not seem to increase the risk for major malformations. Further studies are required to establish its pregnancy safety and its possible association with miscarriages.

  17. Prospective audit and feedback in antimicrobial stewardship: is there value in early reviewing within 48 h of antibiotic prescription?

    PubMed

    Liew, Yi Xin; Lee, Winnie; Tay, Daniel; Tang, Sarah Si Lin; Chua, Nathalie Grace Sy; Zhou, Yvonne; Kwa, Andrea Lay-Hoon; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programme (ASP) methodologies are not well defined, with most preferring to wait ≥72-96 h following antibiotic prescription before reviewing patients. However, we hypothesise that early ASP reviews and interventions are beneficial and do not adversely impact patient safety. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of early ASP interventions within 48 h of antibiotic prescription on patient outcomes and safety. A prospective review of ASP interventions made within 48 h of antibiotic prescription in Singapore General Hospital (SGH) from January to December 2012 was conducted. Patient demographics and outcomes were extracted from the database maintained by the ASP team. For culture-directed treatment, there was a shorter mean duration of therapy (DOT) in the accepted group compared with the rejected group (2.26 days vs. 5.56 days; P<0.001). ASP interventions did not alter the length of hospital stay (LOS), 30-day mortality, 14-day Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), 30-day re-admissions and 14-day re-infection (all P>0.05). For empirical treatment, a shorter DOT (3.61 days vs. 6.25 days; P<0.001) and decreased 30-day all-cause mortality (P=0.003) and infection-related mortality (P=0.002) were observed among patients in the accepted group compared with the rejected group. There was no significant difference in LOS, 14-day CDI and 30-day re-admission (all P>0.05). In conclusion, acceptance of early interventions recommended by ASP in SGH was associated with a reduction in DOT without compromising patient safety. This is evident even during empirical therapy when not all clinical information was available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. The long-term effects of training interventions on transfusion practice: a follow-up audit of red cell concentrate utilisation at Kimberley Hospital, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Jaco; Joubert, Sunette; Raubenheimer, Jacques; Louw, Vernon

    2014-12-01

    This audit in chronically anaemic adult patients assesses whether red cell concentrate is transfused according to guidelines, and evaluates the impact of training interventions, compared with a similar audit conducted in 2010. Retrospectively, 25 transfusion episodes were audited for appropriateness, the investigation of anaemia, threshold achievement, wastage, and informed consent. After training interventions, a further 25 episodes were prospectively analysed. The effects of current training interventions were not shown to have a statistically significant impact. Compared to a 2010 audit, however, a statistically significant improvement was demonstrated in transfusion practice, suggesting that training interventions may lead to sustainable long-term improvements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. From guidelines to practice: a pharmacist-driven prospective audit and feedback improvement model for peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in 34 South African hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brink, Adrian J; Messina, Angeliki P; Feldman, Charles; Richards, Guy A; van den Bergh, Dena

    2017-04-01

    Few data exist on the implementation of process measures to facilitate adherence to peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis (PAP) guidelines in Africa. To implement an improvement model for PAP utilizing existing resources, in order to achieve a reduction in surgical site infections (SSIs) across a heterogeneous group of 34 urban and rural South African hospitals. A pharmacist-driven, prospective audit and feedback strategy involving change management and improvement principles was utilized. This 2.5 year intervention involved a pre-implementation phase to test a PAP guideline and a 'toolkit' at pilot sites. Following antimicrobial stewardship committee and clinician endorsement, the model was introduced in all institutions and a survey of baseline SSI and compliance rates with four process measures (antibiotic choice, dose, administration time and duration) was performed. The post-implementation phase involved audit, intervention and monthly feedback to facilitate improvements in compliance. For 70 weeks of standardized measurements and feedback, 24 206 surgical cases were reviewed. There was a significant improvement in compliance with all process measures (composite compliance) from 66.8% (95% CI 64.8-68.7) to 83.3% (95% CI 80.8-85.8), representing a 24.7% increase ( P  <   0.0001). The SSI rate decreased by 19.7% from a mean group rate of 2.46 (95% CI 2.18-2.73) pre-intervention to 1.97 post-intervention (95% CI 1.79-2.15) ( P  =   0.0029). The implementation of process improvement initiatives and principles targeted to institutional needs utilizing pharmacists can effectively improve PAP guideline compliance and sustainable patient outcomes.

  20. A prospective audit of the impact of additional staff on the care of diabetic patients in a community podiatry service.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alexandra; Uppal, Meenakshi; Cunning, Imelda; Buckley, Claire M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the employment of additional podiatry staff on patients with diabetes attending a community-based podiatry service. An audit was conducted to evaluate the intervention of two additional podiatry staff. All patients with diabetes referred to and attending community podiatry services in a specified area in the Republic of Ireland between June 2011 and June 2012 were included. The service was benchmarked against the UK gold standard outlined in the 'Guidelines on prevention & management of foot problems in Type 2 Diabetes' by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). Process of care measures addressed were the number of patients with diabetes receiving treatment and the waiting times of patients with diabetes from referral to initial review. An increase in the number of patients with diabetes receiving treatment was seen in all risk categories (ranging from low risk to the emergency foot). Waiting times for patients with diabetes decreased post-intervention but did not reach the targets outlined in the NICE guidelines. The average time from referral to initial review of patients with an emergency diabetic foot was 37 weeks post-intervention. NICE guidelines recommend that these patients are seen within 24 hours. During the life cycle of this audit, increased numbers of patients were treated and waiting times for patients with diabetes were reduced. An internal re-organisation of the services coincided with the commencement of the additional staff. The improvements observed were due to the effects of a combination of additional staff and service re-organisation. Efficient organisation of services is key to optimal performance. Continued efforts to improve services are required to reach the standards outlined in the NICE guidelines.

  1. What are incident reports telling us? A comparative study at two Australian hospitals of medication errors identified at audit, detected by staff and reported to an incident system.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Li, Ling; Lehnbom, Elin C; Baysari, Melissa T; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Burke, Rosemary; Conn, Chris; Day, Richard O

    2015-02-01

    To (i) compare medication errors identified at audit and observation with medication incident reports; (ii) identify differences between two hospitals in incident report frequency and medication error rates; (iii) identify prescribing error detection rates by staff. Audit of 3291 patient records at two hospitals to identify prescribing errors and evidence of their detection by staff. Medication administration errors were identified from a direct observational study of 180 nurses administering 7451 medications. Severity of errors was classified. Those likely to lead to patient harm were categorized as 'clinically important'. Two major academic teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Rates of medication errors identified from audit and from direct observation were compared with reported medication incident reports. A total of 12 567 prescribing errors were identified at audit. Of these 1.2/1000 errors (95% CI: 0.6-1.8) had incident reports. Clinically important prescribing errors (n = 539) were detected by staff at a rate of 218.9/1000 (95% CI: 184.0-253.8), but only 13.0/1000 (95% CI: 3.4-22.5) were reported. 78.1% (n = 421) of clinically important prescribing errors were not detected. A total of 2043 drug administrations (27.4%; 95% CI: 26.4-28.4%) contained ≥ 1 errors; none had an incident report. Hospital A had a higher frequency of incident reports than Hospital B, but a lower rate of errors at audit. Prescribing errors with the potential to cause harm frequently go undetected. Reported incidents do not reflect the profile of medication errors which occur in hospitals or the underlying rates. This demonstrates the inaccuracy of using incident frequency to compare patient risk or quality performance within or across hospitals. New approaches including data mining of electronic clinical information systems are required to support more effective medication error detection and mitigation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association

  2. What are incident reports telling us? A comparative study at two Australian hospitals of medication errors identified at audit, detected by staff and reported to an incident system

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Johanna I.; Li, Ling; Lehnbom, Elin C.; Baysari, Melissa T.; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Burke, Rosemary; Conn, Chris; Day, Richard O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To (i) compare medication errors identified at audit and observation with medication incident reports; (ii) identify differences between two hospitals in incident report frequency and medication error rates; (iii) identify prescribing error detection rates by staff. Design Audit of 3291patient records at two hospitals to identify prescribing errors and evidence of their detection by staff. Medication administration errors were identified from a direct observational study of 180 nurses administering 7451 medications. Severity of errors was classified. Those likely to lead to patient harm were categorized as ‘clinically important’. Setting Two major academic teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Main Outcome Measures Rates of medication errors identified from audit and from direct observation were compared with reported medication incident reports. Results A total of 12 567 prescribing errors were identified at audit. Of these 1.2/1000 errors (95% CI: 0.6–1.8) had incident reports. Clinically important prescribing errors (n = 539) were detected by staff at a rate of 218.9/1000 (95% CI: 184.0–253.8), but only 13.0/1000 (95% CI: 3.4–22.5) were reported. 78.1% (n = 421) of clinically important prescribing errors were not detected. A total of 2043 drug administrations (27.4%; 95% CI: 26.4–28.4%) contained ≥1 errors; none had an incident report. Hospital A had a higher frequency of incident reports than Hospital B, but a lower rate of errors at audit. Conclusions Prescribing errors with the potential to cause harm frequently go undetected. Reported incidents do not reflect the profile of medication errors which occur in hospitals or the underlying rates. This demonstrates the inaccuracy of using incident frequency to compare patient risk or quality performance within or across hospitals. New approaches including data mining of electronic clinical information systems are required to support more effective medication error detection and

  3. Offenders with Intellectual Disability: A Prospective Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, P.; Hassiotis, A.; Banes, J.

    2004-01-01

    Intellectually disabled offenders (IDO) are a poorly served and under-recognized group, who are likely to require long-term specialist treatments and interventions. Method This prospective study investigated the characteristics and factors that influence outcome in this group, with particular reference to therapeutic interventions. Sixty-one…

  4. A 10-year prospective audit of LASIK outcomes for myopia in 37,932 eyes at a single institution in Asia.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Leonard H; Chan, Wing Kwong; Koh, Jane; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Tan, Donald T

    2010-06-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy, predictability and safety of LASIK surgery as a treatment for myopia performed as part of a large-scale, prospective clinical audit spanning 10 years in an Asian study population and to evaluate the outcomes and trends. Prospective, nonrandomized, single-center, multisurgeon study. We included 37,932 eyes of 19,753 patients that underwent myopic LASIK at the Singapore National Eye Centre between 1998 and 2007. All eyes underwent LASIK as a treatment for myopia. Pre- and postoperative refractions, uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were documented. Safety, efficacy, refractive predictability, treatment trends, retreatment rates, and complications for mild, moderate, and high myopia according to spherical equivalence (SE) of less than -5.00 diopters (D), -5.00 D or more to less than -10.0 D, and -10.00 D or more, respectively. Patients' median age was 32 years (mean, 33.0+/-7.9 years); there were 6832 males (34.6%) and 12,921 females included. Patients were predominantly ethnic Chinese (90.5%). Mean follow-up time was 68.8 days. The mean spherical error corrected was -5.90+/-2.57 D (median, -5.625 D), and outcomes were categorized into low, moderate, or high myopia. The UCVA achieving > or =20/40 has been consistently above 90% since 2000, with 72.8% achieving > or =20/20. More than 93.0% of eyes achieved within +/-1.00 D target in the last 4 years. An improvement in safety was observed since the start of the study, with the best outcomes observed in 2007; loss of 1 and 2 Snellen line BCVA postoperatively was 2.4% and 0.1%, respectively. The overall retreatment rate was 3.8%; 91% of retreated eyes achieved UCVA of > or =20/30. Between 1998 and 2007, there was a significant improvement in postoperative UCVA and BCVA (P<0.001). Myopic LASIK performed in Asian eyes within a comprehensive LASIK clinical program with appropriate clinical audit governance can be safe and effective, with high

  5. Comparative testing of reliability and audit utility of ordinal objective calculus complexity scores. Can we make an informed choice yet?

    PubMed

    Jaipuria, Jiten; Suryavanshi, Manav; Sen, Tridib K

    2016-12-01

    To assess the reliability of the Guy's Stone Score, the Seoul National University Renal Stone Complexity (S-ReSC) score and the S.T.O.N.E. scores in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and assess their utility in discriminating outcomes [stone free rate (SFR), complications, need for multiple PCNL sessions, and auxiliary procedures] valid across parameters of experience of surgeon, independence from surgical approach, and variations in institution-specific instrumentation. A prospectively maintained database of two tertiary institutions was analysed (606 cases). Institutes differed in instrumentation, while the overall surgical team comprised: two trainees (experience <100 cases), two junior consultants (experience 100-200 cases), and two senior surgeons (experience >1000 cases). Scores were assigned and re-assigned after 4 months by one trainee and an expert surgeon. Inter-rater and test-retest agreement were analysed by Cohen's κ and intraclass correlation coefficient. Multivariate logistic regression models were created adjusting outcomes for the institution, comorbidity, Amplatz size, access tract location, the number of punctures, the experience level of the surgeon, and individual scoring system, and receiver operating curves were analysed for comparison. Despite some areas of inconsistencies, individually all scores had excellent inter-rater and test-retest concordance. On multivariable analyses, while the experience of the surgeon and surgical approach characteristics (such as access tract location, Amplatz size, and number of punctures) remained independently associated with different outcomes in varying combinations, calculus complexity scores were found consistently to be independently associated with all outcomes. The S-ReSC score had a superior association with SFR, the need for multiple PCNL sessions, and auxiliary procedures. Individually all scoring systems performed well. On cross comparison, the S-ReSC score consistently emerged to be more

  6. China’s Democratization Prospects: A Comparative Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    implications at the international level. Based on Kant’s democratic peace theory, a democratic China would have a lower probability of going to war with...each country are distinct. To apply a single theory to gauge the prospects of democratization runs the risk of oversimplification and will result in...flexible and resilient without democratizing, others believe that the economic reforms in China for the past three decades have propelled China in

  7. Comparative Analysis of Five Observational Audit Tools to Assess the Physical Environment of Parks for Physical Activity, 2016

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, Jay E.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed prominent audit tools used to assess the physical environment of parks and their potential to promote physical activity. To accomplish this, we manually searched the Active Living Research website (http://www.activelivingresearch.com) for published observational audit tools that evaluate the physical environment of parks, and we reviewed park audit tools used in studies included in a systematic review of observational park-based physical activity studies. We identified 5 observational audit tools for review: Bedimo-Rung Assessment Tool–Direct Observation (BRAT-DO), Community Park Audit Tool (CPAT), Environmental Assessment of Public Recreation Spaces (EAPRS) tool, Physical Activity Resource Assessment (PARA), and Quality of Public Open Space Tool (POST). All 5 tools have established inter-rater reliability estimates ranging from moderate to good. However, BRAT-DO is the only tool with published validity. We found substantial heterogeneity among the 5 in length, format, intended users, and specific items assessed. Researchers, practitioners, or community coalition members should review the goal of their specific project and match their goal with the most appropriate tool and the people who will be using it. PMID:27978411

  8. Identification of important and potentially avoidable risk factors in a prospective audit study of neonatal deaths in a paediatric hospital in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Alexandra Y; Phuong, Cam N; Ho, Binh T T; Stensballe, Lone G; Pedersen, Freddy K; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-02-01

    Neonatal deaths (≤28 days) account for more than half of child mortality in Vietnam. Presumably most die in hospital, but data are scarce. This study aimed to identify risk factors of death among hospitalised neonates. We prospectively studied all neonatal deaths and expected deaths (discharged alive after withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment) in a Vietnamese tertiary paediatric hospital during a 12-month period in 2009-2010. The medical files were audited classifying admission prognosis, discharge outcome, cause of death/expected death according to two classifications, and important and potentially avoidable risk factors during the hospital stay. Among 5763 neonates admitted, 235 deaths and 67 expected deaths were included. According to both classifications, major causes were congenital malformations, prematurity and severe infections. Six risk factors were identified in 85% (60/71) of the neonates with a relatively good prognosis: recognition or response to danger signs, internal transfers, nosocomial infections, sepsis management, access to usual equipment/staff, and family perception. Among 302 neonatal deaths/expected deaths, the major causes were congenital malformations, prematurity and severe infections. Six important and potentially avoidable risk factors could be addressed in the subgroup with relatively good admission prognosis, without implementing new technology or major organisational changes. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Secondary analysis of outcomes after 11,085 hip fracture operations from the prospective UK Anaesthesia Sprint Audit of Practice (ASAP-2).

    PubMed

    White, S M; Moppett, I K; Griffiths, R; Johansen, A; Wakeman, R; Boulton, C; Plant, F; Williams, A; Pappenheim, K; Majeed, A; Currie, C T; Grocott, M P W

    2016-05-01

    We re-analysed prospective data collected by anaesthetists in the Anaesthesia Sprint Audit of Practice (ASAP-1) to describe associations with linked outcome data. Mortality was 165/11,085 (1.5%) 5 days and 563/11,085 (5.1%) 30 days after surgery and was not associated with anaesthetic technique (general vs. spinal, with or without peripheral nerve blockade). The risk of death increased as blood pressure fell: the odds ratio (95% CI) for mortality within five days after surgery was 0.983 (0.973-0.994) for each 5 mmHg intra-operative increment in systolic blood pressure, p = 0.0016, and 0.980 (0.967-0.993) for each mmHg increment in mean pressure, p = 0.0039. The equivalent odds ratios (95% CI) for 30-day mortality were 0.968 (0.951-0.985), p = 0.0003 and 0.976 (0.964-0.988), p = 0.0001, respectively. The lowest systolic blood pressure after intrathecal local anaesthetic relative to before induction was weakly correlated with a higher volume of subarachnoid bupivacaine: r(2) -0.10 and -0.16 for hyperbaric and isobaric bupivacaine, respectively. A mean 20% relative fall in systolic blood pressure correlated with an administered volume of 1.44 ml hyperbaric bupivacaine. Future research should focus on refining standardised anaesthesia towards administering lower doses of spinal (and general) anaesthesia and maintaining normotension.

  10. A silver coated dressing reduces the incidence of early burn wound cellulitis and associated costs of inpatient treatment: comparative patient care audits.

    PubMed

    Fong, J; Wood, F; Fowler, B

    2005-08-01

    In 2000 and 2002, the Royal Perth Hospital (RPH) Burn Unit, Western Australia, conducted two 'before and after' patient care audits comparing the effectiveness and cost of Silvazine (silver sulphadiazine and chlorhexidine digluconate cream) and Acticoat, a new dressing product for in-patient treatment of early burn wounds. The main outcome variables were: burn wound cellulitis, antibiotic use and cost of treatment. Two patient care audits and a comparative sample were used. The two regimes audited were, 'standard treatment' of twice daily showers or washes with 4% chlorhexidine soap and Silvazine cream as a topical dressing (2000, n=51), compared with the 'new treatment' of daily showers of the burn wound with 4% chlorhexidine soap and the application of an Acticoat dressing (2002, n=19). In 2002, costs were also examined using a sample of matched pairs (n=8) of current and previous patients. The main findings were: when using Acticoat the incidence of infection and antibiotic use fell from 55% (28/51) and 57% (29/51) in 2000 to 10.5% (2/19) and 5.2% (1/19) in 2002. The total costs (excluding antibiotics, staffing and surgery) for those treated with Silvazine were US$ 109,357 and those treated with Acticoat were US$ 78,907, demonstrating a saving of US$ 30,450 with the new treatment. The average length of stay (LOS) in hospital was 17.25 days for the Silvazine group and 12.5 days for the Acticoat group-a difference of 4.75 days. These audits demonstrate that Acticoat results in a reduced incidence of burn wound cellulitis, antibiotic use and overall cost compared to Silvazine in the treatment of early burn wounds.

  11. Energy Auditing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Energy Engineers, Atlanta, GA.

    Presented is a discussion of various aspects of policy and implementation of energy auditing at various levels of government. Included are 11 chapters dealing with: (1) a national energy plan, (2) state certification for energy auditors, (3) survey instrumentation, (4) energy management economics, (5) Maine school energy auditing, (6) energy…

  12. Desiderata for a computer-assisted audit tool for clinical data source verification audits.

    PubMed

    Duda, Stephany N; Wehbe, Firas H; Gadd, Cynthia S

    2010-01-01

    Clinical data auditing often requires validating the contents of clinical research databases against source documents available in health care settings. Currently available data audit software, however, does not provide features necessary to compare the contents of such databases to source data in paper medical records. This work enumerates the primary weaknesses of using paper forms for clinical data audits and identifies the shortcomings of existing data audit software, as informed by the experiences of an audit team evaluating data quality for an international research consortium. The authors propose a set of attributes to guide the development of a computer-assisted clinical data audit tool to simplify and standardize the audit process.

  13. Chiropractic audits

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Allan M

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the process which deals with audits of chiropractic billings. It includes the statutory right to review accounts, the factors which lead to a possible audit, the review process itself as well as the possible outcome of a review. Generally, the number of audits performed on professional practices is minimal in relation to the number of practitioners who submit billings for services. Audits are a matter of public necessity involving accountability to the patient and, if government billings are involved, to the public in general. It is incumbent upon the doctor to ensure that proper protocols exist within his or her office to ensure that an audit is nothing more than opening one’s office for an inspection which should satisfy all of the concerned parties as to legitimacy of the practitioner’s entitlement for reimbursement for services rendered.

  14. Transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy compared with laparoscopy for the evaluation of infertile women: a prospective comparative blind study.

    PubMed

    Darai, E; Dessolle, L; Lecuru, F; Soriano, D

    2000-11-01

    Standard diagnostic laparoscopy is considered the gold standard to investigate tubo-peritoneal infertility. It requires general anaesthesia and full operative facilities. Due to the risk of complications, laparoscopy is frequently postponed to the final stage of infertility evaluation or even after treatment trials have failed. Transvaginal hydrolaparoscopy (THL) is based on vaginal access using a needle puncture technique and saline for distention. THL can be performed on an outpatient basis under local anaesthesia. However, little data exist concerning the accuracy of THL in comparison with laparoscopy. We conducted a prospective comparative blind trial to assess the feasibility and accuracy of THL compared with diagnostic laparoscopy in infertile women. Sixty women were assigned to undergo THL immediately prior to laparoscopy. Different operators evaluated the findings of the two procedures. In order to evaluate the accuracy of THL, findings in terms of tubal pathology, endometriosis and adhesions were analysed. The success rate of accessing the pouch of Douglas was 90.2%. Complication rate was 1.6%. THL diagnosis was correlated with that of laparoscopy in 92.3% of cases. In cases of abnormal findings by THL, there were no normal laparoscopies. Our pilot study suggests that THL is a safe and reproducible method. Retroverted uterus should be considered as a relative contraindication to THL. When a complete evaluation by THL is available, it is a highly accurate technique in comparison with the laparoscopy.

  15. Comparing the AUDIT and 3 Drinking Indices as Predictors of Personal and Social Drinking Problems in Freshman First Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The current study of 376 college freshman adjudicated the first time for breaking university drinking rules tested the predictive power of four alcohol consumption and problem drinking indices--recent changes in drinking (the Alcohol Change Index: ACI), heavy drinking, binge drinking index, and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)…

  16. Comparing the AUDIT and 3 Drinking Indices as Predictors of Personal and Social Drinking Problems in Freshman First Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The current study of 376 college freshman adjudicated the first time for breaking university drinking rules tested the predictive power of four alcohol consumption and problem drinking indices--recent changes in drinking (the Alcohol Change Index: ACI), heavy drinking, binge drinking index, and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT)…

  17. A Comparative Study of Problematic Internet Use and Loneliness among Turkish and Korean Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutgun, Aylin; Deniz, Levent; Moon, Man-Ki

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to compare the problematic internet use and its relation to loneliness among two nations' prospective teachers, Turkey and South Korea. Five hundred and ninety five prospective teachers from three universities, two from Turkey and one from South Korea participated in the study. Generalized Problematic Internet Use…

  18. The effect of a comprehensive injury audit program on injury incidence in ballet: a 3-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Nick; Nevill, Alan M; Brooks, John H M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an intervention with individualized conditioning program based on injury history and functional movement screening would be effective in reducing ballet injury incidence. Prospective 3-year epidemiological study. Professional ballet company and its in-house medical facility. Dancers from a professional ballet company over the 3-year study period. Participant numbers ranged from 52 to 58 (year 1: 52; year 2: 58; year 3: 53). The intervention consisted of individual conditioning programs developed using injury history and functional movement screening. Analysis was undertaken of the all dancers who were present in the company during the study period. The significance of change in injuries over a 3-year period was determined using a Poisson distribution model. To determine whether individual conditioning programs resulted in a decrease in injury incidence over the study period. The injury count reduced significantly in years 2 and 3 (P < 0.001). Injury incidence for male dancers declined from year 1 (in year/1000 h) (4.76/1000 h) to year 2 (2.40/1000 h) and year 3 (2.22/1000 h). For women, a reduction in the injury incidence was observed from year 1 (4.14/1000 h) to year 2 (1.71/1000 h) and year 3 (1.81/1000 h). Through prospective injury surveillance, we were able to demonstrate the benefit of individualized conditioning programs based on injury history and functional movement screening in reducing injuries in ballet. The implementation of well-structured injury surveillance programs can impact on injury incidence through its influence on intervention programs.

  19. National Comparative Audit of Blood Use in Elective Primary Unilateral Total Hip Replacement Surgery in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Boralessa, H; Goldhill, DR; Tucker, K; Mortimer, AJ; Grant-Casey, J

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Blood is a scarce and expensive product. Although it may be life-saving, in recent years there has been an increased emphasis on the potential hazards of transfusion as well as evidence supporting the use of lower transfusion thresholds. Orthopaedic surgery accounts for some 10% of transfused red blood cells and evidence suggests that there is considerable variation in transfusion practice. PATIENTS AND METHODS NHS Blood and Transplant, in collaboration with the Royal College of Physicians, undertook a national audit on transfusion practice. Each hospital was asked to provide information relating to 40 consecutive patients undergoing elective, primary unilateral total hip replacement surgery. The results were compared to indicators and standards. RESULTS Information was analysed relating to 7465 operations performed in 223 hospitals. Almost all hospitals had a system for referring abnormal pre-operative blood results to a doctor and 73% performed a group-and-save rather than a cross-match before surgery. Of hospitals, 47% had a transfusion policy. In 73%, the policy recommended a transfusion threshold at a haemoglobin concentration of 8 g/dl or less. There was a wide variation in transfusion rate among hospitals. Of patients, 15% had a haemoglobin concentration less than 12 g/dl recorded in the 28 days before surgery and 57% of these patients were transfused compared to 20% with higher pre-operative values. Of those who were transfused, 7% were given a single unit and 67% two units. Of patients transfused two or more units during days 1–14 after surgery, 65% had a post transfusion haemoglobin concentration of 10 g/dl or more. CONCLUSIONS Pre-operative anaemia, lack of availability of transfusion protocols and use of different thresholds for transfusion may have contributed to the wide variation in transfusion rate. Effective measures to identify and correct pre-operative anaemia may decrease the need for transfusion. A consistent, evidence

  20. Is parenteral chemotherapy safe in rural hospitals? A prospective audit of neutropenic fever in Albany Hospital, a regional West Australian cancer centre.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, K; Auret, K

    2017-02-01

    Neutropenic fever is a life-threatening complication of chemotherapy. The widely dispersed population of Australia creates challenges for rural patients in accessing healthcare services. Cancer treatment is particularly, burdensome with patients being forced to relocate to the city for treatment or to endure long and repeated journeys to the city. This study aimed to assess the safety of chemotherapy in a rural centre with a general physician-led model, by analysing neutropenic fever in Albany Hospital, a regional cancer centre in Western Australia. A prospective audit of patients undergoing parenteral chemotherapy was undertaken from March 2014 to March 2015. Cases of neutropenic fever as a consequence of parenteral chemotherapy were analysed and recorded by the Albany Hospital medical registrar. There were 1294 cycles of chemotherapy administered to 192 patients during the study period. There were 19 cases of neutropenic fever in 16 patients, meaning 8.33% of patients undergoing parenteral chemotherapy had their treatment complicated by neutropenic fever (n = 16/192). The incidence of neutropenic fever was 1.47% per cycle of chemotherapy (n = 19/1294). There were no deaths in the study period. As per guidelines, antibiotics were given within 60 min of arrival in 73.68% of cases (n = 14/19). The rate of neutropenic fever observed was similar to rates in other centres worldwide, and the mortality rate was lower than average, with no deaths in the study population. These results provide reassurance with regards to the safe delivery of parenteral chemotherapy in this rural centre with a general physician-led model. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. NCQA implements new outcomes audit standards.

    PubMed

    1997-06-01

    Faulty data gathering and auditing techniques have put in question the comparability of HEDIS outcomes standards. The National Center for Quality Assurance has moved to shore up its data's credibility with new auditing standards. A new class of certified auditors must be trained. Until then, the Health Care Financing Administration will have Medicare managed care organizations audited by independent firms.

  2. A Critical Evaluation of Academic Internal Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Jacqueline Ann

    2004-01-01

    This account of internal audit is set within the context of higher education in the UK and a fictitiously named Riverbank University. The study evaluates the recent introduction of "Internal Academic Audit" to the University and compares the process with that of the internationally recognized ISO 19011 Guidelines for Auditing Quality…

  3. A Critical Evaluation of Academic Internal Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Jacqueline Ann

    2004-01-01

    This account of internal audit is set within the context of higher education in the UK and a fictitiously named Riverbank University. The study evaluates the recent introduction of "Internal Academic Audit" to the University and compares the process with that of the internationally recognized ISO 19011 Guidelines for Auditing Quality…

  4. Scholastic Audits. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    What is a scholastic audit? The purpose of the audit is to assist individual schools and districts improve. The focus is on gathering data and preparing recommendations that can be used to guide school improvement initiatives. Scholastic audits use a multi-step approach and include: (1) Preparing for the Audit; (2) Audit process; (3) Audit report;…

  5. A prospective randomized trial comparing open versus laparoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Frazee, R C; Roberts, J W; Symmonds, R E; Snyder, S K; Hendricks, J C; Smith, R W; Custer, M D; Harrison, J B

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined whether there was an advantage to laparoscopic appendectomy when compared with open appendectomy. SUMMARY/BACKGROUND DATA: The advantages of laparoscopic appendectomy versus open appendectomy were questioned because the recovery from open appendectomy is brief. METHODS: From January 15, 1992 through January 15, 1993, 75 patients older than 9 years were entered into a study randomizing the choice of operation to either the open or the laparoscopic technique. Statistical comparisons were performed using the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients were assigned to the open appendectomy group and 38 patients were assigned to the laparoscopic appendectomy group. Two patients were converted intraoperatively from laparoscopic appendectomies to open procedures. Thirty-one patients (81%) in the open group had acute appendicitis, as did 32 patients (84%) in the laparoscopic group. Mean duration of surgery was 65 minutes for open appendectomy and 87 minutes for laparoscopic appendectomy (p < 0.001). There were no statistically significant differences in length of hospitalization, interval until resumption of a regular diet, or morbidity. Duration of both parenteral and oral analgesic use favored laparoscopic appendectomy (2.0 days versus 1.2 days, and 8.0 days versus 5.4 days, p < 0.05). All patients were instructed to return to full activities by 2 weeks postoperatively. This occurred at an average of 25 days for the open appendectomy group versus 14 days for the laparoscopic appendectomy group (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who underwent laparoscopic appendectomies have a shorter duration of analgesic use and return to full activities sooner postoperatively when compared with patients who underwent open appendectomies. The authors consider laparoscopic appendectomy to be the procedure of choice in patients with acute appendicitis. PMID:8203983

  6. AUDIT, AUDIT-C, and AUDIT-3: Drinking Patterns and Screening for Harmful, Hazardous and Dependent Drinking in Katutura, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Puja; Glenshaw, Mary; Sabatier, Jennifer H. F.; Adams, René; Du Preez, Verona; DeLuca, Nickolas; Bock, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe alcohol drinking patterns among participants in Katutura, Namibia, and to evaluate brief versions of the AUDIT against the full AUDIT to determine their effectiveness in detecting harmful drinking. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in four constituencies and 639 participants, 18 years or older, completed a sociodemographic survey and the AUDIT. The effectiveness of the AUDIT-C (first three questions) and the AUDIT-3 (third question) was compared to the full AUDIT. Results Approximately 40% were identified as harmful, hazardous or likely dependent drinkers, with men having a higher likelihood than women (57.2% vs. 31.0%, p<.0001). Approximately 32% reported making and/or selling alcohol from home. The AUDIT-C performed best at a cutoff ≥ 3, better in men (sensitivity: 99.3%, specificity: 77.8%) than women (sensitivity: 91.7%, specificity: 77.4%). The AUDIT-3 performed poorly (maximum sensitivity: < 90%, maximum specificity: <51%). According to AUROC, the AUDIT-C performed better than the AUDIT-3. Conclusions A large proportion of participants met criteria for alcohol misuse, indicating a need for screening and referral for further evaluation and intervention. The AUDIT-C was almost as effective as the full AUDIT and may be easier to implement in clinical settings as a routine screening tool in resource-limited settings because of its brevity. PMID:25799590

  7. AUDIT, AUDIT-C, and AUDIT-3: drinking patterns and screening for harmful, hazardous and dependent drinking in Katutura, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Seth, Puja; Glenshaw, Mary; Sabatier, Jennifer H F; Adams, René; Du Preez, Verona; DeLuca, Nickolas; Bock, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    To describe alcohol drinking patterns among participants in Katutura, Namibia, and to evaluate brief versions of the AUDIT against the full AUDIT to determine their effectiveness in detecting harmful drinking. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in four constituencies and 639 participants, 18 years or older, completed a sociodemographic survey and the AUDIT. The effectiveness of the AUDIT-C (first three questions) and the AUDIT-3 (third question) was compared to the full AUDIT. Approximately 40% were identified as harmful, hazardous or likely dependent drinkers, with men having a higher likelihood than women (57.2% vs. 31.0%, p<.0001). Approximately 32% reported making and/or selling alcohol from home. The AUDIT-C performed best at a cutoff ≥ 3, better in men (sensitivity: 99.3%, specificity: 77.8%) than women (sensitivity: 91.7%, specificity: 77.4%). The AUDIT-3 performed poorly (maximum sensitivity: < 90%, maximum specificity: <51%). According to AUROC, the AUDIT-C performed better than the AUDIT-3. A large proportion of participants met criteria for alcohol misuse, indicating a need for screening and referral for further evaluation and intervention. The AUDIT-C was almost as effective as the full AUDIT and may be easier to implement in clinical settings as a routine screening tool in resource-limited settings because of its brevity.

  8. What are the critical steps in processing blood cultures? A prospective audit evaluating current practice of reporting blood cultures in a centralised laboratory serving secondary care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Meda, Manjula; Clayton, James; Varghese, Reela; Rangaiah, Jayakeerthi; Grundy, Clive; Dashti, Farnaz; Garner, David; Groves, Katherine; Fitzmaurice, Karen; Hutley, E

    2017-04-01

    To assess current procedures of processing positive blood cultures against national standards with an aim to evaluate its clinical impact and to determine the utility of currently available rapid identification and susceptibility tests in processing of blood cultures. Blood cultures from three secondary care hospitals, processed at a centralised laboratory, were prospectively audited. Data regarding processing times, communication with prescribers, changes to patient management and mortality within 30 days of a significant blood culture were collected in a preplanned pro forma for a 4-week period. Of 2206 blood cultures, 211 positive blood cultures flagged positive. Sixty-nine (3.1%) of all cultures were considered to be contaminated. Fifty per cent of blood cultures that flagged positive had a Gram stain reported within 2 hours. Two (0.99%) patients with a significant bacteraemia had escalation of antimicrobial treatment at the point of reporting the Gram stain that was subsequently deemed necessary once sensitivity results were known. Most common intervention was de-escalation of therapy for Gram-positive organisms at the point of availability of pathogen identification (25.6% in Gram positive vs 10% in Gram negative; p=0.012). For Gram-negative organisms, the most common intervention was de-escalation of therapy at the point of availability of sensitivity results (43% in Gram negatives vs 17.9% in Gram positive; p=0.0097). Overall mortality within 30 days of a positive blood culture was 10.9% (23/211). Antibiotic resistance may have contributed to mortality in four of these patients (three Gram negative and one Gram positive). Gram stain result had the least impact on antibiotic treatment interventions (escalation or de-escalation). Tests that improve identification time for Gram-positive pathogens and sensitivity time for Gram-negative pathogens had the greatest impact in making significant changes to antimicrobial treatment. Published by the BMJ

  9. Femoral Arterial Haemostasis Using an Anchored Collagen Plug after Percutaneous EVAR with an Ultra-Low Profile Device: Prospective Audit of an Evolving "Post-Close" Technique.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, A

    2017-08-01

    To present an audit of a successful "post-close" haemostatic technique using the Angio-Seal VIP vascular closure device (VCD) after percutaneous endovascular aneurysm repair (p-EVAR) using an ultra-low profile (ULP) device. Thirty patients underwent EVAR using the Ovation device, of which 26 procedures were totally percutaneous. Data including patient habitus, procedural details, number of VCDs deployed including use of the double wire approach, and technical success/complications were prospectively recorded. Numerical/statistical analyses were undertaken using Microsoft Excel 2007 and Minitab for Windows. Thirty consecutive patients (27 male, 3 female; age range 70-85 years [mean 76.1, SD 6.5]) underwent EVAR for an infrarenal AAA (mean size 61 mm, SD 9.7) between March 2014 and August 2016 using the Ovation endograft system. In a few patients open ipsilateral femoral access was used (n=4); the remainder underwent p-EVAR (n=26), and these results are presented hereafter. Ipsilateral sheath sizes used varied between 14F (n=22), 15F (n=3), and 16F (n=1), and were closed using a single 8F Angio-Seal (n=7), a combination of 8F/6F Angio-Seal VCDs (n=18), or two 8F Angio-Seal VCDs (n=1) with prior double wire set up. Contralateral punctures were closed mostly with a single 8F Angio-Seal (n=24) or combination of 8F/6F Angio-Seal VCDs (n=2) to seal defects downsized to 12F. The overall immediate haemostasis success rate was 100%. Mean length of stay in the p-EVAR cohort was 2 days (SD 1.5). All patients had a post-EVAR computed tomography angiogram (n=24) or duplex ultrasound (n=2) which did not reveal any stenoses or seromas; two patients developed an ipsilateral femoral pseudoaneurysm successfully treated by thrombin injection. A "post-close" technique can be employed successfully for haemostasis after p-EVAR using an ULP device. An 8F Angio-Seal is usually effective in closing a 12F femoral arterial defect. This represents a viable option for femoral arterial closure

  10. Comparing numbers of drinks: college students' reports from retrospective summary, followback, and prospective daily diary measures.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Megan E; Lee, Christine M

    2010-07-01

    Retrospective summary, followback (retrospective diaries), and prospective daily diary measures of alcohol use among college students were compared across 29 days. Participants were college students (n = 176; 60.2% female). Similarities in the three web-based reporting methods and both between-persons (i.e., gender, past drinking behavior, fraternity/sorority affiliation, average drinking behavior during the study period) and within-person (i.e., daily number of drinks, weekend days, Halloween, and week of study) predictors of concordance between reports of followback and prospective diaries were analyzed. On prospective diaries, students reported a greater number of maximum drinks (compared with followback only) and a greater number of heavy drinking days in the past 2 weeks (compared with both followback and retrospective summary measures). In followback compared with prospective diaries, students tended to provide inflated accounts of their drinking behavior when reporting about occasions with greater typical drinking (i.e., weekends, Halloween) and deflated accounts of their drinking on their own heavier drinking days, especially if they were affiliated with a fraternity/sorority. Women and students who drank more on average across study days tended to provide deflated estimates of their day-to-day drinking in followback compared with prospective diary. Understanding the concordance and discordance in self-reported alcohol use is an important area for continued research efforts.

  11. Comparing Numbers of Drinks: College Students' Reports From Retrospective Summary, Followback, and Prospective Daily Diary Measures*

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Megan E.; Lee, Christine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Retrospective summary, followback (retrospective diaries), and prospective daily diary measures of alcohol use among college students were compared across 29 days. Method: Participants were college students (n = 176; 60.2% female). Similarities in the three web-based reporting methods and both between-persons (i.e., gender, past drinking behavior, fraternity/sorority affiliation, average drinking behavior during the study period) and within-person (i.e., daily number of drinks, weekend days, Halloween, and week of study) predictors of concordance between reports of followback and prospective diaries were analyzed. Results: On prospective diaries, students reported a greater number of maximum drinks (compared with followback only) and a greater number of heavy drinking days in the past 2 weeks (compared with both followback and retrospective summary measures). In followback compared with prospective diaries, students tended to provide inflated accounts of their drinking behavior when reporting about occasions with greater typical drinking (i.e., weekends, Halloween) and deflated accounts of their drinking on their own heavier drinking days, especially if they were affiliated with a fraternity/sorority. Women and students who drank more on average across study days tended to provide deflated estimates of their day-to-day drinking in followback compared with prospective diary. Conclusions: Understanding the concordance and discordance in self-reported alcohol use is an important area for continued research efforts. PMID:20553664

  12. Retrospective and prospective data collection compared in the Dutch End Of Life in Dementia (DEOLD) study.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Jenny T; Ribbe, Miel W; Deliens, Luc; Gutschow, Giselka; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2014-01-01

    Studying end of life in dementia patients is challenging because of ill-defined prognoses and frequent inability to self-report. We aim to quantify and compare (1) feasibility and (2) sampling issues between prospective and retrospective data collection specific to end-of-life research in long-term care settings. The observational Dutch End of Life in Dementia study (DEOLD; 2007 to 2011) used both prospective data collection (28 facilities; 17 nursing home organizations/physician teams; questionnaires between January 2007 and July 2010, survival until July 2011) and retrospective data collection (exclusively after death; 6 facilities; 2 teams, questionnaires between November 2007 and March 2010). Prospective collection extended from the time of admission to the time after death or conclusion of the study. Prospectively, we recruited 372 families: 218 residents died (59%) and 184 (49%) had complete physician and family after-death assessments. Retrospectively, 119 decedents were enrolled, with 64 (54%) complete assessments. Cumulative data collection over all homes lasted 80 and 8 years, respectively. Per complete after-death assessments in a year, the prospective data collection involved 37.9 beds, whereas this was 7.9 for the retrospective data collection. Although age at death, sex, and survival curves were similar, prospectively, decedents' length of stay was shorter (10.3 vs. 31.4 mo), and fewer residents had advanced dementia (39% vs. 54%). Regarding feasibility, we conclude that prospective data collection is many fold more intensive and complex per complete after-death assessment. Regarding sampling, if not all are followed until death, it results in right censoring and in different, nonrepresentative samples of decedents compared with retrospective data collection. Future work may adjust or stratify for dementia severity and length of stay as key issues to promote comparability between studies.

  13. Improving everyday prospective memory performance in older adults: comparing cognitive process and strategy training.

    PubMed

    Brom, Sarah Susanne; Kliegel, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    Considering the importance of prospective memory for independence in old age recently, research has started to examine interventions to reduce prospective memory errors. Two general approaches can be proposed: (a) process training of executive control associated with prospective memory functioning, and/or (b) strategy training to reduce executive task demands. The present study was the first to combine and compare both training methods in a sample of 62 community-dwelling older adults (60-86 years) and to explore their effects on an ecologically valid everyday life prospective memory task (here: regular blood pressure monitoring). Even though the training of executive control was successful in enhancing the trained ability, clear transfer effects on prospective memory performance could only be found for the strategy training. However, participants with low executive abilities benefited particularly from the implementation intention strategy. Conceptually, this supports models suggesting interactions between task demands and individual differences in executive control in explaining individual differences in prospective memory performance. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. A Comparison of Radial and Femoral Coronary Angiography in Patients From SNAPSHOT ACS, a Prospective Acute Coronary Syndrome Audit in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Mitchell; Ellis, Chris; Gamble, Greg; Devlin, Gerry; Elliott, John; Hammett, Chris; Chew, Derek; French, John; Briffa, Tom; Redfern, Julie; Rankin, Jamie; Hyun, Karice; D'Souza, Mario; Brieger, David

    2017-03-01

    There is wide variation in the use of radial over femoral access for patients with ACS. This study evaluates the factors associated with the selection of radial versus femoral angiography in Australia and New Zealand and the effect of access site on clinical events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. An analysis of the SNAPSHOT ACS audit was conducted during May 2012 across 286 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Data collected included baseline patient characteristics, hospital site details, treatment received, clinical events in-hospital and mortality at 18 months. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed. Of the 1621 patients undergoing coronary angiography, access was through the femoral artery in 1043 (63%), and the radial in 578 (36%) patients. Radial access dominated in New Zealand (241 out of 327, 73.7%), compared to Australia (337 out of 1293, 26.1%, p=<0.001), with interstate variation (6% to 54%, p=<0.001). Independent predictors of access site included country of admission (Odds of radial, Aus v NZ OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.08-0.24, p=<0.0001), prior CABG surgery (OR 0.16, 95% CI 0.09-0.31, p=<0.0001), high GRACE score (90(th) decile) (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.21-0.91, p=0.026) and admission to a centre with high annual PCI volume (>209 cases per year) (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.06-3.26, p=0.03). After adjustment, there was no difference in clinical events in-hospital or mortality at 18 months CONCLUSION: Coronary angiography in New Zealand rather than Australia is the strongest predictor of radial access in ACS patients. There was no difference in outcomes according to access site in this population based cohort study. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Prospective audit showing improved patient-assessed skin toxicity with use of betamethasone cream for those at high risk of radiation dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Erridge, Sara C; McCabe, Marie; Porter, Mandy K; Simpson, Patricia; Stillie, Alison L

    2016-10-01

    This audit was conducted before and after introduction of a risk-based skincare policy with prophylactic steroids recommended for those at high risk. Comparison of the two cohorts confirmed results seen in trials with significant reduction in redness, itch, discomfort, sleep disturbance, and use of analgesia with the addition of steroids.

  16. Can virtual streetscape audits reliably replace physical streetscape audits?

    PubMed

    Badland, Hannah M; Opit, Simon; Witten, Karen; Kearns, Robin A; Mavoa, Suzanne

    2010-12-01

    There is increasing recognition that the neighborhood-built environment influences health outcomes, such as physical activity behaviors, and technological advancements now provide opportunities to examine the neighborhood streetscape remotely. Accordingly, the aims of this methodological study are to: (1) compare the efficiencies of physically and virtually conducting a streetscape audit within the neighborhood context, and (2) assess the level of agreement between the physical (criterion) and virtual (test) audits. Built environment attributes associated with walking and cycling were audited using the New Zealand Systematic Pedestrian and Cycling Environment Scan (NZ-SPACES) in 48 street segments drawn from four neighborhoods in Auckland, New Zealand. Audits were conducted physically (on-site) and remotely (using Google Street View) in January and February 2010. Time taken to complete the audits, travel mileage, and Internet bandwidth used were also measured. It was quicker to conduct the virtual audits when compared with the physical audits (χ = 115.3 min (virtual), χ = 148.5 min (physical)). In the majority of cases, the physical and virtual audits were within the acceptable levels of agreement (ICC ≥  0.70) for the variables being assessed. The methodological implication of this study is that Google Street View is a potentially valuable data source for measuring the contextual features of neighborhood streets that likely impact on health outcomes. Overall, Google Street View provided a resource-efficient and reliable alternative to physically auditing the attributes of neighborhood streetscapes associated with walking and cycling. Supplementary data derived from other sources (e.g., Geographical Information Systems) could be used to assess the less reliable streetscape variables.

  17. A comparative audit of gunshot wounds and stab wounds to the neck in a South African metropolitan trauma service.

    PubMed

    Madsen, A S; Laing, G L; Bruce, J L; Clarke, D L

    2016-09-01

    Introduction The aim of this comparative study of gunshot wounds (GSWs) and stab wounds (SWs) to the neck was to quantify the impact of the mechanism of injury on the outcome and management of penetrating neck injury (PNI). Methods A prospective trauma registry was interrogated retrospectively. Data were analysed pertaining to demographics and injury severity score (ISS), physiology on presentation, anatomical site of wounds and injuries sustained, investigations, management, outcome and complications. Results There were 452 SW and 58 GSW cases over the 46 months of the study. Patients with GSWs were more likely to have extracervical injuries than those with SWs (69% vs 63%). The incidence of a 'significant cervical injury' was almost twice as high in the GSW cohort (55% vs 31%). For patients with transcervical GSWs, this increased to 80%. The mean ISS was 17 for GSW and 11 for SW patients. Those in the GSW cohort presented with threatened airways and a requirement for an emergency airway three times as often as patients with SWs (24% vs 7% and 14% vs 5% respectively). The incidence among GSW and SW patients respectively was 5% and 6% for airway injuries, 12% and 8% for injuries to the digestive tract, 21% and 16% for vascular injuries, 59% and 10% for associated cervical injuries, 36% and 14% for maxillofacial injuries, 16% and 9% for injuries to the head, and 35% and 45% for injuries to the chest. In the GSW group, 91% underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA), with 23% of these being positive for a vascular injury. For SWs, 74% of patients underwent CTA, with 17% positive for a vascular injury. Slightly more patients with GSWs required operative intervention than those with SWs (29% vs 26%). Conclusions Patients with GSWs to the neck have a worse outcome than those with injuries secondary to SWs. However, the proportion of neck injuries actually requiring direct surgical intervention is not increased and most cases with PNI secondary to GSWs can be managed

  18. A comparative audit of gunshot wounds and stab wounds to the neck in a South African metropolitan trauma service

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, AS; Laing, GL; Bruce, JL

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this comparative study of gunshot wounds (GSWs) and stab wounds (SWs) to the neck was to quantify the impact of the mechanism of injury on the outcome and management of penetrating neck injury (PNI). Methods A prospective trauma registry was interrogated retrospectively. Data were analysed pertaining to demographics and injury severity score (ISS), physiology on presentation, anatomical site of wounds and injuries sustained, investigations, management, outcome and complications. Results There were 452 SW and 58 GSW cases over the 46 months of the study. Patients with GSWs were more likely to have extracervical injuries than those with SWs (69% vs 63%). The incidence of a ‘significant cervical injury’ was almost twice as high in the GSW cohort (55% vs 31%). For patients with transcervical GSWs, this increased to 80%. The mean ISS was 17 for GSW and 11 for SW patients. Those in the GSW cohort presented with threatened airways and a requirement for an emergency airway three times as often as patients with SWs (24% vs 7% and 14% vs 5% respectively). The incidence among GSW and SW patients respectively was 5% and 6% for airway injuries, 12% and 8% for injuries to the digestive tract, 21% and 16% for vascular injuries, 59% and 10% for associated cervical injuries, 36% and 14% for maxillofacial injuries, 16% and 9% for injuries to the head, and 35% and 45% for injuries to the chest. In the GSW group, 91% underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA), with 23% of these being positive for a vascular injury. For SWs, 74% of patients underwent CTA, with 17% positive for a vascular injury. Slightly more patients with GSWs required operative intervention than those with SWs (29% vs 26%). Conclusions Patients with GSWs to the neck have a worse outcome than those with injuries secondary to SWs. However, the proportion of neck injuries actually requiring direct surgical intervention is not increased and most cases with PNI secondary to GSWs can be

  19. An removal of gutta-percha and root canal sealer: a literature review and an audit comparing current practice in dental schools.

    PubMed

    Good, Melissa-L; McCammon, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    Endodontic failures often require non-surgical retreatment. The most common root canal obturating material is gutta-percha (GP), used in conjunction with various sealers. GP removal can be undertaken thermally and/or mechanically with or without solvents, however, no published guidelines exist. Following a literature review, an audit was undertaken comparing current endodontic practice in Belfast Dental School with the other dental schools across the UK and Republic of Ireland. From the findings, Belfast Dental School decided to introduce rotary files and chloroform to its Conservation Clinic with restrictions for use of the latter, although solvent use is not recommended in every case. Efficiency in removing both gutta-percha and root canal sealer would maximize the ability to disinfect the root canal system and therefore increase the likelihood of a successful outcome.

  20. Antenatal corticosteroid prescribing: a complete audit cycle.

    PubMed

    Khoo, C; Welsh, J; Owen, P

    2007-01-01

    We undertook an audit of the practice of antenatal steroid prescribing. Data were collected over a prospective 12-week period in an initial audit (2002). Deviations from compliance with guidelines published by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists were identified and a report highlighting the audit findings was disseminated to all maternity units in Glasgow. A repeat audit (2004) was performed over a further prospective 12-week period. A total of 111 women in the initial and 188 women in the repeat audits received corticosteroids. Steroid courses per eventual delivery between 24-36 weeks' gestation increased from 0.64 to 1.18. Repeat courses of steroid decreased from 5% to <1%. Potentially effective courses of steroid increased from 24% to 35%. The proportion of potentially effective steroid courses varied according to the indication. Few steroid courses were potentially effective where the indication was pre-term labour. The findings of this audit are generally encouraging but continuing education regarding the appropriate prescription of antenatal corticosteroids is necessary to maintain and possibly improve upon the findings of this audit.

  1. Health plan auditing: 100-percent-of-claims vs. random-sample audits.

    PubMed

    Sillup, George P; Klimberg, Ronald K

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relative efficacy of two different methodologies for auditing self-funded medical claim expenses: 100-percent-of-claims auditing versus random-sampling auditing. Multiple data sets of claim errors or 'exceptions' from two Fortune-100 corporations were analysed and compared to 100 simulated audits of 300- and 400-claim random samples. Random-sample simulations failed to identify a significant number and amount of the errors that ranged from $200,000 to $750,000. These results suggest that health plan expenses of corporations could be significantly reduced if they audited 100% of claims and embraced a zero-defect approach.

  2. Impact of peer review audit on occupational health report quality.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, D; Demou, E; Macdonald, E B

    2015-08-01

    In a previous report, we described the implementation of a formal process for peer review of occupational health (OH) reports and a method of assessment of the outcomes of this process. The initial audit identified that 27% of OH reports required modifications. To assess formally, following implementation of this process, if changes in practice had occurred, i.e. whether fewer deficiencies were being identified in reports. We repeated a prospective internal audit of all peer reviewed OH reports between September and November 2011. We used an abbreviated assessment form, based on questions 4-8 and 10-12 of the modified SAIL (Sheffield Assessment Instrument for Letters), with four possible outcomes: no action, no changes made to report following discussion with author, changes made without discussion with author and changes made following discussion with author. One hundred seventy-three reports by 10 clinicians were audited. The audit identified a 13% reduction in OH reports requiring modifications (from 27 to 14%) compared with the previous cycle. Where modifications were required, 8% of these were related to minor typographical, spelling and grammar errors and 6% were for more complex reasons. Implementation of this process also produced a reduction in clinical complaints about OH reports from customers, from three in the preceding year to none 2 years later. Peer review improved the standard of OH reports and was associated with a reduction in customer complaints about reports. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine.

  3. Audit of diabetes mellitus in general practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, T W; Chan, S C; Chua, W T; Harbinder, K; Khoo, Y L; Ow Yeang, Y L; Sethuraman, K; Teoh, L C

    2004-08-01

    An audit on diabetic management was done in seven Perak general practice (GP) clinics in December 2001. The results showed inadequacies in nine out of eleven criteria assessed. Remedial measures were implemented. A second audit in March 2003, at the completion of the audit cycle, showed improvements in all the criteria used. All clinics established a diabetic register compared to 28.6% in the first audit and 57.1% of the clinics set up a reminder mechanism compared to 0% in the first audit. In the process of care, recording of weight, height, blood pressure; feet examination, fundoscopy, blood sugar monitoring and urine for albumin improved at the end of the audit cycle. In the only outcome criteria, the blood sugar control improved from 21.8% to 31.3%.

  4. Financial audit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Trans-Alaska Pipeline Liability Fund, a nonprofit corporate entity created in 1973, pays claims for damages, including cleanup costs, arising from oil discharges from vessel transporting Trans-Alaska Pipeline System oil loaded at Alaskan terminals to ports under U.S. jurisdiction. This paper presents the results of GAO's view of the independent certified public accountants' audit of the Fund's financial statements as of December 31, 1990. GAO also assesses progress toward disposing of the Fund's balances and terminating the Fund.

  5. A reader study comparing prospective tomosynthesis interpretations with retrospective readings of the corresponding FFDM examinations.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stephen L; Tidwell, Andra L; Ice, Mary F; Nordmann, Amy S; Sexton, Russell; Song, Rui

    2014-09-01

    To compare performance of prospective interpretations of clinical tomosynthesis (digital breast tomosynthesis [DBT]) plus full-field digital mammography (FFDM) examinations with retrospective readings of the corresponding FFDM examinations alone. Seven Mammography Quality Standard Act-qualified radiologists retrospectively interpreted 10,878 FFDM examinations that had been interpreted by other radiologists during prospective clinical interpretations of DBT plus FFDM. The radiologists were blinded to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) category given during the clinical interpretations and the verified outcome by follow-up and/or any diagnostic workup that may have followed. Ratings (BIRADS 0, 1, or 2) were recorded. Group performance levels in terms of recall rates and attributable cancer detection rates were compared to the prospective clinical interpretations of the same examinations (DBT plus FFDM) using McNemar test (two sided/tailed) with significance level of .05. During the prospective clinical interpretations of DBT plus FFDM, 588 cases were recalled (588 of 10,878, 5.41%) compared to 888 cases recalled (888 of 10,878, 8.16%) during the FFDM-alone retrospective interpretations (absolute difference, 35%; P<.0001). There were 59 and 38 suspicious abnormalities later verified as cancers detected during the DBT plus FFDM and the FFDM-alone interpretations, respectively (absolute increase, 55%; P<.0001). Invasive cancer detections were 48 and 29, respectively (absolute increase, 66%; P<.0001). The combination of DBT plus FFDM for screening asymptomatic women resulted in a significant reduction in recall rates and a simultaneous increase in cancer detection rates when compared to retrospective interpretations of corresponding FFDM examinations alone. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Desiderata for a Computer-Assisted Audit Tool for Clinical Data Source Verification Audits

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Stephany N.; Wehbe, Firas H.; Gadd, Cynthia S.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data auditing often requires validating the contents of clinical research databases against source documents available in health care settings. Currently available data audit software, however, does not provide features necessary to compare the contents of such databases to source data in paper medical records. This work enumerates the primary weaknesses of using paper forms for clinical data audits and identifies the shortcomings of existing data audit software, as informed by the experiences of an audit team evaluating data quality for an international research consortium. The authors propose a set of attributes to guide the development of a computer-assisted clinical data audit tool to simplify and standardize the audit process. PMID:20841814

  7. Aspects of audit. 4: Acceptability of audit.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C D

    1980-06-14

    Whether or not audit is accepted in Britain will be determined principally by how it is controlled, how much it costs, and how effective it is. The objectives of audit have been defined as education, planning, evaluation, research, and anticipatory diplomacy--that is, starting internal audit before external audit is imposed on the medical profession. Published reports suggest that in Britain internal audit would be more effective andless expensive than the complex professional standards review organisation devised by the Federal Government in the United States.

  8. Care of elderly patients: a prospective audit of the prevalence of hypotension and the use of BIS intraoperatively in 25 hospitals in London.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Alex; Highton, David; Martin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthesia is frequently complicated by intraoperative hypotension (IOH) in the elderly, and this is associated with adverse outcome. The definition of IOH is controversial, and although management guidelines for IOH in the elderly exist, the frequency of IOH and typical clinically applied treatment thresholds are largely unknown in the UK. We audited frequency of intraoperative blood pressure against national guidelines in elderly patients undergoing surgery. Depth of anaesthesia (DOA) monitoring was also audited due to the association between low DOA values and IOH with increased mortality (as part of "double" and "triple low" phenomena) and because it is a suggested management strategy to reduce IOH. Twenty-five hospitals submitted data on 481 patients. Hypotension varied depending on the definition, but affected 400 patients (83.3 %) using the AAGBI standard. Furthermore, 2.9, 13.5, and 24.6 % had mean arterial blood pressures <50, <60, and <70 mmHg for 20 min, respectively, and 136 (28.4 %) had systolic blood pressure decrease by 20 % for 20 min. DOA monitors were used for 45 (9.4 %) patients. IOH is common and use of DOA monitors is less than implied by guidelines. Improved management of IOH may be a simple intervention with real potential to reduce morbidity in this vulnerable group.

  9. How Accurately Do Consecutive Cohort Audits Predict Phase III Multisite Clinical Trial Recruitment in Palliative Care?

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Nikki; Fazekas, Belinda; Cutri, Natalie; Currow, David C

    2016-04-01

    Audits have been proposed for estimating possible recruitment rates to randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but few studies have compared audit data with subsequent recruitment rates. To compare the accuracy of estimates of potential recruitment from a retrospective consecutive cohort audit of actual participating sites and recruitment to four Phase III multisite clinical RCTs. The proportion of potentially eligible study participants estimated from an inpatient chart review of people with life-limiting illnesses referred to six Australian specialist palliative care services was compared with recruitment data extracted from study prescreening information from three sites that participated fully in four Palliative Care Clinical Studies Collaborative RCTs. The predominant reasons for ineligibility in the audit and RCTs were analyzed. The audit overestimated the proportion of people referred to the palliative care services who could participate in the RCTs (pain 17.7% vs. 1.2%, delirium 5.8% vs. 0.6%, anorexia 5.1% vs. 0.8%, and bowel obstruction 2.8% vs. 0.5%). Approximately 2% of the referral base was potentially eligible for these effectiveness studies. Ineligibility for general criteria (language, cognition, and geographic proximity) varied between studies, whereas the reasons for exclusion were similar between the audit and pain and anorexia studies but not for delirium or bowel obstruction. The retrospective consecutive case note audit in participating sites did not predict realistic recruitment rates, mostly underestimating the impact of study-specific inclusion criteria. These findings have implications for the applicability of the results of RCTs. Prospective pilot studies are more likely to predict actual recruitment. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparative study of financial data sources for critical access hospitals: audited financial statements, the Medicare cost report, and the Internal Revenue Service form 990.

    PubMed

    Ozmeral, Alisha Bhadelia; Reiter, Kristin L; Holmes, George M; Pink, George H

    2012-01-01

    Medicare cost reports (MCR), Internal Revenue Service form 990s (IRS 990), and audited financial statements (AFS) vary in their content, detail, purpose, timeliness, and certification. The purpose of this study was to compare selected financial data elements and characterize the extent of differences in financial data and ratios across the MCR, IRS 990, and AFS for a sample of nonprofit critical access hospitals (CAHs). Line items from AFS of 47 CAHs were compared to data reported in the hospitals' MCR and IRS 990s. Line items were based on 9 financial indicators commonly used to assess hospital financial performance. Of the indicators examined, the equity financing ratio most frequently matched between the 3 reports, while salaries and benefits to total expenses and debt service coverage were often different. Variances were driven by differences in individual account balances used to construct the ratios. Relative to AFS, cash was frequently lower on the IRS 990 while marketable securities and unrestricted investments were often higher. Other revenue and net income were consistently lower on the MCR and IRS 990, and depreciation was often higher on the MCR. The majority of total assets and fund balance (equity) values matched across the 3 reports, suggesting differences in classification among detailed accounts were more common than variances between the component totals (total assets, total liabilities, and fund balance). Health policy researchers should consider the impact of these variances on study results and consider ways to improve the availability and quality of financial accounting information. © 2012 National Rural Health Association.

  11. An audit of the nature and impact of clinical coding subjectivity variability and error in otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Nouraei, S A R; Hudovsky, A; Virk, J S; Chatrath, P; Sandhu, G S

    2013-12-01

    To audit the accuracy of clinical coding in otolaryngology, assess the effectiveness of previously implemented interventions, and determine ways in which it can be further improved. Prospective clinician-auditor multidisciplinary audit of clinical coding accuracy. Elective and emergency ENT admissions and day-case activity. Concordance between initial coding and the clinician-auditor multi-disciplinary teams (MDT) coding in respect of primary and secondary diagnoses and procedures, health resource groupings health resource groupings (HRGs) and tariffs. The audit of 3131 randomly selected otolaryngology patients between 2010 and 2012 resulted in 420 instances of change to the primary diagnosis (13%) and 417 changes to the primary procedure (13%). In 1420 cases (44%), there was at least one change to the initial coding and 514 (16%) health resource groupings changed. There was an income variance of £343,169 or £109.46 per patient. The highest rates of health resource groupings change were observed in head and neck surgery and in particular skull-based surgery, laryngology and within that tracheostomy, and emergency admissions, and specially, epistaxis management. A randomly selected sample of 235 patients from the audit were subjected to a second audit by a second clinician-auditor multi-disciplinary team. There were 12 further health resource groupings changes (5%) and at least one further coding change occurred in 57 patients (24%). These changes were significantly lower than those observed in the pre-audit sample, but were also significantly greater than zero. Asking surgeons to 'code in theatre' and applying these codes without further quality assurance to activity resulted in an health resource groupings error rate of 45%. The full audit sample was regrouped under health resource groupings 3.5 and was compared with a previous audit of 1250 patients performed between 2007 and 2008. This comparison showed a reduction in the baseline rate of health resource

  12. Prior task experience and comparable stimulus exposure nullify focal and nonfocal prospective memory retrieval differences.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jason L; Franks, Bryan A; Spitler, Samantha N

    2017-10-01

    We explored the nature of focal versus nonfocal event-based prospective memory retrieval. In the context of a lexical decision task, people received an intention to respond to a single word (focal) in one condition and to a category label (nonfocal) for the other condition. Participants experienced both conditions, and their order was manipulated. The focal instruction condition was a single word presented multiple times. In Experiment 1, the stimuli in the nonfocal condition were different exemplars from a category, each presented once. In the nonfocal condition retrieval was poorer and reaction times were slower during the ongoing task as compared to the focal condition, replicating prior findings. In Experiment 2, the stimulus in the nonfocal condition was a single category exemplar repeated multiple times. When this single-exemplar nonfocal condition followed in time the single-item focal condition, focal versus nonfocal performance was virtually indistinguishable. These results demonstrate that people can modify their stimulus processing and expectations in event-based prospective memory tasks based on experience with the nature of prospective cues and with the ongoing task.

  13. Resting heart rate variability after yogic training and swimming: A prospective randomized comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Sawane, Manish Vinayak; Gupta, Shilpa Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Resting heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the modulation of autonomic nervous system (ANS) at rest. Increased HRV achieved by the exercise is good for the cardiovascular health. However, prospective studies with comparison of the effects of yogic exercises and those of other endurance exercises like walking, running, and swimming on resting HRV are conspicuous by their absence. Study was designed to assess and compare the effects of yogic training and swimming on resting HRV in normal healthy young volunteers. Study was conducted in Department of Physiology in a medical college. Study design was prospective randomized comparative trial. One hundred sedentary volunteers were randomly ascribed to either yoga or swimming group. Baseline recordings of digital electrocardiogram were done for all the subjects in cohorts of 10. After yoga training and swimming for 12 weeks, evaluation for resting HRV was done again. Percentage change for each parameter with yoga and swimming was compared using unpaired t-test for data with normal distribution and using Mann-Whitney U test for data without normal distribution. Most of the HRV parameters improved statistically significantly by both modalities of exercise. However, some of the HRV parameters showed statistically better improvement with yoga as compared to swimming. Practicing yoga seems to be the mode of exercise with better improvement in autonomic functions as suggested by resting HRV.

  14. Resting heart rate variability after yogic training and swimming: A prospective randomized comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Sawane, Manish Vinayak; Gupta, Shilpa Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Context: Resting heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the modulation of autonomic nervous system (ANS) at rest. Increased HRV achieved by the exercise is good for the cardiovascular health. However, prospective studies with comparison of the effects of yogic exercises and those of other endurance exercises like walking, running, and swimming on resting HRV are conspicuous by their absence. Aims: Study was designed to assess and compare the effects of yogic training and swimming on resting HRV in normal healthy young volunteers. Settings and Design: Study was conducted in Department of Physiology in a medical college. Study design was prospective randomized comparative trial. Subjects and Methods: One hundred sedentary volunteers were randomly ascribed to either yoga or swimming group. Baseline recordings of digital electrocardiogram were done for all the subjects in cohorts of 10. After yoga training and swimming for 12 weeks, evaluation for resting HRV was done again. Statistical Analysis Used: Percentage change for each parameter with yoga and swimming was compared using unpaired t-test for data with normal distribution and using Mann-Whitney U test for data without normal distribution. Results: Most of the HRV parameters improved statistically significantly by both modalities of exercise. However, some of the HRV parameters showed statistically better improvement with yoga as compared to swimming. Conclusion: Practicing yoga seems to be the mode of exercise with better improvement in autonomic functions as suggested by resting HRV. PMID:26170587

  15. Comparing Prospective Twice-Exceptional Students with High-Performing Peers on High-Stakes Tests of Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Sherry Mee; Taylor, Emily P.; McCallum, R. Steve; Coles, Jeremy T.; Hays, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    From a sample of 1,242 third graders, prospective twice-exceptional students were selected using reading and math curriculum-based measures (CBMs), routinely used in Response to Intervention (RtI). These prospective twice-exceptional students were compared with non-twice-exceptional peers with similar strengths in either math or reading on CBMs…

  16. Auditing medical records helps reduce liability.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, G; Winfrey, S

    1990-10-01

    An internal audit of a hospital's medical records department compares the department to standards developed by the hospital and to benchmarks set by accrediting organizations. An auditor can review the department's economy and effectiveness through employee surveys, direct observation, and interviews. By uncovering deficiencies and making recommendations for their correction, an internal audit can help limit a hospital's liability exposure.

  17. Northern Territory Heart Failure Initiative–Clinical Audit (NTHFI–CA)–a prospective database on the quality of care and outcomes for acute decompensated heart failure admission in the Northern Territory: study design and rationale

    PubMed Central

    Iyngkaran, Pupalan; Tinsley, Jeff; Smith, David; Haste, Mark; Nadarajan, Kangaharan; Ilton, Marcus; Battersby, Malcolm; Stewart, Simon; Brown, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congestive heart failure is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in Australia. Accurate data for the Northern Territory and Indigenous Australians are not presently available. The economic burden of this chronic cardiovascular disease is felt by all funding bodies and it still remains unclear what impact current measures have on preventing the ongoing disease burden and how much of this filters down to more remote areas. Clear differentials also exist in rural areas including a larger Indigenous community, greater disease burden, differing aetiologies for heart failure as well as service and infrastructure discrepancies. It is becoming increasingly clear that urban solutions will not affect regional outcomes. To understand regional issues relevant to heart failure management, an understanding of the key performance indicators in that setting is critical. Methods and analysis The Northern Territory Heart Failure Initiative—Clinical Audit (NTHFI-CA) is a prospective registry of acute heart failure admissions over a 12-month period across the two main Northern Territory tertiary hospitals. The study collects information across six domains and five dimensions of healthcare. The study aims to set in place an evidenced and reproducible audit system for heart failure and inform the developing heart failure disease management programme. The findings, is believed, will assist the development of solutions to narrow the outcomes divide between remote and urban Australia and between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians, in case they exist. A combination of descriptive statistics and mixed effects modelling will be used to analyse the data. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by respective ethics committees of both the admitting institutions. All participants will be provided a written informed consent which will be completed prior to enrolment in the study. The study results will be disseminated through local and international

  18. Similar early migration when comparing CR and PS in Triathlon™ TKA: A prospective randomised RSA trial.

    PubMed

    Molt, Mats; Toksvig-Larsen, Sören

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the early migration of the cruciate retaining and posterior stabilising versions of the recently introduced Triathlon™ total knee system, with a view to predicting long term fixation performance. Sixty patients were prospectively randomised to receive either Triathlon™ posterior stabilised cemented knee prosthesis or Triathlon™ cruciate retaining cemented knee prosthesis. Tibial component migration was measured by radiostereometric analysis postoperatively and at three months, one year and two years. Clinical outcome was measured by the American Knee Society Score and Knee Osteoarthritis and Injury Outcome Score. There were no differences in rotation around the three coordinal axes or in the maximum total point motion (MTPM) during the two year follow-up. The posterior stabilised prosthesis had more posterior-anterior translation at three months and one year and more caudal-cranial translation at one year and two years. There were no differences in functional outcome between the groups. The tibial tray of the Triathlon™ cemented knee prosthesis showed similar early stability. Level I. Article focus: This was a prospective randomised trial aiming to compare the single radius posterior stabilised (PS) Triathlon™ total knee arthroplasty (TKA) to the cruciate retaining Triathlon™ TKA system with regard to fixation. Strengths and limitations of this study: Strength of this study was that it is a randomised prospective trial using an objective measuring tool. The sample size of 25-30 patients was reportedly sufficient for the screening of implants using RSA [1]. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00436982. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of a general practice audit and data extraction tool.

    PubMed

    Peiris, David; Agaliotis, Maria; Patel, Bindu; Patel, Anushka

    2013-11-01

    We assessed how accurately a common general practitioner (GP) audit tool extracts data from two software systems. First, pathology test codes were audited at 33 practices covering nine companies. Second, a manual audit of chronic disease data from 200 random patient records at two practices was compared with audit tool data. Pathology review: all companies assigned correct codes for cholesterol, creatinine and glycated haemoglobin; four companies assigned incorrect codes for albuminuria tests, precluding accurate detection with the audit tool. Case record review: there was strong agreement between the manual audit and the tool for all variables except chronic kidney disease diagnoses, which was due to a tool-related programming error. The audit tool accurately detected most chronic disease data in two GP record systems. The one exception, however, highlights the importance of surveillance systems to promptly identify errors. This will maximise potential for audit tools to improve healthcare quality.

  20. Clinical applicability and cost of a 46-gene panel for genomic analysis of solid tumours: Retrospective validation and prospective audit in the UK National Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kulvinder; Camps, Carme; Kaisaki, Pamela; Gupta, Avinash; Talbot, Denis; Middleton, Mark; Henderson, Shirley; Cutts, Anthony; Vavoulis, Dimitrios V.; Housby, Nick; Taylor, Jenny C.; Schuh, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Background Single gene tests to predict whether cancers respond to specific targeted therapies are performed increasingly often. Advances in sequencing technology, collectively referred to as next generation sequencing (NGS), mean the entire cancer genome or parts of it can now be sequenced at speed with increased depth and sensitivity. However, translation of NGS into routine cancer care has been slow. Healthcare stakeholders are unclear about the clinical utility of NGS and are concerned it could be an expensive addition to cancer diagnostics, rather than an affordable alternative to single gene testing. Methods and findings We validated a 46-gene hotspot cancer panel assay allowing multiple gene testing from small diagnostic biopsies. From 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2013, solid tumour samples (including non-small-cell lung carcinoma [NSCLC], colorectal carcinoma, and melanoma) were sequenced in the context of the UK National Health Service from 351 consecutively submitted prospective cases for which treating clinicians thought the patient had potential to benefit from more extensive genetic analysis. Following histological assessment, tumour-rich regions of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) sections underwent macrodissection, DNA extraction, NGS, and analysis using a pipeline centred on Torrent Suite software. With a median turnaround time of seven working days, an integrated clinical report was produced indicating the variants detected, including those with potential diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic, or clinical trial entry implications. Accompanying phenotypic data were collected, and a detailed cost analysis of the panel compared with single gene testing was undertaken to assess affordability for routine patient care. Panel sequencing was successful for 97% (342/351) of tumour samples in the prospective cohort and showed 100% concordance with known mutations (detected using cobas assays). At least one mutation was identified in 87% (296/342) of

  1. Rationalised prescribing for community acquired pneumonia: a closed loop audit

    PubMed Central

    Clements, H.; Stephenson, T.; Gabriel, V.; Harrison, T.; Millar, M.; Smyth, A.; Tong, W.; Linton, C.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To audit the management of community acquired pneumonia before and after the introduction of a protocol. To determine the aetiology of pneumonia using routine investigations and polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
METHODS—Retrospective and prospective audit following the introduction of a management protocol. Prospective cases were investigated routinely and with PCR on blood and nasopharyngeal aspirate.
RESULTS—There was a significant increase in rational prescribing following introduction of the protocol with 75% of children receiving intravenous penicillin or erythromycin compared with 26% beforehand. Of 89 children in the prospective group, 51 microbiological diagnoses were achieved in 48 children. Seven children had Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, 14 had Mycoplasma infection, six had pertussis, and one had Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. Twenty three children had a viral cause of which respiratory syncytial virus was commonest.
CONCLUSIONS—Introduction of the protocol led to improved prescribing. PCR increased the diagnostic yield and the results support the management protocol.

 PMID:10999868

  2. Computerizing Audit Studies.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Joanna N; Beasley, Ryan A

    2009-06-01

    This paper briefly discusses the history, benefits, and shortcomings of traditional audit field experiments to study market discrimination. Specifically it identifies template bias and experimenter bias as major concerns in the traditional audit method, and demonstrates through an empirical example that computerization of a resume or correspondence audit can efficiently increase sample size and greatly mitigate these concerns. Finally, it presents a useful meta-tool that future researchers can use to create their own resume audits.

  3. Computerizing Audit Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Joanna N.; Beasley, Ryan A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the history, benefits, and shortcomings of traditional audit field experiments to study market discrimination. Specifically it identifies template bias and experimenter bias as major concerns in the traditional audit method, and demonstrates through an empirical example that computerization of a resume or correspondence audit can efficiently increase sample size and greatly mitigate these concerns. Finally, it presents a useful meta-tool that future researchers can use to create their own resume audits. PMID:24904189

  4. Final Educational Accomplishment Audit of the San Marcos Independent School District's Bilingual Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochnow, Harold G.

    The final audit report (1972)73) on the Bilingual Education Program of the San Marcos Independent School District critiques the quality of the project and the audit. The 5 sections of the audit are: (1) introductory and general comments on the quality of the project evaluation and the comparative findings of the project evaluation and the audit;…

  5. Does Postthyroidectomy Syndrome Really Exist Following Thyroidectomy? Prospective Comparative Analysis of Open vs. Endoscopic Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki Nam; Mok, Ji Oh; Chung, Chan Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study prospectively evaluated postthyroidectomy syndrome (PTS) through objective and subjective voice changes following thyroidectomy of open vs. endoscopic thyroidectomy. Methods A prospective clinical trial (SCHBC IRB 09 26) was performed from Jan 2008 to Aug 2010 to compare the open thyroidectomy (OPEN group) and endoscopic thyroidectomy (ENDO group). Of the 110 patients, 75 completed the evaluation before and 1 and 6 months after surgery. Subjective parameters included perceptual analysis (GRBAS [grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain] scale), stroboscopic or flexible fiberscopic analysis, voice handicap index, and 5-point visual analog scales for vocal fatigue, singing difficulty, difficulty with high-pitch phonation, and neck discomfort. Objective parameters included acoustic, aerodynamic analysis and the electroglottograph. Results For the ENDO group (n=36), the operation time was longer than in the OPEN group (n=39; P<0.01). For the OPEN group, two objective and five subjective parameters were worse 1 month postoperatively; of these, two subjective parameters persisted for 6 months (P<0.05). For the ENDO group, three objective and six subjective parameters were worse 1 month postoperatively, and three of the subjective parameters persisted 6 months postoperatively (P<0.05). Conclusion PTS really exists following simple thyroidectomy and are very common for both OPEN and ENDO groups. Most of the parameters improved gradually over time, but some subjective changes persisted 6 months postoperatively. PMID:25729500

  6. A prospective randomised trial comparing mesh types and fixation in totally extraperitoneal inguinal hernia repairs.

    PubMed

    Cristaudo, Adam; Nayak, Arun; Martin, Sarah; Adib, Reza; Martin, Ian

    2015-05-01

    The totally extraperitoneal (TEP) approach for surgical repair of inguinal hernias has emerged as a popular technique. We conducted a prospective randomised trial to compare patient comfort scores using different mesh types and fixation using this technique. Over a 14 month period, 146 patients underwent 232 TEP inguinal hernia repairs. We compared the comfort scores of patients who underwent these procedures using different types of mesh and fixation. A non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with absorbable tacks (Control group) was compared with either a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm folding slit mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 2), a partially-absorbable 15 × 10 cm mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) or a non-absorbable 15 × 10 cm anatomical mesh fixed with 2 ml fibrin sealant (Group 4). Outcomes were compared at 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks using the Carolina Comfort Scale (CCS) scores. At 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks, the median global CCS scores were low for all treatment groups. Statistically significant differences were seen only for median CCS scores and subscores with the use of partially-absorbable mesh with absorbable tacks (Group 3) at weeks 2 and 4. However, these were no longer significant at week 12. In this study, the TEP inguinal hernia repair with minimal fixation results in low CCS scores. There were no statistical differences in CCS scores when comparing types of mesh, configuration of the mesh or fixation methods.

  7. A National Framework for Energy Audit Ordinances

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Cody; Costa, Marc; Long, Nicholas; Antonoff, Jayson

    2016-08-26

    A handful of U.S. cities have begun to incorporate energy audits into their building energy performance policies. Cities are beginning to recognize an opportunity to use several information tools to bring to real estate markets both motivation to improve efficiency and actionable pointers on how to improve. Care is necessary to combine such tools as operational ratings, energy audits, asset ratings, and building retro-commissioning in an effective policy regime that maximizes market impact. In this paper, the authors focus on energy audits and consider both the needs of the policies' implementers in local governments and the emerging standards and federal tools to improve data collection and practitioner engagement. Over the past two years, we have compared several related data formats such as New York City's existing audit reporting spreadsheet, ASHRAE guidance on building energy auditing, and the DOE Building Energy Asset Score, to identify a possible set of required and optional fields for energy audit reporting programs. Doing so revealed tensions between the ease of data collection and the value of more detailed information, which had implications for the effort and qualifications needed to complete the energy audit. The resulting list of data fields is now feeding back into the regulatory process in several cities currently working on implementing or developing audit policies. Using complementary policies and standardized tools for data transmission, the next generation of policies and programs will be tailored to local building stock and can more effectively target improvement opportunities through each building's life.

  8. Lumbar myelography with iohexol and metrizamide: a comparative multicenter prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, S.A.; Binet, E.F.; Davis, D.O.; Gabrielsen, T.O.; Kido, D.K.; Latchaw, R.E.; Turski, P.A.; Shaw, D.D.

    1984-06-01

    Diagnostic quality of radiographs and adverse reactions associated with the use of metrizamide and iohexol as contrast agents in lumbar myelography were compared in a prospective randomized double blind study in 350 patients at seven centers. Overall quality of radiographic visualization was graded good or excellent in 95% of 175 metrizamide studies and in 98% of 175 iohexol studies. Ninety-three patients examined using metrizamide (53%) and 130 patients examined using iohexol (74%) experienced no discomfort during or after myelography. Postmyelographic headache was associated with 38% of metrizamide examinations and 21% of iohexol examinations. Nausea and vomiting were also more common with metrizamide. Five patients examined using metrizamide (3%) experienced transient confusion and disorientation following lumbar myelography. No such reactions were observed following iohexol myelography.

  9. Muscle-Sparing Blepharoplasty: A Prospective Left-Right Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Lee; Deptula, Peter; Mazhar, Momal; Murariu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard upper blepharoplasty involves removal of both the skin and a portion of the underlying orbicularis oculi muscle. The senior author had observed sluggishness of eyelid closure, lagophthalmos as well as varying degrees of eye irritation in certain patients during the early postoperative period. He postulated that these findings could be due to orbicularis muscle excision. He therefore undertook a prospective study 27 years ago comparing standard blepharoplasty on one eyelid to skin-only excision on the fellow eyelid. Methods A randomized, prospective, single-blinded study was designed using the fellow eye as an internal control. 22 patients undergoing upper blepharoplasty procedure requiring greater than 5 mm of skin resection and with no history of ophthalmologic disease, dry eye, or previous eyelid surgery were selected. Upper blepharoplasty was performed with skin-only removal on one side, and combined skin-muscle removal on the other side. Patients were evaluated until six months after surgery except for two patients who were lost to follow-up after three months. Sluggish eyelid closure, lagophthalmos, dry eye and aesthetic result were outcome measures scored by patient survey, the operating surgeon, and a blinded expert panel. Results There were comparable aesthetic outcomes in both eyelids. The incidence of sluggish eyelid closure, lagophthalmos and dry eye syndrome were significantly higher in eyelids where wide segments of muscle had been resected. Conclusions Muscle-sparing upper blepharoplasty produces similar aesthetic outcomes as conventional blepharoplasty, while significantly reducing the complications of sluggish eyelid closure, lagophthalmos and dry eye disease. The authors therefore recommend muscle-sparing upper blepharoplasty. PMID:25276652

  10. The use of a prospective audit proforma to improve door-to-mask times for acute exacerbations chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requiring non-invasive ventilation (NIV).

    PubMed

    Mandal, S; Howes, T Q; Parker, M; Roberts, C M

    2014-12-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is an evidence based management of acidotic, hypercapnic exacerbations of COPD. Previous national and international audits of clinical practice have shown variation against guideline standards with significant delays in initiating NIV. We aimed to map the clinical pathway to better understand delays and reduce the door-to-NIV time to less than 3 hours for all patients with acidotic, hypercapnic exacerbations of COPD requiring this intervention, by mandating the use of a guideline based educational management proforma.The proforma was introduced at 7 acute hospitals in North London and Essex and initiated at admission of the patient. It was used to record the clinical pathway and patient outcomes until the point of discharge or death. Data for 138 patients were collected. 48% of patients commenced NIV within 3 hours with no reduction in door-to-mask time during the study period. Delays in starting NIV were due to: time taken for review by the medical team (101 minutes) and time taken for NIV to be started once a decision had been made (49 minutes). There were significant differences in door-to-NIV decision and mask times between differing respiratory on-call systems, p < 0.05). The introduction of the proforma had no effect on door-to-mask times over the study period. Main reasons for delay were related to timely access to medical staff and to NIV equipment; however, a marked variation in practice within these hospitals was been noted, with a 9-5 respiratory on-call system associated with shorter NIV initiation times.

  11. Overcoming barriers to residential conservation: do energy audits help

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A study on the effects of energy audits on the pace and choice of household investment in energy-saving improvements in the home is reported. An evaluation based on the household's assessment of the usefulness of the audit which was provided for their home was performed. The number and types of recent conservation actions among audited and unaudited samples of households are compared. The audit's effect on household knowledge about the economically attractive options for their home and on the choice of recent improvements is assessed. Possible reasons are suggested for the weak effect of audits in stimulating activity and reorienting investment choices. (LEW)

  12. Audits Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Belangia, David Warren

    2015-04-09

    A company just got notified there is a big external audit coming in 3 months. Getting ready for an audit can be challenging, scary, and full of surprises. This Gold Paper describes a typical audit from notification of the intent to audit through disposition of the final report including Best Practices, Opportunities for Improvement (OFI), and issues that must be fixed. Good preparation can improve the chances of success. Ensuring the auditors understand the environment and requirements is paramount to success. It helps the auditors understand that the enterprise really does think that security is important. Understanding and following a structured process ensures a smooth audit process. Ensuring follow-up on OFIs and issues in a structured fashion will also make the next audit easier. It is important to keep in mind that the auditors will use the previous report as a starting point. Now the only worry is the actual audit and subsequent report and how well the company has done.

  13. Audit of groundwater monitoring at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations is responsible for ensuring that its contractors` tasks are mission oriented and are completed at the least cost to the DOE. The objective of this audit was to determine whether Richland was effectively managing its groundwater monitoring activities so that unnecessary duplication would not occur. The audit`s objective was accomplished by: reviewing laws and regulations; interviewing DOE and contractor personnel; examining procurement and accounting procedures; reviewing plans, budgets, and actual expenditures; reviewing utilization of the DOE drilling equipment; observing well drilling activities; comparing drilling cost to other DOE sites; analyzing groundwater monitoring activities; and, reviewing and comparing groundwater reports.

  14. Is external cephalic version at term contraindicated in previous caesarean section? A prospective comparative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Cobos, P; Rodríguez, L; Osuna, C; Centeno, M M; Martínez-Astorquiza, T; Fernández-Llebrez, L

    2014-01-01

    To determine if external cephalic version (ECV) can be performed with safety and efficacy in women with previous caesarean section. Prospective comparative cohort study. Cruces University Hospital (Spain). Single pregnancy with breech presentation at term. We compared 70 ECV performed in women with previous caesarean section with 387 ECV performed in multiparous women (March 2002 to June 2012). Success rate, complications of the ECV and caesarean section rate. The success rate of ECV in women after previous caesarean section was 67.1% versus 66.1% in multiparous women (P = 0.87). The logistic regression analysis confirmed this result (odds ratio 0.93, 95% CI 0.52-1.68; P = 0.82) adjusted by the variables associated with success of ECV. There were no complications in the previous caesarean section cohort. The vaginal delivery rate in the previous caesarean section cohort was 52.8% versus 74.9% in the multiparous cohort (P < 0.01). There were no cases of uterine rupture. Based on our data, we conclude that complications are uncommon with ECV in women with previous caesarean section, with a success rate comparable to that of multiparous women. Uterine scar should not be considered a contraindication and ECV should be offered to women with previous caesarean section with breech presentation at term. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  15. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  16. Outpatient Latarjet surgery for gleno-humeral instability: Prospective comparative assessment of feasibility and safety.

    PubMed

    Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Gerometta, A; Herman, S; Lefevre, N

    2016-06-01

    invasive shoulder stabilisation by the Latarjet procedure performed on an outpatient basis. Thus, in selected patients, the risks of outpatient surgery are similar to those of inpatient surgery. III, prospective, comparative, non-randomised study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional outcomes after open versus arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: A prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Nourissat, G; Neyton, L; Metais, P; Clavert, P; Villain, B; Haeni, D; Walch, G; Lafosse, L

    2016-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure provides effective stabilization of chronically unstable shoulders. Since this procedure is mainly performed in a young athletic population, the functional impact is significant. Published data does not shed light on the time needed to recover work-related or sports-related function. Performing this procedure arthroscopically may improve functional recovery. This led us to carry out a prospective, multicenter study to compare the functional recovery after arthroscopic versus open Latarjet procedure. Between June and November 2014, 184 patients were included in a prospective multicenter study: 85 in the open group and 99 in the arthroscopy group. The patients were evaluated preoperatively with the WOSI score. The early postoperative pain was evaluated on D3, D7 and D30. The WOSI score was determined postoperatively at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of follow-up. The functional scores of the shoulder in both cohorts were identical overall preoperatively. In the immediate postoperative period, the arthroscopy group had statistically lower pain levels on D3 and D7. The postoperative WOSI was improved in both groups at 3 months, then continued to improve until it reached a plateau at 1 year. The WOSI score was better in the arthroscopy group at 3 months, but better in the open group at 6 months. This study found that a Latarjet procedure performed arthroscopically generates less immediately postoperative pain than when it is performed as an open procedure. The Latarjet procedure (whether open or arthroscopic) improves shoulder function, with normal function returning after 1 year. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Anthroposophic vs. conventional therapy for chronic low back pain: a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hamre, H J; Witt, C M; Glockmann, A; Wegscheider, K; Ziegler, R; Willich, S N; Kiene, H

    2007-07-26

    To compare anthroposophic treatment (eurythmy, rhythmical massage or art therapy; counselling, anthroposophic medication) and conventional treatment for low back pain (LBP) under routine conditions. 62 consecutive outpatients from 38 medical practices in Germany, consulting an anthroposophic (A-) or conventional (C-) physician with LBP of >or= 6 weeks duration participated in a prospective non-randomised comparative study. Main outcomes were Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire (HFAQ), LBP Rating Scale Pain Score (LBPRS), Symptom Score, and SF-36 after 6 and 12 months. At baseline, LBP duration was > 6 months in 85% (29/34) of A-patients and 54% (15/28) of C-patients (p = 0.004). Unadjusted analysis showed significant improvements in both groups of HFAQ, LBPRS, Symptom Score, SF-36 Physical Component Summary, and three SF-36 scales (Physical Function, Pain, Vitality), and improvements in A-patients of three further SF-36 scales (Role Physical, General Health, Mental Health). After adjustment for age, gender, LBP duration, and education, improvements were still significant in both groups for Symptom Score (p = 0.030), SF-36 Physical Component Summary (p = 0.004), and three SF-36-scales (Physical Function, p = 0.025; Role Physical, p = 0.014; Pain, p = 0.003), and in A-patients for SF-36-Vitality (p = 0.032). Compared to C-patients, A-patients had significantly more pronounced improvements of three SF-36 scales (Mental Health: p = 0.045; General Health: p = 0.006; Vitality: p = 0.005); other improvements did not differ significantly between the two groups. Compared to conventional therapy, anthroposophic therapy for chronic LBP was associated with at least comparable improvements.

  19. Outpatient Myelography: A Prospective Trial Comparing Complications after Myelography between Outpatients and Inpatients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Inoue, Hidenori; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Osawa, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective comparative study. Purpose To compare the incidence and severity of adverse reactions associated with myelography performed in outpatients vs. in inpatients and report the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Overview of Literature Myelography is normally performed as an inpatient procedure in most hospitals in Japan. No studies have reported the usefulness and adverse effects of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. Methods We performed 221 myelography procedures. Eighty-five of the 221 patients underwent outpatient myelography using our new protocol. The incidence and severity of adverse reactions were compared with the other 136 patients, who underwent conventional inpatient myelography. We further compared the cost of outpatient and inpatient myelography. Results The overall rate of adverse effects was 9.4% in outpatients, as compared with 7.4% in inpatients. Overall, 1.2% of outpatients and 0.74% inpatients experienced "severe" adverse effects (requiring hospitalization). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in either the overall rate of adverse effects or the rate of "severe" adverse effects. Moreover, the average outpatient procedure cost was only one-third to one-half that of the inpatient procedure. Conclusions This was the first study to address the safety and usefulness of outpatient myelography in Japanese patients. If selected according to proper inclusion criteria for outpatient procedure, no significant differences were observed in the adverse effects between inpatients and outpatients. The outpatient procedure is more economical and has the added benefit of being more convenient and time-efficient for the patient. PMID:26713127

  20. Analgesia by telemedically supported paramedics compared with physician-administered analgesia: A prospective, interventional, multicentre trial.

    PubMed

    Brokmann, J C; Rossaint, R; Hirsch, F; Beckers, S K; Czaplik, M; Chowanetz, M; Tamm, M; Bergrath, S

    2016-08-01

    In German emergency medical services (EMS), the analgesia is restricted to physicians. In this prospective, interventional, multicentre trial, complications with and quality of telemedically delegated analgesia were evaluated. If prehospital analgesia was necessary, five telemedically equipped paramedic ambulances from four different districts could consult a telemedicine centre. Analgesics were delegated based on a predefined algorithm. Telemedically assisted cases were compared with local historical regular EMS missions using matched pairs. The primary outcome was the frequency of therapeutic complications (respiratory/circulatory insufficiency, allergic reactions). Secondary outcomes were quality of analgesia (11-point numerical rating scale, NRS) and the frequency of nausea/vomiting. Analgesia was necessary in 106 telemedically assisted missions. In 23 cases, the telemedical procedure was used until an EMS physician arrived. Of the remaining 83 cases, 80 could be matched to comparable controls. Complications did not occur in either the study group or the control group (0 vs. 0; p = N/A). Complete NRS documentation was noted in 65/80 (study group) and 32/80 (control group) cases (p < 0.0001). Adequate initial pain reduction (quality indicator: reduction of NRS ≥ 2 points or NRS < 5 at end of mission) occurred in 61/65 versus 31/32 cases (p = 1.0); NRS reduction during mission was 3.78 ± 2.0 versus 4.38 ± 2.2 points (p = 0.0159). Nausea and vomiting occurred with equal frequency in both groups. Telemedical delegation of analgesics to paramedics was safe and led to a pain reduction superior to the published minimum standard in both groups. The documentation quality was better in the telemedicine group. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: Little is known about the safety and quality of prehospital analgesia carried out by emergency medical services (EMS). Beside potential quality problems, in some countries meaningful pain reduction is limited by legal

  1. 46 CFR Sec. 12 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Audit. Sec. 12 Section 12 Shipping MARITIME... TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 12 Audit. (a) The owner will audit as currently as possible subsequent to audit by the agent, all documents relating to the activities, maintenance and...

  2. The Legal Audit: Preventing Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Daniel H.

    1987-01-01

    Suffolk University initiated two audits that proved beneficial: a legal audit and an insurance audit. A legal audit involves having an attorney review a college's contracts, personnel handbooks, catalogs, etc., in order to anticipate and prevent problems. An insurance audit reviews an institution's risk coverage. (MLW)

  3. The Legal Audit: Preventing Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Daniel H.

    1987-01-01

    Suffolk University initiated two audits that proved beneficial: a legal audit and an insurance audit. A legal audit involves having an attorney review a college's contracts, personnel handbooks, catalogs, etc., in order to anticipate and prevent problems. An insurance audit reviews an institution's risk coverage. (MLW)

  4. 46 CFR Sec. 12 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Audit. Sec. 12 Section 12 Shipping MARITIME... TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 12 Audit. (a) The owner will audit as currently as possible subsequent to audit by the agent, all documents relating to the activities, maintenance...

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 12 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Audit. Sec. 12 Section 12 Shipping MARITIME... TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 12 Audit. (a) The owner will audit as currently as possible subsequent to audit by the agent, all documents relating to the activities, maintenance...

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 12 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Audit. Sec. 12 Section 12 Shipping MARITIME... TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 12 Audit. (a) The owner will audit as currently as possible subsequent to audit by the agent, all documents relating to the activities, maintenance...

  7. 46 CFR Sec. 12 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Audit. Sec. 12 Section 12 Shipping MARITIME... TRANSACTIONS UNDER AGENCY AGREEMENTS Reports and Audit Sec. 12 Audit. (a) The owner will audit as currently as possible subsequent to audit by the agent, all documents relating to the activities, maintenance...

  8. [Complications of conventional and laparoscopic gastric bypass. Prospective and comparative study].

    PubMed

    Gramática, Luis; Palas Zúñiga, César E; Moreno, Walter; Álvarez Padilla, Facundo; Arias, Ariel; Lerda, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Roux-en-y gastric bypass for the management of morbid obesity is currently the safest and more efficient treatment option. the laparoscopic era has shown its benefits in this type of surgery, so some authors advocate its implementation in a practical systematic way. all of which has lead in recent years to the unavoidable change in the surgical approach. To evaluate and compare the complications of laparoscopic gastric bypass and the conventional one in patients with morbid obesity. Application site: self-administration national university hospital. Comparative, prospective no randomized study. Between 2002 and 2011, 420 morbidly obese patients received surgical treatment for the obesity either open (167) or laparoscopic (253) surgery Early postoperative complication rate was 4% in the lbg and 34% in the cbg (p < 05, 95%ci 22-38), mostly represented by seromas (25%) and wall abscesses (5.4%). the percentage of late postoperative complications was 2.8% in the lbg group and 9.6% in the cbg (p=0.004, 95%ci 1.4-12.2), the most frequent being incisional hernias (7.18%). According to our experience and consulted literature, laparoscopic gastric bypass is a safe, reproducible and with a lower rate of both early and late complications than cbg, and so we consider and offer lbg as the ideal technique for the treatment of patients with morbid obesity.

  9. [Results of arthrodiastasis in postraumatic ankle osteoarthritis in a young population: prospective comparative study].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Pérez, M; Pais-Brito, J L; de Bergua-Domingo, J; Aciego de Mendoza, M; Guerra-Ferraz, A; Cortés-García, P; Déniz-Rodríguez, B

    2013-01-01

    The most common cause of osteoarthritis of the ankle is post-traumatic, and although tibiotalar arthrodesis remains the surgical gold standard, a number of techniques have been described to preserve joint mobility, such as joint distraction arthroplasty or arthrodiastasis. To evaluate the functional outcome and changes in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain after the application of the distraction arthroplasty for post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis. A prospective comparative study of a group of 10 young patients with post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis treated by synovectomy and arthrodiastasis, compared to a control group of 10 patients treated by isolated synovectomy. Results were calculated using the AOFAS scale and the VAS for pain before and after treatment. As regards the pain measured by VAS, no difference was observed between the two groups before surgery (P=.99), but there was a difference at 3 months (P<.001), 6 months (P=.005), and 12 months (P=.006). No differences were observed in the AOFAS scale between the two groups before surgery (P=.99), or at 3 months (P<.99), but there was a difference at 6 months (P<.001). Ankle arthrodiastasis is effective in reducing pain in post-traumatic ankle arthropathy, and is superior to isolated synovectomy. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Focus Harmonic Scalpel Compared to Conventional Haemostasis in Open Total Thyroidectomy: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Emanuele; Armato, Enrico; Spinato, Giacomo; Spinato, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to compare operative factors, postoperative outcomes and surgical complications of open total thyroidectomy when using the Harmonic Scalpel (HS) versus Conventional Haemostasis (CH). Methods. 100 consecutive patients underwent open total thyroidectomy were randomized into two groups: group CH (Conventional Haemostasis) and group HS (Harmonic Scalpel). We recorded the following: age, sex, pathology, thyroid volume, haemostatic technique, operative time, drainage volume, thyroid weight, postoperative pain, postoperative complications, and hospital stay. The results were analyzed using the Student's t test and χ2 test. Results. No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning mean thyroid weight and mean hospital stay. The mean operative time was significantly shorter in the HS group. The total drainage fluid volume was lower in HS group. Two (4%) transient recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies were observed in CH group and no one (0%) in the HS group. Postoperative transient hypocalcemia occurred more frequently in the CH group. HS group experienced significantly less postoperative pain at 24 and 48 hours. Conclusions. In patients undergoing thyroidectomy, HS is a reliable and safe tool. Comparing with CH techniques, its use reduces operative times, postoperative pain, drainage volume and transient hypocalcemia. PMID:22187563

  11. Glenoumeral dislocation: a prospective randomized study comparing spazo and kocher maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Bruno da Rocha Moreira; de Almeida, José Inácio; de Sousa, Uriel Jaime; Bomfim, Leônidas de Souza; Ferreira, Mário Soares

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and to compare the Spaso and Kocher reduction maneuvers in terms of efficiency, time of reduction, facileness, pain, discomfort to the patient, complications and risks, besides promoting the comparison between the two maneuvers, aiming to ground the emergency conduct. METHODS: A prospective study with 105 patients with acute shoulder dislocations were enrolled in the study between February 2011 and September 2012. The patients were randomized into two groups and they were submitted to the reduction of dislocation using the Spaso maneuver (group A) or the Kocher technique (group B) by first, second or third-year orthopedic surgery residents from our service. The results were evaluated and compared. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, gender, timing of reduction, number of precedent episodes and complications after reduction. However, reduction was achieved in more cases using the Spaso method than it was among the Kocher group, as well as the mean duration of the reduction maneuver and discomfort were shorter in the group A patients. CONCLUSIONS: Both methods presented good results in terms of dislocation reduction and low complications rates. Nevertheless, the Spaso maneuver was more efficient, fast and easily applicable in comparison with Kocher's method. Level of Evidence I, Therapeutic. PMID:26327800

  12. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study comparing remifentanil with fentanyl in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Spies, Claudia; Macguill, Martin; Heymann, Anja; Ganea, Christina; Krahne, Daniel; Assman, Angelika; Kosiek, Heinrich-Rudolf; Scholtz, Kathrin; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Martin, Jörg

    2011-03-01

    To compare the quality of analgesia provided by a remifentanil-based analgesia regime with that provided by a fentanyl-based regime in critically ill patients. This was a registered, prospective, two-center, randomized, triple-blind study involving adult medical and surgical patients requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) for more than 24 h. Patients were randomized to either remifentanil infusion or a fentanyl infusion for a maximum of 30 days. Sedation was provided using propofol (and/or midazolam if required). Primary outcome was the proportion of patients in each group maintaining a target analgesia score at all time points. Secondary outcomes included duration of MV, discharge times, and morbidity. At planned interim analysis (n = 60), 50% of remifentanil patients (n = 28) and 63% of fentanyl patients (n = 32) had maintained target analgesia scores at all time points (p = 0.44). There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to mean duration of ventilation (135 vs. 165 h, p = 0.80), duration of hospital stay, morbidity, or weaning. Interim analysis strongly suggested futility and the trial was stopped. The use of remifentanil-based analgesia in critically ill patients was not superior regarding the achievement and maintenance of sufficient analgesia compared with fentanyl-based analgesia.

  13. Pregnancy outcome following gestational exposure to TNF-alpha-inhibitors: a prospective, comparative, observational study.

    PubMed

    Diav-Citrin, Orna; Otcheretianski-Volodarsky, Anna; Shechtman, Svetlana; Ornoy, Asher

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate pregnancy safety of anti-TNF-α medications. Prospective, comparative, observational study done at the Israeli Teratology Information Service between 2002 and 2011. 83 anti-TNF-α-exposed-pregnancies (97.6% in the first trimester, T1) were followed-up and compared with 86 disease-matched (DM) and 341 non-teratogenic-exposed (NTE) pregnancies. The anti-TNF-α group consisted of 35 infliximab-, 25 etanercept-, and 23 adalimumab-exposed pregnancies. The rate of major congenital anomalies did not significantly differ between the three groups [3/65 (4.6%) (anti-TNF-α, T1), 5/79 (6.3%) (DM), 8/336 (2.4%) (NTE)], even after excluding genetic or cytogenetic anomalies [3/65 (4.6%) (anti-TNF-α, T1), 4/79 (5.1%) (DM), 6/336 (1.8%) (NTE)]. There were no cases of VATER/VACTERL association. The present study suggests that anti-TNF-α treatment does not pose a major teratogenic risk in humans. This conclusion is based on relatively small numbers of exposed pregnancies and should be interpreted with caution. Larger studies are needed to establish anti-TNF-α pregnancy safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pregnancy outcome following in utero exposure to hydroxychloroquine: a prospective comparative observational study.

    PubMed

    Diav-Citrin, Orna; Blyakhman, Shani; Shechtman, Svetlana; Ornoy, Asher

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate pregnancy safety of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for rheumatologic diseases. Prospective comparative observational study done at the Israeli teratology information service between 1998 and 2006. 114 HCQ-exposed pregnancies (98.2% in the first trimester, T1) were followed-up and compared with 455 pregnancies of women counseled for non-teratogenic exposure. The difference in the rate of congenital anomalies was not statistically significant [7/97 (7.2%) vs. 15/440 (3.4%), p=0.094]. The analysis was repeated among those exposed in T1 excluding genetic or cytogenetic anomalies or congenital infections [5/95 (5.3%) vs. 14/440 (3.2%), p=0.355]. There were no cases of neonatal lupus erythematosus. The gestational age at delivery was earlier, rate of preterm delivery higher, and birth weight lower, in the HCQ group. The present study suggests that HCQ treatment in pregnancy is not a major human teratogen. The earlier gestational age and lower birth weight might be associated with maternal disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prospective study in periodontal maintenance therapy: comparative analysis between academic and private practices.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Santuchi, Camila Carvalho; Lages, Eugênio José Pereira; Cota, Luís Otávio Miranda; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Cortelli, José Roberto; Lorentz, Telma Campos Medeiros; Costa, José Eustáquio

    2012-03-01

    This prospective study aims to evaluate and compare the periodontal status, periodontitis progression, tooth loss, and influence of predictable risk variables of two periodontal maintenance therapy programs over a 12-month period. A total of 288 individuals diagnosed with chronic moderate-to-advanced periodontitis, who had finished active periodontal treatment, were evaluated in a public academic environment (AG) (n = 138), as well as in a private clinic (PG) (n = 150). A full-mouth periodontal examination was performed at baseline and at quadrimestral recalls, evaluating plaque index, probing depth, clinical attachment level, furcation involvement, bleeding on probing (BOP), and suppuration. Individuals' social, demographic, and biologic data, as well as compliance with recalls, were recorded. The effect of variables of interest and confounders were tested by univariate and multivariate analysis. The PG demonstrated lower rates of periodontitis progression and tooth loss than did the AG. After adjusting for confounders, the risk variables of BOP (P = 0.047), smoking (P = 0.003), and diabetes (P = 0.028) for the PG and smoking (P = 0.047) for the AG showed a negative influence on periodontal status. In both groups, the periodontal maintenance therapy minimized the negative effect of the risk variables. However, PG showed significantly less progression of periodontitis and tooth loss compared to AG.

  16. Double-blind prospective randomized study comparing polyethylene glycol to lactulose for bowel preparation in colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Menacho, Aline Moraes; Reimann, Adriano; Hirata, Lie Mara; Ganzerella, Caroline; Ivano, Flavio Heuta; Sugisawa, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is the most frequent exam used to evaluate colonic mucosa, allowing the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The appropriate bowel preparation is indispensable for the realization of colonoscopy. Therefore, it is necessary the use of laxative medications, preferentially by oral administration. To compare two medications used in bowel preparation in adult patients going to ambulatory colonoscopy and to analyze the patients' profile. A double-blind prospective study with 200 patients, randomized in two groups: one that received polyethilene glycol and another that received lactulose. The patients answered to questionnaires to data compilation, as tolerance, symptoms and complications related to preparation. Besides, it was also evaluated the prepare efficacy related to the presence of fecal residue. Intestinal habit alterations and abdominal pain were the main reasons to realize the exams and hypertension was the most prevalent comorbidity. Ten percent of the ones who received lactulose didn't get to finish the preparation and 50% considered the taste "bad, but tolerable". The most common subjective symptom after the medication was nausea, especially after lactulose. During the exam, most of the patients who used lactulose had a "light discomfort" and the ones who used polyethilene glycol considered the discomfort as "tolerable". The quality of the preparation was good in 75%, undependable of the medication that was used. Polyethilene glycol was more tolerable when compared to lactulose, without difference on the quality of the preparation.

  17. DOUBLE-BLIND PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED STUDY COMPARING POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL TO LACTULOSE FOR BOWEL PREPARATION IN COLONOSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    MENACHO, Aline Moraes; REIMANN, Adriano; HIRATA, Lie Mara; GANZERELLA, Caroline; IVANO, Flavio Heuta; SUGISAWA, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy is the most frequent exam used to evaluate colonic mucosa, allowing the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The appropriate bowel preparation is indispensable for the realization of colonoscopy. Therefore, it is necessary the use of laxative medications, preferentially by oral administration. Aim To compare two medications used in bowel preparation in adult patients going to ambulatory colonoscopy and to analyze the patients' profile. Methods A double-blind prospective study with 200 patients, randomized in two groups: one that received polyethilene glycol and another that received lactulose. The patients answered to questionnaires to data compilation, as tolerance, symptoms and complications related to preparation. Besides, it was also evaluated the prepare efficacy related to the presence of fecal residue. Results Intestinal habit alterations and abdominal pain were the main reasons to realize the exams and hypertension was the most prevalent comorbidity. Ten percent of the ones who received lactulose didn't get to finish the preparation and 50% considered the taste "bad, but tolerable". The most common subjective symptom after the medication was nausea, especially after lactulose. During the exam, most of the patients who used lactulose had a "light discomfort" and the ones who used polyethilene glycol considered the discomfort as "tolerable". The quality of the preparation was good in 75%, undependable of the medication that was used. Conclusion Polyethilene glycol was more tolerable when compared to lactulose, without difference on the quality of the preparation. PMID:24676290

  18. Intrathecal Versus Intravenous Morphine in Minimally Invasive Posterior Lumbar Fusion: A Blinded Randomized Comparative Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Araimo Morselli, Fabio Silvio Mario; Zuccarini, Francesco; Caporlingua, Federico; Scarpa, Ilaria; Imperiale, Carmela; Caporlingua, Alessandro; De Biase, Lorenzo; Tordiglione, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    A blinded, randomized, comparative prospective study. The aim of this study was to compare the use of intrathecal morphine to endovenous morphine on postoperative pain after posterior lumbar surgery. Intrathecal morphine can provide significant safe analgesia for at least 12 hours and up to 24 hours in patients undergoing major surgery. Its dosages have been decreasing in the last 30 years, but currently, the optimal dose remains unknown. As of today, there are no studies comparing the efficacy and the side effects of this technique with intravenous morphine administration after minimally invasive lumbar fusion surgery. We randomized and compared two groups of 25 patients, who were given either 100 μg intrathecal (ITM group) or 5 ± 2 mg intravenous morphine delivered intravenously for 24 hours at 2 mL/h (IVM group) after minimally invasive posterior lumbar fusion. VAS score at 0, 6, 12, 24 hours, mobilization out of bed at 6 hours, hospitalization duration and complications as lower limbs paresthesia, urinary retention at 6 and 12 hours, nausea, vomit, itch, and constipation were evaluated. Data showed a lower VAS score, a reduction of constipation, lower limbs paresthesia, or urinary retention at 12 hours in ITM rather than in the IVM group. None suffered of vomit, itch, or nausea in both groups. Urinary retention was observed more frequently in ITM group at 6 hours. Patients of ITM group were mobilized out bed earlier than those from IVM group. A low dosage of intrathecal morphine is safe and effective after minimally invasive lumbar fusion surgery. The reduction of pain in the study group permitted a shorter hospitalization and earlier mobilization out of bed, augmenting patients' comfort. 2.

  19. An observational, prospective study comparing tibial and humeral intraosseous access using the EZ-IO.

    PubMed

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Chan, Yiong Huak; Oh, Jen Jen; Ngo, Adeline Su-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative to conventional intravenous access. The proximal tibia and proximal humerus have been proposed as suitable sites for IO access. A nonrandomized, prospective, observational study comparing flow rates and insertion success with tibial and humeral IO access in adults using the EZ-IO-powered drill device was conducted. The tibia was the first site of insertion, and a second IO was inserted in the humerus if clinically indicated for the same patient. Twenty-four patients were recruited, with 24 tibial and 11 humeral insertions. All EZ-IO insertions were successful at the first attempt except for 1 tibial insertion that was successful on the second attempt. All insertions were achieved within 20 seconds. Mean ease of IO insertion score (1=easiest to 10=most difficult) was 1.1 for both sites. We found tibial flow rates to be significantly faster using a pressure bag (165 mL/min) compared with those achieved without a pressure bag (73 mL/min), with a difference of 92 mL/min (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52, 132). Similarly, humeral flow rates were significantly faster using a pressure bag (153 mL/min) compared with humeral those achieved without pressure bag (84 mL/min), with a difference of 69 mL/min (95% CI: 39, 99). Comparing matched pairs (same patient), there was no significant difference in flow rates between tibial and humeral sites, with or without pressure bag infusion. Both sites had high-insertion success rates. Flow rates were significantly faster with a pressure bag infusion than without. However, we did not find any significant difference in tibial or humeral flow rates.

  20. Multiple sclerosis and pregnancy: a single-centre prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cuello, J P; Martínez Ginés, M L; Martin Barriga, M L; de Andrés, C

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a autoimmune disorder which preferentially affects young women of childbearing age. During pregnancy, the annualized relapse rate (AAR) is modified, but pregnancy has no harm effect on the long-term course of the disease. We aimed to study the clinical course of our MS patients during pregnancy, and compare their obstetrics outcomes with a control group of non-MS patients. A single centre prospective observational study was conducted. We assessed the reproductive history, MS history, pregnancy course and new-born outcome of a cohort of MS patients who had had a pregnancy between january 2007 and july 2012. We compared the global outcomes with a control cohort of 58 age-matched healthy pregnancies. Complete data from 35 consecutive women were analyzed, 40 deliveries. Control groups: 58 patients, 60 deliveries. EDSS at pregnancy 0,7. ARR before pregnancy 0,5. During pregnancy 0,3, after pregnancy 0,4. Twelve patients were on disease-modifying drugs (DMD) before pregnancy, 4 prenatal exposure occurs. The comparison between relapse rate and EDSS before, during and after delivery showed no statistically significant difference. In addition, compared to control group, there were also no differences in the obstetric outcomes. In MS cohort, we found a higher incidence of assisted reproductive treatments and lower breastfeeding rate, both statistically significant. Our series confirms that pregnancy has no negative long term impact on the progression of MS and also suggest that there is no additional morbidity in the pregnancy, comparing to the rest of the population. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Blue filter amblyopia treatment protocol for strabismic amblyopia: a prospective comparative study of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Metzler, U; Ham, O; Flores, V; Claramunt, M; Sepulveda, C; Casanova, D

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies of monochromatic visual evoked potentials confirm the strong suppression of (the cortical representation of) paracentral retinal areas of functionally amblyopic eyes, by a flat response to a blue stimulus. A clinical trial stimulating these areas with blue light was encouraging, and justified a prospective comparison of this treatment with conventional classic treatment. In 50 strabismic children with amblyopia, the blue filter treatment protocol (flash stimulation with, and the wearing of, a blue filter during occlusion of the better eye for one hour daily) was compared with the classical treatment (full time total occlusion by patch) in a prospective matched and randomized study. Patients 3 to 7 years old without previous treatment and a visual acuity up to 0.3 were admitted to the study. Visual acuity and fixation behavior were used as the parameters of comparison. Visual Evoked Potentials by monochromatic flashes were also studied. Results of treatment were compared after 6 months. The visual acuity outcome for the blue filter treatment was "statistically significantly" better (p=0.005). The greatest improvement was seen in the subgroup of children with eccentric fixation (p=0.01). Fixation behavior also showed a better outcome from the blue filter treatment (p=0.05) favoring especially children between 3 and 5 years. In children of this age with a visual acuity better than 0.1 we found a very "statistically significant" difference between the two treatments (p=0.004). In children 3 to 5 years old with poorer visual acuity we also found a "statistically significant" difference in the two treatments (p=0.04). The interocular difference of amplitude on the Visual Evoked Potentials also demonstrated more improvement in children treated with the blue filter. This treatment improved especially the cortical response to blue flash stimulation, correlating to paracentral retinal areas. The blue filter treatment protocol provided better results for

  2. [Sensitivity to change of questionnaires measuring subjective health--results of a prospective comparative study].

    PubMed

    Igl, W; Zwingmann, C; Faller, H

    2006-08-01

    Questionnaires measuring patients' subjective health or health-related quality of life are indispensable tools for the evaluation of effects revealed by intervention studies in the field of medical rehabilitation. These patient-reported outcomes should appropriately reflect change over time. Unfortunately, "sensitivity to change" has so far not been adequately examined for German health-related quality of life questionnaires, especially not in a comparative way. Therefore, indices of sensitivity to change for three widespread generic assessment tools have been determined: IRES-3, SF-36, scales of the SCL-90-R. A prospective comparative study was conducted in n = 1145 inpatients with orthopaedic/rheumatologic and cardiac diseases from 16 rehabilitation clinics. All patients received usual care. Their subjective health-status was assessed at two to four weeks before admission (t0), admission (t1), discharge (t2), and three months after discharge (t3). At each time point, they completed the IRES-3, SF-36, and relevant scales of the SCL-90-R. For the time interval t1-t2, Guyatt's responsiveness index (GRI) was calculated and compared across scales and instruments. Virtually all GRI coefficients for scales and aggregated scores, respectively, reached statistical significance. With respect to the GRI distributions of the diagnostic groups, most coefficients were located in a middle to upper range. While the results for the scales do not clearly indicate which assessment instrument should be preferred, GRI coefficients for higher aggregated scores suggest the IRES-3 to be most sensitive to change. These results can be helpful in selecting a health-related quality of life instrument or certain subscales for evaluation studies in the field of medical rehabilitation.

  3. Day case robotic ventral rectopexy compared with day case laparoscopic ventral rectopexy: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Faucheron, J-L; Trilling, B; Barbois, S; Sage, P-Y; Waroquet, P-A; Reche, F

    2016-10-01

    Ventral rectopexy to the promontory has become one of the most strongly advocated surgical treatments for patients with full-thickness rectal prolapse and deep enterocele. Despite its challenges, laparoscopic ventral rectopexy with or without robotic assistance for selected patients can be performed with relatively minimal patient trauma thus creating the potential for same-day discharge. The aim of this prospective case-controlled study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and cost of day case robotic ventral rectopexy compared with routine day case laparoscopic ventral rectopexy. Between February 28, 2014 and March 3, 2015, 20 consecutive patients underwent day case laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for total rectal prolapse or deep enterocele at Michallon University Hospital, Grenoble. Patients were selected for day case surgery on the basis of motivation, favorable social circumstances, and general fitness. One out of every two patients underwent the robotic procedure (n = 10). Demographics, technical results, and costs were compared between both groups. Patients from both groups were comparable in terms of demographics and technical results. Patients operated on with the robot had significantly less pain (p = 0.045). Robotic rectopexy was associated with longer median operative time (94 vs 52.5 min, p < 0.001) and higher costs (9088 vs 3729 euros per procedure, p < 0.001) than laparoscopic rectopexy. Day case robotic ventral rectopexy is feasible and safe, but results in longer operative time and higher costs than classical laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for full-thickness rectal prolapse and enterocele.

  4. A prospective randomized study in 20 patients undergoing bilateral TKA comparing midline incision to anterolateral incision.

    PubMed

    Maniar, Rajesh N; Singhi, Tushar; Nanivadekar, Arun; Maniar, Parul R; Singh, Jaivardhan

    2017-02-11

    Lateral flap numbness is a known side-effect of midline skin incision in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and a cause of patient dissatisfaction. Anterolateral incision is an alternative approach which preserves the infrapatellar branches of the saphenous nerve and avoids numbness. Studies have compared both incisions, but in different patients. However, different patients may assess the same sensory deficit dissimilarly, because of individual variations in anatomy and healing responses. We compared the two incisions in the same patient at the same time, using an anterolateral incision on one knee and a midline incision on the other knee in simultaneous bilateral TKA. Other surgical steps including medial arthrotomy were idential. We also correlated subjective and objective findings. Twenty patients were prospectively randomized. Sensory loss and skin healing were assessed at 6, 12 and 52 weeks. Subjective preference for the knee with less numbness was charted on Wald's Sequential Probability Ratio Test. Sensation scores for touch, vibration, static and moving two-point discrimination were measured. Scar healing was evaluated using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS). Functional scores were measured. A statistically significant difference favoring knees with anterolateral incision was observed in patient preference at all assessment points and this correlated with sensation scores. A statistically significant difference was observed in POSAS score favoring knees with anterolateral incision at 6 and 12 weeks which became statistically insignificant at 1 year. Functional scores remained comparable. We recommend anterolateral incision as a safe and effective method to circumvent the problem of lateral flap numbness with midline incision. I.

  5. Sacroiliac joint pain: Prospective, randomised, experimental and comparative study of thermal radiofrequency with sacroiliac joint block.

    PubMed

    Cánovas Martínez, L; Orduña Valls, J; Paramés Mosquera, E; Lamelas Rodríguez, L; Rojas Gil, S; Domínguez García, M

    2016-05-01

    To compare the analgesic effects between the blockade and bipolar thermal radiofrequency in the treatment of sacroiliac joint pain. Prospective, randomised and experimental study conducted on 60 patients selected in the two hospitals over a period of nine months, who had intense sacroiliac joint pain (Visual Analogue Scale [VAS]>6) that lasted more than 3 months. Patients were randomised into three groups (n=20): Group A (two intra-articular sacroiliac injections of local anaesthetic/corticosteroid guided by ultrasound in 7 days). Group B: conventional bipolar radiofrequency "palisade". Target points were the lateral branch nerves of S1, S2, and S3, distance needles 1cm. Group C: modified bipolar radiofrequency "palisade" (needle distance >1cm). Patients were evaluated at one month, three months, and one year. Demographic data, VAS reduction, and side effects of the techniques were assessed. One month after the treatment, pain reduction was >50% in the three groups P<.001. Three and 12 months after the technique, the patients of the group A did not have a significant reduction in pain. At 3 months, almost 50% patients of the group B referred to improvement of the pain (P=.03), and <25% at 12 months, and those results were statistically significant (P=.01) compared to the baseline. Group C showed an improvement of 50% at 3 and 12 months (P<.001). All patients completed the study. Bipolar radiofrequency "palisade", especially when the distance between the needles was increased, was more effective and lasted longer, compared to join block and steroids, in relieving pain sacroiliac joint. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Pepsin and bile acids in saliva in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux - a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sereg-Bahar, M; Jerin, A; Jansa, R; Stabuc, B; Hocevar-Boltezar, I

    2015-06-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and biliary duodenogastric reflux can cause damage to the laryngeal mucosa and voice disorders. The aim of this study was to find out whether levels of pepsin and bile acids in the saliva can serve as diagnostic markers of LPR. A prospective comparative study. Twenty-eight patients with LPR proven via high-resolution manometry and combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and 24-h pH monitoring and 48 healthy controls without symptoms of LPR were included in the study. In the patients with LPR symptoms, oesophagogastroscopy with oesophageal biopsy was performed. The levels of total pepsin, active pepsin, bile acids and the pH of the saliva were determined in all participants and compared between the groups. Reflux symptom index (RSI) and reflux finding score (RFS) were also obtained and compared. The groups differed significantly in RSI (P = 0.00), RFS (P = 0.00), the levels of bile acids (P = 0.005) and total pepsin in saliva (P = 0.023). The levels of total pepsin and bile acids were about three times higher in the patients with LPR than in the healthy controls. There was a significant correlation between the RSI and RFS score and the level of total pepsin and bile acids in the saliva. Histopathological examination of the oesophageal biopsy taken 5 cm above the lower oesophageal sphincter confirmed reflux in almost 93% of patients with symptoms. The study results show that the levels of total pepsin and bile acids in saliva are significantly higher in patients with LPR than in the controls, thus suggesting this as a useful tool in the diagnosis of LPR and particularly biliary LPR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Improving the Standard of Orthopaedic Operation Documentation Using Typed Proforma Operation Notes: A Completed Audit Loop

    PubMed Central

    Ellanti, Prasad; Moriarty, Andrew; McAuley, Nuala; Hogan, Niall

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) published Good Surgical Practice guidelines in 2008 and revised them in 2014. They outline the basic standard that all surgical operation notes should meet. Objectives To retrospectively audit 57 typed orthopaedic operation notes from St. James’s Hospital in Dublin (from August to November 2015) against the RCS Good Surgical Practice guidelines published in 2014. They were then compared with the department’s previous audit of handwritten notes to complete the audit loop. Materials and methods A total of 57 orthopaedic operation notes were audited by a single reviewer. They were prospectively collected between August and November 2015. All notes were typed on the standard St. James’s Hospital operation note proforma. Results Of the surgeries, 89.5% were emergencies with 77.2% of them being performed by trainees. All of the operation notes were typed and signed by trainees. The procedure name, incision and closure details, tourniquet time (when relevant), and postoperative instructions were documented in 100% of the notes. In total, 80.7% had an operative diagnosis included while only 26.9% of the documentation had prosthesis serial numbers. All of the typed notes were deemed to be legible. Conclusion The use of printed operation notes allows for improved legibility when compared to typed notes. Documentation standards remained very high in the same areas as the handwritten notes and a marked improvement was seen in areas that had been poorly documented. PMID:28405534

  8. Surgical audit: a review. Proceedings of an audit symposium.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    card can be designed to make entry into a computer system easy for a secretary.It is alos much easier to take records to a weekly meeting than 30 sets of patients' notes. In broad terms the audit systems discussed fell into 2 groups: those which used computers and those which did not. There is no doubt that the use of a computer helps in marshalling the information collected. Although a card system was very cheap and easy to use,it was very much difficult to retrieve information rapidly from it than from a computer based system.It seems that the use of computer entails the consumption of more time for entry and validation of data than a card based system, and there may be a temptation not to spend so much time on the educational aspects of audit. This problem can be overcome by holding regular meetings at which only results presented, perhaps firm by firm, in a hospital, so that discussions on policies relating to thromboembolic prophylaxis, the use of prophylactic antibiotics and similar topics can be discussed. Indeed if this kind of meeting does not take place, then it would seem that one of the principal objectives of audit is lost. For this meetings to take place a computer based system is almost certainly going to be essential. In setting up a clinical audit there is clearly a requirement for financial investment. This means first buy in a computer based system and several options are open to the prospective auditor. A simple desk top computer with a modified database system can be used but Messrs. Baird and Horrocks found it required a great deal of programming using a database programme that was already commercially available to obtain a workable system.Two or three commercial systems are now available using personal computers and it seems likely that in many hospitals this will be a popular choice. When introduced in Colchester General Hospital by Mr. Motson where such a facility had not existed in the past, computerisation has been well received and has

  9. Looking for the best anti-colitis medicine: A comparative analysis of current and prospective compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chumanevich, Anastasiya A.; Chaparala, Anusha; Witalison, Erin E.; Tashkandi, Hossam; Hofseth, Anne B.; Lane, Corey; Pena, Edsel; Liu, Piaomu; Pittman, Doug L.; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Chumanevich, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic lifelong inflammatory disorder of the colon, which, while untreated, has a relapsing and remitting course with increasing risk of progression toward colorectal cancer. Current medical treatment strategies of UC mostly focus on inhibition of the signs and symptoms of UC to induce remission and prevent relapse of disease activity, minimizing the impact on quality of life, but not affecting the cause of disease. To date, however, there is no single reliable treatment agent and/or strategy capable of effectively controlling colitis progression throughout the patient's life without side effects, remission, or resistance. Taking into consideration an urgent need for the new colitis treatment strategies, targets and/or modulators of inflammation, we have tested current and prospective compounds for colitis treatment and directly compared their anti-colitis potency using a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) mouse model of colitis. We have introduced a composite score – a multi-parameters comparison tool – to assess biological potency of different compounds. PMID:27974688

  10. Does fair play reduce concussions? A prospective, comparative analysis of competitive youth hockey tournaments

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Aynsley M; Gaz, Daniel V; Larson, Dirk; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Eickhoff, Chad; Krause, David A; Fenske, Brooke M; Aney, Katie; Hansen, Ashley A; Nanos, Stephanie M; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim To determine if Boys Bantam and Peewee and Girls U14 sustain fewer concussions, head hits, ‘other injuries’ and penalties in hockey tournaments governed by intensified fair play (IFP) than non-intensified fair play (NIFP). Methods A prospective comparison of IFP, a behaviour modification programme that promotes sportsmanship, versus control (non-intensified, NIFP) effects on numbers of diagnosed concussions, head hits without diagnosed concussion (HHWDC), ‘other injuries’, number of penalties and fair play points (FPPs). 1514 players, ages 11–14 years, in 6 IFP (N=950) and 5 NIFP (N=564) tournaments were studied. Results Two diagnosed concussions, four HHWDC, and six ‘other injuries’ occurred in IFP tournaments compared to one concussion, eight HHWDC and five ‘other injuries’ in NIFP. There were significantly fewer HHWDC in IFP than NIFP (p=0.018). However, diagnosed concussions, ‘other injuries’, penalties and FPPs did not differ significantly between conditions. In IFP, a minority of teams forfeited the majority of FPPs. Most diagnosed concussions, HHWDC, and other injuries occurred to Bantam B players and usually in penalised teams that forfeited their FPPs. Conclusions In response to significant differences in HHWDC between IFP and NIFP tournaments, the following considerations are encouraged: mandatory implementation of fair play in regular season and tournaments, empowering tournament directors to not accept heavily penalised teams, and introducing ‘no body checking’ in Bantam. PMID:27900157

  11. Are Time- and Event-based Prospective Memory Comparably Affected in HIV Infection?†

    PubMed Central

    Zogg, Jennifer B.; Woods, Steven Paul; Weber, Erica; Doyle, Katie; Grant, Igor; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Hale, Braden R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Letendre, Scott; Capparelli, Edmund; Schrier, Rachel; Heaton, Robert K.; Cherner, Mariana; Moore, David J.; Jernigan, Terry; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah L.; Hesselink, John; Annese, Jacopo; Taylor, Michael J.; Masliah, Eliezer; Everall, Ian; Langford, T. Dianne; Richman, Douglas; Smith, David M.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Everall, Ian; Lipton, Stuart; McCutchan, J. Allen; Atkinson, J. Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Atkinson, J. Hampton; von Jaeger, Rodney; Gamst, Anthony C.; Cushman, Clint; Masys, Daniel R.; Abramson, Ian; Ake, Christopher; Vaida, Florin

    2011-01-01

    According to the multi-process theory of prospective memory (ProM), time-based tasks rely more heavily on strategic processes dependent on prefrontal systems than do event-based tasks. Given the prominent frontostriatal pathophysiology of HIV infection, one would expect HIV-infected individuals to demonstrate greater deficits in time-based versus event-based ProM. However, the two prior studies examining this question have produced variable results. We evaluated this hypothesis in 143 individuals with HIV infection and 43 demographically similar seronegative adults (HIV−) who completed the research version of the Memory for Intentions Screening Test, which yields parallel subscales of time- and event-based ProM. Results showed main effects of HIV serostatus and cue type, but no interaction between serostatus and cue. Planned pair-wise comparisons showed a significant effect of HIV on time-based ProM and a trend-level effect on event-based ProM that was driven primarily by the subset of participants with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Nevertheless, time-based ProM was more strongly correlated with measures of executive functions, attention/working memory, and verbal fluency in HIV-infected persons. Although HIV-associated deficits in time- and event-based ProM appear to be of comparable severity, the cognitive architecture of time-based ProM may be more strongly influenced by strategic monitoring and retrieval processes. PMID:21459901

  12. Does fair play reduce concussions? A prospective, comparative analysis of competitive youth hockey tournaments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Gaz, Daniel V; Larson, Dirk; Jorgensen, Janelle K; Eickhoff, Chad; Krause, David A; Fenske, Brooke M; Aney, Katie; Hansen, Ashley A; Nanos, Stephanie M; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    To determine if Boys Bantam and Peewee and Girls U14 sustain fewer concussions, head hits, 'other injuries' and penalties in hockey tournaments governed by intensified fair play (IFP) than non-intensified fair play (NIFP). A prospective comparison of IFP, a behaviour modification programme that promotes sportsmanship, versus control (non-intensified, NIFP) effects on numbers of diagnosed concussions, head hits without diagnosed concussion (HHWDC), 'other injuries', number of penalties and fair play points (FPPs). 1514 players, ages 11-14 years, in 6 IFP (N=950) and 5 NIFP (N=564) tournaments were studied. Two diagnosed concussions, four HHWDC, and six 'other injuries' occurred in IFP tournaments compared to one concussion, eight HHWDC and five 'other injuries' in NIFP. There were significantly fewer HHWDC in IFP than NIFP (p=0.018). However, diagnosed concussions, 'other injuries', penalties and FPPs did not differ significantly between conditions. In IFP, a minority of teams forfeited the majority of FPPs. Most diagnosed concussions, HHWDC, and other injuries occurred to Bantam B players and usually in penalised teams that forfeited their FPPs. In response to significant differences in HHWDC between IFP and NIFP tournaments, the following considerations are encouraged: mandatory implementation of fair play in regular season and tournaments, empowering tournament directors to not accept heavily penalised teams, and introducing 'no body checking' in Bantam.

  13. Amniocentesis, Maternal Psychopathology and Prenatal Representations of Attachment: A Prospective Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Hage, Wissam; Léger, Julie; Delcuze, Aude; Giraudeau, Bruno; Perrotin, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to characterize the maternal dimensions of anxiety, depression and prenatal attachment in women undergoing an amniocentesis. Methodology/Principal Findings A prospective observational study was conducted. Women were referred to early amniocentesis for increased nuchal translucency, elevated biochemical markers or advanced maternal age. All participants had 3 prenatal (16–18, 20–24, 30–34 weeks of gestation) and one postnatal (30–45 days) interviews reviewing for demographic, medical, and psychiatric information (STAI State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; EPDS: Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale; IRMAG: Interview of Maternal Representations of Attachment during pregnancy). We investigated 232 pregnant women who undergone an amniocentesis compared with 160 pregnant controls. Following the procedure, the amniocentesis group experienced transiently significantly higher levels of state-anxiety on the STAI (44.6 vs. 39.3) and depression as measured by the EPDS (9.4 vs. 6.3) than the controls. Overall in both groups, the maternal representations of attachment were well integrated and balanced, but the amniocentesis group experienced significantly more mother-directed representations. Conclusions/Significance Amniocentesis is associated with higher affective adaptive reactions that tend to normalize during the pregnancy, with overall preserved maternal fetal representations of attachment. PMID:22848599

  14. Comparing conventional gauze therapy to vacuum-assisted closure wound therapy: a prospective randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Mouës, C M; van den Bemd, G J C M; Heule, F; Hovius, S E R

    2007-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure wound therapy (vacuum therapy) has been used in our department since 1997 as a tool to bridge the period between debridement and definite surgical closure in full-thickness wounds. We performed a prospective randomised clinical trial to compare the efficacy of vacuum therapy to conventional moist gauze therapy in this stage of wound treatment. Treatment efficacy was assessed by semi-quantitative scoring of the wound conditions (signs of rubor, calor, exudate and fibrinous slough) and by wound surface area measurements. Tissue biopsies were performed to quantify the bacterial load. Besides this, the duration until 'ready for surgical therapy' and complications encountered during therapy and postoperatively were recorded. Fifty-four patients were included (vacuum n=29, conventional n=25). With vacuum therapy, healthier wound conditions were observed. Furthermore, a tendency towards a shorter duration of therapy was found, which was most prominent in late-treated wounds. In addition, the wound surface area reduced significantly faster with vacuum therapy. Surprisingly, these results were obtained without a decrease in the number of bacteria colonising the wound. Complications were minor, except for one case of septicaemia and one case of increased tissue necrosis, which compelled us to stop vacuum therapy. For the treatment of full-thickness wounds, vacuum therapy has proven to be a valid wound healing modality.

  15. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  16. Auditing Organizational Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    and risks, including the control of security, human factors and other activities that affect the organization’s performance , condition or safety...Managing organizational security is no different from managing any other of the command’s missions. Establish your policies, goals and risk...parameters; implement, train, measure and benchmark them. And then audit, audit, audit. Today, more than ever, Organizational Security is an essential

  17. Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema: Comparing Direct Costs of a Prospective Surveillance Model and a Traditional Model of Care

    PubMed Central

    Pfalzer, Lucinda A.; Springer, Barbara; Levy, Ellen; McGarvey, Charles L.; Danoff, Jerome V.; Gerber, Lynn H.; Soballe, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention involves monitoring and screening to prevent negative sequelae from chronic diseases such as cancer. Breast cancer treatment sequelae, such as lymphedema, may occur early or late and often negatively affect function. Secondary prevention through prospective physical therapy surveillance aids in early identification and treatment of breast cancer–related lymphedema (BCRL). Early intervention may reduce the need for intensive rehabilitation and may be cost saving. This perspective article compares a prospective surveillance model with a traditional model of impairment-based care and examines direct treatment costs associated with each program. Intervention and supply costs were estimated based on the Medicare 2009 physician fee schedule for 2 groups: (1) a prospective surveillance model group (PSM group) and (2) a traditional model group (TM group). The PSM group comprised all women with breast cancer who were receiving interval prospective surveillance, assuming that one third would develop early-stage BCRL. The prospective surveillance model includes the cost of screening all women plus the cost of intervention for early-stage BCRL. The TM group comprised women referred for BCRL treatment using a traditional model of referral based on late-stage lymphedema. The traditional model cost includes the direct cost of treating patients with advanced-stage lymphedema. The cost to manage early-stage BCRL per patient per year using a prospective surveillance model is $636.19. The cost to manage late-stage BCRL per patient per year using a traditional model is $3,124.92. The prospective surveillance model is emerging as the standard of care in breast cancer treatment and is a potential cost-saving mechanism for BCRL treatment. Further analysis of indirect costs and utility is necessary to assess cost-effectiveness. A shift in the paradigm of physical therapy toward a prospective surveillance model is warranted. PMID:21921254

  18. Improving the quality of obstetric care for women with obstructed labour in the national referral hospital in Uganda: lessons learnt from criteria based audit.

    PubMed

    Kayiga, Herbert; Ajeani, Judith; Kiondo, Paul; Kaye, Dan K

    2016-07-11

    Obstructed labour remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality whose complications can be reduced with improved quality of obstetric care. The objective was to assess whether criteria-based audit improves quality of obstetric care provided to women with obstructed labour in Mulago hospital, Uganda. Using criteria-based audit, management of obstructed labour was analyzed prospectively in two audits. Six standards of care were compared. An initial audit of 180 patients was conducted in September/October 2013. The Audit results were shared with key stakeholders. Gaps in patient management were identified and recommendations for improving obstetric care initiated. Six standards of care (intravenous fluids, intravenous antibiotics, monitoring of maternal vital signs, bladder catheterization, delivery within two hours, and blood grouping and cross matching) were implemented. A re-audit of 180 patients with obstructed labour was conducted four months later to evaluate the impact of these recommendations. The results of the two audits were compared. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted among healthcare providers to identify factors that could have influenced the audit results. There was improvement in two standards of care (intravenous fluids and intravenous antibiotic administration) 58.9 % vs. 86.1 %; p < 0.001 and 21.7 % vs. 50.5 %; P < 0.001 respectively after the second audit. There was no improvement in vital sign monitoring, delivery within two hours or blood grouping and cross matching. There was a decline in bladder catheterization (94 % vs. 68.9 %; p < 0.001. The overall mean care score in the first and second audits was 55.1 and 48.2 % respectively, p = 0.19. Healthcare factors (negative attitude, low numbers, poor team work, low motivation), facility factors (poor supervision, stock-outs of essential supplies, absence of protocols) and patient factors (high patient load, poor compliance to

  19. Coding for surgical audit.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, R A; van Rij, A M

    1990-05-01

    A simple system of codes for operations, diagnoses and complications, developed specifically for computerized surgical audit, is described. This arose following a review of our established surgical audit in which problems in the retrieval of data from the database were identified. Evaluation of current methods of classification of surgical data highlighted the need for a dedicated coding system that was suitable for classifying surgical audit data, enabling rapid retrieval from large databases. After 2 years of use, the coding system has been found to fulfil the criteria of being sufficiently flexible and specific for computerized surgical audit, yet simple enough for medical staff to use.

  20. Prospective study comparing laparoscopic and open adenomectomy: Surgical and functional results.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Segui, A; Angulo, J C

    Open adenomectomy (OA) is the surgery of choice for large volume benign prostatic hyperplasia, and laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) represents a minimally invasive alternative. We present a long-term, prospective study comparing both techniques. The study consecutively included 199 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate volumes>80g who were followed for more than 12 months. The patients underwent OA (n=97) or LA (n=102). We recorded and compared demographic and perioperative data, functional results and complications using a descriptive statistical analysis. The mean age was 69.2±7.7 years (range 42-87), and the mean prostate volume (measured by TRUS) was 112.1±32.7mL (range 78-260). There were no baseline differences among the groups in terms of age, ASA scale, prostate volume, PSA levels, Qmax, IPSS, QoL or treatments prior to the surgery. The surgical time (P<.0001) and catheter time (P<.0002) were longer in the LA group. Operative bleeding (P<.0001), transfusion rate (P=.0015) and mean stay (P<.0001) were significantly lower in the LA group. The LA group had a lower rate of complications (P=.04), but there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of major complications (Clavien score≥3) (P=.13) or in the rate of late complications (at one year) (P=.66). There were also no differences between the groups in the functional postoperative results: IPSS (P=.17), QoL (P=.3) and Qmax (P=.17). LA is a reasonable, safe and effective alternative that results in less bleeding, fewer transfusions, shorter hospital stays and lower morbidity than OA. LA has similar functional results to OA, at the expense of longer surgical times and longer catheter times. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Prospective, comparative effectiveness trial of cow's milk elimination and swallowed fluticasone for pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kruszewski, P G; Russo, J M; Franciosi, J P; Varni, J W; Platts-Mills, T A E; Erwin, E A

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune-mediated disease in which food antigens play a key role. Current therapeutic options are limited to long-term steroid medication and dietary elimination of multiple foods, each of which is challenging. Our objective was to compare single food elimination of cow's milk to swallowed fluticasone in pediatric EoE patients. This is a prospective, comparative effectiveness trial of newly diagnosed EoE patients (ages 2-18 years) treated with swallowed fluticasone (n = 24) or elimination of cow's milk (n = 20). The dual outcome measures of repeat esophageal biopsy (6-8 weeks) and change in Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) EoE Module and Symptoms Scales were used to assess response to treatment. After 6-8 weeks of treatment, peak esophageal eosinophil counts decreased to below the threshold of 15 eosinophils/high-power field in 64% of patients treated with cow's milk elimination and 80% of patients treated with swallowed fluticasone (P = 0.4). Mean PedsQL EoE Module total scores (69 vs. 82; P < 0.005) and Total Symptoms scores (58 vs. 75; P = 0.001) showed significant improvement with cow's milk elimination. Among children treated with swallowed fluticasone, mean PedsQL EoE Module total scores (64 vs. 75; P < 0.05) and Total Symptoms scores (58 vs. 69; P < 0.01) were also significantly improved after 6-8 weeks of therapy. Removal of cow's milk from the diet is an effective single food elimination treatment for pediatric patients with EoE as assessed by statistically significant histologic and symptomatic improvement. Cow's milk elimination may be more desirable for EoE patients who do not want to take chronic, long-term steroid medications. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  2. Is the peripapillary retinal perfusion related to myopia in healthy eyes? A prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Kong, Xiangmei; Jiang, Chunhui; Li, Mengwei; Yu, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-03-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the peripapillary and parafoveal perfusion of young, healthy myopic subjects with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. A prospective comparative study was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015. Participants recruited from a population-based study performed by the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University in Shanghai. A total of 78 Chinese normal subjects (78 eyes) with different refraction were included. Myopia was divided into 4 groups on the basis of the refractive status: 20 eyes with emmetropia (mean spherical equivalent (MSE) 0.50D to -0.50D), 20 eyes with mild myopia (MSE -0.75D to -2.75D), 20 eyes with moderate myopia (MSE -3.00D to -5.75D), and 18 eyes with high myopia (MSE≤-6.00D). Peripapillary and parafoveal retinal and choroidal perfusion parameters and their relationships with axial length (AL) and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness were analysed. Significant differences were found for the retinal flow index and vessel density in the peripapillary area among the 4 groups, but not in the parafoveal area. The high myopia group had the lowest peripapillary retinal flow index and vessel density. In addition, there was a negative correlation (β=-0.002, p=0.047) between the AL and peripapillary retinal flow index and a positive correlation between RNFL thickness and the peripapillary retinal perfusion parameters (flow index: β=0.001, p=0.006; vessel density: β=0.350, p=0.002) even after adjustment for other variables. Highly myopic eyes have a decreased peripapillary retinal perfusion compared with emmetropic eyes. Such vascular features might increase the susceptibility to vascular-related eye diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Prospective, randomized comparative study between single-port laparoscopic appendectomy and conventional laparoscopic appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Villalobos Mori, Rafael; Escoll Rufino, Jordi; Herrerías González, Fernando; Mias Carballal, M Carmen; Escartin Arias, Alfredo; Olsina Kissler, Jorge Juan

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy is probably the technique of choice in acute appendicitis. Single port laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been proposed as an alternative technique. The objective of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of SILS against conventional laparoscopic appendectomy (LA). From January 2011 to September 2012, 120 patients with acute appendicitis were prospectively randomized; 60 for SILS and 60 for LA. Patients between 15 to 65 years were selected, with onset of symptoms less than 48h. We compared BMI, surgery time, start of oral intake, hospital stay, postoperative pain, pathology and costs. The median age, BMI, sex and time of onset of symptoms to diagnosis were similar. There were no statistically significant differences in the operative time, start of oral intake or hospital stay. There was a significant difference in postoperative pain being higher in SILS (4±1.3) than in LA (3.3±0.5) with a P=.004. Flemonous appendicitis predominated in both groups in a similar percentage. A total of 3 cases with intra-abdominal abscess (SILS 2, LA 1) required readmission and resolved spontaneously with intravenous antibiotic treatment. One case of SILS required assistance by a 5mm trocar in the RLC for drainage placement. The cost was higher in SILS due the single port device. SILS appendectomy is safe, effective and has similar results to LA in selected patients, and although the cost is greater, the long term results will determine the future of this technique. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Is the peripapillary retinal perfusion related to myopia in healthy eyes? A prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolei; Kong, Xiangmei; Jiang, Chunhui; Li, Mengwei; Yu, Jian; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the peripapillary and parafoveal perfusion of young, healthy myopic subjects with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Design A prospective comparative study was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015. Setting Participants recruited from a population-based study performed by the Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital of Fudan University in Shanghai. Participants A total of 78 Chinese normal subjects (78 eyes) with different refraction were included. Myopia was divided into 4 groups on the basis of the refractive status: 20 eyes with emmetropia (mean spherical equivalent (MSE) 0.50D to −0.50D), 20 eyes with mild myopia (MSE −0.75D to −2.75D), 20 eyes with moderate myopia (MSE −3.00D to −5.75D), and 18 eyes with high myopia (MSE≤−6.00D). Main outcome measures Peripapillary and parafoveal retinal and choroidal perfusion parameters and their relationships with axial length (AL) and retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness were analysed. Results Significant differences were found for the retinal flow index and vessel density in the peripapillary area among the 4 groups, but not in the parafoveal area. The high myopia group had the lowest peripapillary retinal flow index and vessel density. In addition, there was a negative correlation (β=−0.002, p=0.047) between the AL and peripapillary retinal flow index and a positive correlation between RNFL thickness and the peripapillary retinal perfusion parameters (flow index: β=0.001, p=0.006; vessel density: β=0.350, p=0.002) even after adjustment for other variables. Conclusions Highly myopic eyes have a decreased peripapillary retinal perfusion compared with emmetropic eyes. Such vascular features might increase the susceptibility to vascular-related eye diseases. PMID:26969645

  5. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Birdwell, Leah; Lodish, Maya; Tirosh, Amit; Chittiboina, Prashant; Keil, Meg; Lyssikatos, Charlampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Feelders, Richard A.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. Study design A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Coagulation profiles were taken before and 6-12 months after surgery and compared with 18 normocortisolemic children, 13.7 ± 3.6 years. Results At baseline, patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the procoagulant factor VIII (FVIII) vs controls (145 IU/dL ± 84 vs 99 ± 47, P = .04); 6-12 months after surgery, FVIII levels decreased to 111 ± 47, P = .05. Patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin, 96 ± 17% vs 82 ± 26%, P = .015. After surgery, antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin levels decreased to 82 ± 24%, P < .001. Anticoagulants were greater in patients with Cushing syndrome vs controls at baseline, including protein C (138 ± 41% vs 84 ± 25%, P < .001), protein S (94 ± 19% vs 74 ± 19%, P = .001), and antithrombin III (96 ± 18% vs 77 ± 13%, P < .0001). The 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels correlated positively with FVIII levels, r = 0.43, P = .004. Conclusion Children with Cushing syndrome had elevated procoagulants, antifibrinolytics, and anticoagulants at baseline compared with controls; normalization of coagulation measures was seen after surgical cure. Despite the increase in anticoagulants, hypercortisolemia is associated with a hypercoagulable state in children, as is the case in adults. This finding has potential implications for prevention of venous thromboembolism in children with Cushing syndrome. PMID:27496264

  6. Randomized Prospective Trial Comparing the Use of Intravenous versus Oral Acetaminophen in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Politi, Joel R; Davis, Richard L; Matrka, Alexis K

    2017-04-01

    Multimodal pain management has had a significant effect on improving total joint arthroplasty recovery and patient satisfaction. There is literature supporting that intravenous (IV) acetaminophen reduces postoperative pain and narcotic use in the total joint population. However, there are no studies comparing the effectiveness of IV vs oral (PO) acetaminophen as part of a standard multimodal perioperative pain regimen. One hundred twenty patients undergoing hip and knee arthroplasty surgeries performed by one joint arthroplasty surgeon were prospectively randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 (63 patients) received IV and group 2 (57 patients) received PO acetaminophen in addition to a standard multimodal perioperative pain regimen. Each group received 1 gram of acetaminophen preoperatively and then every 6 hours for 24 hours. Total narcotic use and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were collected every 4 hours postoperatively. The 24-hour average hydromorphone equivalents given were not different between groups (3.71 vs 3.48) at 24 hours (P = .76), or at any of the individual 4-hour intervals. The 24-hour average visual analog scale scores in group 1 (IV) was 3.00 and in group 2 (PO) was 3.40 (P = .06). None of the 4-hour intervals were significantly different except the first interval (0-4 hour postoperatively), which favored the IV group (P = .03). The use of IV acetaminophen may have a role when given intraoperatively to reduce the immediate pain after surgery. Following that, it does not provide a significant benefit in reducing pain or narcotic use when compared with the much less expensive PO form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective ECG triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts compared with retrospective ECG gating on 256-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Symersky, Petr; Habets, Jesse; Westers, Paul; de Mol, Bas A J M; Prokop, Mathias; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2012-06-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has diagnostic value for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but it is hampered by artefacts. We hypothesised that image acquisition using prospective triggering instead of retrospective gating would reduce artefacts related to pulsating PHV. In a pulsatile in vitro model, a mono- and bileaflet PHV were imaged using 256 MDCT at 60, 75 and 90 beats per minute (BPM) with either retrospective gating (120 kV, 600 mAs, pitch 0.2, CTDI(vol) 39.8 mGy) or prospective triggering (120 kV, 200 mAs, CTDI(vol) 13.3 mGy). Two thresholds (>175 and <-45HU), derived from the density of surrounding structures, were used for quantification of hyper- and hypodense artefacts. Image noise and artefacts were compared between protocols. Prospective triggering reduced hyperdense artefacts for both valves at every BPM (P = 0.001 all comparisons). Hypodense artefacts were reduced for the monoleaflet valve at 60 (P = 0.009), 75 (P = 0.016) and 90 BPM (P = 0.001), and for the bileaflet valves at 60 (P = 0.001), 90 (P = 0.001) but not at 75 BPM (P = 0.6). Prospective triggering reduced image noise at 60 (P = 0.001) and 75 (P < 0.03) but not at 90 BPM. Compared with retrospective gating, prospective triggering reduced most artefacts related to pulsating PHV in vitro. • Computed tomographic images are often degraded by prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts • Prospective triggering reduces prosthetic heart valve-induced artefacts in vitro • Artefact reduction at 90 beats per minute occurs without image noise reduction • Prospective triggering may improve CT image quality of moving hyperdense structures.

  8. Multimodal Therapy for Stage III Retinoblastoma (International Retinoblastoma Staging System): A Prospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Bhavna; Hasan, Fahmi; Seth, Rachna; Pathy, Sushmita; Pattebahadur, Rajesh; Sharma, Sanjay; Upadhyaya, Ashish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-09-01

    To compare the efficacy of 2 chemotherapeutic drug combinations as part of multimodal therapy for orbital retinoblastoma. Prospective, comparative, study. Patients with stage III retinoblastoma (International Retinoblastoma Staging System). Demographic and clinical features were recorded at presentation. Treatment consisted of a multimodal protocol with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, enucleation, orbital external-beam radiotherapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy. For chemotherapy, patients were randomized into 2 groups: group A patients were treated with vincristine, etoposide, and carboplatin (VEC) and group B patients were treated with carboplatin and etoposide, alternating with cyclophosphamide, idarubicin, and vincristine. Treatment outcomes and adverse effects were recorded. Efficacy parameters were compared between the groups. Survival probability, cause of death, and chemotherapy-related toxicity. A total of 54 children were recruited (27 in each group). The mean ± SD follow-up was 21.3±11.34 months. The overall Kaplan-Meier survival probability was 80% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-0.89) and 42% (95% CI, 0.24-0.59) at 1 year and 4 years, respectively. There were 9 deaths in group A and 15 deaths in group B. The Kaplan-Meier survival probability at 1 year was similar between the groups: 81% (95% CI, 0.60-0.91) and 79% (95% CI, 0.58-0.9) for groups A and B, respectively. At 4 years, the survival probability for group A was higher (63% [95% CI, 0.41-0.79] vs. 25% [95% CI, 0.08-0.46] for groups A and B, respectively), with a strong trend of better survival in group A over time (P = 0.05). The major cause of death was central nervous system relapse (8 patients in group A and 7 patients in group B). Two patients in group B died of sepsis after febrile neutropenia. Grade 3 and grade 4 hematologic toxicities were more common in group B, with a significant difference in grade 4 neutropenia (P = 0.002). This study compared the outcomes of VEC chemotherapy with a 5

  9. Bacterial overgrowth during treatment with omeprazole compared with cimetidine: a prospective randomised double blind study.

    PubMed Central

    Thorens, J; Froehlich, F; Schwizer, W; Saraga, E; Bille, J; Gyr, K; Duroux, P; Nicolet, M; Pignatelli, B; Blum, A L; Gonvers, J J; Fried, M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastric and duodenal bacterial overgrowth frequently occurs in conditions where diminished acid secretion is present. Omeprazole inhibits acid secretion more effectively than cimetidine and might therefore more frequently cause bacterial overgrowth. AIM: This controlled prospective study compared the incidence of gastric and duodenal bacterial overgrowth in patients treated with omeprazole or cimetidine. METHODS: 47 outpatients with peptic disease were randomly assigned to a four week treatment regimen with omeprazole 20 mg or cimetidine 800 mg daily. Gastric and duodenal juice were obtained during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and plated for anaerobic and aerobic organisms. RESULTS: Bacterial overgrowth (> or = 10(5) cfu/ml) was present in 53% of the patients receiving omeprazole and in 17% receiving cimetidine (p < 0.05). The mean (SEM) number of gastric and duodenal bacterial counts was 6.0 (0.2) and 5.0 (0.2) respectively in the omeprazole group and 4.0 (0.2) and 4.0 (0.1) in the cimetidine group (p < 0.001 and < 0.01; respectively). Faecal type bacteria were found in 30% of the patients with bacterial overgrowth. Basal gastric pH was higher in patients treated with omeprazole compared with cimetidine (4.2 (0.5) versus 2.0 (0.2); p < 0.001) and in patients with bacterial overgrowth compared with those without bacterial overgrowth (5.1 (0.6) versus 2.0 (0.1); p < 0.0001). The nitrate, nitrite, and nitrosamine values in gastric juice did not increase after treatment with either cimetidine or omeprazole. Serum concentrations of vitamin B12, beta carotene, and albumin were similar before and after treatment with both drugs. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that the incidence of gastric and duodenal bacterial overgrowth is considerably higher in patients treated with omeprazole compared with cimetidine. This can be explained by more pronounced inhibition of gastric acid secretion. No patient developed signs of malabsorption or an increase of N

  10. Impact of treatment algorithms on the prescribing of antithrombotic therapy in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome – a prospective audit

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Alan C; McCallum, Linsay; Gardiner, Thomas; Darroch, Claire; Walters, Matthew R; Oldroyd, Keith G

    2015-01-01

    Aims Chest pain presentations are common although most patients do not have an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We hypothesized that our local therapeutic guideline was leading to many low risk patients being inappropriately treated with potent anti-thrombotic therapy for ACS. Methods We conducted a prospective analysis of patients presenting with suspected ACS to the Western Infirmary Glasgow over a 2 month period between 6/10/13–3/11/13 and 5/4/14–2/5/14. We collated data on demographics, investigation, initial management and final diagnosis. Patients taking warfarin were excluded. We calculated sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for our local guideline, the SIGN guideline and a new guideline proposal. Results We studied 202 patients of whom 112 (55%) were male with mean (SD) age 60 (15) years. Full anti-thrombotic therapy for ACS was recommended in 91 patients (45%) according to the NHS GG&C guideline, 37 (18%) by the SIGN guideline and 30 (15%) by our new guideline proposal. The final diagnosis was ACS in 39 patients (19%). The current NHS GG&C guideline had a sensitivity of 80%, specificity 63% and AUROC 0.71 (95% CI 0.63, 0.80). The respective values were 62%, 92% and 0.77 (95% CI 0.67, 0.86) for the SIGN guideline and 54%, 94% and 0.74 (95% CI 0.64, 0.84) for our new proposed guideline. Conclusions Only one-fifth of patients who present with chest pain or suspected ACS have ACS as their final diagnosis. Our new guideline proposal is highly specific and would minimize unnecessary administration of potent anti-thrombotic therapy to low risk patients. PMID:26147691

  11. Time to audit.

    PubMed

    Smyth, L G; Martin, Z; Hall, B; Collins, D; Mealy, K

    2012-09-01

    Public and political pressures are increasing on doctors and in particular surgeons to demonstrate competence assurance. While surgical audit is an integral part of surgical practice, its implementation and delivery at a national level in Ireland is poorly developed. Limits to successful audit systems relate to lack of funding and administrative support. In Wexford General Hospital, we have a comprehensive audit system which is based on the Lothian Surgical Audit system. We wished to analyse the amount of time required by the Consultant, NCHDs and clerical staff on one surgical team to run a successful audit system. Data were collected over a calendar month. This included time spent coding and typing endoscopy procedures, coding and typing operative procedures, and typing and signing discharge letters. The total amount of time spent to run the audit system for one Consultant surgeon for one calendar month was 5,168 min or 86.1 h. Greater than 50% of this time related to work performed by administrative staff. Only the intern and administrative staff spent more than 5% of their working week attending to work related to the audit. An integrated comprehensive audit system requires a very little time input by Consultant surgeons. Greater than 90% of the workload in running the audit was performed by the junior house doctors and administrative staff. The main financial implications for national audit implementation would relate to software and administrative staff recruitment. Implementation of the European Working Time Directive in Ireland may limit the time available for NCHD's to participate in clinical audit.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Graduate Employment Prospects in European Labour Markets: A Study of Graduate Recruitment in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branine, Mohamed; Avramenko, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a comparative analysis of higher education and the graduate labour markets in selected European countries (France, Germany, Spain and United Kingdom) in the context of the expectations of graduates and prospective employers, and respective recruitment and selection practices. Expectations of graduating students…

  13. A Comparative Analysis of Graduate Employment Prospects in European Labour Markets: A Study of Graduate Recruitment in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branine, Mohamed; Avramenko, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a comparative analysis of higher education and the graduate labour markets in selected European countries (France, Germany, Spain and United Kingdom) in the context of the expectations of graduates and prospective employers, and respective recruitment and selection practices. Expectations of graduating students…

  14. An audit of peripheral nerve blocks for hand surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, J. M.; Inglefield, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    A prospective audit of 140 median, radial and ulnar blocks, given for 70 hand operations is described. The surgery was completed successfully in every patient. A further injection of local anaesthetic was required in 13 operations. Four patients experienced severe tourniquet pain. The results of the audit have shown that if a careful technique is used, a wide range of minor hand operations can be performed under regional nerve block. PMID:8215147

  15. A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing the Interference Screw and Suture Anchor Techniques for Biceps Tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Soon; Kim, Sae Hoon; Jung, Ho Jin; Lee, Ye Hyun; Oh, Joo Han

    2017-02-01

    Several methods are used to perform biceps tenodesis in patients with superior labrum-biceps complex (SLBC) lesions accompanied by a rotator cuff tear. However, limited clinical data are available regarding the best technique in terms of clinical and anatomic outcomes. To compare the clinical and anatomic outcomes of the interference screw (IS) and suture anchor (SA) fixation techniques for biceps tenodesis performed along with arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. A total of 80 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with SLBC lesions were prospectively enrolled and randomly divided according to the tenodesis method: the IS and SA groups. Functional outcomes were evaluated with the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), Constant score, Korean Shoulder Score (KSS), and long head of the biceps (LHB) score at least 2 years after surgery. The anatomic status of tenodesis was estimated using magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonography, and the anatomic failure of tenodesis was determined when the biceps tendon was not traced in the intertubercular groove directly from the insertion site of the IS or SA. Thirty-three patients in the IS group and 34 in the SA group were monitored for more than 2 years. All postoperative functional scores improved significantly compared with the preoperative scores (all P < .001) and were not significantly different between the groups, including the LHB score (all P > .05). Nine anatomic failures of tenodesis were observed: 7 in the IS group and 2 in the SA group ( P = .083). In a multivariate analysis using logistic regression, IS fixation ( P = .003) and a higher (ie, more physically demanding) work level ( P = .022) were factors associated with the anatomic failure of tenodesis significantly. In patients with tenodesis failure, the LHB score ( P = .049) and the degree of Popeye deformity by the

  16. Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores are elevated in antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Lawford, Bruce R; Barnes, Mark; Connor, Jason P; Heslop, Karen; Nyst, Phillip; Young, Ross McD

    2012-02-01

    Hyperprolactinaemia in antipsychotic treated patients with schizophrenia is a consequence of D2 receptor (DRD2) blockade. Alcohol use disorder is commonly comorbid with schizophrenia and low availability of striatal DRD2 may predispose individuals to alcohol use. In this pilot study we investigated whether hyperprolactinaemia secondary to pharmacological DRD2 blockade was associated with alcohol use disorder in 219 (178 males and 41 females) patients with schizophrenia. Serum prolactin determinations were made in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and maintained on antipsychotic agents. Clinical assessment included demographics, family history and administration of the AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test). Higher AUDIT scores were associated with prolactin-raising antipsychotic medication (n=106) compared with prolactin-sparing medication (n=113). Risperidone (n=63) treated patients had higher AUDIT scores and prolactin levels than those on other atypical antipsychotics (n = 113). Across the entire sample, patients with a prolactin greater than 800 mIU/L had higher AUDIT scores and were more likely to exceed the cut-off score for harmful and hazardous alcohol use. These differences were not explained by potential confounds related to clinical features and demographics, comorbidity or medication side-effects. These data suggest that by lowering dosage, or switching to another antipsychotic agent, the risk for alcohol use disorder in those with schizophrenia may be reduced. This hypothesis requires testing using a prospective methodology.

  17. Is faecal calprotectin equally useful in all Crohn's disease locations? A prospective, comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Piotr; Lykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Krela-Kazmierczak, Iwona; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Szachta, Patrycja; Katulska, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There are data suggesting that the diagnostic usefulness of faecal calprotectin (FC) may vary depending on the Crohn's disease (CD) location. The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic usefulness of FC in CD patients with different disease locations. Material and methods We prospectively enrolled 120 CD patients in the study. Disease activity was assessed by using Crohn's Disease Activity Index (CDAI), biochemical markers, and endoscopic and radiographic methods. Faecal calprotectin concentration was assessed in single stool samples by using the ELISA method. Results Among all patients, 54 (45%) had ileocolonic CD location, 44 (36.5%) had isolated small bowel location, and 22 (18.5%) had colonic CD location. FC correlated significantly with C-reactive protein concentration and endoscopic and radiographic activity among patients with isolated small bowel CD (p = 0.03, r = 0.32; p < 0.0001, r = 0.78; p = 0.03, r = 0.35; respectively) and with C-reactive protein and endoscopic activity in isolated colonic CD (p = 0.0009, r = 0.7; p = 0.0002, r = 0.78; respectively). CDAI and inflammatory biochemical markers did not correlate with endoscopic and radiographic assessment in small bowel CD. In patients with ileocolonic CD, FC correlated significantly with endoscopy (p = 0.006, r = 0.5), radiographic assessment (p = 0.04, r = 0.3), CDAI (p = 0.0006, r = 0.5) and the majority of biochemical markers. Conclusions Faecal calprotectin is a useful diagnostic marker in all CD patients. Although its usefulness in small bowel CD seems to be the lowest, it should be utilized particularly in this disease location because of the lack of other reliable, non-invasive diagnostic methods. PMID:25995752

  18. Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing Hepatic Venous Outflow and Renal Function after Conventional versus Piggyback Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brescia, Marília D'Elboux Guimarães; Massarollo, Paulo Celso Bosco; Imakuma, Ernesto Sasaki; Mies, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    This randomized prospective clinical trial compared the hepatic venous outflow drainage and renal function after conventional with venovenous bypass (n = 15) or piggyback (n = 17) liver transplantation. Free hepatic vein pressure (FHVP) and central venous pressure (CVP) measurements were performed after graft reperfusion. Postoperative serum creatinine (Cr) was measured daily on the first week and on the 14th, 21st and 28th postoperative days (PO). The prevalence of acute renal failure (ARF) up to the 28th PO was analyzed by RIFLE-AKIN criteria. A Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) approach was used for comparison of longitudinal measurements of renal function. FHVP-CVP gradient > 3 mm Hg was observed in 26.7% (4/15) of the patients in the conventional group and in 17.6% (3/17) in the piggyback group (p = 0.68). Median FHVP-CVP gradient was 2 mm Hg (0-8 mmHg) vs. 3 mm Hg (0-7 mm Hg) in conventional and piggyback groups, respectively (p = 0.73). There is no statistically significant difference between the conventional (1/15) and the piggyback (2/17) groups regarding massive ascites development (p = 1.00). GEE estimated marginal mean for Cr was significantly higher in conventional than in piggyback group (2.14 ± 0.26 vs. 1.47 ± 0.15 mg/dL; p = 0.02). The conventional method presented a higher prevalence of severe ARF during the first 28 PO days (OR = 3.207; 95% CI, 1.010 to 10.179; p = 0.048). Patients submitted to liver transplantation using conventional or piggyback methods present similar results regarding venous outflow drainage of the graft. Conventional with venovenous bypass technique significantly increases the harm of postoperative renal dysfunction. ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01707810.

  19. Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing Hepatic Venous Outflow and Renal Function after Conventional versus Piggyback Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Brescia, Marília D’Elboux Guimarães; Massarollo, Paulo Celso Bosco; Imakuma, Ernesto Sasaki; Mies, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Background This randomized prospective clinical trial compared the hepatic venous outflow drainage and renal function after conventional with venovenous bypass (n = 15) or piggyback (n = 17) liver transplantation. Methods Free hepatic vein pressure (FHVP) and central venous pressure (CVP) measurements were performed after graft reperfusion. Postoperative serum creatinine (Cr) was measured daily on the first week and on the 14th, 21st and 28th postoperative days (PO). The prevalence of acute renal failure (ARF) up to the 28th PO was analyzed by RIFLE-AKIN criteria. A Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) approach was used for comparison of longitudinal measurements of renal function. Results FHVP-CVP gradient > 3 mm Hg was observed in 26.7% (4/15) of the patients in the conventional group and in 17.6% (3/17) in the piggyback group (p = 0.68). Median FHVP-CVP gradient was 2 mm Hg (0–8 mmHg) vs. 3 mm Hg (0–7 mm Hg) in conventional and piggyback groups, respectively (p = 0.73). There is no statistically significant difference between the conventional (1/15) and the piggyback (2/17) groups regarding massive ascites development (p = 1.00). GEE estimated marginal mean for Cr was significantly higher in conventional than in piggyback group (2.14 ± 0.26 vs. 1.47 ± 0.15 mg/dL; p = 0.02). The conventional method presented a higher prevalence of severe ARF during the first 28 PO days (OR = 3.207; 95% CI, 1.010 to 10.179; p = 0.048). Conclusion Patients submitted to liver transplantation using conventional or piggyback methods present similar results regarding venous outflow drainage of the graft. Conventional with venovenous bypass technique significantly increases the harm of postoperative renal dysfunction. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01707810 PMID:26115520

  20. PROSPECTIVE AND COMPARATIVE STUDY ON FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER OPEN AND ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ROTATOR CUFF TEARS

    PubMed Central

    de Castro Veado, Marco Antônio; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the surgical results from patients undergoing repairs to rotator cuff injuries via open and arthroscopic procedures, with regard to functional and clinical features, and by means of ultrasound examinations, and to compare occurrences of renewed tearing. Methods: Sixty patients underwent operations performed by the same surgeon (29 via open surgery and 31 via arthroscopy), to repair complete rotator cuff tears. The procedures were performed at Hospital Governor Israel Pinheiro (HGIP) and Mater Dei Hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, between August 2007 and February 2009. The patients were assessed functionally by means of the UCLA score before and after the operation, and magnetic resonance imaging was done before the operation. All the patients were reassessed at least 12 months after the operation, and an ultrasound examination was also performed at this time. Results: Out of the 29 patients who underwent open surgery, 27 (93.1%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 32 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 14 months. Three patients presented renewed tearing on ultrasound, of whom one remained asymptomatic. Out of the 31 patients who underwent arthroscopic procedures, 29 (93.5%) presented good or excellent results, with a mean UCLA score of 33 after the operation. Their mean follow-up was 19 months. Two patients presented renewed tearing, of whom one remained asymptomatic and one evolved with loosening of an anchor, with an unsatisfactory result. Conclusion: The repairs on rotator cuff injuries presented good results by means of both open surgery and arthroscopy, with similar functional results in the two groups and similar rates of renewed tearing. PMID:27027052

  1. An event-based approach for comparing the performance of methods for prospective medical product monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Joshua J.; Walker, Alexander M.; Glynn, Robert J.; Rassen, Jeremy A.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Prospective medical product monitoring is intended to alert stakeholders about whether and when safety problems are identifiable in a continuous stream of longitudinal electronic healthcare data. In comparing the performance of methods to generate these alerts, three factors must be considered: (1) accuracy in alerting; (2) timeliness of alerting; and (3) the trade-offs between the costs of false negative and false positive alerting. Using illustrative examples, we show that traditional scenario-based measures of accuracy, such as sensitivity and specificity, which classify only at the end of monitoring, fail to appreciate timeliness of alerting. We propose an event-based approach that classifies exposed outcomes according to whether or not a prior alert was generated. We provide event-based extensions to existing metrics and discuss why these metrics are limited in this setting because of inherent tradeoffs that they impose between the relative consequences of false positives versus false negatives. We provide an expression that summarizes event-based sensitivity (the proportion of exposed events that occur after alerting among all exposed events in scenarios with true safety issues) and event-based specificity (the proportion of exposed events that occur in the absence of alerting among all exposed events in scenarios with no true safety issues) by taking an average weighted by the relative costs of false positive and false negative alerting. This approach explicitly accounts for accuracy in alerting, timeliness in alerting, and the trade-offs between the costs of false negative and false positive alerting. Subsequent work will involve applying the metric to simulated data. PMID:22223544

  2. Comparing Utility Scores in Common Spinal Radiculopathies: Results of a Prospective Valuation Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nikhil R.; Stephen, James H.; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Stein, Sherman C.; Malhotra, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Objective To determine whether preference-based health utility scores for common spinal radiculopathies vary by specific spinal level. Methods We employed a standard gamble study using the general public to calculate individual preference-based quality of life for four common radiculopathies: C6, C7, L5, and S1. We compared utility scores obtained for each level of radiculopathy with analysis of variance and t test. Multivariable regression was used to test the effects of the covariates age, sex, and years of education. We also reviewed the literature for publications reporting EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) scores for patients with radiculopathy. Results Two hundred participants were included in the study. Average utility for the four spinal levels fell within a narrow range (0.748 to 0.796). There were no statistically significant differences between lumbar and cervical radiculopathies, nor were there significant differences among the different spinal levels (F = 0.0850, p = 0.086). Age and sex had no significant effect on utility scores. There was a significant correlation between years of education and utility values for S1 radiculopathy (p = 0.037). On review of the literature, no study separated utility values by specific spinal level. EQ-5D utilities for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy were considerably lower than the results of our study. Conclusions Utility values associated with the most common levels of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy do not significantly differ from each other, validating the current practice of grouping utility by spinal segment rather than by specific root levels. The discrepancy in average utility values between our study and the EQ-5D highlights the need to be mindful of the underlying instruments used when assessing outcomes studies from different sources. PMID:27099818

  3. Does practice make perfect? Prospectively comparing effects of 2 amounts of practice on tourniquet use performance.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Erez N; Benov, Avi; Shina, Avi; Berg, Amy L; Shlaifer, Amir; Glassberg, Elon; Aden, James K; Bader, Tarif; Kragh, John F; Yitzhak, Avraham

    2016-12-01

    Although a lifesaving skill, currently, there is no consensus for the required amount of practice in tourniquet use. We compared the effect of 2 amounts of practice on performance of tourniquet use by nonmedical personnel. Israeli military recruits without previous medical training underwent their standard tactical first aid course, and their initial performance in use of the Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT; Composite Resources, Rock Hill, SC) was assessed. The educational intervention was to allocate the participants into a monthly tourniquet practice program: either a single-application practice (SAP) group or a triple-application practice (TAP) group. Each group practiced according to its program. After 3 months, the participants' tourniquet use performance was reassessed. Assessments were conducted using the HapMed Leg Tourniquet Trainer (CHI Systems, Fort Washington, PA), a mannequin which measures time and pressure. A total of 151 participants dropped out, leaving 87 in the TAP group and 69 in the SAP group. On initial assessment, the TAP group and the SAP group performed similarly. Both groups improved their performance from the initial to the final assessment. The TAP group improved more than the SAP group in mean application time (faster by 18 vs 8 seconds, respectively; P = .023) and in reducing the proportion of participants who were unable to apply any pressure to the mannequin (less by 18% vs 8%, respectively; P = .009). Three applications per monthly practice session were superior to one. This is the first prospective validation of a tourniquet practice program based on objective measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prospective, randomised controlled trial comparing Versajet™ hydrosurgery and conventional debridement of partial thickness paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Ela J; D'Cruz, Rachel; Menon, Seema; Chan, Queenie; Harvey, John G; Lawrence, Torey; La Hei, Erik; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-06-01

    Conventional surgical debridement of burn wounds consists of tangential excision of eschar using a knife or dermabrasion until viable dermis or punctate bleeding occurs. The Versajet™ (Smith and Nephew, St. Petersburg, FL, USA) hydrosurgery system has also been advocated for burn wound debridement, with the suggestion that enhanced preservation of dermal tissue might reduce subsequent scarring. A prospective randomised controlled trial was undertaken comparing Versajet™ to conventional debridement. After excluding those with facial burns, 61 children ≤16 years of age undergoing debridement and skin grafting for partial thickness burns were recruited. Adequacy of debridement was assessed by 2mm punch biopsies taken pre- and post-debridement. Surgical time, percentage graft take at day 10, time to healing, post-operative infection and scarring at 3 and 6 months were assessed. Thirty-one children underwent conventional debridement and 30 debridement using Versajet™. There was a significant difference in the amount of viable dermal preservation between the two groups (p=0.02), with more viable tissue lost in the conventional group (median 325 μm) versus the Versajet™ group (median 35 μm). There was no significant difference between graft take at day 10 (p=0.9), post-operative wound infection (p=0.5), duration of surgery (p=0.6) or time to healing after grafting (p=0.6). Despite better dermal preservation in the Versajet™ group, there was no significant difference between scarring at 3 or 6 months (p=1.0, 0.1). These findings suggest that Versajet™ hydrosurgery appears a more precise method of burn wound debridement. Although dermal preservation may be a factor in reducing subsequent hypertrophic scarring, there were no significant differences found between scarring at 3 or 6 months after-injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. School Safety Audit Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMary, Jo Lynne; Owens, Marsha; Ramnarain, A. K. Vijay

    The 1997 Virginia General Assembly passed legislation directing school boards to require all schools to conduct safety audits. This audit is designed to assess the safety conditions in each public school to: (1) identify and, if necessary, develop solutions for physical safety concerns, including building security issues; and (2) identify and…

  6. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  7. Auditing Schools for Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric,

    2000-01-01

    Explores the issues involved in conducting effective safety audits for educational facilities. Areas covered include auditing for site characteristics, access control, lighting, building exterior, door types and locking mechanisms, key control, alarm system controls, security monitors, and vision panels in the doors. (GR)

  8. Auditing Schools for Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric,

    2000-01-01

    Explores the issues involved in conducting effective safety audits for educational facilities. Areas covered include auditing for site characteristics, access control, lighting, building exterior, door types and locking mechanisms, key control, alarm system controls, security monitors, and vision panels in the doors. (GR)

  9. Transperitoneal versus extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: A prospective single surgeon randomized comparative study.

    PubMed

    Akand, Murat; Erdogru, Tibet; Avci, Egemen; Ates, Mutlu

    2015-10-01

    To compare operative, pathological, and functional results of transperitoneal and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy carried out by a single surgeon. After having experience with 32 transperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 317 extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 30 transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies and 10 extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomies, 120 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and underwent either transperitoneal or extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The main outcome parameters between the two study groups were compared. No significant difference was found for age, body mass index, preoperative prostate-specific antigen, clinical and pathological stage, Gleason score on biopsy and prostatectomy specimen, tumor volume, positive surgical margin, and lymph node status. Transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy had shorter trocar insertion time (16.0 vs 25.9 min for transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy and extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, P < 0.001), whereas extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy had shorter console time (101.5 vs 118.3 min, respectively, P < 0.001). Total operation time and total anesthesia time were found to be shorter in extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, without statistical significance (200.9 vs 193.2 min; 221.8 vs 213.3 min, respectively). Estimated blood loss was found to be lower for extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (P = 0.001). Catheterization and hospitalization times were observed to be shorter in extraperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (7.3 vs 5.8 days and 3.1 vs 2.3 days for transperitoneal robot-assisted laparoscopic

  10. Double-blind prospective study comparing two automated sperm analyzers versus manual semen assessment.

    PubMed

    Lammers, J; Splingart, C; Barrière, P; Jean, M; Fréour, T

    2014-01-01

    Despite controversy regarding its clinical value, male fertility investigation mainly relies on semen analysis. Even though reference guidelines are available, manual sperm analysis still suffers from analytical variability, thus questioning the interest of automated sperm analysis systems. The aim of this study is to compared automated computerized semen analysis systems (SQA-V GOLD and CASA CEROS) to the conventional manual method in terms of accuracy and precision. We included 250 men in this double-blind prospective study. The SQA-V GOLD (Medical Electronic Systems) and CEROS, CASA system (Hamilton Thorne) were compared to the standard manual assessment based on the WHO 5th Edition. The main outcome measures were sperm concentration, total sperm number, total motility, progressive motility, non-progressive motility, morphology, motile sperm concentration (MSC) and progressively motile sperm concentration (PMSC) with the three methods. Statistical analysis of the test results from the automated systems and the manual method demonstrated no significant differences for most of the semen parameters. The Spearman coefficients of rank correlation (rho) for CASA and the SQA-V GOLD automated systems vs. the manual method were: Sperm concentration (0.95 and 0.95), total sperm number (0.95 and 0.95), MSC (0.94 and 0.96) and PMSC (0.94 and 0.93) correspondingly. Concerning sperm morphology, both automated systems demonstrated high specificity (Sp) and negative predictive values (NPV), despite significantly different medians (CASA: 83.7 % for Sp and 95.2 % for NPV, SQA-V: 97.9 % for Sp and 92.5 %). The highest precision (lowest 95 % confidence interval for duplicate tests) for all semen variables was found in the SQA-V GOLD. The advantages of using automated semen analysers are: Standardization, speed (lower turnaround time), precision, reduced potential for human error, automated data recording and less need for highly skilled professionals to run the systems. The

  11. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Birdwell, Leah; Lodish, Maya; Tirosh, Amit; Chittiboina, Prashant; Keil, Meg; Lyssikatos, Charlampos; Belyavskaya, Elena; Feelders, Richard A; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Coagulation profiles were taken before and 6-12 months after surgery and compared with18 normocortisolemic children, 13.7 ± 3.6 years. At baseline, patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the procoagulant factor VIII (FVIII) vs controls (145 IU/dL ± 84 vs 99 ± 47, P = .04); 6-12 months after surgery, FVIII levels decreased to 111 ± 47, P = .05. Patients with Cushing syndrome had greater levels of the antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin, 96 ± 17% vs 82 ± 26%, P = .015. After surgery, antifibrinolytic α2-antiplasmin levels decreased to 82 ± 24%, P < .001. Anticoagulants were greater in patients with Cushing syndrome vs controls at baseline, including protein C (138 ± 41% vs 84 ± 25%, P < .001), protein S (94 ± 19% vs 74 ± 19%, P = .001), and antithrombin III (96 ± 18% vs 77 ± 13%, P < .0001). The 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels correlated positively with FVIII levels, r = 0.43, P = .004. Children with Cushing syndrome had elevated procoagulants, antifibrinolytics, and anticoagulants at baseline compared with controls; normalization of coagulation measures was seen after surgical cure. Despite the increase in anticoagulants, hypercortisolemia is associated with a hypercoagulable state in children, as is the case in adults. This finding has potential implications for prevention of venous thromboembolism in children with Cushing syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00001595. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Comparing Science Process Skills of Prospective Science Teachers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farsakoglu, Omer Faruk; Sahin, Cigdem; Karsli, Fethiye

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of examining how Prospective Science Teachers' (PST) Science Process Skills (SPS) develop according to different grades. In this study, a cross-sectional research approach in the form of a case study was used. The sample group consisted of a total number of 102 undergraduate students who were selected from…

  13. A Prospective Cohort Study Comparing Workload in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivilis, Irina; Liu, Jian; Cairney, John; Hay, John A.; Klentrou, Panagiota; Faught, Brent E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to assess how cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) of children with probable developmental coordination disorder (DCD) changes over a period of 4.7 years relative to a group of typically developing controls. A school-based sample of children in a large region of Ontario, Canada with 75 out of a possible…

  14. Comparing Science Process Skills of Prospective Science Teachers: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farsakoglu, Omer Faruk; Sahin, Cigdem; Karsli, Fethiye

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of examining how Prospective Science Teachers' (PST) Science Process Skills (SPS) develop according to different grades. In this study, a cross-sectional research approach in the form of a case study was used. The sample group consisted of a total number of 102 undergraduate students who were selected from…

  15. Internal Auditing for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles

    This book provides guidelines for conducting internal audits of school districts. The first five chapters provide an overview of internal auditing and describe techniques that can be used to improve or implement internal audits in school districts. They offer information on the definition and benefits of internal auditing, the role of internal…

  16. Internal Auditing for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles

    This book provides guidelines for conducting internal audits of school districts. The first five chapters provide an overview of internal auditing and describe techniques that can be used to improve or implement internal audits in school districts. They offer information on the definition and benefits of internal auditing, the role of internal…

  17. Internal audit consider the implications.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Grant D; Hamilton, Angela

    2004-06-01

    Internal audit can not only allay external and internal concerns about appropriateness of business operations, but also help improve efficiency and the bottom line. To get an internal audit function under way, healthcare organizations need to obtain board buy-in, form an audit committee of the board, determine resources needed, perform a risk assessment, and develop an internal audit plan.

  18. A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing Disposable with Reusable Blades for a Morcellator Device.

    PubMed

    Becker, Benedikt; Orywal, Ann Katrin; Hausmann, Teresa; Gross, Andreas J; Netsch, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Transurethral enucleation of the prostate for the management of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) involves two steps: the enucleation and morcellation procedure. The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of a morcellator device using disposable and reusable blades with different settings of morcellation speed. A prospective randomized study was initiated for patients with symptomatic BPO undergoing Thulium laser enucleation of the prostate. Mechanical tissue morcellation was performed using the Piranha™ morcellator (R. Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany) with disposable or reusable blades at 850 (n = 24) or 1500 revolutions per minute (rpm) (n = 24). Patient characteristics, intraoperative complications, and the morcellation rate (g/min) were recorded. Data are expressed as median and interquartile range (IQR). Forty-eight patients were randomized using disposable (n = 24) or reusable blades (n = 24). For reusable blades, the morcellation rate did not increase when changing the morcellation speed from 850 to 1500 rpm (5 vs 4.53 g/min, p = 0.843). The morcellation rate increased significantly when changing the morcellation speed from 850 to 1500 rpm using single-use blades (4.77 vs 10 g/min, p ≤ 0.014). The morcellation rate was not different at 850 rpm between reusable and single-use blades (5 vs 4.77 g/min, p = 0.671). Conversely, the morcellation rate was significantly different at 1500 rpm between reusable and single-use blades (4.53 vs 10 g/min, p ≤ 0.017). The total morcellation rate (at 850 and 1500 rpm) was significantly increased using single-use blades compared to reusable blades (7.67 vs 4.8 g/min, p ≤ 0.026). Interestingly, enucleated weight (g) and the morcellation rate (g/min) correlated inversely using single-use blades at 1500 rpm (r = -0.742, p ≤ 0.004). Only one superficial bladder injury occurred at 1500 rpm, which needed no further interventions. The Piranha morcellator

  19. How well do elderly patients with cervical cancer tolerate definitive radiochemotherapy using RapidArc? Results from an institutional audit comparing elderly versus younger patients

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Santam; Geetha, M; Dessai, Sampada; Patil, Vijay M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Elderly patients (65 or older) with cervical cancer often receive suboptimal radio-chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve tolerance to treatment in this setting. This study was designed to compare the treatment-related toxicities and compliance with treatment in patients of cervical cancer treated definitively with RapidArc IMRT in our institute. Methods and materials The treatment records of all patients treated with RapidArc IMRT between April 2012 and April 2014 were reviewed, retrospectively. Prospectively collected data regarding treatment toxicity (CTCAE 4.0), treatment outcomes and parameters related to treatment compliance were compared amongst two age groups (< 65 and ≥ 65 years). The results of 66 patients were identified, of whom 23 were found to be ≥ 65 years age. All patients completed planned external beam radiotherapy. However, significantly fewer patients in the elderly group received concurrent chemoradiation (98% versus 65%, p < 0.001). Old age (median 75 years, IQR: 74–78 years) was the commonest cause for non-receipt of chemotherapy. Incidence of grade 3 haematological toxicities (26.7% versus 16.7%) and gastrointestinal toxicity (16.7% versus 13.3%) were not significantly different between the two groups. Other treatment-related toxicities, breaks, treatment duration and early outcomes were also not significantly different between the two age groups. Conclusions The use of IMRT did not result in excess toxicities in the elderly population and was associated with equivalent compliance to treatment. Concurrent chemoradiation can be safely combined in elderly patients with perfect organ function and performance status. PMID:25525462

  20. National stroke audit: a tool for change?

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, A; Lowe, D; Irwin, P; Rutledge, Z; Pearson, M

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To describe the standards of care for stroke patients in England, Wales and Northern Ireland and to determine the power of national audit, coupled with an active dissemination strategy to effect change. Design—A national audit of organisational structure and retrospective case note audit, repeated within 18 months. Separate postal questionnaires were used to identify the types of change made between the first and second round and to compare the representativeness of the samples. Setting—157 trusts (64% of eligible trusts in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland) participated in both rounds. Participants—5589 consecutive patients admitted with stroke between 1 January 1998 and 31 March 1998 (up to 40 per trust) and 5375 patients admitted between 1 August 1999 and 31 October 1999 (up to 40 per trust). Audit tool—Royal College of Physicians Intercollegiate Working Party stroke audit. Results—The proportion of patients managed on stroke units rose between the two audits from 19% to 26% with the proportion managed on general wards falling from 60% to 55% and those managed on general rehabilitation wards falling from 14% to 11%. Standards of assessment, rehabilitation, and discharge planning improved equally on stroke units and general wards, but in many aspects remained poor (41% formal cognitive assessment, 46% weighed once during admission, 67% physiotherapy assessment within 72 hours, 24% plan documented for mood disturbance, 36% carers' needs assessed separately). Conclusions—Nationally conducted audit linked to a comprehensive dissemination programme was effective in stimulating improvements in the quality of care for patients with stroke. More patients are being managed on stroke units and multidisciplinary care is becoming more widespread. There remain, however, many areas where standards of care are low, indicating a need for investment of skills and resources to achieve acceptable levels. Key Words: stroke; clinical audit PMID:11533421

  1. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr. )

    1992-03-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team.

  2. Screening for At-Risk Drinking in a Population Reporting Symptoms of Depression: A Validation of the AUDIT, AUDIT-C, and AUDIT-3.

    PubMed

    Levola, Jonna; Aalto, Mauri

    2015-07-01

    Excessive alcohol use is common in patients presenting with symptoms of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate how the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and its most commonly used abbreviated versions perform in detecting at-risk drinking among subjects reporting symptoms of depression. A subsample (n = 390; 166 men, 224 women) of a general population survey, the National FINRISK 2007 Study, was used. Symptoms of depression were measured with the Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form and alcohol consumption with the Timeline Follow-back (TLFB). At-risk drinking was defined as ≥280 g weekly or ≥60 g on at least 1 occasion in the previous 28 days for men, 140 and 40 g, respectively, for women. The AUDIT, AUDIT-C, and AUDIT-3 were tested against the defined gold standard, that is, alcohol use calculated from the TLFB. An optimal cutoff was designated as having a sensitivity and specificity of over 0.75, with emphasis on specificity. The AUDIT and its abbreviations were compared with carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase. At-risk drinking was common. The AUDIT and AUDIT-C performed quite consistently. Optimal cutoffs for men were ≥9 for the AUDIT and ≥6 for AUDIT-C. The optimal cut-offs for women with mild symptoms of depression were ≥5 for the AUDIT and ≥4 for AUDIT-C. Optimal cutoffs could not be determined for women with moderate symptoms of depression (specificity <0.75). A nearly optimal cutoff for women was ≥5 for the AUDIT. The AUDIT-3 failed to perform in women, but in men, a good level of sensitivity and specificity was reached at a cutoff of ≥2. With standard threshold values, the biochemical markers demonstrated very low sensitivity (9 to 28%), but excellent specificity (83 to 98%). Screening for at-risk drinking among patients presenting with symptoms of depression using the full AUDIT is recommended, although the AUDIT-C performed almost equally well. Cut-offs should be

  3. Lest we forget: Comparing retrospective and prospective assessments of adverse childhood experiences in the prediction of adult health

    PubMed Central

    Reuben, Aaron; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W.; Harrington, Honalee; Schroeder, Felix; Hogan, Sean; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Danese, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Background Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs; e.g., abuse, neglect, parental loss, etc.) have been associated with increased risk for later-life disease and dysfunction using adults’ retrospective self-reports of ACEs. Research should test whether associations between ACEs and health outcomes are the same for prospective and retrospective ACE measures. Methods We estimated agreement between ACEs prospectively-recorded throughout childhood (by Study staff at Study member ages 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15) and retrospectively-recalled in adulthood (by Study members when they reached age 38), in the population-representative Dunedin cohort (N=1,037). We related both retrospective and prospective ACE measures to physical, mental, cognitive, and social health at midlife measured through both objective (e.g., biomarkers and neuropsychological tests) and subjective (e.g., self-reported) means. Results Dunedin and CDC ACE distributions were similar. Retrospective and prospective measures of adversity showed moderate agreement (r=.47, p<.001; weighted Kappa = .31, 95% CI: .27–.35). Both associated with all midlife outcomes. As compared to prospective ACEs, retrospective ACEs showed stronger associations with life outcomes that were subjectively assessed, and weaker associations with life outcomes that were objectively assessed. Recalled ACEs and poor subjective outcomes were correlated regardless of whether prospectively-recorded ACEs were evident. Individuals who recalled more ACEs than had been prospectively recorded were more neurotic than average, and individuals who recalled fewer ACEs than recorded were more agreeable. Conclusions Prospective ACE records confirm associations between childhood adversity and negative life outcomes found previously using retrospective ACE reports. However, more agreeable and neurotic dispositions may respectively bias retrospective ACE measures toward underestimating the impact of adversity on objectively-measured life outcomes and

  4. Clinical Outcomes Comparing Capsular Repair vs. No Repair Following Hip Arthroscopy: A Prospective, Randomized, Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Sugarman, Etan P.; Birns, Michael E.; Fishman, Matthew; Patel, Deepan N.; Goldsmith, Laura; Greene, Renee Shirley; Banffy, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: As hip arthroscopy procedures become more common there is increasing concern of iatrogenic instability from excessive capsulotomy during surgery. As a result, greater attention is being focused preserving hip capsule integrity following surgery. To date, there are no large scale prospective blinded studies that address whether capsular closure has any detrimental effect on outcomes. Our goal is to evaluate outcomes in patients undergoing interportal capsulotomy repair compared to outcomes when not repairing the capsule. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a clinical/functional difference at 1 & 2 year follow up between patients who undergo capsular repair vs no repair following hip arthroscopy. Our hypothesis is that restoration of normal capsular anatomy with interportal repair will achieve similar clinical outcomes as the “no repair” group without functional deficits from over-constraint. Methods: Adult patients were recruited from November 2013 to July 2015 who were scheduled to undergo hip arthroscopy for femoral acetabular. Subjects were randomized into either the capsular repair (CR) or no repair (NR) groups. Standard AP/Dunn view radiographs were evaluated and alpha angle (AA) /center-edge (CEA) angle measurements were performed for all patients preoperatively. All patients underwent standard hip arthroscopy with labral repair +/- CAM/pincer lesion resection. Primary clinical outcomes were measured via the Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sport-Specific (HOS-SS) subscales at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Secondary outcome measures included the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), visual analog scale (VAS), the international hip outcome tool (iHOT-12), and the Veterans RAND 12 Item Health Survey (VR-12) scores. Results: A total of 56 patients were included in this study (30 male, 26 females) with a mean age of 33 years. Follow up was available for 49 patients at 6 months, 41 patients at 1 year and 26 patients at

  5. Computers and audit

    PubMed Central

    Fitter, M.J.; Evans, A.R.; Garber, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    A computerized information system was installed in a large group practice. This paper describes how the computer system was used for the systematic auditing of clinical activities, and also demonstrates how it acted as a catalyst for the review and changes of administrative and management procedures. An analysis of the issues that arose in an audit group is used to identify how the objectives and activities of the group evolved with experience. It is demonstrated that a computer system and audit can complement and enhance each other to the benefit of clinical and managerial decision making. PMID:4078807

  6. Prescription of secondary prevention medications, lifestyle advice, and referral to rehabilitation among acute coronary syndrome inpatients: results from a large prospective audit in Australia and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Redfern, Julie; Hyun, Karice; Chew, Derek P; Astley, Carolyn; Chow, Clara; Aliprandi-Costa, Bernadette; Howell, Tegwen; Carr, Bridie; Lintern, Karen; Ranasinghe, Isuru; Nallaiah, Kellie; Turnbull, Fiona; Ferry, Cate; Hammett, Chris; Ellis, Chris J; French, John; Brieger, David; Briffa, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the proportion of patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Australia and New Zealand who received optimal inpatient preventive care and to identify factors associated with preventive care. Methods All patients hospitalised bi-nationally with ACS were identified between 14–27 May 2012. Optimal in-hospital preventive care was defined as having received lifestyle advice, referral to rehabilitation, and prescription of secondary prevention pharmacotherapies. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with receipt of optimal preventive care. Results For the 2299 ACS survivors, mean (SD) age was 69 (13) years, 46% were referred to rehabilitation, 65% were discharged on sufficient preventive medications, and 27% received optimal preventive care. Diagnosis of ST elevation myocardial infarction (OR: 2.64 [95% CI: 1.88–3.71]; p<0.001) and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (OR: 1.99 [95% CI: 1.52–2.61]; p<0.001) compared with a diagnosis of unstable angina, having a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (OR: 4.71 [95% CI: 3.67–6.11]; p<0.001) or coronary bypass (OR: 2.10 [95% CI: 1.21–3.60]; p=0.011) during the admission or history of hypertension (OR:1.36 [95% CI: 1.06–1.75]; p=0.017) were associated with greater exposure to preventive care. Age over 70 years (OR:0.53 [95% CI: 0.35–0.79]; p=0.002) or admission to a private hospital (OR:0.59 [95% CI: 0.42–0.84]; p=0.003) were associated with lower exposure to preventive care. Conclusions Only one-quarter of ACS patients received optimal secondary prevention in-hospital. Patients with UA, who did not have PCI, were over 70 years or were admitted to a private hospital, were less likely to receive optimal care. PMID:24914060

  7. A Prospective Trial Comparing Pain and Quality of Life Measures after Anatomic Lung Resection Using Either Thoracoscopy or Thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Nabil P.; GhanieM, Amanda; Hsu, Meier; Bains, Manjit S.; Downey, Robert J.; Sarkaria, Inderpal S.; Finley, David J.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.; Huang, James; Sima, Camelia S.; Burkhalter, Jack E.; Park, Bernard J.; Rusch, Valerie W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive lung lobectomy and segmentectomy (video-assisted thoracic surgery; VATS) are assumed to result in better quality of life (QOL) and less postoperative pain, compared with standard, open approaches. To date, few prospective studies have compared the two approaches. We performed a prospective cohort study to compare QOL and pain scores during the first 12 months after VATS or open anatomic resection. Methods Patients were prospectively enrolled from May 2009 to April 2012. Patients with clinical stage I lung cancer who were scheduled to undergo anatomic lung resection were eligible. The brief pain index (BPI) and SF-36 Health Survey were conducted perioperatively and at four time points during the first 12 months after surgery. Intent-to-treat analyses using mixed-effects models were used to longitudinally assess the effect of treatment on QOL components (physical component summary [PCS] and mental component summary [MCS]) and pain. Results In total, 74 patients underwent thoracotomy, and 132 underwent VATS (including 19 patients who were converted to thoracotomy); 40 and 80 patients, respectively, completed the 12-month surveys. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. PCS and BPI scores were similar between the two groups throughout the 12 months of follow-up. MCS, however, was consistently worse in the VATS group. Conclusions Patient-reported PCS and pain scores after VATS and thoracotomy were similar during the first 12 months after surgery. PMID:25086945

  8. Environmental Auditing Policy Statement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's policy on the use of environmental auditing by regulated entities to help achieve and maintain compliance with environmental laws and regulations, as well as to help identify and correct unregulated environmental hazards.

  9. Prospects for comparing European hospitals in terms of quality and safety: lessons from a comparative study in five countries.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Susan; Renz, Anna; Wiig, Siri; Fernandes, Alexandra; Weggelaar, Anne Marie; Calltorp, Johan; Anderson, Janet E; Robert, Glenn; Vincent, Charles; Fulop, Naomi

    2013-02-01

    Being able to compare hospitals in terms of quality and safety between countries is important for a number of reasons. For example, the 2011 European Union directive on patients' rights to cross-border health care places a requirement on all member states to provide patients with comparable information on health-care quality, so that they can make an informed choice. Here, we report on the feasibility of using common process and outcome indicators to compare hospitals for quality and safety in five countries (England, Portugal, The Netherlands, Sweden and Norway). The cross-country comparison identified the following seven challenges with respect to comparing the quality of hospitals across Europe: different indicators are collected in each country; different definitions of the same indicators are used; different mandatory versus voluntary data collection requirements are in place; different types of organizations oversee data collection; different levels of aggregation of data exist (country, region and hospital); different levels of public access to data exist; and finally, hospital accreditation and licensing systems differ in each country. Our findings indicate that if patients and policymakers are to compare the quality and safety of hospitals across Europe, then further work is urgently needed to agree the way forward. Until then, patients will not be able to make informed choices about where they receive their health care in different countries, and some governments will remain in the dark about the quality and safety of care available to their citizens as compared to that available in neighbouring countries.

  10. Telephone audit for monitoring stroke unit facilities: a post hoc analysis from PROSIT study.

    PubMed

    Candelise, Livia; Gattinoni, Monica; Bersano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Although several valid approaches exist to measure the number and the quality of acute stroke units, only few studies tested their reliability. This study is aimed at establishing whether the telephone administration of the PROject of Stroke unIt ITaly (PROSIT) audit questionnaire is reliable compared with direct face-to-face interview. Forty-three medical leaders in charge of in-hospital stroke services were interviewed twice using the same PROSIT questionnaire with 2 different modalities. First, the interviewers approached the medical leaders by telephone. Thereafter, they went to the hospital site and performed a direct face-to-face interview. Six independent couples of trained researchers conducted the audit interviews. The degree of intermodality agreement was measured with kappa statistic. We found a perfect agreement for stroke units identification between the 2 different audit modalities (K = 1.00; standard error [SE], 1.525). The agreement was also very good for stroke dedicated beds (K = 1.00; SE, 1.525) and dedicated personnel (K = 1.00; SE, 1.525), which are the 2 components of stroke unit definition. The agreement was lower for declared in use process of care and availability of diagnostic investigations. The telephone audit can be used for monitoring stroke unit structures. It is more rapid, less expensive, and can repeatedly be used at appropriate intervals. However, a reliable description of the process of care and diagnostic investigations indicators should be obtained by either local site audit visit or prospective stroke register based on individual patient data. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oneida Tribe Energy Audits

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Ray; Schubert, Eugene

    2014-08-15

    Project funding energy audits of 44 Tribally owned buildings operated by the Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI. Buildings were selected for their size, age, or known energy concerns and total over 1 million square feet. Audits include feasibility studies, lists of energy improvement opportunities, and a strategic energy plan to address cost effective ways to save energy via energy efficiency upgrades over the short and long term.

  12. Significant event auditing.

    PubMed

    Pringle, M

    2000-12-01

    Significant event auditing has been described for 5 years and it is slowly gaining credibility as an effective method of quality assurance in British general practice. This paper describes what it is, what its background is, how it is done and whether it is effective. While it needs a positive team culture - and therefore may not suit every practice - where it is used it appears to be a useful adjunct to a clinical audit programme.

  13. Auditing the auditors.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1998-09-21

    An independent auditor's opinion is supposed to be the gold standard in healthcare accounting. Such audits provide reasonable assurance that financial statements are accurate, which is particularly important in not-for-profit healthcare because most organizations don't have shareholder oversight. But the recent firing of a Big Five accounting firm by a major healthcare system in bankruptcy reorganization raises questions about the credibility of external audits.

  14. Impact of clinical audits on cesarean section rate.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fu-Shiang; Lin, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Ho-Hsiung; Tu, Fung-Chao; Hsiao, Chin-Fen; Hsiao, Sheng-Mou

    2016-08-01

    Many countries have noted a substantial increase in the cesarean section rate (CSR). Several methods for lowering the CSR have been described. Understanding the impact of clinical audits on the CSR may aid in lowering CSR. Thus, our aim is to elucidate the effect of clinical audits on the CSR. We retrospectively analyzed 3781 pregnant women who gave birth in a medical center between January 2008 and January 2011. Pregnant women who delivered between January 2008 and July 2009 were enrolled as the pre-audit group (n = 1592). After August 2009, all cesarean section cases that were audited were enrolled in the audit group (n = 2189). The CSR was compared between groups. The overall CSR (34.5% vs. 31.1%, adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.83, p = 0.008) and the cesarean section rate due to dystocia (9.6% vs. 6.2%, p < 0.001) were significantly lower in the audit group than the pre-audit group. However, there was no significant difference in the rate of operative vaginal delivery between groups. Consensus on the unnecessity for cesarean section was achieved in 16 (8.2%) of 195 audit cases in the monthly audit conference. In nulliparous pregnant women (n = 2148), multivariate analysis revealed that clinical audit (OR = 0.78), maternal age (OR = 1.10), gestational age at delivery (OR = 0.80), and fetal body weight at birth (OR = 1.0005) were independent predictors of cesarean section (all p < 0.05). Most variables of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality did not differ before and after audits were implemented. Clinical audits appear to be an effective strategy for reducing the CSR. Therefore, we recommend strict monitoring of the indications in dystocia for cesarean section to reduce the CSR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Understanding Audit in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Eralil, Georgy Joy

    2016-10-01

    Aim of this audit is to analyse indication and proportion of babies delivered by elective caesarean section at less than 39(+0) weeks of gestation exposed to antenatal corticosteroids performed in a Premier Hospital, Hywel Dda Health University. The second aim was to learn how an audit can be done and used for improving clinical practice. Present study involved all patients who underwent elective caesarean delivery before 39 weeks completed period of gestation in August and September 2014. Data collected from medical record tracking using ICD-9 codes and analysed by clinical audit department. Patients who underwent elective caesarean section after 39 weeks completed period of gestation. The audit showed 66.6 % of patients were given antenatal corticosteroids. The observation was discussed in consultant meetings, labour forum, and was send as e-mail to every one working in Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. The goal was 100 %. Reaudit is to be performed in year time to know the effect of change in practice. All successful audits are structured programmes with realistic aims and objectives, leadership and attitude of senior management, nondirective, hands-on approach, support of staff, strategy groups and regular discussions, emphasis on team working and support, environment conducive to conducting audit.

  16. Prospects for comparing European hospitals in terms of quality and safety: lessons from a comparative study in five countries

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Susan; Renz, Anna; Wiig, Siri; Fernandes, Alexandra; Weggelaar, Anne Marie; Calltorp, Johan; Anderson, Janet E.; Robert, Glenn; Vincent, Charles; Fulop, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Being able to compare hospitals in terms of quality and safety between countries is important for a number of reasons. For example, the 2011 European Union directive on patients' rights to cross-border health care places a requirement on all member states to provide patients with comparable information on health-care quality, so that they can make an informed choice. Here, we report on the feasibility of using common process and outcome indicators to compare hospitals for quality and safety in five countries (England, Portugal, The Netherlands, Sweden and Norway). Main Challenges Identified The cross-country comparison identified the following seven challenges with respect to comparing the quality of hospitals across Europe: different indicators are collected in each country; different definitions of the same indicators are used; different mandatory versus voluntary data collection requirements are in place; different types of organizations oversee data collection; different levels of aggregation of data exist (country, region and hospital); different levels of public access to data exist; and finally, hospital accreditation and licensing systems differ in each country. Conclusion Our findings indicate that if patients and policymakers are to compare the quality and safety of hospitals across Europe, then further work is urgently needed to agree the way forward. Until then, patients will not be able to make informed choices about where they receive their health care in different countries, and some governments will remain in the dark about the quality and safety of care available to their citizens as compared to that available in neighbouring countries. PMID:23292003

  17. Comparative Study for Efficacy and Safety of Adenoidectomy according to the Surgical Method: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyun; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Sung Wan; Kim, Young Hyo; Nam, Jung Gwon; Park, Seok-Won; Park, Chan-Soon; Bae, Woo Yong; Yeo, Nam-Kyung; Won, Tae-Bin; Lee, Seung Hoon; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Sung-Wook; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Han, Doo Hee; Choi, Ji Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective There have been several operative techniques for adenoidectomy and their efficacy and morbidity are different according to the technique. This prospective multicenter study was aimed to compare the efficacy and morbidity of coblation adenoidectomy (CA) with those of power-assisted adenoidectomy. Study Design Prospective multi-institutional study. Methods Children who underwent CA, power-assisted adenoidectomy with cauterization (PAA+C) or without cauterization (PAA-C) due to adenoid hypertrophy were enrolled from 13 hospitals between July 2013 and June 2014. Mean operation time, degree of intraoperative bleeding and postoperative bleeding rate were evaluated. Results A total of 388 children (mean age ± standard deviation = 6.6 ± 2.5 years; 245 males and 143 females) were included. According to the adenoidectomy technique, the children were classified into 3 groups: (1) CA (n = 116); (2) PAA+C (n = 153); and (3) PAA-C (n = 119). Significant differences were not found in age and sex among three groups. In the CA group, mean operation time was significantly shorter (P < 0.001) and degree of intraoperative bleeding was significantly less (P < 0.001) compared to PAA+C or PAA-C group. Delayed postoperative bleeding rate of PAA-C group was significantly higher than that of CA or PAA+C group (P = 0.016). Conclusions This prospective multicenter study showed that CA was superior to PAA in terms of mean operation time and degree of intraoperative bleeding. PMID:26267337

  18. Prospects of pulse phase thermography for finding disbonds in CFRP-sandwich parts with aluminum honeycomb cores compared to ultrasonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Stotter, B.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2013-01-01

    This work shows the prospects of pulse phase thermography (PPT) compared to ultrasonic testing when applied to carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sandwich parts with aluminum honeycomb cores. Measurements were carried out on full-scale components with flaws like disbonds, septum disbonds, staggers and displaced cores, where the last two are not literally flaws, but nevertheless regions of interest. The effect of the measurement time and the feasibility of extrapolating temperature decays were evaluated. Phase images, gathered with PPT, are compared with ultrasonic Cscan images to show the capability of PPT for quality assurance purposes. Finally, the saving on inspection time when using pulse phase thermography instead of ultrasonic testing is considered.

  19. Communication of Audit Risk to Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, C. Wayne; Thompson, James H.

    1986-01-01

    This article focuses on audit risk by examining it in terms of its components: inherent risk, control risk, and detection risk. Discusses applying audit risk, a definition of audit risk, and components of audit risk. (CT)

  20. Auditing for Score Inflation Using Self-Monitoring Assessments: Findings from Three Pilot Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koretz, Daniel; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Ng, Hui Leng; Yu, Carol; Braslow, David; Langi, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Test-based accountability often produces score inflation. Most studies have evaluated inflation by comparing trends on a high-stakes test and a lower stakes audit test. However, Koretz and Beguin (2010) noted weaknesses of audit tests and suggested self-monitoring assessments (SMAs), which incorporate audit items into high-stakes tests. This…

  1. Auditing for Score Inflation Using Self-Monitoring Assessments: Findings from Three Pilot Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koretz, Daniel; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Ng, Hui Leng; Yu, Carol; Braslow, David; Langi, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Test-based accountability often produces score inflation. Most studies have evaluated inflation by comparing trends on a high-stakes test and a lower stakes audit test. However, Koretz and Beguin (2010) noted weaknesses of audit tests and suggested self-monitoring assessments (SMAs), which incorporate audit items into high-stakes tests. This…

  2. Energy audits at 48 hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.

    1981-11-01

    Staff at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted energy audits at 48 hospitals in four states (New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee) between 1978 and 1980. Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ORAU developed and organized a computerized data base containing information from these audits. This paper describes the ORAU audit process; summarizes the data collected from these audits on hospital characteristics annual energy use, and the audit recommendations; and analyzes the audit data in terms of cost effectiveness, type of recommendations, and the relationship between potential energy saving and characteristics of the individual hospital.

  3. Monitoring quality of audit in obstetrics and gynaecology

    PubMed Central

    Semple, D.; Maresh, M.; Khaled, K.

    2000-01-01

    Khaled Khaled Objective—To develop a questionnaire to assess audit activity and to use it to evaluate systematically the quality of audit in obstetrics and gynaecology within NHS hospitals in the UK. Design—Retrospective review of 212 consecutive questionnaires completed at hospital recognition committee visits for training accreditation, between 1 January 1993 and 31 August 1998, validated against hospital trust annual audit reports. Main measures—Use of seven quality criteria developed within the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists clinical audit unit and also assessment of support for audit and participation in regional and national audit. Results were compared between 1993/4 (n=72), 1995/6 (n=72), and 1997/8 (n=68) for evidence of improvement. Results—After modifications to the questionnaire the version used from 1993 proved to be a satisfactory tool with minimal need for subsequent change. The results showed that there has been a significant improvement in the quality of obstetric and gynaecology audit with time (p<0.0001) with 36 (53%) of departments in the previous two year period meeting all seven criteria. Similarly by this stage, 60 (88%) of departments had reached the stage of re-audit and 55 (81%) had conducted patient satisfaction surveys, both of these having significantly improved with time. Critical incident monitoring also became used more widely with time. Validation of topics audited was possible for 45% of hospitals where trust annual audit reports were available and these showed a high level of correlation. Conclusions—It has proved possible to conduct an audit of audit using the current system of hospital recognition visits for training accreditation. This has shown a great variety in the depth and breadth of audit that is being undertaken within individual obstetric and gynaecology departments. Since 1993 there has been an improvement in the quality of audit programmes undertaken, in particular in the number of

  4. Improving energy audit process and report outcomes through planning initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprau Coulter, Tabitha L.

    Energy audits and energy models are an important aspect of the retrofit design process, as they provide project teams with an opportunity to evaluate a facilities current building systems' and energy performance. The information collected during an energy audit is typically used to develop an energy model and an energy audit report that are both used to assist in making decisions about the design and implementation of energy conservation measures in a facility. The current lack of energy auditing standards results in a high degree of variability in energy audit outcomes depending on the individual performing the audit. The research presented is based on the conviction that performing an energy audit and producing a value adding energy model for retrofit buildings can benefit from a revised approach. The research was divided into four phases, with the initial three phases consisting of: 1.) process mapping activity - aimed at reducing variability in the energy auditing and energy modeling process. 2.) survey analysis -- To examine the misalignment between how industry members use the top energy modeling tools compared to their intended use as defined by software representatives. 3.) sensitivity analysis -- analysis of the affect key energy modeling inputs are having on energy modeling analysis results. The initial three phases helped define the need for an improved energy audit approach that better aligns data collection with facility owners' needs and priorities. The initial three phases also assisted in the development of a multi-criteria decision support tool that incorporates a House of Quality approach to guide a pre-audit planning activity. For the fourth and final research phase explored the impacts and evaluation methods of a pre-audit planning activity using two comparative energy audits as case studies. In each case, an energy audit professionals was asked to complete an audit using their traditional methods along with an audit which involved them first

  5. Acid Rain Program CEM audit program

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, K.O.T.; Alexander, T.H.; Dupree, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This presentation will give an overview of the Acid Rain Program CEM Audit Program: electronic and field audits. The presentation will include the reasons for audits, field audit types and levels the steps used in develop in the audit program and the audit procedures.

  6. 10 CFR 603.1295 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Periodic audit. 603.1295 Section 603.1295 Energy... Used in this Part § 603.1295 Periodic audit. An audit of a participant, performed at an agreed-upon... an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a participant differs from an award-specific audit of...

  7. 7 CFR 1773.7 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit standards. 1773.7 Section 1773.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.7 Audit standards. (a) The audit must be performed in accordance with GAGAS and this part. The audit must be performed in accordance...

  8. 29 CFR 96.42 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit standards. 96.42 Section 96.42 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Access to Records, Audit Standards and Relation of Organization-wide Audits to Other Audit Requirements § 96.42 Audit standards...

  9. 29 CFR 96.42 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit standards. 96.42 Section 96.42 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Access to Records, Audit Standards and Relation of Organization-wide Audits to Other Audit Requirements § 96.42 Audit...

  10. 7 CFR 1773.7 - Audit standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit standards. 1773.7 Section 1773.7 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.7 Audit standards. (a) The audit must be performed in accordance with GAGAS and this part. The audit must be performed in...

  11. 10 CFR 603.1295 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Periodic audit. 603.1295 Section 603.1295 Energy... Used in this Part § 603.1295 Periodic audit. An audit of a participant, performed at an agreed-upon... an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a participant differs from an award-specific audit of...

  12. Decentralization Calls for Internal Audits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCello, Jim

    1995-01-01

    Outlines internal-auditing strategies necessitated by decentralization. Describes the following areas of concern: the student activities account, student attendance, and funding delegated to the site level. Guidelines for conducting an internal audit are also included. (LMI)

  13. Evaluation of medical audit.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, M B

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review current knowledge of the effectiveness of medical audit programmes as a whole and of specific interventions within these programmes, as a means of changing clinical behaviour. CRITERIA FOR INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION OF PUBLISHED REPORTS--Articles listed on Medline from 1985-92 with key words "quality assurance" or "medical audit", and "evaluation" and relevant references from these articles, and from recently published reviews and reports on medical audit, were included. Excluded were simple descriptions of audit activity, replications of previous work, and publication in a language other than English. RESULTS--Evaluation of entire programmes of medical audit is unusual. Most reports concern specific interventions and focus particularly on the scientific and technical aspects of quality. These interventions may be classified by the means through which they attempt to achieve desired changes: patient characteristics; physician characteristics; administrative and organisational structures; and financial incentives. CONCLUSIONS--Knowledge about effective methods of bringing about specific changes in clinical behaviour is rudimentary. Impact is highly dependent on local factors, so generalisation of results to other settings is difficult. More qualitative research is needed to define the local factors which influence results. PMID:7964351

  14. 1984 and the Medical Audit

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary

    1984-01-01

    Medical audit in its various forms pervades our practices and our medical thinking in 1984. It includes a wide range of purposes and functions, most of which need not be seen as an external “Big Brother”. Some form of audit, at least internal, is inherent in professionalism. This article reviews the concepts and principles of medical audit with special emphasis on how to stay out of trouble when faced with external audits done for monitoring purposes. PMID:20469422

  15. Audits that Make a Difference

    SciTech Connect

    Malsbury, Judith

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents guidance on how to perform internal audits that get management's attention and result in effective corrective action. It assumes that the reader is already familiar with the basic constructs of auditing and knows how to perform them. Instead, it focuses on additional techniques that have proven to be effective in our internal auditing program. Examples using a theoretical audit of a calibration program are included.

  16. Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing the Efficacy of Surgical Preparation Solutions in Hand Surgery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peter Z; Fowler, John R; Goitz, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    Decontamination of the skin prior to incision is part of the standard of care for any surgical procedure. Previous studies have demonstrated variable efficacy of different surgical preparation solutions based on anatomic location. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of 3 commonly used surgical preparation solutions in eliminating bacteria from the skin prior to incision for common elective soft tissue hand procedures. A total of 240 patients undergoing clean, elective, soft tissue hand surgery were prospectively randomized to 1 of 3 groups (ChloraPrep, DuraPrep, or Betadine). Prepreparation and postpreparation cultures were obtained adjacent to the surgical incision and neutralization was performed on the obtained specimen. Cultures were held for 14 days and patients followed for 6 weeks postoperatively. Postpreparation cultures were positive in 21 of 80 (26.3%) ChloraPrep patients, 3 of 79 (3.8%) DuraPrep patients, and 1 of 81 (1.2%) Betadine patients ( P < .001). There was no difference in the postpreparation culture rate between DuraPrep and Betadine ( P = 1.000). Duraprep and Betadine were found to be superior to Chloraprep for skin decontamination prior to clean elective soft tissue hand surgery. The bacterial flora of the hand was found to be different from those of the shoulder and spine. The clinical significance of this finding requires clinical consideration because the majority of prepreparation and postpreparation positive cultures were of Bacillus species, which are rarely a cause of postoperative infections.

  17. Measuring Data Quality Through a Source Data Verification Audit in a Clinical Research Setting.

    PubMed

    Houston, Lauren; Probst, Yasmine; Humphries, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Health data has long been scrutinised in relation to data quality and integrity problems. Currently, no internationally accepted or "gold standard" method exists measuring data quality and error rates within datasets. We conducted a source data verification (SDV) audit on a prospective clinical trial dataset. An audit plan was applied to conduct 100% manual verification checks on a 10% random sample of participant files. A quality assurance rule was developed, whereby if >5% of data variables were incorrect a second 10% random sample would be extracted from the trial data set. Error was coded: correct, incorrect (valid or invalid), not recorded or not entered. Audit-1 had a total error of 33% and audit-2 36%. The physiological section was the only audit section to have <5% error. Data not recorded to case report forms had the greatest impact on error calculations. A significant association (p=0.00) was found between audit-1 and audit-2 and whether or not data was deemed correct or incorrect. Our study developed a straightforward method to perform a SDV audit. An audit rule was identified and error coding was implemented. Findings demonstrate that monitoring data quality by a SDV audit can identify data quality and integrity issues within clinical research settings allowing quality improvement to be made. The authors suggest this approach be implemented for future research.

  18. Retrograde entry portal for femoral interlocking nailing in femoral nonunion after plate failure: a prospective comparative study with antergrade portal.

    PubMed

    Assaghir, Yasser

    2017-03-01

    The piriformis fossa is the ideal portal of entry for antegrade interlocking nailing. Localizing this portal can be difficult and its eccentricity leads to complications. This prospective comparative study was designed to compare an innovative way to obtain the ideal portal from inside the medullary canal in cases of plate failure and compare it to the classic antegrade portal. It included 41 cases (19 antegrade and 22 retrograde). The retrograde portal was significantly better in terms of entry time, radiation time, blood-loss, and wound length. The proper portal was rapidly and easily achieved in all retrograde cases without complications; while four in antegrade cases had complications. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Level of evidence III.

  19. Internal Audit in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Alison, Ed.; Brown, Sally, Ed.

    This book describes a range of examples of internal audit in higher education as part of a process of the exchange of good practice. The book recognizes well-established links with audit theory from other contexts and makes use of theoretical perspectives explored in the financial sector. The chapters are: (1) "Quality Audit Issues"…

  20. Preparing for the Annual Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuehring, Bert

    2002-01-01

    Proposes several key questions that school district business officials should answer to prepare for an annual financial audit involving auditor information and resource needs, district and auditor monitoring and reporting on the audit progress, and reporting the results of the audit to the board of education. (PKP)

  1. Developmental Audits with Challenging Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; du Toit, Lesley; Bath, Howard; Van Bockern, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Developmental Audit[R] is a new strength-based assessment model for youth who are in conflict in home, school, or community. Developmental Audits involve collaboration with young persons who are seen as experts on themselves. Discussing challenging life events provides a window to the young person's private logic and goals. The audit scans…

  2. Internal Audit in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Alison, Ed.; Brown, Sally, Ed.

    This book describes a range of examples of internal audit in higher education as part of a process of the exchange of good practice. The book recognizes well-established links with audit theory from other contexts and makes use of theoretical perspectives explored in the financial sector. The chapters are: (1) "Quality Audit Issues"…

  3. Auditing of chromatographic data.

    PubMed

    Mabie, J T

    1998-01-01

    During a data audit, it is important to ensure that there is clear documentation and an audit trail. The Quality Assurance Unit should review all areas, including the laboratory, during the conduct of the sample analyses. The analytical methodology that is developed should be documented prior to sample analyses. This is an important document for the auditor, as it is the instrumental piece used by the laboratory personnel to maintain integrity throughout the process. It is expected that this document will give insight into the sample analysis, run controls, run sequencing, instrument parameters, and acceptance criteria for the samples. The sample analysis and all supporting documentation should be audited in conjunction with this written analytical method and any supporting Standard Operating Procedures to ensure the quality and integrity of the data.

  4. Auditing chronic disease care: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    van Vuuren, Unita; De Sa, Angela; Govender, Srini; Murie, Katie; Schlemmer, Arina; Gunst, Colette; Namane, Mosedi; Boulle, Andrew; de Vries, Elma

    2015-01-01

    Background An integrated audit tool was developed for five chronic diseases, namely diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and epilepsy. Annual audits have been done in the Western Cape Metro district since 2009. The year 2012 was the first year that all six districts in South Africa's Western Cape Province participated in the audit process. Aim To determine whether clinical audits improve chronic disease care in health districts over time. Setting Western Cape Province, South Africa. Methods Internal audits were conducted of primary healthcare facility processes and equipment availability as well as a folder review of 10 folders per chronic condition per facility. Random systematic sampling was used to select the 10 folders for the folder review. Combined data for all facilities gave a provincial overview and allowed for comparison between districts. Analysis was done comparing districts that have been participating in the audit process from 2009 to 2010 (‘2012 old’) to districts that started auditing recently (‘2012 new’). Results The number of facilities audited has steadily increased from 29 in 2009 to 129 in 2012. Improvements between different years have been modest, and the overall provincial average seemed worse in 2012 compared to 2011. However, there was an improvement in the ‘2012 old’ districts compared to the ‘2012 new’ districts for both the facility audit and the folder review, including for eight clinical indicators, with ‘2012 new’ districts being less likely to record clinical processes (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.21–0.31). Conclusion These findings are an indication of the value of audits to improve care processes over the long term. It is hoped that this improvement will lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:26245615

  5. Auditing chronic disease care: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed

    Essel, Vivien; van Vuuren, Unita; De Sa, Angela; Govender, Srini; Murie, Katie; Schlemmer, Arina; Gunst, Colette; Namane, Mosedi; Boulle, Andrew; de Vries, Elma

    2015-06-26

    An integrated audit tool was developed for five chronic diseases, namely diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and epilepsy. Annual audits have been done in the Western Cape Metro district since 2009. The year 2012 was the first year that all six districts in South Africa's Western Cape Province participated in the audit process. To determine whether clinical audits improve chronic disease care in health districts over time. Western Cape Province, South Africa. Internal audits were conducted of primary healthcare facility processes and equipment availability as well as a folder review of 10 folders per chronic condition per facility. Random systematic sampling was used to select the 10 folders for the folder review. Combined data for all facilities gave a provincial overview and allowed for comparison between districts. Analysis was done comparing districts that have been participating in the audit process from 2009 to 2010 ('2012 old') to districts that started auditing recently ('2012 new'). The number of facilities audited has steadily increased from 29 in 2009 to 129 in 2012. Improvements between different years have been modest, and the overall provincial average seemed worse in 2012 compared to 2011. However, there was an improvement in the '2012 old' districts compared to the '2012 new' districts for both the facility audit and the folder review, including for eight clinical indicators, with '2012 new' districts being less likely to record clinical processes (OR 0.25, 95% CI 0.21-0.31). These findings are an indication of the value of audits to improve care processes over the long term. It is hoped that this improvement will lead to improved patient outcomes.

  6. Synthetic porous ceramic compared with autograft in scoliosis surgery. A prospective, randomized study of 341 patients.

    PubMed

    Ransford, A O; Morley, T; Edgar, M A; Webb, P; Passuti, N; Chopin, D; Morin, C; Michel, F; Garin, C; Pries, D

    1998-01-01

    We have evaluated the use of a synthetic porous ceramic (Triosite) as a substitute for bone graft in posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis. In a prospective, randomised study 341 patients at five hospitals in the UK and France were randomly allocated either to autograft from the iliac crest or rib segments (171) or to receive Triosite blocks (170). All patients were assessed after operation and at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. The two groups were similar with regard to all demographic and baseline variables, but the 184 treated in France (54%) had Cotrel-Dubouset instrumentation and the 157 treated in the UK usually had Harrington-Luque implants. In the Triosite group the average Cobb angle of the upper curve was 56 degrees, corrected to 24 degrees (57%). At 18 months, the average was 26 degrees (3% loss). In the autograft group the average preoperative upper curve of 53 degrees was corrected to 21 degrees (60%). At 18 months the mean curve was 25 degrees (8% loss). Pain levels after operation were similar in the two groups, being mild in most cases. In the Triosite group only three patients had problems of wound healing, but in the autograft group, 14 patients had delayed healing, infection or haematoma in the spinal wound. In addition, 15 autograft patients had pain at the donor site at three months. Seven had infections, two had haematoma and four had delayed healing. The haematological and serum biochemistry results showed no abnormal trends and no significant differences between the groups. There were no adverse events related to the graft material and no evidence of allergenicity. Our results suggest that Triosite synthetic porous ceramic is a safe and effective substitute for autograft in these patients. Histological findings on biopsy indicate that Triosite provides a favourable scaffolding for the formation of new bone and is gradually incorporated into the fusion mass.

  7. Role of propranolol in ulcerated haemangioma of head and neck: a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Preeti; Pandey, Vaibhav; Gangopadhyay, Ajay N; Sharma, Shiv P; Gupta, Dinesh K

    2016-03-01

    Infantile haemangiomas comprise the majority of vascular anomalies and are considered the predominant vascular tumour type 1. We performed this prospective study to evaluate the therapeutic response and propranolol tolerance in infants with ulcerated infantile haemangioma of head and neck region. Sixty-four patients with ulcerated infantile haemangiomas (IHs) of head and neck region, without any prior treatment and with age older than 1 month, were included in the study, after informed consent was obtained, and were randomly divided into groups A and B. Group A patients were given oral propranolol at a dose of 2 mg/kg per day in three divided doses as outpatients. Group B patients were given oral ibuprofen at a dose of 10 mg/kg 8-hourly and paracetamol at dose of 16.2 mg/kg 8-hourly. Documentation of gender, age, haemangioma location, duration of ulceration and pain was measured on the second and fifth day after commencement of treatment in both groups using the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale. There was no difference in pain score between the two groups (P value 0.074). Mean duration of healing of ulceration in group A was 17.93 ± 2.22 days and in group B was 27.71 ± 2.33 days (P value <0.001). In group A, out of 28 patients, 8 (28.5 %) were complete responders, 16 (57.1 %) were partial responders and 4 (14.2 %) were non-responders. Propranolol is a valuable therapeutic alternative for treatment of ulcerated haemangiomas and effectively reduces pain.

  8. Walkability Audit Tool.

    PubMed

    Smith, Letha

    2015-09-01

    Walking is one of the simplest lifestyle changes workers can make to improve their health. Research shows a wealth of health benefits. Often, occupational and environmental health nurses are in charge of implementing walking programs. A tool is needed to continuously improve a company's walking program whether in the beginning stages or to an already established program. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Walkability Audit Tool for a healthier worksite is an easy seven-step audit tool that occupational and environmental health nurses can easily implement. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. A Prospective Comparative Study of Arthroscopic Versus Mini-Open Latarjet Procedure With a Minimum 2-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Marion, Blandine; Klouche, Shahnaz; Deranlot, Julien; Bauer, Thomas; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Hardy, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    To compare postoperative pain during the first postoperative week and the position of the coracoid bone block at the anterior aspect of the glenoid after the arthroscopic and the mini-open Latarjet procedure. The secondary purpose was to assess functional results and recurrence after at least 2 years of follow-up. This comparative prospective study included patients who underwent a Latarjet-Bristow procedure for anterior shoulder instability in 2012. The Latarjet procedure was performed by a mini-open approach (G1) in one center and by an arthroscopic approach (G2) in the other. The main evaluation criterion was average shoulder pain during the first postoperative week assessed by the patient on a standard 10-cm visual analog scale (0-10). Secondary criteria were consumption of analgesics during the first week, the position of the coracoid bone block on radiograph and computed tomography scan at the 3-month follow-up and clinical outcomes (Western Ontario Score Index and new surgery) after at least 2 years of follow-up. Fifty-eight patients were included, 22 G1 and 36 G2, 13 women and 45 men, mean age 26.9 ± 7.7 years. The mean follow-up was 29.8 ± 4.4 months. There was significantly less pain in the arthroscopic Latarjet group than in the mini-open group during the first postoperative week (2.5 ± 1.4 vs 1.2 ± 1.2, P = .002) with comparable consumption of analgesics (P > .05). The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure resulted in a more lateral coracoid bone block (P = .04) and a better equatorial position than the mini-open technique (P = .02). Three patients underwent revision surgery (1 recurrence [2.8%], 1 block fracture, 1 screw ablation) in the arthroscopic group, none in the mini-open group (P = .54). At the final follow-up, the Western Ontario Score Index score was good in all patients (G1: 78.5 ± 7.5% vs G2: 82.3 ± 7%, P = .03). This prospective comparative study showed that the arthroscopic Latarjet procedure was significantly less painful than

  10. Auditing audits: use and development of the Oxfordshire Medical Audit Advisory Group rating system.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, M.; Griew, K.; Derry, J.; Anderson, J.; Humphreys, J.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess the value of the Oxfordshire Medical Audit Advisory Group rating system in monitoring and stimulating audit activity, and to implement a development of the system. DESIGN--Use of the rating system for assessment of practice audits on three annual visits in Oxfordshire; development and use of an "audit grid" as a refinement of the system; questionnaire to all medical audit advisory groups in England and Wales. SETTING--All 85 general practices in Oxfordshire; all 95 medical audit advisory groups in England and Wales. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Level of practices' audit activity as measured by rating scale and grid. Use of scale nationally together with perceptions of strengths and weaknesses as perceived by chairs of medical audit advisory groups. RESULTS--After one year Oxfordshire practices more than attained the target standards set in 1991, with 72% doing audit involving setting target standards or implementing change; by 1993 this had risen to 78%. Most audits were confined to chronic disease management, preventive care, and appointments. 38 of 92 medical audit advisory groups used the Oxfordshire group's rating scale. Its main weaknesses were insensitivity in assessing the quality of audits and failure to measure team involvement. CONCLUSIONS--The rating system is effective educationally in helping practices improve and summatively for providing feedback to family health service authorities. The grid showed up weakness in the breadth of audit topics studied. IMPLICATIONS AND ACTION--Oxfordshire practices achieved targets set for 1991-2 but need to broaden the scope of their audits and the topics studied. The advisory group's targets for 1994-5 are for 50% of practices to achieve an audit in each of the areas of clinical care, access, communication, and professional values and for 80% of audits to include setting targets or implementing change. PMID:8086911

  11. A 7-Year Clinical Audit of 1107 Cases Comparing Sleeve Gastrectomy, Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass, and Mini-Gastric Bypass, to Determine an Effective and Safe Bariatric and Metabolic Procedure.

    PubMed

    Jammu, Gurvinder S; Sharma, Rajni

    2016-05-01

    The epidemic of obesity is engulfing developed as well as developing countries like India. We present our 7-year experience with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), and mini-gastric bypass (MGB) to determine an effective and safe bariatric and metabolic procedure. The study is an analysis of a prospectively collected bariatric database of 473 MGBs, 339 LSGs, and 295 RYGBs. Mortality rate was 2.1% in LSG, 0.3% in RYGB, and 0% in MGB. Leaks were highest in LSG (1.5%), followed by RYGB (0.3%), and zero in MGB. Bile reflux was seen in <1% in the MGB series. Persistent vomiting was seen only in LSG. Weight regain was 14.2% in LSG, 8.5% in RYGB, but 0% in MGB. Hypoalbuminemia was minimal in LSG, 2.0% in RYGB, and 13.1% in MGB (in earlier patients where bypass was >250 cm). The following resolution of comorbidities: dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes (T2D), hypertension, and percent excess weight loss (%EWL) was maximum in MGB. GERD was maximum in LSG (9.8%), followed by RYGB (1.7%), and minimal in MGB (0.6%). RYGB and MGB act on the principle of restriction and malabsorption, but MGB superseded RYGB in its technical ease, efficacy, revisibility, and reversibility. Mortality was zero in MGB. %EWL and resolution of comorbidities were highly significant in MGB. Based on this audit, we suggest that MGB is the effective and safe procedure for patients who are compliant in taking their supplements. LSG may be done in non-compliant patients and those ready to accept weight regain.

  12. Personalized technologist dose audit feedback for reducing patient radiation exposure from CT.

    PubMed

    Miglioretti, Diana L; Zhang, Yue; Johnson, Eric; Lee, Choonsik; Morin, Richard L; Vanneman, Nicholas; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether providing radiologic technologists with audit feedback on doses from CT examinations they conduct and education on dose-reduction strategies reduces patients' radiation exposure. This prospective, controlled pilot study was conducted within an integrated health care system from November 2010 to October 2011. Ten technologists at 2 facilities received personalized dose audit reports and education on dose-reduction strategies; 9 technologists at a control facility received no intervention. Radiation exposure was measured by the dose-length product (DLP) from CT scans performed before (n = 1,630) and after (n = 1,499) the intervention and compared using quantile regression. Technologists were surveyed before and after the intervention. For abdominal CT, DLPs decreased by 3% to 12% at intervention facilities but not at the control facility. For brain CT, DLPs significantly decreased by 7% to 12% at one intervention facility; did not change at the second intervention facility, which had the lowest preintervention DLPs; and increased at the control facility. Technologists were more likely to report always thinking about radiation exposure and associated cancer risk and optimizing settings to reduce exposure after the intervention. Personalized audit feedback and education can change technologists' attitudes about, and awareness of, radiation and can lower patient radiation exposure from CT imaging. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. All rights reserved.

  13. An audit of antimicrobial prescribing in an acute dental care department.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Radhika; Merali, Razia; Paolinelis, George; Kwok, Jerry

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem that is likely to have a major negative impact on healthcare in the future. Dentists have a key role in ensuring that antimicrobials are prescribed correctly to reduce the emergence of resistant strains. To audit how appropriately antimicrobials were prescribed in the oral surgery acute dental department of Guy's Hospital in London, when compared to the standards set within the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) and Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness guidelines on antimicrobial prescribing in dentistry. 100% compliance. A prospective audit consisting of two cycles (each including 60 patients) was carried out. Between each cycle, there was a two-month intervention period, which included extensive training and education of staff and students. Cycle 1 showed that only 30% of prescriptions were appropriate and only 62% of practitioners were recording a diagnosis. After two months of intervention, cycle 2 was carried out; this showed a significant improvement, with 80% of prescriptions being appropriate and 100% of practitioners recording a diagnosis. The majority of inappropriate prescriptions in both cycles were for acute pulpitis without evidence of systemic involvement. This audit has shown that clinical practice for antimicrobial prescribing did not follow the published guidelines. Following targeted interventions, a substantial improvement was made in the prescribing pattern. The target of 100% has not been reached, necessitating further intervention.

  14. A prospective randomized study comparing percutaneous nephrolithotomy under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with percutaneous nephrolithotomy under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Sankhwar, S N; Malik, Anita

    2011-01-01

    A prospective randomized study was executed to compare the surgical parameters and stone clearance in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) under combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) versus those who underwent PNL under general anesthesia (GA). Between January 2008 to December 2009, 64 patients with renal calculi were randomized into 2 groups and evaluated for the purpose of this study. Group 1 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under CSEA and Group 2 consisted of patients who underwent PNL under GA. The operative time, stone clearance rate, visual pain analog score, mean analgesic dose and mean hospital stay were compared amongst other parameters. The difference between visual pain analog score after the operation and the dose of analgesic requirement was significant on statistical analysis between both groups. PNL under CSEA is as effective and safe as PNL under GA. Patients who undergo PNL under CESA require lesser analgesic dose and have a shorter hospital stay. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Adult parenteral nutrition in the North of England: a region-wide audit

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Jessica K; Thompson, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Parenteral nutrition (PN) is widely used to provide nutritional support to patients with inaccessible or inadequate length of gut or non-functioning gut. The objective was to compare practice in PN administration to results of the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) report, ‘A Mixed Bag’, and to establish whether good practice was being followed within this part of the UK. Setting Using the Northern Nutrition Network (NNN), we examined the care of adult patients receiving PN in all 10 secondary care hospitals in our region. Participants All patients receiving PN were included with no exclusions. Data were collected on 192 patients (51% females, median age 65 years (range 18–96)). Outcome measures A data collection tool was designed based on the recommendations of the NCEPOD report. Results PN was used for a median of 7 days with a 30-day mortality rate of 8%. Metabolic complications occurred in 34%, of which only 13% were avoidable. The catheter sepsis rate was 1.5 per 1000 PN days. The audit suggests that nutrition team input improves patient assessment prior to starting PN and review once PN is established. Risk of refeeding syndrome was identified in 75%. Areas for improvement are documentation of treatment goal (39%), review of PN constitution (38%), ensuring patients are weighed regularly (56%) and documentation of line-tip position (52%). Conclusions This region-wide prospective audit suggests improved practice within the UK compared to the NCEPOD audit with lower mortality and line sepsis rates. However, documentation remains suboptimal. This work strengthens the case for introducing nutrition teams in hospitals without this service. These findings are likely to be reproduced across the UK and in other healthcare settings. We provide a template for similar audits of clinical practice. PMID:28073792

  16. Comparison of the Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality with coronial cause of death.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dylan; Retegan, Claudia; Woodford, Noel; Vinluan, Jessele; Beiles, Charles B

    2016-06-01

    The Victorian Audit of Surgical Mortality (VASM) is designed to improve the level of patient care by educating surgeons of areas for improvement in patient management during a surgical admission. Coronial data obtained via the National Coronial Information System were used as an independent method to validate the cause of death as determined by the treating surgeon. The audit prospectively collected 4905 cases that underwent peer assessment and 842 (17%) received an in-depth second-line assessment of which 200 (24%) also underwent a coronial review. Using the coronial assessment as the reference standard, retrospective comparison of coronial diagnoses compared with the audit case outcomes was conducted to determine the overall accuracy of the stated cause of death. The degree of agreement was also analysed based on whether the patient received a full autopsy (internal examination) or an external examination only. The time taken to obtain the coronial and audit case closure was also analysed. Overall, 195 of the 200 cases had a cause of death identified by the coroner. In 82%, the cause of death reported to VASM by the treating surgeon matched the cause of death determined by the coroner. Concordance was not affected by the extent of post-mortem performed. Time taken to finalize cases was slightly shorter for the coronial process, but unclosed coronial findings resulted in the exclusion of 103 cases. The causes of death data in VASM are accurate when compared with the coronial data independent of whether the coronial investigation included a complete autopsy. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  17. Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing 2 Flexible Digital Ureteroscopes: ACMI/Olympus Invisio DUR-D and Olympus URF-V.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ketul; Monga, Manoj; Knudsen, Bodo

    2015-06-01

    To compare 2 digital flexible ureteroscopes in a randomized, prospective, clinical trial; the complementary metal oxide semiconductor-based Gyrus ACMI/Olympus Invisio DUR-D and the charged coupled device-based Olympus URF-V. Patients scheduled for ureteroscopy were prospectively enrolled and randomized between the DUR-D and URF-V. Patient demographics, laser and total procedure time, laser energy, lower pole time, and difficulties encountered were recorded. The visibility and maneuverability were rated on a scale of 0-10. A total of 101 patients (58 women) with a mean age of 49.5 years (20-80 years) were enrolled. Laser lithotripsy (mean stone size, 11.8 mm) was performed in 88 patients, 10 underwent stone basketing, and 3 had diagnostic ureteroscopy. For the DUR-D and URF-V, the mean total operative time (26.5 vs 25 minutes), laser time (12.5 vs 13 minutes), lower pole time (9 vs 11 minutes), and basket time (14.5 vs 13 minutes) were comparable. In 3 of 45 (6.6%) and 6 of 56 (10.7%) cases, the stone could not be reached with the DUR-D and URF-V, respectively. A fiberoptic scope (URF-P5) reached the stone in all cases. On a scale of 0-10, the mean visibility was 6.86 and 8.73 (P <.01) and the maneuverability was 7.18 and 8.17 (P <.01) for DUR-D and URF-V, respectively. There were 8 repairs, 4 for each scope. The DUR-D averaged 11.25 cases per repair and the URF-V averaged 14. The URF-V offered better visibility and maneuverability compared with the DUR-D. Both had similar failure rates compared with the previous study with fiberoptic scopes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Immediate implant reconstruction is associated with a reduced risk of lymphedema compared to mastectomy alone: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cynthia L.; Colwell, Amy S.; Horick, Nora; Skolny, Melissa N.; Jammallo, Lauren S.; O’Toole, Jean A.; Shenouda, Mina N.; Sadek, Betro T.; Swaroop, Meyha N.; Ferguson, Chantal M.; Smith, Barbara L.; Specht, Michelle C.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2015-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Objective We sought to determine the risk of lymphedema associated with immediate breast reconstruction compared to mastectomy alone. Background Immediate breast reconstruction is increasingly performed at the time of mastectomy. Few studies have examined whether breast reconstruction impacts development of lymphedema. Methods 616 breast cancer patients who underwent 891 mastectomies between 2005–2013 were prospectively screened for lymphedema at our institution, with 22.2 months median follow-up. Mastectomies were categorized as immediate implant, immediate autologous, or no reconstruction. Arm measurements were performed pre-operatively and during post-operative follow-up using a Perometer. Lymphedema was defined as ≥10% arm volume increase compared to pre-operative. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine lymphedema rates and risk factors. Results Of 891 mastectomies, 65% (580/891) had immediate implant, 11% (101/891) immediate autologous, and 24% (210/891) no reconstruction. The two-year cumulative incidence of lymphedema was: 4.08% (95% CI: 2.59–6.41%) implant, 9.89% (95% CI: 4.98–19.1%) autologous, and 26.7% (95% CI: 20.4–34.4%) no reconstruction. By multivariate analysis, immediate implant (HR: 0.352, p<0.0001) but not autologous (HR: 0.706, p=0.2151) reconstruction was associated with a significantly reduced risk of lymphedema compared to no reconstruction. Axillary lymph node dissection (p<0.0001), higher Body Mass Index (p<0.0001), and greater number of nodes dissected (p=0.0324) were associated with increased lymphedema risk. Conclusion This prospective study suggests that in patients for whom implant-based reconstruction is available, immediate implant reconstruction does not increase the risk of lymphedema compared to mastectomy alone. PMID:25607768

  19. Metamizol (dipyrone, optalgin) in pregnancy, is it safe? A prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bar-Oz, Benjamin; Clementi, Maurizio; Di Giantonio, Elena; Greenberg, Revital; Beer, Monic; Merlob, Paul; Arnon, Judy; Ornoy, Asher; Zimmerman, Deena M; Berkovitch, Matitiahu

    2005-04-01

    To assess the teratogenic effect of metamizol when used during the first trimester of pregnancy. One hundred and eight women who used metamizol during the first trimester of pregnancy were recruited from 4 teratogen information centers in Israel (3) and in Italy (1). The study group was paired for age, smoking habits and alcohol consumption with a comparative group exposed to acetaminophen. Maternal demographics and history, birth weight, gestational age at delivery, rate of live births, spontaneous abortions and fetal distress were comparable in both groups. The rate of major malformations in the metamizol group (3%) did not differ significantly from the rate in the comparative group (2%) (P = 0.57, relative risk = 1.55, 95% confidence interval 0.26-9.05). Our data may suggest that exposure to metamizol during the first trimester of pregnancy is probably not associated with a significantly increased risk for malformations or spontaneous abortions.

  20. [Nurses' practice in health audit].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Karina Araújo; de Melo, Cristina Maria Meira

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to identify nurses' practice in heath audit. The hermeneutic-dialectic method was used for the analysis. The study was performed in three loci: the internal audit service of a hospital; the external audit service of a private health service buyer, and the state audit service of the public health system (SUS, acronym in Portuguese for Sistema Unico de Saúde-Unique Health System), in Bahia. Nine audit nurses were interviewed. In the SUS audit, the nurses report being fulfilled with their practice and with the valorization of their professional role. In the private audit--both inside and outside of health organizations--the nurses' activities are focused on meeting the interests of their contractors, and do not get much involved with the care delivered by the nursing team and with the needs of service users.

  1. Passing the Audition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliniak, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Auditioning is often uncomfortable but can lead to great rewards. Music educators can do much to help their students be at their best in front of a panel. In this article, four experts share their experiences as adjudicators and their advice on how best to prepare students for the process.

  2. From Auditing to Editing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    Clarity in communication is important for workers in the General Accounting Office since much of the auditing work must be committed to paper if Congress, government officials and employees, or the public are to benefit. As a result an extensive writing improvement program was launched and this booklet written. Part 1 covers basic communication…

  3. Conducting a Technology Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, William

    2011-01-01

    Technology is a critical component in the success of any high-functioning school district, thus it is important that education leaders should examine it closely. Simply put, the purpose of a technology audit is to assess the effectiveness of the technology for administrative or instructional use. Rogers Public Schools in Rogers, Arkansas, recently…

  4. Energy Audit . . . Here's How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    After establishing building use patterns and complaints, a consulting engineer's walkthrough energy audit begins with the exterior. Then heating/cooling system efficiency is checked with a flue gases kit. Efficient use of water heaters, lighting, teacher lounges, and food preparation and eating areas saves energy. Most effective conservation…

  5. Energy Audit . . . Here's How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    After establishing building use patterns and complaints, a consulting engineer's walkthrough energy audit begins with the exterior. Then heating/cooling system efficiency is checked with a flue gases kit. Efficient use of water heaters, lighting, teacher lounges, and food preparation and eating areas saves energy. Most effective conservation…

  6. Going beyond Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Mike; Liss, Anne; Milner, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the work undertaken by a cluster of Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) to ensure that annual effectiveness reviews were more than a compliance exercise but a genuine attempt to improve their service to schools, hence the title of this article of "Going Beyond Audit". Historically, the cluster had met…

  7. Passing the Audition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliniak, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Auditioning is often uncomfortable but can lead to great rewards. Music educators can do much to help their students be at their best in front of a panel. In this article, four experts share their experiences as adjudicators and their advice on how best to prepare students for the process.

  8. Mandibular Third Molar Extraction Wound Healing With and Without Platelet Rich Plasma: A Comparative Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Shubha Ranjan; Singh, Purnima; Passi, Deepak; Patter, Pradeep

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) in regeneration of bone and to assess clinical compatibility of the material in mandibular third molar extraction socket. To compare the healing of mandibular third molar extraction wounds with and without PRP. Group A consists of the 30 patients where PRP will be placed in the extraction socket before closure of the socket. Group B consists of 30 patients who will be the control group where the extraction sockets will be closed without any intra socket medicaments. The patients would be allocated to the groups randomly. Soft tissue healing was better in study site compared to control site. The result of the study shows rapid bone regeneration in the extraction socket treated with PRP when compared with the socket without PRP. Evaluation for bone blending and trabecular bone formation started earlier in PRP site compared to control, non PRP site. Also there was less postoperative discomfort on the PRP treated side. Autologous PRP is biocompatible and has significant improved soft tissue healing, bone regeneration and increase in bone density in extraction sockets.

  9. The Environmental Knowledge and Attitudes of Prospective Teachers in Lebanon: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Taylor, T. G. Neil

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents data arising from a study of final-year primary and secondary teaching students in Lebanon using an equivalent Australian sample as a comparative reference group. It was found that the Lebanese students lagged behind their Australian counterparts with respect to their knowledge of global environmental issues, and displayed a…

  10. Comparing the Open University Systems of China and India: Origins, Developments and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perris, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    The national open universities of China and India are unique adaptations of the open university model that emanated from the UK. These institutions have expanded to become the largest universities in the world as measured by current enrollment of approximately four million each. This article comparatively analyzes how these open universities have…

  11. Comparative evaluation of the immunogenicity of combined hepatitis A and B vaccine by a prospective and retrospective trial.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Bernd; Müller, Tobias; Ross, R Stefan; Clauberg, Ralf; Werfel, Uwe; Roggendorf, Hedwig; Siggelkow, Cornelius; Hausen, Thomas; Roggendorf, Michael

    2009-04-01

    In the past, immunogenicity of hepatitis A and B vaccines needed to be questioned in persons of advanced age, especially in those of 40 years and older. We performed a comparative multicenter prospective and retrospective study with the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine Twinrix to identify factors influencing the results of the vaccination in a population of all age groups. Out of 489 subjects enrolled, 241 were vaccinated in a prospective study (group 1) and 248 subjects in a retrospective study (group 2) in 17 German centers with median age of 40.1 (14-79) years. Following three applications of the combined hepatitis A/B vaccine we found 96.2% with protective antibodies against HAV and 88.7% were protected against HBV. With increasing age the subjects developed decreasing anti-HBs antibody levels whereas the seroprotection rate was significantly reduced by age (p < 0.05) in the retrospective study group only. Subjects with arterial hypertension and thyroid disease showed significantly decreased protection rates. The timing of the HBV antibody control seems to be important especially in low-responders because protective antibodies may drop below the detection limit within some month. The combined hepatitis A and B vaccine Twinrix proved to be highly effective against HBV, although antibody concentrations and seroprotection rates decreased with increasing age.

  12. Phaco Prechop versus Divide and Conquer Phacoemulsification: A Prospective Comparative Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Elnaby, Effat A.; El Zawahry, Omar M.; Abdelrahman, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Hany E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare two phaco techniques, namely Phaco Prechop and Divide and conquer, basically during their early learning curves. Patients and Methods: The study included 50 patients divided into 2 groups, each including 25 patients; group (A) where phaco Prechop was performed, and group (B) in which divide and conquer was performed. The mean effective ultrasound time, mean endothelial cell count, mean endothelial cell loss, corneal thickness, intraoperative complications, and the best corrected visual acuity were reported in the two groups both preoperative and postoperative. Results: The mean effective ultrasound time in group A was 19.36 ± 8.51 seconds, and in group B, it was 24.44 ± 7.86 seconds with a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.033). The mean endothelial cell count 3 months postoperative in group A was 2139.88 cells/mm2. In group B, the mean endothelial cell count 3 months postoperative was 2087.08 cells/mm2. The difference between the two groups was statistically insignificant (P = 0.558), however The difference in endothelial cell loss 3 months postoperatively between the two groups was statistically significant. (P = 0.001). Four cases in groups A (16%) had posterior capsular rents compared to three cases (12 %) in group B. Postoperative best corrected visual acuity in group B was 6/12 or better in 88% of cases as compared to 92% in group A with no statistical difference. Conclusion: Early cataract surgical cases performed with the Phaco Prechop and divide and conquer techniques showed comparable results and complications. However the former technique utilized less phaco time and energy without significant effect on the final surgical outcome. PMID:21369468

  13. Pregnancy outcomes following use of escitalopram: a prospective comparative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Klieger-Grossmann, Chagit; Weitzner, Brenda; Panchaud, Alice; Pistelli, Alessandra; Einarson, Thomas; Koren, Gideon; Einarson, Adrienne

    2012-05-01

    Escitalopram is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor prescribed for depression and anxiety. There is a paucity of information regarding safety in pregnancy. The objective of this study was to determine whether escitalopram is associated with an increased risk for major malformations or other adverse outcomes following use in pregnancy. The authors analyzed pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to escitalopram (n = 212) versus other antidepressants (n = 212) versus nonteratogenic exposures (n = 212) and compared the outcomes. Among the escitalopram exposures were 172 (81%) live births, 32 (15%) spontaneous abortions, 6 (2.8%) therapeutic abortions, 3 stillbirths (1.7%), and 3 major malformations (1.7%). The only significant differences among groups was the rate of low birth weight (<2500 g) and overall mean birth weight (P = .225). However, spontaneous abortion rates were higher in both antidepressant groups (15% and 16%) compared with controls (8.5%; P = .066). There were lower rates of live births (P = .006), lower overall birth weight (P < .001), and increased rates of low birth weight (<2500 g; P = .009) with escitalopram. Spontaneous abortion rates were nearly double in both antidepressant groups (15% and 16%) compared with controls (8.5%) but not significant (P = .066). Escitalopram does not appear to be associated with an increased risk for major malformations but appears to increase the risk for low birth weight, which was correlated with the increase in infants weighing <2500 g. In addition, the higher rates of spontaneous abortions in both antidepressant groups confirmed previous findings.

  14. Biceps tenodesis (long head): arthroscopic keyhole technique versus arthroscopic interference screw: a prospective comparative clinical and radiographic marker study.

    PubMed

    Kany, Jean; Guinand, Régis; Croutzet, Pierre; Amaravathi, Rajkumar; Sekaran, Padmanaban

    2016-01-01

    The long head biceps tenodesis (LHBT) is an alternative to tenotomy in order to prevent Popeye sign.Biomechanical studies showed that interference screw(IFS) was the strongest fixation but there might be complications and cost. What's more, the analyses of tenodesis failures are undervalued because they only take visible deformations of the arm into account. The purpose of this study was to compare a modified arthroscopic "keyhole" LHBT (modified @KH) with an arthroscopic IFS LHBT(@IFS) using an objective method. We hypothesized that modified @KH gave similar clinical outcomes as @IFS without its hassles or drawbacks. We present a 12-month prospective comparative study (modified @KH versus @IFS) performed by two experienced orthopedic surgeons. Modified @KH was performed on one hundred and nine patients versus @IFS that was performed on one hundred and two. A radiopaque marker was placed into the tendon. The review was conducted in the sixth month with clinical examination and plain standard X-ray to objectify the potential migration of the marker. Modified @KH showed 2.4 % visible deformity without any Popeye sign but 3.4 % radiographic metallic marker migrations. No complications were noted. @IFS showed 5.8 % visible deformity with 2.9 % Popeye sign and with 10.3 % radiographic metallic marker migrations;pain at tenodesis location was noted in 2 %. P value (0.13) indicates that there were no statistically significant differences. We confirm the hypothesis that the modified@KH gives clinical and radiographic outcomes at least similar to @IFS without any complications and cost. The establishment of the radiopaque marker allows us to know the exact number of failures.Level of evidence Consecutive prospective comparative clinical, Level II-1 studies.

  15. Value of audits in breast cancer screening quality assurance programmes.

    PubMed

    Geertse, Tanya D; Holland, Roland; Timmers, Janine M H; Paap, Ellen; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Broeders, Mireille J M; den Heeten, Gerard J

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to retrospectively evaluate the results of all audits performed in the past and to assess their value in the quality assurance of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme. The audit team of the Dutch Reference Centre for Screening (LRCB) conducts triennial audits of all 17 reading units. During audits, screening outcomes like recall rates and detection rates are assessed and a radiological review is performed. This study investigates and compares the results of four audit series: 1996-2000, 2001-2005, 2003-2007 and 2010-2013. The analysis shows increased recall rates (from 0.66%, 1.07%, 1.22% to 1.58%), increased detection rates (from 3.3, 4.5, 4.8 to 5.4 per 1000) and increased sensitivity (from 64.5%, 68.7%, 70.5% to 71.6%), over the four audit series. The percentage of 'missed cancers' among interval cancers and advanced screen-detected cancers did not change (p = 0.4). Our audits not only provide an opportunity for assessing screening outcomes, but also provide moments of self-reflection with peers. For radiologists, an accurate understanding of their performance is essential to identify points of improvement. We therefore recommend a radiological review of screening examinations and immediate feedback as part of an audit. • Radiological review and immediate feedback are recommended as part of an audit. • For breast screening radiologists, audits provide moments of self-reflection with peers. • Radiological review of screening examinations provides insights in recall behaviour. • Accurate understanding of radiologists' performance is essential to identify points of improvement.

  16. Prospects for Problems Associated with Integrative and Inter-comparative Analysis of Eddy Flux Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Miyata, A.; Nagai, H.; Mano, M.; Yamamoto, S.

    2005-12-01

    In last decade, numerous long-term eddy flux measurements have been conducted worldwide to assess annual/seasonal energy, water and carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere. And FLUXNET communities now seem to come into a next phase with the objectives: integration of flux data observed at various ecosystems and/or inter-sites comparative studies. For example, a big research project "S-1" is ongoing in Japan and other eastern Asian region to set up terrestrial carbon management of Asia in the 21st century. One of the highlights of S-1 project is to provide a carbon budget map of all over Asia based on integrated and inter-compared eddy flux data collected at 15 sites of S-1 membership. FLUXNET communities including S-1 project have recognized that integration and inter-comparison of eddy flux data are the key issues to understand aspects of energy, water and carbon budgets at regional scale. However, the issues have difficulties to be settled because each flux site applies own data processing methods and gap-filling methods with site-specified classification and threshold values. In order to conduct appropriate integrative and inter-comparative analysis for eddy flux data effectively, we made it clear that how the differences in the data processing method affect the obtained flux values and searched for suitable and common gap-filling methodology. The differences in the data processing methods affect the obtained flux data in the present study was discussed based on a comparative experiment in S-1 project. We prepared one-month common test data sets, which consisted of 10 Hz eddy covariance raw data and related half-hourly meteorological data obtained at a larch forest site and a paddy site, in the comparative experiment. The 15 sites of S-1 memberships processed the test data by using their own processing methods. The results indicated that combined influences of coordinate rotation, detrending and frequency response correction brought

  17. An evaluation of Interprofessional group antenatal care: a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Zoë G; Saxell, Lee; Christians, Julian K

    2017-09-07

    Maternal and neonatal outcomes are influenced by the nature of antenatal care. Standard pregnancy care is provided on an individual basis, with one-on-one appointments between a client and family doctor, midwife or obstetrician. A novel, group-based antenatal care delivery model was developed in the United States in the 1990s and is growing in popularity beyond the borders of the USA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes in clients receiving interprofessional group perinatal care versus interprofessional individual care in a Canadian setting. Clients attending the South Community Birth Program (SCBP), an interprofessional, collaborative, primary care maternity program, offering both individual and group care, were invited to participate in the study. Pregnancy knowledge and satisfaction scores, and perinatal outcomes were compared between those receiving group versus individual care. Chi-square tests, general linear models and logistic regression were used to compare the questionnaire scores and perinatal outcomes between cohorts. Three hundred three clients participated in the study. Group care was comparable to individual care in terms of mode of birth, gestational age at birth, infant birth weight, breastfeeding rates, pregnancy knowledge, preparedness for labour and baby care, and client satisfaction. The rates of adverse perinatal outcomes were extremely low amongst SCBP clients, regardless of the type of care received (preterm birth rates ~5%). Breastfeeding rates were very high amongst all study participants (> 78% exclusive breastfeeding), as were measures of pregnancy knowledge and satisfaction. This is the first Canadian study to compare outcomes in clients receiving interprofessional group care versus individual care. Our observation that interprofessional group care outcomes and satisfaction were as good as interprofessional individual care has important implications for the antenatal care of clients and for addressing the projected

  18. The iBRA-2 (immediate breast reconstruction and adjuvant therapy audit) study: protocol for a prospective national multicentre cohort study to evaluate the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on the delivery of adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Rajiv; O'Connell, Rachel; Rattay, Tim; Tolkien, Zoe; Barnes, Nicola; Skillman, Joanna; Williamson, Paula; Conroy, Elizabeth; Gardiner, Matthew; Harnett, Adrian; O'Brien, Ciara; Blazeby, Jane; Holcombe, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) is routinely offered to improve quality of life for women with breast cancer requiring a mastectomy, but there are concerns that more complex surgery may delay the delivery of adjuvant oncological treatments and compromise long-term oncological outcomes. High-quality evidence, however, is lacking. iBRA-2 is a national prospective multicentre cohort study that aims to investigate the effect of IBR on the delivery of adjuvant therapy. Methods and analysis Breast and plastic surgery centres in the UK performing mastectomy with or without (±) IBR will be invited to participate in the study through the trainee research collaborative network. All women undergoing mastectomy ± IBR for breast cancer between 1 July and 31 December 2016 will be included. Patient demographics, operative, oncological and complication data will be collected. Time from last definitive cancer surgery to first adjuvant treatment for patients undergoing mastectomy ± IBR will be compared to determine the impact that IBR has on the time of delivery of adjuvant therapy. Prospective data on 3000 patients from ∼50 centres are anticipated. Ethics and dissemination Research ethics approval is not required for this study. This has been confirmed using the online Health Research Authority decision tool. This novel study will explore whether IBR impacts the time to delivery of adjuvant therapy. The study will provide valuable information to help patients and surgeons make more informed decisions about their surgical options. Dissemination of the study protocol will be via the Mammary Fold Academic and Research Collaborative (MFAC) and the Reconstructive Surgery Trials Network (RSTN), the Association of Breast Surgery (ABS) and the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS). Participating units will have access to their own data and collective results will be presented at relevant surgical conferences and

  19. Comparative, prospective, and randomized study between urotherapy and the pharmacological treatment of children with urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Renata Martins; Gugliotta, Antonio; Ikari, Osamu; Perissinoto, Maria Carolina; Lúcio, Adélia Correia; Miyaoka, Ricardo; D'Ancona, Carlos Arturo Levi

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To verify and compare the results of behavioral modification plus pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral modifications plus oxybutynin chloride in children with nonmonosymptomatic enuresis. Methods: A total of 47 children were randomized using opaque and sealed envelopes sequentially numbered. Group I was composed of 21 children who underwent antimuscarinic treatment (oxybutynin), and Group II was composed of 26 patients who underwent pelvic floor muscle training. Both groups were instructed as to behavioral modifications. Results: The voiding diary results were compared each month between Groups I and II. In the first month of treatment, children in Group I presented 12.2 dry nights, 13.4 in the second month, and 15.9 in the last month. In Group II, the results were: 14.9 dry nights in the first month, 20.8 dry nights in the second and 24.0 dry nights in the last month. There was a significant difference between the groups in second and third months. Conclusion: Pelvic floor exercises associated with behavioral changes were more effective than pharmacological treatment in children with urinary incontinence. PMID:23843062

  20. Comparative effectiveness research in cancer genomics and precision medicine: current landscape and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Simonds, Naoko I; Khoury, Muin J; Schully, Sheri D; Armstrong, Katrina; Cohn, Wendy F; Fenstermacher, David A; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Goddard, Katrina A B; Knaus, William A; Lyman, Gary H; Ramsey, Scott D; Xu, Jianfeng; Freedman, Andrew N

    2013-07-03

    A major promise of genomic research is information that can transform health care and public health through earlier diagnosis, more effective prevention and treatment of disease, and avoidance of drug side effects. Although there is interest in the early adoption of emerging genomic applications in cancer prevention and treatment, there are substantial evidence gaps that are further compounded by the difficulties of designing adequately powered studies to generate this evidence, thus limiting the uptake of these tools into clinical practice. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is intended to generate evidence on the "real-world" effectiveness compared with existing standards of care so informed decisions can be made to improve health care. Capitalizing on funding opportunities from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the National Cancer Institute funded seven research teams to conduct CER in genomic and precision medicine and sponsored a workshop on CER on May 30, 2012, in Bethesda, Maryland. This report highlights research findings from those research teams, challenges to conducting CER, the barriers to implementation in clinical practice, and research priorities and opportunities in CER in genomic and precision medicine. Workshop participants strongly emphasized the need for conducting CER for promising molecularly targeted therapies, developing and supporting an integrated clinical network for open-access resources, supporting bioinformatics and computer science research, providing training and education programs in CER, and conducting research in economic and decision modeling.

  1. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy following cystectomy for invasive bladder cancer: a prospective comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Skinner, D G; Daniels, J R; Russell, C A; Lieskovsky, G; Boyd, S D; Nichols, P; Kern, W; Sakamoto, J; Krailo, M; Groshen, S

    1991-03-01

    We assigned 91 patients with deeply invasive, pathological stage P3, P4 or N+ and Mo transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (with or without squamous or glandular differentiation) to adjuvant chemotherapy or to observation after radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. For most patients chemotherapy was planned as 4 courses at 28-day intervals of 100 mg./M.2 cisplatin, 60 mg./M.2 doxorubicin and 600 mg./M.2 cyclophosphamide. A significant delay was shown in the time to progression (p = 0.0010) with 70% of the patients assigned to chemotherapy free of disease at 3 years compared to 46% in the observation group. Median survival time for patients in the chemotherapy group was 4.3 years compared to 2.4 years in the observation group (p = 0.0062). In addition to treatment groups, important prognostic factors included age, gender and lymph node status. The number of involved lymph nodes was the single most important variable. We recommend adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with invasive transitional cell carcinoma after definitive surgical resection.

  2. Reviewing audit: barriers and facilitating factors for effective clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, G; Crombie, I; Alder, E; Davies, H; Millard, A

    2000-01-01

    I K Crombie, professor and E M Alder, senior lecturer H T O Davies, reader A Millard, research fellow Objective—To review the literature on the benefits and disadvantages of clinical and medical audit, and to assess the main facilitators and barriers to conducting the audit process. Design—A comprehensive literature review was undertaken through a thorough review of Medline and CINAHL databases using the keywords of "audit", "audit of audits", and "evaluation of audits" and a handsearch of the indexes of relevant journals for key papers. Results—Findings from 93 publications were reviewed. These ranged from single case studies of individual audit projects through retrospective reviews of departmental audit programmes to studies of interface projects between primary and secondary care. The studies reviewed incorporated the experiences of a wide variety of clinicians, from medical consultants to professionals allied to medicine and from those involved in unidisciplinary and multidisciplinary ventures. Perceived benefits of audit included improved communication among colleagues and other professional groups, improved patient care, increased professional satisfaction, and better administration. Some disadvantages of audit were perceived as diminished clinical ownership, fear of litigation, hierarchical and territorial suspicions, and professional isolation. The main barriers to clinical audit can be classified under five main headings. These are lack of resources, lack of expertise or advice in project design and analysis, problems between groups and group members, lack of an overall plan for audit, and organisational impediments. Key facilitating factors to audit were also identified: they included modern medical records systems, effective training, dedicated staff, protected time, structured programmes, and a shared dialogue between purchasers and providers. Conclusions—Clinical audit can be a valuable assistance to any programme which aims to improve the

  3. [A prospective study to compare the efficiency of oocyte vitrification using closed or open devices].

    PubMed

    Sarandi, S; Herbemont, C; Sermondade, N; Benoit, A; Sonigo, C; Poncelet, C; Benard, J; Gronier, H; Boujenah, J; Grynberg, M; Sifer, C

    2016-05-01

    Oocyte vitrification using an open device is thought to be a source of microbiological and chemical contaminations that can be avoided using a closed device. The principal purpose of this study was to compare the two vitrification protocols: closed and open system. The secondary aim was to study the effects of the storage in the vapor phase of nitrogen (VPN) on oocytes vitrified using an open system and to compare it to those of a storage in liquid nitrogen (LN). Forty-four patients have been included in our study between November 2014 and May 2015. Two hundred and fourteen oocytes have been vitrified at germinal vesicle (GV), metaphase I (0PB) and metaphase II (1PB) stages. We vitrified 96 oocytes (59 GV/37 0PB) using a closed vitrification device and 118 oocytes (57 GV/31 0PB/30 1PB) using an open device. The vitrified oocytes were then stored either in LN or in VPN. The main outcome measures were the survival rate after warming (SR), meiosis resumption rate (MRR) and maturation rate (MR). The global post-thaw SR was significantly higher for oocytes vitrified using an open system (93.2%) compared to those vitrified using a closed one (64.5%; P<0.001). On the contrary, there was no significant difference in terms of global MRR and MR (82.1% vs. 87.5% and 60.7% vs. 61.2% using closed and open system respectively). The SR, MRR and the MR were not significantly different when vitrified oocytes were stored in VPN or LN (91.6, 83.8, 64.5% vs. 93.9, 89.8, 59.1% respectively). Taking into account the limits of our protocol, the open vitrification system remains the more efficient system. The use of sterile liquid nitrogen for oocyte vitrification and the subsequent storage in vapor phase of nitrogen could minimize the hypothetical risks of biological and chemical contaminations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Improvements in survival of the uncemented Nottingham Total Shoulder prosthesis: a prospective comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Nahum; Neumann, Lars; Modi, Amit; Mersich, Istvan J; Wallace, Angus W

    2007-01-01

    Background The uncemented Nottingham Total Shoulder Replacement prosthesis system (Nottingham TSR) was developed from the previous BioModular® shoulder prosthesis taking into consideration the causes of the initial implant's failure. We investigated the impact of changes in the design of Nottingham TSR prosthesis on its survivorship rate. Methods Survivorship analyses of three types of uncemented total shoulder arthroplasty prostheses (BioModular®, initial Nottingham TSR and current Nottingham TSR systems with 11, 8 and 4 year survivorship data respectively) were compared. All these prostheses were implanted for the treatment of disabling pain in the shoulder due to primary and secondary osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Each type of the prosthesis studied was implanted in consecutive group of patients – 90 patients with BioModular® system, 103 with the initial Nottingham TSR and 34 patients with the current Nottingham TSR system. The comparison of the annual cumulative survivorship values in the compatible time range between the three groups was done according to the paired t test. Results The 8-year and 11-year survivorship rates for the initially used modified BioModular® uncemented prosthesis were relatively low (75.6% and 71.7% respectively) comparing to the reported survivorship of the conventional cemented implants. The 8-year survivorship for the uncemented Nottingham TSR prosthesis was significantly higher (81.8%), but still not in the desired range of above 90%, that is found in other cemented designs. Glenoid component loosening was the main factor of prosthesis failure in both prostheses and mainly occurred in the first 4 postoperative years. The 4-year survivorship of the currently re-designed Nottingham TSR prosthesis, with hydroxylapatite coating of the glenoid baseplate, was significantly higher, 93.1% as compared to 85.1% of the previous Nottingham TSR. Conclusion The initial Nottingham shoulder prosthesis showed significantly higher

  5. 7 CFR 1290.10 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit requirements. 1290.10 Section 1290.10... PROGRAM § 1290.10 Audit requirements. The State is accountable for conducting a financial audit of the... audit, a copy of the audit results. ...

  6. 23 CFR 172.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Audits. 172.7 Section 172.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... SERVICE CONTRACTS § 172.7 Audits. (a) Performance of audits. When State procedures call for audits of contracts or subcontracts for engineering design services, the audit shall be performed to test compliance...

  7. 7 CFR 1773.8 - Audit date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit date. 1773.8 Section 1773.8 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.8 Audit date. (a) The annual audit must be performed as of the end of the same calendar month each year unless prior approval to...

  8. 45 CFR 96.31 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Audits. 96.31 Section 96.31 Public Welfare... Audits. (a) Basic rule. Grantees and subgrantees are responsible for obtaining audits in accordance with the Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 (31 U.S.C. 7501-7507) and revised OMB Circular A-133, “Audits...

  9. 7 CFR 3052.230 - Audit costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit costs. 3052.230 Section 3052.230 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.230 Audit costs. (a) Allowable costs. Unless prohibited by law, the cost of audits made in accordance with the...

  10. 20 CFR 655.1312 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Audits. 655.1312 Section 655.1312 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1312 Audits. (a) Discretion. The Department will conduct audits of... selected for audit will be chosen within the sole discretion of the Department. (b) Audit letter. Where an...

  11. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date within...

  12. 32 CFR 37.1325 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Periodic audit. 37.1325 Section 37.1325 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1325 Periodic audit. An audit of... awards. Appendix C to this part describes what such an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a participant...

  13. 45 CFR 158.402 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Audits. 158.402 Section 158.402 Public Welfare... REVENUE: REPORTING AND REBATE REQUIREMENTS HHS Enforcement § 158.402 Audits. (a) Notice of Audit. HHS will provide 30 days advance notice of its intent to conduct an audit of an issuer. (b) Conferences. All audits...

  14. 20 CFR 655.24 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Audits. 655.24 Section 655.24 Employees...) § 655.24 Audits. (a) Discretion. OFLC will conduct audits of H-2B temporary labor certification applications. The applications selected for audit will be chosen within the sole discretion of OFLC. (b) Audit...

  15. 16 CFR 703.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audits. 703.7 Section 703.7 Commercial... Audits. (a) The Mechanism shall have an audit conducted at least annually, to determine whether the... be kept under § 703.6 of this part shall be available for audit. (b) Each audit provided for in...

  16. 11 CFR 9038.1 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit. 9038.1 Section 9038.1 Federal Elections... EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS § 9038.1 Audit. (a) General. (1) The Commission will conduct an audit of the qualified... primary matching funds. The audit may be conducted at any time after the date of the candidate's...

  17. 7 CFR 3052.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit requirements. 3052.200 Section 3052.200..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $500,000 or more in a year in...

  18. 13 CFR 120.490 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audits. 120.490 Section 120.490... Companies (sblc) § 120.490 Audits. Every SBLC is subject to periodic audits by SBA's Office of Inspector General, Auditing Division, and the cost of such audits will be assessed against the SBLC, except for the...

  19. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a...

  20. 30 CFR 735.22 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit. 735.22 Section 735.22 Mineral Resources... ENFORCEMENT § 735.22 Audit. The agency shall arrange for an independent audit no less frequently than once..., Attachment P. The audits will be performed in accordance with the “Standards for Audit of Governmental...

  1. 12 CFR 704.15 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit requirements. 704.15 Section 704.15 Banks... UNIONS § 704.15 Audit requirements. (a) External audit. The corporate credit union supervisory committee shall cause an annual opinion audit of the financial statements to be made. The audit must be performed...

  2. 30 CFR 725.19 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit. 725.19 Section 725.19 Mineral Resources... REGULATIONS REIMBURSEMENTS TO STATES § 725.19 Audit. The agency shall arrange for an independent audit no less... Circular No. A-102, Attachment P. The audits will be performed in accordance with the “Standards for Audit...

  3. 30 CFR 1217.250 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audits. 1217.250 Section 1217.250 Mineral... Revenue AUDITS AND INSPECTIONS Other Solid Minerals § 1217.250 Audits. An audit of the lessee's accounts... duplicate copies of such annual or other audits to the mining supervisor, within 30 days after the...

  4. 20 CFR 655.180 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... United States (H-2A Workers) Integrity Measures § 655.180 Audit. The CO may conduct audits of... will be chosen within the sole discretion of the CO. (b) Audit letter. Where an application is selected for audit, the CO will issue an audit letter to the employer and a copy, if appropriate, to...

  5. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in a...

  6. 11 CFR 9038.1 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... interviews of committee personnel. Commission staff will be available to explain aspects of the audit and... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit. 9038.1 Section 9038.1 Federal Elections... EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS § 9038.1 Audit. (a) General. (1) The Commission will conduct an audit of the qualified...

  7. 32 CFR 37.1325 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Periodic audit. 37.1325 Section 37.1325 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1325 Periodic audit. An audit of... awards. Appendix C to this part describes what such an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a...

  8. 20 CFR 655.1312 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Audits. 655.1312 Section 655.1312 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1312 Audits. (a) Discretion. The Department will conduct audits of... selected for audit will be chosen within the sole discretion of the Department. (b) Audit letter. Where...

  9. 13 CFR 120.490 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audits. 120.490 Section 120.490... Companies (sblc) § 120.490 Audits. Every SBLC is subject to periodic audits by SBA's Office of Inspector General, Auditing Division, and the cost of such audits will be assessed against the SBLC, except for...

  10. 16 CFR 703.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audits. 703.7 Section 703.7 Commercial... Audits. (a) The Mechanism shall have an audit conducted at least annually, to determine whether the... be kept under § 703.6 of this part shall be available for audit. (b) Each audit provided for...

  11. 30 CFR 735.22 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit. 735.22 Section 735.22 Mineral Resources... ENFORCEMENT § 735.22 Audit. The agency shall arrange for an independent audit no less frequently than once..., Attachment P. The audits will be performed in accordance with the “Standards for Audit of...

  12. 23 CFR 172.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Audits. 172.7 Section 172.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... SERVICE CONTRACTS § 172.7 Audits. (a) Performance of audits. When State procedures call for audits of contracts or subcontracts for engineering design services, the audit shall be performed to test...

  13. 38 CFR 41.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit requirements. 41...) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 41.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $500,000 or more in a year in Federal awards shall...

  14. 29 CFR 99.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit requirements. 99.200 Section 99.200 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 99.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $300,000 or more in a...

  15. 29 CFR 99.230 - Audit costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit costs. 99.230 Section 99.230 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 99.230 Audit costs. (a) Allowable costs. Unless prohibited by law, the cost of audits made in accordance with the...

  16. 12 CFR 620.30 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit committees. 620.30 Section 620.30 Banks... Association Audit and Compensation Committees § 620.30 Audit committees. Each Farm Credit bank and association must establish and maintain an audit committee. An audit committee is established by adopting a written...

  17. 12 CFR 620.30 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit committees. 620.30 Section 620.30 Banks... Association Audit and Compensation Committees § 620.30 Audit committees. Each Farm Credit bank and association must establish and maintain an audit committee. An audit committee is established by adopting a...

  18. 7 CFR 1773.8 - Audit date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit date. 1773.8 Section 1773.8 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.8 Audit date. (a) The annual audit must be performed as of the end of the same calendar month each year unless prior approval...

  19. 12 CFR 1274.2 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit requirements. 1274.2 Section 1274.2 Banks... § 1274.2 Audit requirements. (a) Each Bank, the OF, and the FICO shall obtain annually an independent external audit of and an audit report on its individual financial statement. (b) The OF audit...

  20. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date...

  1. 7 CFR 3052.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit requirements. 3052.200 Section 3052.200..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $500,000 or more in a year...

  2. 30 CFR 735.22 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit. 735.22 Section 735.22 Mineral Resources... ENFORCEMENT § 735.22 Audit. The agency shall arrange for an independent audit no less frequently than once..., Attachment P. The audits will be performed in accordance with the “Standards for Audit of...

  3. 32 CFR 37.1325 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Periodic audit. 37.1325 Section 37.1325 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1325 Periodic audit. An audit of... awards. Appendix C to this part describes what such an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a...

  4. 7 CFR 3052.230 - Audit costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit costs. 3052.230 Section 3052.230 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.230 Audit costs. (a) Allowable costs. Unless prohibited by law, the cost of audits made in accordance with...

  5. 12 CFR 390.285 - Audit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit period. 390.285 Section 390.285 Banks and... Associations § 390.285 Audit period. The audit period of a State savings association means the twelve month period (or other period in the case of a change in audit period) covered by the annual audit conducted...

  6. 12 CFR 620.30 - Audit committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit committees. 620.30 Section 620.30 Banks... Association Audit and Compensation Committees § 620.30 Audit committees. Each Farm Credit bank and association must establish and maintain an audit committee. An audit committee is established by adopting a...

  7. 13 CFR 120.490 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audits. 120.490 Section 120.490... Companies (sblc) § 120.490 Audits. Every SBLC is subject to periodic audits by SBA's Office of Inspector General, Auditing Division, and the cost of such audits will be assessed against the SBLC, except for...

  8. 38 CFR 41.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit requirements. 41...) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 41.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $500,000 or more in a year in Federal awards shall...

  9. 32 CFR 37.1325 - Periodic audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Periodic audit. 37.1325 Section 37.1325 National... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1325 Periodic audit. An audit of... awards. Appendix C to this part describes what such an audit may cover. A periodic audit of a...

  10. 30 CFR 735.22 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit. 735.22 Section 735.22 Mineral Resources... ENFORCEMENT § 735.22 Audit. The agency shall arrange for an independent audit no less frequently than once..., Attachment P. The audits will be performed in accordance with the “Standards for Audit of...

  11. 7 CFR 3052.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings. 3052.510 Section 3052.510 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  12. 23 CFR 172.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Audits. 172.7 Section 172.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... SERVICE CONTRACTS § 172.7 Audits. (a) Performance of audits. When State procedures call for audits of contracts or subcontracts for engineering design services, the audit shall be performed to test...

  13. 23 CFR 172.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Audits. 172.7 Section 172.7 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY... SERVICE CONTRACTS § 172.7 Audits. (a) Performance of audits. When State procedures call for audits of contracts or subcontracts for engineering design services, the audit shall be performed to test...

  14. 16 CFR 703.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audits. 703.7 Section 703.7 Commercial... Audits. (a) The Mechanism shall have an audit conducted at least annually, to determine whether the... be kept under § 703.6 of this part shall be available for audit. (b) Each audit provided for...

  15. 20 CFR 655.1312 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Audits. 655.1312 Section 655.1312 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1312 Audits. (a) Discretion. The Department will conduct audits of... selected for audit will be chosen within the sole discretion of the Department. (b) Audit letter. Where...

  16. 29 CFR 99.510 - Audit findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit findings. 99.510 Section 99.510 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.510 Audit findings. (a) Audit findings reported. The auditor shall report the following as audit findings in...

  17. 7 CFR 1773.8 - Audit date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Audit date. 1773.8 Section 1773.8 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.8 Audit date. (a) The annual audit must be performed as of the end of the same calendar month each year unless prior approval...

  18. 7 CFR 1290.10 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit requirements. 1290.10 Section 1290.10... PROGRAM § 1290.10 Audit requirements. The State is accountable for conducting a financial audit of the... audit, a copy of the audit results....

  19. 29 CFR 99.230 - Audit costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit costs. 99.230 Section 99.230 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 99.230 Audit costs. (a) Allowable costs. Unless prohibited by law, the cost of audits made in accordance with...

  20. 7 CFR 1773.3 - Annual audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Annual audit. 1773.3 Section 1773.3 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) POLICY ON AUDITS OF RUS BORROWERS RUS Audit Requirements § 1773.3 Annual audit. (a) Each borrower... RUS as set forth in § 1773.4. (b) Each borrower must establish an annual as of audit date...

  1. 12 CFR 1274.2 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit requirements. 1274.2 Section 1274.2 Banks... § 1274.2 Audit requirements. (a) Each Bank, the OF, and the FICO shall obtain annually an independent external audit of and an audit report on its individual financial statement. (b) The OF audit...

  2. 20 CFR 655.1312 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Audits. 655.1312 Section 655.1312 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1312 Audits. (a) Discretion. The Department will conduct audits of... selected for audit will be chosen within the sole discretion of the Department. (b) Audit letter. Where...

  3. 11 CFR 9038.1 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit. 9038.1 Section 9038.1 Federal Elections... EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS § 9038.1 Audit. (a) General. (1) The Commission will conduct an audit of the qualified... primary matching funds. The audit may be conducted at any time after the date of the...

  4. 13 CFR 120.490 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audits. 120.490 Section 120.490... Companies (sblc) § 120.490 Audits. Every SBLC is subject to periodic audits by SBA's Office of Inspector General, Auditing Division, and the cost of such audits will be assessed against the SBLC, except for...

  5. 30 CFR 735.22 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Audit. 735.22 Section 735.22 Mineral Resources... ENFORCEMENT § 735.22 Audit. The agency shall arrange for an independent audit no less frequently than once..., Attachment P. The audits will be performed in accordance with the “Standards for Audit of...

  6. 16 CFR 703.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audits. 703.7 Section 703.7 Commercial... Audits. (a) The Mechanism shall have an audit conducted at least annually, to determine whether the... be kept under § 703.6 of this part shall be available for audit. (b) Each audit provided for...

  7. 29 CFR 99.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit requirements. 99.200 Section 99.200 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 99.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $300,000 or more in...

  8. 11 CFR 9038.1 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit. 9038.1 Section 9038.1 Federal Elections... EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS § 9038.1 Audit. (a) General. (1) The Commission will conduct an audit of the qualified... primary matching funds. The audit may be conducted at any time after the date of the...

  9. 12 CFR 390.285 - Audit period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit period. 390.285 Section 390.285 Banks and... Associations § 390.285 Audit period. The audit period of a State savings association means the twelve month period (or other period in the case of a change in audit period) covered by the annual audit conducted...

  10. 16 CFR 703.7 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audits. 703.7 Section 703.7 Commercial... Audits. (a) The Mechanism shall have an audit conducted at least annually, to determine whether the... be kept under § 703.6 of this part shall be available for audit. (b) Each audit provided for...

  11. 11 CFR 9038.1 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Audit. 9038.1 Section 9038.1 Federal Elections... EXAMINATIONS AND AUDITS § 9038.1 Audit. (a) General. (1) The Commission will conduct an audit of the qualified... primary matching funds. The audit may be conducted at any time after the date of the...

  12. 13 CFR 120.490 - Audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audits. 120.490 Section 120.490... Companies (sblc) § 120.490 Audits. Every SBLC is subject to periodic audits by SBA's Office of Inspector General, Auditing Division, and the cost of such audits will be assessed against the SBLC, except for...

  13. 7 CFR 3052.230 - Audit costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.230 Audit costs. (a) Allowable costs. Unless prohibited by law, the cost of audits made in accordance with the... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit costs. 3052.230 Section 3052.230 Agriculture...

  14. 7 CFR 3052.200 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Audits § 3052.200 Audit requirements. (a) Audit required. Non-Federal entities that expend $500,000 or more in a year in... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit requirements. 3052.200 Section 3052.200...

  15. Prospective comparative study for the evaluation of prosthetic rehabilitation users with transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Prim, Gabriel de Souza; Santos, Francisco Assis Souza; Vieira, Milton; Nassar, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with transtibial amputations have difficulties in performing march and stay in balance, directly affecting their quality of life. The use of prostheses can enable the rehabilitation of the individual, but we question how effective are for certain tasks and how they can still improve. To evaluate the prosthesis for transtibial amputation, a comparative study was conducted with two groups: Amputee and NOT Amputees. With the help of Motion Capture technology was held measuring the angles of static balance, walking speed and scores in the execution of daily activities. The results indicate that dispersions of larger static equilibrium angles belonging to the group amputees. In terms of average speed march and in scores of Daily Activities, there was better performance for the group of NOT amputees. From this it was also identified that the technical characteristics of transtibial prosthetic could impact rehabilitation of its members.

  16. Immediate loading of mandibular dental implants in partially edentulous patients: a prospective randomized comparative study.

    PubMed

    Margossian, Patrice; Mariani, Paul; Stephan, Grégory; Margerit, Jacques; Jorgensen, Christian

    2012-04-01

    While immediate loading in the edentulous mandible is a well-documented procedure, there are limited scientific data on immediate loading in the partially edentulous mandible. Two-year success rates of immediate loading and conventional delayed loading of dental implants in partially dentate mandibles were compared. Patients were randomized into three groups: group A (n = 40), immediate provisionalization with nonocclusal loading; group B (n = 40), immediate provisionalization with occlusal loading; and group C (n = 37), delayed loading with single-stage surgery. Baseline and 2-year measurements included implant stability quotient, insertion torque, and peri-implant bone crest radiography. Two hundred nine implants were immediately loaded in 80 patients. The 2-year success rates were 93.3% for group B and 100% for groups A and C. Immediate provisionalization provided success rates similar to those for delayed loading only when not loaded in occlusion.

  17. [A prospective comparative study to assess the impact of pharmaceutical intervention in the promotion of sequential therapy with flouroquinolones].

    PubMed

    Pinteño Blanco, M; Delgado Sánchez, O; Escrivá Torralva, A; Crespí Monjo, M; Ventayol Bosch, P; Puigventós Latorre, F; Martínez López, I

    2004-01-01

    To assess the impact of pharmaceutical intervention on the use of sequential therapy (ST) with fluoroquinolones. A prospective comparative study of pharmaceutical intervention in two stages: observational stage and intervention stage for ST promotion. In all, 250 patients receiving intravenous therapy with fluoroquinolones (113 with levofloxacin and 137 with ciprofloxacin) were studied, with 76 and 70 patients, respectively, being eligible for a pharmaceutical intervention program to promote ST. Pharmaceutical intervention showed a decreased duration of intravenous therapy and increased duration of oral therapy for both drugs, as well as decreased medication-related costs, all in a statistically significant manner. ST promotion provides an opportunity to expand the role of hospital pharmacists and to optimize fluoroquinolone-based therapy, which results in decreased intravenous treatments and provides a more cost-effective option.

  18. Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing 1- versus 7-day manipulation following collagenase injection for dupuytren contracture.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Dayne T; Noland, Shelley S; Watt, Andrew J; Kollitz, Kathleen M; Vedder, Nicholas B; Huang, Jerry I

    2014-10-01

    To compare the efficacy, tolerance, and safety of manual manipulation at day 7 to day 1 following collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) injection for Dupuytren contracture. Eligible patients were randomized to manipulation at day 1 versus day 7 following CCH injection. Preinjection, premanipulation, postmanipulation, and 30-day follow-up metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint contractures were measured. Pain scores were recorded at each time point. Data were stratified per cohort based on primary joint treated (MCP vs PIP). Means were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Forty-three patients with 46 digits were eligible and were randomized to 1-day (22 digits) and 7-day (24 digits) manipulation. For MCP joints, there were no significant differences in flexion contractures between 1- and 7-day cohorts for initial (47° vs 46°), postmanipulation (0° vs 2°), or 30-day follow-up (1° vs 2°) measurements. Premanipulation, the residual contracture was significantly lower in the 7-day group (23° vs 40°). For PIP joints, there were no significant differences between 1- and 7-day cohorts for initial (63° vs 62°), premanipulation (56° vs 52°), postmanipulation (13° vs 15°), or 30-day (14° vs 16°) measurements. There were no significant differences in pain or skin tears between the 2 groups. No flexor tendon ruptures were observed. The effectiveness of CCH in achieving correction of Dupuytren contractures was preserved when manipulation was performed on day 7, with no differences in correction, pain, or skin tears. These data suggest that manipulation can be scheduled at the convenience of the patient and surgeon within the first 7 days after injection. Therapeutic I. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pain intensity on the first day after surgery: a prospective cohort study comparing 179 surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Gerbershagen, Hans J; Aduckathil, Sanjay; van Wijck, Albert J M; Peelen, Linda M; Kalkman, Cor J; Meissner, Winfried

    2013-04-01

    Severe pain after surgery remains a major problem, occurring in 20-40% of patients. Despite numerous published studies, the degree of pain following many types of surgery in everyday clinical practice is unknown. To improve postoperative pain therapy and develop procedure-specific, optimized pain-treatment protocols, types of surgery that may result in severe postoperative pain in everyday practice must first be identified. This study considered 115,775 patients from 578 surgical wards in 105 German hospitals. A total of 70,764 patients met the inclusion criteria. On the first postoperative day, patients were asked to rate their worst pain intensity since surgery (numeric rating scale, 0-10). All surgical procedures were assigned to 529 well-defined groups. When a group contained fewer than 20 patients, the data were excluded from analysis. Finally, 50,523 patients from 179 surgical groups were compared. The 40 procedures with the highest pain scores (median numeric rating scale, 6-7) included 22 orthopedic/trauma procedures on the extremities. Patients reported high pain scores after many "minor" surgical procedures, including appendectomy, cholecystectomy, hemorrhoidectomy, and tonsillectomy, which ranked among the 25 procedures with highest pain intensities. A number of "major" abdominal surgeries resulted in comparatively low pain scores, often because of sufficient epidural analgesia. Several common minor- to medium-level surgical procedures, including some with laparoscopic approaches, resulted in unexpectedly high levels of postoperative pain. To reduce the number of patients suffering from severe pain, patients undergoing so-called minor surgery should be monitored more closely, and postsurgical pain treatment needs to comply with existing procedure-specific pain-treatment recommendations.

  20. [Prospective and comparative study of minimally invasive posterior approach versus standard posterior approach in total hip replacement].

    PubMed

    Laffosse, J-M; Chiron, P; Tricoire, J-L; Giordano, G; Molinier, F; Puget, J

    2007-05-01

    There have been few prospective studies comparing minimally invasive approaches for total hip replacement. We wanted to ascertain the contribution of the minimally invasive posterior approach in comparison with the standard posterolateral approach in terms of early outcome. This was prospective comparative consecutive series of patients. Patients with major architectural problems or undergoing revision arthroplasty were excluded. One hundred ten patients (116 hips) were divided into two groups which were comparable for number of patients, gender, age, body mass index, indication for surgery, and preoperative function scores. The preoperative ASA score was lower in the minimally invasive group (p=0.04). The patients were in the lateral reclining position for the two approaches and classical instrumentation using the same implants (stems and cemented or non-cemented cups) were used. We noted operative time and blood loss (using the Brecher method based on the hematocrit at day 1 and 5 and the number of blood transfusions), postoperative pain, and implant position. Functional outcome was assessed with the modified Harris score and the WOMAC index (at 6 weeks and 3 and 6 months). Statview(R) was used to search for statistical significance considering p<0.05 as significant. Mean length of incision was 8.5 cm versus 15.1 cm. Mean blood loss was significantly less in the minimally invasive group (p=0.027) as was the level of postoperative pain as confirmed by the lesser consumption of morphine analgesics (p=0.006). Other operative variables as well as implant position were comparable. There were no major complications in the minimally invasive group. In the standard group, there was one case of common peroneal nerve palsy, two dislocations, and two fractures related to falls after prosthesis implantation. The WOMAC index was better after the minimally invasive approach at six weeks and at three months (p<0.05). The modified Harris score was better only at six weeks

  1. Optimizing Radiation Doses for Computed Tomography Across Institutions: Dose Auditing and Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Demb, Joshua; Chu, Philip; Nelson, Thomas; Hall, David; Seibert, Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John; Krishnam, Mayil; Cagnon, Christopher; Bostani, Maryam; Gould, Robert; Miglioretti, Diana; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) vary substantially across institutions. To assess the impact of institutional-level audit and collaborative efforts to share best practices on CT radiation doses across 5 University of California (UC) medical centers. In this before/after interventional study, we prospectively collected radiation dose metrics on all diagnostic CT examinations performed between October 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, at 5 medical centers. Using data from January to March (baseline), we created audit reports detailing the distribution of radiation dose metrics for chest, abdomen, and head CT scans. In April, we shared reports with the medical centers and invited radiology professionals from the centers to a 1.5-day in-person meeting to review reports and share best practices. We calculated changes in mean effective dose 12 weeks before and after the audits and meeting, excluding a 12-week implementation period when medical centers could make changes. We compared proportions of examinations exceeding previously published benchmarks at baseline and following the audit and meeting, and calculated changes in proportion of examinations exceeding benchmarks. Of 158 274 diagnostic CT scans performed in the study period, 29 594 CT scans were performed in the 3 months before and 32 839 CT scans were performed 12 to 24 weeks after the audit and meeting. Reductions in mean effective dose were considerable for chest and abdomen. Mean effective dose for chest CT decreased from 13.2 to 10.7 mSv (18.9% reduction; 95% CI, 18.0%-19.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 3.8% to 23.5%. The mean effective dose for abdominal CT decreased from 20.0 to 15.0 mSv (25.0% reduction; 95% CI, 24.3%-25.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 10.8% to 34.7%. The number of CT scans that had an effective dose measurement that exceeded benchmarks was reduced considerably by 48% and 54% for chest and abdomen, respectively. After

  2. Audit of lymphadenectomy in lung cancer resections using a specimen collection kit and checklist

    PubMed Central

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U.; Sareen, Srishti; Eke, Ransome; Yu, Xinhua; McHugh, Laura M.; Kernstine, Kemp H.; Putnam, Joe B.; Robbins, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Audits of operative summaries and pathology reports reveal wide discordance in identifying the extent of lymphadenectomy performed (the communication gap). We tested the ability of a pre-labeled lymph node specimen collection kit and checklist to narrow the communication gap between operating surgeons, pathologists, and auditors of surgeons’ operation notes. Methods We conducted a prospective single cohort study of lung cancer resections performed with a lymph node collection kit from November 2010 to January 2013. We used the kappa statistic to compare surgeon claims on a checklist of lymph node stations harvested intraoperatively, to pathology reports, and an independent audit of surgeons’ operative summaries. Lymph node collection procedures were classified into 4 groups based on the anatomic origin of resected lymph nodes: mediastinal lymph node dissection, systematic sampling, random sampling and no sampling. Results From the pathology report, 73% of 160 resections had a mediastinal lymph node dissection or systematic sampling procedure, 27% had random sampling. The concordance with surgeon claims was 80% (kappa statistic 0.69 [CI 0.60 – 0.79]). Concordance between independent audits of the operation notes and either the pathology report (kappa 0.14 [0.04 – 0.23]), or surgeon claims (kappa 0.09 [0.03 – 0.22]), was poor. Conclusion A pre-labeled specimen collection kit and checklist significantly narrowed the communication gap between surgeons and pathologists in identifying the extent of lymphadenectomy. Audit of surgeons’ operation notes did not accurately reflect the procedure performed, bringing its value for quality improvement work into question. PMID:25530090

  3. Audit of lymphadenectomy in lung cancer resections using a specimen collection kit and checklist.

    PubMed

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Sareen, Srishti; Eke, Ransome; Yu, Xinhua; McHugh, Laura M; Kernstine, Kemp H; Putnam, Joe B; Robbins, Edward T

    2015-02-01

    Audits of operative summaries and pathology reports reveal wide discordance in identifying the extent of lymphadenectomy performed (the communication gap). We tested the ability of a prelabeled lymph node specimen collection kit and checklist to narrow the communication gap between operating surgeons, pathologists, and auditors of surgeons' operation notes. We conducted a prospective single cohort study of lung cancer resections performed with a lymph node collection kit from November 2010 to January 2013. We used the kappa statistic to compare surgeon claims on a checklist of lymph node stations harvested intraoperatively with pathology reports and an independent audit of surgeons' operative summaries. Lymph node collection procedures were classified into four groups based on the anatomic origin of resected lymph nodes: mediastinal lymph node dissection, systematic sampling, random sampling, and no sampling. From the pathology reports, 73% of 160 resections had a mediastinal lymph node dissection or systematic sampling procedure, 27% had random sampling. The concordance with surgeon claims was 80% (kappa statistic 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.60 to 0.79). Concordance between independent audits of the operation notes and either the pathology report (kappa 0.14, 95% confidence interval: 0.04 to 0.23) or surgeon claims (kappa 0.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.03 to 0.22) was poor. A prelabeled specimen collection kit and checklist significantly narrowed the communication gap between surgeons and pathologists in identifying the extent of lymphadenectomy. Audit of surgeons' operation notes did not accurately reflect the procedure performed, bringing its value for quality improvement work into question. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Internal fixation of the fibula in ankle fractures: a prospective, randomized and comparative study: plating versus nailing.

    PubMed

    Asloum, Y; Bedin, B; Roger, T; Charissoux, J-L; Arnaud, J-P; Mabit, C

    2014-06-01

    Open reduction and internal plate fixation of the fibula is the gold standard treatment for ankle fractures. The aim of this study was to perform a prospective randomized study to compare bone union, complications and functional results of two types of internal fixation of the fibula (plating and the Epifisa FH intramedullary nail). Inclusion criteria were: closed fractures, isolated displaced fractures of the lateral malleolus, inter- and supra-tubercular bimalleolar fractures, and trimalleolar fractures. This study included 71 patients (mean age 53 ± 19): plate fixation group (n=35) and intramedullary nail fixation group (n=36). In seven cases, intramedullary nailing was technically impossible and was converted to plate fixation (the analysis of this sub-group was performed independently). Two patients died and two patients were lost to follow-up. The final comparative series included 32 cases of plate fixation and 28 cases of intramedullary nail fixation. Union, postoperative complications and Kitaoka and Olerud-Molander functional scores were analyzed after one year of follow-up. There was no significant difference in the rate of union (P=0.5605) between the two types of fixation. There were significantly fewer complications (7% versus 56%) and better functional scores (96 versus 82 for the Kitaoka score; 97 versus 83 for the Olerud-Molander score) with intramedullary nailing than with plate fixation. Intramedullary nailing of the lateral malleolus in non-comminuted ankle fractures without syndesmotic injury is a reproducible technique with very few complications that provides better functional results than plate fixation. II (randomized prospective study). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Feasibility of using routinely collected inpatient data to monitor quality and inform choice: a case study using the UK inflammatory bowel disease audit

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stephen E; Williams, John G; Cohen, David R; Akbari, Ashley; Groves, Sam; Button, Lori A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the utility and cost of using routinely collected inpatient data for large-scale audit. Design Comparison of audit data items collected nationally in a designed audit of inflammatory bowel disease (UK IBD audit) with routinely collected inpatient data; surveys of audit sites to compare costs. Setting National Health Service hospitals across England, Wales and Northern Ireland that participated in the UK IBD audit. Patients Patients in the UK IBD audit. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Percentage agreement between designed audit data items collected for the UK IBD audit and routine inpatient data items; costs of conducting the designed UK IBD audit and the routine data audit. Results There were very high matching rates between the designed audit data and routine data for a small subset of basic important information collected in the UK IBD audit, including mortality; major surgery; dates of admission, surgery, discharge and death; principal diagnoses; and sociodemographic patient characteristics. There were lower matching rates for other items, including source of admission, primary reason for admission, most comorbidities, colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. Routine data did not cover most detailed information collected in the UK IBD audit. Using routine data was much less costly than collecting designed audit data. Conclusion Although valuable for large population-based studies, and less costly than designed data, routine inpatient data are not suitable for the evaluation of individual patient care within a designed audit. PMID:28839601

  6. The Brazilian Audit Tribunal's role in improving the federal environmental licensing process

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Luiz Henrique; Magrini, Alessandra

    2010-02-15

    This article describes the role played by the Brazilian Audit Tribunal (Tribunal de Contas da Uniao - TCU) in the external auditing of environmental management in Brazil, highlighting the findings of an operational audit conducted in 2007 of the federal environmental licensing process. Initially, it records the constitutional and legal framework of Brazilian environmental licensing, describing the powers and duties granted to federal, state and municipal institutions. In addition, it presents the responsibilities of the TCU in the environmental area, comparing these with those of other Supreme Audit Institutions (SAI) that are members of the International Organization of Supreme Audit Institutions (INTOSAI). It also describes the work carried out in the operational audit of the Brazilian environmental licensing process and its main conclusions and recommendations. Finally, it draws a parallel between the findings and recommendations made in Brazil with those of academic studies and audits conducted in other countries.

  7. Comparative Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Medications: A National Prospective Cohort From Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Chin; Hsueh, Kuang-Chieh; Tsai, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Relative effectiveness of smoking cessation medications—varenicline, bupropion and nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)—remains unclear among smokers in real-world settings. Evidence in females and smokers with light/moderate nicotine dependence is particularly insufficient. This study compared the effectiveness of varenicline, bupropion or NRT gum relative to NRT patch, in achieving abstinence among recent quitters. Methods In a national smoking cessation program in Taiwan (2012–2015), a cohort of 11,968 participants received varenicline (n = 5,052), bupropion (n = 823), NRT gum (n = 1944) or NRT patch (n = 4,149). The 7-day, 1-month or 6-month point-prevalence was calculated based on self-reported last smoking event via telephone interview after 6 months. Logistic regression modellings estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for achieving abstinence using different modalities (NRT patch as referent). Models included age, sex, education, marital status, geographic region, smoke-years, nicotine-dependence level, medical institution, number of clinic visits and medication use duration. Analyses were further stratified by sex and dependence severity. Results Participants were predominantly male (83%) with a mean age of 43.7±12.6 years. Varenicline users were more likely than NRT patch users to achieve abstinence, based on 7-day point-prevalence (OR = 1.30, CI: 1.19–1.44), 1-month point-prevalence (OR = 1.36, CI: 1.24–1.50) or 6-month point-prevalence (OR = 1.30, CI: 1.14–1.47). Compared with NRT patch, varenicline was associated with greater odds of being abstinent in women (OR = 1.29, CI: 1.01–1.65), men (OR = 1.31, CI: 1.18–1.46), those with light/moderate dependence (OR = 1.42, CI: 1.24–1.63) or smokers with severe dependence (OR = 1.19, CI: 1.04–1.37), based on 7-day point-prevalence. Differences in effectiveness were not observed between users of bupropion, NRT gum and NRT patch. Conclusions In

  8. Prospective malaria control using entomopathogenic fungi: comparative evaluation of impact on transmission and selection for resistance.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Penelope A; Grimm, Uwe; Thomas, Matthew B; Read, Andrew F

    2012-11-22

    Chemical insecticides against adult mosquitoes are a key element in most malaria management programmes, but their efficacy is threatened by the evolution of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. By killing only older mosquitoes, entomopathogenic fungi can in principle significantly impact parasite transmission while imposing much less selection for resistance. Here an assessment is made as to which of the wide range of possible virulence characteristics for fungal biopesticides best realise this potential. With mathematical models that capture relevant timings and survival probabilities within successive feeding cycles, transmission and resistance-management metrics are used to compare susceptible and resistant mosquitoes exposed to no intervention, to conventional instant-kill interventions, and to delayed-action biopesticides with a wide range of virulence characteristics. Fungal biopesticides that generate high rates of mortality at around the time mosquitoes first become able to transmit the malaria parasite offer potential for large reductions in transmission while imposing low fitness costs. The best combinations of control and resistance management are generally accessed at high levels of coverage. Strains which have high virulence in malaria-infected mosquitoes but lower virulence in malaria-free mosquitoes offer the ultimate benefit in terms of minimizing selection pressure whilst maximizing impact on transmission. Exploiting this phenotype should be a target for product development. For indoor residual spray programmes, biopesticides may offer substantial advantages over the widely used pyrethroid-based insecticides. Not only do fungal biopesticides provide substantial resistance management gains in the long term, they may also provide greater reductions in transmission before resistance has evolved. This is because fungal spores do not have contact irritancy, reducing the chances that a blood-fed mosquito can survive an encounter and thus live long enough to

  9. Alveolar bone grafting: achieving the organisational standards determined by CSAG, a baseline audit at the Birmingham Children's Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, J.; Paterson, P.; Thorburn, G.; El-Ali, K.; Richard, B.; Hammond, M.; Wake, M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Birmingham Children's Hospital (BCH) is the centre for a regional comprehensive cleft service attempting to implement the national guidelines for minimum standards of care. A national audit of cleft management (CSAG) found that 58% of alveolar bone grafts were successful; published series suggest that success rates can be of the order of 95%. We present the results of an audit of alveolar bone grafting over a 33-month period, after implementation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective clinical process audit was taken from the hospital notes and an analysis of radiological outcome by Bergland score was obtained by two independent assessors. RESULTS: The audit highlighted the difficulties of integrating the increased clinical workload. Other difficulties included poorly standardised pre- and postoperative occlusal radiography, inconsistent orthodontic management and a lack of prospective data collection. An 81% success rate for alveolar bone grafting compares favourably to the CSAG study. Of 82 patients, 68 had sufficient data for a retrospective review; 21 were our own patients and 47 were referred into the centralised service. The success of bone grafting as defined by CSAG (including Bergland scores) is based on only two-thirds of the patients as many have their orthodontic treatment managed in more distant units and radiographs are much harder to obtain. Bone grafting later than age 11 years, was true for 28% (6/21) of our BCH patients and 46% (22/47) for those referred to our service. CONCLUSIONS: This audit demonstrates what has been achieved in a re-organised service in the context of Real Politik in the NHS and suggests the areas that require improvement. PMID:16263019

  10. Females' sampling strategy to comparatively evaluate prospective mates in the peacock blenny Salaria pavo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatello, Lisa; Rasotto, Maria B.

    2017-08-01

    Emerging evidence suggests the occurrence of comparative decision-making processes in mate choice, questioning the traditional idea of female choice based on rules of absolute preference. In such a scenario, females are expected to use a typical best-of- n sampling strategy, being able to recall previous sampled males based on memory of their quality and location. Accordingly, the quality of preferred mate is expected to be unrelated to both the number and the sequence of female visits. We found support for these predictions in the peacock blenny, Salaria pavo, a fish where females have the opportunity to evaluate the attractiveness of many males in a short time period and in a restricted spatial range. Indeed, even considering the variability in preference among females, most of them returned to previous sampled males for further evaluations; thus, the preferred male did not represent the last one in the sequence of visited males. Moreover, there was no relationship between the attractiveness of the preferred male and the number of further visits assigned to the other males. Our results suggest the occurrence of a best-of- n mate sampling strategy in the peacock blenny.

  11. Inflammatory cytokines during liver transplantation: prospective randomized trial comparing conventional and piggyback techniques.

    PubMed

    Baía, Carlos Eduardo Sandoli; Abdala, Edson; Massarollo, Paulo; Beduschi, Thiago; Palma, Thomson Marques; Mies, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines have a significant role in the response to injury following liver transplantation, but the origin and course of such molecules are not completely known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the production and liver metabolism of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), comparing the conventional and the piggyback methods. We performed a study of 30 patients who underwent elective OLT and were randomized for the conventional or piggyback techniques at the beginning of the operation. The amount of cytokines and their hepatic metabolism were calculated based on plasma concentrations and vascular blood flow at 2, 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after revascularization. The amount of IL-11 in portal blood was higher in patients who underwent surgery using the conventional technique (estimate interest = 63,783.9 +/-16,586.1 pg/min, versus 11,979.6 +/-16,585.7 pg/min in the piggyback group, p = 0.035). There were no significant differences between the two operative's methods for IL-6, IL-8, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha production. The hepatic metabolism of cytokines was not different between groups. Although all the curves showed higher amounts of cytokines with the conventional technique, these were not statistically significant. The study shows the similarity between the two techniques concerning the stimuli for the production of inflammatory molecules.

  12. Computerized tomographic simulation compared with clinical mark-up in palliative radiotherapy: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Peiman; Cheung, Fred; Pond, Gregory; Easton, Debbie; Cops, Frederick; Bezjak, Andrea; McLean, Michael; Levin, Wilfred; Billingsley, Susan; Williams, Diane; Wong, Rebecca . E-mail: Rebecca.Wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of computed tomographic (CT) planning in comparison to clinical mark-up (CM) for palliative radiation of chest wall metastases. Methods and Materials In patients treated with CM for chest wall bone metastases (without conventional simulation/fluoroscopy), two consecutive planning CT scans were acquired with and without an external marker to delineate the CM treatment field. The two sets of scans were fused for evaluation of clinical tumor volume (CTV) coverage by the CM technique. Under-coverage was defined as the proportion of CTV not covered by the CM 80% isodose. Results Twenty-one treatments (ribs 17, sternum 2, and scapula 2) formed the basis of our study. Due to technical reasons, comparable data between CM and CT plans were available for 19 treatments only. CM resulted in a mean CTV under-coverage of 36%. Eleven sites (58%) had an under-coverage of >20%. Mean volume of normal tissues receiving {>=}80% of the dose was 5.4% in CM and 9.3% in CT plans (p = 0.017). Based on dose-volume histogram comparisons, CT planning resulted in a change of treatment technique from direct apposition to a tangential pair in 7 of 19 cases. Conclusions CT planning demonstrated a 36% under-coverage of CTV with CM of ribs and chest wall metastases.

  13. Comparative prevalences of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm infections and the prospects for combined control.

    PubMed

    Booth, M; Bundy, D A

    1992-08-01

    Programmes to control Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm infections have often been targeted at each infection separately, but the advent of benign and broad-spectrum anthelmintics suggests that combined control may be feasible. The extent to which the infections co-occur in communities will determine the need for, and potential benefits of, such a combined approach. This paper examines the comparative distribution of the three geohelminths in different geographical areas and shows that A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura have closely related distributions, while hookworm infection is largely independent of the other two. These results indicate that many communities are at risk of disease from infection by more than one species of helminth. The similar distributions and epidemiological characteristics of A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura suggest that simultaneous control of these two parasites by the same strategy would be feasible and highly beneficial to communities. Multiple species control strategies which aim to control hookworm infection may require a more complicated protocol with more precise locality targeting.

  14. PROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN PROXIMAL TRANSVERSE INCISION AND THE CONVENTIONAL LONGITUDINAL INCISIONS FOR CARPAL TUNNEL RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira Alves, Marcelo de Pinho

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a pathological condition frequently seen in orthopedic consultation offices. It is most common compressive neuropathy and also the one most often treated surgically. CTS is usually diagnosed clinically, through the clinical history, physical examination (Tinel, Phalen and Durkan tests) and complementary examinations, and more specifically, nerve conduction studies. Ultrasound scans and magnetic resonance imaging may also be used. Conservative treatment is reserved for patients presenting with mild symptoms, with little incapacitation, who show good response to non-steroidal or steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy and lifestyle changes. Surgical treatment is more frequent, and a variety of techniques are used. The goal of the surgery is to decompress the carpal tunnel and, by sectioning the transverse carpal ligament, release the median nerve. The aim of this paper was to compare surgical treatment of CTS by means of a transverse mini-incision made proximally to the carpal canal, with the classic longitudinal incision over the carpal canal. The mini-incision technique was shown to be less invasive and equally effective for treating CTS, with less morbidity than with the classic longitudinal incision. PMID:27022592

  15. Individualized anterior cruciate ligament surgery: a prospective study comparing anatomic single- and double-bundle reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohsen; van Eck, Carola F; Cretnik, Andrej; Dinevski, Dejan; Fu, Freddie H

    2012-08-01

    Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has become a commonly performed procedure. However, biomechanical studies have demonstrated that conventional single-bundle ACL reconstruction techniques are only successful in limiting anterior tibial translation but less effective for restoring rotatory laxity. This study aimed to compare the results of single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction using an anatomic technique, individualized based on the patient's native ACL size. The authors hypothesized that there would be no difference between the results of anatomic single-bundle (ASB) and anatomic double-bundle (ADB) reconstruction when the surgical technique is individualized. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Depending on intraoperative measurements of the ACL insertion site size, patients were selected for either ASB (n = 32) or ADB (n = 69) ACL reconstruction. In all groups, hamstring tendons autograft was used with suspensory fixation on the femoral side and bioabsorbable interference screw fixation on the tibial side. The outcomes were evaluated by an independent blinded observer using the Lysholm score, subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) form, KT-1000 arthrometer for anteroposterior stability, and pivot-shift test for rotational stability. The average follow-up was 30 months (range, 26-34 months). There were no statistically significant differences in the baseline demographics of the 2 groups. There was no significant difference between the ADB and ASB groups for Lysholm score (93.9 vs 93.5), subjective IKDC score (93.3 vs 93.1), anterior tibial translation (1.5- vs 1.6-mm side-to-side difference), and pivot shift (92% vs 90% with negative pivot-shift examination). Anatomic double-bundle reconstruction is not superior to anatomic single-bundle reconstruction when an individualized ACL reconstruction technique is used.

  16. A prospective randomized study comparing centrifugation and sedimentation for fat grafting in breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sarfati, I; van la Parra, R F D; Terem-Rapoport, C A; Benyahi, D; Nos, C; Clough, K B

    2017-09-01

    Fat grafting is an efficient method to correct large volumetric defects after mastectomy. There is an ongoing debate regarding the best method of processing the harvested fat before fat grafting. This study aimed to introduce a new MRI model and to compare two fat processing techniques measuring the gain in soft tissue thickness after fat grafting to the chest wall. Fifty-one mastectomy patients (one double sided), who required delayed implant reconstruction, with poor skin conditions were proposed fat grafting prior to implant reconstruction. At the time of fat grafting, patients were randomly assigned to centrifugation or sedimentation of the aspirated fat. The trial was undertaken in a single-center private practice setting. The gain in soft tissue thickness of the chest wall was measured using an MRI model, with 12 predefined points for measurement. Two MRIs were performed, one prior to fat grafting and one 8 weeks thereafter. The radiologist was blinded to the fat graft processing method used. Seven cases were excluded because they did not complete their second MRI. The analyses were thus based on 44 patients (one double sided). Centrifugation was performed in 21 cases and sedimentation in 24 cases. The mean gain in soft tissue thickness was +7.0 mm in the centrifugation group and +8.8 mm in the sedimentation group (p = .268). The mean operative time was 88 min in the centrifugation group and 78 min in the sedimentation group (p = .11). There were no adverse events for any of the patients. We developed a simple and reproducible MRI model to objectively measure and evaluate different fat processing techniques prior to fat grafting. At a median time of 8 weeks after one session of fat grafting, there was no benefit of centrifugation over sedimentation. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Headache in systemic lupus erythematosus vs multiple sclerosis: a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Katsiari, Christina G; Vikelis, Michail; Paraskevopoulou, Eleftheria S; Sfikakis, Petros P; Mitsikostas, Dimos D

    2011-10-01

    To clarify whether headache, and particularly migraine, belongs to the spectrum of neurologic manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the archetypal autoimmune disease. Consecutive SLE patients were matched 1:1 for age, gender, and level of education with healthy control subjects. A representative subgroup of SLE patients were also matched with patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS), a nervous system-specific autoimmune disease. All study participants were assessed for headache present in the previous year. Anxiety, depression, and quality of life were also estimated at baseline. During the following year, all participants were assessed every 3 months using specific headache diaries. Seventy-two SLE/control pairs and 48 MS patients completed 12 months of follow-up. Prevalence of migraine, with or without aura, was similar between SLE patients (21%), MS patients (23%), and controls (22%), as was the prevalence of frequent tension-type headache. Duration and severity of migraine attacks were milder in SLE patients than controls. Only chronic tension-type headache was significantly more prevalent in SLE patients (12.5%) compared to controls (1.4%). MS patients also presented increased frequency of chronic tension-type headache (8.3%). No associations of any headache type with particular clinical manifestations, autoantibody, or disease activity, either in SLE or MS patient groups, were found. Irrespective of the presence of headache, anxiety symptoms and impaired quality of life were more frequent among SLE than MS patients or controls. Migraine should be no longer considered a neurologic manifestation of systemic or organ-specific autoimmunity. Increased migraine prevalence in these patients found in previous studies could be due to methodological weaknesses. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  18. Prospective randomized controlled trial comparing laser lithotripsy with pneumatic lithotripsy in miniperc for renal calculi.

    PubMed

    Ganesamoni, Raguram; Sabnis, Ravindra B; Mishra, Shashikant; Parekh, Narendra; Ganpule, Arvind; Vyas, Jigish B; Jagtap, Jitendra; Desai, Mahesh

    2013-12-01

    The energy source used for stone fragmentation is important in miniperc. In this study, we compared the stone fragmentation characteristics and outcomes of laser lithotripsy and pneumatic lithotripsy in miniperc for renal calculi. After Institutional Review Board approval, 60 patients undergoing miniperc for renal calculi of 15 to 30 mm were equally randomized to laser and pneumatic lithotripsy groups. Miniperc was performed using 16.5F Karl Storz miniperc sheath and a 12F nephroscope. Laser lithotripsy was performed using a 550-μm laser fiber and 30 W laser with variable settings according to the need. Pneumatic lithotripsy was performed using the EMS Swiss lithoclast. Patient demographics, stone characteristics, intraoperative parameters, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. The baseline patient demographics and stone characteristics were similar in both groups. The total operative time (P = 0.433) and fragmentation time (P=0.101) were similar between the groups. The surgeon assessed that the Likert score (1 to 5) for fragmentation was similar in both groups (2.1 ± 0.8 vs 1.9 ± 0.9, P=0.313). Stone migration was lower with the laser (1.3 ± 0.5 vs 1.7 ± 0.8, P=0.043), and fragment removal was easier with the laser (1.1 ± 0.3 vs 1.7 ± 1.1, P=0.011). The need for fragment retrieval using a basket was significantly more in the pneumatic lithotripsy group (10% vs 37%, P=0.002). The hemoglobin drop, complication rates, auxiliary procedures, postoperative pain, and stone clearance rates were similar between the groups (P>0.2). Both laser lithotripsy and pneumatic lithotripsy are equally safe and efficient stone fragmentation modalities in miniperc. Laser lithotripsy is associated with lower stone migration and easier retrieval of the smaller fragments it produces.

  19. Comparison of K-loop Molar Distalization with that of Pendulum Appliance - A Prospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Nagam Reddy; Reddy, S Rama Koteswara; Rachala, Madhukar Reddy

    2016-06-01

    Molar distalization is the non extraction method of managing Class II malocclusions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects of maxillary molar distalization with K-loop appliance, and to compare these effects with that of pendulum group. Class I and dental Class II malocclusions were divided into two groups of 15 each: In Group 1 (nine females and six males; mean age, 16.0±2.6 years) patients were treated with K-Loop molar distalization supported palatally by Nance button, while in Group 2 (seven females and eight males; mean age, 15.4±4.7 years), the patients were treated with conventional pendulum appliance. Standardized lateral cephalograms were taken at the beginning of treatment (T0) and at the end of molar distalization (T1) and the changes were statistically analyzed with paired t-test. The results showed no statistically significant difference in the amount of molar distalization in either of the appliance groups: the mean amount of molar distal movement of 5.1±0.8 mm and 4.93±1.68 mm was observed in the Group 1 and 2 respectively. The incisors moved mesially by 1.3±0.63 mm in Group 1 and 1.57±0.58 mm in Group 2. K-Loop molar distalizing appliance has similar skeletal and dentoalveolar effects as that of pendulum appliance, with the advantages of simple yet efficient to control the moment-force ratio to produce all types of tooth movements and also requires minimal patient co-operation.

  20. Enteral contrast in the computed tomography diagnosis of appendicitis: comparative effectiveness in a prospective surgical cohort.

    PubMed

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Alfonso, Rafael; Bhargava, Puneet; Cuevas, Carlos; Dighe, Manjiri K; Florence, Michael G; Johnson, Morris G; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Steele, Scott R; Symons, Rebecca Gaston; Thirlby, Richard C; Flum, David R

    2014-08-01

    Our goal was to perform a comparative effectiveness study of intravenous (IV)-only versus IV + enteral contrast in computed tomographic (CT) scans performed for patients undergoing appendectomy across a diverse group of hospitals. Small randomized trials from tertiary centers suggest that enteral contrast does not improve diagnostic performance of CT for suspected appendicitis, but generalizability has not been demonstrated. Eliminating enteral contrast may improve efficiency, patient comfort, and safety. We analyzed data for adult patients who underwent nonelective appendectomy at 56 hospitals over a 2-year period. Data were obtained directly from patient charts by trained abstractors. Multivariate logistic regression was utilized to adjust for potential confounding. The main outcome measure was concordance between final radiology interpretation and final pathology report. A total of 9047 adults underwent appendectomy and 8089 (89.4%) underwent CT, 54.1% of these with IV contrast only and 28.5% with IV + enteral contrast. Pathology findings correlated with radiographic findings in 90.0% of patients who received IV + enteral contrast and 90.4% of patients scanned with IV contrast alone. Hospitals were categorized as rural or urban and by their teaching status. Regardless of hospital type, there was no difference in concordance between IV-only and IV + enteral contrast. After adjusting for age, sex, comorbid conditions, weight, hospital type, and perforation, odds ratio of concordance for IV + enteral contrast versus IV contrast alone was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.72-1.25). Enteral contrast does not improve CT evaluation of appendicitis in patients undergoing appendectomy. These broadly generalizable results from a diverse group of hospitals suggest that enteral contrast can be eliminated in CT scans for suspected appendicitis.

  1. [Mini-laparoscopy vs. laparoscopy for the gallblader stone treatment. Prospective and comparative study].

    PubMed

    Lada, Paul Eduardo; Forez, Francisco; Janikov, Christian; Mariot, Daniela; Sanchez Tassone, Carlos; Massa, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: La colecistectomía por video-laparoscópica es considerada como el gold-standard del tratamiento de la colecistolitiasis. No obstante, en la literatura internacional sigue teniendo presencia las incisiones pequeñas adaptadas como procedimiento alternativo. Objetivos: El objetivo de este estudio es evaluar los resultados obtenidos con la video-laparoscopia (CVL) y las incisiones pequeñas adaptadas (IPA) en el tratamiento de la colecistolitiasis. Diseño: Prospectivo y comparativo protocolizado. Lugar de aplicación: Servicio de Cirugía General “Pablo Luis Mirizzi” del Hospital Nacional de Clínicas. Material y Métodos: Entre enero del 1994 y diciembre del 2011, hemos tratado quirúrgicamente 3822 pacientes con colélitiasis. En 1735 pacientes se práctico una CVL y en 2087 por IPA, configurando dos grupos, que en lo relacionado a la edad, sexo, operaciones previas y diagnóstico preoperatorio constituyen dos grupos comparables. Resultados: Ninguno de los procedimientos tuvo mortalidad. 115 casos (6,62%) fueron convertidos a cirugía abierta en la CVL. Las complicaciones postoperatorias quirúrgicas fueron del 2,40 % para la CVL y del 6,37 % para las IPA. Las causas de bilirragias fueron superiores y de mayor gravedad en la CVL, cuya incidencia fue del 0,55 % en contraposición del 0,23 % de los operados por IPA. Conclusiones: Sin duda en manos experimentadas la CVL constituye el procedimiento de elección o gold standard en el tratamiento de la colecistolitiasis. No obstante, sobretodo en ambientes o regiones con restricciones presupuestarias las IPA representa una excelente gold estándar alternativo, por ser un procedimiento seguro, muy económico y complejidad razonable con menor índice de lesiones quirúrgicas graves.

  2. Comparison of K-loop Molar Distalization with that of Pendulum Appliance - A Prospective Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shashidhar, Nagam Reddy; Reddy, S.Rama Koteswara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Molar distalization is the non extraction method of managing Class II malocclusions. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects of maxillary molar distalization with K-loop appliance, and to compare these effects with that of pendulum group. Materials and Methods Class I and dental Class II malocclusions were divided into two groups of 15 each: In Group 1 (nine females and six males; mean age, 16.0±2.6 years) patients were treated with K-Loop molar distalization supported palatally by Nance button, while in Group 2 (seven females and eight males; mean age, 15.4±4.7 years), the patients were treated with conventional pendulum appliance. Standardized lateral cephalograms were taken at the beginning of treatment (T0) and at the end of molar distalization (T1) and the changes were statistically analyzed with paired t-test. Results The results showed no statistically significant difference in the amount of molar distalization in either of the appliance groups: the mean amount of molar distal movement of 5.1±0.8 mm and 4.93±1.68 mm was observed in the Group 1 and 2 respectively. The incisors moved mesially by 1.3±0.63 mm in Group 1 and 1.57±0.58 mm in Group 2. Conclusion K-Loop molar distalizing appliance has similar skeletal and dentoalveolar effects as that of pendulum appliance, with the advantages of simple yet efficient to control the moment-force ratio to produce all types of tooth movements and also requires minimal patient co-operation. PMID:27504403

  3. Genomic Array as Compared to Karyotyping in Myelodysplastic Syndromes in a Prospective Clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian J; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; ElIdrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van der Reijden, Bert; Cremers, Eline M P; Alhan, Canan; Westers, Theresia M; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A; Chitu, Dana A; Cunha, Sonia M; Vellenga, Edo; Klein, Saskia K; Wijermans, Pierre; de Greef, Georgine E; Schaafsma, M R; Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Jansen, Joop H

    2017-02-25

    Karyotyping is considered as the gold standard in the genetic subclassification of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling is a high-resolution tool that also enables genome wide analysis. We compared karyotyping with oligo/SNP-based array profiling in 104 MDS patients from the HOVON-89 study. Oligo/SNP-array identified all cytogenetically defined genomic lesions, except for subclones in two cases and balanced translocations in three cases. On the other hand oligo/SNP-based genomic array profiling had a higher success rate, showing 55 abnormal cases, while an abnormal karyotype was found in only 35 patients. In 9 patients whose karyotyping was unsuccessful because of insufficient metaphases or failure, oligo/SNP-based array analysis was successful. Based on cytogenetic visible abnormalities as identified by oligo/SNP-based genomic array prognostic scores based on IPSS/-R were assigned. These prognostic scores were identical to the IPSS/-R scores as obtained with karyotyping in 95-96% of the patients. In addition to the detection of cytogenetically defined lesions, oligo/SNP-based genomic profiling identified focal copy number abnormalities or regions of copy neutral loss of heterozygosity that were out of the scope of karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Of interest, in 26 patients we demonstrated such cytogenetic invisible abnormalities. These abnormalities often involved regions that are recurrently affected in hematological malignancies, and may therefore be of clinical relevance. Our findings indicate that oligo/SNP-based genomic array can be used to identify the vast majority of recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities in MDS. Furthermore, oligo/SNP-based array profiling yields additional genetic abnormalities that may be of clinical importance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. [Preliminary results of DERMATEL: prospective randomized study comparing synchronous and asynchronous modalities of teledermatology].

    PubMed

    Romero, G; García, M; Vera, E; Martínez, C; Cortina, P; Sánchez, P; Guerra, A

    2006-12-01

    There is considerable variability in the results of studies that evaluate diagnostic reliability in teledermatology. There are only two studies that compare the synchronous and asynchronous modalities of teleconsult in the same sample. We present the results of the pilot project DERMATEL, a study of diagnostic concordance that aims to increase the evidence of these aspects. One-hundred-fifty.nine patients referred by the general practitioner in the first consult were randomized (algorithm 3:2:1) in three arms: asyncronous teledermatology (store-and-forward or SAF), synchronous teldermatology (real-time or VTC), and conventional consult (CC). We used high-quality, fixed digital images in all cases. The patients on the VTC teledermatology arm were also evaluated by videoconference. Finally all patients attended a face-to-face consult, considered the gold standard of patient care. A second dermatologist evaluated the diagnostic and management concordance between the teleconsults and the face-to-face consults. One-hundred.forty-seven patients completed the study as follows: 74 in the SAF teledermatology arm, 47 in the VTC teledermatology arm and 26 in the conventional consult (control group). The teledermatological (SAF and VTC) and face-to-face evaluations were identical in 100 of 121 patients (82.6%). The errors were mild in 14 cases (11.6%) and severe in 7 (5.8%). The diagnostic concordance was very high (kappa=0,813). The errors grouped by diseases were as follows: 6/54 (11%) for tumors, 10/30 (33.3%) for inflammatory conditions, 1/20 (5%) for infectious diseases, 3/12 (25%) for alopecia/acne and 1/5 (20%) for others. There were 15 errors in the SAF teledermatology arm (20.3%) and 6 in the VTC teledermatology arm (12.8%); these differences were not statistically significant (chi2 1.12; p=0.288). The reliability of dermatological teleconsult is very high, especially for tumoral or infectious diseases. The synchronous interaction with audio requires more resources

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis audit and questionnaire study: Traffic Light Poster improves adherence to protocol in gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Michaella; Jones, Stacey; Adedeji, Olufunso

    2015-07-01

    To measure adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) protocol amongst surgeons and anesthetists and explore their understanding of AP prescribing in practice. A prospective audit of AP in gastrointestinal surgery and re-audit after intervention. A questionnaire survey of practice. 58 (38%- clean; 62%- clean contaminated) operations were audited and 73 (48%-clean; 51%-clean contaminated) operations were re-audited after intervention with "Traffic Light Poster" (TFP) .55 colleagues (32 consultants and 23 trainees) were recruited for questionnaire survey in three West Midlands hospitals. Audit and Re-Audits. Only 31% of procedures followed the protocol correctly in the initial audit and this increased to 73% in the re-audit. 73% of patients undergoing clean procedures received AP inappropriately in the initial audit but reduced significantly to 20% (p < 0.002) in the re-audit. In the initial audit, 62% of clean contaminated procedures did not receive the appropriate first line AP but this fell to 35% (p < 0.05) in the re-audit. Questionnaire Survey- Only 30% of respondents would not give AP in clean surgery as recommended. 45% would use appropriate AP for clean-contaminated wounds. 73% of respondents will give AP at induction, 20% 1 h pre op and 7% just before incision. There is poor compliance with AP protocols in gastrointestinal surgery in part due to general lack of awareness. An educational intervention in the form of a 'Traffic Light Poster' improved adherence to AP protocol two fold. There was improved rationalizing of AP. Clean procedures, in particular, had less inappropriate prescribing. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Revalidation and electronic cataract surgery audit: a Scottish survey on current practice and opinion.

    PubMed

    Megaw, R; Rane-Malcolm, T; Brannan, S; Smith, R; Sanders, R

    2011-11-01

    To determine current knowledge and opinion on revalidation, and methods of cataract surgery audit in Scotland and to outline the current and future possibilities for electronic cataract surgery audit. In 2010 we conducted a prospective, cross-sectional, Scottish-wide survey on revalidation knowledge and opinion, and cataract audit practice among all senior NHS ophthalmologists. Results were anonymised and recorded manually for analysis. In all, 61% of the ophthalmologists surveyed took part. Only 33% felt ready to take part in revalidation, whereas 76% felt they did not have adequate information about the process. Also, 71% did not feel revalidation would improve patient care, but 85% agreed that cataract surgery audit is essential for ophthalmic practice. In addition, 91% audit their cataract outcomes; 52% do so continuously. Further, 63% audit their subspecialist surgical results. Only 25% audit their cataract surgery practice electronically, and only 12% collect clinical data using a hospital PAS system. Funding and system incompatibility were the main reasons cited for the lack of electronic audit setup. Currently, eight separate hospital IT patient administration systems are used across 14 health boards in Scotland. Revalidation is set to commence in 2012. The Royal College of Ophthalmologists will use cataract outcome audit as a tool to ensure surgical competency for the process. Retrospective manual auditing of cataract outcome is time consuming, and can be avoided with an electronic system. Scottish ophthalmologists view revalidation with scepticism and appear to have inadequate knowledge of the process. However, they strongly agree with the concept of cataract surgery audit. The existing and future electronic applications that may support surgical audit are commercial electronic records, web-based applications, centrally funded software applications, and robust NHS connections between community and hospital.

  7. Pulsed Compared to Thermal Radiofrequency to the Medial Calcaneal Nerve for Management of Chronic Refractory Plantar Fasciitis: A Prospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Osman, Ayman M; El-Hammady, Dina H; Kotb, Mohamed M

    2016-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) treatment is a minimally invasive procedure that has been used for more than 3 decades in treating various chronic pain syndromes. Conventional (continuous) RF treatment occasionally results in worsening or even initiating a new type of pain. The use of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF), which has a non- or minimally neurodestructive neuromodulatory effect, serves as an alternative to conventional RF therapy in many medical situations. To evaluate the effect of applying PRF for 6 minutes vs. thermal radiofrequency (TRF) for 90 seconds to the medial calcaneal nerve for treatment of chronic refractory plantar fasciitis pain. Prospective comparative study. Pain, Orthopedic, and Rheumatology and Rehabilitation Clinics of Assiut University Hospital. Twenty patients with refractory chronic bilateral plantar fasciitis received PRF to the medial calcaneal nerve for 6 minutes for one heel and TRF to the same nerve on the other heel (as their own control) for 90 seconds. Numerical verbal rating scale (NVRS) at waking up from bed and after prolonged walking, and satisfaction score were used for assessment of studied patients at one, 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks from the intervention. All studied patients showed significant improvement in their pain scale after the intervention that lasted for 24 weeks; however, the PRF heels had significantly better pain scale and satisfaction scores at the first and third weeks assessments when compared to the TRF heels. Effective analgesia was achieved after one week or less after PRF compared to 3 weeks for the TRF (P < 0.001). No randomization. PRF to the medial calcaneal nerve is a safe and effective method for treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis pain. The onset of effective analgesia can be achieved more rapidly with PRF compared to TRF on the same nerve. Further randomized trials are needed to confirm the therapeutic effect and optimizing the dose of RF needed.Key words: Pulsed radiofrequency, thermal radiofrequency, medial

  8. An audit comparing the discrepancies between a verbal enquiry, a written history, and an electronic medical history questionnaire: a suggested medical history/social history form for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Carey, Barbara; Stassen, Leo

    2011-01-01

    In everyday practice, dentists are confronted with an increasing number of patients with complex medical problems. There is divergence of opinion among dentists regarding how to obtain a thorough medical/social history. The objective of this audit is to produce a standardised medical history in order to identify the medically compromised patient attending the general dental practitioner. At present in the Dublin Dental School and Hospital, there are three different methods: a verbal enquiry, and a written or an electronic questionnaire. This study was undertaken to identify any differences or discrepancies between each of the three methods in eliciting the medical history, and to determine whether one method was superior to the others. The results are used to recommend the most accurate method for obtaining a thorough health history for practitioners, both in a hospital and a general practice setting. One hundred and fifty charts within the Dublin Dental School and Hospital of all new patients at a randomly chosen clinic were selected and then audited: 50 charts from the oral and maxillofacial surgery assessment clinics (written pro forma questionnaire), 50 from the oral medicine clinic (consultant verbal enquiry), and 50 from A&E (electronic questionnaire) were compared to determine if an adequate medical history was taken, and to detect differences and discrepancies in patients' medical histories. The records pertained to 91 females and 59 males. The age distribution was 5-87 years for females and 3-85 years for males. The mean age was 45 years for females and 42 years for males. The written patient-administered pro forma questionnaire, combined with verbal verification by the clinician/consultant, proved to be the most useful and consistent method for detecting medical problems in dental patients. The consultant verbal enquiry alone showed more inconsistency than the other two methods. Based on these results, a modified questionnaire for use within all

  9. Enhancing compliance at Department of Defense facilities: comparison of three environmental audit tools.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Jeff A; Neumann, Cathy

    2003-04-01

    To enhance environmental compliance, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) recently developed and implemented a standardized environmental audit tool called The Environmental Assessment and Management (TEAM) Guide. Utilization of a common audit tool (TEAM Guide) throughout DOD agencies could be an effective agent of positive change. If, however, the audit tool is inappropriate, environmental compliance at DOD facilities could worsen. Furthermore, existing audit systems such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Generic Protocol for Conducting Environmental Audits of Federal Facilities and the International Organization for Standardization's (ISO's) Standard 14001, "Environmental Management System Audits," may be abandoned even if they offer significant advantages over TEAM Guide audit tool. Widespread use of TEAM Guide should not take place until thorough and independent evaluation has been performed. The purpose of this paper is to compare DOD's TEAM Guide audit tool with U.S. EPA's Generic Protocol for Conducting Environmental Audits of Federal Facilities and ISO 14001, in order to assess which is most appropriate and effective for DOD facilities, and in particular those operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). USACE was selected as a result of one author's recent experience as a district environmental compliance coordinator responsible for the audit mission at this agency. Specific recommendations for enhancing the quality of environmental audits at all DOD facilities also are given.

  10. Comparison of outpatient versus inpatient transurethral prostate resection for benign prostatic hyperplasia: Comparative, prospective bi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Park, Jae Young; Shim, Ji Sung; Lee, Jeong Gu; Moon, Du Geon; Yoo, Jeong woo; Choi, Hoon; Bae, Jae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We compare the symptomatic relief with urodynamic parameter change and operative safety of the outpatient transurethral resection in saline (TURIS-V) technique with inpatient transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: This prospective cohort comparison study enrolled patients who needed BPH surgery. Between January 2010 and June 2011, outpatient TURIS-V was performed at 1 centre and the results of the treatment were compared with inpatient TURP performed at a separate hospital. Preoperative characteristics, including prostate volume, were similar in both groups. Perioperative data and any treatment complications were recorded. The analysis compared postoperative outcomes, including a 6-month postoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a quality of life (QoL) evaluation and a record of any changes in uroflowmetry findings, between the 2 groups. Results: In the TURIS-V patient group, 75 patients agreed to be in the study. Of these, 69 ultimately complete the study. In the TURP group, 76 patients agreed and 71 of these completed the study. Both study groups were well-matched for age, IPSS, QoL and uroflowmetry findings. The TURIS-V group experienced both shorter operation times (54.6 vs. 74.8 minutes) and shorter catheterization times (2.2 vs. 4.2 days) when compared to the TURP group. There were comparable improvements in the 6-month postoperative IPSS, QoL, and uroflowmetry findings between the 2 groups. There were also equally low incidence rates of procedural complications. Conclusions: Both TURIS-V and TURP relieve lower urinary tract symptoms in a similar way, with great efficacy and safety. Overall, TURIS-V had shorter operative and catheterization times compared to TURP. Notwithstanding the paper’s limitations (non- randomized cohort comparison with possible selection or surgeon bias and small heterogeneous sample size), TURIS-V can be performed safely even in

  11. Prospective comparative study of endoscopic via unilateral axillobreast approach versus open conventional total thyroidectomy in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Nam; Jung, Chan-Hee; Mok, Ji Oh; Kwak, Jung Ja; Lee, Seung Won

    2016-09-01

    Total thyroidectomy can be accomplished in one of two ways. The first is an open conventional approach, and the other is an endoscopic unilateral axillobreast approach (UABA). However, the two have not been thoroughly compared. In the study described herein, we compare the technical feasibility, safety, and surgical completeness of open versus endoscopic total thyroidectomy procedures. A total of 152 patients who underwent open (n = 102) or endoscopic (n = 50) total thyroidectomy via UABA for papillary microcarcinoma from January to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. Data were collected prospectively after obtaining informed consent. We analyzed the clinical characteristics, pathologic results, postoperative thyroglobulin (Tg) levels, and results of radioactive iodine treatment between the two groups. We conclude that endoscopic thyroidectomy resulted in a younger age, lower body mass index, longer operation time and drain maintenance, and larger drain amount. There were no significant differences with respect to gender, hospital stay, tumor size, time for central compartment neck dissection, number of harvested ipsilateral lymph nodes, or bleeding amount between groups. The proportion of extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, and bilaterality did not differ, and the surgical complication rate was similar. In addition, the postoperative stimulated and non-stimulated Tg levels did not differ significantly, nor did the thyroid bed/brain iodine uptake ratio. Based on our results, endoscopic total thyroidectomy via UABA is technically feasible and has comparable surgical completeness to open total thyroidectomy for papillary microcarcinoma within 1 cm.

  12. A prospective study comparing PlasmaKnife with bipolar dissection tonsillectomy: a preliminary communication of an emerging technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Stephens, J; Ghufoor, K; Sandhu, G

    2008-06-01

    To clinically evaluate and compare the PlasmaKnife to bipolar electrocautery in paediatric tonsillectomy. Prospective comparative non-randomised study. Central London teaching hospital with tertiary referrals. Forty-three patients aged 3-12 years with recurrent tonsillitis or obstructive adenotonsillar hypertrophy awaiting a tonsillectomy were recruited into the study. Primary outcome was throat, ear and swallowing pain scores over 2 weeks. Secondary measures included: return to normal diet, return to normal activity, analgesic requirements, operation time and intraoperative blood loss. Surgical dissection was similar between the two groups with minimal blood loss and comparable overall operative times. Median throat pain scores suggest PlasmaKnife to be less painful in the early postoperative period (at 8 h, P < 0.005) but, overall, did not quite reach statistical significance (Mann-Whitney U-test). PlasmaKnife was similar to bipolar in all other measured categories. During the study, three secondary bleeds occurred in the PlasmaKnife group and all were managed conservatively. PlasmaKnife is a safe new technology with similar outcome to the established bipolar technique. This preliminary study finds PlasmaKnife to be an interesting instrument and warrants a larger randomised study to truly evaluate the potential advantages of lowered pain and early recovery attributed to this emerging technology.

  13. A comparative study of continuous versus pulsed radiofrequency discectomy for management of low backache: Prospective randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bhagya Ranjan; Paswan, Anil; Singh, Yashpal; Loha, Sandeep; Singh, Anil Prasad; Rastogi, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiofrequency (RF) is a minimally invasive target-selective technique that has been used with success for many years in the treatment of different pathologies, such as low back pain, trigeminal neuralgia, and others. Aim: The aim of this study is to compare different mode of RF - continuous RF (CRF) versus pulsed RF (PRF) along with steroid in the management of low back pain of discogenic origin. Setting and Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blind trial. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with chronic discogenic low back pain were randomized to receive CRF plus intradiscal triamcinolone 40 mg (Group 1) or to receive PRF plus intradiscal triamcinolone 40 mg (Group 2). Outcome measured includes immediate as well as long-term pain relief using visual analog scale, the Oswestry Disability Index and straight leg raising test. Statistical Analysis: The continuous variables were compared by one-way analysis of variance test. Discrete variables were compared by Fisher's exact test/Chi-square test/Student's t-test, whichever appropriate. The value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: There was a significant decrease in pain score after CRF without any added side effect. Pain relief after PRF was insignificant. Conclusion: CRF with steroid seems to be better for treatment of chronic discogenic low back pain than PRF with steroid. PMID:27746559

  14. Criteria for internal auditing.

    PubMed

    Holder, W W; Clay, R J

    1979-01-01

    An effective, inclusive internal auditing endeavor should help assure hospital managements that (1) an adequate system of internal control exists to assure the safeguarding of assets and the reliability of data produced by the financial information system, (2) uneconomic operating practices are detected promptly so they can be remedied, and (3) program results and effectiveness levels are of sufficiently high quality to demonstrate managerial competence.

  15. Audit Plan FY 2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-27

    of accountability and transactions submitted to the U . S . Treasury. Expenditure reporting performed by DFAS Indianapolis is critical to the accuracy...determine whether the retirement, health, and life insurance withholdings and employee headcount data submitted by DoD, and other Government agencies for...Withholding Data (D2004FH-0046) The overall audit objective was to determine whether the retirement, health, and life insurance withholdings and

  16. An audit of medicolegal conferencing.

    PubMed

    Pringle, R G

    2003-09-01

    In the English civil justice system, experts involved in a case are now commonly required to confer before the hearing and identify the areas of agreement and disagreement. A prospective study of 50 consecutive medicolegal conferences of experts was undertaken, with a view to defining their benefits, weaknesses and the optimum conference format. A record was kept of the dates of first instruction, court deadlines, and date, time and duration of conferences, together with related calls and correspondence. The manner of preparation of the statement was noted, the level of agreement/disagreement, any compromise, any later modifications of the draft, and the author's fees. Subsequently the instructing solicitors were asked to comment on the suitability of the joint statement and its contribution to settlement. Medicolegal conferencing is time-consuming and expensive. It may be of limited value where there is little or no difference of opinion, either between experts in a single field or between experts in different fields. The instructing solicitors must ensure that the participants receive, in advance of the conference, copies of all relevant documents including medical reports and medical records. An agenda is helpful in ensuring that matters of importance are not overlooked. Conferences are more effective when held in person than when conducted by telephone. The joint statement is best dictated in the presence of all participants during or after the conference. To ensure the most efficient and economical use of consultant time a formal combined audit of conferencing should be undertaken by the medical and legal professions.

  17. Audit on complicated diverticular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, A. A.; Keighley, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-three patients were seen between 1970 and 1983 with complicated diverticular disease. There were only six hospital deaths (8%). Two out of 7 patients with faecal peritonitis died, 2 of 27 patients with purulent peritonitis died and there was one death each associated with an inflammatory mass and a peridiverticular abscess. Five of the six hospital deaths were from cardiorespiratory disease and only one was from sepsis. Three of the early deaths were in patients who were receiving steroid therapy. There were three late deaths: one from uncontrolled sepsis, one an anaesthetic death from coronary occlusion during revision of a Hartmann operation and the third was an incidental myocardial infarction. A very conservative surgical policy was adopted, primary resection only being used for an inflammatory mass and selectively for fistula and local purulent disease. Despite our apparent low hospital mortality there was a high incidence of complication; wound sepsis 29%, fistula after colostomy closure 12% and anastomotic dehiscence after primary or secondary reconstruction 12%. These findings indicate the need for a prospective audit which is now in progress. PMID:3947025

  18. Public Perception and School District Audits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkybile, Sharon; Goodman, Jon

    1999-01-01

    School districts are subject to many audits each year. Offers a guide to school district business officials on managing their various audits effectively to maximize the benefits of each audit and minimize public-image damage and disruption. (MLF)

  19. Auditing the Records of Student-Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Robert O.; Hedden, Carole R.

    1985-01-01

    A 1985 survey showed that NCAA members favored mandating annual audits of athletics budgets by institutional or independent auditors. Development of Tennessee's internal audit system is described, and its internal audit procedures is outlined. (MLW)

  20. Auditing the Records of Student-Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Robert O.; Hedden, Carole R.

    1985-01-01

    A 1985 survey showed that NCAA members favored mandating annual audits of athletics budgets by institutional or independent auditors. Development of Tennessee's internal audit system is described, and its internal audit procedures is outlined. (MLW)

  1. 7 CFR 1291.11 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Act applies to an eligible grantee, the State shall submit the annual audit results to AMS within 30... shall submit to AMS not later than 30 days after completion of the audit, a copy of the audit results....

  2. 7 CFR 4284.18 - Audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Grant Programs § 4284.18 Audit requirements. Grantees must comply with the audit requirements of 7 CFR part 3052. The audit requirements apply to the years in which grant funds are received and years in...

  3. The ICA Communication Audit: Process, Status, Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Gerald M.; Krivonos, Paul D.

    1977-01-01

    Explores the International Communication Association (ICA) Audit process including goals, products, instruments, audit logistics and timetable, feedback of results and follow-up, costs, current status and audits conducted to date. (ED.)

  4. A prospective study comparing endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy plus immediate reconstruction with implants and breast conserving surgery for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin-Jun; Jiang, Jun; Yang, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xing-Gang; Chen, Xian-Chun; Zhong, Ling

    2009-12-20

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) has been the standard surgical procedure for the treatment of early breast cancer. Endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy (ESM) plus immediate reconstruction with implants is an emerging procedure. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of these two surgical procedures in our clinical setting. From March 2004 to October 2007, 43 patients with breast cancer underwent ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants, while 54 patients underwent BCS. The clinical and pathological characteristics, surgical safety, and therapeutic effects were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in the age, clinical stage, histopathologic type of tumor, operative blood loss, postoperative drainage time, and postoperative complications between the two groups (P > 0.05). The postoperative complications were partial necrosis of the nipple and superficial skin flap in the ESM patients, and hydrops in the axilla and residual cavity in the BCS patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of satisfactory postoperative cosmetic outcomes between the ESM (88.4%, 38/43) and BCS (92.6%, 50/54) patients (P > 0.05). During follow-up of 6 months to 4 years, all patients treated with ESM were disease-free, but 3 patients who underwent BCS had metastasis or recurrence -one of these patients died of multiple organ metastasis. After considering the wide indications for use, high surgical safety, and favorable cosmetic outcomes, we conclude that ESM plus axillary lymph node dissection and immediate reconstruction with implants - the new surgery of choice for breast cancer - warrants serious consideration as the prospective next standard surgical procedure.

  5. A prospective randomized comparative trial between open subinguinal and loupe assisted subinguinal varicocelectome: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Hari Gopal; Bhandari, Vimal; Kumar, Anup; Nanda, Biswajit; Singh, Harbinder; Bhowmick, Subroto

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In our study, we reviewed efficacy and complication rates of open subinguinal varicocelectomy (OSV) and loupe assisted subinguinal varicocelectomy (LASV) using seminal and hormonal parameters in a prospective randomized study. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 60 males with Grade 2 and Grade 3 varicocele. Thirty patients underwent OSV and the other 30 patients underwent LASV. Intra-operative and post-operative complications along with pre-operative and post-operative seminal, hormonal parameters and testicular volume were compared between the groups. Results: Sperm count, motility and morphology increased significantly in both groups, but the improvement was significantly better in LASV group. (Group A – improvement in sperm count, motility and morphology by 25%, 8.5%, 10.3%, respectively and in Group B – improvement in sperm count, motility and morphology by 110%, 68.59%, 71.1%, respectively. Decrease in serum follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and increase in serum testosterone were significant in both groups, but the improvement was significantly better in LASV group. (Group A – serum FSH and LH decreased by 17.2%, 23%, respectively and serum testosterone increased by 13.7% and in Group B – serum FSH and LH decreased by 56.9%, 56.65%, respectively and serum testosterone increased by 95.9%). The recurrence (OSV = 13.2% and LASV = 0, P = 0.01) and complication rates were significantly lower in LASV group. Conclusion: Our study shows that LASV is significantly better than OSV regarding efficacy and complication rates. PMID:28216922

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging–Guided versus Surrogate-Based Motion Tracking in Liver Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Paganelli, Chiara; Seregni, Matteo; Fattori, Giovanni; Summers, Paul; Bellomi, Massimo; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: This study applied automatic feature detection on cine–magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) liver images in order to provide a prospective comparison between MRI-guided and surrogate-based tracking methods for motion-compensated liver radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In a population of 30 subjects (5 volunteers plus 25 patients), 2 oblique sagittal slices were acquired across the liver at high temporal resolution. An algorithm based on scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) was used to extract and track multiple features throughout the image sequence. The position of abdominal markers was also measured directly from the image series, and the internal motion of each feature was quantified through multiparametric analysis. Surrogate-based tumor tracking with a state-of-the-art external/internal correlation model was simulated. The geometrical tracking error was measured, and its correlation with external motion parameters was also investigated. Finally, the potential gain in tracking accuracy relying on MRI guidance was quantified as a function of the maximum allowed tracking error. Results: An average of 45 features was extracted for each subject across the whole liver. The multi-parametric motion analysis reported relevant inter- and intrasubject variability, highlighting the value of patient-specific and spatially-distributed measurements. Surrogate-based tracking errors (relative to the motion amplitude) were were in the range 7% to 23% (1.02-3.57mm) and were significantly influenced by external motion parameters. The gain of MRI guidance compared to surrogate-based motion tracking was larger than 30% in 50% of the subjects when considering a 1.5-mm tracking error tolerance. Conclusions: Automatic feature detection applied to cine-MRI allows detailed liver motion description to be obtained. Such information was used to quantify the performance of surrogate-based tracking methods and to provide a prospective comparison with respect to MRI

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Efficacy of Physics Forceps versus Conventional Forceps in Orthodontic Extractions: A Prospective Randomized Split Mouth Study

    PubMed Central

    Managutti, Anil M; Menat, Shailesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Shah, Dishan; Patel, Jigar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tooth extraction is one of the most commonly performed procedures in dentistry. It is usually a traumatic procedure often resulting in immediate destruction and loss of alveolar bone and surrounding soft tissues. Various instruments have been described to perform atraumatic extractions which can prevent damage to the paradental structures. Recently developed physics forceps is one of the instruments which is claimed to perform atraumatic extractions. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of physics forceps with conventional forceps in terms of operating time, prevention of marginal bone loss & soft tissue loss, postoperative pain and postoperative complications following bilateral premolar extractions for orthodontic purpose. Materials and Methods In this prospective split-mouth study, outcomes of the 2 groups (n = 42 premolars) requiring extraction of premolars for orthodontic treatment purpose using Physics forceps and Conventional forceps were compared. Clinical outcomes in form of time taken, loss of buccal soft tissue and buccal cortical plate based on extraction defect classification system, postoperative pain and other complication associated with extraction were recorded and compared. Results Statistically significant reduction in the operating time was noted in physics forceps group. Marginal bone loss and soft tissue loss was also significantly lesser in physics forceps group when compared to conventional forceps group. However, there was no statistically significant difference in severity of postoperative pain between both groups. Conclusion The results of the present study suggest that physics forceps was more efficient in reducing operating time and prevention of marginal bone loss & soft tissue loss when compared to conventional forceps in orthodontically indicated premolar extractions. PMID:27630951

  8. A Prospective Randomized Study Comparing Mini-surgical Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy With Surgical and Classical Percutaneous Tracheostomy

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad-Reza; Digaleh, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) is more accessible and less time-demanding compared with surgical tracheostomy (ST), it has its own limitations. We introduced a modified PDT technique and brought some surgical knowledge to the bedside to overcome some standard percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy relative contraindications. PDT uses a blind route of tracheal access that usually requires perioperational imaging guidance to protect accidental injuries. Moreover, there are contraindications in certain cases, limiting widespread PDT application. Different PDT modifications and devices have been represented to address the problem; however, these approaches are not generally popular among professionals due to limited accessibility and/or other reasons. We prospectively analyzed the double-blinded trial, patient and nurse head evaluating the complications, and collected data from 360 patients who underwent PDT, ST, or our modified mini-surgical PDT (msPDT, Hashemian method). These patients were divided into 2 groups—contraindicated to PDT—and randomization was done for msPDT or PDT in PDT-indicated group and msPDT or ST for PDT-contraindicated patients. The cases were compared in terms of pre and postoperational complications. Data analysis demonstrated that the mean value of procedural time was significantly lower in the msPDT group, either compared with the standard PDT or the ST group. Paratracheal insertion, intraprocedural hypoxemia, and bleeding were also significantly lower in the msPDT group compared with the standard PDT group. Other complications were not significantly different between msPDT and ST patients. The introduced msPDT represented a semiopen incision, other than blinded PDT route of tracheal access that allowed proceduralist to withdraw bronchoscopy and reduced the total time of procedure. Interestingly, the most important improvement was performing msPDT on PDT-contraindicated patients with the complication rate

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Efficacy of Physics Forceps versus Conventional Forceps in Orthodontic Extractions: A Prospective Randomized Split Mouth Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harsh S; Managutti, Anil M; Menat, Shailesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Shah, Dishan; Patel, Jigar

    2016-07-01

    Tooth extraction is one of the most commonly performed procedures in dentistry. It is usually a traumatic procedure often resulting in immediate destruction and loss of alveolar bone and surrounding soft tissues. Various instruments have been described to perform atraumatic extractions which can prevent damage to the paradental structures. Recently developed physics forceps is one of the instruments which is claimed to perform atraumatic extractions. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of physics forceps with conventional forceps in terms of operating time, prevention of marginal bone loss & soft tissue loss, postoperative pain and postoperative complications following bilateral premolar extractions for orthodontic purpose. In this prospective split-mouth study, outcomes of the 2 groups (n = 42 premolars) requiring extraction of premolars for orthodontic treatment purpose using Physics forceps and Conventional forceps were compared. Clinical outcomes in form of time taken, loss of buccal soft tissue and buccal cortical plate based on extraction defect classification system, postoperative pain and other complication associated with extraction were recorded and compared. Statistically significant reduction in the operating time was noted in physics forceps group. Marginal bone loss and soft tissue loss was also significantly lesser in physics forceps group when compared to conventional forceps group. However, there was no statistically significant difference in severity of postoperative pain between both groups. The results of the present study suggest that physics forceps was more efficient in reducing operating time and prevention of marginal bone loss & soft tissue loss when compared to conventional forceps in orthodontically indicated premolar extractions.

  10. Using Google Earth to conduct a neighborhood audit: reliability of a virtual audit instrument.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Philippa; Ailshire, Jennifer; Melendez, Robert; Bader, Michael; Morenoff, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    Over the last two decades, the impact of community characteristics on the physical and mental health of residents has emerged as an important frontier of research in population health and health disparities. However, the development and evaluation of measures to capture community characteristics is still at a relatively early stage. The purpose of this work was to assess the reliability of a neighborhood audit instrument administered in the city of Chicago using Google Street View by comparing these "virtual" data to those obtained from an identical instrument administered "in-person". We find that a virtual audit instrument can provide reliable indicators of recreational facilities, the local food environment, and general land use. However, caution should be exercised when trying to gather more finely detailed observations. Using the internet to conduct a neighborhood audit has the potential to significantly reduce the costs of collecting data objectively and unobtrusively.

  11. Using Google Earth to Conduct a Neighborhood Audit: Reliability of a Virtual Audit Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Philippa; Ailshire, Jennifer; Melendez, Robert; Bader, Michael; Morenoff, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the impact of community characteristics on the physical and mental health of residents has emerged as an important frontier of research in population health and health disparities. However, the development and evaluation of measures to capture community characteristics is still at a relatively early stage. The purpose of this work was to assess the reliability of a neighborhood audit instrument administered in the city of Chicago using Google Street View by comparing these “virtual” data to those obtained from an identical instrument administered “in person”. We find that a virtual audit instrument can provide reliable indicators of recreational facilities, the local food environment, and general land use. However, caution should be exercised when trying to gather more finely detailed observations. Using the Internet to conduct a neighborhood audit has the potential to significantly reduce the costs of collecting data objectively and unobtrusively. PMID:20797897

  12. Inventory auditing: a manufacturing perspective.

    PubMed

    Swartley, J A; Hall, J D

    1990-08-01

    Despite the mystery that usually surrounds the annual audit program, its plan is easy to understand if you learn the basic concerns of the auditor. A five-step inventory audit plan usually consists of proving that the inventory exists, is completely represented, belongs to the firm, is properly valued, and is properly classified. To develop the inventory audit plan, an auditor must verify a firm's system of internal controls, in addition to verifying management's financial assertions by obtaining evidence about them. The time, cost, and frequency of the inventory audit with even the best plans may vary because of changing factors.

  13. Statistical auditing of toxicology reports.

    PubMed

    Deaton, R R; Obenchain, R L

    1994-06-01

    Statistical auditing is a new report review process used by the quality assurance unit at Eli Lilly and Co. Statistical auditing allows the auditor to review the process by which the report was generated, as opposed to the process by which the data was generated. We have the flexibility to use different sampling techniques and still obtain thorough coverage of the report data. By properly implementing our auditing process, we can work smarter rather than harder and continue to help our customers increase the quality of their products (reports). Statistical auditing is helping our quality assurance unit meet our customers' need, while maintaining or increasing the quality of our regulatory obligations.

  14. Outcome of Large to Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Repaired With and Without Extracellular Matrix Augmentation: A Prospective Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Gilot, Gregory J; Alvarez-Pinzon, Andres M; Barcksdale, Leticia; Westerdahl, David; Krill, Michael; Peck, Evan

    2015-08-01

    To compare the results of arthroscopic repair of large to massive rotator cuff tears (RCTs) with or without augmentation using an extracellular matrix (ECM) graft and to present ECM graft augmentation as a valuable surgical alternative used for biomechanical reinforcement in any RCT repair. We performed a prospective, blinded, single-center, comparative study of patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a large to massive RCT with or without augmentation with ECM graft. The primary outcome was assessed by the presence or absence of a retear of the previously repaired rotator cuff, as noted on ultrasound examination. The secondary outcomes were patient satisfaction evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using the 12-item Short Form Health Survey, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder outcome score, a visual analog scale score, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index, and a shoulder activity level survey. We enrolled 35 patients in the study: 20 in the ECM-augmented rotator cuff repair group and 15 in the control group. The follow-up period ranged from 22 to 26 months, with a mean of 24.9 months. There was a significant difference between the groups in terms of the incidence of retears: 26% (4 retears) in the control group and 10% (2 retears) in the ECM graft group (P = .0483). The mean pain level decreased from 6.9 to 4.1 in the control group and from 6.8 to 0.9 in the ECM graft group (P = .024). The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score improved from 62.1 to 72.6 points in the control group and from 63.8 to 88.9 points (P = .02) in the treatment group. The mean Short Form 12 scores improved in the 2 groups, with a statistically significant difference favoring graft augmentation (P = .031), and correspondingly, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index scores improved in both arms, favoring the treatment group (P = .0412). The use of ECM for augmentation of arthroscopic repairs of large to massive RCTs reduces the incidence of retears

  15. A prospective randomized study of a dental appliance compared with uvulopalatopharyngoplasty in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsson, B; Tegelberg, A; Walker-Engström, M L; Ringqvist, M; Andersson, L; Krekmanov, L; Ringqvist, I

    1999-01-01

    The enthusiasm for uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) has declined in recent years, partly because of a lower success rate over time and partly because of adverse effects. Reports on the beneficial effects of dental appliances exist, but only one prospective randomized study has been published comparing dental appliances with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. No study has been published comparing dental appliance treatment with UPPP. Ninety-five male patients with confirmed OSA, subjective daytime sleepiness and an apnoea index (AI) > 5 were randomized for subsequent treatment with either a dental appliance or UPPP. There were 49 patients in the dental appliance group and 46 in the UPPP group. Thirty-seven patients in the dental appliance group and 43 in the UPPP group completed the 12-month follow-up. The success rate (rate of patients with at least a 50% reduction in AI) for the dental appliance group was 95%, which was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than the 70% success rate for the UPPP group. According to the criteria for OSA (apnoea index > or = 5 or apnoea/hypopnoea index > or = 10), 78% of the dental appliance group and 51% of the UPPP group were normalized after 12 months. The difference between the groups was significant (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that the dental appliance technique is useful in the treatment of mild to moderate OSA.

  16. Do partial thickness, bursal side cuff tears affect outcome following arthroscopic subacromial decompression? A prospective comparative cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maiyah, Mohammed; Goodchild, Lorna; Fourie, J M Brendan; Finn, Paul; Rangan, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to compare medium-term clinical outcomes of patients following arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASAD): those with intact rotator cuff with two groups of increasing size of partial thickness bursal-side tears. Methods: Patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy by a single surgeon had pre- and postoperative Constant scores prospectively recorded. Arthroscopic surgery included the assessment of any supraspinatus tears using the Ellman criteria, as well as ASAD and cuff debridement. Groups were created based on the status of rotator cuff and size of bursal tear. Outcome in these patient groups was then compared and analyzed Results: Seventy-four patients were suitable for inclusion in the study: 32 patients without a cuff tear; 21 patients with a cuff tear of 9 mm or less in length; and 21 patients with a cuff tear of 10 mm or more in length. Baseline characteristics of the three groups were similar. All three groups showed a significant improvement in their Constant scores following surgery. There was, however, no significant difference in Constant scores between the three groups. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that patients with varying sizes of bursal-side tears respond to ASAD as well as those with no rotator cuff tear. PMID:27582953

  17. Online assessment of ALS functional rating scale compares well to in-clinic evaluation: A prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Maier, André; Holm, Teresa; Wicks, Paul; Steinfurth, Laura; Linke, Peter; Münch, Christoph; Meyer, Robert; Meyer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Self-assessment of symptom progression in chronic diseases is of increasing importance in clinical research, patient management and specialized outpatient care. Against this background, we developed a secure internet platform (ALShome.de) that allows online assessment of the revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and other established self-assessment questionnaires. We developed a secure and closed internet portal to assess patient reported outcomes. In a prospective, controlled and stratified study, patients conducted a web-based self-assessment of ALSFRS-R compared to on-site assessment. On-site and online assessments were compared at baseline (n = 127) and after 3.5 months (n = 81, 64%). Results showed that correlation between on-site evaluation and online testing of ALSFRS-R was highly significant (r = 0.96; p < 0.001). The agreement of both capturing methods (online vs. on-site) was excellent (mean interval, 8.8 days). The adherence to online rating was high; 75% of patients tested on-site completed a follow-up online visit (mean 3.5 months, SD 1.7). We conclude that online self-assessment of ALS severity complements the well-established face-to-face application of the ALSFRS-R during on-site visits. The results of our study support the use of online administration of ALSFRS-R within clinical trials and for managing the care of ALS patients. PMID:22292842

  18. Randomized Prospective Study of Endoscopic Rubber Band Ligation Compared With Bipolar Coagulation for Chronically Bleeding Internal Hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Jutabha, Rome; Jensen, Dennis M.; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our purpose was to compare the efficacy, complications, success rate, recurrence rate at 1 year, and crossovers of rubber band ligation (RBL) with those of bipolar electrocoagulation (BPEC) treatment for chronically bleeding internal hemorrhoids. METHODS: A total of 45 patients of mean age 51.5 years, who had rectal bleeding from grade II or III hemorrhoids and in whom intensive medical therapy failed, were randomized in a prospective study comparing RBL with BPEC. Treatment failure was predefined as continued bleeding, occurrence of a major complication, or failure to reduce the size of all internal hemorrhoidal segments to grade I in ≤ 3 treatments. Patients were followed up for 1 year. RESULTS: With similar patients, rectal bleeding and other symptoms were controlled with significantly fewer treatments of RBL than of BPEC (2.3±0.2 vs. 3.8±0.4, P < 0.05), and RBL had a significantly higher success rate (92% vs. 62%, P< 0.05). RBL had more cases of severe pain during treatment (8% vs. 0%, P> 0.05), but significantly fewer failures and crossovers (8% vs. 38%). Symptomatic recurrence at 1 year was 10% RBL and 15% BPEC. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with chronically bleeding grade II or III internal hemorrhoids that are unresponsive to medical therapy, safety and complication rates of banding and BPEC were similar. The success rate was significantly higher with RBL than with BPEC. Symptom recurrence rates at 1 year were similar. PMID:19513028

  19. Cognitive behavioral therapy for somatic symptom disorders in later life: a prospective comparative explorative pilot study in two clinical populations.

    PubMed

    Verdurmen, Michelle Jh; Videler, Arjan C; Kamperman, Astrid M; Khasho, David; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2017-01-01

    Elderly patients with somatic symptom disorder (SSD) put a great burden on the health care delivery system. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective in adults with SSD. However, no studies have been conducted yet into CBT for SSD in later life. We explored the feasibility of CBT for SSD in the elderly. This is a prospective pilot study comparing two outpatient specialty mental health settings for adults (<60 years; n=13) and for elderly patients (≥60 years; n=9) with SSD. Intervention was 18 structured, protocoled, and supervised CBT sessions. Outcomes were somatic symptoms, pain intensity, pain disability, quality of life, depressive symptoms, and generalized anxiety symptoms. Feasibility of the CBT intervention was explored with self-developed questions, both for the therapists and the patients. Both therapists and elderly patients evaluated the treatment as positive. Somatic symptoms improved significantly in the adult group but not in the elderly group. There was a large, significant decrease in pain intensity and pain disability in elderly patients compared to the adults. Social functioning, vitality, and anxiety symptoms improved significantly in the adults. Presence of chronic medical conditions did not influence these results. This study shows that CBT is feasible as a treatment for SSD in older adults and has encouraging results. Replication in an RCT is warranted.

  20. A prospective clinical study comparing MI-TLIF with unilateral versus bilateral transpedicular fixation in low grade lumbar spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Sánchez, José-Antonio; Soriano-Solis, Sergio; Soriano-Lopez, Miroslava-Elizabeth; Covarrubias-Rosas, Claudia-Angélica; Quillo-Reséndiz, Javier; Gutiérrez-Partida, Carlos-Francisco; Rodríguez-García, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) has become one of the standard techniques for approaching ipsilateral decompression, anterior column fusion, and posterior stabilization. This procedure is usually accompanied by the placement of bilateral transpedicular screws in the corresponding segment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of unilateral screw fixation compared with bilateral fixation in patients diagnosed with low-grade symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis who underwent an MI-TLIF technique. Methods A prospective and comparative study was performed in 67 patients with grade 1 symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis. The sample was allocated on both unilateral fixation group (n=33) and bilateral fixation group (n=34). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg and back pain, and Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), preoperatively, and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Changes over time and differences between the groups were analyzed. Statistical analyses included: Friedman test, Student’s t-test and Mann-Whitney’s U. A two-tailed P value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results During 1-year of evaluation there were no significant clinical differences between both groups. Conclusions Patients with grade 1 symptomatic lumbar spondylolisthesis treated with MI-TLIF with unilateral screw fixation had similar clinical results than those treated with bilateral fixation at 12 months postoperatively. PMID:28435913

  1. Endotracheal intubation using the C-MAC® video laryngoscope or the Macintosh laryngoscope: A prospective, comparative study in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endotracheal intubation in the ICU is a challenging procedure and is frequently associated with life-threatening complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the C-MAC® video laryngoscope on laryngeal view and intubation success compared with direct laryngoscopy. Methods In a single-center, prospective, comparative before-after study in an anesthetist-lead surgical ICU of a tertiary university hospital, predictors of potentially difficult tracheal intubation, number of intubation attempts, success rate and glottic view were evaluated during a 2-year study period (first year, Macintosh laryngoscopy (ML); second year, C-MAC®). Results A total of 274 critically ill patients requiring endotracheal intubation were included; 113 intubations using ML and 117 intubations using the C-MAC® were assessed. In patients with at least one predictor for difficult intubation, the C-MAC® resulted in more successful intubations on first attempt compared with ML (34/43, 79% vs. 21/38, 55%; P = 0.03). The visualization of the glottis with ML using Cormack and Lehane (C&L) grading was more frequently rated as difficult (20%, C&L grade 3 and 4) compared with the C-MAC® (7%, C&L grade 3 and 4) (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Use of the C-MAC® video laryngoscope improved laryngeal imaging and improved the intubating success rate on the first attempt in patients with predictors for difficult intubation in the ICU setting. Video laryngoscopy seems to be a useful tool in the ICU where potentially difficult endotracheal intubations regularly occur. PMID:22695007

  2. A prospective cohort study comparing the reactogenicity of trivalent influenza vaccine in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Regan, Annette K; Tracey, Lauren; Blyth, Christopher C; Mak, Donna B; Richmond, Peter C; Shellam, Geoffrey; Talbot, Caroline; Effler, Paul V

    2015-03-18

    Influenza vaccination during pregnancy can prevent serious illness in expectant mothers and provide protection to newborns; however, historically uptake has been limited due to a number of factors, including safety concerns. Symptomatic complaints are common during pregnancy and may be mistakenly associated with reactions to trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). To investigate this, we compared post-vaccination events self-reported by pregnant women to events reported by non-pregnant women receiving TIV. A prospective cohort of 1,086 pregnant women and 314 non-pregnant female healthcare workers (HCWs) who received TIV between March-May 2014 were followed-up seven days post-vaccination to assess local and systemic adverse events following immunisation (AEFIs). Women were surveyed by text message regarding perceived reactions to TIV. Those reporting an AEFI completed an interview by telephone or mobile phone to ascertain details. Logistic regression models adjusting for age and residence were used to compare reactions reported by pregnant women and non-pregnant HCWs. Similar proportions of pregnant women and non-pregnant, female HCWs reported ≥1 reaction following vaccination with TIV (13.0% and 17.3%, respectively; OR = 1.2 [95% CI: 0.8-1.8]). Non-pregnant, female HCWs were more likely to report fever or headache compared to pregnant women (OR: 4.6 [95% CI 2.1-10.3] and OR: 2.2 [95% CI 1.0-4.6], respectively). No other significant differences in reported symptoms were observed. No serious vaccine-associated adverse events were reported, and less than 2% of each group sought medical advice for a reaction. We found no evidence suggesting pregnant women are more likely to report adverse events following influenza vaccination when compared to non-pregnant female HCWs of similar age, and in some cases, pregnant women reported significantly fewer adverse events. These results further support the safety of TIV administered in pregnant women.

  3. Endotracheal intubation using the C-MAC® video laryngoscope or the Macintosh laryngoscope: a prospective, comparative study in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Noppens, Ruediger R; Geimer, Stephanie; Eisel, Nicole; David, Matthias; Piepho, Tim

    2012-06-13

    Endotracheal intubation in the ICU is a challenging procedure and is frequently associated with life-threatening complications. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the C-MAC® video laryngoscope on laryngeal view and intubation success compared with direct laryngoscopy. In a single-center, prospective, comparative before-after study in an anesthetist-lead surgical ICU of a tertiary university hospital, predictors of potentially difficult tracheal intubation, number of intubation attempts, success rate and glottic view were evaluated during a 2-year study period (first year, Macintosh laryngoscopy (ML); second year, C-MAC®). A total of 274 critically ill patients requiring endotracheal intubation were included; 113 intubations using ML and 117 intubations using the C-MAC® were assessed. In patients with at least one predictor for difficult intubation, the C-MAC® resulted in more successful intubations on first attempt compared with ML (34/43, 79% vs. 21/38, 55%; P = 0.03). The visualization of the glottis with ML using Cormack and Lehane (C&L) grading was more frequently rated as difficult (20%, C&L grade 3 and 4) compared with the C-MAC® (7%, C&L grade 3 and 4) (P < 0.0001). Use of the C-MAC® video laryngoscope improved laryngeal imaging and improved the intubating success rate on the first attempt in patients with predictors for difficult intubation in the ICU setting. Video laryngoscopy seems to be a useful tool in the ICU where potentially difficult endotracheal intubations regularly occur.

  4. A Comparative Analysis of the English-Language Accent Preferences of Prospective and Practicing Businesspersons from around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James C.; Green, Diana J.; Blaszczynski, Carol; Rosewarne, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Problem: The studies of the English-language accent preferences of prospective and practicing businesspersons from around the world have not been integrated. Research Questions: What are the English-language accent preferences of prospective and practicing businesspersons from around the world, and how are those preferences influenced by the…

  5. A Comparative Analysis of the English-Language Accent Preferences of Prospective and Practicing Businesspersons from around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James C.; Green, Diana J.; Blaszczynski, Carol; Rosewarne, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Problem: The studies of the English-language accent preferences of prospective and practicing businesspersons from around the world have not been integrated. Research Questions: What are the English-language accent preferences of prospective and practicing businesspersons from around the world, and how are those preferences influenced by the…

  6. NEVER AUDIT ALONE--THE CASE FOR AUDIT TEAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-site audits conducted by technical and quality assurance (QA) experts at the data-gathering location are the core of an effective QA program. However, inadequate resources for such audits are the bane of a QA program, and the proposed solution frequently is to send only one au...

  7. NEVER AUDIT ALONE--THE CASE FOR AUDIT TEAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-site audits conducted by technical and quality assurance (QA) experts at the data-gathering location are the core of an effective QA program. However, inadequate resources for such audits are the bane of a QA program, and the proposed solution frequently is to send only one au...

  8. DCAA Audits: Widespread Problems with Audit Quality Require Significant Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    GAO United States Government Accountability Office Report to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs...U.S. Senate DCAA AUDITS Widespread Problems with Audit Quality Require Significant Reform September 2009 GAO-09-468 Report ...Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response

  9. A prospective comparative study of microscope-integrated intraoperative fluorescein and indocyanine videoangiography for clip ligation of complex cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lane, Brandon; Bohnstedt, Bradley N; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2015-03-01

    The authors prospectively analyzed 2 microscope-integrated videoangiography techniques using intravenous indocyanine green (ICG) and fluorescein for assessment of cerebral aneurysm obliteration and adjacent vessel patency. The authors prospectively enrolled 22 patients who underwent clip ligation of their aneurysm and used intraoperative videoangiography to assess obliteration of the aneurysmal sac and patency of the adjacent branching and perforating arteries. Patients underwent ICG videoangiography (ICG-VA) and the newly developed fluorescein videoangiography (FL-VA) using microscope-integrated fluorescence modules. Two independent observers compared the videoangiography recordings for value and quality to assess aneurysm exclusion and the patency of adjacent arteries. All 22 patients first underwent FL-VA and then ICG-VA after clip application. In 7 cases (32%), FL-VA provided superior detail to assess perforating arteries (4 cases), distal branches (2 cases), and both (1 case); such detail was not readily available on ICG-VA. In 1 patient, ICG-VA offered better visualization of posterior communicating artery aneurysm occlusion than FL-VA because of staining artifact on the aneurysm dome from the adjacent tentorium. In 2 patients, FL-VA offered the needed advantage of real-time manipulation of the vessels and flow assessment by visualization through the operating microscope oculars. In 2 other cases, ICG-VA was more practical for repeat usage because of its more efficient clearance from the intravascular space. The ICG-VA image quality was often degraded at higher magnification in deep operative fields, partly due to chromatic aberration. Both ICG-VA and FL-VA afforded restricted views of vasculature based on the angle of surgical approach and obscuration by blood clot, aneurysm, or brain tissue. Compared with ICG-VA, FL-VA can potentially provide an improved visualization of vasculature at high magnification in deep surgical fields. ICG-VA is more effective for

  10. Environmental auditing: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Dixon; Wilson, Melvin J.

    1994-07-01

    The environmental audit has become a regular part of corporate environmental management in Canada and is also gaining recognition in the public sector. A 1991 survey of 75 private sector companies across Canada revealed that 76% (57/75) had established environmental auditing programs. A similar survey of 19 federal, provincial, and municipal government departments revealed that 11% (2/19) had established such programs. The information gained from environmental audits can be used to facilitate and enhance environmental management from the single facility level to the national and international levels. This paper is divided into two sections: section one examines environmental audits at the facility/company level and discusses environmental audit characteristics, trends, and driving forces not commonly found in the available literature. Important conclusions are: that wherever possible, an action plan to correct the identified problems should be an integral part of an audit, and therefore there should be a close working relationship between auditors, managers, and employees, and that the first audits will generally be more difficult, time consuming, and expensive than subsequent audits. Section two looks at environmental audits in the broader context and discusses the relationship between environmental audits and three other environmental information gathering/analysis tools: environmental impact assessments, state of the environment reports, and new systems of national accounts. The argument is made that the information collected by environmental audits and environmental impact assessments at the facility/company level can be used as the bases for regional and national state of the environment reports and new systems of national accounts.

  11. Oversight Review: Quality Control Review of Army Audit Agency’s Special Access Program Audits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-25

    external peer review at least once every three years by reviewers independent of the audit organization being reviewed. As the organization that has audit...policy and oversight responsibilities for audits in the DoD, we conducted this external peer review of the AAA SAP audits in conjunction with the Air...Force Audit Agency (AFAA) external peer review of AAA non-SAP audits. An audit organization’s quality control policies and procedures should be

  12. Oversight Review: Quality Control Review of Air Force Audit Agency’s Special Access Program Audits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-26

    external peer review at least once every 3 years by reviewers independent of the audit organization being reviewed. As the organization that has audit...policy and oversight responsibilities for audits in the Department of Defense, we conducted this external peer review of the AFAA SAP audits in...conjunction with the Naval Audit Service’s external peer review of AFAA non-SAP audits. An audit organization’s quality control policies and procedures

  13. Prospective randomized study to compare between intravenous dexmedetomidine and esmolol for attenuation of hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Venkatesh; Manoharan, Karthik Raj

    2016-01-01

    Esmolol has an established role in attenuation of hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. We studied the effect of dexmedetomidine compared to that of esmolol in this study. To study the role of dexmedetomidine in attenuation of hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and oral endotracheal intubation compared to that of esmolol hydrochloride in patients posted for elective surgery under general anesthesia. Prospective randomized study double-dummy blinding method. A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I patients, aged 18-60 years randomly divided into two groups; Group A patients received dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/kg diluted in 50 ml with normal saline and infused over 10 min before induction and also 20 ml of normal saline intravenous (IV) 2 min before endotracheal intubation. Group B patients received 50 ml IV infusion of normal saline over 10 min before induction and IV bolus of esmolol 0.5 mg/kg diluted in 20 ml with normal saline given 2 min before intubation. Standard induction technique followed. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded just before induction and after intubation at 1 min, 3 min, and 5 min after intubation. Independent samples t-test and repeated measures of analysis of variance. Dexmedetomidine group showed statistically significant reduction in all the study parameters at all study time intervals following intubation. While esmolol group showed significant attenuation of HR, SBP, and MAP following intubation but failed to produce significant reduction in DBP. Dexmedetomidine is more effective in attenuating the hemodynamic response to oral endotracheal intubation compared to that of esmolol hydrochloride.

  14. Anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine versus 2% lignocaine during the surgical removal of the third molar: A comparative prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Nikil Kumar; John, Reena Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed at evaluating the clinical efficacy of articaine over lidocaine in the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. Objective: The objectives were to compare the onset of anesthesia, pain during injection, during the procedure and after the procedure, compare the duration of anesthesia, and need for re-anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 70 subjects planned for surgical removal of mandibular third molars. Subjects were randomly administered one of two local anesthetics. The anesthetic agent used was unknown for the patient and the observer who performed the measurements. Results: The differences in latency with 4% articaine (56.57 ± 9.8 s) and with 2% lignocaine (88.26 ± 12.87 s), pain during procedure for articaine 1.31 ± 0.87 and for lignocaine 2.60 ± 1.06, pain after procedure was 0.89 ± 0.58 for articaine and 1.31 ± 1.05 for lignocaine, and mean duration of anesthetic effect for articaine was 231 ± 57.15 min and 174.80 ± 37.02 min for lignocaine, which was statistically significant. For re-anesthesia, 6 out of 35 patients needed re-anesthesia at the frequency of 8.57% for articaine and 13 out of 35 patients needed re-anesthesia at a frequency of 18.57% for lignocaine. Conclusion: The results proved that articaine had a significant faster onset of action and longer duration of action when compared to lignocaine. Hence, the pain experienced by the patients during and after the surgical procedure was significantly less. The study was concluded that articaine is a safe alternative to lignocaine, which is potent and effective in minor surgical procedures such as removal of mandibular third molars. PMID:27212774

  15. Dermal autografts as a substitute for acellular dermal matrices (ADM) in tissue expander breast reconstruction: a prospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael P; Chung, Michael T; Rinker, Brian D

    2013-11-01

    The use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in tissue expander breast reconstruction has several advantages but increased complications have been reported. Dermal autografts may offer a safer and more cost-effective alternative. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare the outcomes of tissue expander breast reconstruction using dermal autografts with ADM-assisted reconstruction. Patients undergoing tissue expander breast reconstruction with either ADM or dermal autografts were enrolled. Autografts were harvested from the lower abdomen. At each follow-up visit, patients were surveyed on a seven-point scale for scar and overall satisfaction. Biopsies taken at the time of device exchange were evaluated histologically with CD34 staining to assess tissue integration and vessel ingrowth. Expansion parameters, complications, procedural costs, and operative times were compared. Forty-eight patients were enrolled (76 breasts). Twenty-seven patients received ADM, and twenty-one patients received dermal autograft. Wound healing complications were significantly higher in the ADM group (14.8% versus 4.8%, p-value = 0.03), as were major complications (18.5% versus 0%, p-value < 0.01). Histologic vessel counts in the autograft group averaged 21 vessels/mm(2), compared to 7 vessels/mm(2) in the ADM group (p-value < 0.01). There was no difference between the two groups in scar satisfaction or overall satisfaction. Patients receiving dermal autograft had a lower incidence of major complications and delayed wound healing than patients who received ADM. Despite harvest time, the overall cost of the ADM-assisted expander placement was higher. Dermal autograft-assisted breast reconstruction offers many of the benefits of ADM, but with a lower cost and improved safety profile. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Prospective Randomized Trial Comparing Pneumatic Lithotripsy and Holmium Laser for Management of Middle and Distal Ureteral Calculi.

    PubMed

    Li, Linjin; Pan, Yue; Weng, Zhiliang; Bao, Wenshuo; Yu, Zhixian; Wang, Feng

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety between pneumatic and holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser in the treatment of patients with ureteral stones located in the middle and distal ureter. We conducted a prospective study in recruiting 982 eligible patients from 2009 to 2012. Patients were randomly divided into two groups-the pneumatic lithotripsy (PL) group or the Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy (LL) group. Patient demographics, stone characteristics, intraoperative parameters, and postoperative complications were evaluated and analyzed. The baseline demographics of patients and stone characteristics were similar in the two groups. The LL group showed significant benefits compared with the PL group in terms of mean operative time (28±9.2 vs 41±12.4 min, P=0.001) and early stone-free rate (80.8% vs 91.3%, P=0.04), but there was no statistically significant difference at the third month (92.6% vs 95.5%, P=0.15). In the LL group, 24 postoperative cases of stricture were seen, whereas only 5 cases occurred in the PL group (P=0.02). The other complications, such as perforation, bleeding, and mucosal injury, were comparable in the two groups. The average postoperative stay was also similar (1.7±2.4 days for PL and 1.5±3.1 days for LL (P=0.62). Both PL and LL are effective in the management of middle and distal impacted stones. Ho:YAG laser has advantages in better efficacy of stone fragmentation and a higher early stone-free rate but seems to have to face the increased risks of postoperative stricture.

  17. Comparative efficacy of tadalafil versus tamsulosin as the medical expulsive therapy in lower ureteric stone: a prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Mylarappa, Prasad; Aggarwal, Kuldeep; Patil, Avinash; Joshi, Prarthan; Desigowda, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, medical expulsive therapy has been used in the management of distal ureteric stones as a supplement to conservative treatment. Therefore, we conducted a prospective randomized study to evaluate the possible role of tadalafil individually in comparison with proven tamsulosin therapy in ureteric stone expulsion. The aim of this study is to compare the safety and efficacy of a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (tadalafil) and an α-1 blocker (tamsulosin) as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric calculi. Material and methods Between August 2014 and October 2015, 207 patients who presented with distal ureteric stones of size 5–10 mm were randomly divided into two groups: tadalafil (Group A) and tamsulosin (Group B). Therapy was given for a maximum of 4 weeks. Stone expulsion rate, time to stone expulsion, analgesic use, number of hospital visits for pain, follow-up, endoscopic treatment and adverse effects of drugs were noted. Both groups were compared for normally distributed data by percentage, analysis of variance, and T-test. All the classified and categorical data were analyzed for both groups using the chi-square test. Results A statistically significant expulsion rate of 84.0% in Group A compared with 68.0% in Group B (P value = 0.0130), and shorter stone expulsion time in Group A (14.7±3.8) in comparison to Group B (16.8 ±4.5) was observed. Statistically significant differences were noted in renal colic episodes and analgesic requirement in Group A than Group B. No serious adverse effects were noted. Conclusions Tadalafil is safe, efficacious, and well tolerated as medical expulsive therapy for distal ureteric stones. This study showed that tadalafil increases ureteric stone expulsion quite significantly along with better control of pain and significantly lower analgesic requirement. PMID:27551555

  18. Inconsistencies between alcohol screening results based on AUDIT-C scores and reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions: prevalence in two US national samples.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Kate E; Lee, Amy K; Lapham, Gwen T; Rubinsky, Anna D; Chavez, Laura J; Bradley, Katharine A

    2014-01-27

    The AUDIT-C is an extensively validated screen for unhealthy alcohol use (i.e. drinking above recommended limits or alcohol use disorder), which consists of three questions about alcohol consumption. AUDIT-C scores ≥4 points for men and ≥3 for women are considered positive screens based on US validation studies that compared the AUDIT-C to "gold standard" measures of unhealthy alcohol use from independent, detailed interviews. However, results of screening--positive or negative based on AUDIT-C scores--can be inconsistent with reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions. For example, individuals can screen positive based on the AUDIT-C score while reporting drinking below US recommended limits on the same AUDIT-C. Alternatively, they can screen negative based on the AUDIT-C score while reporting drinking above US recommended limits. Such inconsistencies could complicate interpretation of screening results, but it is unclear how often they occur in practice. This study used AUDIT-C data from respondents who reported past-year drinking on one of two national US surveys: a general population survey (N = 26,610) and a Veterans Health Administration (VA) outpatient survey (N = 467,416). Gender-stratified analyses estimated the prevalence of AUDIT-C screen results--positive or negative screens based on the AUDIT-C score--that were inconsistent with reported drinking (above or below US recommended limits) on the same AUDIT-C. Among men who reported drinking, 13.8% and 21.1% of US general population and VA samples, respectively, had screening results based on AUDIT-C scores (positive or negative) that were inconsistent with reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions (above or below US recommended limits). Among women who reported drinking, 18.3% and 20.7% of US general population and VA samples, respectively, had screening results that were inconsistent with reported drinking. This study did not include an independent interview gold standard for unhealthy

  19. Inconsistencies between alcohol screening results based on AUDIT-C scores and reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions: prevalence in two US national samples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The AUDIT-C is an extensively validated screen for unhealthy alcohol use (i.e. drinking above recommended limits or alcohol use disorder), which consists of three questions about alcohol consumption. AUDIT-C scores ≥4 points for men and ≥3 for women are considered positive screens based on US validation studies that compared the AUDIT-C to “gold standard” measures of unhealthy alcohol use from independent, detailed interviews. However, results of screening—positive or negative based on AUDIT-C scores—can be inconsistent with reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions. For example, individuals can screen positive based on the AUDIT-C score while reporting drinking below US recommended limits on the same AUDIT-C. Alternatively, they can screen negative based on the AUDIT-C score while reporting drinking above US recommended limits. Such inconsistencies could complicate interpretation of screening results, but it is unclear how often they occur in practice. Methods This study used AUDIT-C data from respondents who reported past-year drinking on one of two national US surveys: a general population survey (N = 26,610) and a Veterans Health Administration (VA) outpatient survey (N = 467,416). Gender-stratified analyses estimated the prevalence of AUDIT-C screen results—positive or negative screens based on the AUDIT-C score—that were inconsistent with reported drinking (above or below US recommended limits) on the same AUDIT-C. Results Among men who reported drinking, 13.8% and 21.1% of US general population and VA samples, respectively, had screening results based on AUDIT-C scores (positive or negative) that were inconsistent with reported drinking on the AUDIT-C questions (above or below US recommended limits). Among women who reported drinking, 18.3% and 20.7% of US general population and VA samples, respectively, had screening results that were inconsistent with reported drinking. Limitations This study did not include an

  20. Effective general practice: audit and feedback for the primary series of immunisations.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Gary; Timo, Mareta; Dev, Anjileena; Poole, Tracey; Turner, Nikki

    2014-03-01

    General practice immunisation audits do not always match the national rates recorded on the New Zealand (NZ) National Immunisation Register (NIR). To complete audits at one general practice for infants requiring the primary series of immunisations (6-week, 3-month and 5-month vaccines) over a 12-month period and compare findings with the NIR audit. A manual and electronic practice management system (PMS) audit were compared with identical NIR audit parameters for completion of the 5-month vaccination from 1 February 2011 to 1 February 2012. All three results were then combined with further sub-audits of the total practice newborn population to produce a multifaceted audit, identifying further eligible patients. The NIR database query tool was used to corroborate data on partially immunised and unimmunised patients identified. All three initial audits produced different results for vaccinated and eligible patients: NIR 31/36; PMS audit 39/43; manual audit 41/48. The multifaceted audit identified 48 eligible infants. All 48 (100%) started their primary series-95.8% (46 of 48) fully immunised; 4.2% (2 of 48) partially immunised, missing only one injection. None were unimmunised, contrary to initial audits. Lower levels of timeliness of delivery were confirmed for this practice, with 52.1% (25 of 48) immunised on time. Results show 9.7% higher levels of immunisation than reported by NIR statistics for this practice (95.8% vs 86.1%), above current NZ government and World Health Organization targets. The multifaceted audit produced the best estimate of eligible patients and identified deficiencies in vaccine delivery.

  1. A "Quick & Dirty" Strategic Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawley, Dorothy E.

    2016-01-01

    In teaching Strategic Management, it is imperative that students first learn how to audit the firm before they begin analysis, planning and implementation. Unfortunately this is a step often overlooked. Without a complete and up to date audit, any analysis conducted would have questionable validity and reliability. This report focuses on an…

  2. Getting Ready for an Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Julia

    1979-01-01

    The increasing intrusion of the federal government in institutional affairs and accountability make audits of higher education institutions inevitable. Some suggestions on how to be prepared for an audit are provided. Suggestions include familiarization with regulations, current indirect cost rate, and current rate for benefits negotiated with…

  3. Your Audit and Financial Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Mary B.; And Others

    Audits should be performed on school accounting systems because they are required by law and they provide independent reviews of school financial procedures and suggestions for improvement. A licensed certified public accountant, public accountant, or an accountant who has met the Continuation of Education requirement should perform the audit.…

  4. The Audit Committee. Board Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, John S.

    2004-01-01

    The Effective Committees set of booklets comprises publications on the following committees: investment, buildings and grounds, academic affairs, student affairs, finance, development, trustees, audit, compensation, and executive. It is part of the AGB Board Basics Series. This report describes the primary role of an audit committee. The primary…

  5. The Audit Committee. Board Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, John S.

    2004-01-01

    The Effective Committees set of booklets comprises publications on the following committees: investment, buildings and grounds, academic affairs, student affairs, finance, development, trustees, audit, compensation, and executive. It is part of the AGB Board Basics Series. This report describes the primary role of an audit committee. The primary…

  6. Women's Campus Safety Audit Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This booklet is designed for those who want to make the college campus a safer environment for women. Specifically, it provides information to help make public and semi-public places safer and more comfortable for women, focusing on preventing sexual harassment and assault. The booklet introduces the safety audit and explains what the audit is…

  7. Your Audit and Financial Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Mary B.; And Others

    Audits should be performed on school accounting systems because they are required by law and they provide independent reviews of school financial procedures and suggestions for improvement. A licensed certified public accountant, public accountant, or an accountant who has met the Continuation of Education requirement should perform the audit.…

  8. Comparative Outcomes of the Two Types of Sacral Extradural Spinal Meningeal Cysts Using Different Operation Methods: A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-jun; Wang, Zhen-yu; Teo, Mario; Li, Zhen-dong; Wu, Hai-bo; Yen, Ru-yu; Zheng, Mei; Chang, Qing; Yisha Liu, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study compares different clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with two types of sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts (SESMC) undergoing different means of surgical excision. Using the relationship between the cysts and spinal nerve roots fibers (SNRF) as seen under microscope, SESMCs were divided into two types: cysts with SNRF known as Tarlov cysts and cysts without. The surgical methods were tailored to the different types of SESMCs. The improved Japanese Orthopedic Association (IJOA) scoring system was used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function of the patients. Preoperative IJOA scores were 18.5±1.73, and postoperative IJOA scores were 19.6±0.78. The difference between preoperative and postoperative IJOA scores was statistically significant (t = -4.52, p = 0.0001), with a significant improvement in neurological function after surgery. Among the improvements in neurological functions, the most significant was sensation (z=-2.74, p=0.006), followed by bowel/bladder function (z=-2.50, p=0.01). There was a statistically significant association between the types of SESMC and the number (F=12.57, p=0.001) and maximum diameter (F=8.08, p=0.006) of the cysts. SESMC with SNRF are often multiple and small, while cysts without SNRF tend to be solitary and large. We advocate early surgical intervention for symptomatic SESMCs in view of significant clinical improvement postoperatively. PMID:24386317

  9. Comparative outcomes of the two types of sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts using different operation methods: a prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Jun; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Teo, Mario; Li, Zhen-Dong; Wu, Hai-Bo; Yen, Ru-Yu; Zheng, Mei; Chang, Qing; Yisha Liu, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study compares different clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with two types of sacral extradural spinal meningeal cysts (SESMC) undergoing different means of surgical excision. Using the relationship between the cysts and spinal nerve roots fibers (SNRF) as seen under microscope, SESMCs were divided into two types: cysts with SNRF known as Tarlov cysts and cysts without. The surgical methods were tailored to the different types of SESMCs. The improved Japanese Orthopedic Association (IJOA) scoring system was used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative neurological function of the patients. Preoperative IJOA scores were 18.5 ± 1.73, and postoperative IJOA scores were 19.6 ± 0.78. The difference between preoperative and postoperative IJOA scores was statistically significant (t = -4.52, p = 0.0001), with a significant improvement in neurological function after surgery. Among the improvements in neurological functions, the most significant was sensation (z=-2.74, p=0.006), followed by bowel/bladder function (z=-2.50, p=0.01). There was a statistically significant association between the types of SESMC and the number (F=12.57, p=0.001) and maximum diameter (F=8.08, p=0.006) of the cysts. SESMC with SNRF are often multiple and small, while cysts without SNRF tend to be solitary and large. We advocate early surgical intervention for symptomatic SESMCs in view of significant clinical improvement postoperatively.

  10. Prospective study comparing hyoscyamine, doxazosin, and combination therapy for the treatment of urgency and frequency in women.

    PubMed

    Serels, S; Stein, M

    1998-01-01

    Anticholinergics are commonly used for the treatment of frequency, urgency, and urge incontinence in women. Alpha-blockers have been shown to have a modulating effect on bladder smooth muscle but are not commonly used clinically for this indication. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of each treatment as well as the combination therapy, we performed an open prospective study comparing these agents. Between September 1994 and October 1995, 34 women aged 28-91 (mean age, 62) received either 0.375 mg of sustained-release hyoscyamine twice a day or 2 mg doxazosin QHS prior to being crossed over to the other drug and/or the combination. Symptoms were assessed using an expanded American Urological Association (AUA) symptoms score, which included questions regarding incontinence at completion of each therapeutic phase. Evaluation included 6-channel urodynamics. All three therapies were noted to be effective in reducing AUA symptom scores. By urodynamic evaluation, a greater percentage of patients with increased voiding pressures or decreased compliance responded to doxazosin than hyoscyamine. Side effects were noted to be less prevalent with doxazosin than with the other therapies. There appears to be a significant role for alpha-blockers in the treatment of voiding symptoms in women.

  11. Differentiation between primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon: a prospective study comparing nailfold capillaroscopy using an ophthalmoscope or stereomicroscope

    PubMed Central

    Anders, H; Sigl, T; Schattenkirchner, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Nailfold capillary microscopy is a routine procedure in the investigation of patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP). As a standard method, nailfold capillary morphology is inspected with a stereomicroscope to look for capillary abnormalities such as giant loops, avascular areas, and bushy capillaries, which have all been found to be associated with certain connective tissue diseases.
AIM—To investigate prospectively whether nailfold capillary inspection using an ophthalmoscope is of equivalent diagnostic value to standard nailfold capillary microscopy.
METHOD—All the fingers of 26 patients with RP were examined in a blinded fashion and compared with the final diagnosis one month later.
RESULTS—All giant loops, large avascular areas, and bushy capillaries were identified by both methods. The correlation for moderate avascular areas and crossed capillaries was 0.93 and 0.955 respectively. The correlation for minor abnormalities that do not contribute to the differentiation between primary and secondary RP was 0.837 and 0.861 respectively. All patients were classified identically by the two methods.
CONCLUSION—For the evaluation of patients with RP, nailfold capillary morphology can reliably be assessed with an ophthalmoscope.

 PMID:11247874

  12. A prospective randomised trial to compare the efficacy of povidone-iodine 10% and chlorhexidine 2% for skin disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Atul P; Awode, Rishikesh M

    2013-01-01

    Context: Infectious complications of invasive procedures affect patient outcomes adversely. Choice of antiseptic solution at the time of insertion is one of the major factors affecting their incidence. Aims: This study was undertaken to compare efficacy of chlorhexidine 2% and povidone iodine 10% for skin disinfection prior to placement of epidural and central venous catheters (CVCs). Settings and Design: A prospective randomised trial in the operating rooms of a tertiary referral cancer centre. Methods: Sixty consecutive adult patients undergoing elective oncosurgery requiring placement of epidural and CVCs were enrolled. Paired skin swabs were collected before and after application of the antiseptic solution. The samples were incubated in McConkey's media and blood agar at 35°C for up to 24 h. Any bacterial growth was graded as: <10 colonies - poor growth, 10-50 colonies - moderate growth and >50 colonies as heavy growth. Data on demographics and antibiotic prophylaxis and costs was collected for all patients. Statistical Analysis: Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyse data, P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Demographics and antibiotic prophylaxis use was similar in both groups. Before application of antiseptic solution, a variety of micro-organisms were grown from most patients with growth ranging from none-heavy. No organism was grown after application of either antiseptic solution from any patient. Conclusions: We found no differences between 2% chlorhexidine and 10% povidone-iodine for skin disinfection in regard to costs, efficacy or side-effects. PMID:23983286

  13. Parents' decisional conflict, self-determination and emotional experiences in pediatric otolaryngology: A prospective descriptive-comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Krista C; Chorney, Jill; Hong, Paul

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the level of decisional conflict experienced by parents considering surgery for their children and to determine if personal characteristics and emotional experiences vary as a function of whether or not parents experienced clinically significant levels of decisional conflict. Sixty consecutive parents of children who underwent surgical consultation for elective otolaryngological procedures were prospectively enrolled. Participants completed the Decisional Conflict Scale, Basic Needs Satisfaction Scale, and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule-Revised. Eight participants (13.3%) scored over 25 on the Decisional Conflict Scale, a previously defined cut-off indicating clinically significant decisional conflict. Parents who experienced significant decisional conflict felt less autonomous and less related or connected to others as compared to those who did not report significant decisional conflict. In addition, parents who experienced significant decisional conflict reported more negative emotions and fewer positive emotions during the surgical consultation visit. However, parents who reported significant decisional conflict did not report feeling less competent. Parental decision-making on whether their child should undergo elective pediatric otolaryngological surgery is a personal and emotional process. Parents' characteristics and experiences should be acknowledged and supported during the surgical consultation. Future research should aim to normalize the decision-making experience for parents, and to allow surgeons to be aware of the importance of decisional needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A prospective study comparing attempted weight bearing in fiberglass below-knee casts and prefabricated pneumatic braces.

    PubMed

    Mason, Lyndon W; Dodds, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Partial weight bearing is commonly advised after fracture of the lower extremity. Research has determined this to be inaccurate both in its instruction and its reproducibility. Many trauma departments are commonly using alternatives to plaster in the splintage of fractures, such as fiberglass and the prefabricated pneumatic braces. This study's null hypothesis is that there is no difference between partial weight bearing through a fiberglass cast as compared with a pneumatic walker. A prospective study was conducted in our department including all patients who had metatarsal or ankle fractures and could partially weight bear. Patients were excluded if they were not allowed to bear weight, had received operative fixation of their fracture, or were younger than age 16 years. The patients' total weight was measured first, and then they were trained to place 50% of their weight through the splinted limb. Three measurements were taken of their attempted weight bearing at 50%, and they were blinded to the results. Over a 16-month period, 117 patients were enrolled for this study: 72 in the pneumatic walker group and 45 in the fiberglass group. There was no significant difference in sex, age, or fracture type. There was a significant difference in percentage of weight placed through the splinted limb, with the pneumatic brace group placing much greater force than the fiberglass group. This may have been caused by altered proprioception from the walker. It is important to realize this when prescribing partial weight bearing in a particular splint as this may result in avoidable complications.

  15. Coronally advanced flap with two different techniques for the treatment of multiple gingival recessions: A pilot prospective comparative case series.

    PubMed

    Barrella, Guilherme Emerson; Kolbe, Maria Fernanda; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Casati, Marcio Zaffalon; Casarin, Renato Correa; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Pimentel, Suzana Peres

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to compare the clinical outcomes of coronally advanced flap (CAF) using two different surgical strategies in the treatment of multiple gingival recessions. Ten patients presenting with a total of 81 Miller class I gingival recessions were included. Recessions were randomly treated according to a split-mouth design by means of CAF with oblique interdental incisions (OBL technique), or CAF with horizontal interdental incisions (HOR technique). Marginal gingival recession (REC), clinical attachment level (CAL), pocket probing depth (PPD), height of keratinized tissue (HKT), and thickness of keratinized tissue (TKT) were measured at baseline, and 3 and 6 months after treatment. Patient-centered outcomes concerning morbidity and improvement in the esthetic appearance were recorded using a visual analog scale (VAS). Both groups showed significant reductions in REC and gains in CAL throughout the study (P < .05). At 3 months, OBL-treated sites showed greater root coverage than HOR-treated sites (P < .05), although no intergroup differences were observed at 6 months (P > .05). There was an increase in HKT only in the OBL group at 6 months from baseline (P < .05). No differences between therapies were revealed concerning morbidity (P > .05), whereas a higher satisfaction with the esthetic appearance was reported for the OBL technique 6 months postsurgery (P < .05). Although both surgical approaches may provide satisfactory root coverage, use of the OBL technique promoted additional benefits in terms of esthetic perception after the management of multiple gingival recessions.

  16. Thromboprophylaxis in patients with hip fractures: a prospective, randomized, comparative study between Org 10172 and dextran 70.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D; Kettunen, K; Fredin, H; Faunø, P; Suomalainen, O; Soimakallio, S; Karjalainen, P; Cederholm, C; Jensen, L J; Justesen, T

    1991-05-01

    A prospective, randomized, assessor-blind trial has been undertaken to compare the thromboprophylactic effect and safety of the heparinoid Org 10172 (a mixture of low molecular-weight sulfated glycosaminoglycuronides) and dextran 70 in patients operated on for hip fracture. Prestudy biostatistical calculations led to the need for 260 patients. Three hundred eight patients were randomized and 19 were excluded after randomization, the majority because of postponed surgery. Analyses were made on the 289 patients on an intention-to-treat basis, as well as on the 247 patients given correct prophylaxis. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis was based on bilateral ascending phlebography on postoperative days 10 through 12. The frequency of deep vein thrombosis on an intention-to-treat basis was 10% in the Org 10172 group and 30% in the dextran 70 group and, on the basis of correct prophylaxis, 12% and 31%, respectively, both differences being significant (p less than 0.001). Two-month mortality rates were equal in the groups. Three fatal pulmonary emboli were seen in the dextran group. Significantly more patients in the dextran group received postoperative transfusions; no other differences in various hemorrhagic parameters were seen. Thus it can be concluded that Org 10172 has a significantly better thromboprophylactic effect than does dextran in patients with hip fractures without significant side effects.

  17. A blinded prospective study comparing four current noninvasive approaches in the differential diagnosis of medical versus surgical jaundice

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, K.W.; Snodgrass, P.J.; Swonder, J.E.; Mahoney, S.; Burt, R.; Cockerill, E.M.; Lumeng, L.

    1983-06-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to compare the diagnostic accuracy of clinical evaluation, ultrasound, computed tomography, and technetium 99m-HIDA or -PIPIDA biliary scans in distinguishing between intrahepatic and extrahepatic jaundice. A final diagnosis was established in each of the 50 patients who completed the study, among whom 29 had intrahepatic cholestasis and 21 had extrahepatic obstruction. In the diagnosis of extrahepatic obstruction, the sensitivities of clinical evaluation, ultrasound, computed tomography, and nuclear medicine biliary scan were 95%, 55%, 63%, and 41%, respectively; the specificities were 76%, 93%, 93%, and 88%; and the overall accuracies were 84%, 78%, 81%, and 68%. These data support the conclusion that when the clinical evaluation is carefully performed, it is the single most effective noninvasive means of detecting extrahepatic biliary obstruction in a jaundiced patient. Although ultrasound, computed tomography, and radionuclide biliary scan are less sensitive, they are highly reliable if they indicate that extrahepatic obstruction is present. A flow chart of invasive and noninvasive approaches for evaluation of the jaundiced patient is presented.

  18. Posterior tibial slope changes after opening- and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a comparative prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ducat, A; Sariali, E; Lebel, B; Mertl, P; Hernigou, P; Flecher, X; Zayni, R; Bonnin, M; Jalil, R; Amzallag, J; Rosset, P; Servien, E; Gaudot, F; Judet, T; Catonné, Y

    2012-02-01

    Valgus high tibial osteotomy is considered to be an effective treatment for unicompartmental medial osteoarthritis. It is generally admitted that tibial slope increases after open-wedge high tibial osteotomy and decreases after closing-wedge high tibial osteotomy. However, the effects on posterior tibial slope of closing- or opening-wedge osteotomies remain controversial. We analyzed the modifications of tibial slope after opening- and closing-wedge high tibial osteotomies and compared the results of these two procedures. We hypothesized that there was no difference in postoperative tibial slope between opening and closing-wedge osteotomies. This prospective consecutive nonrandomized multicenter study was conducted between January 2008 and March 2009 and included 321 patients: 205 men and 116 women. A total of 224 patients underwent an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy and 97 a closing-wedge osteotomy. The mean age was 52 years ± 9 and the mean body mass index was 28kg/m(2) ± 5. The main etiology was primary arthritis. Posterior tibial slope was measured preoperatively and at the last follow-up on a lateral radiograph in relation to the posterior tibial cortex. In the opening-wedge group, a definite 0.6° increase in tibial slope (P=0.016) was observed. In the closing-wedge group, a definite 0.7° decrease in tibial slope (P=0.02) was found. Fourteen percent of the opening-wedge osteotomies increased tibial slope by 5° or more versus only 2% of the closed-wedge osteotomies (P<0.001). Twelve percent of the closing-wedge high tibial osteotomies led to a decrease of 5° or more of the tibial slope versus 7% of the opening-wedge osteotomies (P<0.02). These results confirm what is generally reported in the literature, i.e., an increase in tibial slope in opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy and a decrease in the slope in closing-wedge osteotomies. These tibial slope changes appear to be very limited in this series, less than 1° on average. However, there was a bias

  19. Multidisciplinary audit of digoxin.

    PubMed

    Keys, P W; DeSantis, D; Duffy, M G

    1978-08-01

    Use review of digoxin as part of a medical care evaluation study in a hospital is described. This drug audit within the hospital's quality assurance program used a multidisciplinary approach. The study was designed to measure the incidence of digoxin toxicity, evaluate monitoring practices for digoxin use and evaluate the adequacy of digoxin dosing patterns. Forty-eight patients were involved. Results indicated that some patients were not adequately assessed in regard to renal function and digoxin serum level. Further, there was a 17% incidence of digoxin toxicity. Studies such as this give pharmacists an opportunity to use their knowledge of proper drug use through a structured hospital program.

  20. Introducing students to clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Jacqueline; O'Dell, Cindy

    2015-11-01

    It is more than a decade since the UK Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting said that engaging with clinical audit is 'the business of every registered practitioner', yet there appears to be little evidence that nursing has embraced the process. To address this issue, Northampton General Hospital and the University of Northampton implemented a pilot project in which two third-year adult nursing students worked on a 'real life' audit. Supported by the hospital's audit department, and supervised by academic tutors with the relevant experience, the students worked on a pressure-ulcer care audit for their final year dissertation. This article describes the process undertaken by the hospital audit team and the university academic team to develop the pilot project and support the students. Based on the positive evaluations, the university has extended the project to a second phase, incorporating two new partner organisations.