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Sample records for prostate acinar epithelium

  1. Dickkopf-3 regulates prostate epithelial cell acinar morphogenesis and prostate cancer cell invasion by limiting TGF-β-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diana; Al-Shareef, Zainab; Gorroño-Etxebarria, Irantzu; Atkins, Stephanie; Turrell, Frances; Chhetri, Jyoti; Bengoa-Vergniory, Nora; Zenzmaier, Christoph; Berger, Peter; Waxman, Jonathan; Kypta, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Dickkopf-3 (Dkk-3) is a secreted protein whose expression is downregulated in many types of cancer. Endogenous Dkk-3 is required for formation of acini in 3D cultures of prostate epithelial cells, where it inhibits transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad signaling. Here, we examined the effects of Dkk-3 on the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which mediate the effects of TGF-β on extracellular matrix disassembly during tissue morphogenesis and promote invasion of tumor cells. Silencing of Dkk-3 in prostate epithelial cells resulted in increased expression and enzyme activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Inhibition of MMP-9 partially restored normal acinar morphogenesis in Dkk-3-silenced RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells. In PC3 prostate cancer cells, Dkk-3 inhibited TGF-β-dependent migration and invasion. Inhibition was mediated by the Dkk-3 C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (Cys2), which also inhibited TGF-β-induced expression of MMP9 and MMP13. In contrast, Dkk-3, but not Cys2, increased formation of normal acini in Dkk-3-silenced prostate epithelial cells. These observations highlight a role for Dkk-3 in modulating TGF-β/MMP signals in the prostate, and suggest that the Dkk-3 Cys2 domain can be used as a basis for therapies that target the tumor promoting effects of TGF-β signaling in advanced prostate cancer.

  2. The metaplastic effects of estrogen on mouse prostate epithelium: proliferation of cells with basal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Risbridger, G P; Wang, H; Frydenberg, M; Cunha, G

    2001-06-01

    The exogenous administration of estrogens to male mice alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and reduces androgen levels, leading to a regression of the prostatic epithelium. As well, a specific direct response to estrogens is the induction of epithelial squamous metaplasia. The aims of this study were to identify the process by which the prostatic epithelium is transformed in intact adult male mice using the synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol. A comparison of the effects of diethylstilbestrol in the three lobes revealed a hierarchy of response, with the anterior lobe being the most responsive, the dorsolateral lobe less responsive, and the ventral lobe the least responsive. The effect of castration was used to distinguish between the epithelial responses to estrogen administration and androgen deprivation. The results demonstrate that transformation of the epithelium involved proliferation of cells with a basal cell phenotype, the onset of cytokeratin 10 expression, up-regulation of progesterone receptor expression, and loss of the cell cycle inhibitor, p27(Kip1) expression; none of these changes was observed after castration. Mice lacking functional estrogen receptor alpha failed to respond, demonstrating a requirement for estrogen receptor alpha in the epithelium and/or stroma to mediate the proliferative response to estrogen in the prostate gland.

  3. Differential Gene Expression in Benign Prostate Epithelium of Men with and without Prostate Cancer: Evidence for a Prostate Cancer Field Effect

    PubMed Central

    Risk, Michael C; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Coleman, Ilsa; Dumpit, Ruth F; Kristal, Alan R; LeMeur, Nolwenn; Gentleman, Robert C; True, Lawrence D; Nelson, Peter S; Lin, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Background Several malignancies are known to exhibit a “field-effect” whereby regions beyond tumor boundaries harbor histological or molecular changes that are associated with cancer. We sought to determine if histologically benign prostate epithelium collected from men with prostate cancer exhibits features indicative of pre-malignancy or field effect. Methods Prostate needle biopsies from 15 men with high grade(Gleason 8–10) prostate cancer and 15 age- and BMI-matched controls were identified from a biospecimen repository. Benign epithelia from each patient were isolated by laser capture microdissection. RNA was isolated, amplified, and used for microarray hybridization. Quantitative PCR(qPCR) was used to determine the expression of specific genes of interest. Alterations in protein expression were analyzed through immunohistochemistry. Results Overall patterns of gene expression in microdissected benign-associated benign epithelium (BABE) and cancer-associated benign epithelium (CABE) were similar. Two genes previously associated with prostate cancer, PSMA and SSTR1, were significantly upregulated in the CABE group(FDR <1%). Expression of other prostate cancer-associated genes, including ERG, HOXC4, HOXC5 and MME, were also increased in CABE by qRT-PCR, although other genes commonly altered in prostate cancer were not different between the BABE and CABE samples. The expression of MME and PSMA proteins on IHC coincided with their mRNA alterations. Conclusion Gene expression profiles between benign epithelia of patients with and without prostate cancer are very similar. However, these tissues exhibit differences in the expression levels of several genes previously associated with prostate cancer development or progression. These differences may comprise a field effect and represent early events in carcinogenesis. PMID:20935156

  4. Epithelium

    MedlinePlus

    The term "epithelium" refers to layers of cells that line hollow organs and glands. It is also those cells that make up the outer surface of the body. Epithelial cells help to protect or enclose organs. Most produce mucus or other secretions. Certain ...

  5. Beta-catenin (CTNNB1) induces Bmp expression in urogenital sinus epithelium and participates in prostatic bud initiation and patterning

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vatsal; Schmitz, Christopher T.; Keil, Kimberly P.; Joshi, Pinak S.; Abler, Lisa L.; Lin, Tien-Min; Taketo, Makoto M.; Sun, Xin; Vezina, Chad M.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal prostate development is initiated by androgens and patterned by androgen dependent and independent signals. How these signals integrate to control epithelial cell differentiation and prostatic bud patterning is not fully understood. To test the role of beta-catenin (Ctnnb1) in this process, we used a genetic approach to conditionally delete or stabilize Ctnnb1 in urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium from which the prostate derives. Two opposing mechanisms of action were revealed. By deleting Ctnnb1, we found it is required for separation of UGS from cloaca, emergence or maintenance of differentiated UGS basal epithelium and formation of prostatic buds. By genetically inducing a patchy subset of UGS epithelial cells to express excess CTNNB1, we found its excess abundance increases Bmp expression and leads to a global impairment of prostatic bud formation. Addition of NOGGIN partially restores prostatic budding in UGS explants with excess Ctnnb1. These results indicate a requirement for Ctnnb1 in UGS basal epithelial cell differentiation, prostatic bud initiation and bud spacing and suggest some of these actions are mediated in part through activation of BMP signaling. PMID:23396188

  6. Bisphenol A Promotes Human Prostate Stem-Progenitor Cell Self-Renewal and Increases In Vivo Carcinogenesis in Human Prostate Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Majumdar, Shyama; Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nelles, Jason L.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in rodent models have shown that early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) reprograms the prostate and enhances its susceptibility to hormonal carcinogenesis with aging. To determine whether the human prostate is similarly sensitive to BPA, the current study used human prostate epithelial stem-like cells cultured from prostates of young, disease-free donors. Similar to estradiol-17β (E2), BPA increased stem-progenitor cell self-renewal and expression of stem-related genes in a dose-dependent manner. Further, 10 nM BPA and E2 possessed equimolar membrane-initiated signaling with robust induction of p-Akt and p-Erk at 15 minutes. To assess in vivo carcinogenicity, human prostate stem-progenitor cells combined with rat mesenchyme were grown as renal grafts in nude mice, forming normal human prostate epithelium at 1 month. Developmental BPA exposure was achieved through oral administration of 100 or 250 μg BPA/kg body weight to hosts for 2 weeks after grafting, producing free BPA levels of 0.39 and 1.35 ng/mL serum, respectively. Carcinogenesis was driven by testosterone plus E2 treatment for 2 to 4 months to model rising E2 levels in aging men. The incidence of high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma markedly increased from 13% in oil-fed controls to 33% to 36% in grafts exposed in vivo to BPA (P < .05). Continuous developmental BPA exposure through in vitro (200 nM) plus in vivo (250 μg/kg body weight) treatments increased high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia/cancer incidence to 45% (P < .01). Together, the present findings demonstrate that human prostate stem-progenitor cells are direct BPA targets and that developmental exposure to BPA at low doses increases hormone-dependent cancer risk in the human prostate epithelium. PMID:24424067

  7. Electronic expert consultation using digital still images for evaluation of atypical small acinar proliferations of the prostate: a comparison with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Banihashemi, Amir; Asgari, Mojgan; Shooshtarizade, Tina; Abolhasani, Maryam; Mireskandari, Masoud

    2014-06-01

    This study was performed on a series of prostate needle biopsies with diagnosis of atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) to verify to what extent the application of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for p504s and p63 markers as well as expert consultation by still images could affect the diagnosis. The results of these 2 methods were compared. Immunohistochemistry staining for p504s and p63 was performed on sections from 42 patients with a primary diagnosis of ASAP. Meanwhile, digital still images were taken from hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides of cases and were sent to an expert uropathologist, blind to IHC staining interpretations. The results of IHC staining were compared with diagnostic interpretations of the consultant pathologist. In 13 cases, the focus of concern was not detectable on IHC slides. In the remaining 29 cases, IHC showed a benign and malignant expression pattern in 17 and 9 patients, respectively. In 3 cases, IHC findings were inconclusive and retained the diagnosis of ASAP. The consultant pathologist diagnosed 11 cases of benign and 7 cases of malignant processes. He retained the diagnosis of ASAP in 11 cases. There was high concordance between the results of IHC and electronic consultation in the group of benign cases. All 11 cases with the diagnosis of benignancy by electronic consultation showed a benign IHC pattern. Among 7 cases with the diagnosis of malignancy by the consultant pathologist, 5 were classified as malignant, 1 as benign, and 1 as inconclusive IHC groups. Considering problems with IHC staining of prostate needle biopsy, including loss of focus of interest, expert consultation using still images can provide very useful diagnostic information. This approach can be used as an adjunct to other diagnostic activities like IHC or even as an independent source of information to reach more accurate diagnoses in ASAP cases, particularly in institutions with limited resources.

  8. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers.

  9. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter–Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W. K.; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor–promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter–driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  10. Co-Targeting Prostate Cancer Epithelium and Bone Stroma by Human Osteonectin-Promoter-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Inhibits Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Sung, Shian-Ying; Chang, Junn-Liang; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Liu, Yun-Ru; Su, Yen-Hao; Hsueh, Chia-Yen; Chung, Leland W K; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction has been shown to promote local tumor growth and distant metastasis. We sought to create a promising gene therapy approach that co-targets cancer and its supporting stromal cells for combating castration-resistant prostate tumors. Herein, we demonstrated that human osteonectin is overexpressed in the prostate cancer epithelium and tumor stroma in comparison with their normal counterpart. We designed a novel human osteonectin promoter (hON-522E) containing positive transcriptional regulatory elements identified in both the promoter and exon 1 region of the human osteonectin gene. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the hON-522E promoter is highly active in androgen receptor negative and metastatic prostate cancer and bone stromal cells compared to androgen receptor-positive prostate cancer cells. Moreover, in vivo prostate-tumor-promoting activity of the hON-522E promoter was confirmed by intravenous administration of an adenoviral vector containing the hON-522E promoter-driven luciferase gene (Ad-522E-Luc) into mice bearing orthotopic human prostate tumor xenografts. In addition, an adenoviral vector with the hON-522E-promoter-driven herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (Ad-522E-TK) was highly effective against the growth of androgen-independent human prostate cancer PC3M and bone stromal cell line in vitro and in pre-established PC3M tumors in vivo upon addition of the prodrug ganciclovir. Because of the heterogeneity of human prostate tumors, hON-522E promoter-mediated gene therapy has the potential for the treatment of hormone refractory and bone metastatic prostate cancers. PMID:27054343

  11. Comparison of prostate MRI-3D transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy for first-time and repeat biopsy patients with previous atypical small acinar proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chin, Joseph; Gardi, Lori; Tessier, David; Mercado, Ashley; Mandel, Jonathan; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluates the clinical benefit of magnetic resonance-transrectal ultrasound (MR-TRUS) fusion biopsy over systematic biopsy between first-time and repeat prostate biopsy patients with prior atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Materials: 100 patients were enrolled in a single-centre prospective cohort study: 50 for first biopsy, 50 for repeat biopsy with prior ASAP. Multiparameteric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) and standard 12-core ultrasound biopsy (Std-Bx) were performed on all patients. Targeted biopsy using MRI-TRUS fusion (Fn-Bx) was performed f suspicious lesions were identified on the pre-biopsy MP-MRI. Classification of clinically significant disease was assessed independently for the Std-Bx vs. Fn-Bx cores to compare the two approaches. Results: Adenocarcinoma was detected in 49/100 patients (26 first biopsy, 23 ASAP biopsy), with 25 having significant disease (17 first, 8 ASAP). Fn-Bx demonstrated significantly higher per-core cancer detection rates, cancer involvement, and Gleason scores for first-time and ASAP patients. However, Fn-Bx was significantly more likely to detect significant cancer missed on Std-Bx for ASAP patients than first-time biopsy patients. The addition of Fn-Bx to Std-Bx for ASAP patients had a 166.7% relative risk reduction for missing Gleason ≥ 3 + 4 disease (number needed to image with MP-MRI=10 patients) compared to 6.3% for first biopsy (number to image=50 patients). Negative predictive value of MP-MRI for negative biopsy was 79% for first-time and 100% for ASAP patients, with median followup of 32.1 ± 15.5 months. Conclusions: MR-TRUS Fn-Bx has a greater clinical impact for repeat biopsy patients with prior ASAP than biopsy-naïve patients by detecting more significant cancers that are missed on Std-Bx. PMID:27800057

  12. Extra-prostatic Transgene-associated Neoplastic Lesions in Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J.; Clinton, Steven K.; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubulo-acinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of two novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain, and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice as well as in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this paper we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubulo-acinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice. PMID:24742627

  13. Differential expression and regulation of vitamin D hydroxylases and inflammatory genes in prostate stroma and epithelium by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in men with prostate cancer and an in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Giangreco, Angeline A.; Dambal, Shweta; Wagner, Dennis; Van der Kwast, Theodorus; Vieth, Reinhold; Prins, Gail S.; Nonn, Larisa

    2014-01-01

    Previous work on vitamin D in the prostate has focused on the prostatic epithelium, from which prostate cancer arises. Prostatic epithelial cells are surrounded by stroma, which has well-established regulatory control over epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and the inflammatory response. Here we examined the regulation of vitamin D-related genes and inflammatory genes by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D) in laser-capture microdissected prostate tissue from a vitamin D3 clinical trial and in an in vitro model that facilitates stromal–epithelial crosstalk. Analysis of the trial tissues showed that VDR was present in both cell types, whereas expression of the hydroxylases was the highest in the epithelium. Examination of gene expression by prostatic (1,25(OH)2D) concentrations showed that VDR was significantly lower in prostate tissues with the highest concentration of 1,25(OH)2D, and down-regulation of VDR by 1,25(OH) 2D was confirmed in the primary cell cultures. Analysis of inflammatory genes in the patient tissues revealed that IL-6 expression was the highest in the prostate stroma while PTGS2 (COX2) levels were lowest in the prostate cancer tissues from men in the highest tertile of prostatic 1,25(OH)2D. In vitro, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were suppressed by 1,25 (OH)2D in the primary epithelial cells, whereas TNF-α and PTGS2 were suppressed by 1,25(OH) 2D in the stromal cells. Importantly, the ability of 1,25(OH)2D to alter pro-inflammatory-induced changes in epithelial cell growth were dependent on the presence of the stromal cells. In summary, whereas both stromal and epithelial cells of the prostate express VDR and can presumably respond to 1,25(OH)2D, which appears to be primarily produced by the prostatic epithelium. Further, while the prostate epithelium was more responsive to the anti-inflammatory activity of 1,25 (OH)2D than stromal cells, stroma–epithelial crosstalk enhanced the phenotypic effects of 1,25(OH)2D and the inflammatory

  14. Precursors of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Cheng, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is the only accepted precursor of prostatic adenocarcinoma, according to numerous studies of animal models and man; other proposed precursors include atrophy and malignancy-associated changes (with no morphologic changes). PIN is characterized by progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between benign prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. The only method of detection of PIN is biopsy because it does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultrasonography. The mean incidence of PIN in biopsies is 9% (range, 4%-16%), representing about 115,000 new cases of isolated PIN diagnosed each year in the United States. The clinical importance of PIN is its high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeat biopsy for concurrent or subsequent carcinoma, especially when multifocal or observed in association with atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Carcinoma develops in most patients with PIN within 10 years. Androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy decrease the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that these forms of treatment may play a role in prevention of subsequent cancer. Multiple clinical trials to date of men with PIN have had modest success in delaying or preventing subsequent cancer. PMID:22212075

  15. Fibronectin Expression Modulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation during Acinar Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Courtney M.; Engler, Adam J.; Slone, R. Daniel; Galante, Leontine L.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2009-01-01

    The mammary gland consists of a polarized epithelium surrounded by a basement membrane matrix that forms a series of branching ducts ending in hollow, sphere-like acini. Essential roles for the epithelial basement membrane during acinar differentiation, in particular laminin and its integrin receptors, have been identified using mammary epithelial cells cultured on a reconstituted basement membrane. Contributions from fibronectin, which is abundant in the mammary gland during development and tumorigenesis, have not been fully examined. Here, we show that fibronectin expression by mammary epithelial cells is dynamically regulated during the morphogenic process. Experiments with synthetic polyacrylamide gel substrates implicate both specific extracellular matrix components, including fibronectin itself, and matrix rigidity in this regulation. Alterations in fibronectin levels perturbed acinar organization. During acinar development, increased fibronectin levels resulted in overproliferation of mammary epithelial cells and increased acinar size. Addition of fibronectin to differentiated acini stimulated proliferation and reversed growth arrest of mammary epithelial cells negatively affecting maintenance of proper acinar morphology. These results show that expression of fibronectin creates a permissive environment for cell growth that antagonizes the differentiation signals from the basement membrane. These effects suggest a link between fibronectin expression and epithelial cell growth during development and oncogenesis in the mammary gland. PMID:18451144

  16. Immunocytochemical localization of estrogen receptors in the normal male and female canine urinary tract and prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, H.; Barrack, E.R.

    1987-11-01

    We have used the monoclonal estrogen receptor (ER) antibody H222Sp gamma to localize ER by immunocytochemistry in frozen sections of the normal canine urinary tract of both sexes and of the normal prostate of the male. Striking regional heterogeneity of ER location was observed. In the urinary tract, specific ER staining was confined to nuclei of the transitional epithelium (mucosa) and subjacent stroma (submucosa) of the prostatic urethra in the male dog and of the proximal urethra in the female dog. In both sexes there was a gradient of ER staining intensity along these urethral segments. In the male, ER staining intensity was highest in the region of the verumontanum. The pattern and intensity of staining were similar in the male prostatic urethra and female proximal urethra, indicating a similar concentration of ER in these tissues, which have the same embryological origin. No specific staining was found in the kidney, ureter, bladder, or distal urethra of either sex. In the normal prostate, specific immunocytochemical ER staining was confined to nuclei of the prostatic stroma and prostatic ductal epithelium. Specific staining intensity appeared to be higher in the periurethral region of the prostate than in the periphery. No specific staining was found in the acinar epithelium of the prostate. Based on overall staining intensity there appeared to be a higher concentration of ER in the urethra than in the prostate. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding confirmed a similar ER content in the urethra of male and female dogs and a higher ER content in the prostatic urethra than in the prostate itself (P less than 0.001).

  17. Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate: histogenesis, biology and clinicopathological features.

    PubMed

    Seipel, Amanda H; Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Egevad, Lars

    2016-08-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate (DAC) is recognised as a subtype of prostatic adenocarcinoma, but its diagnostic criteria and biology remain controversial. DAC was first thought to stem from Müllerian duct remnants, but further studies suggest a prostatic origin. DAC is composed of tall, columnar, pseudostratified epithelium with a papillary, cribriform, glandular or solid architecture. The diagnosis is based on morphology alone with papillary architecture being the most helpful diagnostic feature. The tumour is rare in a pure form and most cases are combined with acinar adenocarcinoma. The most common differential diagnoses of DAC are intraductal carcinoma of the prostate and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Patients often present at an advanced clinicopathological stage. High rates of extra-prostatic extension, seminal vesicle invasion, local and regional metastases, and positive surgical margins are seen after radical prostatectomy. DAC metastasises to sites that are less commonly seen for prostate cancer such as lung, brain, testis and penis. The morphology and the unusual metastatic locations make the accurate diagnosis of metastases challenging, but a positive immunostain for prostate specific markers may be helpful. The correct identification of DAC has implications for treatment as well as outcome. PMID:27321992

  18. Role of CEACAM1 and CEACAM20 in an in vitro model of prostate morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Eisenried, Andreas; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Shively, John E

    2013-01-01

    CEACAM20, a novel member of the CEACAM1 gene family with expression limited to the lumen of small intestine, testes, and prostate, is co-expressed with CEACAM1 in adult prostate tissue and down-regulated to the same extent as CEACAM1 in prostate cancer. Since prostate cancer often involves loss of epithelial lumen formation, we hypothesized that CEACAM20 and CEACAM1 play important roles in lumen formation of normal prostate epithelium. When prostate cells were grown on Matrigel as a source of extracellular matrix (ECM), they differentiated into acinar structures with single tubules and well-defined lumina closely resembling embryonic prostate organoids. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed restriction of CEACAM20 to acini and CEACAM1 to tubule structures, respectively. Inhibition of CEACAM1 with antibodies or soluble CEACAM1 or antisense oligonucleotides inhibited tubule formation by over 50% while the remaining tubules were stunted. Inhibition of CEACAM20 with antisense oligonucleotides completely inhibited tubule formation and stunted the growth of acini. We conclude that CEACAM20 and CEACAM1 not only mark the lumina of adult prostate tissue but also play a critical role in the vitro generation of prostate organoids.

  19. Antagonistic effect of Lepidium meyenii (red maca) on prostatic hyperplasia in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Gasco, M; Malheiros-Pereira, A; Gonzales-Castañeda, C

    2008-06-01

    The plants from the Lepidium gender have demonstrated to have effect on the size of the prostate. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a Peruvian plant that grows exclusively over 4000 m above sea level. The present study was designed to determine the effect of red maca (RM) in the prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone enanthate (TE) in adult mice. Prostate hyperplasia was induced by administering TE, and then these animals (n = 6, each group) were treated with RM or Finasteride (positive control) for 21 days. There was an additional group without prostate hyperplasia (vehicle). Mice were killed on days 7, 14 and 21 after treatment with RM. Testosterone and oestradiol levels were measured on the last day of treatment. Prostatic stroma, epithelium and acini were measured histologically. RM reduced prostate weight at 21 days of treatment. Weights of seminal vesicles, testis and epididymis were not affected by RM treatment. The reduction in prostate size by RM was 1.59 times. Histological analysis showed that TE increased 2-fold the acinar area, effect prevented in the groups receiving TE + RM for 14 (P < 0.05) and 21 (P < 0.05) days and the group receiving TE + Finasteride for 21 days (P < 0.05). TE increased prostatic stroma area and this effect was prevented by treatment with RM since 7 days of treatment or Finasteride. The reduction in prostatic stroma area by RM was 1.42 times. RM has an anti-hyperplastic effect on the prostate of adult mice when hyperplasia was induced with TE acting first at prostatic stromal level. PMID:18477205

  20. Antagonistic effect of Lepidium meyenii (red maca) on prostatic hyperplasia in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Gasco, M; Malheiros-Pereira, A; Gonzales-Castañeda, C

    2008-06-01

    The plants from the Lepidium gender have demonstrated to have effect on the size of the prostate. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a Peruvian plant that grows exclusively over 4000 m above sea level. The present study was designed to determine the effect of red maca (RM) in the prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone enanthate (TE) in adult mice. Prostate hyperplasia was induced by administering TE, and then these animals (n = 6, each group) were treated with RM or Finasteride (positive control) for 21 days. There was an additional group without prostate hyperplasia (vehicle). Mice were killed on days 7, 14 and 21 after treatment with RM. Testosterone and oestradiol levels were measured on the last day of treatment. Prostatic stroma, epithelium and acini were measured histologically. RM reduced prostate weight at 21 days of treatment. Weights of seminal vesicles, testis and epididymis were not affected by RM treatment. The reduction in prostate size by RM was 1.59 times. Histological analysis showed that TE increased 2-fold the acinar area, effect prevented in the groups receiving TE + RM for 14 (P < 0.05) and 21 (P < 0.05) days and the group receiving TE + Finasteride for 21 days (P < 0.05). TE increased prostatic stroma area and this effect was prevented by treatment with RM since 7 days of treatment or Finasteride. The reduction in prostatic stroma area by RM was 1.42 times. RM has an anti-hyperplastic effect on the prostate of adult mice when hyperplasia was induced with TE acting first at prostatic stromal level.

  1. Snail1 is required for the maintenance of the pancreatic acinar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Loubat-Casanovas, Jordina; Peña, Raúl; Gonzàlez, Núria; Alba-Castellón, Lorena; Rosell, Santi; Francí, Clara; Navarro, Pilar; de Herreros, Antonio García

    2016-01-01

    The Snail1 transcriptional factor is required for correct embryonic development, yet its expression in adult animals is very limited and its functional roles are not evident. We have now conditionally inactivated Snail1 in adult mice and analyzed the phenotype of these animals. Snail1 ablation rapidly altered pancreas structure: one month after Snail1 depletion, acinar cells were markedly depleted, and pancreas accumulated adipose tissue. Snail1 expression was not detected in the epithelium but was in pancreatic mesenchymal cells (PMCs). Snail1 ablation in cultured PMCs downregulated the expression of several β-catenin/Tcf-4 target genes, modified the secretome of these cells and decreased their ability to maintain acinar markers in cultured pancreas cells. Finally, Snail1 deficiency modified the phenotype of pancreatic tumors generated in transgenic mice expressing c-myc under the control of the elastase promoter. Specifically, Snail1 depletion did not significantly alter the size of the tumors but accelerated acinar-ductal metaplasia. These results demonstrate that Snail1 is expressed in PMCs and plays a pivotal role in maintaining acinar cells within the pancreas in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:26735179

  2. Elevated expression of HIF-lα in actively growing prostate tissues is associated with clinical features of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Haihu; Bi, Dongbin; Ding, Kejia; Lu, Jiaju

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-age or older men. Increasing evidence has shown that BPH is associated with hypoxia microenvironment. Methods We retrospectively collected patient data and tissue samples from fetal prostates(FP), normal prostates(NP), intra-acinar of BPH, peri-acinar of BPH, prostate cancers and sarcomas of prostate. The expression of HIF-1α, as well as VEGF was visualized by immunohistochemistry and statistically analyzed with clinical parameters. Results Expression of HIF-lα was observed in intra-acinar of BPH (69.5%), prostate cancer (85.7%) and all FPs, while NP and peri-acinar of BPH tissues were all stained negative. HIF-lα levels in FPs and the malignant tumors were higher than BPH tissues(p < 0.05), and the expression of HIF-lα in intra-acinar of BPH was higher than NP and peri-acinar of BPH (p < 0.05). The expression of HIF-lα was correlated with the weight of intra-acinar of prostate (p < 0.05). And patients with prostate weight larger that 72.45g were prone to have HIF-lα moderate-positive expression, according to the ROC curve (AUC = 0.734, 95%CI = 0.630-0.838). Moreover, the risk of acute urine retention (AUR) for HIF-lα moderate-positive patients increased significantly (OR=5.517, 95%CI = 2.434-12.504). Conclusions HIF-lα expression is increased in highly proliferative prostate tissues and correlated with the weight of intra-acinar prostate. Moreover, HIF-lα is also an independent risk factor for AUR occurrence in BPH patients. PMID:26919249

  3. Progenitor Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells within the vertebrate fetal pancreas acquire their fate in a step-wise manner. Whereas the intrinsic factors dictating the transcriptional or epigenetic status of pancreatic lineages have been intensely examined, less is known about cell–cell interactions that might constitute a niche for the developing β cell lineage. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding and recapitulating these steps may instruct in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or therapeutic regeneration. Indeed, directed differentiation techniques have improved since transitioning from 2D to 3D cultures, suggesting that the 3D microenvironment in which β cells are born is critical. However, to date, it remains unknown whether the changing architecture of the pancreatic epithelium impacts the fate of cells therein. An emerging challenge in the field is to elucidate how progenitors are allocated during key events, such as the stratification and subsequent resolution of the pre-pancreatic epithelium, as well as the formation of lumens and branches. Here, we assess the progenitor epithelium and examine how it might influence the emergence of pancreatic multipotent progenitors (MPCs), which give rise to β cells and other pancreatic lineages. PMID:26216134

  4. Diets Rich in Saturated and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Induce Morphological Alterations in the Rat Ventral Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Furriel, Angélica; Campos-Silva, Pamella; Silva, Paola Cariello Guedes Picarote; Costa, Waldemar Silva; Sampaio, Francisco José Barcellos; Gregório, Bianca Martins

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the influence of dietary lipid quality on the body mass, carbohydrate metabolism and morphology of the rat ventral prostate. Materials and Methods Wistar rats were divided into four groups: SC (standard chow), HF-S (high-fat diet rich in saturated fatty acids), HF-P (high-fat diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids) and HF-SP (high-fat diet rich in saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids). We analyzed body mass, fat mass deposits, plasma blood, insulin resistance and the ventral prostate structure. Results Groups that received high-fat diets were heavier and presented larger fat deposits than SC group. The HF-S and HF-SP groups had higher glucose, insulin and total cholesterol serum levels and insulin resistance compared with the SC. The acinar area, epithelium height and area density of the lumen were higher in the HF-SP than in the other groups. The epithelium area density and epithelial cell proliferation were greater in the HF-P and HF-SP than in the SC group. All of the groups that received high-fat diets had greater area density of the stroma, area density of smooth muscle cells and stromal cell proliferation compared with the SC group. Conclusion Diets rich in saturated and/or polyunsaturated fatty acids induced overweight. Independently of insulin resistance, polyunsaturated fatty acids increased prostate stromal and epithelial cell proliferation. Saturated fatty acids influenced only stromal cellular proliferation. These structural and morphometric alterations may be considered risk factors for the development of adverse remodeling process in the rat ventral prostate. PMID:25029463

  5. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic transperineal prostate biopsy (STPB)

  6. PD2/Paf1 depletion in pancreatic acinar cells promotes acinar-to-ductal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Parama; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Vaz, Arokia P.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic differentiation 2 (PD2), a PAF (RNA Polymerase II Associated Factor) complex subunit, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has demonstrated potential oncogenic property. Here, we report that PD2/Paf1 expression was restricted to acinar cells in the normal murine pancreas, but its expression increased in the ductal cells of Pdx1Cre; KrasG12D (KC) mouse model of pancreatic cancer with increasing age, showing highest expression in neoplastic ductal cells of 50 weeks old mice. PD2/Paf1 was specifically expressed in amylase and CK19 double positive metaplastic ducts, representing intermediate structures during pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Similar PD2/Paf1 expression was observed in murine pancreas that exhibited ADM-like histology upon cerulein challenge. In normal mice, cerulein-mediated inflammation induced a decrease in PD2/Paf1 expression, which was later restored upon recovery of the pancreatic parenchyma. In KC mice, however, PD2/Paf1 mRNA level continued to decrease with progressive dysplasia and subsequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, knockdown of PD2/Paf1 in pancreatic acinar cells resulted in the abrogation of Amylase, Elastase and Lipase (acinar marker) mRNA levels with simultaneous increase in CK19 and CAII (ductal marker) transcripts. In conclusion, our studies indicate loss of PD2/Paf1 expression during acinar transdifferentiation in pancreatic cancer initiation and PD2/Paf1 mediated regulation of lineage specific markers. PMID:24947474

  7. Expression and Localization of Aquaporins in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Insang; Hwang, Eu-Chang; Song, Seung Hee; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kang, Taek-Won; Kwon, Dongdeuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2012-01-01

    The aquaporin (AQP) families of water channels are intrinsic membrane proteins that facilitate selective water and small solute movement across the plasma membrane. The purposes of this study were to determine the expression and localization of AQPs in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Prostatic tissue was collected from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer by transurethral resection of the prostate. The expression and cellular localization of the AQPs were determined in the human prostate by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. AQP1, 3, and 9 were expressed in the human prostate. Western blot analysis revealed bands at 28-36 kDa for the AQP1, 3, and 9 proteins. Of these proteins, AQP3 and 9 were expressed in the epithelium. Immunolabeling showed that AQP1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the prostate, AQP9 was expressed in the cytoplasm of the epithelium, and AQP3 was mainly associated with the plasma membrane of the prostatic epithelium. Only AQP3 expression was localized in the cell membrane, and expressed AQP3 was translocated to the cytoplasm in prostate cancer. The epithelium in the human prostate expresses AQP3 and 9 proteins, and the capillaries and venules of the prostate express AQP1. Characterizing or modifying the expression of AQP3 may lead to an understanding of the role of the AQPs in human prostatic disease. PMID:23323224

  8. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  9. A Microfluidic Model of Biomimetically Breathing Pulmonary Acinar Airways.

    PubMed

    Fishler, Rami; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying respiratory flow characteristics in the pulmonary acinar depths and how they influence inhaled aerosol transport is critical towards optimizing drug inhalation techniques as well as predicting deposition patterns of potentially toxic airborne particles in the pulmonary alveoli. Here, soft-lithography techniques are used to fabricate complex acinar-like airway structures at the truthful anatomical length-scales that reproduce physiological acinar flow phenomena in an optically accessible system. The microfluidic device features 5 generations of bifurcating alveolated ducts with periodically expanding and contracting walls. Wall actuation is achieved by altering the pressure inside water-filled chambers surrounding the thin PDMS acinar channel walls both from the sides and the top of the device. In contrast to common multilayer microfluidic devices, where the stacking of several PDMS molds is required, a simple method is presented to fabricate the top chamber by embedding the barrel section of a syringe into the PDMS mold. This novel microfluidic setup delivers physiological breathing motions which in turn give rise to characteristic acinar air-flows. In the current study, micro particle image velocimetry (µPIV) with liquid suspended particles was used to quantify such air flows based on hydrodynamic similarity matching. The good agreement between µPIV results and expected acinar flow phenomena suggest that the microfluidic platform may serve in the near future as an attractive in vitro tool to investigate directly airborne representative particle transport and deposition in the acinar regions of the lungs.

  10. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A.; Washburn, William K.; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  11. Human pulmonary acinar aplasia: reduction of transforming growth factor-beta ligands and receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, M F; Gray, K D; Prentice, M A; Mariano, J M; Jakowlew, S B

    1999-07-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia has been found in the human neonatal autopsy population and has been attributed to an alteration in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during development of the lung. Pulmonary acinar aplasia is a very rare and severe form of pulmonary hypoplasia. The transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-beta) are multifunctional regulatory peptides that are secreted by a variety of normal and malignant cells and are expressed in developing organs including the lung; their tissue distribution patterns have possible significance for signaling roles in many epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Here, we report our examination of TGF-beta in the lungs of a term female infant diagnosed with pulmonary acinar aplasia whose autopsy revealed extremely hypoplastic lungs with complete absence of alveolar ducts and alveoli. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization analyses were used to localize and measure the proteins and mRNA, respectively, for TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, TGF-beta3, and TGF-beta type I and type II receptors (TGF-beta RI and RII) in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections of these hypoplastic lungs and normal lungs. Immunostaining for TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, and TGF-beta RI and RII was significantly lower in the bronchial epithelium and muscle of the hypoplastic lungs than in normal lungs, whereas no difference was detected in staining for other proteins including Clara cell 10-kD protein, adrenomedullin, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor/Met in the hypoplastic and normal lungs or in the liver and kidneys of this infant compared with normal liver and kidney. In addition, in situ hybridization showed that TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta RI transcripts were considerably reduced in the bronchial epithelium of the hypoplastic lung compared with normal lung. These results show that there is a selective reduction of TGF-beta in pulmonary acinar aplasia and suggest that the signaling action of TGF-beta in epithelial

  12. Morphofunctional analysis of the prostate exposed to chemical manufacture factors.

    PubMed

    Lapii, G A; Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Kiptilov, A V; Neimark, A I

    2014-07-01

    The structural characteristics of the prostate and the blood flow in the organ were studied in chemical plant workers suffering from chronic prostatitis. The prostate echostructure was characterized by vast zones of fibrosis and calcinosis, the hemodynamic ultrasonic parameters were low. Degenerative changes in the acinar structures and stromal fibrosis predominated in the biopsy specimens, these shifts were the most pronounced in the peripheral and transitory zones. Foci of common and small-acinar degeneration of the glands, abundant concrements, and significant collagenization with periglandular and perivascular sclerosis without or with slight inflammatory infiltration were detected. We hypothesize that long exposure to adverse factors of sulfuric acid manufacture contributed to the development of pathological changes in the prostate.

  13. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  15. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  16. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC.

  17. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  18. A null-mutation in the Znt7 gene accelerates prostate tumor formation in a transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decrease of cellular zinc in the epithelium of the prostate has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. To investigate whether ZnT7, a zinc transporter involved in intracellular zinc accumulation, plays a role in prostate cancer development, we have generated and characterized a trans...

  19. Effects of Benzodiazepines on Acinar and Myoepithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Tatiana M. F.; Alanis, Luciana R. A.; Sapelli, Silvana da Silva; de Lima, Antonio A. S.; de Noronha, Lucia; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef; Ignacio, Sergio A.; Johann, Aline C. B. R.; Gregio, Ana M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benzodiazepines (BZDs), the most commonly prescribed psychotropic drugs with anxiolytic action, may cause hyposalivation. It has been previously shown that BZDs can cause hypertrophy and decrease the acini cell number. In this study, we investigated the effects of BZDs and pilocarpine on rat parotid glands, specifically on acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Methods: Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into nine groups. Control groups received a saline solution for 30 days (C30) and 60 days (C60), and pilocarpine (PILO) for 60 days. Experimental groups received lorazepam (L30) and midazolam (M30) for 30 days. Another group (LS60 or MS60) received lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and saline for additional 30 days. Finally, other groups (LP60 or MP60) received either lorazepam or midazolam for 30 days, respectively, and pilocarpine for additional 30 days. The expression of calponin in myoepithelial cells and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in acinar and ductal cells were evaluated. Results: Animals treated with lorazepam showed an increase in the number of positive staining cells for calponin as compared to control animals (p < 0.05). Midazolam administered with pilocarpine (MP60) induced an increase in the proliferation of acinar and ductal cells and a decrease in the positive staining cells for calponin as compared to midazolam administered with saline (MS60). Conclusion: We found that myoepithelial cells might be more sensitive to the effects of BZD than acinar and ductal cells in rat parotid glands. PMID:27445812

  20. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G.; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P.; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Çiǧdem; Arkan, Melek C.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (IkkαΔpan) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in IkkαΔpan mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation. PMID:23563314

  1. Characterization of cysteine string protein in rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Hiromi; Imai, Akane; Nashida, Tomoko

    2013-10-01

    Cysteine string proteins (CSPs) are secretory vesicle chaperone proteins that contain: (i) a heavily palmitoylated cysteine string (comprised of 14 cysteine residues, responsible for the localization of CSP to secretory vesicle membranes), (ii) an N-terminal J-domain (DnaJ domain of Hsc70, 70kDa heat-shock cognate protein family of co-chaperones), and (iii) a linker domain (important in mediating CSP effects on secretion). In this study, we investigated the localization of CSP1 in rat parotid acinar cells and evaluated the role of CSP1 in parotid secretion. RT-PCR and western blotting revealed that CSP1 was expressed and associated with Hsc70 in rat parotid acinar cells. Further, CSP1 associated with syntaxin 4, but not with syntaxin 3, on the apical plasma membrane. Introduction of anti-CSP1 antibody into SLO-permeabilized acinar cells enhanced isoproterenol (IPR)-induced amylase release. Introduction of GST-CSP11-112, containing both the J-domain and the adjacent linker region, enhanced IPR-induced amylase release, whereas neither GST-CSP11-82, containing the J-domain only, nor GST-CSP183-112, containing the linker region only, did produce detectable enhancement. These results indicated that both the J-domain and the linker domain of CSP1 are necessary to function an important role in acinar cell exocytosis.

  2. Regulation of Acinar Cell Function in The Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review identifies and puts into context the recent articles which have advanced understanding of the functions of pancreatic acinar cells and the mechanisms by which these functions are regulated. Recent Findings Receptors present on acinar cells, particularly those for cholecystokinin and secretin, have been better characterized as to the molecular nature of the ligand-receptor interaction. Other reports have described the potential regulation of acinar cells by GLP-1 and cannabinoids. Intracellular Ca2+ signaling remains at the center of stimulus secretion coupling and its regulation has been further defined. Recent studies have identified specific channels mediating Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and influx across the plasma membrane.Work downstream of intracellular mediators has focused on molecular mechanisms of exocytosis particularly involving small G proteins, SNARE proteins and chaperone molecules. In addition to secretion, recent studies have further defined the regulation of pancreatic growth both in adaptive regulation to diet and hormones in the regeneration that occurs after pancreatic damage. Lineage tracing has been used to show the contribution of different cell types. The importance of specific amino acids as signaling molecules to activate the mTOR pathway is being elucidated. Summary Understanding the mechanisms that regulate pancreatic acinar cell function is contributing to knowledge of normal pancreatic function and alterations in disease. PMID:20625287

  3. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  4. Acinar origin of CFTR-dependent airway submucosal gland fluid secretion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin V; Krouse, Mauri E; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease arises from defective innate defenses, especially defective mucus clearance of microorganisms. Airway submucosal glands secrete most airway mucus, and CF airway glands do not secrete in response to VIP or forskolin. CFTR, the protein that is defective in CF, is expressed in glands, but immunocytochemistry finds the highest expression of CFTR in either the ciliated ducts or in the acini, depending on the antibodies used. CFTR is absolutely required for forskolin-mediated gland secretion; we used this finding to localize the origin of forskolin-stimulated, CFTR-dependent gland fluid secretion. We tested the hypothesis that secretion to forskolin might originate from the gland duct rather than or in addition to the acini. We ligated gland ducts at various points, stimulated the glands with forskolin, and monitored the regions of the glands that swelled. The results supported an acinar rather than ductal origin of secretion. We tracked particles in the mucus using Nomarski time-lapse imaging; particles originated in the acini and traveled toward the duct orifice. Estimated bulk flow accelerated in the acini and mucus tubules, consistent with fluid secretion in those regions, but was constant in the unbranched duct, consistent with a lack of fluid secretion or absorption by the ductal epithelium. We conclude that CFTR-dependent gland fluid secretion originates in the serous acini. The failure to observe either secretion or absorption from the CFTR and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-rich ciliated ducts is unexplained, but may indicate that this epithelium alters the composition rather than the volume of gland mucus. PMID:16997881

  5. High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, David G; Liu, Lina; Brawer, Michael K; Qian, Junqi

    2004-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia is considered the most likely precursor of prostatic carcinoma. The only method of detection is biopsy; prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultra-sonography. The incidence of PIN in prostate biopsies averages 9% (range, 4%–16%), representing 115,000 new cases of PIN diagnosed each year in United States. PIN has a high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeated biopsy for concurrent or subsequent invasive carcinoma. Carcinoma will develop in most patients with PIN within 10 years. PIN is associated with progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between normal prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. Androgen deprivation therapy decreases the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that this form of treatment may play a role in chemoprevention. PMID:16985598

  6. Integrin adhesion in regulation of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sofia V; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Gierow, J Peter

    2006-09-01

    The extracellular microenvironment regulates lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion. Culturing isolated rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells on different extracellular matrix proteins revealed that laminin enhances carbachol-stimulated secretion to a greater extent than other extracellular matrix proteins investigated. Furthermore, immunofluorescence indicated that integrin subunits, potentially functioning as laminin receptors are present in acinar cells. Among these, the integrin alpha6 and beta1 subunit mRNA expression was also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequence analysis. Secretion assays, which measured beta-hexosaminidase activity released in the culture media, demonstrated that function-blocking integrin alpha6 and beta1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) induce a rapid, transient and dose-dependent secretory response in cultured cells. To determine the intracellular pathways by which integrin alpha6 and beta1 mAbs could induce secretion, selected second messenger molecules were inhibited. Although inhibitors of protein kinase C and IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) mobilization attenuated carbachol-stimulated secretion, no effect on integrin mAb-induced release was observed. In addition, protein tyrosine kinases do not appear to have a role in transducing signals arising from mAb interactions. Our data clearly demonstrate, though, that cell adhesion through integrins regulates secretion from lacrimal gland acinar cells. The fact that the integrin mAbs affect the cholinergic response differently and that the integrin beta1 mAb secretion, but not the alpha6, was attenuated by the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate, suggests that each subunit utilizes separate intracellular signaling pathways to induce exocytosis. The results also indicate that the secretory response triggered by the beta1 integrin mAb is generated through dephosphorylation events.

  7. Salivary gland homeostasis is maintained through acinar cell self-duplication.

    PubMed

    Aure, Marit H; Konieczny, Stephen F; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2015-04-20

    Current dogma suggests that salivary gland homeostasis is stem cell dependent. However, the extent of stem cell contribution to salivary gland maintenance has not been determined. We investigated acinar cell replacement during homeostasis, growth, and regeneration, using an inducible CreER(T2) expressed under the control of the Mist1 gene locus. Genetic labeling, followed by a chase period, showed that acinar cell replacement is not driven by the differentiation of unlabeled stem cells. Analysis using R26(Brainbow2.1) reporter revealed continued proliferation and clonal expansion of terminally differentiated acinar cells in all major salivary glands. Induced injury also demonstrated the regenerative potential of pre-labeled acinar cells. Our results support a revised model for salivary gland homeostasis based predominantly on self-duplication of acinar cells, rather than on differentiation of stem cells. The proliferative capacity of differentiated acinar cells may prove critical in the implementation of cell-based strategies to restore the salivary glands.

  8. Prostatic structure and function in relation to the etiology of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, J T

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, studies by a large series of independent investigators are reviewed with regard to the basic structure and function of the prostate in an attempt to examine their relationship to prostatic cancer etiology. These studies demonstrate that the functional activities of the prostate involve secretion, transport, and reabsorption of a variety of materials into and out of the glandular lumen and that these activities are directly related to the basic structural organization of the gland. These functional activities are constantly occurring in the prostate even under basal (ie, nonejaculating) conditions. Due to these functional activities, the prostatic fluid in the glandular lumen is a complex mixture of a variety of components derived, not only from the synthetic activity of the glandular epithelial cells of the gland itself, but also from the blood serum. The levels of these components are continuously modulated, not only by the frequency of active ejaculation, but also, under basal conditions by the continuous interaction with the glandular prostatic cells lining the acinar lumen and ducts. A concept is presented that the initiation and/or promotion of prostatic carcinogenesis may well involve the chronic modulation/interaction of the prostatic glandular cells with their lumenal fluid.

  9. Beyond Prostate Adenocarcinoma: Expanding the Differential Diagnosis in Prostate Pathologic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Mongan, John; Behr, Spencer C; Sud, Seema; Coakley, Fergus V; Simko, Jeffry; Westphalen, Antonio C

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the prostate gland have dramatically improved the ability to detect and stage adenocarcinoma of the prostate, one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men and one of the most frequently diagnosed pathologic conditions of the prostate gland. A wide variety of nonadenocarcinoma diseases can also be seen with MR imaging, ranging from benign to malignant diseases, as well as infectious and inflammatory manifestations. Many of these diseases have distinctive imaging features that allow differentiation from prostate acinar adenocarcinoma. Early recognition of these entities produces a more accurate differential diagnosis and may enable more expeditious clinical workup. Benign neoplasms of the prostate include plexiform neurofibroma and cystadenoma, both of which demonstrate distinctive imaging features. Stromal neoplasms of uncertain malignant potential are rare tumors of uncertain malignant potential that are often difficult to distinguish at imaging from more-malignant prostate sarcomas. Other malignant neoplasms of the prostate include urothelial carcinoma, primary prostatic carcinoid, carcinosarcoma, endometrioid or ductal adenocarcinoma, and mucinous adenocarcinoma. Prostatic infections can lead to abscesses of pyogenic, tuberculous, or fungal origins. Finally, miscellaneous idiopathic disorders of the prostate include amyloidosis, exophytic benign prostatic hyperplasia, and various congenital cysts. Considerable overlap can exist in the clinical history and imaging findings associated with these prostate pathologic conditions, and biopsy is often required for ultimate confirmation of the diagnosis. However, many diagnoses, including cystadenoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, sarcoma, and abscesses, have distinct imaging features, which can enable the informed radiologist to identify the diagnosis and recommend appropriate clinical workup and management. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27315446

  10. Flaxseed suppressed prostatic epithelial proliferation in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Said, Mahmoud M; Hassan, Nahla S; Schlicht, Michael J; Bosland, Maarten C

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a disease occurring frequently among elderly males, is a slow progressive enlargement of the fibromuscular and epithelial structures of the prostate gland. Dietary factors may influence the prostate and exert an influence on prostatic growth and disease. The current study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of dietary flaxseed supplementation against testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in male rats. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: (1) untreated control; (2) treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) to induce prostate enlargement; (3) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 5% milled flaxseed; (4) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 10% milled flaxseed; and (5) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 20 ppm finasteride. Treatment with TP significantly increased the absolute and relative weights of different prostatic lobes, serum testosterone (T), and testosterone/estradiol ratio, as well as prostatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, RNA synthesis per cell, and epithelial cell proliferation, detected as Ki67 labeling. Histopathological examination did not reveal marked differences in acinar morphology in ventral prostate, whereas morphometric analysis showed significantly increased epithelial cell height. Co-administration of flaxseed or finasteride with TP significantly reduced prostatic VEFG, epithelial cell proliferation, and RNA/DNA ratio, along with a significant increase in serum T and testosterone/estradiol ratio compared with TP-only-treated rats. Our results indicate that flaxseed, similar to the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, blocked TP-induced prostate enlargement in a rat model of BPH, likely through suppression of prostatic VEFG and cellular proliferation.

  11. Giant multilocular prostatic cystadenoma: a distinctive lesion of the retroperitoneum in men. A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Maluf, H M; King, M E; DeLuca, F R; Navarro, J; Talerman, A; Young, R H

    1991-02-01

    Two examples of large, multiloculated, cystic tumors that arose within the pelvis in men of 28 and 37 years of age are described. The tumors were composed of glands and cysts lined by prostatic-type epithelium lying in a hypocellular fibrous stroma. The prostatic nature of the lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining of the epithelium for prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. Two apparently similar lesions were found in the literature; one tumor was attached to the prostate by a pedicle, and the other arose in the retrovesical space. These tumors, for which we propose the designation "giant multilocular prostatic cystadenoma," appear to be benign, although they may recur if incompletely excised. They may pose considerable diagnostic difficulty if the prostatic nature of the epithelium is not appreciated, an error that is likely if a relationship to the prostate is not recognized. This lesion should be included in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cystic tumors in men.

  12. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... plan and then place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with ...

  13. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells.

  14. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells. PMID:26235267

  15. Prostatic cellular changes after injection of cadmium and lead into rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Khare, N; Der, R; Ross, G; Fahim, M

    1978-05-01

    Forty male rats were divided into four groups. Group I served as control. Group II received 1 mg. lead injected into the prostate; Group III received 1 mg. cadmium chloride; and Group IV received 0.5 mg. lead acetate and 0.5 mg. cadmium chloride. Results indicated that lead caused stone formation in the bladder and calcification of both bladder and prostate; cadmium caused reduction in size and weight of prostate, and histological observation showed marked atrophy of the gland, cuboidal epithelium, and squamous metaplasia in the acini of the prostate; there was no synergistic effect of lead acetate and cadmium chloride when combined at the level administered to Group IV.

  16. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    PubMed

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L; Parkhurst, Linnea J; Steinke, Laura M; Marker, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  17. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L.; Parkhurst, Linnea J.; Steinke, Laura M.; Marker, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  18. Murine pulmonary acinar mechanics during quasi-static inflation using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sera, Toshihiro; Yokota, Hideo; Tanaka, Gaku; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto; Schroter, Robert C

    2013-07-15

    We visualized pulmonary acini in the core regions of the mouse lung in situ using synchrotron refraction-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and evaluated their kinematics during quasi-static inflation. This CT system (with a cube voxel of 2.8 μm) allows excellent visualization of not just the conducting airways, but also the alveolar ducts and sacs, and tracking of the acinar shape and its deformation during inflation. The kinematics of individual alveoli and alveolar clusters with a group of terminal alveoli is influenced not only by the connecting alveolar duct and alveoli, but also by the neighboring structures. Acinar volume was not a linear function of lung volume. The alveolar duct diameter changed dramatically during inflation at low pressures and remained relatively constant above an airway pressure of ∼8 cmH2O during inflation. The ratio of acinar surface area to acinar volume indicates that acinar distension during low-pressure inflation differed from that during inflation over a higher pressure range; in particular, acinar deformation was accordion-like during low-pressure inflation. These results indicated that the alveoli and duct expand differently as total acinar volume increases and that the alveolar duct may expand predominantly during low-pressure inflation. Our findings suggest that acinar deformation in the core regions of the lung is complex and heterogeneous.

  19. Expansion of prostate epithelial progenitor cells after inflammation of the mouse prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Zoetemelk, Marloes; Chitteti, Brahmananda R.; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Myers, Jason D.; Srour, Edward F.; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic inflammation is a nearly ubiquitous pathological feature observed in specimens from benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients. The microenvironment of the inflamed prostate is highly reactive, and epithelial hyperplasia is a hallmark feature of inflamed prostates. How inflammation orchestrates epithelial proliferation as part of its repair and recovery action is not well understood. Here, we report that a novel epithelial progenitor cell population is induced to expand during inflammation. We used sphere culture assays, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry to show that this population is increased in bacterially induced inflamed mouse prostates relative to naïve control prostates. We confirmed from previous reports that this population exclusively possesses the ability to regrow entire prostatic structures from single cell culture using renal grafts. In addition, putative progenitor cells harvested from inflamed animals have greater aggregation capacity than those isolated from naïve control prostates. Expansion of this critical cell population requires IL-1 signaling, as IL-1 receptor 1-null mice exhibit inflammation similar to wild-type inflamed animals but exhibit significantly reduced progenitor cell proliferation and hyperplasia. These data demonstrate that inflammation promotes hyperplasia in the mouse prostatic epithelium by inducing the expansion of a selected epithelial progenitor cell population in an IL-1 receptor-dependent manner. These findings may have significant impact on our understanding of how inflammation promotes proliferative diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, both of which depend on expansion of cells that exhibit a progenitor-like nature. PMID:25925259

  20. Prostate-regenerating capacity of cultured human adult prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, M; Taylor, R A; Richards, M G; Sved, P; Wong, J; Eisinger, D; Xie, C; Salomon, R; Risbridger, G P; Dong, Q

    2010-01-01

    Experimentation with the progenitor/stem cells in adult prostate epithelium can be inconvenient due to a tight time line from tissue acquisition to cell isolation and to downstream experiments. To circumvent this inconvenience, we developed a simple technical procedure for culturing epithelial cells derived from human prostate tissue. In this study, benign prostate tissue was enzymatically digested and fractionated into epithelium and stroma, which were then cultured in the medium designed for prostate epithelial and stromal cells, respectively. The cultured cells were analyzed by immunocytochemical staining and flow cytometry. Prostate tissue-regenerating capacity of cultured cells in vitro was determined by co-culturing epithelial and stromal cells in dihydrotestosterone-containing RPMI. Cell lineages in formed acini-like structures were determined by immunohistochemistry. The culture of epithelial cells mainly consisted of basal cells. A minor population was negative for known lineage markers and positive for CD133. The culture also contained cells with high activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase. After co-culturing with stromal cells, the epithelial cells were able to form acini-like structures containing multiple cell lineages. Thus, the established culture of prostate epithelial cells provides an alternative source for studying progenitor/stem cells of prostate epithelium.

  1. Pancreatic acinar cells: molecular insight from studies of signal-transduction using transgenic animals.

    PubMed

    Yule, David I

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells are classical exocrine gland cells. The apical regions of clusters of coupled acinar cells collectively form a lumen which constitutes the blind end of a tube created by ductal cells - a structure reminiscent of a "bunch of grapes". When activated by neural or hormonal secretagogues, pancreatic acinar cells are stimulated to secrete a variety of proteins. These proteins are predominately inactive digestive enzyme precursors called "zymogens". Acinar cell secretion is absolutely dependent on secretagogue-induced increases in intracellular free Ca(2+). The increase in [Ca(2+)](i) has precise temporal and spatial characteristics as a result of the exquisite regulation of the proteins responsible for Ca(2+) release, Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) clearance in the acinar cell. This brief review discusses recent studies in which transgenic animal models have been utilized to define in molecular detail the components of the Ca(2+) signaling machinery which contribute to these characteristics.

  2. Adequate histologic sectioning of prostate needle biopsies.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Kahane, Hillel

    2013-08-01

    No standard method exists for sampling prostate needle biopsies, although most reports claim to embed 3 cores per block and obtain 3 slices from each block. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of histologic sectioning necessary for optimal examination of prostate biopsies. We prospectively compared the impact on cancer yield of submitting 1 biopsy core per cassette (biopsies from January 2010) with 3 cores per cassette (biopsies from August 2010) from a large national reference laboratory. Between 6 and 12 slices were obtained with the former 1-core method, resulting in 3 to 6 slices being placed on each of 2 slides; for the latter 3-core method, a limit of 6 slices was obtained, resulting in 3 slices being place on each of 2 slides. A total of 6708 sets of 12 to 18 core biopsies were studied, including 3509 biopsy sets from the 1-biopsy-core-per-cassette group (January 2010) and 3199 biopsy sets from the 3-biopsy-cores-percassette group (August 2010). The yield of diagnoses was classified as benign, atypical small acinar proliferation, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and cancer and was similar with the 2 methods: 46.2%, 8.2%, 4.5%, and 41.1% and 46.7%, 6.3%, 4.4%, and 42.6%, respectively (P = .02). Submission of 1 core or 3 cores per cassette had no effect on the yield of atypical small acinar proliferation, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or cancer in prostate needle biopsies. Consequently, we recommend submission of 3 cores per cassette to minimize labor and cost of processing. PMID:23764163

  3. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas.

  4. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Clark, Philip Johnson

    1940-01-01

    Cystic hyperplasia of the prostate occurs spontaneously in senile dogs only when they possess physiologically effective amounts of androgenic hormone. The cysts are closely grouped and radially arranged in a conical manner with the base of the cone at the periphery of the gland. Flattened and columnar epithelium, varying from about 5 to 25µ are seen in each cyst. The cysts communicate with the urethra by way of ducts. Both normal and cystic prostates undergo marked atrophy when the testes are removed, the chief difference 3 months after orchiectomy being the persistence of slightly dilated clefts and spaces at the site of the former cysts in the senile state. In the castrate dog whose prostate gland is being reconstructed as result of the influence of daily injections of androgen, certain doses of estrogen prevent increase of secretion and still larger doses greatly depress the output of the gland. In dogs so treated by daily injections of testosterone propionate, 10 mg., the amount of secretion is maintained from day to day at a level by daily injections of stilbestrol, 0.4 to 0.6 mg. and greatly depressed by doses of 1 to 1.5 mg. When the larger amounts of estrogen are used, together with androgen, squamous metaplasia occurs in the posterior lobe of the prostate while the epithelium of the acini decreases in height to cuboidal or low columnar form; these histological signs of activity of both androgen and estrogen on the prostate show that inhibition of the male hormone by stilbestrol is incomplete at these ratios. In dogs with either normal or cystic prostate glands, the prostate decreases in size when estrogen is injected in amounts to depress prostatic secretion profoundly. The gland is maintained in an atrophic state and overdosage avoided by controlled periodic injections of stilbestrol until secretion is reduced to the minimum, followed by free intervals, the estrogen being again administered when secretion measurably increases. The shrinkage is related to

  5. Impact of Prostate Inflammation on Lesion Development in the POET3+Pten+/− Mouse Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Burcham, Grant N.; Cresswell, Gregory M.; Snyder, Paul W.; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A.; Henry, Michael D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten+/−) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten+/− mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b+Gr1+ cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten+/− model of cancer. PMID:25455686

  6. Impact of prostate inflammation on lesion development in the POET3(+)Pten(+/-) mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Burcham, Grant N; Cresswell, Gregory M; Snyder, Paul W; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A; Henry, Michael D; Ratliff, Timothy L

    2014-12-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten(+/-)) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten(+/-) mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten(+/-) model of cancer.

  7. PNA lectin for purifying mouse acinar cells from the inflamed pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Fusco, Joseph; Zimmerman, Ray; Song, Zewen; Nebres, Philip; Ricks, David Matthew; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Husain, Sohail Z.; Gittes, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Better methods for purifying human or mouse acinar cells without the need for genetic modification are needed. Such techniques would be advantageous for the specific study of certain mechanisms, such as acinar-to-beta-cell reprogramming and pancreatitis. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin I (UEA-I) lectin has been used to label and isolate acinar cells from the pancreas. However, the purity of the UEA-I-positive cell fraction has not been fully evaluated. Here, we screened 20 widely used lectins for their binding specificity for major pancreatic cell types, and found that UEA-I and Peanut agglutinin (PNA) have a specific affinity for acinar cells in the mouse pancreas, with minimal affinity for other major pancreatic cell types including endocrine cells, duct cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, PNA-purified acinar cells were less contaminated with mesenchymal and inflammatory cells, compared to UEA-I purified acinar cells. Thus, UEA-I and PNA appear to be excellent lectins for pancreatic acinar cell purification. PNA may be a better choice in situations where mesenchymal cells or inflammatory cells are significantly increased in the pancreas, such as type 1 diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26884345

  8. A case of multilocular prostatic cystadenoma.

    PubMed

    Seong, B M; Cheon, J; Lee, J G; Kim, J J; Chae, Y S

    1998-10-01

    We recently experienced a 43-year-old man with a large, multiloculated, cystic tumor that appeared on the pelvis. The tumor was composed of glands and cysts lined by prostatic-type epithelium and attached microscopically to the prostate by a pedicle. The prostatic nature of the lesions was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining of epithelium for prostate specific antigen (PSA). Our review of literature disclosed nine similar cases in men of various ages, originated from the prostate and grew to massive proportions. The lesions in these reported cases did not invade contiguous structures but they can adhere to viscera in their proximity. The multilocular prostatic cystadenoma is a pathologically benign entity, and they can be definitively treated by a carefully planned complete surgical excision. This lesion should be included in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cystic tumors in man. We report a rare case of multilocular prostatic cystadenoma that did not invade adjacent organs and showed no evidence of recurrence after complete surgical excision.

  9. Acinar cell carcinoma of exocrine pancreas in two horses.

    PubMed

    de Brot, S; Junge, H; Hilbe, M

    2014-05-01

    Two horses were presented with non-specific clinical signs of several weeks' duration and were humanely destroyed due to a poor prognosis. At necropsy examination, both horses had multiple small, white nodules replacing pancreatic tissue and involving the serosal surface of the abdominal cavity, the liver and the lung. Microscopically, neoplastic cells were organized in acini and contained abundant (case 1) or sparse (horse 2) intracytoplasmic zymogen granules. Immunohistochemically, both tumours expressed amylase and pan-cytokeratin, but not insulin or neuron-specific enolase. In case 2, a low percentage of neoplastic cells expressed glucagon and synaptophysin. The presence of zymogen granules was confirmed in both cases by electron microscopy and occasional fibrillary or glucagon granules were observed in cases 1 and 2, respectively. A diagnosis of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma was established in both horses.

  10. KRAS Mutations in Canine and Feline Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Crozier, C; Wood, G A; Foster, R A; Stasi, S; Liu, J H W; Bartlett, J M S; Coomber, B L; Sabine, V S

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals may serve as valuable models for studying human cancers. Although KRAS is the most commonly mutated gene in human ductal pancreatic cancers (57%), with mutations frequently occurring at codons 12, 13 and 61, human pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (ACCs) lack activating KRAS mutations. In the present study, 32 pancreatic ACC samples obtained from 14 dogs and 18 cats, including seven metastases, were analyzed for six common activating KRAS mutations located in codons 12 (n = 5) and 13 (n = 1) using Sequenom MassARRAY. No KRAS mutations were found, suggesting that, similar to human pancreatic ACC, KRAS mutations do not play a critical role in feline or canine pancreatic ACC. Due to the similarity of the clinical disease in dogs and cats to that of man, this study confirms that companion animals offer potential as a suitable model for investigating this rare subtype of pancreatic carcinoma.

  11. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  12. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  13. A Computer-Based Automated Algorithm for Assessing Acinar Cell Loss after Experimental Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Eisses, John F.; Davis, Amy W.; Tosun, Akif Burak; Dionise, Zachary R.; Chen, Cheng; Ozolek, John A.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2014-01-01

    The change in exocrine mass is an important parameter to follow in experimental models of pancreatic injury and regeneration. However, at present, the quantitative assessment of exocrine content by histology is tedious and operator-dependent, requiring manual assessment of acinar area on serial pancreatic sections. In this study, we utilized a novel computer-generated learning algorithm to construct an accurate and rapid method of quantifying acinar content. The algorithm works by learning differences in pixel characteristics from input examples provided by human experts. HE-stained pancreatic sections were obtained in mice recovering from a 2-day, hourly caerulein hyperstimulation model of experimental pancreatitis. For training data, a pathologist carefully outlined discrete regions of acinar and non-acinar tissue in 21 sections at various stages of pancreatic injury and recovery (termed the “ground truth”). After the expert defined the ground truth, the computer was able to develop a prediction rule that was then applied to a unique set of high-resolution images in order to validate the process. For baseline, non-injured pancreatic sections, the software demonstrated close agreement with the ground truth in identifying baseline acinar tissue area with only a difference of 1%±0.05% (p = 0.21). Within regions of injured tissue, the software reported a difference of 2.5%±0.04% in acinar area compared with the pathologist (p = 0.47). Surprisingly, on detailed morphological examination, the discrepancy was primarily because the software outlined acini and excluded inter-acinar and luminal white space with greater precision. The findings suggest that the software will be of great potential benefit to both clinicians and researchers in quantifying pancreatic acinar cell flux in the injured and recovering pancreas. PMID:25343460

  14. Necro-inflammatory response of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gu, H; Werner, J; Bergmann, F; Whitcomb, D C; Büchler, M W; Fortunato, F

    2013-01-01

    The role of pancreatic acinar cells in initiating necro-inflammatory responses during the early onset of alcoholic acute pancreatitis (AP) has not been fully evaluated. We investigated the ability of acinar cells to generate pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, including inflammasome-associated IL-18/caspase-1, and evaluated acinar cell necrosis in an animal model of AP and human samples. Rats were fed either an ethanol-containing or control diet for 14 weeks and killed 3 or 24 h after a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Inflammasome components and necro-inflammation were evaluated in acinar cells by immunofluorescence (IF), histology, and biochemical approaches. Alcohol exposure enhanced acinar cell-specific production of TNFα, IL-6, MCP-1 and IL-10, as early as 3 h after LPS, whereas IL-18 and caspase-1 were evident 24 h later. Alcohol enhanced LPS-induced TNFα expression, whereas blockade of LPS signaling diminished TNFα production in vitro, indicating that the response of pancreatic acinar cells to LPS is similar to that of immune cells. Similar results were observed from acinar cells in samples from patients with acute/recurrent pancreatitis. Although morphologic examination of sub-clinical AP showed no visible signs of necrosis, early loss of pancreatic HMGB1 and increased systemic levels of HMGB1 and LDH were observed, indicating that this strong systemic inflammatory response is associated with little pancreatic necrosis. These results suggest that TLR-4-positive acinar cells respond to LPS by activating the inflammasome and producing pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators during the development of mild, sub-clinical AP, and that these effects are exacerbated by alcohol injury.

  15. Necro-inflammatory response of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, H; Werner, J; Bergmann, F; Whitcomb, D C; Büchler, M W; Fortunato, F

    2013-01-01

    The role of pancreatic acinar cells in initiating necro-inflammatory responses during the early onset of alcoholic acute pancreatitis (AP) has not been fully evaluated. We investigated the ability of acinar cells to generate pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, including inflammasome-associated IL-18/caspase-1, and evaluated acinar cell necrosis in an animal model of AP and human samples. Rats were fed either an ethanol-containing or control diet for 14 weeks and killed 3 or 24 h after a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Inflammasome components and necro-inflammation were evaluated in acinar cells by immunofluorescence (IF), histology, and biochemical approaches. Alcohol exposure enhanced acinar cell-specific production of TNFα, IL-6, MCP-1 and IL-10, as early as 3 h after LPS, whereas IL-18 and caspase-1 were evident 24 h later. Alcohol enhanced LPS-induced TNFα expression, whereas blockade of LPS signaling diminished TNFα production in vitro, indicating that the response of pancreatic acinar cells to LPS is similar to that of immune cells. Similar results were observed from acinar cells in samples from patients with acute/recurrent pancreatitis. Although morphologic examination of sub-clinical AP showed no visible signs of necrosis, early loss of pancreatic HMGB1 and increased systemic levels of HMGB1 and LDH were observed, indicating that this strong systemic inflammatory response is associated with little pancreatic necrosis. These results suggest that TLR-4-positive acinar cells respond to LPS by activating the inflammasome and producing pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators during the development of mild, sub-clinical AP, and that these effects are exacerbated by alcohol injury. PMID:24091659

  16. Renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Patne, Shashikant C U; Johri, Nidhi; Katiyar, Richa; Trivedi, Sameer; Dwivedi, Uday Shankar

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old male presented with urinary symptoms. His serum prostate specific antigen level was 65.2 ng/ml. His radical prostatectomy specimen showed clear cell lesion reminiscent of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma along with acinar type of prostatic adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 4 + 4. The lesional clear cells were positive for pancytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, CD10, vimentin, and AMACR while negative for 34βE12, CK7, prostate specific antigen, and PAX8. The final diagnosis was renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate. A follow-up of 20 months did not show metastasis. We herein report fifth case of renal-type clear cell carcinoma of the prostate. PMID:26498435

  17. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  18. Unsteady diffusional screening in 3D pulmonary acinar structures: from infancy to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Hofemeier, Philipp; Shachar-Berman, Lihi; Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Filoche, Marcel; Sznitman, Josué

    2016-07-26

    Diffusional screening in the lungs is a physical phenomenon where the specific topological arrangement of alveolated airways of the respiratory region leads to a depletion, or 'screening', of oxygen molecules with increasing acinar generation. Here, we revisit diffusional screening phenomena in anatomically-inspired pulmonary acinar models under realistic breathing maneuvers. By modelling 3D bifurcating alveolated airways capturing both convection and diffusion, unsteady oxygen transport is investigated under cyclic breathing motion. To evaluate screening characteristics in the developing lungs during growth, four representative stages of lung development were chosen (i.e. 3 months, 1 year and 9 months, 3 years and adulthood) that capture distinct morphological acinar changes spanning alveolarization phases to isotropic alveolar growth. Numerical simulations unveil the dramatic changes in O2 transport occurring during lung development, where young infants exhibit highest acinar efficiencies that rapidly converge with age to predictions at adulthood. With increased ventilatory effort, transient dynamics of oxygen transport is fundamentally altered compared to tidal breathing and emphasizes the augmented role of convection. Resolving the complex convective acinar flow patterns in 3D acinar trees allows for the first time a spatially-localized and time-resolved characterization of oxygen transport in the pulmonary acinus, from infancy to adulthood.

  19. Basal autophagy maintains pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis and protein synthesis and prevents ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Laura; Fagman, Johan B.; Kim, Ju Youn; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovsky, Ilya; Mackey, Mason; Ellisman, Mark H.; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells possess very high protein synthetic rates as they need to produce and secrete large amounts of digestive enzymes. Acinar cell damage and dysfunction cause malnutrition and pancreatitis, and inflammation of the exocrine pancreas that promotes development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a deadly pancreatic neoplasm. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain acinar cell function and whose dysregulation can lead to tissue damage and chronic pancreatitis are poorly understood. It was suggested that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis, but it is unknown whether impaired autophagy is a cause or a consequence of pancreatitis. To address this question, we generated Atg7Δpan mice that lack the essential autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) in pancreatic epithelial cells. Atg7Δpan mice exhibit severe acinar cell degeneration, leading to pancreatic inflammation and extensive fibrosis. Whereas ATG7 loss leads to the expected decrease in autophagic flux, it also results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, oxidative stress, activation of AMPK, and a marked decrease in protein synthetic capacity that is accompanied by loss of rough ER. Atg7Δpan mice also exhibit spontaneous activation of regenerative mechanisms that initiate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a process that replaces damaged acinar cells with duct-like structures. PMID:26512112

  20. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  1. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  2. Effect of sialodacryoadenitis virus exposure on acinar epithelial cells from the rat lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Wickham, L A; Huang, Z; Lambert, R W; Sullivan, D A

    1997-09-01

    Sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV), a RNA coronavirus, induces degenerative, necrotic and atrophic alterations in acinar epithelial cells of the rat lacrimal gland. To begin to explore the underlying mechanism(s) of this viral effect, we sought in the present study to: (1) determine whether SDAV invades and replicates in lacrimal gland acinar cells in vitro and (2) assess whether short-term SDAV challenge interferes with the viability or function of acinar cells in vitro. For comparison we also evaluated the relative infectivity of SDAV in acinar epithelial cells from lacrimal, submandibular and parotid glands, given that salivary tissues are known to be highly susceptible to SDAV infection in vivo. Acinar epithelial cells from lacrimal, submandibular or parotid glands were isolated from male rats, exposed briefly to SDAV or control cell antigen and then cultured for four, eight or twelve days. At experimental termination, SDAV titers in both media and sonicated cell extracts were evaluated by plaque assay titration on mouse L2 cell monolayers. To evaluate functional aspects of lacrimal gland acinar cells, SDAV-infected cells were incubated in the presence or absence of dihydrotestosterone and culture media were analyzed by RIA to measure the extent of the androgen-induced increase in secretory component (SC) production. Our results showed that: (1) SDAV invades and replicates in lacrimal gland acinar cells, Viral challenge resulted in a significant, time-dependent increase in SDAV titers, that were primarily cell-associated and greatly exceeded amounts contained in the original inoculum; (2) SDAV infection did not compromise lacrimal acinar cell viability or prevent the cellular SC response to androgens. Viral presence, though, did often attenuate the magnitude of this hormone action; and (3) SDAV infects salivary acinar cells, but the kinetics and magnitude or viral replication in lacrimal, submandibular and parotid cells showed considerable variations. These

  3. Acinar cell-specific knockout of the PTHrP gene decreases the proinflammatory and profibrotic responses in pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Vandanajay; Rastellini, Cristiana; Han, Song; Aronson, Judith F.; Greeley, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a necroinflammatory disease with acute and chronic manifestations. Accumulated damage incurred during repeated bouts of acute pancreatitis (AP) can lead to chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pancreatic parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) levels are elevated in a mouse model of cerulein-induced AP. Here, we show elevated PTHrP levels in mouse models of pancreatitis induced by chronic cerulein administration and pancreatic duct ligation. Because acinar cells play a major role in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis, mice with acinar cell-specific targeted disruption of the Pthrp gene (PTHrPΔacinar) were generated to assess the role of acinar cell-secreted PTHrP in pancreatitis. These mice were generated using Cre-LoxP technology and the acinar cell-specific elastase promoter. PTHrPΔacinar exerted protective effects in cerulein and pancreatic duct ligation models, evident as decreased edema, histological damage, amylase secretion, pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) activation, and extracellular matrix deposition. Treating acinar cells in vitro with cerulein increased IL-6 expression and NF-κB activity; these effects were attenuated in PTHrPΔacinar cells, as were the cerulein- and carbachol-induced elevations in amylase secretion. The cerulein-induced upregulation of procollagen I expression was lost in PSCs from PTHrPΔacinar mice. PTHrP immunostaining was elevated in human CP sections. The cerulein-induced upregulation of IL-6 and ICAM-1 (human acinar cells) and procollagen I (human PSCs) was suppressed by pretreatment with the PTH1R antagonist, PTHrP (7–34). These findings establish PTHrP as a novel mediator of inflammation and fibrosis associated with CP. Acinar cell-secreted PTHrP modulates acinar cell function via its effects on proinflammatory cytokine release and functions via a paracrine pathway to activate PSCs. PMID:25035110

  4. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  5. Marked differences in immunocytological localization of ( sup 3 H)estradiol-binding protein in rat pancreatic acinar tumor cells compared to normal acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudoin, A.R.; Grondin, G.; St Jean, P.; Pettengill, O.; Longnecker, D.S.; Grossman, A. )

    1991-03-01

    ({sup 3}H)Estradiol can bind to a specific protein in normal rat pancreatic acinar cells. Electron microscopic immunocytochemical analysis has shown this protein to be localized primarily in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Rat exocrine pancreatic tumor cell lines, whether grown in tissue culture (AR42J) or as a tumor mass after sc injection into rats (DSL-2), lacked detectable amounts of this ({sup 3}H)estradiol-binding protein (EBP), as determined by the dextran-coated charcoal assay. Furthermore, primary exocrine pancreatic neoplasms induced with the carcinogen azaserine contained little or no detectable ({sup 3}H)estradiol-binding activity. However, electron immunocytochemical studies of transformed cells indicated the presence of material that cross-reacted with antibodies prepared against the ({sup 3}H)EBP. The immunopositive reaction in transformed cells was localized almost exclusively in lipid granules. Such lipid organelles in normal acinar cells, although present less frequently than in transformed cells, have never been observed to contain EBP-like immunopositive material. Presumably, the aberrant localization of EBP in these acinar tumor cells results in loss of function of this protein, which in normal pancreatic acinar cells appears to exert a modulating influence on zymogen granule formation and the process of secretion.

  6. The small GTPase Rab33A participates in regulation of amylase release from parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Imai, Akane; Tsujimura, Maiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2015-06-01

    Amylase is released from exocrine parotid acinar cells via typical exocytosis. Exocytosis of amylase-containing granules occurs through several steps, including formation, maturation, and transport of granules. These steps are thought to be regulated by members of the small GTPase Rab family. We previously demonstrated that Rab27 and its effectors mediate amylase release from parotid acinar cells, but the functional involvement of other Rab proteins in exocrine granule exocytosis remains largely unknown. Here, we studied isoproterenol (IPR)-induced amylase release from parotid acinar cells to investigate the possible involvement of Rab33A, which was recently suggested to regulate exocytosis in hippocampal neurons and PC12 cells. Rab33A was endogenously expressed in parotid acinar cells and present in secretory granules and the Golgi body. Functional ablation of Rab33A with anti-Rab33A antibody or a dominant-negative Rab33A-T50N mutant significantly reduced IPR-induced amylase release. Our results indicated that Rab33A is a novel component of IPR-stimulated amylase secretion from parotid acinar cells.

  7. Formation of salivary acinar cell spheroids in vitro above a polyvinyl alcohol-coated surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Huey; Chen, Yi-Jane; Liao, Chih-Chen; Chan, Yen-Hui; Lin, Chia-Yung; Chen, Rung-Shu; Young, Tai-Hong

    2009-09-15

    Tissue engineering of salivary glands offers the potential for future use in the treatment of patients with salivary hypofunction. Biocompatible materials that promote acinar cell aggregation and function in vitro are an essential part of salivary gland tissue engineering. In this study, rat parotid acinar cells assembled into three-dimensional aggregates above the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-coated surface. These aggregates developed compact acinar cell spheroids resembling in vivo physiological condition, which were different from the traditional monolayered morphology in vitro. Cells remained viable and with better functional activity in response to acetylcholine in the spheroids and could form monolayered acinar cells when they were reinoculated on tissue culture polystyrene wells. To interpret the phenomenon further, we proposed that the formation of acinar cell spheroids on the PVA is mediated by a balance between two competing forces: the interactions of cell-PVA and cell-cell. This study demonstrated the formation of functional cell spheroids above a PVA-coated surface may provide an in vitro system for investigating cell behaviors for tissue engineering of artificial salivary gland.

  8. Slug inhibits pancreatic cancer initiation by blocking Kras-induced acinar-ductal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ebine, Kazumi; Chow, Christina R.; DeCant, Brian T.; Hattaway, Holly Z.; Grippo, Paul J.; Kumar, Krishan; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the pancreas that have undergone acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM) can transform into premalignant cells that can eventually become cancerous. Although the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulator Snail (Snai1) can cooperate with Kras in acinar cells to enhance ADM development, the contribution of Snail-related protein Slug (Snai2) to ADM development is not known. Thus, transgenic mice expressing Slug and Kras in acinar cells were generated. Surprisingly, Slug attenuated Kras-induced ADM development, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation. Co-expression of Slug with Kras also attenuated chronic pancreatitis-induced changes in ADM development and fibrosis. In addition, Slug attenuated TGF-α-induced acinar cell metaplasia to ductal structures and TGF-α-induced expression of ductal markers in ex vivo acinar explant cultures. Significantly, blocking the Rho-associated protein kinase ROCK1/2 in the ex vivo cultures induced expression of ductal markers and reversed the effects of Slug by inducing ductal structures. In addition, blocking ROCK1/2 activity in Slug-expressing Kras mice reversed the inhibitory effects of Slug on ADM, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, proliferation and fibrosis. Overall, these results increase our understanding of the role of Slug in ADM, an early event that can eventually lead to pancreatic cancer development. PMID:27364947

  9. Urinary bladder stone associated with seminal vesicle and prostate infection in a Copenhagen rat.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Shantibhusan; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Mallik, Hrudananda; Panda, Sabyasachi; Hota, Datteswar; Baisakh, Manas R

    2016-01-01

    We report a very rare case of urinary bladder stone in a laboratory rat, which was associated with severe prostatitis and seminal vesiculitis. Importantly, the histopathological analysis revealed the rare variety of keratinizing desquamative squamous metaplasia of bladder, prostate, and seminal vesicle epithelium. Immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin protein and aniline blue staining for collagen clearly showed interstitial prostate fibrosis. The detail information about these findings and subsequent discussion are provided here. PMID:27433075

  10. Urinary bladder stone associated with seminal vesicle and prostate infection in a Copenhagen rat

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Shantibhusan; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Mallik, Hrudananda; Panda, Sabyasachi; Hota, Datteswar; Baisakh, Manas R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a very rare case of urinary bladder stone in a laboratory rat, which was associated with severe prostatitis and seminal vesiculitis. Importantly, the histopathological analysis revealed the rare variety of keratinizing desquamative squamous metaplasia of bladder, prostate, and seminal vesicle epithelium. Immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin protein and aniline blue staining for collagen clearly showed interstitial prostate fibrosis. The detail information about these findings and subsequent discussion are provided here. PMID:27433075

  11. Effect of Phellius linteus water extract on benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Sun; Chun, Sung-Sik; Choi, Jeong-Hwa

    2013-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases among elderly men. As the old-age population is increasing recently, it is to our interest to observe the growing BPH within them. In BPH, the dihydrotestosterone (DHT) acts as promotes prostate growth. It inhibits enzyme 5α-reductase that is involved in the conversion of testosterone to the DHT activity which reduces the excessive prostate growth. Through experiments, the effects of Phellius linteus water extract performed on the BPH rats were induced by testosterone treatments. For 12 weeks, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with testosterone for the induction of BPH. Rats were divided into four experimental groups: the not treated group (N), the testosterone injection and D.W treatment group (TN), the testosterone injection and Phellinus linteus treatment group (TP) and testosterone injection and finasteride treatment group (TF). Prostate weight, volume and weight ratio in the TP group and the TF group were significantly lower than the TN group. Testosterone and DHT levels in the TN group were significantly higher than that of the N group. And the TP group was significantly decreased than that of the TN group. While prostates of control rats revealed severe acinar gland atrophy and stromal proliferation; the TP and TF groups showed trophic symptoms and were lined by flattened epithelial cells, thus, the stromal proliferation is relatively low as compared to the TN group. These suggest that Phellinus linteus water extracts may be an useful remedy for treating the benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23766877

  12. Characterization of single potassium channels in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Single K(+)-selective channels with a conductance of about 48 pS (pipette, 145 mM KCl; bath, 140 mM NaCl + 4.7 mM KCl) were recorded in the patch-clamp whole-cell configuration in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Neither application of the secretagogues acetylcholine (second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) or secretin (second messenger, cAMP), nor addition of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A to the pipette solution changed the activity of the 48 pS K+ channel. 3. Intracellular acidification with sodium propionate (20 mM) diminished activity of the 48 pS channel, whereas channel open probability was increased by cytosolic alkalization with 20 mM NH4Cl. 4. BaCl2 (5 mM), TEA (10 mM) or apamin (1 microM) added to the bath solution had no obvious effect on the kinetics of the 48 pS channel. Similarly, glibenclamide and diazoxide failed to influence the channel activity. 5. When extracellular NaCl was replaced by KCl, whole-cell recordings revealed an inwardly rectifying K+ current carried by a 17 pS K+ channel. 6. The inwardly rectifying K+ current was not pH dependent and could largely be blocked by Ba2+ but not by TEA. 7. Since the 48 pS K+ channel is neither Ca2+ nor cAMP regulated, we suggest that this channel could play a role in the maintenance of the negative cell resting potential. PMID:7623283

  13. Eosinophilic prostatitis and prostatic specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Miller, P D; Holmes, S A; Christmas, T J; Kirby, R S

    1992-01-01

    Eosinophilic prostatitis is a rare form of abacterial prostatitis with uncertain aetiology. Its clinical presentation, like other types of abacterial prostatitis, commonly mimics carcinoma of the prostate. Transrectal ultrasound may be helpful in the diagnosis of prostatitis but histological confirmation is necessary. Prostatic specific antigen has been widely used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostatic carcinoma. High levels of this antigen (greater than 30 micrograms/l) have been claimed to be highly specific for prostate cancer, although lesser elevations may also occur in patients with large benign prostate glands and in bacterial prostatitis. We report 3 patients with histologically proven eosinophilic prostatitis and high levels of prostatic specific antigen. This diagnosis may closely mimic carcinoma of the prostate and must be excluded by histological examination of biopsy material before treatment for presumed prostate carcinoma is initiated.

  14. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Hu, Yanling; Ni, Jianbo; Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao; Shen, Jie; Tang, Maochun; Chen, Congying; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xingpeng; and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  15. Protein kinase D1 drives pancreatic acinar cell reprogramming and progression to intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Geou-Yarh; Döppler, Heike; Braun, Ursula B.; Panayiotou, Richard; Scotti Buzhardt, Michele; Radisky, Derek C.; Crawford, Howard C.; Fields, Alan P.; Murray, Nicole R.; Wang, Q. Jane; Leitges, Michael; Storz, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The transdifferentiation of pancreatic acinar cells to a ductal phenotype (acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, ADM) occurs after injury or inflammation of the pancreas and is a reversible process. However, in the presence of activating Kras mutations or persistent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signalling, cells that underwent ADM can progress to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually pancreatic cancer. In transgenic animal models, ADM and PanINs are initiated by high-affinity ligands for EGF-R or activating Kras mutations, but the underlying signalling mechanisms are not well understood. Here, using a conditional knockout approach, we show that protein kinase D1 (PKD1) is sufficient to drive the reprogramming process to a ductal phenotype and progression to PanINs. Moreover, using 3D explant culture of primary pancreatic acinar cells, we show that PKD1 acts downstream of TGFα and Kras, to mediate formation of ductal structures through activation of the Notch pathway.

  16. Activation of Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase Protects against Secretagogue Stimulated Zymogen Activation in Rat Pancreaic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolodecik, Thomas R.; Shugrue, Christine A.; Thrower, Edwin C.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Gorelick, Fred S.

    2012-01-01

    An early feature of acute pancreatitis is activation of zymogens, such as trypsinogen, within the pancreatic acinar cell. Supraphysiologic concentrations of the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK; 100 nM), or its orthologue cerulein (CER), induce zymogen activation and elevate levels of cAMP in pancreatic acinar cells. The two classes of adenylyl cyclase, trans-membrane (tmAC) and soluble (sAC), are activated by distinct mechanisms, localize to specific subcellular domains, and can produce locally high concentrations of cAMP. We hypothesized that sAC activity might selectively modulate acinar cell zymogen activation. sAC was identified in acinar cells by PCR and immunoblot. It localized to the apical region of the cell under resting conditions and redistributed intracellularly after treatment with supraphysiologic concentrations of cerulein. In cerulein-treated cells, pre-incubation with a trans-membrane adenylyl cyclase inhibitor did not affect zymogen activation or amylase secretion. However, treatment with a sAC inhibitor (KH7), or inhibition of a downstream target of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA), significantly enhanced secretagogue-stimulated zymogen activation and amylase secretion. Activation of sAC with bicarbonate significantly inhibited secretagogue-stimulated zymogen activation; this response was decreased by inhibition of sAC or PKA. Bicarbonate also enhanced secretagogue-stimulated cAMP accumulation; this effect was inhibited by KH7. Bicarbonate treatment reduced secretagogue-stimulated acinar cell vacuolization, an early marker of pancreatitis. These data suggest that activation of sAC in the pancreatic acinar cell has a protective effect and reduces the pathologic activation of proteases during pancreatitis. PMID:22844459

  17. Establishment of functional acinar-like cultures from human salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Jang, S I; Ong, H L; Gallo, A; Liu, X; Illei, G; Alevizos, I

    2015-02-01

    Disorders of human salivary glands resulting from therapeutic radiation treatment for head and neck cancers or from the autoimmune disease Sjögren syndrome (SS) frequently result in the reduction or complete loss of saliva secretion. Such irreversible dysfunction of the salivary glands is due to the impairment of acinar cells, the major glandular cells of protein, salt secretion, and fluid movement. Availability of primary epithelial cells from human salivary gland tissue is critical for studying the underlying mechanisms of these irreversible disorders. We applied 2 culture system techniques on human minor salivary gland epithelial cells (phmSG) and optimized the growth conditions to achieve the maintenance of phmSG in an acinar-like phenotype. These phmSG cells exhibited progenitor cell markers (keratin 5 and nanog) as well as acinar-specific markers-namely, α-amylase, cystatin C, TMEM16A, and NKCC1. Importantly, with an increase of the calcium concentration in the growth medium, these phmSG cells were further promoted to acinar-like cells in vitro, as indicated by an increase in AQP5 expression. In addition, these phmSG cells also demonstrated functional calcium mobilization, formation of epithelial monolayer with high transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), and polarized secretion of α-amylase secretion after β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Taken together, suitable growth conditions have been established to isolate and support culture of acinar-like cells from the human salivary gland. These primary epithelial cells can be useful for study of molecular mechanisms involved in regulating the function of acinar cells and in the loss of salivary gland function in patients.

  18. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  19. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics.

  20. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K.; Phillips, John W.; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic the MYC amplification and PTEN loss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  1. Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia accompanies c-myc-induced exocrine pancreatic cancer progression in transgenic rodents.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Paul J; Sandgren, Eric P

    2012-09-01

    Several important characteristics of exocrine pancreatic tumor pathogenesis remain incompletely defined, including identification of the cell of origin. Most human pancreatic neoplasms are ductal adenocarcinomas. However, acinar cells have been proposed as the source of some ductal neoplasms through a process of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. The oncogenic transcription factor c-myc is associated with human pancreatic neoplasms. Transgenic mice overexpressing c-myc under control of acinar cell-specific elastase (Ela) gene regulatory elements not only develop acinar cell carcinomas but also mixed neoplasms that display both acinar-like neoplastic cells and duct-like neoplastic cells. In this report, we demonstrate that, first, c-myc is sufficient to induce acinar hyperplasia, though neoplastic lesions develop focally. Second, cell proliferation remains elevated in the neoplastic duct cell compartment of mixed neoplasms. Third, the proliferation/apoptosis ratio in cells from all lesion types remains constant, suggesting that differential regulation of these processes is not a feature of cancer progression in this model. Fourth, before the development of mixed neoplasms, there is transcriptional activation of the duct cell-specific cytokeratin-19 gene promoter in multicellular foci of amylase-positive acinar neoplasms. This observation provides direct evidence for metaplasia as the mechanism underlying development of ductal neoplastic cells within the context of an acinar neoplasm and suggests that the stimulus for this transformation acts over a multicellular domain or field within a neoplasm. Finally, focal ductal elements develop in some acinar cell carcinomas in Ela-c-myc transgenic rats, indicating that myc-associated acinar-to-ductal metaplasia is not restricted to the mouse.

  2. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  3. Single luminal epithelial progenitors can generate prostate organoids in culture

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Chee Wai; Shibata, Maho; Lei, Ming; Toivanen, Roxanne; Barlow, LaMont J.; Bergren, Sarah K.; Badani, Ketan K.; McKiernan, James M.; Benson, Mitchell C.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Shen, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic ability to display self-organizing morphogenetic properties in ex vivo culture may represent a general property of tissue stem cells. Here we show that single luminal stem/progenitor cells can generate prostate organoids in a three-dimensional culture system in the absence of stroma. Organoids generated from CARNs (castration-resistant Nkx3.1-expressing cells) or normal prostate epithelium exhibit tissue architecture containing luminal and basal cells, undergo long-term expansion in culture, and display functional androgen receptor signaling. Lineage-tracing demonstrates that luminal cells are favored for organoid formation, and generate basal cells in culture. Furthermore, tumor organoids can initiate from CARNs after oncogenic transformation, and from mouse models of prostate cancer, and can facilitate analyses of drug response. Finally, we provide evidence supporting the feasibility of organoid studies of human prostate tissue. Our studies underscore the progenitor properties of luminal cells, and identify in vitro approaches for studying prostate biology. PMID:25241035

  4. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    AZEVEDO-ALANIS, Luciana Reis; TOLENTINO, Elen de Souza; de ASSIS, Gerson Francisco; CESTARI, Tânia Mary; LARA, Vanessa Soares; DAMANTE, José Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG) found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated. Objective The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death. Material and Methods 186 cadavers’ glands were allocated to age groups: I (0–30 years); II (31–60), and III (61–90). Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results There was correlation between age and acinar autolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001). However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis. Conclusion Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death. PMID:26537715

  5. Ectrodactyly and Lethal Pulmonary Acinar Dysplasia Associated with Homozygous FGFR2 Mutations Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher P; Nataren, Nathalie J; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Schwarz, Quenten; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young K; Bruno, Damien L; Lipsett, Jill; McPhee, Andrew J; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-09-01

    Ectrodactyly/split hand-foot malformation is genetically heterogeneous with more than 100 syndromic associations. Acinar dysplasia is a rare congenital lung lesion of unknown etiology, which is frequently lethal postnatally. To date, there have been no reports of combinations of these two phenotypes. Here, we present an infant from a consanguineous union with both ectrodactyly and autopsy confirmed acinar dysplasia. SNP array and whole-exome sequencing analyses of the affected infant identified a novel homozygous Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) missense mutation (p.R255Q) in the IgIII domain (D3). Expression studies of Fgfr2 in development show localization to the affected limbs and organs. Molecular modeling and genetic and functional assays support that this mutation is at least a partial loss-of-function mutation, and contributes to ectrodactyly and acinar dysplasia only in homozygosity, unlike previously reported heterozygous activating FGFR2 mutations that cause Crouzon, Apert, and Pfeiffer syndromes. This is the first report of mutations in a human disease with ectrodactyly with pulmonary acinar dysplasia and, as such, homozygous loss-of-function FGFR2 mutations represent a unique syndrome. PMID:27323706

  6. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goals of this study were to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR and ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR and ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH.

  7. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  8. Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Two groundbreaking trials have this year reported conflicting results as to the benefit of screening for prostate cancer. Careful interpretation in the light of contemporary data might, however, reveal the true value of this intervention. PMID:19498406

  9. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Possible side effects include decreased sex drive and impotence . Antibiotics may be prescribed to treat chronic prostatitis ( ... less-invasive procedures carry a lower risk for impotence and incontinence than TURP, although the risk with ...

  10. Prostatitis - bacterial

    MedlinePlus

    ... emptying the bladder Foul-smelling urine Weak urine stream Other symptoms that may occur with this condition: ... the risk of spreading bacteria into the blood stream. The exam may reveal that the prostate is: ...

  11. Prostate Adenocarcinomas Aberrantly Expressing p63 Are Molecularly Distinct from Usual-Type Prostatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hsueh-Li; Haffner, Michael C.; Esopi, David M.; Vaghasia, Ajay M.; Giannico, Giovanna A.; Ross, Hillary M.; Ghosh, Susmita; Hicks, Jessica; Zheng, Qizhi; Sangoi, Ankur R.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Lotan, Tamara L.

    2014-01-01

    We have described a rare group of prostate adenocarcinomas that show aberrant expression of p63, a protein strongly expressed in prostatic basal cells and absent from usual-type acinar prostate cancers. The partial basal-like immunophenotype of these tumors is intriguing in light of the persistent debate surrounding the cell-of-origin for prostate cancer, however their molecular phenotype is unknown. We collected 37 of these tumors on radical prostatectomy and biopsy and assessed subsets for a diverse panel of molecular markers. The majority of p63-expressing tumors were positive for the ΔNp63 isoform (6/7) by immunofluorescence and p63 mRNA (7/8) by chromogenic in situ hybridization. Despite p63 positivity, these tumors uniformly expressed luminal-type cytokeratin proteins such as CK18 (13/13), CK8 (8/8) and markers of androgen axis signaling commonly seen in luminal cells, including androgen receptor (10/11), NKX3.1 (8/8) and prostein (12/13). Conversely, basal cytokeratins such as CK14 and CK15 were negative in all cases (0/8) and CK5/6 was weakly and focally positive in 36% (4/11) of cases. Pluripotency markers including β-catenin, Oct4 and c-kit were negative in p63-expressing tumors (0/11). Despite nearly universal expression of androgen receptor and downstream androgen signaling targets, p63-expressing tumors lacked ERG rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization (0/14) and ERG protein expression (0/37). No tumors expressed SPINK1 or showed PTEN protein loss (0/19). Surprisingly, 74% (14/19) of p63-expressing tumors expressed GSTP1 protein at least focally, and 33% (2/6) entirely lacked GSTP1 CpG island hypermethylation by bisulfite sequencing. In contrast to usual prostatic adenocarcinomas, prostate tumors with p63-expression show a mixed luminal/basal immunophenotype, uniformly lack ERG gene rearrangement and frequently express GSTP1. These data strongly suggest that p63-expressing prostate tumors represent a molecularly distinct subclass and

  12. Blood and tissue selenium concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activities in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B A; Szewczyk-Golec, K; Tyloch, J; Wolski, Z; Szylberg, T; Stepien, S; Kwiatkowski, S; Bloch-Boguslawska, E; Wasowicz, W

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men and a leading cause of cancer death. Prostatic gland accumulates reasonably high amount of selenium (Se), the element that prevents the development of PC. It is hypothesized that some selenoproteins inhibit the transformation of normal prostate epithelium into neoplasm. We studied Se levels in whole blood, plasma and prostate of 32 PC and 40 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) patients and in the control group composed of 39 healthy subjects. The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) was also measured in the patients' red cells, plasma and prostate tissue. Se concentration in whole blood and plasma in both groups of patients was lower as compared with controls, while in prostate gland it was significantly higher in PC than in BPH patients and controls. Red cell GSH-Px activity was the same in PC patients and controls but significantly lower in BPH patients. Plasma GSH-Px activity was significantly lower in PC patients than in the control group, and prostate GSH-Px activity was significantly lower in PC patients as compared with BPH patients. Since Se has anticancer properties, it is very likely that its low level in blood may facilitate the development of cancer. A higher level of Se in prostate of PC patients has no influence on GSH-Px activity in the gland. PMID:15875088

  13. Ductal barriers in mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Mark B; Hill, Arnold DK; Hopkins, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Tissue barriers play an integral role in the biology and pathobiology of mammary ductal epithelium. In normal breast physiology, tight and adherens junctions undergo dynamic changes in permeability in response to hormonal and other stimuli, while several of their proteins are directly involved in mammary tumorigenesis. This review describes first the structure of mammary ductal epithelial barriers and their role in normal mammary development, examining the cyclical changes in response to puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. It then examines the role of adherens and tight junctions and the participation of their constituent proteins in mammary tumorigenic functions such as migration, invasion and metastasis. Finally, it discusses the potential of these adhesion proteins as both prognostic biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer. PMID:24665412

  14. Intracellular calcium signalling in rat parotid acinar cells that lack secretory vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Scott, J; Smith, P M

    1998-01-01

    Secretory vesicles from pancreatic acinar cells have recently been shown to release Ca2+ after stimulation with Ins(1,4,5)P3 [Gerasimenko, Gerasimenko, Belan and Petersen, (1996) Cell 84, 473-480]. These observations have been used in support of the hypothesis that Ca2+ release from secretory vesicles could be an important component of stimulus secretion coupling in exocrine acinar cells. In the rat, ligation of the parotid duct causes a reversible atrophy of the parotid gland. Most notably, after atrophy the acinar cells are reduced in size and no longer contain secretory vesicles [Liu, Smith, and Scott (1996) J. Dent. Res. 74, 900]. We have measured cytosolic free-Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single, acutely isolated, rat parotid acinar cells, and compared Ca2+ mobilization in response to acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation in cells obtained from control animals to that in cells lacking secretory vesicles obtained after atrophy of the parotid gland. Application of 50-5000 nM ACh to control cells gave rise to a typical, dose-dependent, biphasic increase in [Ca2+]i, of which the later, plateau, phase was acutely dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration. An identical pattern of response was observed with cells obtained from atrophic glands. Low concentrations of ACh (10-100 nM) occasionally produced [Ca2+]i oscillations of a similar pattern in cells from both control and atrophic glands. We were able to show that Ca2+ rises first in the apical pole of the cell and the increase then spreads to the rest of the cell in cells from control glands but not in cells from atrophic glands. However, at present we are unable to determine whether this is due to the lack of secretory vesicles or whether the separation is too small to measure in the smaller acinar cells obtained from atrophic glands. We conclude therefore, that secretory vesicles make no significant contribution to overall Ca2+ mobilization in rat parotid acinar cells, nor are they required for oscillatory

  15. Epiregulin is critical for the acinar cell regeneration of the submandibular gland in a mouse duct ligation model.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Koichi; Arai, Hideo; Okudera, Michisato; Yamamura, Takashi; Oki, Hidero; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2014-05-01

    Acinar cell regeneration from tubular structures has been reported to occur in duct-deligated salivary glands. However, the detailed process of acinar cell regeneration has not been clarified. We have developed a mouse duct ligation model to clarify the mechanisms underlying acinar cell regeneration, and we analyzed the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands using the model. We studied these ligands expressions in the course of acinar cell regeneration using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR methods. In the duct-ligated portion of the submandibular gland (SMG) that underwent atrophy, newly formed acinar cells were observed arising from the tubular structures after the release of the duct obstruction. The constitutive expression of EGFR was observed by immunohistochemistry in both the duct-ligated and duct-deligated animals as well as in normal controls. The EGFR phosphorylation detected on the tubular structures after duct ligation paralleled the acinar cell regeneration. RT-PCR showed an increase in the epiregulin and heparin-binding EGF levels from day 0 to day 3 after the release of the duct obstruction. The EGF level was increased only after day 7. In vitro, cultured cells isolated from ligated SMGs proliferated and produced EGF ligands following the addition of epiregulin to the culture medium. These findings suggest that the tubular structures localized in an atrophic gland are the source of acinar cell regeneration of the salivary gland. The induction of EGF ligands, in particular epiregulin, may play an important role in acinar cell regeneration in this model.

  16. α–blockade, apoptosis, and prostate shrinkage: how are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Chłosta, Piotr; Kaplan, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The α1–adrenoreceptor antagonists, such as terazosin and doxazosin, induce prostate programmed cell death (apoptosis) within prostate epithelial and stromal cells in vitro. This treatment should cause prostate volume decrease, However, this has never been observed in clinical conditions. The aim of this paper is to review the disconnect between these two processes. Methods PubMed and DOAJ were searched for papers related to prostate, apoptosis, and stem cell death. The following key words were used: prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia, programmed cell death, apoptosis, cell death, α1–adrenoreceptor antagonist, α–blockade, prostate epithelium, prostate stroma, stem cells, progenitors, and in vitro models. Results We have shown how discoveries related to stem cells can influence our understanding of α–blockade treatment for BPH patients. Prostate epithelial and mesenchymal compartments have stem (progenitors) and differentiating cells. These compartments are described in relation to experimental in vitro and in vivo settings. Conclusions Apoptosis is observed within prostate tissue, but this effect has no clinical significance and cannot lead to prostate shrinkage. In part, this is due to stem cells that are responsible for prostate tissue regeneration and are resistant to apoptosis triggered by α1–receptor antagonists. PMID:24579025

  17. Glycosylations in demilunar and central acinar cells of the submandibular salivary gland of ferret investigated by lectin histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Asterios; Fletcher, David; Scott, John

    2004-09-01

    'Resting' submandibular salivary glands obtained post-mortem from mature ferrets of both sexes were examined here. The binding patterns of labelled lectins applied to paraffin sections of tissue slivers fixed in an aldehyde-HgCl2 mixture and the effects of pretreatment procedures on the results were assessed lightmicroscopically. Lectins with affinity for terminal GalNAc residues (DBA, SBA) bound preferentially to demilunar acinar cells which were also strongly reactive with Fuc-directed UEA I. In contrast, lectins with affinity for neuraminic acid (SNA, WGA) bound to central acinar cells where consistent binding of DBA and SNA occurred only after neuraminidase digestion, and variation in the binding of UEA I was seen. The reactivities corresponded with the distribution of secretory granules, but staining in Golgi-like areas occurred in central acinar cells with PNA lectin. The results suggest that glycosylations are more advanced in central than demilunar acinar cells of the ferret submandibular gland. Possibly demilunar and central acinar cells reflect phenotypic changes of a single secretory cell, the 'central' acinar phenotype being influenced by incorporation of neuraminic acid in glycoprotein side chains and by increased Golgi activity.

  18. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  19. Trefoil factor 3 is overexpressed in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Garraway, Isla P; Seligson, David; Said, Jonathan; Horvath, Steve; Reiter, Robert E

    2004-11-01

    The trefoil factors are secreted peptides produced by normal intestinal mucosa. Members of the trefoil family are overexpressed in a variety of cancers and are associated with tumor invasion, resistance to apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent cDNA array analyses suggest that human intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) may be overexpressed in human prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry was performed on a prostate cancer tissue microarray containing tumor tissue samples from 246 primary radical retropubic prostatectomy cases with antibodies specific for TFF3. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and morphologically normal prostatic epithelium were represented on this array. Additionally, 18 metastatic lesions were also stained. Two independent pathologists scored the tissue arrays, with positive cases defined as those containing TFF3 staining in a majority of target cells within any spots representing the appropriate designated histology. Forty-two percent of 236 cases containing prostate cancer stained positive for TFF3, while only 10% of 145 cases containing normal tissue and 18% of 91 cases containing BPH, stained positive. Seven of 18 (39%) metastatic lesions analyzed stained positive. Although TFF3 expression correlates significantly with prostate cancer, TFF3 expression did not correlate with Gleason grade, tumor stage, or rate of recurrence. These studies validate that TFF3 is overexpressed in a subset of primary and metastic prostate cancers.

  20. Aerosol deposition characteristics in distal acinar airways under cyclic breathing conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshun; Darquenne, Chantal

    2011-05-01

    Although the major mechanisms of aerosol deposition in the lung are known, detailed quantitative data in anatomically realistic models are still lacking, especially in the acinar airways. In this study, an algorithm was developed to build multigenerational three-dimensional models of alveolated airways with arbitrary bifurcation angles and spherical alveolar shape. Using computational fluid dynamics, the deposition of 1- and 3-μm aerosol particles was predicted in models of human alveolar sac and terminal acinar bifurcation under rhythmic wall motion for two breathing conditions (functional residual capacity = 3 liter, tidal volume = 0.5 and 0.9 liter, breathing period = 4 s). Particles entering the model during one inspiration period were tracked for multiple breathing cycles until all particles deposited or escaped from the model. Flow recirculation inside alveoli occurred only during transition between inspiration and expiration and accounted for no more than 1% of the whole cycle. Weak flow irreversibility and convective transport were observed in both models. The average deposition efficiency was similar for both breathing conditions and for both models. Under normal gravity, total deposition was ~33 and 75%, of which ~67 and 96% occurred during the first cycle, for 1- and 3-μm particles, respectively. Under zero gravity, total deposition was ~2-5% for both particle sizes. These results support previous findings that gravitational sedimentation is the dominant deposition mechanism for micrometer-sized aerosols in acinar airways. The results also showed that moving walls and multiple breathing cycles are needed for accurate estimation of aerosol deposition in acinar airways.

  1. Elucidation of the Roles of the Src kinases in pancreatic acinar cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, R. T.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies report the Src-Family kinases(SFK’s) are important in a number of physiological and pathophysiological responses of pancreatic acinar cells(pancreatitis, growth, apoptosis), however, the role of SFKs in various signaling cascades important in mediating these cell functions is either not investigated or unclear. To address this we investigated the action of SFKs in these signaling cascades in rat pancreatic acini by modulating SFK activity using three methods:Adenovirus-induced expression of an inactive dominant-negative CSK(Dn-CSK-Advirus) or Wild-Type CSK(Wt-CSK-Advirus), which activate or inhibit SFK, respectively or using the chemical inhibitor, PP2, with its inactive control, PP3. CCK(0.3,100 nM) and TPA(1 µM) activated SFK and altered the activation of FAK proteins(PYK2, p125 FAK), adaptor proteins(p130CAS, paxillin), MAPK (p42/44, JNK, p38), Shc, PKC(PKD, MARCKS), Akt but not GSK3-β. Changes in SFK activity by using the three methods of altering SFK activity affected CCK/TPAs activation of SFK, PYK2, p125 FAK, p130CAS, Shc, paxillin, Akt but not p42/44, JNK, p38, PKC(PKD, MARCKS) or GSK3-β. With chemical inhibition the active SFK inhibitor, PP2, but not the inactive control analogue, PP3, showed these effects. For all stimulated changes pre-incubation with both adenoviruses showed similar effects to chemical inhibition of SFK activity. In conclusion, using three different approaches to altering Src activity allowed us to define fully for the first time the roles of SFKs in acinar cell signaling. Our results show that in pancreatic acinar cells, SFKs play a much wider role than previously reported in activating a number of important cellular signaling cascades shown to be important in mediating both acinar cell physiological and pathophysiological responses. PMID:25079913

  2. Functional differences in the acinar cells of the murine major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Nakamoto, T; Jaramillo, Y; Choi, S; Catalan, M A; Melvin, J E

    2015-05-01

    In humans, approximately 90% of saliva is secreted by the 3 major salivary glands: the parotid (PG), the submandibular (SMG), and the sublingual glands (SLG). Even though it is known that all 3 major salivary glands secrete saliva by a Cl(-)-dependent mechanism, salivary secretion rates differ greatly among these glands. The goal of this study was to gain insight into the properties of the ion-transporting pathways in acinar cells that might account for the differences among the major salivary glands. Pilocarpine-induced saliva was simultaneously collected in vivo from the 3 major salivary glands of mice. When normalized by gland weight, the amount of saliva secreted by the PG was more than 2-fold larger than that obtained from the SMG and SLG. At the cellular level, carbachol induced an increase in the intracellular [Ca(2+)] that was more than 2-fold larger in PG and SMG than in SLG acinar cells. Carbachol-stimulated Cl(-) efflux and the protein levels of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel TMEM16A, the major apical Cl(-) efflux pathway in salivary acinar cells, were significantly greater in PG compared with SMG and SLG. In addition, we evaluated the transporter activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters (NKCC1) and anion exchangers (AE), the 2 primary basolateral Cl(-) uptake mechanisms in acinar cells. The SMG NKCC1 activity was about twice that of the PG and more than 12-fold greater than that of the SLG. AE activity was similar in PG and SLG, and both PG and SLG AE activity was about 2-fold larger than that of SMG. In summary, the salivation kinetics of the 3 major glands are distinct, and these differences can be explained by the unique functional properties of each gland related to Cl(-) movement, including the transporter activities of the Cl(-) uptake and efflux pathways, and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization.

  3. Intracellular mediators of Na -K pump activity in guinea pig pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, S.R.; Ochs, D.L.; Williams, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    The involvement of CaS and cyclic nucleotides in neurohormonal regulation of Na -K -ATPase (Na -K pump) activity in guinea pig pancreatic acinar cells was investigated. Changes in Na+-K+ pump activity elicited by secretagogues were assessed by (3H)ouabain binding and by ouabain-sensitive YWRb uptake. Carbachol (CCh) and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) each stimulated both ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake and equilibrium binding of (TH)ouabain by approximately 60%. Secretin increased both indicators of Na+-K+ pump activity by approximately 40% as did forskolin, 8-bromo- and dibutyryl cAMP, theophylline, and isobutylmethylxanthine. Incubation of acinar cells in CaS -free HEPES-buffered Ringer (HR) with 0.5 mM EGTA reduced the stimulatory effects of CCh and CCK-8 by up to 90% but caused only a small reduction in the effects of secretin, forskolin, and cAMP analogues. In addition, CCh, CCK-8, secretin, and forskolin each stimulated ouabain-insensitive 86Rb+ uptake by acinar cells. The increase elicited by CCh and CCK-8 was greatly reduced in the absence of extracellular CaS , while that caused by the latter two agents was not substantially altered. The effects of secretagogues on free CaS levels in pancreatic acinar cells also were investigated with quin-2, a fluorescent CaS chelator. Basal intracellular CaS concentration ((CaS )i) was 161 nM in resting cells and increased to 713 and 803 nM within 15 s after addition of 100 microM CCh or 10 nM CCK-8, respectively.

  4. Calcium signaling of pancreatic acinar cells in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zong-Fang

    2014-11-21

    Pancreatitis is an increasingly common and sometimes severe disease that lacks a specific therapy. The pathogenesis of pancreatitis is still not well understood. Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a versatile carrier of signals regulating many aspects of cellular activity and plays a central role in controlling digestive enzyme secretion in pancreatic acinar cells. Ca(2+) overload is a key early event and is crucial in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In pancreatic acinar cells, pathological Ca(2+) signaling (stimulated by bile, alcohol metabolites and other causes) is a key contributor to the initiation of cell injury due to prolonged and global Ca(2+) elevation that results in trypsin activation, vacuolization and necrosis, all of which are crucial in the development of pancreatitis. Increased release of Ca(2+) from stores in the intracellular endoplasmic reticulum and/or increased Ca(2+) entry through the plasma membrane are causes of such cell damage. Failed mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production reduces re-uptake and extrusion of Ca(2+) by the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-activated ATPase and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumps, which contribute to Ca(2+) overload. Current findings have provided further insight into the roles and mechanisms of abnormal pancreatic acinar Ca(2+) signals in pancreatitis. The lack of available specific treatments is therefore an objective of ongoing research. Research is currently underway to establish the mechanisms and interactions of Ca(2+) signals in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  5. Confocal and electron microscopy to characterize sialoglycoconjugates in mouse sublingual gland acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Menghi, G; Bondi, A M; Marchetti, L; Ballarini, P; Materazzi, G

    1998-08-01

    Double lectin labeling for confocal microscopy and lectin-protein A-gold binding for electron microscopy were applied to the mouse sublingual gland in order to study surface and cytoplasmic sialoglycoconjugates. For this purpose, serially cut sections were submitted to sialidase followed by incubation with lectins recognizing usually acceptor sugars for terminal sialic acids. At the electron microscope level, the residues subtended to sialic acid were individually identified on adjacent sections by an indirect technique of labeling, whereas with confocal microscopy the above sugars were simultaneously visualized on the same section by a double staining method using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)- and tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC)-conjugated lectins. Acinar cells were found to contain the terminal sequence sialic acid-beta-galactose in abundance while the sequence sialic acid-alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine appeared to be present in modest amounts. Both sialoglycoconjugates were homogeneously codistributed inside acinar cells. The combination with a saponification method also allowed the occurrence of C4 acetylated sialic acids linked to beta-galactose to be discovered, at the electron microscope level, on acinar cell secretory products.

  6. Steady streaming: A key mixing mechanism in low-Reynolds-number acinar flows

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Haribalan; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    Study of mixing is important in understanding transport of submicron sized particles in the acinar region of the lung. In this article, we investigate transport in view of advective mixing utilizing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques: tracer advection, stretch rate and dispersion analysis. The phenomenon of steady streaming in an oscillatory flow is found to hold the key to the origin of kinematic mixing in the alveolus, the alveolar mouth and the alveolated duct. This mechanism provides the common route to folding of material lines and surfaces in any region of the acinar flow, and has no bearing on whether the geometry is expanding or if flow separates within the cavity or not. All analyses consistently indicate a significant decrease in mixing with decreasing Reynolds number (Re). For a given Re, dispersion is found to increase with degree of alveolation, indicating that geometry effects are important. These effects of Re and geometry can also be explained by the streaming mechanism. Based on flow conditions and resultant convective mixing measures, we conclude that significant convective mixing in the duct and within an alveolus could originate only in the first few generations of the acinar tree as a result of nonzero inertia, flow asymmetry, and large Keulegan–Carpenter (KC) number. PMID:21580803

  7. Particle dynamics and deposition in true-scale pulmonary acinar models

    PubMed Central

    Fishler, Rami; Hofemeier, Philipp; Etzion, Yael; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    Particle transport phenomena in the deep alveolated airways of the lungs (i.e. pulmonary acinus) govern deposition outcomes following inhalation of hazardous or pharmaceutical aerosols. Yet, there is still a dearth of experimental tools for resolving acinar particle dynamics and validating numerical simulations. Here, we present a true-scale experimental model of acinar structures consisting of bifurcating alveolated ducts that capture breathing-like wall motion and ensuing respiratory acinar flows. We study experimentally captured trajectories of inhaled polydispersed smoke particles (0.2 to 1 μm in diameter), demonstrating how intrinsic particle motion, i.e. gravity and diffusion, is crucial in determining dispersion and deposition of aerosols through a streamline crossing mechanism, a phenomenon paramount during flow reversal and locally within alveolar cavities. A simple conceptual framework is constructed for predicting the fate of inhaled particles near an alveolus by identifying capture and escape zones and considering how streamline crossing may shift particles between them. In addition, we examine the effect of particle size on detailed deposition patterns of monodispersed microspheres between 0.1–2 μm. Our experiments underline local modifications in the deposition patterns due to gravity for particles ≥0.5 μm compared to smaller particles, and show good agreement with corresponding numerical simulations. PMID:26358580

  8. Chronic hypoxia does not cause wall thickening of intra-acinar pulmonary supernumerary arteries.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kaori; McLendon, Jared M; Wagner, Wiltz W; McMurtry, Ivan F; Oka, Masahiko

    2016-02-01

    Chronic exposure to hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial remodeling. Although the exact mechanisms of this remodeling are unclear, there is evidence that it is dependent on hemodynamic stress, rather than on hypoxia alone. Pulmonary supernumerary arteries experience low hemodynamic stress as a consequence of reduced perfusion due to 90° branching angles, small diameters, and "valve-like" structures at their orifices. We investigated whether or not intra-acinar supernumerary arteries undergo structural remodeling during the moderate pulmonary hypertension induced by chronic hypoxia. Rats were exposed to either normoxia or hypoxia for 6 weeks. The chronically hypoxic rats developed pulmonary hypertension. For both groups, pulmonary arteries were selectively filled with barium-gelatin mixture, and the wall thickness of intra-acinar pulmonary arteries was measured in histological samples. Only thin-walled arteries were observed in normoxic lungs. In hypertensive lungs, we found both thin- and thick-walled pulmonary arteries with similar diameters. Disproportionate degrees of arterial wall thickening between parent and daughter branches were observed with supernumerary branching patterns. While parent arteries developed significant wall thickening, their supernumerary branches did not. Thus, chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension did not cause wall thickening of intra-acinar pulmonary supernumerary arteries. These findings are consistent with the idea that hemodynamic stress, rather than hypoxia alone, is the cause of structural remodeling during chronic exposure to hypoxia.

  9. The course and nature of acinar cell death following pancreatic ligation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed Central

    Zeligs, J. D.; Janoff, A.; Dumont, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    The course and nature of acinar cell death (ACD) following pancreatic ligation in the guinea pig was studied as a possible model for human disease. Ultrastructural studies after various periods of ligation suggested a biphasic pattern of ACD. Early phase ACD involved only a small portion of acinar cells and occurred within a few hours of ligation. It was preceded by swelling and vesiculation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Morphometric measurements disclosed celular swelling at this time, and NaCl equilibration studies demonstrated a change in cellular osmoregulation. Late phase ACD, characterized by cellular wasting and autophagic vacuole formation, became prominent several days after ligation. Marked increases in lysosomal enzyme activities were found in tissue homogenates at this time, and acid phosphatase electron histochemistry localized the majority of this increased activity to lysosomes and autophagic vacuoles within the acinar cells. The etiology and nature of both phases of ACD are discussed. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 12 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:169698

  10. Analysis of changes in the expression pattern of claudins using salivary acinar cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko

    2011-01-01

    Primary saliva is produced from blood plasma in the acini of salivary glands and is modified by ion adsorption and secretion as the saliva passes through the ducts. In rodents, acinar cells of salivary glands express claudin-3 but not claudin-4, whereas duct cells express both claudins-3 and -4. The distinct claudin expression patterns may reflect differences in the permeability of tight junctions between acinar and duct cells. To analyze the role of claudins in salivary glands, we established a system for the primary culture of parotid acinar cells, where the expression patterns of claudins are remarkably changed. Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses reveal that the expression levels of claudins-4 and -6 increased, whereas claudins-3 and -10 decreased. We found that the signal to induce those changes is triggered during cell isolation and is mediated by Src and p38 MAP kinase. Here, we introduce the methods used to determine the signal pathway that induces the change in claudin expression.

  11. Steady streaming: A key mixing mechanism in low-Reynolds-number acinar flows.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Haribalan; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-04-01

    Study of mixing is important in understanding transport of submicron sized particles in the acinar region of the lung. In this article, we investigate transport in view of advective mixing utilizing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques: tracer advection, stretch rate and dispersion analysis. The phenomenon of steady streaming in an oscillatory flow is found to hold the key to the origin of kinematic mixing in the alveolus, the alveolar mouth and the alveolated duct. This mechanism provides the common route to folding of material lines and surfaces in any region of the acinar flow, and has no bearing on whether the geometry is expanding or if flow separates within the cavity or not. All analyses consistently indicate a significant decrease in mixing with decreasing Reynolds number (Re). For a given Re, dispersion is found to increase with degree of alveolation, indicating that geometry effects are important. These effects of Re and geometry can also be explained by the streaming mechanism. Based on flow conditions and resultant convective mixing measures, we conclude that significant convective mixing in the duct and within an alveolus could originate only in the first few generations of the acinar tree as a result of nonzero inertia, flow asymmetry, and large Keulegan-Carpenter (K(C)) number. PMID:21580803

  12. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  13. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... finasteride who did have prostate cancer had more aggressive tumors . The number of deaths from prostate cancer ... men that did not. The number of less aggressive prostate cancers was lower, but the number of ...

  14. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of the cancer. But it does not cure the cancer. If prostate cancer spreads even after hormone therapy, ... the Gleason score) when you are diagnosed. A cure is possible if the cancer has not spread. Hormone treatment can improve survival, ...

  15. Epithelial and stromal alterations in prostate after cypermethrin administration in adult albino rats (histological and biochemical study).

    PubMed

    Hashem, Hala E; Abd El-Haleem, Manal R; Abass, Marwa A

    2015-08-01

    Histological and biochemical alterations induced in prostate by cypermethrin insecticide exposure were investigated in adult albino rats. 60 mg/kg/day of cypermethrin were given orally to experimental group for 15 days then prostatic specimens were processed for light and electron microscopic examinations and for assessment of oxidative stress markers; prostatic glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GPx) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Masson's trichrome and anti-α-actin antibodies immunohistochemical staining were done. Blood samples were collected for measurement of total and prostatic acid phosphatase enzymes. Morphometric and statistical analyses were conducted. Cypermethrin treated group showed decrease in acinar epithelial height with detection of heterochromatic nuclei, cytoplasmic vacuolations and few apical microvilli. The stroma surrounding the acini was widened with significant increase in collagen fibers and significant decrease in smooth muscle cell α-actin immunoexpression. This was accompanied by a significant decrease of prostatic GSH level, activity of GPx enzyme with a significant increase in MDA level. Significant decrease in total and prostatic enzyme activities was also detected. In conclusion, cypermethrin induced epithelial degenerative changes in prostate which were accompanied by stromal alterations that seemed to be due to oxidative stress. More attention is required to the role of stromal microenvironment and oxidative stress markers in prostatic diseases.

  16. Annexin 1 is secreted by the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Haigler, H T; Christmas, P

    1990-12-01

    The human prostate expresses very high concentrations of annexins 1, 4, and 5 and secretes high concentrations of annexins 1 and 5. Although the biological roles of these proteins in prostate secretions are not known, these studies emphasize the need to consider extracellular sites for physiological functions of annexins. The clear demonstration of secretion of proteins that have blocked N-termini and lack hydrophobic signal sequences raises the possibility that novel cellular secretory pathways exist. Preliminary immunohistochemical experiments in collaboration with Dr. James Fallon indicate that both annexins 1 and 4 are expressed in prostate ductal secretory epithelium. Since annexin 1, but not annexin 4, is secreted, a comparison of the cellular fate of these two related proteins in the prostate may provide a useful model system for determining the structural elements that direct the secretion of proteins which lack conventional signal sequences.

  17. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility.

  18. The junctional epithelium originates from the odontogenic epithelium of an erupted tooth.

    PubMed

    Yajima-Himuro, Sara; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Gou; Ogawa, Miho; Furuya, Madoka; Tanaka, Junichi; Nishii, Kousuke; Mishima, Kenji; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Tsuji, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2014-05-02

    The junctional epithelium (JE) is an epithelial component that is directly attached to the tooth surface and has a protective function against periodontal diseases. In this study, we determined the origin of the JE using a bioengineered tooth technique. We transplanted the bioengineered tooth germ into the alveolar bone with an epithelial component that expressed green fluorescence protein. The reduced enamel epithelium from the bioengineered tooth fused with the oral epithelium, and the JE was apparently formed around the bioengineered tooth 50 days after transplantation. Importantly, the JE exhibited green fluorescence for at least 140 days after transplantation, suggesting that the JE was not replaced by oral epithelium. Therefore, our results demonstrated that the origin of the JE was the odontogenic epithelium, and odontogenic epithelium-derived JE was maintained for a relatively long period.

  19. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  20. Transgenic Expression of a Single Transcription Factor Pdx1 Induces Transdifferentiation of Pancreatic Acinar Cells to Endocrine Cells in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Tashiro, Fumi; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    A promising approach to new diabetes therapies is to generate β cells from other differentiated pancreatic cells in vivo. Because the acinar cells represent the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, an attractive possibility is to reprogram acinar cells into β cells. The transcription factor Pdx1 (Pancreas/duodenum homeobox protein 1) is essential for pancreatic development and cell lineage determination. Our objective is to examine whether exogenous expression of Pdx1 in acinar cells of adult mice might induce reprogramming of acinar cells into β cells. We established a transgenic mouse line in which Pdx1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) could be inducibly expressed in the acinar cells. After induction of Pdx1, we followed the acinar cells for their expression of exocrine and endocrine markers using cell-lineage tracing with EGFP. The acinar cell-specific expression of Pdx1 in adult mice reprogrammed the acinar cells as endocrine precursor cells, which migrated into the pancreatic islets and differentiated into insulin-, somatostatin-, or PP (pancreatic polypeptide)-producing endocrine cells, but not into glucagon-producing cells. When the mice undergoing such pancreatic reprogramming were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), the newly generated insulin-producing cells were able to ameliorate STZ-induced diabetes. This paradigm of in vivo reprogramming indicates that acinar cells hold promise as a source for new islet cells in regenerative therapies for diabetes. PMID:27526291

  1. Thymus epithelium induces tissue-specific tolerance

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Most current models of T cell development include a positive selection step in the thymus that occurs when T cells interact with thymic epithelium and a negative selection step after encounters with bone marrow-derived cells. We show here that developing T cells are tolerized when they recognize antigens expressed by thymic epithelium, that the tolerance is tissue specific, and that it can occur by deletion of the reactive T cells. PMID:8459209

  2. Regeneration of acinar cells following ligation of rat submandibular gland retraces the embryonic-perinatal pathway of cytodifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Cotroneo, Emanuele; Proctor, Gordon B; Carpenter, Guy H

    2010-02-01

    Rat submandibular gland can regenerate following ligation-induced atrophy, eventually recovering its normal morphology and function. Previous studies have suggested that the regeneration process implies both self-proliferation of existing acini and formation of new acinar cells. One hypothesis is that new acinar cells may differentiate from the ductal cells in a similar fashion to the process of cytodifferentiation occurring during submandibular glandular development. In this study atrophy was induced, under recovery anaesthesia, by applying a metal clip on the main duct of the submandibular gland without including the chorda lingual nerve. After 2 weeks the duct was deligated for 3, 5 or 7 days or 8 weeks and the glands collected. Tissue was prepared for immunohistochemistry, biochemical analysis and RNA extraction. The histology of the regenerated glands shows several normal-looking acini, which have regained their glycoprotein content (AB/PAS positive), data also confirmed by biochemical analysis (SDS-PAGE/PAS). Regenerating tissue was characterized by the presence of embryonic-like branched structures ending with AB/PAS positive acinar cells. The proteins SMG-B and PSP are normally expressed in acinar cell precursors during development but only by intercalated ductal cells in the adult stage. In the adult regenerating gland mRNA levels of both SMG-B and PSP were found to be up-regulated compared to ligated glands and SMG-B expression localized to acinar cells whilst the ductal cells were negative. This study of rat submandibular gland regeneration suggests new acinar cells have differentiated from ducts and express markers of acinar cell precursors in a similar manner to the cytodifferentiation process occurring during glandular development.

  3. CCR5 receptor antagonists block metastasis to bone of v-Src-oncogene-transformed metastatic prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Daniela; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ju, Xiaoming; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; Li, Zhiping; Ando, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Thakur, Mathew L.; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) integrate signal transduction for multiple receptors, regulating cellular proliferation invasion and metastasis in human cancer. Although Src is rarely mutated in human prostate cancer, SFK activity is increased in the majority of human prostate cancers. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing prostate cancer bone metastasis, FVB murine prostate epithelium was transduced with oncogenic v-Src. The prostate cancer cell lines metastasized in FVB mice to brain and bone. Gene expression profiling of the tumors identified activation of a CCR5 signaling module when the prostate epithelial cells (PEC) lines were grown in vivo vs. tissue cultures. The whole body, bone and brain metastatic prostate cancer burden was reduced by oral CCR5 antagonist. Clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors may warrant consideration in patients with CCR5 activation in their tumors. PMID:25452256

  4. Simultaneous inactivation of Par-4 and PTEN in vivo leads to synergistic NF-κB activation and invasive prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Abu-Baker, Shadi; Joshi, Jayashree; Galvez, Anita; Castilla, Elias A.; Cañamero, Marta; Collado, Manuel; Saez, Carmen; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Palacios, Jose; Leitges, Michael; Serrano, Manuel; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasias in men. The tumor suppressor Par-4 is an important negative regulator of the canonical NF-κB pathway and is highly expressed in prostate. Here we show that Par-4 expression is lost in a high percentage of human prostate carcinomas, and this occurs in association with phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) loss. Par-4 null mice, similar to PTEN-heterozygous mice, only develop benign prostate lesions, but, importantly, concomitant Par-4 ablation and PTEN-heterozygosity lead to invasive prostate carcinoma in mice. This strong tumorigenic cooperation is anticipated in the preneoplastic prostate epithelium by an additive increase in Akt activation and a synergistic stimulation of NF-κB. These results establish the cooperation between Par-4 and PTEN as relevant for the development of prostate cancer and implicate the NF-κB pathway as a critical event in prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:19470463

  5. Pancreatic acinar cells produce, release, and respond to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Role in regulating cell death and pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gukovskaya, A S; Gukovsky, I; Zaninovic, V; Song, M; Sandoval, D; Gukovsky, S; Pandol, S J

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and receptors for TNFalpha are expressed in the exocrine pancreas, and whether pancreatic acinar cells release and respond to TNFalpha. Reverse transcription PCR, immunoprecipitation, and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of TNFalpha and 55- and 75-kD TNFalpha receptors in pancreas from control rats, rats with experimental pancreatitis induced by supramaximal doses of cerulein, and in isolated pancreatic acini. Immunohistochemistry showed TNFalpha presence in pancreatic acinar cells. ELISA and bioassay measurements of TNFalpha indicated its release from pancreatic acinar cells during incubation in primary culture. Acinar cells responded to TNFalpha. TNFalpha potentiated NF-kappaB translocation into the nucleus and stimulated apoptosis in isolated acini while not affecting LDH release. In vivo studies demonstrated that neutralization of TNFalpha with an antibody produced a mild improvement in the parameters of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. However, TNFalpha neutralization greatly inhibited apoptosis in a modification of the cerulein model of pancreatitis which is associated with a high percentage of apoptotic cell death. The results indicate that pancreatic acinar cells produce, release, and respond to TNFalpha. This cytokine regulates apoptosis in both isolated pancreatic acini and experimental pancreatitis. PMID:9312187

  6. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D.

  7. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D. PMID:26845357

  8. Cannabinoid receptors in submandibular acinar cells: functional coupling between saliva fluid and electrolytes secretion and Ca2+ signalling.

    PubMed

    Kopach, Olga; Vats, Juliana; Netsyk, Olga; Voitenko, Nana; Irving, Andrew; Fedirko, Nataliya

    2012-04-15

    Cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, and activation of CBRs in salivary cells inhibits agonist-stimulated salivation and modifies saliva content. However, the role of different CBR subtypes in acinar cell physiology and in intracellular signalling remains unclear. Here, we uncover functional CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in acinar cells of rat submandibular gland and their essential role in saliva secretion. Pharmacological activation of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in the submandibular gland suppressed saliva outflow and modified saliva content produced by the submandibular gland in vivo. Using Na(+)-selective microelectrodes to record secretory Na(+) responses in the lumen of acini, we observed a reduction in Na(+) transport following the activation of CBRs, which was counteracted by the selective CB(1)R antagonist AM251. In addition, activation of CB(1)Rs or CB Rs caused inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) 2 -ATPase activity in microsomes derived from the gland tissue as well as in isolated acinar cells. Using a Ca(2+) imaging technique, we showed that activation of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs alters [Ca(2+)](cyt) signalling in acinar cells by distinct pathways, involving Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), respectively. Our data demonstrate the expression of CB(1)Rs and CB(2)Rs in acinar cells, and their involvement in the regulation of salivary gland functioning.

  9. Carcinoid tumor associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium in the renal pelvis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Sun; Choi, Chan; Kang, Taek Won; Choi, Yoo Duk

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are well documented in the pulmonary and gastrointestinal systems, but very rare in the urinary tract, especially in the renal pelvis. We report on a 60-year-old female patient who presented with left flank pain and fever. Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left renal pelvis and a stone at the left proximal ureter. Multiple parenchymal lesions were also observed, which were identified as uneven caliectasis displaying air-fluid levels and renal parenchymal atrophy. The patient underwent simple nephro-ureterectomy. Macroscopically, a polypoid mass was observed in the renal pelvis. Microscopically, the tumor revealed acinar, tubular, and solid pattern and was composed of small, monotonous and hyperchromatic cells. Lining epithelia in renal pelvis and ureter revealed columnar epithelia with dysplastic change. The tumor cells were positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, CD56, and focally positive for cytokeratin. Immunohistochemical staining of synaptophysin and chromogranin A highlighted the neuroendocrine cells in the columnar epithelium. Ki-67 (1:50; MIB-1) labeling index was less than 1% in the area with highest uptake. We report here a case of carcinoid tumor of the renal pelvis that was associated with adjacent dysplastic columnar epithelium. PMID:26644387

  10. A Proposal to Unify the Classification of Breast and Prostate Cancers Based on the Anatomic Site of Cancer Origin and on Long-term Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Tabár, László; Dean, Peter B; Yen, Amy M-F; Tarján, Miklós; Chiu, Sherry Y-H; Chen, Sam L-S; Fann, Jean C-Y; Chen, Tony H-H

    2014-01-01

    The similarity between the structure and function of the breast and prostate has been known for a long time, but there are serious discrepancies in the terminology describing breast and prostate cancers. The use of the large, thick-section (3D) histology technique for both organs exposes the irrationality of the breast cancer terminology. Pathologists with expertise in diagnosing prostate cancer take the anatomic site of cancer origin into account when using the terms AAP (acinar adenocarcinoma of the prostate) and DAP (ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate) to distinguish between the prostate cancers originating primarily from the fluid-producing acinar portion of the organ (AAP) and the tumors originating either purely from the larger ducts (DAP) or from both the acini and the main ducts combined (DAP and AAP). Long-term patient outcome is closely correlated with the terminology, because patients with DAP have a significantly poorer prognosis than patients with AAP. The current breast cancer terminology could be improved by modeling it after the method of classifying prostate cancer to reflect the anatomic site of breast cancer origin and the patient outcome. The long-term survival curves of our consecutive breast cancer cases collected since 1977 clearly show that the non-palpable, screen-detected breast cancers originating from the milk-producing acini have excellent prognosis, irrespective of their histologic malignancy grade or biomarkers. Correspondingly, the breast cancer subtypes of truly ductal origin have a significantly poorer outcome, despite recent improvements in diagnosis and therapy. The mammographic appearance of breast cancers reflects the underlying tissue structure. Addition of these "mammographic tumor features" to the currently used histologic phenotypes makes it possible to distinguish the breast cancer cases of ductal origin with a poor outcome, termed DAB (ductal adenocarcinoma of the breast), from the more easily managed breast cancers of

  11. Prostate specific antigen gene expression in androgen insensitive prostate carcinoma subculture cell line.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chung, Li-Chuan; Chao, Chun-Hsiang; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2008-01-01

    A novel prostate cancer cell line (PC-J) was isolated from an androgen independent non-prostate specific antigen (non-PSA) producing carcinoma cell line. The homologous correlation between PC-J and PC-3 was determined by short tandem repeat analysis. The PSA promoter activity was detected by transient expression assay in the PC-J and LNCaP cells but not in androgen insensitive PC-3 cells. When the PC-J cells were cotransfected with androgen receptor, androgen receptor coactivators and PSA reporter vector cells, the reporter assays indicated that nuclear receptor coactivator 4 (NCOA4) but not androgen receptor activator 24 (ARA24) increased the sensitivity and maximum stimulation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-inducing PSA promoter activity. The RT-PCR assays revealed that the expression of several tumor markers, including interleukin-6, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), prostate epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor (PDEF) and matriptase, was lower in the PC-J cells than in the PC-3 cells. This cell model elucidated the regulation of PSA expression and enabled comparison of the gene profile at different stages of metastasis in prostatic carcinoma.

  12. Expression of keratins in mouse vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Conti, I B; Lynch, M; Roop, D; Bhowmik, S; Majeski, P; Conti, C J

    1994-05-01

    In the epithelium of the rodent vagina proliferation and differentiation are tightly regulated by ovarian hormones. Estrogens stimulate proliferation and squamous differentiation, whereas progesterone redirects differentiation to a mucus-secreting epithelium formed by goblet-like cells. In the present study, we used monospecific keratin antibodies to show the expression and distribution of keratins in SENCAR mouse vaginal epithelium in different stages of the estral cycle and in ovariectomized animals. In ovariectomized animals, the vaginal epithelium expressed K6, K8, K13 and K14, but not K1. After estrogen treatment, K1 was expressed. During proestrus and estrus, the keratin pattern was essentially identical to that observed in 17 beta-estradiol-stimulated animals. In contrast, during the progestational stages (metaestrus and diestrus) or after progesterone treatment of ovariectomized mice, the most relevant change was the loss of K1. Together, these results show that K1 expression is induced by estrogens in the vaginal epithelium. In contrast, K6, K8, K13 and K14 are constitutively expressed even when squamous differentiation is not observed.

  13. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  14. Detection and characterisation of biopsy tissue using quantitative optical coherence elastography (OCE) in men with suspected prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Ling, Yuting; Hsu, Ying-Ting; Song, Shaozhen; Huang, Jeffrey T-J; Lang, Stephen; Wang, Ruikang K; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-02-01

    We present first quantitative three-dimensional (3D) data sets recorded using optical coherence elastography (OCE) for the diagnosis and detection of prostate cancer (PCa). 120 transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy specimens from 10 men suspected with prostate cancer were imaged using OCE. 3D quantitative mechanical assessment of biopsy specimens obtained in kilopascals (kPa) at an interval of 40 µm was compared with histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for OCE in comparison to histopathology. The results show OCE imaging could reliably differentiate between benign prostate tissue, acinar atypical hyperplasia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and malignant PCa. The sensitivity and specificity of OCE for the detection of prostate cancer was 0.98 and 0.91 with AUC > 0.99. Quantitative 3D OCE based on the assessment of mechanical properties of tissues can reliably differentiate prostate tissue specimen in an ex-vivo setting. This is a promising imaging modality for characterising different grades of cancers.

  15. ERK and AKT signaling drive MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer in association with elevated proliferation and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng; Irshad, Shazia; Yu, Wei; Belakavadi, Madesh; Chekmareva, Marina; Ittmann, Michael M; Abate-Shen, Cory; Fondell, Joseph D

    2013-07-01

    MED1 is a key coactivator of the androgen receptor (AR) and other signal-activated transcription factors. Whereas MED1 is overexpressed in prostate cancer cell lines and is thought to coactivate distinct target genes involved in cell-cycle progression and castration-resistant growth, the underlying mechanisms by which MED1 becomes overexpressed and its oncogenic role in clinical prostate cancer have remained unclear. Here, we report that MED1 is overexpressed in the epithelium of clinically localized human prostate cancer patients, which correlated with elevated cellular proliferation. In a Nkx3.1:Pten mutant mouse model of prostate cancer that recapitulates the human disease, MED1 protein levels were markedly elevated in the epithelium of both invasive and castration-resistant adenocarcinoma prostate tissues. Mechanistic evidence showed that hyperactivated ERK and/or AKT signaling pathways promoted MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer cells. Notably, ectopic MED1 overexpression in prostate cancer xenografts significantly promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, MED1 expression in prostate cancer cells promoted the expression of a number of novel genes involved in inflammation, cell proliferation, and survival. Together, these findings suggest that elevated MED1 is a critical molecular event associated with prostate oncogenesis.

  16. Polycomb repressor complex 1 promotes gene silencing through H2AK119 mono-ubiquitination in acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Tobias; Popp, Anna; Schäffer, Isabell; Raulefs, Susanne; Kong, Bo; Esposito, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) occurring in cerulein-mediated pancreatitis or in oncogenic Kras-driven pancreatic cancer development is accompanied by extensive changes in the transcriptional program. In this process, acinar cells shut down the expression of acinar specific differentiation genes and re-express genes usually found in embryonic pancreatic progenitor cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that a loss of acinar-specific transcription factors sensitizes the cells towards oncogenic transformation, ultimately resulting in cancer development. However, the mechanism behind the transcriptional silencing of acinar cell fate genes in ADM and pancreatic cancer is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed whether elevated levels of the polycomb repressor complex 1 (PRC1) components Bmi1 and Ring1b and their catalyzed histone modification H2AK119ub in ADMs and tumor cells, are responsible for the mediation of acinar gene silencing. Therefore, we performed chromatin-immunoprecipitation in in vitro generated ADMs and isolated murine tumor cells against the repressive histone modifications H3K27me3 and H2AK119ub. We established that the acinar transcription factor complex Ptf1-L is epigenetically silenced in ADMs as well as in pancreatic tumor cells. For the first time, this work presents a possible mechanism of acinar gene silencing, which is an important prerequisite in the initiation and maintenance of a dedifferentiated cell state in ADMs and tumor cells. PMID:26716510

  17. KLF4 Is Essential for Induction of Cellular Identity Change and Acinar-to-Ductal Reprogramming during Early Pancreatic Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Daoyan; Wang, Liang; Yan, Yongmin; Jia, Zhiliang; Gagea, Mihai; Li, Zhiwei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Kong, Xiangyu; Huang, Suyun; Xie, Keping

    2016-03-14

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of tumor initiation has significant impact on early cancer detection and intervention. To define the role of KLF4 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) initiation, we used molecular biological analyses and mouse models of klf4 gain- and loss-of-function and mutant Kras. KLF4 is upregulated in and required for acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. Klf4 ablation drastically attenuates the formation of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia induced by mutant Kras(G12D), whereas upregulation of KLF4 does the opposite. Mutant KRAS and cellular injuries induce KLF4 expression, and ectopic expression of KLF4 in acinar cells reduces acinar lineage- and induces ductal lineage-related marker expression. These results demonstrate that KLF4 induces ductal identity in PanIN initiation and may be a potential target for prevention of PDA initiation.

  18. [Giant phyllodes tumor of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Kawamorita, Naoki; Inaba, Yasuo; Soma, Fumihiko; Katayama, Yousei; Mikami, Yoshiki

    2007-09-01

    A 55 year-old man complained dysuria and visited to our hospital. Physical examination showed firm large mass occupying whole abdomen. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated a huge retroperitoneal tumor which compressed intestine, liver, kidney, and urinary bladder. We performed extirpation of the tumor (8.6 kg, largest diameter 60 cm) which was composed of myxoid stromal region associated with cystic pattern. Histological examination revealed that the epithelium of the cystic region was positive for prostate specific antigen (PSA) immunostaining. The tumor was diagnosed phyllodes tumor of the prostate (prostatic stromal proliferation of uncertain malignancy, PSTUMP). Serum PSA was declined 3.9 ng/ml to 0.9 ng/ml; however, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a residual (recurrent?) tumor in the pelvis one month after the operation. We carried out total prostatectomy and residual tumor resection. Phyllodes tumor of the prostate is histologically characterized with biphasic pattern of hyperplastic epithelial cysts and variably cellular spindle stroma. The tumor is considered to have malignant potential and several histological factors including cellularity, atypia, etc. are utilized to assess it. However diagnostic criteria and subsequent treatment modalities are not established thus far. Previous reports showed efficacy of total surgical removal rather than partial resection and that we performed radical extirpation of the entire tumor. Close follow up is needed against this frequently recurrent disease.

  19. [Vital fluorochrome staining of isolated pancreatic acinar cells for the characterization of cell-structural changes].

    PubMed

    Dietzmann, K; Letko, G; Spormann, H

    1986-01-01

    Rhodamine 6 G as a cationic fluorophore is demonstrated to be selectively accumulated by mitochondria of living pancreatic acinar cells (cell isolation see Spormann et al. [1986]. The accumulation of rhodamine was studied under using of electron transport inhibitors, ionophores and some hydrogen donors. The application of DNP as wellknown protonophore resulted in a rapid dissipation of any fluorescent signals, whereas application of sodium succinate, hyperosmolaric exhibited a remarkable increase of fluorescence intensity. Using this technique it is possible to estimate the energy state of living cells under various conditions of energy supply and demand. PMID:2426729

  20. p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) limits senescence and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia formation during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Hehl, Adrian B; Seleznik, Gitta M; Saponara, Enrica; Schlesinger, Kathryn; Zuellig, Richard A; Dittmann, Anja; Bain, Martha; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-02-01

    Trans-differentiation of pancreatic acinar cells into ductal-like lesions, a process defined as acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), is observed in the course of organ regeneration following pancreatitis. In addition, ADM is found in association with pre-malignant PanIN lesions and correlates with an increased risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Human PDAC samples show down-regulation of p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) , a key regulator of cell cycle and cell differentiation. Here we investigated whether p21 down-regulation is implicated in controlling the early events of acinar cell trans-differentiation and ADM formation. p21-mediated regulation of ADM formation and regression was analysed in vivo during the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis, using wild-type (WT) and p21-deficient (p21(-/-) ) mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate disease progression over 2 weeks of the disease and during a recovery phase. We found that p21 was strongly up-regulated in WT acinar cells during pancreatitis, while it was absent in ADM areas, suggesting that p21 down-regulation is associated with ADM formation. In support of this hypothesis, p21(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in number and size of metaplasia. In addition, p21 over-expression in acinar cells reduced ADM formation in vitro, suggesting that the protein regulates the metaplastic transition in a cell-autonomous manner. p21(-/-) mice displayed increased expression and relocalization of β-catenin both during pancreatitis and in the subsequent recovery phase. Finally, loss of p21 was accompanied by increased DNA damage and development of senescence. Our findings are consistent with a gate-keeper role of p21 in acinar cells to limit senescence activation and ADM formation during pancreatic regeneration. PMID:25212177

  1. p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) limits senescence and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia formation during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Hehl, Adrian B; Seleznik, Gitta M; Saponara, Enrica; Schlesinger, Kathryn; Zuellig, Richard A; Dittmann, Anja; Bain, Martha; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-02-01

    Trans-differentiation of pancreatic acinar cells into ductal-like lesions, a process defined as acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), is observed in the course of organ regeneration following pancreatitis. In addition, ADM is found in association with pre-malignant PanIN lesions and correlates with an increased risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Human PDAC samples show down-regulation of p21(WAF1) (/Cip1) , a key regulator of cell cycle and cell differentiation. Here we investigated whether p21 down-regulation is implicated in controlling the early events of acinar cell trans-differentiation and ADM formation. p21-mediated regulation of ADM formation and regression was analysed in vivo during the course of cerulein-induced pancreatitis, using wild-type (WT) and p21-deficient (p21(-/-) ) mice. Biochemical and immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate disease progression over 2 weeks of the disease and during a recovery phase. We found that p21 was strongly up-regulated in WT acinar cells during pancreatitis, while it was absent in ADM areas, suggesting that p21 down-regulation is associated with ADM formation. In support of this hypothesis, p21(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in number and size of metaplasia. In addition, p21 over-expression in acinar cells reduced ADM formation in vitro, suggesting that the protein regulates the metaplastic transition in a cell-autonomous manner. p21(-/-) mice displayed increased expression and relocalization of β-catenin both during pancreatitis and in the subsequent recovery phase. Finally, loss of p21 was accompanied by increased DNA damage and development of senescence. Our findings are consistent with a gate-keeper role of p21 in acinar cells to limit senescence activation and ADM formation during pancreatic regeneration.

  2. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  3. A tetanus toxin sensitive protein other than VAMP 2 is required for exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell.

    PubMed

    Padfield, P J

    2000-11-01

    The neurotoxin sensitivity of regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell was investigated using streptolysin-O permeabilized pancreatic acini. Treatment of permeabilized acini with botulinum toxin B (BoNT/B) or botulinum toxin D (BoNT/D) had no detectable effect on Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion but did result in the complete cleavage of VAMP 2. In comparison, tetanus toxin (TeTx) treatment both significantly inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent amylase secretion and cleaved VAMP 2. These results indicate that regulated exocytosis in the pancreatic acinar cell requires a tetanus toxin sensitive protein(s) other than VAMP 2.

  4. Inhibition of O-GlcNAc transferase activity reprograms prostate cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Itkonen, Harri M.; Gorad, Saurabh S.; Duveau, Damien Y.; Martin, Sara E.S.; Barkovskaya, Anna; Bathen, Tone F.; Moestue, Siver A.; Mills, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic networks are highly connected and complex, but a single enzyme, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) can sense the availability of metabolites and also modify target proteins. We show that inhibition of OGT activity inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, leads to sustained loss of c-MYC and suppresses the expression of CDK1, elevated expression of which predicts prostate cancer recurrence (p=0.00179). Metabolic profiling revealed decreased glucose consumption and lactate production after OGT inhibition. This decreased glycolytic activity specifically sensitized prostate cancer cells, but not cells representing normal prostate epithelium, to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (rotenone and metformin). Intra-cellular alanine was depleted upon OGT inhibitor treatment. OGT inhibitor increased the expression and activity of alanine aminotransferase (GPT2), an enzyme that can be targeted with a clinically approved drug, cycloserine. Simultaneous inhibition of OGT and GPT2 inhibited cell viability and growth rate, and additionally activated a cell death response. These combinatorial effects were predominantly seen in prostate cancer cells, but not in a cell-line derived from normal prostate epithelium. Combinatorial treatments were confirmed with two inhibitors against both OGT and GPT2. Taken together, here we report the reprogramming of energy metabolism upon inhibition of OGT activity, and identify synergistically lethal combinations that are prostate cancer cell specific. PMID:26824323

  5. PDEF in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ashwani K; Kim, Hyung; Geradts, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    Prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF) is a relatively recently described member of the Ets family of transcription factors. It differs from other family members in its restricted and epithelial-specific expression in normal tissues and its unique DNA-binding motif that together may impart interesting specificity to its function. This communication reviews our current understanding of the expression characteristics of PDEF in normal prostate and in prostate cancer. Also, the biochemical and genetic evidence relating to the role of this transcription factor in prostate cancer is reviewed. Most evidence is consistent with an oncogenic role for PDEF in prostate cancer. Specific observations about the loss of PDEF expression in prostate tumors and its apparent role as a prostate tumor suppressor are also discussed. PDEF is one of the few transcription factors with potential to have a significant impact on the management of prostate cancer. A better understanding of its biology and its role in prostate cancer is urgently needed.

  6. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance.

  7. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance. PMID:25727526

  8. Restricted diffusion in a model acinar labyrinth by NMR: Theoretical and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Guillot, G.; Sapoval, B.

    2007-01-01

    A branched geometrical structure of the mammal lungs is known to be crucial for rapid access of oxygen to blood. But an important pulmonary disease like emphysema results in partial destruction of the alveolar tissue and enlargement of the distal airspaces, which may reduce the total oxygen transfer. This effect has been intensively studied during the last decade by MRI of hyperpolarized gases like helium-3. The relation between geometry and signal attenuation remained obscure due to a lack of realistic geometrical model of the acinar morphology. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations of restricted diffusion in a realistic model acinus to compute the signal attenuation in a diffusion-weighted NMR experiment. We demonstrate that this technique should be sensitive to destruction of the branched structure: partial removal of the interalveolar tissue creates loops in the tree-like acinar architecture that enhance diffusive motion and the consequent signal attenuation. The role of the local geometry and related practical applications are discussed.

  9. Salivary gland acinar cells regenerate functional glandular structures in modified hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Swati

    Xerostomia, a condition resulting from irradiation of the head and neck, affects over 40,000 cancer patients each year in the United States. Direct radiation damage of the acinar cells that secrete fluid and protein results in salivary gland hypofunction. Present medical management for xerostomia for patients treated for upper respiratory cancer is largely ineffective. Patients who have survived their terminal diagnosis are often left with a diminished quality of life and are unable to enjoy the simple pleasures of eating and drinking. This project aims to ultimately reduce human suffering by developing a functional implantable artificial salivary gland. The goal was to create an extracellular matrix (ECM) modified hyaluronic acid (HA) based hydrogel culture system that allows for the growth and differentiation of salivary acinar cells into functional acini-like structures capable of secreting large amounts of protein and fluid unidirectionally and to ultimately engineer a functional artificial salivary gland that can be implanted into an animal model. A tissue collection protocol was established and salivary gland tissue was obtained from patients undergoing head and neck surgery. The tissue specimen was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry to establish the phenotype of normal salivary gland cells including the native basement membranes. Hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed normal glandular tissue structures including intercalated ducts, striated ducts and acini. alpha-Amylase and periodic acid schiff stain, used for structures with a high proportion of carbohydrate macromolecules, preferentially stained acinar cells in the tissue. Intercalated and striated duct structures were identified using cytokeratins 19 and 7 staining. Myoepithelial cells positive for cytokeratin 14 were found wrapped around the serous and mucous acini. Tight junction components including ZO-1 and E-cadherin were present between both ductal and acinar cells. Ductal and acinar

  10. THE DEGENERATIVE CHANGES IN PANCREATIC ACINAR CELLS CAUSED BY DL-ETHIONINE

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Lawrence; Fitzgerald, Patrick J.

    1962-01-01

    Degeneration of pancreatic acinar cells in rats injected with ethionine was studied by electron microscopy. The most conspicuous morphologic lesions occurred in the ergastoplasm. There was a widening of the endoplasmic reticulum, a decrease in number of membrane-associated ribosomes, and a development of fine and coarse vacuoles containing agranular disoriented membranes. Cytoplasmic ribosomes unassociated with membranes were less numerous. Nuclear changes consisted of a coarsening and clumping of the nuclear chromatin, chromatin margination, and increased osmiophilia and vacuolation of the nucleolus. Eight to ten days after the beginning of ethionine injections, changes in zymogen granules, mitochondria, and the Golgi apparatus appeared, but only after extensive damage to the acinar cell. The effects were consistent with ethionine's known interference with protein metabolism but also suggest disturbance in ribonucleic acid metabolism. The ergastoplasmic changes after ethionine were similar in some respects to the early lesions produced in liver parenchymal cells by fasting, to the changes occurring in animals on protein-free diets, or to some of the liver changes produced by azo dye carcinogens. The ribosomal and ergastoplasmic changes represent early morphologic expressions of the biochemical effect of ethionine. PMID:13906694

  11. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury.

  12. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury. PMID:26476347

  13. MHC class II molecules, cathepsins, and La/SSB proteins in lacrimal acinar cell endomembranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, T; Zeng, H; Zhang, J; Okamoto, C T; Warren, D W; Wood, R L; Bachmann, M; Mircheff, A K

    1999-11-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting the lacrimal glands and other epithelia. It has been suggested that acinar cells of the lacrimal glands provoke local autoimmune responses, leading to Sjögren's syndrome when they begin expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We used isopycnic centrifugation and phase partitioning to resolve compartments that participate in traffic between the basolateral membranes and the endomembrane system to test the hypothesis that MHC class II molecules enter compartments that contain potential autoantigens, i.e., La/SSB, and enzymes capable of proteolytically processing autoantigen, i.e., cathepsins B and D. A series of compartments identified as secretory vesicle membranes, prelysosomes, and microdomains of the trans-Golgi network involved in traffic to the basolateral membrane, to the secretory vesicles, and to the prelysosomes were all prominent loci of MHC class II molecules, La/SSB, and cathepsins B and D. These observations support the thesis that lacrimal gland acinar cells that have been induced to express MHC class II molecules function as autoantigen processing and presenting cells.

  14. Genetic ablation of Smoothened in pancreatic fibroblasts increases acinar-ductal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Pitarresi, Jason R; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Woelke, Sarah A; Sizemore, Gina M; Nayak, Sunayana G; Egriboz, Onur; Schweickert, Patrick G; Yu, Lianbo; Trela, Stefan; Schilling, Daniel J; Halloran, Shannon K; Li, Maokun; Dutta, Shourik; Fernandez, Soledad A; Rosol, Thomas J; Lesinski, Gregory B; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    The contribution of the microenvironment to pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a preneoplastic transition in oncogenic Kras-driven pancreatic cancer progression, is currently unclear. Here we show that disruption of paracrine Hedgehog signaling via genetic ablation of Smoothened (Smo) in stromal fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D) mouse model increased ADM. Smo-deleted fibroblasts had higher expression of transforming growth factor-α (Tgfa) mRNA and secreted higher levels of TGFα, leading to activation of EGFR signaling in acinar cells and increased ADM. The mechanism involved activation of AKT and noncanonical activation of the GLI family transcription factor GLI2. GLI2 was phosphorylated at Ser230 in an AKT-dependent fashion and directly regulated Tgfa expression in fibroblasts lacking Smo Additionally, Smo-deleted fibroblasts stimulated the growth of Kras(G12D)/Tp53(R172H) pancreatic tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. These results define a non-cell-autonomous mechanism modulating Kras(G12D)-driven ADM that is balanced by cross-talk between Hedgehog/SMO and AKT/GLI2 pathways in stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27633013

  15. The role of Ca2+ influx in endocytic vacuole formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Voronina, Svetlana; Collier, David; Chvanov, Michael; Middlehurst, Ben; Beckett, Alison J; Prior, Ian A; Criddle, David N; Begg, Malcolm; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Sutton, Robert; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2015-02-01

    The inducers of acute pancreatitis trigger a prolonged increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c), which is responsible for the damage to and eventual death of pancreatic acinar cells. Vacuolization is an important indicator of pancreatic acinar cell damage. Furthermore, activation of trypsinogen occurs in the endocytic vacuoles; therefore the vacuoles can be considered as 'initiating' organelles in the development of the cell injury. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the formation of endocytic vacuoles and Ca(2+) influx developed in response to the inducers of acute pancreatitis [bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLC-S) and supramaximal concentration of cholecystokinin-8 (CCK)]. We found that the inhibitor of STIM (stromal interaction molecule)/Orai channels, GSK-7975A, effectively suppressed both the Ca(2+) influx (stimulated by inducers of pancreatitis) and the formation of endocytic vacuoles. Cell death induced by TLC-S or CCK was also inhibited by GSK-7975A. We documented the formation of endocytic vacuoles in response to store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) induced by thapsigargin [TG; inhibitor of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) pumps] and observed strong inhibition of TG-induced vacuole formation by GSK-7975A. Finally, we found that structurally-unrelated inhibitors of calpain suppress formation of endocytic vacuoles, suggesting that this Ca2+-dependent protease is a mediator between Ca(2+) elevation and endocytic vacuole formation.

  16. [Autocrine growth mechanisms of cholesteatoma epithelium].

    PubMed

    Schilling, V; Holly, A; Bujía, J; Schulz, P

    1993-07-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) are known to be produced by normal human keratinocytes stimulating their proliferation. The distribution and expression of TGF alpha and IL-1 alpha were examined in specimens of middle ear cholesteatoma by means of immunohistochemical methods using a monoclonal antibody against TGF alpha and a polyclonal one against IL-1 alpha. Normal retroauricular skin was stained for comparison. Staining for TGF alpha was consistently stronger in cholesteatoma epithelium than in normal epidermis, and encompassed all epithelial cell layers. Immune cells occurring in the stroma of cholesteatoma also reacted positively for TGF alpha. The intensity of staining for IL-1 alpha was markedly stronger in cholesteatoma tissue than in normal epidermis. All cellular layers of the squamous epithelium of cholesteatoma stained strongly and uniformly for IL-1 alpha, whereas the keratin layer was negative for IL-1 alpha. In the connective tissue beneath the cholesteatoma epithelium intensely positive cells were scattered between negative stromal cells. These data are consistent with autocrine stimulation of the squamous epithelium of cholesteatoma by TGF alpha and IL-1 alpha as well as with a paracrine stimulation by immune cells. Both factors contribute to the unrestrained growth of cholesteatoma in the middle ear cavity.

  17. [Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Prostate in which Docetaxel Therapy was Effective : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Hiroyuki; Kajiwara, Mitsuru; Yonehara, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    The patient was a 73-year-old man who visited our hospital with asymptomatic gross hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a bladder tumor in two places. Serum prostatic specific antigen was normal (2.535 ng/ml). Transurethral resection of bladder tumors was performed. In order to complete resection of bladder tumor, transurethral resection of right lobe of the prostate whitch had protruded into the bladder, was needed. Histology of the prostatic tissue revealed squamous cell carcinoma with no grandular and acinar structures. Serum SCC-antigen level was evaluated (6.2 ng/ml) after establishment of the diagnosis. Thoraco-abdominal computed tomography and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/ computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) showed prostate cancer and multiple metastases in the lymph nodes, such as right external iliac, right common iliac, para-aortic and left supraclavicular region. The patient received external radiation therapy to the prostate and underwent systemic chemotherapy using docetaxel. After 2 courses of docetaxel therapy, multiple lymph nodes metastases were reduced and serum SCC-antigen level was normalized. Docetaxel therapy could not be continued because of a side effect of interstitial pneumonia. PMID:27320118

  18. Prolactin-induced prostate tumorigenesis links sustained Stat5 signaling with the amplification of basal/stem cells and emergence of putative luminal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Chiche, Aurélie; Mosquera-Garrote, Nerea; Boutillon, Florence; Cordier, Corinne; Pourmir, Ivan; Pascual-Mathey, Luz; Kessal, Karima; Pigat, Natascha; Camparo, Philippe; Goffin, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Current androgen ablation therapies for prostate cancer are initially successful, but the frequent development of castration resistance urges the generation of alternative therapies and represents an important health concern. Prolactin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling is emerging as a putative target for alternative treatment for prostate cancer. However, mechanistic data for its role in development or progression of prostate tumors are scarce. In vivo mouse studies found that local prolactin induced the amplification of prostate epithelial basal/stem cells. Because these cells are proposed cells of origin for prostate cancer and disease recurrence, we looked further into this amplification. Our results indicated that sustained Stat5 activation was associated with the occurrence of abnormal basal/stem cell clusters in prostate epithelium of prostate-specific prolactin-transgenic mice. Analysis of epithelial areas containing these clusters found high proliferation, Stat5 activation, and expression of stem cell antigen 1. Furthermore, enhanced prolactin signaling also led to amplification of a luminal cell population that was positive for stem cell antigen 1. These cells may originate from amplified basal/stem cells and might represent important progenitors for tumor development in prostate epithelium. These data provide a deeper understanding of the initial stages of prostate tumorigenesis induced by prolactin to help determine whether this hormone or its downstream messengers could be useful targets for prostate cancer treatment in the future.

  19. Effects of L-Glutamine oral supplementation on prostate of irradiated rats

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Flavia C. M.; Costa, Waldemar S.; Silva, Pamella C.; de Souza, Diogo B; Gregório, Bianca; Sampaio, Francisco J. B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate the protective effect of L-Glutamine in animals undergone to ventral radiation when the target organ is not the prostate. Materials and Methods Wistar rats were divided into groups of 10 animals each: Controls (C), maintained under standard conditions and not exposed to radiation, Radiated group (R) undergone to abdominal radiation only and Radiated plus supplemented by L-glutamine group (R+G). The animals of group R+G were supplemented with L-glutamine at the beginning of the experiment until death in the 22nd day. The ventral prostate was dissected and processed for morphometrical analysis. The epithelial height, collagen density and acinar area were objectively assessed in histological sections. Results Epithelial height was significantly reduced in R group in comparison to C group (p= 0.005). However, there was no statistical difference between the C and R+G groups. Collagen surface density in the C and R groups were not statistically different, but a significant difference was observed when comparing groups R+G and R (p= 0.040). The R+G group values did not differ significantly from C group. The acinar prostate area of group R was similar to that of C (p= 0.971), but in R+G it was significantly reduced when compared with the C (p= 0.038) and R (p= 0.001) groups. Conclusions Pelvic radiation promotes structural modifications in ventral prostate of rats, which can be reduced by L-Glutamine. PMID:27286127

  20. Changes in Estrogen Receptor ERβ (ESR2) Expression without Changes in the Estradiol Levels in the Prostate of Aging Rats

    PubMed Central

    Morais-Santos, Mônica; Nunes, Aryane E. B.; Oliveira, André G.; Moura-Cordeiro, Júnia Dayrell; Mahecha, Germán A. B.; Avellar, Maria Christina W.; Oliveira, Cleida A.

    2015-01-01

    Although the prostate is androgen-dependent, it is also influenced by estrogens, which act via the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. In the prostate, ERβ is highly expressed in the epithelium and appears to participate in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. Evidence shows that ERβ is decreased in malignant prostate, suggesting that it plays an important role in protecting this tissue. Despite the relationship between reductions in ERβ and abnormal growth of the gland, little is known about the age-dependent variation of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to investigate ERβ expression in the prostatic lobes of aging Wistar rats (3 to 24 months). Histopathological alterations, including hyperplasia, intraluminal concretions, nuclear atypia and prostate intraepithelial neoplasias (PIN), were observed in the prostates of aging rats. Epithelial proliferation led to cribriform architecture in some acini, especially in the ventral prostate (VP). In the VP, areas of epithelial atrophy were also observed. Furthermore, in the lateral prostate, there was frequent prostatitis. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression of ERβ is reduced in specific areas related to PIN, atrophic abnormalities and cellular atypia in the prostate epithelium of senile rats. Corroborating the involvement of the receptor with proliferative activity, the punctual reduction in ERβ paralleled the increase in cell proliferation especially in areas of PIN and nuclear atypies. The decrease in ERβ reactivity occurred in a hormonal milieu characterized by a constant concentration of estradiol and decreased plasmatic and tissue DHT. This paper is a pioneering study that reveals focal ERβ reduction in the prostate of aging rats and indicates a potential disorder in the ERβ pathway. These data corroborate previous data from humans and dogs that silencing of this receptor may be associated with premalignant or malignant conditions in the prostate. PMID:26147849

  1. Variations in the expression and distribution pattern of AQP5 in acinar cells of patients with sialadenosis.

    PubMed

    Teymoortash, Afshin; Wiegand, Susanne; Borkeloh, Martin; Bette, Michael; Ramaswamy, Annette; Steinbach-Hundt, Silke; Neff, Andreas; Werner, Jochen A; Mandic, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we pointed out on a possible role of aquaporin 5 (AQP5) in the development of sialadenosis. The goal of the present study was to further assess the association of AQP5 in the development of this salivary gland disease. The acinar diameter and mean surface area appeared elevated in sialadenosis tissues, which is a typical observation in this disease. AQP5 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using tissue samples derived from salivary glands of patients with confirmed sialadenosis either as a primary diagnosis or as a secondary diagnosis within the framework of other salivary gland diseases. Normal salivary gland tissue served as a control. In sialadenosis tissues, the AQP5 signal at the apical plasma membrane of acinar cells frequently appeared stronger compared with that in normal salivary glands. In addition, the distribution of AQP5 at the apical region seemed to differ between normal and sialadenosis tissues, where AQP5 frequently was diffusely distributed near or at the apical plasma membrane of the acinar cells in contrast to normal controls where the AQP5 signal was strictly confined to the apical plasma membrane. These observations suggest that sialadenosis is associated with a different AQP5 expression and distribution pattern in salivary acinar cells.

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor is present in pancreatic acinar cells and regulates amylase secretion through cAMP.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Heidenreich, Kaeli; Williams, John A

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a glucoincretin hormone that can act through its receptor (GLP-1R) on pancreatic β-cells and increase insulin secretion and production. GLP-1R agonists are used clinically to treat type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 may also regulate the exocrine pancreas at multiple levels, including inhibition through the central nervous system, stimulation indirectly through insulin, and stimulation directly on acinar cells. However, it has been unclear whether GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acini and what physiological functions these receptors regulate. In the current study we utilized GLP-1R knockout (KO) mice to study the role of GLP-1R in acinar cells. RNA expression of GLP-1R was detected in acutely isolated pancreatic acini. Acinar cell morphology and expression of digestive enzymes were not affected by loss of GLP-1R. GLP-1 induced amylase secretion in wild-type (WT) acini. In GLP-1R KO mice, this effect was abolished, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced amylase release in KO acini showed a pattern similar to that in WT acini. GLP-1 stimulated cAMP production and increased protein kinase A-mediated protein phosphorylation in WT acini, and these effects were absent in KO acini. These data show that GLP-1R is present in pancreatic acinar cells and that GLP-1 can regulate secretion through its receptor and cAMP signaling pathway.

  3. Androgen- and Estrogen-Receptor Content in Spontaneous and Experimentally Induced Canine Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, John; Hicks, L. Louise; Walsh, Patrick C.

    1980-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism by which steroidal hormones influence the development of canine prostatic hyperplasia, nuclear and cytosolic androgen- and estrogen-receptor content, as measured under exchange conditions by the binding of [3H]R1881 (methyltrienolone) and [3H]estradiol, respectively, were quantitated in the prostates of purebred beagles of known age. In young dogs with spontaneously arising and experimentally induced (androstanediol plus estradiol treatment) prostatic hyperplasia, nuclear, but not cytosolic, prostatic androgen-receptor content was significantly greater than that determined in the normal prostates of age-matched dogs (3,452±222 and 4,035±274 fmol/mg DNA vs. 2,096±364 fmol/mg DNA, respectively). No differences were observed between the androgen-receptor content of the normal prostates of young dogs and the hyperplastic prostates of old dogs. The cytosolic and nuclear estrogen-receptor content of spontaneously arising prostatic hyperplasia in both young and old animals was similar to that found in normal prostates. The administration of estradiol plus androstanediol to castrate dogs significantly increased the prostatic nuclear androgen-receptor content over that found in dogs treated only with androstanediol. This estradiol-associated increase in nuclear androgen-receptor content was accompanied by the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Estradiol treatment of castrate dogs resulted in an increase in prostatic nuclear estrogen-receptor content, in the appearance of a putative prostatic cytosolic progesterone receptor, and in an alteration of the epithelium of the prostate to one characterized by squamous metaplasia. Treatment of castrate dogs with both estradiol and androstanediol resulted in a reduction in prostatic nuclear estrogen-receptor content, disappearance of the progesterone receptor, and loss of squamous metaplasia. An increase in nuclear androgen-receptor content, thus, appears to be an important event in the

  4. Pseudohyperplastic prostatic carcinoma in simple prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Arista-Nasr, Julián; Martinez-Benitez, Braulio; Fernandez-Amador, Jose Antonio; Bornstein-Quevedo, Leticia; Arceo-Olaiz, Ricardo; Albores-Saavedra, Jorge

    2011-06-01

    Pseudohyperplastic carcinoma (PHPC) is a prostatic neoplasm that can be easily mistaken for nodular hyperplasia or atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. To determine the frequency and clinicopathologic characteristics of PHPC, we reviewed 200 simple prostatectomy specimens. We found 3 cases (1.5%) of PHPC. The tumors were small and ranged in size from 4 to 6 mm. Two of them were erroneously diagnosed as benign glandular proliferations in the original interpretation. Their histologic aspect at low magnification showed nodules of well-differentiated medium-sized glands with cystic dilation in a tight arrangement that imparted a benign appearance. Corpora amylacea were found in 2 cases. However, the lining cells showed nucleomegaly and prominent nuclei in most of the neoplastic glands, and the high-molecular-weight keratin (34BE12) immunostain revealed absence of basal cells. α-Methylacyl-CoA-racemase was positive in 2 cases. In one case, a small focus of moderated acinar adenocarcinoma was found adjacent to the pseudohyperplastic glands facilitating the diagnosis. The 3 patients are disease-free 3 and 4 years after surgery probably because of the small size of the tumors; however, it must be emphasized that most PHPC are considered moderately differentiated and potentially aggressive neoplasms.

  5. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca(2+) signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca(2+) overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  6. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  7. Up-regulation of Store-operated Ca2+ Entry and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Promote the Acinar Phenotype of the Primary Human Salivary Gland Cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Shyh-Ing; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Alevizos, Ilias; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2016-04-15

    The signaling pathways involved in the generation and maintenance of exocrine gland acinar cells have not yet been established. Primary human salivary gland epithelial cells, derived from salivary gland biopsies, acquired an acinar-like phenotype when the [Ca(2+)] in the serum-free medium (keratinocyte growth medium, KGM) was increased from 0.05 mm (KGM-L) to 1.2 mm (KGM-H). Here we examined the mechanism underlying this Ca(2+)-dependent generation of the acinar cell phenotype. Compared with cells in KGM-L, those in KGM-H display enhancement of Orai1, STIM1, STIM2, and nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) expression together with an increase in store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), SOCE-dependent nuclear translocation of pGFP-NFAT1, and NFAT-dependent but not NFκB-dependent gene expression. Importantly, AQP5, an acinar-specific protein critical for function, is up-regulated in KGM-H via SOCE/NFAT-dependent gene expression. We identified critical NFAT binding motifs in the AQP5 promoter that are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent up-regulation of AQP5. These important findings reveal that the Ca(2+)-induced switch of salivary epithelial cells to an acinar-like phenotype involves remodeling of SOCE and NFAT signaling, which together control the expression of proteins critically relevant for acinar cell function. Our data provide a novel strategy for generating and maintaining acinar cells in culture.

  8. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Laser prostatectomy; Transurethral needle ablation; TUNA; Transurethral incision; TUIP; Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate; HoLep; Interstitial laser coagulation; ILC; Photoselective vaporization of the prostate; PVP; Transurethral ...

  9. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  10. Prostate cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... not do an accurate job of screening for prostate cancer. ... and anxiety, even if you do not have prostate cancer. Side effects from further testing. If your PSA test is higher than normal, you may need to ...

  11. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  12. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  13. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the needles to the prostate gland. Then, very cold gas passes through the needles, creating ice balls that destroy the prostate gland. Warm salt water will flow through the catheter to keep your urethra (the tube from the bladder to ...

  14. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  15. A Systems Biology Approach Identifies a Regulatory Network in Parotid Acinar Cell Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Metzler, Melissa A.; Venkatesh, Srirangapatnam G.; Lakshmanan, Jaganathan; Carenbauer, Anne L.; Perez, Sara M.; Andres, Sarah A.; Appana, Savitri; Brock, Guy N.; Wittliff, James L.; Darling, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The transcription factor networks that drive parotid salivary gland progenitor cells to terminally differentiate, remain largely unknown and are vital to understanding the regeneration process. Methodology A systems biology approach was taken to measure mRNA and microRNA expression in vivo across acinar cell terminal differentiation in the rat parotid salivary gland. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to specifically isolate acinar cell RNA at times spanning the month-long period of parotid differentiation. Results Clustering of microarray measurements suggests that expression occurs in four stages. mRNA expression patterns suggest a novel role for Pparg which is transiently increased during mid postnatal differentiation in concert with several target gene mRNAs. 79 microRNAs are significantly differentially expressed across time. Profiles of statistically significant changes of mRNA expression, combined with reciprocal correlations of microRNAs and their target mRNAs, suggest a putative network involving Klf4, a differentiation inhibiting transcription factor, which decreases as several targeting microRNAs increase late in differentiation. The network suggests a molecular switch (involving Prdm1, Sox11, Pax5, miR-200a, and miR-30a) progressively decreases repression of Xbp1 gene transcription, in concert with decreased translational repression by miR-214. The transcription factor Xbp1 mRNA is initially low, increases progressively, and may be maintained by a positive feedback loop with Atf6. Transfection studies show that Xbp1Mist1 promoter. In addition, Xbp1 and Mist1 each activate the parotid secretory protein (Psp) gene, which encodes an abundant salivary protein, and is a marker of terminal differentiation. Conclusion This study identifies novel expression patterns of Pparg, Klf4, and Sox11 during parotid acinar cell differentiation, as well as numerous differentially expressed microRNAs. Network analysis identifies a novel stemness arm, a

  16. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25-30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10(-6) M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R.

  17. Activation of neurokinin-1 receptors up-regulates substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor expression in murine pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yung-Hua; Moochhala, Shabbir; Bhatia, Madhav

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) has been associated with an up-regulation of substance P (SP) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) in the pancreas. Increased SP-NK1R interaction was suggested to be pro-inflammatory during AP. Previously, we showed that caerulein treatment increased SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, but the effect of SP treatment was not evaluated. Pancreatic acinar cells were obtained from pancreas of male swiss mice (25–30 g). We measured mRNA expression of preprotachykinin-A (PPTA) and NK1R following treatment of SP (10−6M). SP treatment increased PPTA and NK1R expression in isolated pancreatic acinar cells, which was abolished by pretreatment of a selective NK1R antagonist, CP96,345. SP also time dependently increased protein expression of NK1R. Treatment of cells with a specific NK1R agonist, GR73,632, up-regulated SP protein levels in the cells. Using previously established concentrations, pre-treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with Gö6976 (10 nM), rottlerin (5 μM), PD98059 (30 μM), SP600125 (30 μM) or Bay11-7082 (30 μM) significantly inhibited up-regulation of SP and NK1R. These observations suggested that the PKC-ERK/JNK-NF-κB pathway is necessary for the modulation of expression levels. In comparison, pre-treatment of CP96,345 reversed gene expression in SP-induced cells, but not in caerulein-treated cells. Overall, the findings in this study suggested a possible auto-regulatory mechanism of SP/NK1R expression in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, via activation of NK1R. Elevated SP levels during AP might increase the occurrence of a positive feedback loop that contributes to abnormally high expression of SP and NK1R. PMID:22040127

  18. Tmem16A encodes the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel in mouse submandibular salivary gland acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Victor G; Catalán, Marcelo A; Brown, David A; Putzier, Ilva; Hartzell, H Criss; Marmorstein, Alan D; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Rock, Jason R; Harfe, Brian D; Melvin, James E

    2010-04-23

    Activation of an apical Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) channel (CaCC) is the rate-limiting step for fluid secretion in many exocrine tissues. Here, we compared the properties of native CaCC in mouse submandibular salivary gland acinar cells to the Ca(2+)-gated Cl(-) currents generated by Tmem16A and Best2, members from two distinct families of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels found in salivary glands. Heterologous expression of Tmem16A and Best2 transcripts in HEK293 cells produced Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents with time and voltage dependence and inhibitor sensitivity that resembled the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current found in native salivary acinar cells. Best2(-/-) and Tmem16A(-/-) mice were used to further characterize the role of these channels in the exocrine salivary gland. The amplitude and the biophysical footprint of the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current in submandibular gland acinar cells from Best2-deficient mice were the same as in wild type cells. Consistent with this observation, the fluid secretion rate in Best2 null mice was comparable with that in wild type mice. In contrast, submandibular gland acinar cells from Tmem16A(-/-) mice lacked a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current and a Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonist failed to stimulate Cl(-) efflux, requirements for fluid secretion. Furthermore, saliva secretion was abolished by the CaCC inhibitor niflumic acid in wild type and Best2(-/-) mice. Our results demonstrate that both Tmem16A and Best2 generate Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current in vitro with similar properties to those expressed in native cells, yet only Tmem16A appears to be a critical component of the acinar Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel complex that is essential for saliva production by the submandibular gland.

  19. Cleavage of SNAP-25 and VAMP-2 impairs store-operated Ca2+ entry in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Juan A; Redondo, Pedro C; Salido, Ginés M; Sage, Stewart O; Pariente, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in nonexcitable cells is likely to be mediated by a reversible interaction between Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum, a mechanism known as "secretion-like coupling." As for secretion, in this model the actin cytoskeleton plays a key regulatory role. In the present study we have explored the involvement of the secretory proteins synaptosome-associated protein (SNAP-25) and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP) in SOCE in pancreatic acinar cells. Cleavage of SNAP-25 and VAMPs by treatment with botulinum toxin A (BoNT A) and tetanus toxin (TeTx), respectively, effectively inhibited amylase secretion stimulated by the physiological agonist CCK-8. BoNT A significantly reduced Ca(2+) entry induced by store depletion using thapsigargin or CCK-8. In addition, treatment with BoNT A once SOCE had been activated reduced Ca(2+) influx, indicating that SNAP-25 is needed for both the activation and maintenance of SOCE in pancreatic acinar cells. VAMP-2 and VAMP-3 are expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Both proteins associate with the cytoskeleton upon Ca(2+) store depletion, although only VAMP-2 seems to be sensitive to TeTx. Treatment of pancreatic acinar cells with TeTx reduced the activation of SOCE without affecting its maintenance. These findings support a role for SNAP-25 and VAMP-2 in the activation of SOCE in pancreatic acinar cells and show parallels between this process and secretion in a specialized secretory cell type.

  20. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  1. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  2. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  3. Polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 6 disrupts mammary acinar morphogenesis through O-glycosylation of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Chung, Suyoun; Kijima, Kyoko; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2011-04-01

    A high expression of short and immature O-glycans is one of the prominent features of breast cancer cells, which would be attributed to the upregulated expression of glycosyltransferases. Therefore, a detailed elucidation of glycosyltransferases and their substrate(s) may improve our understandings for their roles in mammary carcinogenesis. Here we report that overexpression of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 6 (GALNT6), a glycosyltransferase involved in the initial step of O-glycosylation, has transformational potentials through disruptive acinar morphogenesis and cellular changes similar to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in normal mammary epithelial cell, MCF10A. As one of the critical O-glycan substrates, we identified fibronectin that was O-glycosylated in vivo and thereby stabilized by GALNT6. Because knockdown of fibronectin abrogated the disruptive proliferation caused by introduction of GALNT6 into epithelial cells, our findings suggest that GALNT6-fibronectin pathway should be a critical component for breast cancer development and progression.

  4. Confocal fluorescence microendoscopy of bronchial epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Pierre M.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Leriche, Jean C.; Anderson, Marshall W.; Macaulay, Calum E.

    2009-03-01

    Confocal microendoscopy permits the acquisition of high-resolution real-time confocal images of bronchial mucosa via the instrument channel of an endoscope. We report here on the construction and validation of a confocal fluorescence microendoscope and its use to acquire images of bronchial epithelium in vivo. Our objective is to develop an imaging method that can distinguish preneoplastic lesions from normal epithelium to enable us to study the natural history of these lesions and the efficacy of chemopreventive agents without biopsy removal of the lesion that can introduce a spontaneous regression bias. The instrument employs a laser-scanning engine and bronchoscope-compatible confocal probe consisting of a fiber-optic image guide and a graded-index objective lens. We assessed the potential of topical application of physiological pH cresyl violet (CV) as a fluorescence contrast-enhancing agent for the visualization of tissue morphology. Images acquired ex vivo with the confocal microendoscope were first compared with a bench-top confocal fluorescence microscope and conventional histology. Confocal images from five sites topically stained with CV were then acquired in vivo from high-risk smokers and compared to hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of biopsies taken from the same site. Sufficient contrast in the confocal imagery was obtained to identify cells in the bronchial epithelium. However, further improvements in the miniature objective lens are required to provide sufficient axial resolution for accurate classification of preneoplastic lesions.

  5. Development of the ovarian follicular epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Lavranos, T C; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F

    1999-05-25

    A lot is known about the endocrine control of the development of ovarian follicles, but a key question now facing researchers is which molecular and cellular processes take part in control of follicular growth and development. The growth and development of ovarian follicles occurs postnatally and throughout adult life. In this review, we focus on the follicular epithelium (membrana granulosa) and its basal lamina. We discuss a model of how granulosa cells arise from a population of stem cells and then enter different lineages before differentiation. The structure of the epithelium at the antral stage of development is presented, and the effects that follicle growth has on the behavior of the granulosa cells are discussed. Finally, we discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition. This would be expected if the behavior of the granulosa cells changes, or if the permeability of the basal lamina changes. It will be evident that the follicular epithelium has similarities to other epithelia in the body, but that it is more dynamic, as gross changes occur during the course of follicle development. This basic information will be important for the development of future reproductive technologies in both humans and animals, and possibly for understanding polycystic ovarian syndrome in women. PMID:10411332

  6. JNK and PTEN cooperatively control the development of invasive adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Mulholland, David J.; Standen, Claire L.; Karasarides, Maria; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Chi, Hongbo; Greiner, Dale L.; Tournier, Cathy; Sawyers, Charles L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Wu, Hong; Davis, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    The c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway is implicated in cancer, but the role of JNK in tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the JNK signaling pathway reduces the development of invasive adenocarcinoma in the phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) conditional deletion model of prostate cancer. Mice with JNK deficiency in the prostate epithelium (ΔJnk ΔPten mice) develop androgen-independent metastatic prostate cancer more rapidly than control (ΔPten) mice. Similarly, prevention of JNK activation in the prostate epithelium (ΔMkk4 ΔMkk7 ΔPten mice) causes rapid development of invasive adenocarcinoma. We found that JNK signaling defects cause an androgen-independent expansion of the immature progenitor cell population in the primary tumor. The JNK-deficient progenitor cells display increased proliferation and tumorigenic potential compared with progenitor cells from control prostate tumors. These data demonstrate that the JNK and PTEN signaling pathways can cooperate to regulate the progression of prostate neoplasia to invasive adenocarcinoma. PMID:22753496

  7. Effects of cardiac oscillations and lung volume on acinar gas mixing during apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, C.F.; Skacel, M.; Barnas, G.M.; Brampton, W.J.; Alana, C.A. )

    1990-05-01

    We evaluated the importance of cardiogenic gas mixing in the acini of 13 dogs during 2 min of apnea. 133Xe (1-2 mCi in 4 ml of saline) was injected into an alveolar region through an occluded pulmonary artery branch, and washout was measured by gamma scintillation scanning during continued occlusion or with blood flow reinstated. The monoexponential rate constant for Xe washout (XeW) was -0.4 +/- 0.08 (SE) min-1 at functional residual capacity (FRC) with no blood flow in the injected region. It decreased by more than half at lung volumes 500 ml above and 392 ml below FRC. With intact pulmonary blood flow, XeW was -1.0 +/- 0.08 (SE) min-1 at FRC, and it increased with decreasing lung volume. However, if calculated Xe uptake by the blood was subtracted from the XeW measured with blood flow intact, resulting values at FRC and at FRC + 500 ml were not different from XeW with no blood flow. Reasonable calculation of Xe blood uptake at 392 ml below FRC was not possible because airway closure, increased shunt, and other factors affect XeW. After death, no significant XeW could be measured, which suggests that XeW caused by molecular diffusion was small. We conclude that (1) the effect of heart motion on the lung parenchyma increases acinar gas mixing during apnea, (2) this effect diminishes above or below FRC, and (3) there is probably no direct effect of pulmonary vascular pulsatility on acinar gas mixing.

  8. [Influence of Ca2+ on kinetic parameters of pancreatic acinar mitochondria in situ respiration].

    PubMed

    Man'ko, B O; Man'ko, V V

    2013-01-01

    The dependence of respiration rate of rat permeabilized acinar pancreacytes on oxidative substrates concentration was studied at various [Ca2+] - 10-8-10-6 M. Pancreacytes were permeabilized with 50 microg of digitonin per 1 million cells. Respiration rate was measured polarographically using the Clark electrode at oxidation of succinate or pyruvate either glutamate in the presence of malate. Parameters of Michaelis-Menten equation were calculated by the method of Cornish-Bowden or using Idi-Hofsti coordinates and parameters of Hill equation - using coordinates {v; v/[S]h}. In the studied range of [Ca2+] the kinetic dependence of respiration at pyruvate oxidation is described by the Michaelis-Menten equation, and at oxidation of succinate or glutamate - by Hill equation with h = 1.11-1.43 and 0.50-0.85, respectively. The apparent constant of respiration half-activation (K0.5) did not significantly change in the studied range of [Ca2+] while at 10-7 M Ca2+ it was 0.90 +/- 0.06 mM for succinate, 0.096 +/- 0.007 mM for pyruvate and 0.34 +/- 0.03 mM for glutamate. Maximum respiration rate Vax at pyruvate oxidation increased from 0.077 +/- 0.002 to 0.119 +/- 0.002 and 0.140 +/- 0.002 nmol O2/(s.million cells) due to the increase of [Ca2+] from 10-7 to 5x10-7 or 10-6 M, respectively. At oxidation of succinate or glutamate Ca2+ did not significantly affect Vmax Thus, the increase of [Ca2+] stimulates respiration of mitochondria in situ of acinar pancreacytes at oxidation of exogenous pyruvate (obviously due to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation), but not at succinate or glutamate oxidation.

  9. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    PubMed

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function.

  10. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini

    PubMed Central

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  11. The Acinar Cage: Basement Membranes Determine Molecule Exchange and Mechanical Stability of Human Breast Cell Acini.

    PubMed

    Gaiko-Shcherbak, Aljona; Fabris, Gloria; Dreissen, Georg; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Noetzel, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The biophysical properties of the basement membrane that surrounds human breast glands are poorly understood, but are thought to be decisive for normal organ function and malignancy. Here, we characterize the breast gland basement membrane with a focus on molecule permeation and mechanical stability, both crucial for organ function. We used well-established and nature-mimicking MCF10A acini as 3D cell model for human breast glands, with ether low- or highly-developed basement membrane scaffolds. Semi-quantitative dextran tracer (3 to 40 kDa) experiments allowed us to investigate the basement membrane scaffold as a molecule diffusion barrier in human breast acini in vitro. We demonstrated that molecule permeation correlated positively with macromolecule size and intriguingly also with basement membrane development state, revealing a pore size of at least 9 nm. Notably, an intact collagen IV mesh proved to be essential for this permeation function. Furthermore, we performed ultra-sensitive atomic force microscopy to quantify the response of native breast acini and of decellularized basement membrane shells against mechanical indentation. We found a clear correlation between increasing acinar force resistance and basement membrane formation stage. Most important native acini with highly-developed basement membranes as well as cell-free basement membrane shells could both withstand physiologically relevant loads (≤ 20 nN) without loss of structural integrity. In contrast, low-developed basement membranes were significantly softer and more fragile. In conclusion, our study emphasizes the key role of the basement membrane as conductor of acinar molecule influx and mechanical stability of human breast glands, which are fundamental for normal organ function. PMID:26674091

  12. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms.

  13. What Is the Ideal Core Number for Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Fábio Hissachi; de Oliveira Lima, Flávio; Yamamoto, Hamilto Akihissa; de Jesus, Carlos Márcio Nóbrega

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the utility of 10-, 12-, and 16-core prostate biopsies for detecting prostate cancer (PCa) and correlated the results with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, prostate volumes, Gleason scores, and detection rates of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Materials and Methods A prospective controlled study was conducted in 354 consecutive patients with various indications for prostate biopsy. Sixteen-core biopsy specimens were obtained from 351 patients. The first 10-core biopsy specimens were obtained bilaterally from the base, middle third, apex, medial, and latero-lateral regions. Afterward, six additional punctures were performed bilaterally in the areas more lateral to the base, middle third, and apex regions, yielding a total of 16-core biopsy specimens. The detection rate of carcinoma in the initial 10-core specimens was compared with that in the 12- and 16-core specimens. Results No significant differences in the cancer detection rate were found between the three biopsy protocols. PCa was found in 102 patients (29.06%) using the 10-core protocol, in 99 patients (28.21%) using the 12-core protocol, and in 107 patients (30.48%) using the 16-core protocol (p=0.798). The 10-, 12-, and 16-core protocols were compared with stratified PSA levels, stratified prostate volumes, Gleason scores, and detection rates of HGPIN and ASAP; no significant differences were found. Conclusions Cancer positivity with the 10-core protocol was not significantly different from that with the 12- and 16-core protocols, which indicates that the 10-core protocol is acceptable for performing a first biopsy. PMID:25405014

  14. Biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Loeb, Stacy; Getzenberg, Robert H; Partin, Alan W

    2009-01-01

    The development of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, detection, and prognostication has revolutionized the management of this disease. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a useful, though not specific, biomarker for detecting prostate cancer. We review the literature on prostate cancer biomarkers, including serum markers (PAP, tPSA, fPSA, proPSA, PSAD, PSAV, PSADT, EPCA, and EPCA-2), tissue markers (AMACR, methylated GSTP1, and the TMPRSS2-ETS gene rearrangement), and a urine marker (DD3PCA3/UPM-3). Future research should focus on validation of already existing biomarkers and the discovery of new markers to identify men with aggressive prostate cancer.

  15. Novel organelles in primate retinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, A; Gouras, P

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating age-related changes in organelles in monkey retinal epithelium using transmission and analytic electron microscopy. We previously described a circular organelle in retinal epithelium with a diameter of about 0.5μm. The organelle is unique in containing a single, round vacuole within an otherwise electron dense interior. We suggested that the organelle might be a melanosome with lysosomal properties. We now find that there are two similar organelles with such a single vacuole but which differ in their chemical composition, electron density, cell location and according to age. Epon embedded sections from the macular epithelium of seven monkeys, ranging from 1 to 35 years of age, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. A seven year old monkey was processed for analytic electron microscopy to determine the chemical composition of the organelles. The number and location of the organelles in the retinal epithelium were determined. The chemical composition of these two organelles was different. One of the organelles contained high mole fractions of oxygen and nitrogen and little phosphorous characteristic of melanin; the other had little oxygen and nitrogen and higher mole fractions of phosphorous uncharacteristic of melanin, but more common with lysosomal organelles. The latter had an electron dense rim around the vacuole, a less electron dense interior than the melanin containing organelle and also contained iron. The melanin containing organelle was more common in young monkeys and in the middle third of the cell. The organelle without melanin was more common in old monkeys and localized in the basal third of the cell. Two similarly vacuolated organelles, not identified before in retinal epithelium, differ in their chemical composition. One contains melanin; the other does not. The former is more common in young and the latter more common in old monkeys. This suggests reorganization and or degradation of melanin-containing organelles

  16. Novel organelles in primate retinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, A; Gouras, P

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating age-related changes in organelles in monkey retinal epithelium using transmission and analytic electron microscopy. We previously described a circular organelle in retinal epithelium with a diameter of about 0.5μm. The organelle is unique in containing a single, round vacuole within an otherwise electron dense interior. We suggested that the organelle might be a melanosome with lysosomal properties. We now find that there are two similar organelles with such a single vacuole but which differ in their chemical composition, electron density, cell location and according to age. Epon embedded sections from the macular epithelium of seven monkeys, ranging from 1 to 35 years of age, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. A seven year old monkey was processed for analytic electron microscopy to determine the chemical composition of the organelles. The number and location of the organelles in the retinal epithelium were determined. The chemical composition of these two organelles was different. One of the organelles contained high mole fractions of oxygen and nitrogen and little phosphorous characteristic of melanin; the other had little oxygen and nitrogen and higher mole fractions of phosphorous uncharacteristic of melanin, but more common with lysosomal organelles. The latter had an electron dense rim around the vacuole, a less electron dense interior than the melanin containing organelle and also contained iron. The melanin containing organelle was more common in young monkeys and in the middle third of the cell. The organelle without melanin was more common in old monkeys and localized in the basal third of the cell. Two similarly vacuolated organelles, not identified before in retinal epithelium, differ in their chemical composition. One contains melanin; the other does not. The former is more common in young and the latter more common in old monkeys. This suggests reorganization and or degradation of melanin-containing organelles

  17. Enlarged prostate - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... body? What does the prostate gland do? What causes the prostate gland to enlarge? Do many other men have prostate problems? How do I know my problem is not prostate cancer? What are the symptoms of an enlarged prostate? ...

  18. Evaluation of transurethral and transperineal tin ethyl etiopurpurin-photodynamic therapy on the canine prostate one week after drug injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selman, Steven H.; Keck, Rick W.; Kondo, Sandy; Albrecht, Detlef

    1999-06-01

    We have been investigating the potential applicability of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of benign and malignant disease of the prostate. Both transurethral and transperineal approaches to the delivery of light to the tin ethyl etiopurpurin sensitized canine prostate have been studied. Pharmacologic studies were performed and suggested that delaying light treatment for 7 days after drug administration would maximize the desired effect on the targeted prostatic tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding bladder and rectum. A total of 12 dogs were treated with transurethral light alone (n=6) or the combination of transurethral light and transperineal light one week after tin ethyl etiopurpurin administration. (Previous studies have shown that light alone has no effect on prostate size or histology.) Animals were euthanized 48 hours and 3 weeks after completion of treatment (drug, 1mg/kg day 0, light [400mw/750sec]day 7). Tissue response was determined by gross and microscopic examination. Additionally, pre- and post- treatment transrectal ultrasounds were compared to assess changes in prostate volume and tissue echogenicity. The combination of transurethral and transperineal light results in extensive destruction of glandular epithelium with minimal damage to surrounding structures. Prostate volumes decreased by an average of 52%. Untreated areas were found to lie greater than 0.5 cm from the light diffuser. These studies have encouraged us to continue to investigate this modality as a technique for total ablation of prostatic glandular epithelium.

  19. Detection of preneoplasia in histologically normal prostate biopsies.

    PubMed

    Slater, M D; Delprado, W J; Murphy, C R; Barden, J A

    2001-01-01

    P2X immunolabeling of prostate detected preneoplastic changes in apparently normal tissue. Labeling occurred in two well-defined stages before the diagnostic histological markers of cancer were visible. As cancer progressed, the location of P2X expression changed from confinement within individual nuclei in the acini (stage 1) to a cytoplasmic punctate label in the acinal epithelium, with an associated removal of nuclear stain (stage 2). Finally, in advanced cases, where clear morphological evidence of cancer was apparent, the P2X label condensed exclusively on the apical epithelium (stage 3). BPH/normal tissue was entirely devoid of P2X label. Biopsy samples (77) were tested in three categories. One group (35) were diagnosed as normal benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) on the basis of haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain, although underlying disease was suspected. Of these, 14 (40%) were clearly normal and appeared entirely devoid of label, 13 (37%) exhibited the first stage of P2X receptor labeling and the remaining eight (23%) exhibited second stage labeling. The accompanying H&E-stained sections of all these cases had a normal appearance. Low grade cancer biopsy samples with Gleason scores G4-7 (25) all revealed widespread second stage receptor labeling in areas of both normal and cancerous morphology, while 17 high grade cancer biopsy samples (Gleason G8-10) all showed third stage labeling along with some residual second stage labeling. The features of each P2X labeling stage occupied the entire histological area affected, offering more opportunity to diagnose the tissue than was supplied by the more-localised diagnostic features identified by H&E-stain. Besides detecting cases of preneoplasia in biopsies with a normal H&E appearance, this technique was also able to rule out the presence of neoplasia in purely hyperplasic prostates by the absence of any P2X labeling.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2001) 4, 92-96 PMID:12497044

  20. Increase in muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) response by adenovirus-mediated Stim1-mKO1 gene transfer to rat submandibular acinar cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morita, Takao; Nezu, Akihiro; Tojyo, Yosuke; Tanimura, Akihiko

    2013-10-01

    Adenoviruses have been used for gene transfer to salivary gland cells in vivo. Their use to study the function of salivary acinar cells was limited by a severe inflammatory response and by the destruction of fluid-secreting acinar cells. In the present study, low doses of adenovirus were administered to express Stim1-mKO1 by retrograde ductal injection to submandibular glands. The approach succeeded in increasing muscarinic stimulation-induced Ca(2+) responses in acinar cells without inflammation or decreased salivary secretions. This increased Ca(2+) response was notable upon weak muscarinic stimulation and was attributed to increased Ca(2+) release from internal stores and increased Ca(2+) entry. The basal Ca(2+) level was higher in Stim1-mKO1-expressing cells than in mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. Exposure of permeabilized submandibular acinar cells, where Ca(2+) concentration was fixed at 50 nM, to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) produced similar effects on the release of Ca(2+) from stores in Stim1-mKO1-expressing and non-expressing cells. The low toxicity and relative specificity to acinar cells of the mild gene transfer method described herein are particularly useful for studying the molecular functions of salivary acinar cells in vivo, and may be applied to increase salivary secretions in experimental animals and human in future.

  1. Defective Barrier Function in Neosquamous Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jovov, Biljana; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Orlando, Geraldine S.; Djukic, Zorka; Orlando, Roy C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a common strategy for the prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). After RFA, the ablated esophagus heals on acid suppressive therapy, and is re-populated with a stratified squamous epithelium, referred to as ‘neosquamous epithelium (NSE).’ Because the ability of the NSE to protect the underlying tissue from recurrent insult by reflux is unclear, we assessed the barrier function of NSE by comparing it to that of the native upper squamous epithelium (USE) in subjects having undergone RFA. METHODS At varying intervals following RFA, the barrier function of NSE and USE were assessed in endoscopic biopsies by light and electron microscopy, and by measurement of electrical resistance (RT) and fluorescein flux in mini-Ussing chambers. Chamber results were further compared with results from control biopsies (healthy distal esophagus). A claudin expression profile in the tight junctions (TJ) of NSE and USE was determined using qRT-PCR. Differential expression of claudin 4 between NSE and USE was assayed by immunoblots. RESULTS USE was histologically normal while NSE showed dilated intercellular spaces and marked eosinophilia. NSE was also more permeable than USE and healthy controls, having lower mean RT and higher fluorescein fluxes. Abnormally low RT values for NSE were unrelated to the time period following RFA (or number of prior RFA sessions), being abnormal even 26 months after RFA. Abnormal permeability in NSE was associated with significantly lower values for claudin-4 and claudin-10 than in USE. CONCLUSIONS NSE commonly exhibits defective barrier function. Since this defect will make it vulnerable to injury, inflammation and destruction by acidic and weakly acidic refluxates, it may in part explain incidences of recurrence of BE following ablation. PMID:23318477

  2. Ontogeny of the mouse vocal fold epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Lungova, Vlasta; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Herriges, John; Sun, Xin; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation provides the first systematic determination of the cellular and molecular progression of vocal fold (VF) epithelium development in a murine model. We define five principal developmental events that constitute the progression from VF initiation in the embryonic anterior foregut tube to fully differentiated and functional adult tissue. These developmental events include (1) the initiation of the larynx and vocal folds with apposition of the lateral walls of the primitive laryngopharynx (embryonic (E) day 10.5); (2) the establishment of the epithelial lamina with fusion of the lateral walls of the primitive laryngopharynx (E11.5); (3) the epithelial lamina recanalization and separation of VFs (E13.5–18.5); (4) the stratification of the vocal folds (E13.5–18.5); and (5) the maturation of vocal fold epithelium (postnatal stages). The illustration of these morphogenetic events is substantiated by dynamic changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as the expression pattern of key transcription factors, FOXA2, SOX2 and NKX2-1 that specify and pattern the foregut endoderm. Furthermore, we documented the gradual conversion of VF epithelial cells from simple precursors expressing cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the embryo into mature stratified epithelial cells also expressing cytokeratins 5 and 14 in the adult. Interestingly, in the adult, cytokeratins 5 and 14 appear to be expressed in all cell layers in the VF, in contrast to their preferential localization to the basal cell layer in surrounding epithelium. To begin investigating the role of signaling molecules in vocal fold development, we characterized the expression pattern of SHH pathway genes, and how loss of Shh affects vocal fold development in the mutant. This study defines the cellular and molecular context and serves as the necessary foundation for future functional investigations of VF formation. PMID:25601450

  3. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  5. Deletion of antigens of the Lewis a/b blood group family in human prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Young, W. W.; Mills, S. E.; Lippert, M. C.; Ahmed, P.; Lau, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of antigens of the blood group Lewis a/b family were studied in a series of 42 prostatectomy specimens from patients with adenocarcinoma clinically confined to the prostate; 19 of these were later reclassified as pathologic Stage C. Staining of normal or hyperplastic versus neoplastic epithelium was assessed in routinely processed, paraffin-embedded tissue using murine monoclonal antibodies and an avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase technique. Antigens screened and the antibodies used to recognize them were Lewis a (CF4C4), Lewis b and Type 1 H (NS10), monosialosyl Lewis a I (19.9), and disialosyl Lewis a and monosialosyl Lewis a II (FH7). FH7 strongly stained the benign epithelium of all 39 Lewis positive cases, suggesting that the sialyltransferase responsible for synthesis of FH7-reactive determinants is highly active in benign prostatic tissue. When compared to the reactivity of benign epithelium in Lewis positive cases, the staining of the carcinomas was markedly reduced in 18 cases (46%) and absent in 16 cases (41%). This reduction or loss of staining of the malignant epithelium was observed for all antibodies that stained the corresponding benign epithelium of each case. In only five of the cases (13%) was the intensity of staining in the carcinoma equal to that of the surrounding benign epithelium. No cases in this latter group had recurrence of disease, whereas in the other staining groups 25-33% of the cases had recurrences; median follow-up for the entire group was 78 months. No correlation was apparent between Gleason score and the staining pattern with these antigens. In summary, antigens of the Lewis a/b family are deleted in a high percentage of cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2454582

  6. Ultrastructural Analysis of the Prostate Gland under the Effect of Factors of Chemical Industry.

    PubMed

    Nepomnyashchikh, L M; Lapiy, G A; Nikityuk, D B; Neimark, A I; Kiptilov, A V; Molodykh, O P

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed ultrastruciture of the cell populations in the prostate gland in chronic nonbacterial prostatitis in a chemical industry worker. It was shown that ultrastructural reorganization of the epithelium consisted in reduction of the secretory compartment of the cytoplasm and dystrophic-degenerative changes in cell organelles. Endothelial cells of the capillaries showed signs of significant degeneration and low intensity of micropinocytosis. Most of the smooth muscle cells underwent dystrophic-degenerative modifications of ultrastructural elements. The dominance of degenerative cell changes in the epithelial and stromal cell populations along with intensification of collagen formation in the absence of inflammatory elements allows us to interpret this pathological condition of the prostate gland as prostate pathology of occupational or mixed genesis.

  7. Long-term dexamethasone treatment alters the histomorphology of acinar cells in rat parotid and submandibular glands.

    PubMed

    Bighetti, Bruna B; d Assis, Gerson F; Vieira, Danilo C; Violato, Natalia M; Cestari, Tania M; Taga, Rumio; Bosqueiro, José R; Rafacho, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) induce insulin resistance (IR), a condition known to alter oral homeostasis. This study investigated the effects of long-term dexamethasone administration on morphofunctional aspects of salivary glands. Male Wistar rats received daily injections of dexamethasone [0.1 mg/kg body weight (b.w.), intraperitoneally] for 10 days (DEX), whereas control rats received saline. Subsequently, glycaemia, insulinaemia, insulin secretion and salivary flow were analysed. The parotid and submandibular glands were collected for histomorphometric evaluation and Western blot experiments. The DEX rats were found to be normoglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic, insulin resistant and glucose intolerant (P < 0.05). DEX rat islets secreted more insulin in response to glucose (P < 0.05). DEX rats had significant reductions in the masses of the parotid (29%) and submandibular (16%) glands (P < 0.05) that was associated with reduced salivary flux rate. The hypotrophy in both glands observed in the DEX group was associated with marked reduction in the volume of the acinar cells in these glands of 50% and 26% respectively (P < 0.05). The total number of acinar cells was increased in the submandibular glands of the DEX rats (P < 0.05) but not in the parotid glands. The levels of proteins related to insulin and survival signalling in both glands did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, the long-term administration of dexamethasone caused IR, which was associated with significant reductions in both mass and flux rate of the salivary glands. The parotid and submandibular glands exhibited reduced acinar cell volume; however, the submandibular glands displayed acinar hyperplasia, indicating a gland-specific response to GCs. Our data emphasize that GC-based therapies and insulin-resistant states have a negative impact on salivary gland homeostasis.

  8. TNF-α inhibits aquaporin 5 expression in human salivary gland acinar cells via suppression of histone H4 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Yoshiko; Motegi, Katsumi; Kani, Kouichi; Takano, Hideyuki; Momota, Yukihiro; Aota, Keiko; Yamanoi, Tomoko; Azuma, Masayuki

    2012-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by reductions in salivary and lacrimal secretions. The mechanisms underlying these reductions remain unclear. We have previously shown that TNF-α plays an important role in the destruction of acinar structures. Here we examined TNF-α's function in the expression of aquaporin (AQP) 5 in human salivary gland acinar cells. Immortalized human salivary gland acinar (NS-SV-AC) cells were treated with TNF-α, and then the expression levels of AQP5 mRNA and protein were analysed. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the reduction of AQP5 expression by TNF-α treatment were investigated. TNF-α-treatment of NS-SV-AC cells significantly suppressed the expression levels of AQP5 mRNA and protein, and reduced the net fluid secretion rate. We examined the expression and activation levels of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) in NS-SV-AC cells treated with TNF-α. However, no significant changes were observed in the expression or activation levels of Dnmt1, Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b. Although we also investigated the role of NF-κB activity in the TNF-α-induced suppression of AQP5 expression in NS-SV-AC cells, we detected similar TNF-α suppression of AQP5 expression in non-transfected cells and in a super-repressor form of IκBα cDNA-transfected cell clones. However, interestingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated a remarkable decrease in levels of acetylated histone H4 associated with the AQP5 gene promoter after treatment with TNF-α in NS-SV-AC cells. Therefore, our results may indicate that TNF-α inhibition of AQP5 expression in human salivary gland acinar cells is due to the epigenetic mechanism by suppression of acetylation of histone H4.

  9. Uptake and metabolism of D-glucose in isolated acinar and ductal cells from rat submandibular glands.

    PubMed

    Cetik, Sibel; Rzajeva, Aigun; Hupkens, Emeline; Malaisse, Willy J; Sener, Abdullah

    2014-07-01

    The present study deals with the possible effects of selected environmental agents upon the uptake and metabolism of d-glucose in isolated acinar and ductal cells from the rat submandibular salivary gland. In acinar cells, the uptake of d-[U-(14) C]glucose and its non-metabolised analogue 3-O-[(14) C-methyl]-d-glucose was not affected significantly by phloridzin (0.1 mM) or substitution of extracellular NaCl (115 mM) by an equimolar amount of CsCl, whilst cytochalasin B (20 μM) decreased significantly such an uptake. In ductal cells, both phloridzin and cytochalasin B decreased the uptake of d-glucose and 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Although the intracellular space was comparable in acinar and ductal cells, the catabolism of d-glucose (2.8 or 8.3 mM) was two to four times higher in ductal cells than in acinar cells. Phloridzin (0.1 mM), ouabain (1.0 mM) and cytochalasin B (20 μM) all impaired d-glucose catabolism in ductal cells. Such was also the case in ductal cells incubated in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) or in media in which NaCl was substituted by CsCl. It is proposed that the ductal cells in the rat submandibular gland are equipped with several systems mediating the insulin-sensitive, cytochalasin B-sensitive and phloridzin-sensitive transport of d-glucose across the plasma membrane.

  10. A fluid secretion pathway unmasked by acinar-specific Tmem16A gene ablation in the adult mouse salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Marcelo A; Kondo, Yusuke; Peña-Munzenmayer, Gaspar; Jaramillo, Yasna; Liu, Frances; Choi, Sooji; Crandall, Edward; Borok, Zea; Flodby, Per; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E

    2015-02-17

    Activation of an apical Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CaCC) triggers the secretion of saliva. It was previously demonstrated that CaCC-mediated Cl(-) current and Cl(-) efflux are absent in the acinar cells of systemic Tmem16A (Tmem16A Cl(-) channel) null mice, but salivation was not assessed in fully developed glands because Tmem16A null mice die within a few days after birth. To test the role of Tmem16A in adult salivary glands, we generated conditional knockout mice lacking Tmem16A in acinar cells (Tmem16A(-/-)). Ca(2+)-dependent salivation was abolished in Tmem16A(-/-) mice, demonstrating that Tmem16A is obligatory for Ca(2+)-mediated fluid secretion. However, the amount of saliva secreted by Tmem16A(-/-) mice in response to the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (IPR) was comparable to that seen in controls, indicating that Tmem16A does not significantly contribute to cAMP-induced secretion. Furthermore, IPR-stimulated secretion was unaffected in mice lacking Cftr (Cftr(∆F508/∆F508)) or ClC-2 (Clcn2(-/-)) Cl(-) channels. The time course for activation of IPR-stimulated fluid secretion closely correlated with that of the IPR-induced cell volume increase, suggesting that acinar swelling may activate a volume-sensitive Cl(-) channel. Indeed, Cl(-) channel blockers abolished fluid secretion, indicating that Cl(-) channel activity is critical for IPR-stimulated secretion. These data suggest that β-adrenergic-induced, cAMP-dependent fluid secretion involves a volume-regulated anion channel. In summary, our results using acinar-specific Tmem16A(-/-) mice identify Tmem16A as the Cl(-) channel essential for muscarinic, Ca(2+)-dependent fluid secretion in adult mouse salivary glands.

  11. Long-term dexamethasone treatment alters the histomorphology of acinar cells in rat parotid and submandibular glands

    PubMed Central

    Bighetti, Bruna B; Assis, Gerson F d; Vieira, Danilo C; Violato, Natalia M; Cestari, Tania M; Taga, Rumio; Bosqueiro, José R; Rafacho, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) induce insulin resistance (IR), a condition known to alter oral homeostasis. This study investigated the effects of long-term dexamethasone administration on morphofunctional aspects of salivary glands. Male Wistar rats received daily injections of dexamethasone [0.1 mg/kg body weight (b.w.), intraperitoneally] for 10 days (DEX), whereas control rats received saline. Subsequently, glycaemia, insulinaemia, insulin secretion and salivary flow were analysed. The parotid and submandibular glands were collected for histomorphometric evaluation and Western blot experiments. The DEX rats were found to be normoglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic, insulin resistant and glucose intolerant (P < 0.05). DEX rat islets secreted more insulin in response to glucose (P < 0.05). DEX rats had significant reductions in the masses of the parotid (29%) and submandibular (16%) glands (P < 0.05) that was associated with reduced salivary flux rate. The hypotrophy in both glands observed in the DEX group was associated with marked reduction in the volume of the acinar cells in these glands of 50% and 26% respectively (P < 0.05). The total number of acinar cells was increased in the submandibular glands of the DEX rats (P < 0.05) but not in the parotid glands. The levels of proteins related to insulin and survival signalling in both glands did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, the long-term administration of dexamethasone caused IR, which was associated with significant reductions in both mass and flux rate of the salivary glands. The parotid and submandibular glands exhibited reduced acinar cell volume; however, the submandibular glands displayed acinar hyperplasia, indicating a gland-specific response to GCs. Our data emphasize that GC-based therapies and insulin-resistant states have a negative impact on salivary gland homeostasis. PMID:25186305

  12. Objectivity in the classification of tumours of the nasal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, L.; Hyams, V. J.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of tumours derived from each of the four cell types of nasal epithelium is presented. Criticism is levelled at the adoption of additional terms for tissue types such as lympho-epithelium and transitional cell epithelium and tumours said to be derived from them. Electron microscopy is of assistance in classification particularly in the detection of evidence of keratin synthesis. The proposed classification of tumours of the nasal epithelium is: (1) Pseudostratified columnar epithelium: (a) papillary adenoma, (b) papillary carcinoma. (2) Squamous epithelium: (a) everted squamous papilloma, (b) inverted papilloma, (c) squamous carcinoma of any grade of differentiation from well differentiated to undifferentiated. (3) Melanocyte: malignant melanoma. (4) Olfactory neuroepithelium: olfactory neuroblastoma. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 21Fig. 20 PMID:1197175

  13. Evidence that estrogens directly alter androgen-regulated prostate development.

    PubMed

    Jarred, R A; Cancilla, B; Prins, G S; Thayer, K A; Cunha, G R; Risbridger, G P

    2000-09-01

    Neonatal exposure to high doses of estrogen results in permanent suppression of prostate growth and reduced sensitivity to androgens in adulthood. It is unclear whether alterations in prostate growth are due to a direct effect of estrogens on the gland or are the result of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis suppression and a subsequent reduction in androgen levels. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether estrogens have a direct effect on the prostate using a defined method of culturing neonatal prostates. Newborn rat ventral prostates were microdissected and cultured in the presence of testosterone, which resulted in branching morphogenesis and ductal canalization. Solid cords of epithelium differentiated into acini lined by tall columnar epithelial cells; these acini were surrounded by stromal cells, expressing smooth muscle alpha-actin. When cultured in the presence of 17beta-estradiol or diethylstilbestrol in addition to testosterone, androgen-induced prostatic growth was reduced, and differentiation was altered. Although estrogen-treated explants were smaller than controls, quantification of epithelial, stromal, and luminal volumes using unbiased stereology revealed significant changes; the proportion of epithelial cells and lumen decreased, and the proportion of stroma increased compared with control values. Concurrent with this reduced growth rate, we observed a disturbance in the branching pattern and a reduction in ductal canalization. Specifically, stromal differentiation and organization were disrupted, so that a discontinuous smooth muscle layer was observed around the epithelial ducts, and epithelial differentiation was altered. The effects of estrogens were not accompanied by a decrease in androgen response via the androgen receptor, because immunolocalization of this receptor remained constant. These data demonstrate that high doses of estrogens are growth inhibitory and have direct effects on prostate development in vitro, which

  14. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  15. Whole exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in BRCA2 and FAT genes in acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Shoko; Ameri, Mitra; Kuboki, Yuko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Hatori, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Sugiyama, Masanori; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Michio; Shibata, Noriyuki; Shimizu, Kyoko; Shiratori, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas is a rare tumor with a poor prognosis. Compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, its molecular features are poorly known. We studied a total of 11 acinar cell carcinomas, including 3 by exome and 4 by target sequencing. Exome sequencing revealed 65 nonsynonymous mutations and 22 indels with a mutation rate of 3.4 mutations/Mb per tumor, on average. By accounting for not only somatic but also germline mutations with loss of the wild-type allele, we identified recurrent mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. BRCA2 showed somatic or germline premature termination mutations, with loss of the wild-type allele in 3 of 7 tumors. FAT1, FAT3, and FAT4 showed somatic or germline missense mutations in 4 of 7 tumors. The germline FAT mutations were with loss of the wild-type allele. Loss of BRCA2 expression was observed in 5 of 11 tumors. One patient with a BRCA2-mutated tumor experienced complete remission of liver metastasis following cisplatinum chemotherapy. In conclusion, acinar cell carcinomas show a distinct mutation pattern and often harbor somatic or germline mutations of BRCA2 and FAT genes. This result may warrant assessment of BRCA2 abrogation in patients with the carcinoma to determine their sensitivity to chemotherapy. PMID:25743105

  16. Ascl3 expression marks a progenitor population of both acinar and ductal cells in mouse salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Tara; Koek, Laurie; Roztocil, Elisa; Kingsley, Paul D; Mirels, Lily; Ovitt, Catherine E

    2008-08-01

    Ascl3, also know as Sgn1, is a member of the mammalian achaete scute (Mash) gene family of transcription factors, which have been implicated in cell fate specification and differentiation. In the mouse salivary gland, expression of Ascl3 is restricted to a subset of duct cells. Salivary gland function depends on the secretory acinar cells, which are responsible for saliva formation, and duct cells, which modify the saliva and conduct it to the oral cavity. The salivary gland ducts are also the putative site of progenitor cells in the adult gland. Using a Cre recombinase-mediated reporter system, we followed the fate of Ascl3-expressing cells after the introduction of an EGFP-Cre expression cassette into the Ascl3 locus by homologous recombination. Lineage tracing shows that these cells are progenitors of both acinar and ductal cell types in all three major salivary glands. In the differentiated progeny, expression of Ascl3 is down-regulated. These data directly demonstrate a progenitor-progeny relationship between duct cells and the acinar cell compartment, and identify a population of multipotent progenitor cells, marked by expression of Ascl3, which is capable of generating both gland cell types. We conclude that Ascl3-expressing cells contribute to the maintenance of the adult salivary glands.

  17. [Thapsigargin-sensitive and insensitive intracellular calcium stores in acinar cells of the submandibular salivary gland in rats].

    PubMed

    Kopach, O V; Kruhlykov, I A; Voĭtenko, N V; Fedirko, N V

    2005-01-01

    Acinar cells of rat submandibular salivary gland are characterized by heterogeneity of intracellular Ca2+ stores. In the present work we have studied this heterogeneity using Arsenazo III dye to measure a cellular total calcium content and Fura-2/AM, to determine free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). We have found that the amount of Ca2+ released by inhibition of Ca2+ ATPase of the ER with thapsigargin comprises approximately 30% of total ER calcium. This result was obtained in experiments on both intact and permeabilized acinar cells. We have also shown that both Ca2+ ATPase inhibition with thapsigargin and emptying the stores with acetylcholine (ACh) led to activation of store-operated Ca2+ influx (an increase in total calcium content of approximately 14%). In permeabilized cells application of ACh after preincubation with thapsigargin led to a further decrease in total cellular calcium content (approximately 38%). At the same time in intact cells it resulted in generation of [Ca2+]i transients with gradually decreasing amplitudes. Thus, ACh is capable of producing an additional release of Ca2+ from thapsigargin-insensitive stores. This additional release is IP3-dependent since it was completely blocked by heparin. We conclude that in acinar cells of rat submandibular gland thapsigargin-sensitive and thapsigargin-insensitive Ca2+ stores could exist.

  18. Phorbol esters and A23187 regulate Na/sup +/=K/sup +/-pump activity in pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, S.R.; Brown, M.E.; Williams, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    To clarify the subcellular mechanisms that mediate stimulation of Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-pump activity in pancreatic acinar cells by cholinergic agonists, the authors examined the effects of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and the Ca/sup 2 +/ ionophore A23187 on (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding to dispersed guinea pig pancreatic acinar cells under conditions in which binding reflects the average rate of pump cycling. The phorbol ester more than doubled Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-pump activity as did the diacylglycerol analogue, 1-oleoyl-2-acetolyl-sn-3-glycerol. A23187 increased pump activity by a maximum of 31% at 0.3 ..mu..M but was progressively inhibitory at higher concentrations. The stimulatory effects of TPA and A23187 were additive, although either secretagogue elicited a less than additive response when added together with a maximally effective concentration of the cholinergic agonist, carbachol. Removal of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ had little effect on the pump response to TPA and did not reduce the maximal effect of A23187 but abolished the inhibitory effect seen at high ionophore concentrations in Ca/sup 2 +/-containing medium. These results indicate that both Ca/sup 2 +/ and protein kinase c are involved in regulating Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-pump activity in the pancreatic acinar cell.

  19. Flow cytometric DNA analysis of corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Burns, E R; Roberson, M C; Brown, M F; Shock, J P; Pipkin, J L; Hinson, W G; Anson, J F

    1990-03-01

    We have modified an existing technique in order to perform DNA analysis by flow cytometry (FCM) of corneal epithelium from the mouse, rat, chicken, rabbit, and human. This protocol permitted an investigation of human corneal scrapings from several categories: normal, aphakic bullous keratopathy (ABK), keratoconus (KC), Fuch's dystrophy, edema, epithelial dysplasia, and lipid degeneration. No abnormal characteristic cell-kinetic profile was detected when averaged DNA histograms were compared statistically between the normal and either ABK, KC, edema, or Fuch's dystrophy groups. Abnormal DNA histograms were recorded for cell samples that were taken 1) from three individuals who had epithelial dysplasia and 2) from one individual diagnosed with lipid degeneration. The former condition was characterized by histograms that had a subpopulation of cells with an aneuploid amount of DNA or had higher than normal percentages of cells in the S and G2 + M phases of the cell cycle. Corneal cells from the patient who had lipid degeneration had an abnormally high percentage of cells in the G2 + M phases of the cell cycle. The availability of accurate DNA flow cytometric analysis of corneal epithelium allows further studies on this issue from both experimental and clinical situations.

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 disrupts mammary acinar architecture and initiates malignant transformation of mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Teh, Jessica L F; Shah, Raj; La Cava, Stephanie; Dolfi, Sonia C; Mehta, Madhura S; Kongara, Sameera; Price, Sandy; Ganesan, Shridar; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Hirshfield, Kim M; Karantza, Vassiliki; Chen, Suzie

    2015-05-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1/Grm1) is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, which was once thought to only participate in synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability, but has more recently been implicated in non-neuronal tissue functions. We previously described the oncogenic properties of Grm1 in cultured melanocytes in vitro and in spontaneous melanoma development with 100 % penetrance in vivo. Aberrant mGluR1 expression was detected in 60-80 % of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples. As most human cancers are of epithelial origin, we utilized immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cells (iMMECs) as a model system to study the transformative properties of Grm1. We introduced Grm1 into iMMECs and isolated several stable mGluR1-expressing clones. Phenotypic alterations in mammary acinar architecture were assessed using three-dimensional morphogenesis assays. We found that mGluR1-expressing iMMECs exhibited delayed lumen formation in association with decreased central acinar cell death, disrupted cell polarity, and a dramatic increase in the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Orthotopic implantation of mGluR1-expressing iMMEC clones into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient nude mice resulted in mammary tumor formation in vivo. Persistent mGluR1 expression was required for the maintenance of the tumorigenic phenotypes in vitro and in vivo, as demonstrated by an inducible Grm1-silencing RNA system. Furthermore, mGluR1 was found be expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor biopsies. Elevated levels of extracellular glutamate were observed in mGluR1-expressing breast cancer cell lines and concurrent treatment of MCF7 xenografts with glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, and an AKT inhibitor led to suppression of tumor progression. Our results are likely relevant to human breast cancer, highlighting a putative role of mGluR1 in the pathophysiology of breast cancer and the potential

  1. High expression of a specific T-cell receptor γ transcript in epithelial cells of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Essand, Magnus; Vasmatzis, George; Brinkmann, Ulrich; Duray, Paul; Lee, Byungkook; Pastan, Ira

    1999-01-01

    We have identified expression of T-cell receptor γ chain (TCRγ) mRNA in human prostate and have shown that it originates from epithelial cells of the prostate and not from infiltrating T-lymphocytes. In contrast, the T-cell receptor δ chain (TCRδ) gene is silent in human prostate. The major TCRγ transcript in prostate has a different size than the transcript expressed in thymus, spleen, and blood leukocytes. It is expressed in normal prostate epithelium, adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and the prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line LNCaP. The RNA originates from an unrearranged TCRγ locus, and it is initiated within the intronic sequence directly upstream of the Jγ1.2 gene segment. The prostate-specific TCRγ transcript consists of the Jγ1.2 and Cγ1 gene segments, and it has an untranslated sequence including a polyadenylation signal and poly(A) sequence at the 3′end. The finding that prostate epithelial cells express a high level of a transcript from a gene that was thought to by exclusively expressed by T-lymphocytes is highly unexpected. PMID:10430935

  2. Stromal microcalcification in prostate.

    PubMed

    Muezzinoglu, B; Gurbuz, Y

    2001-06-01

    Prostatic calcification is most commonly encountered as calculus or intraluminal calcifications within atypical small glandular proliferations. This study was undertaken to detect stromal microcalcifications in prostate tissue. All slides from 194 needle biopsies were retrospectively reviewed. Six cases (3.1%) had stromal microcalcifications constantly associated with mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate around the each focus. Association with prostatic glands was not seen in any of the microcalcification foci. Three cases had simultaneous adenocarcinoma and one had high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, all of which were apart from the microcalcification foci. In conclusion, stromal microcalcification is a dystrophic, inflammation-mediated, benign process.

  3. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  4. To treat or not to treat with testosterone replacement therapy: a contemporary review of management of late-onset hypogonadism and critical issues related to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kava, Bruce R

    2014-07-01

    Over the last 10 years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of patients identified and treated with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). By virtue of age, race, and family history, many of these patients are concurrently at risk for harboring indolent prostate cancer. Other men are at increased risk for prostate cancer as a result of an elevated serum PSA level or having had a prior prostate biopsy showing prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) or atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). The clinician is often challenged with the decision whether to initiate TRT in these patients. This review presents a contemporary overview of the rationale for TRT, as well as the relationship between testosterone (endogenous and exogenous) and premalignant and malignant lesions of the prostate. We will discuss preliminary data from several recent series demonstrating that TRT may be safely administered in select patients with certain premalignant and bona fide malignant tumors of the prostate. In the absence of a large randomized clinical trial with long-term outcome data evaluating TRT, we hope that this overview will provide clinicians with an evidence-based approach to managing these anxiety-provoking - and often frustrating - clinical scenarios.

  5. Aerosol bolus dispersion in acinar airways--influence of gravity and airway asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshun; Darquenne, Chantal

    2012-08-01

    The aerosol bolus technique can be used to estimate the degree of convective mixing in the lung; however, contributions of different lung compartments to measured dispersion cannot be differentiated unambiguously. To estimate dispersion in the distal lung, we studied the effect of gravity and airway asymmetry on the dispersion of 1 μm-diameter particle boluses in three-dimensional computational models of the lung periphery, ranging from a single alveolar sac to four-generation (g4) structures of bifurcating airways that deformed homogeneously during breathing. Boluses were introduced at the beginning of a 2-s inhalation, immediately followed by a 3-s exhalation. Dispersion was estimated by the half-width of the exhaled bolus. Dispersion was significantly affected by the spatial orientation of the models in normal gravity and was less in zero gravity than in normal gravity. Dispersion was strongly correlated with model volume in both normal and zero gravity. Predicted pulmonary dispersion based on a symmetric g4 acinar model was 391 ml and 238 ml under normal and zero gravity, respectively. These results accounted for a significant amount of dispersion measured experimentally. In zero gravity, predicted dispersion in a highly asymmetric model accounted for ∼20% of that obtained in a symmetric model with comparable volume and number of alveolated branches, whereas normal gravity dispersions were comparable in both models. These results suggest that gravitational sedimentation and not geometrical asymmetry is the dominant factor in aerosol dispersion in the lung periphery.

  6. A model system for the study of stimulus - enzyme secretion coupling in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; Heisler, S

    1980-08-01

    A superfusion technique was developed as a model system for the study of stimulus-secretion coupling in collagenase-dispersed rat pancreatic acinar cells. Cells (10(7)) were combined with a slurry of Biogel P-4 beads and the mixture was decanted into a plastic column (1.5 cm X 8.5 cm) and perfused with Krebs-Ringer. Amylase activity was determined in sequentially collected effusate fractions and used to estimate the secretory rate. Carbachol, carbachol plus dibutyryl cyclic AMP, cholecystokinin-pancreozymin, and the ionophore A-23187 all stimulated a rapid increase in the rate of secretion. Cell integrity was unaffected by these stimulants as evidenced microscopically and by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase activity in the effusates. Enzymes secreted in response to secretagogues were collected, concentrated, and isoelectrofocused on polyacrylamide gels. A film detection technique was developed to localize amylase activity. The model system has the following advantages: (1) secreted proteolytic products are removed from the vicinity of cells, thereby preventing direct cellular damage and hydrolysis of peptide agonist; (2) the need to add trypsin inhibitors is eliminated and only a minimal addition of albumin (0.001%) is required, thus allowing the separation and distortion-free analysis of secreted proteins; (3) the perfusion conditions can be changed rapidly without disturbing the cells. The model described is therefore well suited to the study of both molecular and kinetic events involved in the enzyme secretory phenomenon in exocrine pancreas. PMID:6164455

  7. Antigen-presenting cells in parotid glands contain cystatin D originating from acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Nashida, Tomoko; Sato, Ritsuko; Haga-Tsujimura, Maiko; Yoshie, Sumio; Yoshimura, Ken; Imai, Akane; Shimomura, Hiromi

    2013-02-01

    Cystatin D encoded by Cst5 is a salivary classified type II cystatin. We investigated the dynamism of cystatin D by examining the distribution of cystatin D protein and mRNA in rats, to identify novel functions. The simultaneous expression of Cst5 and cystatin D was observed in parotid glands, however in situ hybridization showed that only acinar cells produced cystatin D. Synthesized cystatin D was localized in small vesicles and secreted from the apical side to the saliva, and from the basolateral side to the extracellular region, a second secretory pathway for cystatin D. We also identified antigen-presenting cells in the parotid glands that contained cystatin D without the expression of Cst5, indicating the uptake of cystatin D from the extracellular region. Cystatin D was detected in blood serum and renal tubular cells with megalin, indicating the circulation of cystatin D through the body and uptake by renal tubular cells. Thus, the novel dynamism of cystatin D was shown and a function for cystatin D in the regulation of antigen-presenting cell activity was proposed.

  8. Nuclear iASPP may facilitate prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Morris, E V; Cerundolo, L; Lu, M; Verrill, C; Fritzsche, F; White, M J; Thalmann, G N; ten Donkelaar, C S; Ratnayaka, I; Salter, V; Hamdy, F C; Lu, X; Bryant, R J

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in prostate cancer (PCa) research is the identification of key players that control the progression of primary cancers to invasive and metastatic disease. The majority of metastatic PCa express wild-type p53, whereas loss of p63 expression, a p53 family member, is a common event. Here we identify inhibitor of apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 (iASPP), a common cellular regulator of p53 and p63, as an important player of PCa progression. Detailed analysis of the prostate epithelium of iASPP transgenic mice, iASPPΔ8/Δ8 mice, revealed that iASPP deficiency resulted in a reduction in the number of p63 expressing basal epithelial cells compared with that seen in wild-type mice. Nuclear and cytoplasmic iASPP expression was greater in PCa samples compared with benign epithelium. Importantly nuclear iASPP associated with p53 accumulation in vitro and in vivo. A pair of isogenic primary and metastatic PCa cell lines revealed that nuclear iASPP is enriched in the highly metastatic PCa cells. Nuclear iASPP is often detected in PCa cells located at the invasive leading edge in vivo. Increased iASPP expression associated with metastatic disease and PCa-specific death in a clinical cohort with long-term follow-up. These results suggest that iASPP function is required to maintain the expression of p63 in normal basal prostate epithelium, and nuclear iASPP may inactivate p53 function and facilitate PCa progression. Thus iASPP expression may act as a predictive marker of PCa progression. PMID:25341046

  9. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  10. Spatially limited growth of an epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforet, Maxime; Cochet, Olivier; Buguin, Axel; Silberzan, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    We present a study dealing with the growth of an epithelium on a spatially limited adhesive substrate. Adhesive patterns (typical size: 50μm to 500μm) are created by micro-fabrication techniques: A protein repellent polymeric gel homogeneously grafted on a coverslip is selectively ablated by plasma treatment through a thin layer of photoresist. The technique achieves a high resolution of patterning (around 2μm). After seeding cells (MDCK) on circular adhesive patterns, we let the monolayer grow for 30 hours after reaching the confluence. We use physical descriptors to describe migration and compaction. Two days after the confluence, we observe and characterize by confocal microscopy, the appearance of a tridimensionnal assembly of cells in the peripherical zone of the adhesive pattern (a ``rim''). Moreover using other patterns, the existence of a tissue line tension and internal pressure is investigated.

  11. Prostatic Stromal Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential Which Was Difficult to Diagnose

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoko; Nohara, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Seto, Chikashi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Uchiyama, Akio; Ishizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a case of stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) that was difficult to diagnose. A 53-year-old male was found to have a hard nodule on digital rectal examination; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large nodule on the left side of the prostate, indicating prostate cancer. However, pathological diagnosis of the biopsy specimen was benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although a papillary tumor in the prostatic urethra was also seen on urethrocystoscopy, the tumor specimen obtained from transurethral resection was not malignant. The tumor in the prostatic urethra recurred only 3 months after transurethral resection, and pathological findings revealed benign hyperplasia not only in the stromal tissue but also in the epithelium; therefore, the prostate tumor was suspected to be STUMP. It took many prostate pathologists a long time to reach the final diagnosis of STUMP. STUMP is a rare benign tumor, difficult to diagnose, and sometimes transforms into stromal sarcoma. Thus, we should consider radical resection in such cases. PMID:26839730

  12. s-SHIP expression identifies a subset of murine basal prostate cells as neonatal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Chmelar, Renee S.; Bauderlique-Le Roy, Hélène; Deruy, Emeric; Tian, Lu; Vessella, Robert L.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Bourette, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of prostate stem cells (PSCs) is crucial for understanding their biology during normal development and tumorigenesis. In this aim, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing GFP from the stem cell-specific s-SHIP promoter to mark putative stem cells during postnatal prostate development. Here we show that cells identified by GFP expression are present transiently during early prostate development and localize to the basal cell layer of the epithelium. These prostate GFP+ cells are a subpopulation of the Lin− CD24+ Sca-1+ CD49f+ cells and are capable of self-renewal together with enhanced growth potential in sphere-forming assay in vitro, a phenotype consistent with that of a PSC population. Transplantation assays of prostate GFP+ cells demonstrate reconstitution of prostate ducts containing both basal and luminal cells in renal grafts. Altogether, these results demonstrate that s-SHIP promoter expression is a new marker for neonatal basal prostate cells exhibiting stem cell properties that enables PSCs in situ identification and isolation via a single consistent parameter. Transcriptional profiling of these GFP+ neonatal stem cells showed an increased expression of several components of the Wnt signaling pathway. It also identified stem cell regulators with potential applications for further analyses of normal and cancer stem cells. PMID:27081082

  13. EpCAM Expression in Lymph Node and Bone Metastases of Prostate Carcinoma: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Anna K.; Hoving, Hilde D.; Rosati, Stefano; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; de Jong, Igle J.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new imaging modalities in prostate carcinoma staging. A non-invasive modality that can assess lymph node and bone metastases simultaneously is preferred. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a membranous protein of interest as an imaging target since it is overexpressed in prostatic carcinoma compared with benign prostate epithelium and compared with stroma. However, EpCAM expression in lymph node metastases is sparsely available in the literature and EpCAM expression in bone metastases is yet unknown. The current study evaluates the expression of EpCAM in prostate carcinoma lymph nodes, in matched normal lymph nodes, in prostate carcinoma bone metastases, and in normal bone by immunohistochemistry. EpCAM was expressed in 100% of lymph node metastases (21 out of 21), in 0% of normal lymph nodes (0 out of 21), in 95% of bone metastases (19 out of 20), and in 0% of normal bone (0 out of 14). Based on these results, EpCAM may be a feasible imaging target in prostate carcinoma lymph node and bone metastases. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm current results. Preoperative visualization of prostate carcinoma metastases will improve disease staging and will prevent unnecessary invasive surgery. PMID:27690012

  14. Regulation of 5alpha-reductase isoforms by oxytocin in the rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Assinder, S J; Johnson, C; King, K; Nicholson, H D

    2004-12-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is present in the male reproductive tract, where it is known to modulate contractility, cell growth, and steroidogenesis. Little is known about how OT regulates these processes. This study describes the localization of OT receptor in the rat ventral prostate and investigates if OT regulates gene expression and/or activity of 5alpha-reductase isoforms I and II. The ventral prostates of adult male Wistar rats were collected following daily sc administration of saline (control), OT, a specific OT antagonist or both OT plus antagonist for 3 d. Expression of the OT receptor was identified in the ventral prostate by RT-PCR and Western blot, and confirmed to be a single active binding site by radioreceptor assay. Immunohistochemistry localized the receptor to the epithelium of prostatic acini and to the stromal tissue. Real-time RT-PCR determined that OT treatment significantly reduced expression of 5alpha-reductase I but significantly increased 5alpha-reductase II expression in the ventral prostate. Activity of both isoforms of 5alpha-reductase was significantly increased by OT, resulting in increased concentration of prostatic dihydrotestosterone. In conclusion, OT is involved in regulating conversion of testosterone to the biologically active dihydrotestosterone in the rat ventral prostate. It does so by differential regulation of 5alpha-reductase isoforms I and II.

  15. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH.

  16. NPM1 Silencing Reduces Tumour Growth and MAPK Signalling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Loubeau, Gaëlle; Boudra, Rafik; Maquaire, Sabrina; Lours-Calet, Corinne; Beaudoin, Claude; Verrelle, Pierre; Morel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The chaperone nucleophosmin (NPM1) is over-expressed in the epithelial compartment of prostate tumours compared to adjacent healthy epithelium and may represent one of the key actors that support the neoplastic phenotype of prostate adenocarcinoma cells. Yet, the mechanisms that underlie NPM1 mediated phenotype remain elusive in the prostate. To better understand NPM1 functions in prostate cancer cells, we sought to characterize its impact on prostate cancer cells behaviour and decipher the mechanisms by which it may act. Here we show that NPM1 favors prostate tumour cell migration, invasion and colony forming. Furthermore, knockdown of NPM1 leads to a decrease in the growth of LNCaP-derived tumours grafted in Nude mice in vivo. Such oncogenic-like properties are found in conjunction with a positive regulation of NPM1 on the ERK1/2 (Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinases 1/2) kinase phosphorylation in response to EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor) stimulus, which is critical for prostate cancer progression following the setting of an autonomous production of the growth factor. NPM1 could then be a target to switch off specifically ERK1/2 pathway activation in order to decrease or inhibit cancer cell growth and migration. PMID:24796332

  17. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27483178

  18. Challenges and opportunities for tissue-engineering polarized epithelium.

    PubMed

    Paz, Ana C; Soleas, John; Poon, James C H; Trieu, Dennis; Waddell, Thomas K; McGuigan, Alison P

    2014-02-01

    The epithelium is one of the most important tissue types in the body and the specific organization of the epithelial cells in these tissues is important for achieving appropriate function. Since many tissues contain an epithelial component, engineering functional epithelium and understanding the factors that control epithelial maturation and organization are important for generating whole artificial organ replacements. Furthermore, disruption of the cellular organization leads to tissue malfunction and disease; therefore, engineered epithelium could provide a valuable in vitro model to study disease phenotypes. Despite the importance of epithelial tissues, a surprisingly limited amount of effort has been focused on organizing epithelial cells into artificial polarized epithelium with an appropriate structure that resembles that seen in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of epithelial tissue organization and highlight the importance of cell polarization to achieve appropriate epithelium function. We next describe the in vitro models that exist to create polarized epithelium and summarize attempts to engineer artificial epithelium for clinical use. Finally, we highlight the opportunities that exist to translate strategies from tissue engineering other tissues to generate polarized epithelium with a functional structure.

  19. Histomorphological Study on Number of Acini of the Prostate Gland of Bangladeshi Cadaver.

    PubMed

    Epsi, E Z; Khalil, M; Sultana, S Z; Zaman, U S; Choudhury, S; Ameen, S; Sultana, R; Tabassum, R; Nawshin, N; Azam, M S; Akhter, S M

    2016-04-01

    The prostate is made up of 30 to 50 compound tubuloalveolar glands that are embedded in a framework of fibromuscular tissue and arranged in three concentric groups (mucosal, submucosal and main prostatic gland). The prostate consists of peripheral, central and transitional zone accounting for approximately 70%, 20% and 5% of the glandular substances. Benign prostatic hyperplasia affects the transitional zone and carcinoma of the prostate affects the peripheral zone. The glandular tissue consists of numerous acini with frequent internal papillae. Follicular epithelium is variable but predominantly columnar and either single-layered or pseudostratified. This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in Department of Anatomy, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh to find out the difference in number of acini of the prostate gland of Bangladeshi people in relation to age. The present study was performed on 67 postmortem human prostate gland collected from the morgue in the Department of Forensic Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College by non random purposive sampling technique. The specimens were collected from Bangladeshi cadaver of age ranging from 10 to 80 years. All the specimens were grouped into three categories: Group A (up to 18 years), Group B (19 to 45 years) and Group C (above 45 years) according to age. Dissection was performed following standard autopsy techniques. In the present study, total 60 slides were made for histological study from both central and peripheral zone of the prostate which were examined under low power objectives. The number of the acini of the prostate gland were counted and recorded. The mean number of the acini of the prostate gland was 16.45, 43.54 and 42.45 in Group A, B and C respectively in central zone and 30.08, 51.35 and 44.16 in Group A, B and C respectively in peripheral zone of the prostate. Variance analysis shows that mean differences were highly significant between Group A & B and Group C & A and non

  20. Histomorphological Study on Number of Acini of the Prostate Gland of Bangladeshi Cadaver.

    PubMed

    Epsi, E Z; Khalil, M; Sultana, S Z; Zaman, U S; Choudhury, S; Ameen, S; Sultana, R; Tabassum, R; Nawshin, N; Azam, M S; Akhter, S M

    2016-04-01

    The prostate is made up of 30 to 50 compound tubuloalveolar glands that are embedded in a framework of fibromuscular tissue and arranged in three concentric groups (mucosal, submucosal and main prostatic gland). The prostate consists of peripheral, central and transitional zone accounting for approximately 70%, 20% and 5% of the glandular substances. Benign prostatic hyperplasia affects the transitional zone and carcinoma of the prostate affects the peripheral zone. The glandular tissue consists of numerous acini with frequent internal papillae. Follicular epithelium is variable but predominantly columnar and either single-layered or pseudostratified. This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in Department of Anatomy, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh to find out the difference in number of acini of the prostate gland of Bangladeshi people in relation to age. The present study was performed on 67 postmortem human prostate gland collected from the morgue in the Department of Forensic Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College by non random purposive sampling technique. The specimens were collected from Bangladeshi cadaver of age ranging from 10 to 80 years. All the specimens were grouped into three categories: Group A (up to 18 years), Group B (19 to 45 years) and Group C (above 45 years) according to age. Dissection was performed following standard autopsy techniques. In the present study, total 60 slides were made for histological study from both central and peripheral zone of the prostate which were examined under low power objectives. The number of the acini of the prostate gland were counted and recorded. The mean number of the acini of the prostate gland was 16.45, 43.54 and 42.45 in Group A, B and C respectively in central zone and 30.08, 51.35 and 44.16 in Group A, B and C respectively in peripheral zone of the prostate. Variance analysis shows that mean differences were highly significant between Group A & B and Group C & A and non

  1. The Prostate Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Frederico R.; Romero, Antonio W.; Filho, Thadeu Brenny; Kulysz, David; Oliveira, Fernando C., Jr.; Filho, Renato Tambara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To help students, residents, and general practitioners to improve the technique, skills, and reproducibility of their prostate examination. Methods: We developed a comprehensive guideline outlining prostate anatomy, indications, patient preparation, positioning, technique, findings, and limitations of this ancient art of urological…

  2. Bronchial epithelium in children: a key player in asthma.

    PubMed

    Carsin, Ania; Mazenq, Julie; Ilstad, Alexandra; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Chanez, Pascal; Gras, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Bronchial epithelium is a key element of the respiratory airways. It constitutes the interface between the environment and the host. It is a physical barrier with many chemical and immunological properties. The bronchial epithelium is abnormal in asthma, even in children. It represents a key component promoting airway inflammation and remodelling that can lead to chronic symptoms. In this review, we present an overview of bronchial epithelium and how to study it, with a specific focus on children. We report physical, chemical and immunological properties from ex vivo and in vitro studies. The responses to various deleterious agents, such as viruses or allergens, may lead to persistent abnormalities orchestrated by bronchial epithelial cells. As epithelium dysfunctions occur early in asthma, reprogramming the epithelium may represent an ambitious goal to induce asthma remission in children.

  3. Do Airway Epithelium Air–Liquid Cultures Represent the In Vivo Airway Epithelium Transcriptome?

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Anna; Tilley, Ann E.; Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Human airway epithelial cells cultured in vitro at the air–liquid interface (ALI) form a pseudostratified epithelium that forms tight junctions and cilia, and produces mucin. These cells are widely used in models of differentiation, injury, and repair. To assess how closely the transcriptome of ALI epithelium matches that of in vivo airway epithelial cells, we used microarrays to compare the transcriptome of human large airway epithelial cells cultured at the ALI with the transcriptome of large airway epithelium obtained via bronchoscopy and brushing. Gene expression profiling showed that global gene expression correlated well between ALI cells and brushed cells, but with some differences. Gene expression patterns mirrored differences in proportions of cell types (ALIs have higher percentages of basal cells, whereas brushed cells have higher percentages of ciliated cells), that is, ALI cells expressed higher levels of basal cell–related genes, and brushed cells expressed higher levels of cilia-related genes. Pathway analysis showed that ALI cells had increased expression of cell cycle and proliferation genes, whereas brushed cells had increased expression of cytoskeletal organization and humoral immune response genes. Overall, ALI cells provide a good representation of the in vivo airway epithelial transcriptome, but for some biologic questions, the differences between in vitro and in vivo environments need to be considered. PMID:20525805

  4. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  5. Tbx18 Regulates the Differentiation of Periductal Smooth Muscle Stroma and the Maintenance of Epithelial Integrity in the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães-Camboa, Nuno; Zhang, Huimin; Troy, Joseph M.; Lu, Xiaochen; Kispert, Andreas; Evans, Sylvia M.; Stubbs, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor TBX18 is essential to mesenchymal cell differentiation in several tissues and Tbx18 loss-of-function results in dramatic organ malformations and perinatal lethality. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Tbx18 is required for the normal development of periductal smooth muscle stromal cells in prostate, particularly in the anterior lobe, with a clear impact on prostate health in adult mice. Prostate abnormalities are only subtly apparent in Tbx18 mutants at birth; to examine postnatal prostate development we utilized a relatively long-lived hypomorphic mutant and a novel conditional Tbx18 allele. Similar to the ureter, cells that fail to express Tbx18 do not condense normally into smooth muscle cells of the periductal prostatic stroma. However, in contrast to ureter, the periductal stromal cells in mutant prostate assume a hypertrophic, myofibroblastic state and the adjacent epithelium becomes grossly disorganized. To identify molecular events preceding the onset of this pathology, we compared gene expression in the urogenital sinus (UGS), from which the prostate develops, in Tbx18-null and wild type littermates at two embryonic stages. Genes that regulate cell proliferation, smooth muscle differentiation, prostate epithelium development, and inflammatory response were significantly dysregulated in the mutant urogenital sinus around the time that Tbx18 is first expressed in the wild type UGS, suggesting a direct role in regulating those genes. Together, these results argue that Tbx18 is essential to the differentiation and maintenance of the prostate periurethral mesenchyme and that it indirectly regulates epithelial differentiation through control of stromal-epithelial signaling. PMID:27120339

  6. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: age-related tissue-remodeling.

    PubMed

    Untergasser, Gerold; Madersbacher, Stephan; Berger, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Aging and androgens are the two established risk factors for the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE), which can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in elderly men. BPH, consisting of a nodular overgrowth of the epithelium and fibromuscular tissue within transition zone and periurethral areas, is first detectable around the fourth decade of life and affects nearly all men by the ninth decade. The pathogenesis of BPH is still largely unresolved, but multiple partially overlapping and complementary theories have been proposed, all of which seem to be operative at least to some extent. In addition to nerve-, endocrine- and immune system, local para- and luminocrine pleiotrope mechanisms/factors are implicated in the prostatic tissue-remodeling process. Prostate tissue-remodeling in the transition zone is characterized by: (i) hypertrophic basal cells, (ii) altered secretions of luminal cells leading to calcification, clogged ducts and inflammation, (iii) lymphocytic infiltration with production of proinflammatory cytokines, (iv) increased radical oxygen species (ROS) production that damages epithelial and stromal cells, (v) increased basic fibroblast (bFGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1) production leading to stromal proliferation, transdifferentiation and extracellular matrix production, (vi) altered autonomous innervation that decreases relaxation and leads to a high adrenergic tonus, (vii) and altered neuroendocine cell function and release of neuroendocrine peptides (NEP). This review summarizes the multifactorial nature of prostate tissue remodeling in elderly men with symptomatic BPH with a particular focus on changes of cell-cell interactions and cell functions in the human aging prostate.

  7. Trachea Epithelium as a “Canary” for Cigarette Smoking-induced Biologic Phenotype of the Small Airway Epithelium*

    PubMed Central

    Turetz, Meredith L.; O’Connor, Timothy P.; Tilley, Ann E.; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Dang, David; Teater, Matthew; Mezey, Jason; Clark, Andrew G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    The initial site of smoking-induced lung disease is the small airway epithelium, which is difficult and time consuming to sample by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. We developed a rapid, office-based procedure to obtain trachea epithelium without conscious sedation from healthy nonsmokers (n=26) and healthy smokers (n=19, 27 ± 15 pack-yr). Gene expression differences (fold-change >1.5, p<0.01, Benjamini-Hochberg correction) were assessed with Affymetrix microarrays. 1,057 probe sets were differentially expressed in healthy smokers vs nonsmokers, representing >500 genes. Trachea gene expression was compared to an independent group of small airway epithelial samples (n=23 healthy nonsmokers, n=19 healthy smokers, 25 ± 12 pack-yr). The trachea epithelium is more sensitive to smoking, responding with 3-fold more differentially-expressed genes than small airway epithelium. The trachea transcriptome paralleled the small airway epithelium, with 156 of 167 (93%) genes that are significantly upand down-regulated by smoking in the small airway epithelium showing similar direction and magnitude of response to smoking in the trachea. Trachea epithelium can be obtained without conscious sedation, representing a less invasive surrogate “canary” for smoking-induced changes in the small airway epithelium. This should prove useful in epidemiologic studies correlating gene expression with clinical outcome in assessing smoking-induced lung disease. PMID:20443905

  8. SOX9 drives WNT pathway activation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fen; Ye, Huihui; He, Housheng Hansen; Gerrin, Sean J.; Chen, Sen; Tanenbaum, Benjamin A.; Sowalsky, Adam G.; He, Lingfeng; Wang, Hongyun; Balk, Steven P.; Yuan, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX9 is critical for prostate development, and dysregulation of SOX9 is implicated in prostate cancer (PCa). However, the SOX9-dependent genes and pathways involved in both normal and neoplastic prostate epithelium are largely unknown. Here, we performed SOX9 ChIP sequencing analysis and transcriptome profiling of PCa cells and determined that SOX9 positively regulates multiple WNT pathway genes, including those encoding WNT receptors (frizzled [FZD] and lipoprotein receptor-related protein [LRP] family members) and the downstream β-catenin effector TCF4. Analyses of PCa xenografts and clinical samples both revealed an association between the expression of SOX9 and WNT pathway components in PCa. Finally, treatment of SOX9-expressing PCa cells with a WNT synthesis inhibitor (LGK974) reduced WNT pathway signaling in vitro and tumor growth in murine xenograft models. Together, our data indicate that SOX9 expression drives PCa by reactivating the WNT/β−catenin signaling that mediates ductal morphogenesis in fetal prostate and define a subgroup of patients who would benefit from WNT-targeted therapy. PMID:27043282

  9. An immunocytochemical analysis of TGF alpha expression in benign and malignant prostatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Harper, M E; Goddard, L; Glynne-Jones, E; Wilson, D W; Price-Thomas, M; Peeling, W B; Griffiths, K

    1993-01-01

    Transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) expression was analyzed immunocytochemically on formalin-fixed wax-embedded sections obtained from 24 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) specimens and 76 prostatic carcinoma tissues, 3 human prostatic tumor xenografts, normal kidney, and salivary gland. Low amounts of TGF alpha immunopositivity were encountered in the epithelium of BPH glandular tissues, whereas in the prostatic adenocarcinoma samples, a greater heterogeneity and intensity of TGF alpha immunostaining was observed. The most intense staining was exhibited by the least differentiated tumors, although a few of these were weakly stained. Statistical analysis of the relationship of histopathological grade of tumor with TGF alpha expression in the carcinomas showed a significant correlation of these parameters, 0.01 > P > 0.001. The expression of the proliferation markers Ki-67 and PCNA was also analyzed in the carcinoma specimens, and the relationship of these to TGF alpha expression indicated that there was no significant correlation in this series of tumors between increased growth activity and TGF alpha expression (p approximately 0.25 with both markers). The prostatic carcinoma xenografts TEN12 and TEN15 contained low levels of immunoreactive TGF alpha, which was uniformly distributed, whilst heterogeneous immunostaining was observed in the uroepithelial xenograft TEN16. In the normal human kidney, TGF alpha was concentrated in the epithelium of the distal convoluted tubules (DCT) and the collecting tubules (CT), and lower amounts were identified in the proximal convoluted tubules (PCT). As in the prostatic carcinomas, the immunostaining was eliminated by prior absorption of the antibody with pure TGF alpha and not with human or mouse EGF. No crossreactivity of the TGF alpha antibody with salivary EGF was demonstrated. This study concludes that, in prostate carcinoma, the least differentiated tumors more often expressed greater amounts immunoreactive TGF

  10. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  11. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  12. G protein in stimulation of PI hydrolysis by CCK (cholecystokinin) in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matozaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Nagao, Munehiko; Nishizaki, Hogara; Baba, Shigeaki )

    1988-11-01

    To clarify the possible role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) in the signal transducing system activated by cholecystokinin (CCK), actions of CCK on rat pancreatic acini were compared with those of fluoride, a well-known activator of stimulatory (G{sub s}) or inhibitory (G{sub i}) G protein. When acini were incubated with increasing concentrations of either CCK-octapeptide (CCK8) or NaF, a maximal stimulation of amylase release from acini occurred at 100 pM CCK8 or 10 mM NaF, respectively; this secretory rate decreased as CCK8 or NaF concentration was increased. NaF caused an increase in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} concentration from the internal Ca{sup 2+} store and stimulated accumulation of inositol phosphates in acini, as observed with CCK. Guanylimidodiphosphate activated the generation of inositol phosphates in the ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled pancreatic acinar cell membrane preparation, with half-maximal and maximal stimulation at 1 and 10 {mu}M, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of submaximal CCK concentrations on inositol phosphate accumulation in membranes were markedly potentiated in the presence of 100 {mu}M GTP, which alone was ineffective. Combined findings of the present study strongly suggest that pancreatic CCK receptors are probably coupled to the activation of polyphosphoinositide (PI) breakdown by a G protein, which appears to be fluoride sensitive but is other than G{sub s}- or G{sub i}-like protein.

  13. Apical Ca2+-activated potassium channels in mouse parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Almassy, Janos; Won, Jong Hak; Begenisich, Ted B; Yule, David I

    2012-02-01

    Ca(2+) activation of Cl and K channels is a key event underlying stimulated fluid secretion from parotid salivary glands. Cl channels are exclusively present on the apical plasma membrane (PM), whereas the localization of K channels has not been established. Mathematical models have suggested that localization of some K channels to the apical PM is optimum for fluid secretion. A combination of whole cell electrophysiology and temporally resolved digital imaging with local manipulation of intracellular [Ca(2+)] was used to investigate if Ca(2+)-activated K channels are present in the apical PM of parotid acinar cells. Initial experiments established Ca(2+)-buffering conditions that produced brief, localized increases in [Ca(2+)] after focal laser photolysis of caged Ca(2+). Conditions were used to isolate K(+) and Cl(-) conductances. Photolysis at the apical PM resulted in a robust increase in K(+) and Cl(-) currents. A localized reduction in [Ca(2+)] at the apical PM after photolysis of Diazo-2, a caged Ca(2+) chelator, resulted in a decrease in both K(+) and Cl(-) currents. The K(+) currents evoked by apical photolysis were partially blocked by both paxilline and TRAM-34, specific blockers of large-conductance "maxi-K" (BK) and intermediate K (IK), respectively, and almost abolished by incubation with both antagonists. Apical TRAM-34-sensitive K(+) currents were also observed in BK-null parotid acini. In contrast, when the [Ca(2+)] was increased at the basal or lateral PM, no increase in either K(+) or Cl(-) currents was evoked. These data provide strong evidence that K and Cl channels are similarly distributed in the apical PM. Furthermore, both IK and BK channels are present in this domain, and the density of these channels appears higher in the apical versus basolateral PM. Collectively, this study provides support for a model in which fluid secretion is optimized after expression of K channels specifically in the apical PM.

  14. Stromal ETS2 Regulates Chemokine Production and Immune Cell Recruitment during Acinar-to-Ductal Metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Pitarresi, Jason R; Liu, Xin; Sharma, Sudarshana M; Cuitiño, Maria C; Kladney, Raleigh D; Mace, Thomas A; Donohue, Sydney; Nayak, Sunayana G; Qu, Chunjing; Lee, James; Woelke, Sarah A; Trela, Stefan; LaPak, Kyle; Yu, Lianbo; McElroy, Joseph; Rosol, Thomas J; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Lesinski, Gregory B; Fernandez, Soledad A; Konieczny, Stephen F; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical studies have suggested that the pancreatic tumor microenvironment both inhibits and promotes tumor development and growth. Here we establish the role of stromal fibroblasts during acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), an initiating event in pancreatic cancer formation. The transcription factor V-Ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) was elevated in smooth muscle actin-positive fibroblasts in the stroma of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patient tissue samples relative to normal pancreatic controls. LSL-Kras(G12D/+); LSL-Trp53(R172H/+); Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice showed that ETS2 expression initially increased in fibroblasts during ADM and remained elevated through progression to PDAC. Conditional ablation of Ets-2 in pancreatic fibroblasts in a Kras(G12D)-driven mouse ADM model decreased the amount of ADM events. ADMs from fibroblast Ets-2-deleted animals had reduced epithelial cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Surprisingly, fibroblast Ets-2 deletion significantly altered immune cell infiltration into the stroma, with an increased CD8+ T-cell population, and decreased presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and mature macrophages. The mechanism involved ETS2-dependent chemokine ligand production in fibroblasts. ETS2 directly bound to regulatory sequences for Ccl3, Ccl4, Cxcl4, Cxcl5, and Cxcl10, a group of chemokines that act as potent mediators of immune cell recruitment. These results suggest an unappreciated role for ETS2 in fibroblasts in establishing an immune-suppressive microenvironment in response to oncogenic Kras(G12D) signaling during the initial stages of tumor development. PMID:27659014

  15. Mechanisms involved in the inhibitory effect of chronic alcohol exposure on pancreatic acinar thiamin uptake.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Subramanian, Veedamali S; Said, Hamid M

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells (PAC) obtain thiamin from the circulation via a carrier-mediated process that involves thiamin transporters 1 and 2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; products of SLC19A2 and SLC19A3, respectively). Chronic alcohol exposure of PAC inhibits thiamin uptake, and, on the basis of in vitro studies, this inhibition appears to be transcriptionally mediated. The aim of this study was to confirm the involvement of a transcriptional mechanism in mediating the chronic alcohol effect in in vivo settings and to delineate the molecular mechanisms involved. Using transgenic mice carrying full-length SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters, we found that chronic alcohol feeding led to a significant reduction in the activity of SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters (as well as in thiamin uptake and expression of THTR-1 and -2). Similar findings were seen in 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol in vitro. In the latter studies, the alcohol inhibitory effect was found to be mediated via the minimal SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters and involved the cis-regulatory elements stimulating protein 1 (SP1)/gut-enriched Kruppel-like factor and SP1-GG-box and SP1/GC, respectively. Chronic alcohol exposure of PAC also led to a significant reduction in the expression of the SP1 transcription factor, which upon correction (via expression) led to the prevention of alcohol inhibitory effects on not only the activity of SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters but also on the expression of THTR-1 and -2 mRNA and thiamin uptake. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of chronic alcohol exposure on physiological/molecular parameters of thiamin uptake by PAC is mediated via specific cis-regulatory elements in SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 minimal promoters.

  16. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  17. Acinar cell carcinomas of the pancreas: a molecular analysis in a series of 57 cases.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Frank; Aulmann, Sebastian; Sipos, Bence; Kloor, Matthias; von Heydebreck, Anja; Schweipert, Johannes; Harjung, Andreas; Mayer, Philipp; Hartwig, Werner; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Capper, David; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Freier, Kolja; Herpel, Esther; Schleider, Anja; Schirmacher, Peter; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Klöppel, Günter; Bläker, Hendrik

    2014-12-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinomas (PACs) are rare but are distinct aggressive neoplasms that phenotypically differ from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs). Despite recent work on the genetic changes of PACs, their molecular pathogenesis is still poorly understood. In this study, we focus on a comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Based on frequent chromosomal imbalances, the involvement of DCC and c-MYC in the pathogenesis of PACs is further investigated. Moreover, we examine markers harboring potential therapeutic relevance (K-RAS, BRAF, EGFR, MGMT, HSP90, L1CAM, Her2). PACs revealed a microsatellite stable, chromosomal unstable genotype, defined by recurrent chromosomal losses of 1p, 3p, 4q, 5q, 6q, 8p, 9p, 11q, 13q, 16q, and 18, as well as gains of 1q, 7, 8q, 12, 17q, and 20q. Subsets of PAC displayed reduction/loss of DCC (79 %) and c-MYC-amplification (17 %). Significant EGFR expression occurred in 42 %, HSP90 expression in 98 %, L1CAM expression in 72 %, and loss of MGMT in 26 %. Two cases carried a K-RAS mutation. Mutations of EGFR or BRAF were not detected. All cases were Her2/neu-negative. PACs display characteristic chromosomal imbalances which are distinctly different from those in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. Our findings suggest that DCC and c-MYC alterations may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PACs. Furthermore, EGFR, MGMT, HSP90, and L1CAM may be useful as therapeutic markers and predictors of response to therapy in a subset of PACs. PMID:25298229

  18. DOG1: a novel marker of salivary acinar and intercalated duct differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chênevert, Jacinthe; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Chiosea, Simion; Dacic, Sanja; Cieply, Kathleen; Kim, Jean; Shiwarski, Daniel; Seethala, Raja R

    2012-07-01

    Anoctamin-1 (ANO1) (DOG1, TMEM16a) is a calcium-activated chloride channel initially described in gastrointestinal stromal tumors, but now known to be expressed in a variety of normal and tumor tissues including salivary tissue in murine models. We herein perform a comprehensive survey of DOG1 expression in 156 cases containing non-neoplastic human salivary tissues and tumors. ANO1 mRNA levels were significantly higher (8-fold increase, P<0.0001) in normal parotid tissue (n=6) as compared with squamous mucosa (n=15). By immunohistochemistry, DOG1 showed a diffuse moderate (2+) apical membranous staining pattern in normal serous acini, 1+ apical membranous pattern in mucous acini, and variable 1-2+ apical staining of distal intercalated ducts. Myoepithelial cells, striated and excretory ducts were invariably negative. All acinic cell carcinomas (n=28) were DOG1 positive demonstrating a complex mixture of intense (3+) apical membranous, cytoplasmic and complete membranous staining. Most ductal tumor types were negative or only showed a subset of positive cases. Within the biphasic tumor category, adenoid cystic carcinomas (18/24 cases) and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinomas (8/15 cases) were frequently positive, often showing a distinctive combined apical ductal and membranous/cytoplasmic myoepithelial staining profile. Thus, DOG1 staining is a marker of salivary acinar and to a lesser extent intercalated duct differentiation. Strong staining can be used to support the diagnosis of acinic cell carcinoma. DOG1 may also be a marker of a 'transformed' myoepithelial phenotype in a subset of biphasic salivary gland malignancies.

  19. Ca²⁺ signaling and regulation of fluid secretion in salivary gland acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Ambudkar, Indu S

    2014-06-01

    Neurotransmitter stimulation of plasma membrane receptors stimulates salivary gland fluid secretion via a complex process that is determined by coordinated temporal and spatial regulation of several Ca(2+) signaling processes as well as ion flux systems. Studies over the past four decades have demonstrated that Ca(2+) is a critical factor in the control of salivary gland function. Importantly, critical components of this process have now been identified, including plasma membrane receptors, calcium channels, and regulatory proteins. The key event in activation of fluid secretion is an increase in intracellular [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) triggered by IP3-induced release of Ca(2+) from ER via the IP3R. This increase regulates the ion fluxes required to drive vectorial fluid secretion. IP3Rs determine the site of initiation and the pattern of [Ca(2+)]i signal in the cell. However, Ca(2+) entry into the cell is required to sustain the elevation of [Ca(2+)]i and fluid secretion. This Ca(2+) influx pathway, store-operated calcium influx pathway (SOCE), has been studied in great detail and the regulatory mechanisms as well as key molecular components have now been identified. Orai1, TRPC1, and STIM1 are critical components of SOCE and among these, Ca(2+) entry via TRPC1 is a major determinant of fluid secretion. The receptor-evoked Ca(2+) signal in salivary gland acinar cells is unique in that it starts at the apical pole and then rapidly increases across the cell. The basis for the polarized Ca(2+) signal can be ascribed to the polarized arrangement of the Ca(2+) channels, transporters, and signaling proteins. Distinct localization of these proteins in the cell suggests compartmentalization of Ca(2+) signals during regulation of fluid secretion. This chapter will discuss new concepts and findings regarding the polarization and control of Ca(2+) signals in the regulation of fluid secretion.

  20. Expression, localization, and functional role for synaptotagmins in pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Falkowski, Michelle A.; Thomas, Diana D. H.; Messenger, Scott W.; Martin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Secretagogue-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ play a pivotal role in secretion in pancreatic acini yet the molecules that respond to Ca2+ are uncertain. Zymogen granule (ZG) exocytosis is regulated by soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes. In nerve and endocrine cells, Ca2+-stimulated exocytosis is regulated by the SNARE-associated family of proteins termed synaptotagmins. This study examined a potential role for synaptotagmins in acinar secretion. RT-PCR revealed that synaptotagmin isoforms 1, 3, 6, and 7 are present in isolated acini. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence using three different antibodies demonstrated synaptotagmin 1 immunoreactivity in apical cytoplasm and ZG fractions of acini, where it colocalized with vesicle-associated membrane protein 2. Synaptotagmin 3 immunoreactivity was detected in membrane fractions and colocalized with an endolysosomal marker. A potential functional role for synaptotagmin 1 in secretion was indicated by results that introduction of synaptotagmin 1 C2AB domain into permeabilized acini inhibited Ca2+-dependent exocytosis by 35%. In contrast, constructs of synaptotagmin 3 had no effect. Confirmation of these findings was achieved by incubating intact acini with an antibody specific to the intraluminal domain of synaptotagmin 1, which is externalized following exocytosis. Externalized synaptotagmin 1 was detected exclusively along the apical membrane. Treatment with CCK-8 (100 pM, 5 min) enhanced immunoreactivity by fourfold, demonstrating that synaptotagmin is inserted into the apical membrane during ZG fusion. Collectively, these data indicate that acini express synaptotagmin 1 and support that it plays a functional role in secretion whereas synaptotagmin 3 has an alternative role in endolysosomal membrane trafficking. PMID:21636530

  1. Prostate response to prolactin in sexually active male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Elena; Soto-Cid, Abraham; Rojas, Fausto; Pascual, Luz I; Aranda-Abreu, Gonzalo E; Toledo, Rebeca; Garcia, Luis I; Quintanar-Stephano, Andres; Manzo, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    the detrimental effects produced by constant levels. However, we showed that minor elevations of prolactin which do not affect the sexual behaviour of males, produced significant changes at the prostate epithelium that could account for triggering the development of hyperplasia or cancer. Thus, it is suggested that minute elevations of serum prolactin in healthy subjects are at the etiology of prostate abnormal growth. PMID:16707016

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein-6 is a marker of serous acinar cell differentiation in normal and neoplastic human salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Heikinheimo, K A; Laine, M A; Ritvos, O V; Voutilainen, R J; Hogan, B L; Leivo, I V; Heikinheimo, A K

    1999-11-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-6, also known as vegetal-pale-gene-related and decaplentaplegic-vegetal-related) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of multifunctional signaling molecules. BMP-6 appears to play various biological roles in developing tissues, including regulation of epithelial differentiation. To study the possible involvement of BMP-6 in normal and neoplastic human salivary glands, we compared its mRNA and protein expression in 4 fetal and 15 adult salivary glands and in 22 benign and 32 malignant salivary gland tumors. In situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis indicated that BMP-6 transcripts are expressed at low levels in acinar cells of adult submandibular glands but not in ductal or stromal cells. BMP-6 was immunolocated specifically in serous acini of parotid and submandibular glands. None was found in primitive fetal acini or any other types of cell in adult salivary glands, including mucous acini and epithelial cells of intercalated, striated, and excretory ducts. All 16 cases of acinic cell carcinoma consistently exhibited cytoplasmic BMP-6 staining in the acinar tumor cells. Other cell types in these tumors, including intercalated duct-like cells, clear, vacuolated cells, and nonspecific glandular cells, exhibited no cytoplasmic BMP-6 staining. Other benign and malignant salivary gland tumors lacked BMP-6 immunoreactivity, except in areas of squamous differentiation. The results indicate that in salivary glands, BMP-6 expression is uniquely associated with acinar cell differentiation and suggest that BMP-6 may play a role in salivary gland function. More importantly, our experience of differential diagnostic problems related to salivary gland tumors suggests that the demonstration of consistent and specific BMP-6 immunoreactivity in acinic cell carcinoma is likely to be of clinical value.

  3. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  4. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence. PMID:24188663

  5. Assessment of Prostatism

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Peter H.

    1978-01-01

    Prostatism is a syndrome associated with outlet obstruction at the bladder neck and the commonest cause is benign prostatic hypertrophy. The main indications for investigation and treatment are these symptoms (especially nocturia). The diagnosis should then be confirmed by the physical signs such as an enlarged gland or palpable bladder. If other causes of these symptoms are eliminated, the patient should be referred to a urologist to confirm, through cystoscopy, signs of an obstructing prostate and bladder trabeculation. The surgery (TUR or open) for benign disease leaves the capsules behind and the patient should still be followed with routine rectal examinations for early detection of malignancy. PMID:21301523

  6. Biochemical studies of the tracheobronchial epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, M.J.; Kaufman, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    Tracheobronchial epithelium has been a focus of intense investigation in the field of chemical carcinogenesis. We have reviewed some biochemical investigations that have evolved through linkage with carcinogenesis research. These areas of investigation have included kinetics of carcinogen metabolism, identification of carcinogen metabolites, levels of carcinogen binding to DNA, and analysis of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Such studies appear to have provided a reasonable explanation for the susceptibilities of the respiratory tracts of rats and hamsters to carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene. Coinciding with the attempts to understand the initiation of carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract has also been a major thrust aimed at effecting its prevention both in humans and in animal models for human bronchogenic carcinoma. These studies have concerned the effects of derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) and their influence on normal cell biology and biochemistry of this tissue. Recent investigations have included the effects of retinoid deficiency on the synthesis of RNA and the identification of RNA species associated with this biological state, and also have included the effects of retinoids on the synthesis of mucus-related glycoproteins. Tracheal organ cultures from retinoid-deficient hamsters have been used successfully to indicate the potency of synthetic retinoids by monitoring the reversal of squamous metaplasia. Techniques applied to this tissue have also served to elucidate features of the metabolism of retinoic acid using high pressure liquid chromatography. 94 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Stem cells of the skin epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Laura; Fuchs, Elaine

    2003-01-01

    Tissue stem cells form the cellular base for organ homeostasis and repair. Stem cells have the unusual ability to renew themselves over the lifetime of the organ while producing daughter cells that differentiate into one or multiple lineages. Difficult to identify and characterize in any tissue, these cells are nonetheless hotly pursued because they hold the potential promise of therapeutic reprogramming to grow human tissue in vitro, for the treatment of human disease. The mammalian skin epithelium exhibits remarkable turnover, punctuated by periods of even more rapid production after injury due to burn or wounding. The stem cells responsible for supplying this tissue with cellular substrate are not yet easily distinguishable from neighboring cells. However, in recent years a significant body of work has begun to characterize the skin epithelial stem cells, both in tissue culture and in mouse and human skin. Some epithelial cells cultured from skin exhibit prodigious proliferative potential; in fact, for >20 years now, cultured human skin has been used as a source of new skin to engraft onto damaged areas of burn patients, representing one of the first therapeutic uses of stem cells. Cell fate choices, including both self-renewal and differentiation, are crucial biological features of stem cells that are still poorly understood. Skin epithelial stem cells represent a ripe target for research into the fundamental mechanisms underlying these important processes. PMID:12913119

  8. Human vomeronasal epithelium development: An immunohistochemical overview.

    PubMed

    Dénes, Lóránd; Pap, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, Annamária; Gergely, István; Pop, Tudor Sorin

    2015-06-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor structure of the vomeronasal system (VNS) in vertebrates. It is found bilaterally in the submucosa of the inferior part of the nasal septum. There are ongoing controversies regarding the functionality of this organ in humans. In this study we propose the immunohistochemical evaluation of changes in components of the human vomeronasal epithelium during foetal development. We used 45 foetuses of different age, which were included in three age groups. After VNO identification immunohistochemical reactions were performed using primary antibodies against the following: neuron specific enolase, calretinin, neurofilament, chromogranin, synaptophysin, cytokeratin 7, pan-cytokeratin and S100 protein. Digital slides were obtained and following colorimetric segmentation, surface area measurements were performed. The VNO was found in less than half of the studied specimens (42.2%). Neuron specific enolase and calretinin immunoexpression showed a decreasing trend with foetal age, while the other neural/neuroendocrine markers were negative in all specimens. Cytokeratin 7 expression increased with age, while Pan-Ctk had no significant variations. S100 protein immunoexpression also decreased around the VNO. The results of the present work uphold the theory of regression of the neuroepithelium that is present during initial stages of foetal development.

  9. Glucose metabolism in rat retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2006-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major transport pathway for exchange of metabolites and ions between choroidal blood supply and the neural retina. To gain insight into the mechanisms controlling glucose metabolism in RPE and its possible relationship to retinopathy, we studied the influence of different glucose concentrations on glycogen and lactate levels and CO(2) production in RPE from normal and streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Incubation of normal RPE in the absence of glucose caused a decrease in lactate production and glycogen content. In normal RPE, increasing glucose concentrations from 5.6 mM to 30 mM caused a four-fold increase in glucose accumulation and CO(2) yield, as well as reduction in lactate and glycogen production. In RPE from diabetic rats glucose accumulation did not increase in the presence of high glucose substrate, but it showed a four- and a seven-fold increase in CO(2) production through the mitochondrial and pentose phosphate pathways, respectively. We found high glycogen levels in RPE which can be used as an energy reserve for RPE itself and/or neural retina. Findings further show that the RPE possesses a high oxidative capacity. The large increase in glucose shunting to the pentose phosphate pathway in diabetic retina exposed to high glucose suggests a need for reducing capacity, consistent with increased oxidative stress. PMID:16475003

  10. Cell Jamming in the Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Hallmarks of asthma include chronic airway inflammation, progressive airway remodeling, and airway hyperresponsiveness. The initiation and perpetuation of these processes are attributable at least in part to critical events within the airway epithelium, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. New evidence now suggests that epithelial cells derived from donors without asthma versus donors with asthma, even in the absence of inflammatory cells or mediators, express modes of collective migration that innately differ not only in the amount of migration but also in the kind of migration. The maturing cell layer tends to undergo a transition from a hypermobile, fluid-like, unjammed phase in which cells readily rearrange, exchange places, and flow, to a quiescent, solid-like, jammed phase in which cells become virtually frozen in place. Moreover, the unjammed phase defines a phenotype that can be perpetuated by the compressive stresses caused by bronchospasm. Importantly, in cells derived from donors with asthma versus donors without asthma, this jamming transition becomes substantially delayed, thus suggesting an immature or dysmature epithelial phenotype in asthma. PMID:27027955

  11. Changes in the adult vertebrate auditory sensory epithelium after trauma.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Elizabeth C

    2013-03-01

    Auditory hair cells transduce sound vibrations into membrane potential changes, ultimately leading to changes in neuronal firing and sound perception. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and repair capabilities of traumatized auditory sensory epithelium in the adult vertebrate ear. Injured mammalian auditory epithelium repairs itself by forming permanent scars but is unable to regenerate replacement hair cells. In contrast, injured non-mammalian vertebrate ear generates replacement hair cells to restore hearing functions. Non-sensory support cells within the auditory epithelium play key roles in the repair processes.

  12. [Ovarian surface epithelium and its histogenic relation to ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Dietl, J; Buchholz, F; Stoll, P

    1986-09-01

    Approximately 80 to 90 per cent of adult ovarian cancers are assumed to originate from ovarian surface cells. A series of morphological and biochemical studies has been recently conducted to test this. The ovarian surface epithelium shows permanent morphological changes such as crypts, inclusion cysts, villous processes and different forms of müllerian epithelium. The unique nature of ovarian surface changes and their abrupt disappearance in immediately adjacent mesothelia suggest that local factors may play an important part in modifying the growth and morphogenesis of the epithelium of the ovarian surface. Whether these endogenous and/or exogenous factors may also induce surface neoplasia is a moot point.

  13. Intracellular transport of nanocarriers across the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weiwei; Xia, Dengning; Zhu, Quanlei; Hu, Lei; Gan, Yong

    2016-05-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the main barrier restricting the oral delivery of low-permeability drugs. Over recent years, numerous nanocarriers have been designed to improve the efficiency of oral drug delivery. However, the intracellular processes determining the transport of nanocarriers across the intestinal epithelium remain elusive, and only limited enhancement of the oral bioavailability of drugs has been achieved. Here, we review the processes involved in nanocarrier trafficking across the intestinal epithelium, including apical endocytosis, intracellular transport, and basolateral exocytosis. Understanding the complex intracellular processes of nanocarrier trafficking is particularly essential for the rational design of oral drug delivery systems. PMID:27094490

  14. Targeting androgen receptor to suppress macrophage-induced EMT and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tianjing; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Wang, Xiaohai; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Li, Lei; Jiang, Qi; Jin, Jie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-10-01

    Early studies suggested macrophages might play roles in inflammation-associated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we first showed that CD68(+) macrophages were identified in both epithelium and the stromal area of human BPH tissues. We then established an in vitro co-culture model with prostate epithelial and macrophage cell lines to study the potential impacts of infiltrating macrophages in the BPH development and found that co-culturing prostate epithelial cells with macrophages promoted migration of macrophages. In a three-dimensional culture system, the sphere diameter of BPH-1 prostate cells was significantly increased during coculture with THP-1 macrophage cells. Mechanism dissection suggested that expression levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as N-cadherin, Snail, and TGF-β2, were increased, and administration of anti-TGF-β2 neutralizing antibody during co-culture suppressed the EMT and THP-1-mediated growth of BPH-1 cells, suggesting THP-1 might go through EMT to influence the BPH development and progression. Importantly, we found that modulation of androgen receptor (AR) in BPH-1 and mPrE cells significantly increased THP-1 and RAW264.7 cell migration, respectively, and enhanced expression levels of EMT markers, suggesting that AR in prostate epithelial cells might play a role in promoting macrophage-mediated EMT in prostate epithelial cells. Silencing AR function via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, decreased the macrophage migration to BPH-1 cells and suppressed EMT marker expression. Together, these results provide the first evidence to demonstrate that prostate epithelial AR function is important for macrophage-mediated EMT and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells, which represents a previously unrecognized role of AR in the cross-talk between macrophages and prostate epithelial cells. These results may provide new insights for a new therapeutic

  15. Gastric adenocarcinoma with prostatic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Roshni, S; Anoop, Tm; Preethi, Tr; Shubanshu, G; Lijeesh, Al

    2014-06-01

    Metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma to the prostate gland is extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old man with prostatic metastasis diagnosed through the analysis of biopsy specimens from representative lesions in the stomach and prostate gland. Immunohistochemistry of the prostatic tissue showed positive staining for cytokeratin 7 and negative staining for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), whereas the serum PSA level was normal, confirming the diagnosis of prostatic metastasis from carcinoma of the stomach. PMID:25061542

  16. Gastric Adenocarcinoma with Prostatic Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Roshni, S; Preethi, TR; Shubanshu, G; Lijeesh, AL

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis of gastric adenocarcinoma to the prostate gland is extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of gastric adenocarcinoma in a 56-year-old man with prostatic metastasis diagnosed through the analysis of biopsy specimens from representative lesions in the stomach and prostate gland. Immunohistochemistry of the prostatic tissue showed positive staining for cytokeratin 7 and negative staining for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), whereas the serum PSA level was normal, confirming the diagnosis of prostatic metastasis from carcinoma of the stomach. PMID:25061542

  17. Prostate-specific targeting of the aqueous root extract of Croton membranaceus in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Afriyie, D K; Asare, G A; Bugyei, K; Asiedu-Gyekye, I J; Tackie, R; Adjei, S

    2014-09-01

    Croton membranaceus Müll.Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) is used for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) treatment. The study aimed at investigating organs that the aqueous root extracts of C. membranaceus (CMARE) target, which is absent in literature. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats (100-140 g) were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group 1, the control group received distilled water. Groups 2, 3 and 4 received 30, 150 and 300 mg kg(-1) b.wt CMARE respectively (oral gavage). Rats fed 90 days the standard chow diet ad libitum. Upon sacrifice, major organs were histologically examined and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) biochemically determined. Only the prostate was abnormal. Histologically, H&E staining revealed thickness and infoldings of the epithelial cells shrinking with increasing dose. The 30 mg kg(-1) group showed low columnar or flattened epithelium cells, whereas the columnar epithelium infoldings of the 150 mg kg(-1) b.wt and 300 mg kg(-1) b.wt groups were virtually nonexistent. The acini of the control, 30 mg kg(-1) b.wt group and the 150 mg kg(-1) b.wt groups showed clear pinkish secretion. However, secretion of the high-dose group appeared light pink in colour and the stroma cells appeared much darker than all the treated and control group. C. membranaceus targets the prostate with significant PSA reduction (P < 0.01).

  18. MRI of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted electronically, printed or copied to a CD. The prostate gland is part of the male reproductive system. It is located in front of the rectum ...

  19. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close About Us Our Story A Legacy of Leadership About the Prostate Cancer Foundation CEO Message Why ... Cancer Board of Directors Annual Report & Financials Our Leadership Leadership Team A Legacy of Leadership Featured Take ...

  20. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rittmaster, Roger S

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, many more men are diagnosed with prostate cancer then die of the disease. This increase in diagnosis has led to aggressive treatment of indolent disease in many individuals and has been the impetus for finding a means of reducing the risk of prostate cancer. In the past decade, there have been eight large trials of prostate cancer risk reduction using dietary supplements, 5α-reductase inhibitors, or anti-estrogens. The only two trials which have demonstrated efficacy are those involving 5α-reductase inhibitors: the PCPT (finasteride) and REDUCE (dutasteride). This review examines prostate cancer risk reduction, with emphasis on conclusions that can be drawn from these two landmark studies. PMID:21604953

  1. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Andrew J; Abouassaly, Robert; Klein, Eric A

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is an appropriate target for primary chemoprevention because of its ubiquity, disease-related mortality, treatment-related morbidity, and long latency period. The PCPT and REDUCE trials demonstrate that this cancer can be prevented by a relatively nontoxic oral pharmacologic agent (5alpha-reductase inhibitors). Evidence from the SELECT trial argues against the recommendation of the use of vitamins and micronutrients as chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Dietary modification may substantially alter a man's risk of prostate cancer, but the specific dietary manipulations that are necessary are poorly defined and these may need to be instituted in early adulthood to be successful. 5alpha-reductase inhibitors represent an effective primary prevention strategy, and these agents should be used more liberally for the prevention of prostate cancer, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:20152515

  2. Chronic prostatitis: management strategies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Adam B; Macejko, Amanda; Taylor, Aisha; Nadler, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has redefined prostatitis into four distinct entities. Category I is acute bacterial prostatitis. It is an acute prostatic infection with a uropathogen, often with systemic symptoms of fever, chills and hypotension. The treatment hinges on antimicrobials and drainage of the bladder because the inflamed prostate may block urinary flow. Category II prostatitis is called chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of documented urinary tract infections with the same uropathogen and causes pelvic pain, urinary symptoms and ejaculatory pain. It is diagnosed by means of localization cultures that are 90% accurate in localizing the source of recurrent infections within the lower urinary tract. Asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis comprises NIH category IV. This entity is, by definition, asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally during the evaluation of infertility or prostate cancer. The clinical significance of category IV prostatitis is unknown and it is often left untreated. Category III prostatitis is called chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). It is characterized by pelvic pain for more than 3 of the previous 6 months, urinary symptoms and painful ejaculation, without documented urinary tract infections from uropathogens. The syndrome can be devastating, affecting 10-15% of the male population, and results in nearly 2 million outpatient visits each year. The aetiology of CP/CPPS is poorly understood, but may be the result of an infectious or inflammatory initiator that results in neurological injury and eventually results in pelvic floor dysfunction in the form of increased pelvic muscle tone. The diagnosis relies on separating this entity from chronic bacterial prostatitis. If there is no history of documented urinary tract infections with a urinary tract pathogen, then cultures should be taken when patients are symptomatic. Prostatic localization cultures, called the

  3. Prostate cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment of prostate cancer varies depending on the stage of the cancer (i.e., spread) and may include surgical removal, radiation, chemotherapy, hormonal manipulation or a combination of these treatments.

  4. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  5. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the more likely he is to develop the disease. Physician: Come on back, first room. Narrator: Most ... cancer. Prostate cancer is really a spectrum of diseases where on one end of the spectrum there ...

  6. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... enlarges in size in a process called benign hypertrophy, which means that the gland got larger without ... in several of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH. Symptoms may include a slowed or ...

  7. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... abnormal and raises the index of suspicion that cancer may be present. Narrator: While the use of ... examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it ...

  8. Selective estrogen receptor modulators regulate stromal proliferation in human benign prostatic hyperplasia by multiple beneficial mechanisms--action of two new agents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sarswat, Amit; Maikhuri, J P; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Rajeev K; Sharma, V L; Dalela, Diwakar; Gupta, Gopal

    2012-04-01

    The existing drugs for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are partially effective with undesirable side-effects; hence new agents acting by different mechanism(s) are required as supplements. Modulation of estrogen receptor signaling using selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) offers an alternative approach for BPH management. Using human BPH-derived stromal cells and tissue explants in culture we evaluated two SERMs, DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2 H-1-benzopyran (BP) and Ormeloxifene (Orm) in comparison to Tamoxifen (Tam) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). BP, OHT and Tam were more effective than Orm in reducing stromal cell proliferation of human BPH. BP was either equipotent or more effective than OHT and Tam in increasing estrogen receptor(ER)-ß, TGFß1, Fas and FasL, and in decreasing ER-α, AR, EGF-R and IGF-I expressions in BPH stromal cells. BP, Tam and Orm (1.0 mg/Kg) reduced rat prostate weights by almost same extent as Finasteride (Fin, 5.0 mg/Kg); however combination treatment (SERM+Fin) was more effective. BP was exceptionally efficient in reducing IGF-1 and cleaving PARP while combination treatments more effectively increased bax:bcl-2 ratio. Fin reduced acinar diameter and prostatic DHT level but increased testosterone, estradiol (E(2)) and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. SERMs, especially BP, reduced epithelial cell height drastically without significantly altering steroid hormone levels and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. Combination treatment reduced both acinar diameter and epithelial cell height with modest increase in E(2), T and E(2)/T+DHT. The study reveals the potential of SERMs per se for BPH management, and more effectively in combination with a 5α-reductase inhibitor. BP appears promising for further evaluation as a drug candidate for BPH and prostate cancer.

  9. Splice variant PRKC-ζ-PrC is a novel biomarker of human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Ireland, S J; Bee, A; Beesley, C; Forootan, S S; Dodson, A; Dickinson, T; Gerard, P; Lian, L-Y; Risk, J M; Smith, P; Malki, M I; Ke, Y; Cooper, C S; Gosden, C; Foster, C S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously, using gene-knockdown techniques together with genome expression array analysis, we showed the gene protein Kinase C (PKC)-zeta (PRKCZ) to mediate the malignant phenotype of human prostate cancer. However, according to NCBI, the gene has undergone several major iterations. Therefore, to understand the relationship between its structure and biological activities, we have analysed its expressed sequence in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues. Methods: Transcriptome-walking and targeted PCR were used to sequence the mRNA transcribed from PRKCZ. Hydropathy analysis was employed to analyse the hypothetical protein sequence subsequently translated and to identify an appropriate epitope to generate a specific monoclonal antibody. Results: A novel sequence was identified within the 3′-terminal domain of human PRKCZ that, in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues, is expressed during transcription and thereafter translated into protein (designated PKC-ζ-PrC) independent of conventional PKC-ζ-a. The monoclonal antibody detected expression of this 96 kD protein only within malignant prostatic epithelium. Interpretation: Transcription and translation of this gene sequence, including previous intronic sequences, generates a novel specific biomarker of human prostate cancer. The presence of catalytic domains characteristic of classic PKC-β and atypical PKC-ι within PKC-ζ-PrC provides a potential mechanism for this PRKCZ variant to modulate the malignant prostatic phenotype out-with normal cell-regulatory control. PMID:22644296

  10. Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects of Withania coagulans Extract on Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarbishegi, Maryam; Khani, Mohaddeseh; Salimi, Saeedeh; Valizadeh, Mohharam; Sargolzaei Aval, Fereydoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a common urological disorder in elderly men. Phytotherapy is frequently used to alleviate the symptoms of this condition. Objectives: The present study investigated the effect of Withania coagulans extract (WCE), which is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, and anti-cancer properties, on testosterone-induced BPH in rats. Materials and Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into five groups (each n = 8): the control group, the untreated BPH group, and three WCE-treated groups (WCE250, 500, and 1000). BPH was induced with 3 mg/kg subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate for four weeks. WCE was concomitantly administrated by oral gavage. At the end of the induction schedule, the animals were sacrificed and their prostate glands were dissected, weighed, and fixed for histological examination (H&E and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA] staining). Half of each sample was prepared for measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels in the prostate. Results: The present study revealed that BPH caused elevation of MDA levels, suppression of TAC levels, and increased PCNA expression in the prostate gland. Interestingly, in a dose-dependent manner, WCE caused decreased MDA levels and increased TAC levels in the prostate gland, compared to the untreated BPH group. Histopathological examinations showed a reduction in PCNA expression in the prostate epithelium of the WCE animals. Conclusions: W. coagulans inhibits the development of BPH can be useful for the treatment of this condition. PMID:26981498

  11. Prostate cancer. Foreword.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiten R H

    2014-11-01

    Professor Hiten Patel is an expert in Laparoscopic and Robotic Surgery for treating prostate disease. He is also a leading researcher in basic science and `clinical research. His basic science research is focused on studying the pathways for improving prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis through biomarker application, and his clinical research includes new technology applications for training surgeons and improving patient care outcome. Prof Patel is also Chairman of the Urology group for the Enhanced Recovery after Surgery Society.

  12. Ultrastructural study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium.

    PubMed

    Aihara, M

    1989-01-01

    An electron microscopical study of grafted autologous cultured human epithelium is presented. Biopsy samples were collected from four patients with full thickness burns at 9 days, 6 weeks and 5-21 months after grafting of the cultured epithelium. By the sixth week after transplantation, grafted cultured epithelial sheets had developed to consist of 10 to 20 layers of cells and the epithelium showed distinct basal, spinous, granular and horny layers, and a patchy basement membrane had formed. Langerhans cells and melanocytes were identifiable. From 5 months onwards flat basal cells became oval, and oval keratohyalin granules in the keratinocytes also assumed a normal irregular shape. Membrane-coating granules in the keratinocytes increased in number. The fine structures of desmosomes also showed a normal mature appearance. Furthermore, complete extension of the basement membrane could be observed. The maturation of cultured human epithelium is complete by 5 months after grafting.

  13. Quantitative description of the spatial arrangement of organelles in a polarised secretory epithelial cell: the salivary gland acinar cell

    PubMed Central

    MAYHEW, TERRY M.

    1999-01-01

    Previous quantitative descriptions of cellular ultrastructure have focused on spatial content (volume, surface area and number of organelles and membrane domains). It is possible to complement such descriptions by also quantifying spatial arrangements. Hitherto, applications of stereological methods for achieving this (notably, estimation of covariance and pair correlation functions) have been confined to organ and tissue levels. This study explores 3-dimensional subcellular arrangements of key organelles within acinar cells of rabbit parotid salivary glands, highly polarised epithelial cells specialised for exocrine secretion of α-amylase. It focuses on spatial arrangements of secretion product stores (zymogen granules), rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and mitochondria. Systematic random samples of electron microscopical fields of view from 3 rabbits were analysed using test grids bearing linear dipole probes of different sizes. Unbiased estimates of organelle volume densities were obtained by point counting and estimates of covariance and pair correlation functions by dipole counting. Plots of pair correlation functions against dipole length identified spatial arrangement differences between organelle types. Volumes within RER and mitochondrial compartments were positively correlated with themselves at distances below 4 μm and 2 μm respectively but were essentially randomly arranged at longer distances. In sharp contrast, zymogen granules were not randomly arranged. They were clustered at distances below 6–7 μm and more widely scattered at greater distances. These findings provide quantitative confirmation of the polarised arrangement of zymogen granules within acinar cells and further support for the relative invariance of biological organisation between subjects. PMID:10337960

  14. The perinuclear space of pancreatic acinar cells and the synthetic pathway of zymogen in Scorpaena scrofa L.: ultrastructural aspects.

    PubMed

    Gilloteaux, Jacques; Kashouty, Rabih; Yono, Noor

    2008-02-01

    Electron microscopic examination of exocrine pancreatic tissues from the fish Scorpaena scrofa L., probably captured while replenishing the acinar cells, shows two main functional cell morphologies of the same cell type. One cell functional aspect contains numerous well-contrasted small vesicles, the zymogenic vesicles. The other functional morphology is mainly represented by a few cells containing large apical zymogen vesicles with many empty RER cisterns. In our observations, the zymogenic vesicles are always studded with ribosomes. The main cytological finding is to report that zymogenic vesicles can be extruded from the perinuclear space and it confirms the suspected, synthetic activity of this cell compartment. The pool of zymogenic vesicles, maintaining their coat of ribosomes, then fuses and transfers their content into the cis Golgi complex network. Finally, the zymogen vesicles are produced following the classical secretory pathway from the trans Golgi saccular network into the supranuclear, apical region of the acinar cells where the largest vesicles concentrate their content until secretion. PMID:17961618

  15. p21-Activated kinase 6 (PAK6) inhibits prostate cancer growth via phosphorylation of androgen receptor and tumorigenic E3 ligase murine double minute-2 (Mdm2).

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Li, Yang; Gu, Hui; Zhu, Ge; Li, Jiabin; Cao, Liu; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the development and growth of prostate malignancies. Regulation of AR homeostasis in prostate tumorigenesis has not yet been fully characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) inhibits prostate tumorigenesis by regulating AR homeostasis. First, we demonstrated that in normal prostate epithelium, AR co-localizes with PAK6 in the cytoplasm and translocates into the nucleus in malignant prostate. Furthermore, AR phosphorylation at Ser-578 by PAK6 promotes AR-E3 ligase murine double minute-2 (Mdm2) association, causing AR degradation upon androgen stimuli. We also showed that PAK6 phosphorylates Mdm2 on Thr-158 and Ser-186, which is critical for AR ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Moreover, we found that Thr-158 collaborates with Ser-186 for AR-Mdm2 association and AR ubiquitin-mediated degradation as it facilitates PAK6-mediated AR homeostasis. PAK6 knockdown promotes prostate tumor growth in vivo. Interestingly, we found a strong inverse correlation between PAK6 and AR expression in the cytoplasm of prostate cancer cells. These observations indicate that PAK6 may be important for the maintenance of androgen-induced AR signaling homeostasis and in prostate malignancy, as well as being a possible new therapeutic target for AR-positive and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

  16. Comprehensive microRNA Profiling of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walter, Beatriz A; Valera, Vladimir A; Pinto, Peter A; Merino, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that have been shown to regulate the expression of genes linked to cancer. The relevance of microRNAs in the development, progression and prognosis of prostate cancer is not fully understood. It is also possible that these specific molecules may assist in the recognition of aggressive tumors and the development of new molecular targets. Our study investigated the importance of several microRNAs in cases of prostate cancer from 37 patients that were manually microdissected to obtain pure populations of tumor cells, normal epithelium and adjacent stroma. MicroRNA was extracted for PCR array profiling. Differentially expressed miRNAs for each case were used to compare tumor vs. normal epithelium and tumor-adjacent stroma samples. Loss of 18 miRNAs (e.g.miR-34c, miR-29b, miR-212 and miR-10b) and upregulation of miR-143 and miR-146b were significantly found in all the tumors in comparison with normal epithelium and/or stroma (p≤ 0.001). A different signature was found in the high grade tumors (Gleason score ≥ 8) when compared with tumors Gleason score 6. Upregulation of miR-122, miR-335, miR-184, miR-193, miR-34, miR-138, miR-373, miR-9, miR-198, miR-144 and miR-215 and downregulation of miR-96, miR-222, miR-148, miR-92, miR-27, miR-125, miR-126, miR-27 were found in the high grade tumors. MicroRNA profiling in prostate cancer appears to have unique expression patterns in comparison with normal tissue. These differential expressed miRNAs may provide novel diagnostic and prognostic tools that will assist in the recognition of prostate cancers with aggressive behavior.

  17. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  18. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  19. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  20. Computed tomography of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Van Engelshoven, J M; Kreel, L

    1979-02-01

    The conventional anatomy of the prostate is reviewed and the computed tomography (CT) anatomy described and illustrated. The results of 55 "normal" cases were analyzed for size and relationship to the symphysis pubis, retropubic space, and bladder, as shown on CT sections correlating the features with age and possible urinary symptoms. Attention is also drawn to the differences between phleboliths and prostatic calcification. Computed tomography is an effective method of demonstrating the prostate and surrounding structures and of assessing prostatic enlargement.

  1. CCN6 knockdown disrupts acinar organization of breast cells in three-dimensional cultures through up-regulation of type III TGF-β receptor.

    PubMed

    Pal, Anupama; Huang, Wei; Toy, Kathy A; Kleer, Celina G

    2012-11-01

    While normal cells in the human breast are organized into acinar structures, disruption of the acinar architecture is a hallmark of cancer. In a three-dimensional model of morphogenesis, we show that down-regulation of the matrix-associated tumor suppressor protein CCN6 (WNT1-inducible-signaling pathway protein 3) disrupts breast epithelial cell polarity and organization into acini through up-regulation of the type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII or betaglycan). Down-regulation of CCN6 in benign breast cells led to loss of tissue polarity and resulted in cellular disorganization with loss of α6 integrin-rich basement membrane and the basolateral polarity protein E-cadherin. Silencing of TβRIII with shRNA and siRNA rescued the ability of breast epithelial cells to form polarized acinar structures with reduced matrix invasion and restored the correct expression of α6 integrin and E-cadherin. Conversely, CCN6 overexpression in aggressive breast cancer cells reduced TβRIII in vitro and in a xenograft model of CCN6 overexpression. The relevance of our studies to human breast cancer is highlighted by the finding that CCN6 protein levels are inversely associated with TβRIII protein in 64%of invasive breast carcinomas. These results reveal a novel function of the matricellular protein CCN6 and establish a mechanistic link between CCN6 and TβRIII in maintaining acinar organization in the breast.

  2. Prostatic adenoma of ductal origin.

    PubMed

    Min, K W; Gyorkey, F

    1980-07-01

    A case of prostatic adenoma believed to originate from the prostatic duct is described. There were morphologic similarities to basal cell adenomas of salivary glands, and it was concluded that the tumor is a benign counterpart of "salivary gland" carcinomas, rarely observed in the prostate.

  3. Steroid hormone receptors in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khalid, B A; Nurshireen, A; Rashidah, M; Zainal, B Y; Roslan, B A; Mahamooth, Z

    1990-06-01

    One hundred and six prostatic tissue samples obtained from transurethral resection were analysed for androgen and estrogen receptors. In 62 of these, progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were also assayed. Steroid receptors were assayed using single saturation dose 3H-labelled ligand assays. Ninety percent of the 97 prostatic hyperplasia tissues and six of the nine prostatic carcinoma tissues were positive for androgen receptors. Estrogen receptors were only present in 19% and 33% respectively. Progesterone receptors were present in 70% of the tissues, but glucocorticoid receptors were present in only 16% of prostatic hyperplasia and none in prostatic carcinoma. PMID:1725553

  4. Experience with prostate-specific antigen in prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D

    1991-01-01

    A total of 71 prostatic tumour patients and 45 prostatic adenoma patients were tested for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), immunological prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) concentration as well as serum prostatic phosphatase (SPP) and enzymic serum phosphatase. It was found among untreated patients that PSA showed the highest percentage of pathologic affection in each stage. PSA, on the evidence of clearance test in the initial days of therapy and after a follow-up period of several months, gave a good picture of the course that the disease had taken.

  5. Efficacy of Compound Therapy by Ginseng and Ciprofloxacin on Bacterial Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Maryam; Shokri, Saeid; Darabi, Shahram; Alipour Heidari, Mahmood; Ghalyanchi, Akhgar; Karimfar, Mohammad Hassan; Shirazi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genitourinary tract infections play a significant role in male infertility. Infections of reproductive sex glands, such as the prostate, impair function and indirectly affect male fertility. The general aim of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) on prostatitis in male rats treated with ciprofloxacin (CIPX). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we randomly divided 72 two male Wistar rats into 9 groups. The groups were treated as follows for 10 days: i. Control (no medication), ii. Sham [(normal saline injection into the vas deferens and oral administration of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)], iii. Ginseng, iv. CPIX, v. CIPX+ginseng, vi. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) (UPEC), vii. UPEC+ginseng, viii. UPEC+CIPX, and ix. UPEC+ginseng+CIPX. The rats were killed 14 days after the last injection and the prostate glands were removed. After sample preparation, routine histology was performed using hematoxylin and eosin staining. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method was used to determine the presence of apoptotic cells. Results The severity score for acinar changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the UPEC+CIPX group did not significantly different from the UPEC group. However this score significantly decreased in the UPEC+CIPX+ginseng group compared to the UPEC group. Apoptotic index of all ginseng treated groups significantly decreased compared to the UPEC and CPIX groups. Conclusion These results suggested that ginseng might be an effective adjunct in CIPX treatment of prostatitis. The combined use ginseng and CIPX was more effective than ginseng or CIPX alone. PMID:27054125

  6. Expression of Ki-67 in normal oral epithelium, leukoplakic oral epithelium and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Birajdar, Smita Shrishail; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Soumya, M; Gadivan, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To demonstrate the presence, location and pattern of cell proliferation in different histological grades of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral epithelium (NOE) using an antibody directed against the Ki-67 antigen and its intensity of staining evaluated respectively. Materials and Methods: A total number of 100 archival paraffin embedded blocks obtained from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology were studied. The case details were retrieved which consisted of histopathologically diagnosed cases of OSCC (n = 20), low risk OED (n = 30), high risk OED (n = 30) and normal appearing mucosa (n = 20) were taken as standard for comparison. Ki-67 immunostaining was detected. Ki-67 positive cells were counted in the five random high power fields in each case. Results: Ki-67 labeling Index (LI) was restricted to the basal and parabasal layers of the normal oral epithelium irrespective of age, sex and site whereas it was seen in the basal, suprabasal and spinous layers in OED. Ki-67 LI is increased in high risk cases than the low risk cases of OED. Ki-67 positive cells in OSCC were located in the periphery of the tumor nests than the center, where frequent mitoses were observed. Conclusion: The architectural alteration evaluated by Ki-67 antibody in proliferating cell distribution in the layers of epithelial dysplasias may provide useful information to evaluate the grading of OED. Ki-67 LI increased in high risk cases than low risk cases of OED. This study showed that over expression of Ki-67 antigen between well-differentiated and poorly differentiated OSCC was in accordance with histologic grade of malignancy but not in accordance with moderately differentiated OSCC. PMID:25328294

  7. Controlled 3D culture in Matrigel microbeads to analyze clonal acinar development.

    PubMed

    Dolega, Monika E; Abeille, Fabien; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie; Gidrol, Xavier

    2015-06-01

    3D culture systems are a valuable tool for modeling morphogenesis and carcinogenesis of epithelial tissue in a structurally appropriate context. We present a novel approach for 3D cell culture based on a flow-focusing microfluidic system that encapsulates epithelial cells in Matrigel beads. As a model we use prostatic and breast cells and assay for development of acini, polarized cellular spheres enclosing lumen. Each individual bead on average acts as a single 3D cell culture compartment generating one acinus per bead. Compared to standard protocols microfluidics provides increased control over the environment leading to more a uniform acini population. The increased facility of bead manipulation allowed us to isolate single cells which are self-sufficient to fully develop into acini in presence of Matrigel. Furthermore, combination of our microfluidic approach with large particle FACS opens new avenues in high throughput screening on single acini or spheroids.

  8. Prostate Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Suzanne; Garrett, Bernie; Bottorff, Joan L.; McKenzie, Michael; Han, Christina S.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.

    2015-01-01

    To understand prostate cancer (PCa) specialists’ views about prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs), a volunteer sample of Canada-based PCa specialists (n = 150), including urologists (n = 100), radiation oncologists (n = 40), and medical oncologists (n = 10) were surveyed. The 56-item questionnaire used in this study included six sets of attitudinal items to measure prostate cancer specialists’ beliefs about positive and negative influences of PCSGs, reasons for attending PCSGs, the attributes of effective PCSGs, and the value of face-to-face and web-based PCSGs. In addition, an open-ended question was included to invite additional input from participants. Results showed that PCSGs were positively valued, particularly for information sharing, education and psychosocial support. Inclusivity, privacy, and accessibility were identified as potential barriers, and recommendations were made for better marketing PCSGs to increase engagement. Findings suggest prostate cancer specialists highly valued the role and potential benefits of face-to-face PCSGs. Information provision and an educational role were perceived as key benefits. Some concerns were expressed about the ability of web-based PCSGs to effectively engage and educate men who experience prostate cancer. PMID:25061087

  9. Roles of AQP5/AQP5-G103D in carbamylcholine-induced volume decrease and in reduction of the activation energy for water transport by rat parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Keitaro; Seo, Yoshiteru; Matsuo, Shinsuke; Karabasil, Mileva Ratko; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Nakahari, Takashi; Hosoi, Kazuo

    2012-10-01

    In order to assess the contribution of the water channel aquaporin-5 (AQP5) to water transport by salivary gland acinar cells, we measured the cell volume and activation energy (E (a)) of diffusive water permeability in isolated parotid acinar cells obtained from AQP5-G103D mutant and their wild-type rats. Immunohistochemistry showed that there was no change induced by carbamylcholine (CCh; 1 μM) in the AQP5 detected in the acinar cells in the wild-type rat. Acinar cells from mutant rats, producing low levels of AQP5 in the apical membrane, showed a minimal increase in the AQP5 due to the CCh. In the wild-type rat, CCh caused a transient swelling of the acinus, followed by a rapid agonist-induced cell shrinkage, reaching a plateau at 30 s. In the mutant rat, the acinus did not swell by CCh challenge, and the agonist-induced cell shrinkage was delayed by 8 s, reaching a transient minimum at around 1 min, and recovered spontaneously even though CCh was persistently present. In the unstimulated wild-type acinar cells, E (a) was 3.4 ± 0.6 kcal mol(-1) and showed no detectable change after CCh stimulation. In the unstimulated mutant acinar cells, high E (a) value (5.9 ± 0.1 kcal mol(-1)) was detected and showed a minimal decrease after CCh stimulation (5.0 ± 0.3 kcal mol(-1)). These results suggested that AQP5 was the main pathway for water transport in the acinar cells and that it was responsible for the rapid agonist-induced acinar cell shrinkage and also necessary to keep the acinar cell volume reduced during the steady secretion in the wild-type rat.

  10. Distinct contributions by ionotropic purinoceptor subtypes to ATP-evoked calcium signals in mouse parotid acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sumit; Verrill, Douglas S; Carbone, Kristopher M; Brown, Stefanie; Yule, David I; Giovannucci, David R

    2012-01-01

    There is emerging consensus that P2X4 and P2X7 ionotropic purinoceptors (P2X4R and P2X7R) are critical players in regulating [Ca2+]i dynamics and fluid secretion in the salivary gland. In contrast, details regarding their compartmentalization and selective activation, contributions to the spatiotemporal properties of intracellular signals and roles in regulating protein exocytosis and ion channel activity have remained largely undefined. To address these concerns, we profiled mouse parotid acinar cells using live-cell imaging to follow the spatial and temporal features of ATP-evoked Ca2+ dynamics and exocytotic activity. Selective activation of P2X7Rs revealed an apical-to-basal [Ca2+]i signal that initiated at the sub-luminal border and propagated with a wave speed estimated at 17.3 ± 4.3 μm s−1 (n = 6). The evoked Ca2+ spike consisted of Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ channels. In contrast, selective activation of P2X4Rs induced a Ca2+ signal that initiated basally and propagated toward the lumen with a wave speed of 4.3 ± 0.2 μm s−1 (n = 8) that was largely independent of intracellular Ca2+ channel blockade. Consistent with these observations, P2X7R expression was enriched in the sub-luminal regions of acinar cells while P2X4R appeared localized to basal areas. In addition, we showed that P2X4R and P2X7R activation evokes exocytosis in parotid acinar cells. Our studies also demonstrate that the P2X4R-mediated [Ca2+]i rise and subsequent protein exocytosis was enhanced by ivermectin (IVR). Thus, in addition to furthering our understanding of salivary gland physiology, this study identifies P2X4R as a potential target for treatment of salivary hypofunction diseases. PMID:22451435

  11. Insulation of a G protein-coupled receptor on the plasmalemmal surface of the pancreatic acinar cell

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Receptor desensitization is a key process for the protection of the cell from continuous or repeated exposure to high concentrations of an agonist. Well-established mechanisms for desensitization of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors include phosphorylation, sequestration/internalization, and down-regulation. In this work, we have examined some mechanisms for desensitization of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor which is native to the pancreatic acinar cell, and have found the predominant mechanism to be distinct from these recognized processes. Upon fluorescent agonist occupancy of the native receptor, it becomes "insulated" from the effects of acid washing and becomes immobilized on the surface of the plasma membrane in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. This localization was assessed by ultrastructural studies using a colloidal gold conjugate of CCK, and lateral mobility of the receptor was assessed using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Of note, recent application of the same morphologic techniques to a CCK receptor-bearing Chinese hamster ovary cell line demonstrated prominent internalization via the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway, as well as entry into caveolae (Roettger, B.F., R.U. Rentsch, D. Pinon, E. Holicky, E. Hadac, J.M. Larkin, and L.J. Miller, 1995, J. Cell Biol. 128: 1029-1041). These organelles are not observed to represent prominent compartments for the same receptor to traverse in the acinar cell, although fluorescent insulin is clearly internalized in these cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In this work, the rate of lateral mobility of the CCK receptor is observed to be similar in both cell types (1-3 x 10(-10) cm2/s), while the fate of the agonist-occupied receptor is quite distinct in each cell. This supports the unique nature of desensitization processes which occur in a cell-specific manner. A plasmalemmal site of insulation of this important receptor on the pancreatic acinar cell

  12. Ae4 (Slc4a9) Anion Exchanger Drives Cl- Uptake-dependent Fluid Secretion by Mouse Submandibular Gland Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; Catalán, Marcelo A; Kondo, Yusuke; Jaramillo, Yasna; Liu, Frances; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E

    2015-04-24

    Transcellular Cl(-) movement across acinar cells is the rate-limiting step for salivary gland fluid secretion. Basolateral Nkcc1 Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters play a critical role in fluid secretion by promoting the intracellular accumulation of Cl(-) above its equilibrium potential. However, salivation is only partially abolished in the absence of Nkcc1 cotransporter activity, suggesting that another Cl(-) uptake pathway concentrates Cl(-) ions in acinar cells. To identify alternative molecular mechanisms, we studied mice lacking Ae2 and Ae4 Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchangers. We found that salivation stimulated by muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptor agonists was normal in the submandibular glands of Ae2(-/-) mice. In contrast, saliva secretion was reduced by 35% in Ae4(-/-) mice. The decrease in salivation was not related to loss of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter or Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity in Ae4(-/-) mice but correlated with reduced Cl(-) uptake during β-adrenergic receptor activation of cAMP signaling. Direct measurements of Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity revealed that HCO3 (-)-dependent Cl(-) uptake was reduced in the acinar cells of Ae2(-/-) and Ae4(-/-) mice. Moreover, Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity was nearly abolished in double Ae4/Ae2 knock-out mice, suggesting that most of the Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity in submandibular acinar cells depends on Ae2 and Ae4 expression. In conclusion, both Ae2 and Ae4 anion exchangers are functionally expressed in submandibular acinar cells; however, only Ae4 expression appears to be important for cAMP-dependent regulation of fluid secretion.

  13. Zinc Ionophore (Clioquinol) Inhibition of Human ZIP1-Deficient Prostate Tumor Growth in the Mouse Ectopic Xenograft Model: A Zinc Approach for the Efficacious Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Renty B.; Zou, Jing; Zheng, Yao; Naslund, Michael J.; Costello, Leslie C.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in males. This is mainly due to the absence of an available efficacious chemotherapy despite decades of research in pursuit of effective treatment approaches. A plausible target for the treatment is the established clinical relationship that the zinc levels in the malignant cells are markedly decreased compared to the normal epithelium in virtually all cases of prostate cancer, and at all stages malignancy. The decrease in zinc results from the downregulation of the functional zinc uptake transporter, ZIP1; which occurs during early development of prostate malignancy. This is an essential requirement for the development of malignancy to prevent the cytotoxic/tumor-suppressor effects of increased zinc on the premalignant and malignant cells. Thus prostate cancer is a ZIP1-deficient malignancy. This relationship provides the basis for a treatment regimen that will facilitate the uptake and accumulation of zinc into the premalignant and malignant cells. In this report we employed a zinc ionophore (clioquinol) approach in the treatment of mice with human ZIP1-deficient prostate tumors (ectopic xenograft model). Clioquinol treatment resulted in 85%inhibition of tumor growth due to the cytotoxic effects of zinc. Coupled with additional results from earlier studies, the compelling evidence provides a plausible approach for the effective treatment of human prostate cancer; including primary site malignancy, hormone-resistant cancer, and metastasis. Additionally, this approach might be effective in preventing the development of malignancy in individuals suspected of presenting with early development of malignancy. Clinical trials are now required in leading to the potential for an efficacious zinc-treatment approach, which is urgently needed for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26878064

  14. The many faces of neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Terry, Stéphane; Beltran, Himisha

    2014-01-01

    In normal prostate, neuroendocrine (NE) cells are rare and interspersed among the epithelium. These cells are believed to provide trophic signals to epithelial cell populations through the secretion of an abundance of neuropeptides that can diffuse to influence surrounding cells. In the setting of prostate cancer (PC), NE cells can also stimulate surrounding prostate adenocarcinoma cell growth, but in some cases adenocarcinoma cells themselves acquire NE characteristics. This epithelial plasticity is associated with decreased androgen receptor (AR) signaling and the accumulation of neuronal and stem cell characteristics. Transformation to an NE phenotype is one proposed mechanism of resistance to contemporary AR-targeted treatments, is associated with poor prognosis, and thought to represent up to 25% of lethal PCs. Importantly, the advent of high-throughput technologies has started to provide clues for understanding the complex molecular profiles of tumors exhibiting NE differentiation. Here, we discuss these recent advances, the multifaceted manner by which an NE-like state may arise during the different stages of disease progression, and the potential benefit of this knowledge for the management of patients with advanced PC. PMID:24724054

  15. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Bulk Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, R.; Cao, A.; Pandya, A.; Auner, G. W.; Sarkar, F.; Sakr, W.; Naik, V.

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men. The mortality rate for this disease can be dramatically reduced if it can be diagnosed in its early stages. Raman spectroscopy is one of the optical techniques which can provide fingerprints of a disease in terms of its molecular composition which changes due to the onset of disease. The aim of this project is to investigate the differences in the Raman spectra to identify benign epithelium (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma of various Gleason grades in archived bulk tissues embedded in paraffin wax. For each tissue, two adjacent tissue sections were cut and dewaxed, where one of the sections was stained using haematoxylin and eosin for histological examination and the other unstained adjacent section was used for Raman spectroscopic studies. We have collected Raman spectra from 10 prostatic adenocarcinoma dewaxed tissue sections using Raman microscope (785 nm excitation laser). The data were analyzed using statistical methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis to classify the tissue regions. The results indicate that Raman Spectroscopy can differentiate between BE, PIN and Cancer regions.

  16. Developmental origin of the posterior pigmented epithelium of iris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Xiong, Kai; Lu, Lei; Gu, Dandan; Wang, Songtao; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Honglei; Zhou, Guomin

    2015-03-01

    Iris epithelium is a double-layered pigmented cuboidal epithelium. According to the current model, the neural retina and the posterior iris pigment epithelium (IPE) are derived from the inner wall of the optic cup, while the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the anterior IPE are derived from the outer wall of the optic cup during development. Our current study shows evidence, contradicting this model of fetal iris development. We demonstrate that human fetal iris expression patterns of Otx2 and Mitf transcription factors are similar, while the expressions of Otx2 and Sox2 are complementary. Furthermore, IPE and RPE exhibit identical morphologic development during the early embryonic period. Our results suggest that the outer layer of the optic cup forms two layers of the iris epithelium, and the posterior IPE is the inward-curling anterior rim of the outer layer of the optic cup. These findings provide a reasonable explanation of how IPE cells can be used as an appropriate substitute for RPE cells.

  17. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, R J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia reflects a complex interplay between benign prostatic enlargement, which will affect almost all men by the age of 80, and the resulting outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease is now known to adversely affect the quality of life of around one man in three over the age of 50. New medical treatments and new surgical interventions are challenging the previous standard treatment of transurethral resection of prostate, which continues to have a morbidity of 17% and some mortality. Primary care will be increasingly involved in shared care with particular emphasis on monitoring of patients on watchful waiting medical therapy- and following operative intervention. PMID:9196969

  18. Prostate cancer marker panel with single cell sensitivity in urine

    PubMed Central

    Nickens, Kristen P.; Ali, Amina; Scoggin, Tatiana; Tan, Shyh‐Han; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; McLeod, David G.; Dobi, Albert; Tacha, David; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Srivastava, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Background Over one million men undergo prostate biopsies annually in the United States, a majority of whom due to elevated serum PSA. More than half of the biopsies turn out to be negative for prostate cancer (CaP). The limitations of both the PSA test and the biopsy procedure have led to the development for more precise CaP detection assays in urine (e.g., PCA3, TMPRSS2‐ERG) or blood (e.g., PHI, 4K). Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the Urine CaP Marker Panel (UCMP) assay for sensitive and reproducible detection of CaP cells in post‐digital rectal examination (post‐DRE) urine. Methods The cellular content of the post‐DRE urine was captured on a translucent filter membrane, which is placed on Cytoclear slides for direct evaluation by microscopy and immuno‐cytochemistry (ICC). Cells captured on the membrane were assayed for PSA and Prostein expression to identify prostate epithelial cells, and for ERG and AMACR to identify prostate tumor cells. Immunostained cells were analyzed for quantitative and qualitative features and correlated with biopsy positive and negative status for malignancy. Results The assay was optimized for single cell capture sensitivity and downstream evaluations by spiking a known number of cells from established CaP cell lines, LNCaP and VCaP, into pre‐cleared control urine. The cells captured from the post‐DRE urine of subjects, obtained prior to biopsy procedure, were co‐stained for ERG, AMACR (CaP specific), and Prostein or PSA (prostate epithelium specific) rendering a whole cell based analysis and characterization. A feasibility cohort of 63 post‐DRE urine specimens was assessed. Comparison of the UCMP results with blinded biopsy results showed an assay sensitivity of 64% (16 of 25) and a specificity of 68.8% (22 of 32) for CaP detection by biopsy. Conclusions This pilot study assessing a minimally invasive CaP detection assay with single cell sensitivity cell‐capture and characterization from the

  19. Pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Indudhara, R

    1994-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a benign neoplasm of the prostate seen in men of advancing age. Microscopic evidence of the disorder is seen in about 70% of men by 70 years of age, whereas symptoms requiring some form of surgical intervention occur in 30% of men during their lifetime. Although the exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia is not clear, it is well recognized that high levels of intraprostatic androgens are required for the maintenance of prostatic growth. In recent years, extensive surveys of patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate reveal an 18% incidence of morbidity that has essentially not changed in the past 30 years. This procedure is also the second highest reimbursed surgical therapy under Medicare. These findings have resulted in an intensive search for alternative therapies for prostatic hyperplasia. An alternative that has now been well defined is the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers to relax the prostatic urethra. This is based on findings that a major component of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms is spasm of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck, which is mediated by the alpha-adrenergic nerves. A second approach is to block androgens involved in maintaining prostate growth. Several such drugs are now available for clinical use, and we discuss their side effects and use. We also include the newer recommendations on evaluating benign prostatic hyperplasia that are cost-effective yet comprehensive. Images PMID:7528957

  20. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes.

  1. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes. PMID:22212080

  2. Postnatal Pancreas of Mice Contains Tripotent Progenitors Capable of Giving Rise to Duct, Acinar, and Endocrine Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ghazalli, Nadiah; Mahdavi, Alborz; Feng, Tao; Jin, Liang; Kozlowski, Mark T.; Hsu, Jasper; Riggs, Arthur D.; Tirrell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal pancreas is a potential source for progenitor cells to generate endocrine β-cells for treating type 1 diabetes. However, it remains unclear whether young (1-week-old) pancreas harbors multipotent progenitors capable of differentiating into duct, acinar, and endocrine cells. Laminin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein important for β-cells' survival and function. We established an artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) protein that contains the functional IKVAV (Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val) sequence derived from laminin (designated aECM-lam). Whether IKVAV is necessary for endocrine differentiation in vitro is unknown. To answer these questions, we cultured single cells from 1-week-old pancreas in semi-solid media supplemented with aECM-lam, aECM-scr (which contains a scrambled sequence instead of IKVAV), or Matrigel. We found that colonies were generated in all materials. Individual colonies were examined by microfluidic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunostaining, and electron microscopy analyses. The majority of the colonies expressed markers for endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, demonstrating tri-lineage potential of individual colony-forming progenitors. Colonies grown in aECM-lam expressed higher levels of endocrine markers Insulin1, Insulin2, and Glucagon compared with those grown in aECM-scr and Matrigel, indicating that the IKVAV sequence enhances endocrine differentiation. In contrast, Matrigel was inhibitory for endocrine gene expression. Colonies grown in aECM-lam displayed the hallmarks of functional β-cells: mature insulin granules and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Colony-forming progenitors were enriched in the CD133high fraction and among 230 micro-manipulated single CD133high cells, four gave rise to colonies that expressed tri-lineage markers. We conclude that young postnatal pancreas contains multipotent progenitor cells and that aECM-lam promotes differentiation of β-like cells in vitro. PMID:25941840

  3. Postnatal Pancreas of Mice Contains Tripotent Progenitors Capable of Giving Rise to Duct, Acinar, and Endocrine Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghazalli, Nadiah; Mahdavi, Alborz; Feng, Tao; Jin, Liang; Kozlowski, Mark T; Hsu, Jasper; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2015-09-01

    Postnatal pancreas is a potential source for progenitor cells to generate endocrine β-cells for treating type 1 diabetes. However, it remains unclear whether young (1-week-old) pancreas harbors multipotent progenitors capable of differentiating into duct, acinar, and endocrine cells. Laminin is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein important for β-cells' survival and function. We established an artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) protein that contains the functional IKVAV (Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val) sequence derived from laminin (designated aECM-lam). Whether IKVAV is necessary for endocrine differentiation in vitro is unknown. To answer these questions, we cultured single cells from 1-week-old pancreas in semi-solid media supplemented with aECM-lam, aECM-scr (which contains a scrambled sequence instead of IKVAV), or Matrigel. We found that colonies were generated in all materials. Individual colonies were examined by microfluidic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunostaining, and electron microscopy analyses. The majority of the colonies expressed markers for endocrine, acinar, and ductal lineages, demonstrating tri-lineage potential of individual colony-forming progenitors. Colonies grown in aECM-lam expressed higher levels of endocrine markers Insulin1, Insulin2, and Glucagon compared with those grown in aECM-scr and Matrigel, indicating that the IKVAV sequence enhances endocrine differentiation. In contrast, Matrigel was inhibitory for endocrine gene expression. Colonies grown in aECM-lam displayed the hallmarks of functional β-cells: mature insulin granules and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Colony-forming progenitors were enriched in the CD133(high) fraction and among 230 micro-manipulated single CD133(high) cells, four gave rise to colonies that expressed tri-lineage markers. We conclude that young postnatal pancreas contains multipotent progenitor cells and that aECM-lam promotes differentiation of β-like cells in vitro.

  4. Morphometric studies of secretory granule formation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Dissecting the early structural changes following pilocarpine injection

    PubMed Central

    HAMMEL, ILAN; SHOR-HAZAN, OSNAT; ELDAR, TORA; AMIHAI, DINA; LEW, SYLVIA

    1999-01-01

    Secretory granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells is known to involve massive membrane flow. In previous studies we have undertaken morphometry of the regranulation mechanism in these cells and in mast cells as a model for cellular membrane movement. In our current work, electron micrographs of pancreatic acinar cells from ICR mice were taken at several time points after extensive degranulation induced by pilocarpine injection in order to investigate the volume changes of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), nucleus, mitochondria and autophagosomes. At 2–4 h after stimulation, when the pancreatic cells demonstrated a complete loss of granules, this was accompanied by an increased proportion of autophagosomal activity. This change primarily reflected a greatly increased proportion of profiles retaining autophagic vacuoles containing recognisable cytoplasmic structures such as mitochondria, granule profiles and fragments of RER. The mitochondrial structures reached a significant maximal size 4 h following injection (before degranulation 0.178±0.028 μm3; at 4 h peak value, 0.535±0.109 μm3). Nucleus size showed an early volume increase approaching a maximum value 2 h following degranulation. The regranulation span was thus divided into 3 stages. The first was the membrane remodelling stage (0–2 h). During this period the volume of the RER and secretory granules was greatly decreased. At the intermediate stage (2–4 h) a significant increase of the synthesis zone was observed within the nucleus. The volume of the mitochondria was increasing. At the last step, the major finding was a significant granule accumulation in parallel with an active Golgi zone. PMID:10227666

  5. Human salivary gland acinar cells spontaneously form three-dimensional structures and change the protein expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yen-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Young, Tai-Horng; Lou, Pei-Jen

    2011-11-01

    Applying tissue engineering principles to design an auto-secretory device is a potential solution for patients suffering loss of salivary gland function. However, the largest challenge in implementing this solution is the primary culture of human salivary gland cells, because the cells are highly differentiated and difficult to expand in vitro. This situation leads to the lack of reports on the in vitro cell biology and physiology of human salivary gland cells. This study used a low-calcium culture system to selectively cultivate human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells from tissues with high purity in cell composition. This condition enables PGAC cells to continuously proliferate and retain the phenotypes of epithelial acinar cells to express secreting products (α-amylase) and function-related proteins (aquaporin-3, aquaporin-5, and ZO-1). Notably, when the cells reached confluence, three-dimensional (3D) cell aggregates were observed in crowded regions. These self-formed cell spheres were termed post-confluence structures (PCSs). Unexpectedly, despite being cultured in the same media, cells in PCSs exhibited higher expression levels and different expression patterns of function-related proteins compared to the two-dimensional (2D) cells. Translocation of aquoporin-3 from cytosolic to alongside the cell boundaries, and of ZO-1 molecules to the boundary of the PCSs were also observed. These observations suggest that when PGAC cells cultured on the 2D substrate would form PCSs without the help of 3D scaffolds and retain certain differentiation and polarity. This phenomenon implies that it is possible to introduce 2D substrates instead of 3D scaffolds into artificial salivary gland tissue engineering.

  6. Ultrastructural localization of acid phosphatase in nonhuman primate vaginal epithelium.

    PubMed

    King, B F

    1985-01-01

    The vagina of the rhesus monkey is lined by a stratified squamous epithelium. However, little is known regarding the cytochemical composition of its cell organelles and the substances found in the intercellular spaces. In this study we have examined the ultrastructural distribution of acid phosphatase in the vaginal epithelium. In basal and parabasal cells reaction product was found in some Golgi cisternae and vesicles and in a variety of cytoplasmic granules. Reaction product was also found in some, but not all, membrane-coating granules. In the upper layers of the epithelium, the membrane-coating granules extruded their contents and acid phosphatase was localized in the intercellular spaces. The possible roles of acid phosphatase in keratinization, desquamation, or modification of substances in the intercellular compartment are discussed.

  7. Effects of nobiletin on PhIP-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming Xi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Asamoto, Makoto; Chewonarin, Teera; Suzuki, Shugo; Tanaka, Takuji; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the effects of nobiletin (5,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxy flavone) on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis. PhIP was administered to 6-wk-old F344 male rats intragastrically (100 mg/kg) twice a wk for 10 wk. The animals were given 0.05% nobiletin or the basal diet for 50 wk. At the end of the experiment, serum testosterone, estrogen, and leptin did not differ between the 2 groups. The body weights of nobiletin-treated rats were significantly higher than controls (P<0.05), and feeding of nobiletin significantly reduced the relative prostate (P<0.05) and testes (P<0.05) weights as well as the Ki67 labeling index in the normal epithelium in the ventral prostate (P<0.01). The incidence and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas in nobiletin-treated ventral prostate were 50% and 36%, respectively, of controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, nobiletin did significantly reduce the total number of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) compared to the control value (P<0.05). Nobiletin, therefore, may have potential for chemoprevention of early changes associated with carcinogenesis in both the prostate and colon.

  8. Androgen deprivation–induced NCoA2 promotes metastatic and castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jun; Lee, Hui-Ju; Wu, San-Pin; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lanz, Rainer B.; Creighton, Chad J.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2014-01-01

    A major clinical hurdle for the management of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) in patients is the resistance of tumors to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and their subsequent development into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). While recent studies have identified potential pathways involved in CRPC development, the drivers of CRPC remain largely undefined. Here we determined that nuclear receptor coactivator 2 (NCoA2, also known as SRC-2), which is frequently amplified or overexpressed in patients with metastatic PCa, mediates development of CRPC. In a murine model, overexpression of NCoA2 in the prostate epithelium resulted in neoplasia and, in combination with Pten deletion, promoted the development of metastasis-prone cancer. Moreover, depletion of NCoA2 in PTEN-deficient mice prevented the development of CRPC. In human androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, androgen signaling suppressed NCoA2 expression, and NCoA2 overexpression in murine prostate tumors resulted in hyperactivation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling, promoting tumor malignance. Analysis of PCa patient samples revealed a strong correlation among NCoA2-mediated signaling, disease progression, and PCa recurrence. Taken together, our findings indicate that androgen deprivation induces NCoA2, which in turn mediates activation of PI3K signaling and promotes PCa metastasis and CRPC development. Moreover, these results suggest that the inhibition of NCoA2 has potential for PCa therapy. PMID:25295534

  9. Androgen deprivation-induced NCoA2 promotes metastatic and castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Lee, Hui-Ju; Wu, San-Pin; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lanz, Rainer B; Creighton, Chad J; DeMayo, Francesco J; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2014-11-01

    A major clinical hurdle for the management of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) in patients is the resistance of tumors to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and their subsequent development into castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). While recent studies have identified potential pathways involved in CRPC development, the drivers of CRPC remain largely undefined. Here we determined that nuclear receptor coactivator 2 (NCoA2, also known as SRC-2), which is frequently amplified or overexpressed in patients with metastatic PCa, mediates development of CRPC. In a murine model, overexpression of NCoA2 in the prostate epithelium resulted in neoplasia and, in combination with Pten deletion, promoted the development of metastasis-prone cancer. Moreover, depletion of NCoA2 in PTEN-deficient mice prevented the development of CRPC. In human androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, androgen signaling suppressed NCoA2 expression, and NCoA2 overexpression in murine prostate tumors resulted in hyperactivation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling, promoting tumor malignance. Analysis of PCa patient samples revealed a strong correlation among NCoA2-mediated signaling, disease progression, and PCa recurrence. Taken together, our findings indicate that androgen deprivation induces NCoA2, which in turn mediates activation of PI3K signaling and promotes PCa metastasis and CRPC development. Moreover, these results suggest that the inhibition of NCoA2 has potential for PCa therapy.

  10. Ultrastructure of free-ending nerve fibres in oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Chillida, E M; Rodrigo, J; Mayo, I; Arnedo, A; Gómez, A

    1981-01-01

    For the first time, at the ultrastructural level, the existence of free-ending, intraepithelial nerve fibres has been demonstrated in the oesophagus wall of adult cats and monkeys. Their form, the way they penetrate the epithelium, their location within the epithelium and their relationships with neighbouring cells have been established. A sensory function is suggested for this type of ending. Images Figs. 1-4 Figs. 5-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Figs. 14-15 Figs. 16-17 PMID:7333951

  11. The ionic components of normal human oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, D; Milne, G; Curtis, M; Nicholson, G

    1979-11-01

    The distribution of cations and anions in normal human oesophageal epithelium has been investigated with the pyroantimonate and silver-osmium tetroxide techniques. There is a discontinuous distribution of both ions in the intercellular space. The ions are associated with various organelles, as has already been described in the literature. Specifically, in the oesophageal epithelium, there are a few deposits of pyroantimonate and occasional silver in the membrane coating granules, but here is no apparent relationship of either ion with the tonofilaments or glycogen particles. The superficial cells are leaky and contain fewer ions than the deeper functional layer cells.

  12. The permeability of a keratinizing squamous epithelium in culture.

    PubMed

    Squier, C A; Fejerskov, O; Jepsen, A

    1978-05-01

    Horseradish peroxidase or lanthanum was applied to the surface of keratinized oral epithelium growing in tissue culture and the extent of penetration of these substances examined with the electron microscope. Both tracer substances penetrated between the superficial keratinized squames of the tissue, the lanthanum reaching the basal cell layer and the peroxidase diffusing to within 3--8 cells of the basal layer. The permeability of the keratinized layer in this epithelium is in contrast to the situation in vivo where an intercellular barrier is found in the superficial layer. This difference might be related to the absence of membrane-coating granules from the tissue maintained in culture.

  13. Human prostatic tumor cells in culture produce growth and differentiation factors active on osteoblasts: a new biological and clinical parameter for prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Festuccia, C; Teti, A; Bianco, P; Guerra, F; Vicentini, C; Tennina, R; Villanova, I; Sciortino, G; Bologna, M

    1997-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PRCA) cells metastasize to bone with high frequency, inducing typical osteosclerotic lesions. To establish if local stimuli on the bone tissue may derive from metastatic colonies of prostatic origin, we evaluated the biologic activities secreted by human prostatic epithelium and effective on osteoblast-like cells in vitro. Supernatant from short-term tissue cultures of human prostatic tissue samples obtained from PRCA (35 cases) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, 12 cases) patients were applied to three models of cells with osteoblastic phenotype: two normal [rabbit osteoblasts (OB) and rat periosteal cells (PO)] and one transformed (human osteosarcoma cell line, MG63). Proliferative activity was monitored through enzymatic reduction of tetrazolium salts and expressed as relative mitogenic activities (RMA). Analysis of proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast function, demonstrates that conditioned media (CM) from PRCA cultures stimulate both growth and activity of osteoblast-like cells to a greater extent compared to CM from BPH. Furthermore, cell growth and activity of osteoblast-like cells are progressively increased by CM derived from patients with stage B (tumor confined within the prostate capsule), stage C (locally invasive tumor), and stage D (invasive tumor with distant metastasis) disease. One of the mechanisms potentially underlying the CM-stimulated effects on bone cells is associated with the urokinase (uPA) enzyme route, whose release progressively increases with the stage of disease. However, antibodies against uPA and p-aminobenzamidine (a low molecular weight urokinase inhibitor) treatment, which both inhibit the proliferative and differentiative effects induced by exogenous urokinase, partially slow down the effects of CM from PRCA tissue cultures, suggesting that additional factors are secreted by prostatic tumor cells in vitro. In conclusion, we show that the mitogenic and differentiative

  14. Genetic background influences murine prostate gene expression: implications for cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi-Frias, Daniella; Pritchard, Colin; Mecham, Brigham H; Coleman, Ilsa M; Nelson, Peter S

    2007-01-01

    Background Cancer of the prostate is influenced by both genetic predisposition and environmental factors. The identification of genes capable of modulating cancer development has the potential to unravel disease heterogeneity and aid diagnostic and prevention strategies. To this end, mouse models have been developed to isolate the influences of individual genetic lesions in the context of consistent genotypes and environmental exposures. However, the normal prostatic phenotypic variability dictated by a genetic background that is potentially capable of influencing the process of carcinogenesis has not been established. Results In this study we used microarray analysis to quantify transcript levels in the prostates of five commonly studied inbred mouse strains. We applied a multiclass response t-test and determined that approximately 13% (932 genes) exhibited differential expression (range 1.3-190-fold) in any one strain relative to other strains (false discovery rate ≤10%). Expression differences were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, or immunohistochemistry for several genes previously shown to influence cancer progression, such as Psca, Mmp7, and Clusterin. Analyses of human prostate transcripts orthologous to variable murine prostate genes identified differences in gene expression in benign epithelium that correlated with the differentiation state of adjacent tumors. For example, the gene encoding apolipoprotein D, which is known to enhance resistance to cell stress, was expressed at significantly greater levels in benign epithelium associated with high-grade versus low-grade cancers. Conclusion These studies support the concept that the cellular, tissue, and organismal context contribute to oncogenesis and suggest that a predisposition to a sequence of events leading to pathology may exist prior to cancer initiation. PMID:17577413

  15. mp-MRI Prostate Characterised PIRADS 3 Lesions are Associated with a Low Risk of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer - A Retrospective Review of 92 Biopsied PIRADS 3 Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Liddell, Heath; Jyoti, Rajeev; Haxhimolla, Hodo Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether prostate image reporting and data system (PIRADS) 3 lesions as assessed by a 3T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent clinically significant prostate cancer. Method A retrospective review was performed on a series of consecutive patients who underwent MRI guided biopsy of the prostate for clinical suspicion of prostate cancer between January 2013 and March 2014. Demographic, clinical, MRI and biopsy data were reviewed and compared. The same 3T MRI without the use of an endo-rectal coil was employed to assess each patient, obtaining high resolution T2 weighted images, diffusion weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhancement. The MRI data was sent to Dynacad software for analysis. A single experienced radiologist reported all the studies from this series using a modified PIRADS scoring system. Subsequently, all the lesions marked PIRADS 3 or above were targeted with 18G core biopsy using DynaTrim in-gantry MRI guidance system. Needle position targeting the lesion was recorded prior to each biopsy. All core biopsy samples were sent to one of two pathology laboratories where they were processed and reported as per the International Society of Urological Pathology protocols. Results One hundred and eighteen patients comprising a total of 215 lesions were reviewed. Amongst this cohort, 92 PIRADS 3 lesions were identified and biopsied. The mean age of patients in this cohort was 62.6 years. Median prostate specific antigen (PSA) was 6.5 ng/ml and median prostate size was 78.4 ml. Eightysix (93.5%) of biopsied PIRADS 3 lesions were benign and 6 (6.5%) lesions were found to be malignant. Of these 6 malignant lesions, 4 (66%) were Gleason score 6 (3 + 3) and 2 (33%) were Gleason score 7 (3 + 4). Of the 86 non-malignant lesions, 1 (1.2%) represented high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and 2 (2.4%) represented atypical small acinar proliferation. PIRADS 3 lesions within the peripheral zone were more likely to be

  16. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate cancer early detection What tests can detect prostate cancer early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  17. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  18. Giant prostatic fossa with misleading radiographic features.

    PubMed

    Stenzl, A; Fuchs, G J

    1989-01-01

    The long-term complication of a perforation of the prostatic capsule during transurethral resection of the prostate is described. Calcifications in a giant prostatic fossa led to initially misleading radiologic findings.

  19. Cancer of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 180,890 % of All New Cancer Cases 10.7% Estimated Deaths in 2016 26,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 2,850,139 men living with prostate cancer ...

  20. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system. PMID:27393141

  1. [Chemotherapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rauchenwald, Michael; De Santis, Maria; Fink, Eleonore; Höltl, Wolfgang; Kramer, Gero; Marei, Isabella-Carolina; Neumann, Hans-Jörg; Reissigl, Andreas; Schmeller, Nikolaus; Stackl, Walter; Hobisch, Alfred; Krainer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For many years the benefit of chemotherapy in patients with prostate cancer was thought to be limited to palliation of late-stage disease, and thus this treatment option only became involved in patient care towards the end of the disease process, if at all. However, two landmark phase-III trials with docetaxel-based therapy (TAX 327 and Southwest Oncology Group, SWOG, 9916) have shown a survival benefit for patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) thus prompting a change in patterns of care. With raising interest for chemotherapeutic options and clinical trials for new drugs and new indications (neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, increasing PSA levels after local treatment, and hormone sensitive cancer) under way our goal was to review within the context of a multidisciplinary team the available evidence and explore the standard for the medical treatment of prostate cancer outside of clinical trials. We are carefully evaluating the current treatment recommendations based on the available evidence and highlight potential future treatment options but also discuss important clinical topics (treatment until progression versus the advantage of chemo holidays, definition of particular patient subgroups and potential second line options) for which there are no clear cut answers to date. The role and importance of radiotherapy, biphosphonate treatment and the medical management of pain and side effects is also discussed. The multitude of treatment options for patients with advanced prostate cancer clearly asks for a close collaboration between urologists, medical oncologists and radiation therapists. PMID:18726672

  2. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A.; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V.; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release–activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca2+ entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. Results GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca2+ currents after Ca2+ release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Conclusions Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed

  3. Effect of the cigarette smoke component, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), on physiological and molecular parameters of thiamin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Subramanian, Veedamali S; Said, Hamid M

    2013-01-01

    Thiamin is indispensable for the normal function of pancreatic acinar cells. These cells take up thiamin via specific carrier-mediated process that involves thiamin transporter-1 and -2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; products of SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes, respectively). In this study we examined the effect of chronic exposure of pancreatic acinar cells in vitro (pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells) and in vivo (wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters) to the cigarette smoke component 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) on physiological and molecular parameters of the thiamin uptake process. The results show that chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to NNK (3 µM, 24 h) leads to a significant inhibition in thiamin uptake. The inhibition was associated with a significant decrease in the level of expression of THTR-1 and -2 at the protein and mRNA levels as well as in the activity of SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters. Similarly chronic exposure of mice to NNK (IP 10 mg/100 g body weight, three times/week for 2 weeks) leads to a significant inhibition in thiamin uptake by freshly isolated pancreatic acinar cells, as well as in the level of expression of THTR-1 and -2 protein and mRNA. Furthermore, activity of the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters expressed in transgenic mice were significantly suppressed by chronic exposure to NNK. The effect of NNK on the activity of the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 promoters was not mediated via changes in their methylation profile, rather it appears to be exerted via an SP1/GG and SP1/GC cis-regulatory elements in these promoters, respectively. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic exposure of pancreatic acinar cells to NNK negatively impacts the physiological and molecular parameters of thiamin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells and that this effect is exerted, at least in part, at the level of transcription of the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes.

  4. Adenovirus-mediated hAQP1 expression in irradiated mouse salivary glands causes recovery of saliva secretion by enhancing acinar cell volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Teos, L Y; Zheng, C-Y; Liu, X; Swaim, W D; Goldsmith, C M; Cotrim, A P; Baum, B J; Ambudkar, I S

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck irradiation (IR) during cancer treatment causes by-stander effects on the salivary glands leading to irreversible loss of saliva secretion. The mechanism underlying loss of fluid secretion is not understood and no adequate therapy is currently available. Delivery of an adenoviral vector encoding human aquaporin-1 (hAQP1) into the salivary glands of human subjects and animal models with radiation-induced salivary hypofunction leads to significant recovery of saliva secretion and symptomatic relief in subjects. To elucidate the mechanism underlying loss of salivary secretion and the basis for AdhAQP1-dependent recovery of salivary gland function we assessed submandibular gland function in control mice and mice 2 and 8 months after treatment with a single 15-Gy dose of IR (delivered to the salivary gland region). Salivary secretion and neurotransmitter-stimulated changes in acinar cell volume, an in vitro read-out for fluid secretion, were monitored. Consistent with the sustained 60% loss of fluid secretion following IR, a carbachol (CCh)-induced decrease in acinar cell volume from the glands of mice post IR was transient and attenuated as compared with that in cells from non-IR age-matched mice. The hAQP1 expression in non-IR mice induced no significant effect on salivary fluid secretion or CCh-stimulated cell volume changes, except in acinar cells from 8-month group where the initial rate of cell shrinkage was increased. Importantly, the expression of hAQP1 in the glands of mice post IR induced recovery of salivary fluid secretion and a volume decrease in acinar cells to levels similar to those in cells from non-IR mice. The initial rates of CCh-stimulated cell volume reduction in acinar cells from hAQP1-expressing glands post IR were similar to those from control cells. Altogether, the data suggest that expression of hAQP1 increases the water permeability of acinar cells, which underlies the recovery of fluid secretion in the salivary glands

  5. Adenovirus-mediated hAQP1 expression in irradiated mouse salivary glands causes recovery of saliva secretion by enhancing acinar cell volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Teos, L Y; Zheng, C-Y; Liu, X; Swaim, W D; Goldsmith, C M; Cotrim, A P; Baum, B J; Ambudkar, I S

    2016-07-01

    Head and neck irradiation (IR) during cancer treatment causes by-stander effects on the salivary glands leading to irreversible loss of saliva secretion. The mechanism underlying loss of fluid secretion is not understood and no adequate therapy is currently available. Delivery of an adenoviral vector encoding human aquaporin-1 (hAQP1) into the salivary glands of human subjects and animal models with radiation-induced salivary hypofunction leads to significant recovery of saliva secretion and symptomatic relief in subjects. To elucidate the mechanism underlying loss of salivary secretion and the basis for AdhAQP1-dependent recovery of salivary gland function we assessed submandibular gland function in control mice and mice 2 and 8 months after treatment with a single 15-Gy dose of IR (delivered to the salivary gland region). Salivary secretion and neurotransmitter-stimulated changes in acinar cell volume, an in vitro read-out for fluid secretion, were monitored. Consistent with the sustained 60% loss of fluid secretion following IR, a carbachol (CCh)-induced decrease in acinar cell volume from the glands of mice post IR was transient and attenuated as compared with that in cells from non-IR age-matched mice. The hAQP1 expression in non-IR mice induced no significant effect on salivary fluid secretion or CCh-stimulated cell volume changes, except in acinar cells from 8-month group where the initial rate of cell shrinkage was increased. Importantly, the expression of hAQP1 in the glands of mice post IR induced recovery of salivary fluid secretion and a volume decrease in acinar cells to levels similar to those in cells from non-IR mice. The initial rates of CCh-stimulated cell volume reduction in acinar cells from hAQP1-expressing glands post IR were similar to those from control cells. Altogether, the data suggest that expression of hAQP1 increases the water permeability of acinar cells, which underlies the recovery of fluid secretion in the salivary glands

  6. Effects of an immunosuppressive treatment on the rat prostate

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Marta; Kędzierska, Karolina; Michałek, Katarzyna; Słuczanowska-Głąbowska, Sylwia; Grabowski, Maciej; Piasecka, Małgorzata; Kram, Andrzej; Rotter, Iwona; Rył, Aleksandra; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of immunosuppressive drugs on the morphology, ultrastructure, and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cytoskeleton proteins in the rat dorsolateral prostate. The studies were conducted on 48 male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into eight groups: a control group and seven experimental groups. For 6 months, the animals in the experimental groups were administered a combination of drugs including rapamycin (Rapa), cyclosporin A, tacrolimus (Tac), mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone (Pred), according to the standard three-drug regimens for immunosuppressive therapy used in clinical practice. An evaluation of the morphology and ultrastructure was conducted, and a quantitative evaluation of the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and desmin- and cytokeratin-positive cells with weak, moderate, and strong expression was performed. The combination of Rapa, Tac, and Pred caused the smallest morphological and ultrastructural changes in the rat prostate cells. In the case of rats whose treatment was switched to Rapa monotherapy, a decreased percentage of proliferating cells of both the glandular epithelium and the stroma was found. Decreases in body weight and changes in the expression of cytokeratin and desmin were observed in all the experimental rats. The combination of Rapa, Tac, and Pred would seem to be the most beneficial for patients who do not suffer from prostate diseases. Our results justify the use of inhibitors of the mammalian target of Rapa in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer. The changes in the expression of cytoskeleton proteins may be the result of direct adverse effects of the immunosuppressive drugs, which are studied in this article, on the structure and organization of intermediate filament proteins. PMID:27672312

  7. Effects of an immunosuppressive treatment on the rat prostate

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Marta; Kędzierska, Karolina; Michałek, Katarzyna; Słuczanowska-Głąbowska, Sylwia; Grabowski, Maciej; Piasecka, Małgorzata; Kram, Andrzej; Rotter, Iwona; Rył, Aleksandra; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of immunosuppressive drugs on the morphology, ultrastructure, and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cytoskeleton proteins in the rat dorsolateral prostate. The studies were conducted on 48 male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into eight groups: a control group and seven experimental groups. For 6 months, the animals in the experimental groups were administered a combination of drugs including rapamycin (Rapa), cyclosporin A, tacrolimus (Tac), mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone (Pred), according to the standard three-drug regimens for immunosuppressive therapy used in clinical practice. An evaluation of the morphology and ultrastructure was conducted, and a quantitative evaluation of the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and desmin- and cytokeratin-positive cells with weak, moderate, and strong expression was performed. The combination of Rapa, Tac, and Pred caused the smallest morphological and ultrastructural changes in the rat prostate cells. In the case of rats whose treatment was switched to Rapa monotherapy, a decreased percentage of proliferating cells of both the glandular epithelium and the stroma was found. Decreases in body weight and changes in the expression of cytokeratin and desmin were observed in all the experimental rats. The combination of Rapa, Tac, and Pred would seem to be the most beneficial for patients who do not suffer from prostate diseases. Our results justify the use of inhibitors of the mammalian target of Rapa in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer. The changes in the expression of cytoskeleton proteins may be the result of direct adverse effects of the immunosuppressive drugs, which are studied in this article, on the structure and organization of intermediate filament proteins.

  8. Cabazitaxel Plus Prednisone With Octreotide For Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Previously Treated With Docetaxel

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-21

    Diarrhea; Hormone-resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  9. Heteropterys tomentosa (A. Juss.) infusion counteracts Cyclosporin a side effects on the ventral prostate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug widely used in treatment of auto-immune diseases or after organ transplants. However, several side effects are commonly associated with CsA long term intake, some regarding to loss of reproductive organ function due to oxidative damage. Considering that phytotherapy is an important tool often used against oxidative stress, we would like to describe the beneficial effects of Heteropterys tomentosa intake to minimize the damage caused by CsA to the ventral prostate tissue of Wistar rats under laboratorial conditions. Methods Thirty adult Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were divided into: control group (water); CsA group (Cyclosporin A); Ht group (H. tomentosa infusion) and CsA + Ht group (CsA and H. tomentosa infusion). Plasmic levels of hepatotoxicity markers, triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose were quantified. The ventral prostate tissue was analyzed under light microscopy, using stereological, morphometrical and immunohistochemical techniques. Results H. tomentosa did not cause any alterations either of the plasmic parameters or of the ventral prostate structure. CsA caused alterations of GOT, total and indirect bilirubin, cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in the plasma; CsA-treated rats showed alterations of the ventral prostate tissue. There were no alterations regarding the plasma levels of GOT, triglycerides and glucose of CsA + Ht animals. The same group also showed normalization of most of the parameters analyzed on the ventral prostate tissue when compared to the CsA group. The treatments did not alter the pattern of AR expression or the apoptotic index of the ventral prostate epithelium. Conclusions The results suggest a protective action of the H. tomentosa infusion against the side effects of CsA on the ventral prostate tissue, which could also be observed with plasmic biochemical parameters. PMID:23406403

  10. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  11. Effects of CO2 inhalation exposure on mice vomeronasal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hacquemand, Romain; Buron, Gaelle; Pourié, Gregory; Karrer, Melanie; Jacquot, Laurence; Brand, Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Nasal epitheliums are the first sites of the respiratory tract in contact with the external environment and may therefore be susceptible to damage from exposure to many toxic volatile substances (i.e., volatile organic components, vapors, and gases). In the field of inhalation toxicology, a number of studies have considered the main olfactory epithelium, but few have dealt with the epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO). However, in several species such as in rodents, the VNO (an organ of pheromone detection) plays an important role in social interactions, and alterations of this organ are known to induce adaptative behavioral disturbances. Among volatile toxicants, health effects of inhaled gases have been thoroughly investigated, especially during CO(2) inhalation because of its increasing atmospheric concentration. Therefore, this work was designed to examine the effects of 3% CO(2) inhalation on VNO in two different exposure conditions (5 h/day and 12 h/day) in mice. Behavioral sensitivity tests to urine of congener and histological measurements of VNO were conducted before, during (weeks 1-4), and after (weeks 5-8) CO(2) inhalation exposures. Results showed no significant modifications of behavioral responses to urine, but there were significant changes of both cell number and thickness of the VNO epithelium. Moreover, the findings indicated a selectively dose-dependent effect of CO(2), and further research could use other gases in the same manner for comparison.

  12. Examination of the reticular epithelium of the bovine pharyngeal tonsil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nasopharyngeal tonsil (adenoid), located at the posterior of the nasopharynx is ideally positioned to sample antigens entering through the nasal cavity or oral cavity. Entering antigens will first contact tonsilar epithelium. To better understand the cellular composition of this important epithe...

  13. Quantum Dot Distribution in the Olfactory Epithelium After Nasal Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotto, D.; De Marchis, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of human applications from industrial to bio-medical fields. However, the unique characteristics of nanoparticles, such as the small size, large surface area per mass and high reactivity raises great concern on the adverse effects of these particles on ecological systems and human health. There are several pioneer studies reporting translocation of inhaled particulates to the brain through a potential neuronal uptake mediated by the olfactory nerve (1, 2, 3). However, no direct evidences have been presented up to now on the pathway followed by the nanoparticles from the nose to the brain. In addition to a neuronal pathway, nanoparticles could gain access to the central nervous system through extracellular pathways (perineuronal, perivascular and cerebrospinal fluid paths). In the present study we investigate the localization of intranasally delivered fluorescent nanoparticles in the olfactory epithelium. To this purpose we used quantum dots (QDs), a model of innovative fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals commonly used in cell and animal biology (4). Intranasal treatments with QDs were performed acutely on adult CD1 mice. The olfactory epithelium was collected and analysed by confocal microscopy at different survival time after treatment. Data obtained indicate that the neuronal components of the olfactory epithelium are not preferentially involved in QDs uptake, thus suggesting nanoparticles can cross the olfactory epithelium through extracellular pathways.

  14. Effects of CO2 inhalation exposure on mice vomeronasal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hacquemand, Romain; Buron, Gaelle; Pourié, Gregory; Karrer, Melanie; Jacquot, Laurence; Brand, Gerard

    2010-08-01

    Nasal epitheliums are the first sites of the respiratory tract in contact with the external environment and may therefore be susceptible to damage from exposure to many toxic volatile substances (i.e., volatile organic components, vapors, and gases). In the field of inhalation toxicology, a number of studies have considered the main olfactory epithelium, but few have dealt with the epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO). However, in several species such as in rodents, the VNO (an organ of pheromone detection) plays an important role in social interactions, and alterations of this organ are known to induce adaptative behavioral disturbances. Among volatile toxicants, health effects of inhaled gases have been thoroughly investigated, especially during CO(2) inhalation because of its increasing atmospheric concentration. Therefore, this work was designed to examine the effects of 3% CO(2) inhalation on VNO in two different exposure conditions (5 h/day and 12 h/day) in mice. Behavioral sensitivity tests to urine of congener and histological measurements of VNO were conducted before, during (weeks 1-4), and after (weeks 5-8) CO(2) inhalation exposures. Results showed no significant modifications of behavioral responses to urine, but there were significant changes of both cell number and thickness of the VNO epithelium. Moreover, the findings indicated a selectively dose-dependent effect of CO(2), and further research could use other gases in the same manner for comparison. PMID:19924548

  15. Botanical derivatives for the prostate.

    PubMed

    Cristoni, A; Di Pierro, F; Bombardelli, E

    2000-08-01

    The prostate, after the age of 45 years, may undergo benign hyperplasia (BPH). Its etiology has not yet been completely explained, but different factors play a major role in its occurrence, among them, the sexual hormones (with a fundamental role of 5 alpha reductase). The 5-alpha reductase activity and inflammatory aspects in the prostate tissue can be effectively controlled with the use of highly standardized plant extracts (Pygeum africanum, Serenoa repens, etc.), which yield excellent results in the prophylaxis and treatment of the symptoms linked to prostate hypertrophy. The prostate tissue is not affected only by benign diseases but may also be subject to neoplastic transformation. From an epidemiological point of view, a vegetable derivative, lycopene, was linked with a lower occurrence of prostate carcinoma. A recent clinical study demonstrated that lycopene might not only prevent prostate cancer but also have therapeutic effects.

  16. Prostate cancer markers: An update

    PubMed Central

    PENTYALA, SRINIVAS; WHYARD, TERRY; PENTYALA, SAHANA; MULLER, JOHN; PFAIL, JOHN; PARMAR, SUNJIT; HELGUERO, CARLOS G.; KHAN, SARDAR

    2016-01-01

    As the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men, prostate cancer currently accounts for 29% of all diagnosed cancers, and ranks second as the cause of cancer fatality in American men. Prostatic cancer is rarely symptomatic early in its course and therefore disease presentation often implies local extension or even metastatic disease. Thus, it is extremely critical to detect and diagnose prostate cancer in its earliest stages, often prior to the presentation of symptoms. Three of the most common techniques used to detect prostate cancer are the digital rectal exam, the transrectal ultrasound, and the use of biomarkers. This review presents an update regarding the field of prostate cancer biomarkers and comments on future biomarkers. Although there is not a lack of research in the field of prostate cancer biomarkers, the discovery of a novel biomarker that may have the advantage of being more specific and effective warrants future scientific inquiry. PMID:26998261

  17. Prostate cancer stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Zhi; Jiang, Yuan; Keller, Evan. T.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides insights into pathophysiology of cancers and their therapeutic response. The CSC model has been both controversial, yet provides a foundation to explore cancer biology. In this review, we provide an overview of CSC concepts, biology and potential therapeutic avenues. We then focus on prostate CSC including (1) their purported origin as either basal-derived or luminal-derived cells; (2) markers used for prostate CSC identification; (3) alterations of signaling pathways in prostate CSCs (4) involvement of prostate CSCs in metastasis of PCa and (5) microRNA-mediated regulation of prostate CSCs. Although definitive evidence for the identification and characterization of prostate CSCs still remains unclear, future directions pursuing therapeutic targets of CSCs may provide novel insights for the treatment of PCa. PMID:22402315

  18. Prostatic Stromal Hyperplasia with Atypia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ryan C.; Wu, Kevin J.; Cheville, John C.; Thiel, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  19. Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ryan C; Wu, Kevin J; Cheville, John C; Thiel, David D

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  20. Changes in the acinar activity patterns of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in livers of male and female rats upon feeding a high protein and a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, M; Luttringer, C; Colombi, M

    1990-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity was investigated in relation to its localization within the liver acinus of male and female rats after feeding either a high protein diet (77%) or a high fat diet (52%). Both diets led to sex-dependent changes in activity and acinar distribution patterns. In male rats high protein diet provoked a shift in the acinar activity pattern towards the perivenous parts of the acinus without increase in average activity. Yet in the livers of females the activity was increased in all parts of the acinus, but to a greater extent in the perivenous parts of the acinus. Feeding a high fat diet increased PEPCK activity in males and to an even greater extent in females. In both sexes the increase was greater in the perivenous zone when compared to the changes within the periportal zone. The results are discussed in relation to changes in the concentrations of glucoregulatory hormones.

  1. Prostatic Leiomyoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohammed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jalal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohammed-Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic enlargement due to benign adenomatous hyperplasia is very common in elderly males. However, benign mesenchymal tumors especially true leiomyoma of the prostate are rare. We describe a 68-year-old male presenting a urinary obstruction lasting more than two years. The patient was referred for an acute urinary retention. The clinical examination was normal. The perrectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate without abnormalities. An endoscopic resection was performed. The histopathological examination revealed a benign smooth muscle tumor with absence of glandular hyperplasia; the result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, the diagnosis of true leiomyoma of the prostate was made. PMID:23198266

  2. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wibmer, Andreas G; Burger, Irene A; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig; Weber, Wolfgang A; Vargas, Hebert Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men in the Western world. The natural history and clinical course of prostate cancer are markedly diverse, ranging from small indolent intraprostatic lesions to highly aggressive disseminated disease. An understanding of this biologic heterogeneity is considered a necessary requisite in the quest for the adoption of precise and personalized management strategies. Molecular imaging offers the potential for noninvasive assessment of the biologic interactions underpinning prostate carcinogenesis. Currently, numerous molecular imaging probes are in clinical use or undergoing preclinical or clinical evaluation. These probes can be divided into those that image increased cell metabolism, those that target prostate cancer-specific membrane proteins and receptor molecules, and those that bind to the bone matrix adjacent to metastases to bone. The increased metabolism and vascular changes in prostate cancer cells can be evaluated with radiolabeled analogs of choline, acetate, glucose, amino acids, and nucleotides. The androgen receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (ie, bombesin) are overexpressed in prostate cancer and can be targeted by specific radiolabeled imaging probes. Because metastatic prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic signaling pathways of adjacent bone tissue, bone-seeking radiotracers are sensitive tools for the detection of metastases to bone. Knowledge about the underlying biologic processes responsible for the phenotypes associated with the different stages of prostate cancer allows an appropriate choice of methods and helps avoid pitfalls. PMID:26587888

  3. Prostate resection - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Laser prostatectomy - discharge; Transurethral needle ablation - discharge; TUNA - discharge; Transurethral incision - discharge; TUIP - discharge; Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate - discharge; HoLep - discharge; Interstitial laser ...

  4. Prostatitis--clinical and bacterial studies.

    PubMed

    Chandiok, S; Fisk, P G; Riley, V C

    1992-01-01

    Forty men with clinical prostatitis were studied to determine the value of symptomatology and categorization and 30 (75%) were classified as having prostatitis on the basis of prostatic localization studies. Of these 3 (10%) had chronic bacterial prostatitis, 18 (60%) had chronic abacterial prostatitis, and 9 (30%) had prostatodynia. No patient had acute bacterial prostatitis. Although Enterobacteriaciae were isolated from the 3 men with chronic bacterial prostatitis, these bacteria along with Staphlococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, and Chlamydia trachomatis were isolated from a further 6 patients. The mean pH of the expressed prostatic secretion was measured for each group and was found to be 7.6 for those with chronic bacterial prostatitis, 7.1 for chronic abacterial prostatitis, 6.5 for prostatodynia, and 6.9 for those with urethritis suggesting that this test may be of value in the diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis.

  5. Successful Salvage Chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX for Recurrent Mixed Acinar Cell Carcinoma and Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas in an Adolescent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pfrommer, Sarah; Weber, Achim; Dutkowski, Philipp; Schäfer, Niklaus G.; Müllhaupt, Beat; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Breitenstein, Stefan; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C.; Stenner, Frank; Renner, Christoph; D'Addario, Giannicola; Graf, Hans-Jörg; Knuth, Alexander; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are rare in children and adolescents. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a mixed acinar cell carcinoma/ductal adenocarcinoma with blastomatous components. He received multimodal treatment including various chemotherapy regimens and multistep surgery including liver transplantation. Introduction of FOLFIRINOX after relapse repeatedly achieved a durable metabolic and clinical response with good quality of life. PMID:24163668

  6. Successful Salvage Chemotherapy with FOLFIRINOX for Recurrent Mixed Acinar Cell Carcinoma and Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas in an Adolescent Patient.

    PubMed

    Pfrommer, Sarah; Weber, Achim; Dutkowski, Philipp; Schäfer, Niklaus G; Müllhaupt, Beat; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Breitenstein, Stefan; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Stenner, Frank; Renner, Christoph; D'Addario, Giannicola; Graf, Hans-Jörg; Knuth, Alexander; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Samaras, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are rare in children and adolescents. Here, we report the case of a 15-year-old boy who presented with a mixed acinar cell carcinoma/ductal adenocarcinoma with blastomatous components. He received multimodal treatment including various chemotherapy regimens and multistep surgery including liver transplantation. Introduction of FOLFIRINOX after relapse repeatedly achieved a durable metabolic and clinical response with good quality of life. PMID:24163668

  7. Differences in claudin synthesis in primary cultures of acinar cells from rat salivary gland are correlated with the specific three-dimensional organization of the cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Bing; Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko; Michikawa, Hiromi; Satoh, Keitaro; Katsumata, Osamu; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Tight junctions are essential for the maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. We have previously established a system for the primary culture of salivary parotid acinar cells that retain their ability to generate new secretory granules and to secrete proteins in a signal-dependent manner. Because cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion are prerequisites for the formation of epithelial tissues, we have investigated the structure of the tight junctions in these cultures. We have found two types of cellular organization in the culture: monolayers and semi-spherical clusters. Electron microscopy has revealed tight junctions near the apical region of the lateral membranes between cells in the monolayers and cells at the surface of the clusters. The cells in the interior of the clusters also have tight junctions and are organized around a central lumen. These interior cells retain more secretory granules than the surface or monolayer cells, suggesting that they maintain their original character as acinar cells. The synthesis of claudin-4 increases during culture, although it is not detectable in the cells immediately after isolation from the glands. Immunofluorescence microscopy has shown that claudin-4 is synthesized in the monolayers and at the surface of the clusters, but not inside the clusters. Only claudin-3, which is present in the original acinar cells following isolation and in the intact gland, has been detected inside the clusters. These results suggest that differences in claudin expression are related to the three-dimensional structures of the cell cultures and reflect their ability to function as acinar cells.

  8. Leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of prostaglandin and constitutive nitric oxide synthase pathways.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2008-04-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic cytokine secreted by adipocytes but also identified in salivary glands and saliva, is recognized as an important element of oral mucosal defense. Here, we report that in sublingual salivary glands leptin protects the acinar cells of against ethanol cytotoxicity. We show that ethanol- induced cytotoxicity, characterized by a marked drop in the acinar cell capacity for NO production, arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin generation, was subject to suppression by leptin. The loss in countering capacity of leptin on the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity was attained with cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin and nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, as well as PP2, an inhibitor of Src kinase. Indomethacin, while not affecting leptin-induced arachidonic acid release, caused the inhibition in PGE2 generation, pretreatment with L-NAME led to the inhibition in NO production, whereas PP2 exerted the inhibitory effect on leptin-induced changes in NO, arachidonic acid, and PGE2. The leptin-induced changes in arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation were blocked by ERK inhibitor, PD98059, but not by PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin. Further, leptin suppression of ethanol cytotoxicity was reflected in the increased Akt and cNOS phosphorylation that was sensitive to PP2. Moreover, the stimulatory effect of leptin on the acinar cell cNOS activity was inhibited not only by PP2, but also by Akt inhibitor, SH-5, while wortmannin had no effect. Our findings demonstrate that leptin protection of salivary gland acinar cells against ethanol cytotoxicity involves Src kinase-mediated parallel activation of MAPK/ERK and Akt that result in up-regulation of the respective prostaglandin and nitric oxide synthase pathways.

  9. Protein kinase C expression in salivary gland acinar epithelial cells in non-obese diabetic mice, an experimental model for Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tensing, E-K; Ma, J; Hukkanen, M; Fox, H S; Li, T-F; Törnwall, J; Konttinen, Y T

    2005-01-01

    We planned to investigate the expression of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in acinar epithelial cells of salivary glands in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse to find out if they develop changes of the PKC system like those seen in the human counterpart, i.e. in Sjögren's syndrome. Parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands from NOD and control BALB/c mice were stained with a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against conventional (alpha, beta, and gamma), novel (delta, epsilon, and theta), and atypical (lambda and iota) PKC isoforms using the streptavidin/HRP method. Similarly to human labial salivary glands, acinar epithelial cells of the healthy control BALB/c mice contained two of the conventional PKC isoforms, alpha and beta. Acinar and ductal epithelial cells also contained the atypical PKC isoforms lambda and iota. PKC isoforms gamma, delta, epsilon, and theta were not found. NOD mice which displayed focal sialadenitis contained the same conventional and atypical PKC isoforms. The acinar cells in NOD mice, in contrast to the Sjögren's syndrome patients, did not lack PKC alpha or beta. On the contrary, PKC alpha and beta staining was stronger than in the control BALB/c mice. The present results demonstrate that both conventional and atypical PKC isoforms participate in the salivary epithelial cell biology and that there are mouse strain-associated and/or disease state-associated changes in their expression. The lack of PKC alpha and beta isoforms found in Sjögren's syndrome was not reproduced in NOD mice, which discloses one more difference between the human disease and its NOD mouse model.

  10. Somatostatin receptors on rat pancreatic acinar cells. Pharmacological and structural characterization and demonstration of down-regulation in streptozotocin diabetes.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1986-06-15

    The binding of somatostatin-14 (S-14) to rat pancreatic acinar cell membranes was characterized using [125I-Tyr11]S-14 as the radioligand. Maximum binding was observed at pH 7.4 and was Ca2+-dependent. Such Ca2+ dependence of S-14 receptor binding was not observed in other tissues. Scatchard analysis of the competitive inhibition by S-14 of [125I-Tyr11]S-14 binding revealed a single class of high affinity sites (Kd = 0.5 +/- 0.07 nM) with a binding capacity (Bmax) of 266 +/- 22 fmol/mg of protein. [D-Trp8]S-14 and structural analogs with halogenated Trp moiety exhibited 2-32-fold greater binding affinity than S-14, [D-F5-Trp8]S-14 being the most potent. [Tyr11]S-14 was equipotent with S-14. The affinity of somatostatin-28 for binding to these receptors was 50% of that of S-14. Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) inhibited the binding of [125I-Tyr11]S-14, but its inhibition curve was not parallel to that of S-14. In the presence of 1 nM CCK-8, the Bmax of S-14 receptors was reduced to 150 +/- 17 fmol/mg of protein. Dibutyryl cyclic GMP, a CCK receptor antagonist, partially reversed the inhibitory action of CCK-8, suggesting that CCK receptors mediate the inhibition of S-14 receptor binding. GDP, GTP, and guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate inhibit S-14 receptor binding in this tissue. The inhibition was shown to be due to decrease in binding capacity and not due to change in affinity. Specifically bound [125I-Tyr11]S-14 cross-linked to the S-14 receptors was found associated with three proteins of approximate Mr = 200,000, 80,000, and 70,000 which could be detected under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Finally, pancreatic acinar cell S-14 receptors were shown to be down-regulated by persistent hypersomatostatinemia 1 week after streptozotocin-induced diabetes characterized by decreased Bmax (105 +/- 13 fmol/mg of protein) without any change in affinity. We conclude that pancreatic acinar cell membrane S-14 receptors require Ca2+ for maximal binding and thus

  11. Low-level (gallium-aluminum-arsenide) laser irradiation of Par-C10 cells and acinar cells of rat parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Onizawa, Katsuhiro; Muramatsu, Takashi; Matsuki, Miwako; Ohta, Kazumasa; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Oda, Yutaka; Shimono, Masaki

    2009-03-01

    We investigated cell response, including cell proliferation and expression of heat stress protein and bcl-2, to clarify the influence of low-level [gallium-aluminum-arsenide (Ga-Al-As) diode] laser irradiation on Par-C10 cells derived from the acinar cells of rat parotid glands. Furthermore, we also investigated amylase release and cell death from irradiation in acinar cells from rat parotid glands. The number of Par-C10 cells in the laser-irradiated groups was higher than that in the non-irradiated group at days 5 and 7, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Greater expression of heat shock protein (HSP)25 and bcl-2 was seen on days 1 and 3 in the irradiated group. Assay of the released amylase showed no significant difference statistically between the irradiated group and the non-irradiated group. Trypan blue exclusion assay revealed that there was no difference in the ratio of dead to live cells between the irradiated and the non-irradiated groups. These results suggest that low-level laser irradiation promotes cell proliferation and expression of anti-apoptosis proteins in Par-C10 cells, but it does not significantly affect amylase secretion and does not induce rapid cell death in isolated acinar cells from rat parotid glands.

  12. Pancreatic Fat Accumulation, Fibrosis, and Acinar Cell Injury in the Zucker Diabetic Fatty Rat Fed a Chronic High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Akiko; Makino, Naohiko; Tozawa, Tomohiro; Shirahata, Nakao; Honda, Teiichiro; Ikeda, Yushi; Sato, Hideyuki; Ito, Miho; Kakizaki, Yasuharu; Akamatsu, Manabu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kawata, Sumio

    2014-01-01

    Objective The histological alteration of the exocrine pancreas in obesity has not been clarified. In the present study, we investigated biochemical and histological changes in the exocrine pancreas of obese model rats. Methods Zucker lean rats were fed a standard diet, and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were divided into 2 groups fed a standard diet and a high-fat diet, respectively. These experimental groups were fed each of the diets from 6 weeks until 12, 18, 24 weeks of age. We performed blood biochemical assays and histological analysis of the pancreas. Results In the ZDF rats fed a high-fat diet, the ratio of accumulated pancreatic fat area relative to exocrine gland area was increased significantly at 18 weeks of age in comparison with the other 2 groups (P < 0.05), and lipid droplets were observed in acinar cells. Subsequently, at 24 weeks of age in this group, pancreatic fibrosis and the serum exocrine pancreatic enzyme levels were increased significantly relative to the other 2 groups (P < 0.01). Conclusions In ZDF rats fed a chronic high-fat diet, fat accumulates in pancreatic acinar cells, and this fatty change seems to be related to subsequent pancreatic fibrosis and acinar cell injury. PMID:24717823

  13. SGLT1 protein expression in plasma membrane of acinar cells correlates with the sympathetic outflow to salivary glands in diabetic and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sabino-Silva, Robinson; Alves-Wagner, Ana B T; Burgi, Katia; Okamoto, Maristela M; Alves, Adilson S; Lima, Guilherme A; Freitas, Helayne S; Antunes, Vagner R; Machado, Ubiratan F

    2010-12-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction is a feature in diabetes and hypertension. We hypothesized that sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) participates in salivary dysfunctions through a sympathetic- and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. In Wistar-Kyoto (WKY), diabetic WKY (WKY-D), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and diabetic SHR (SHR-D) rats, PKA/SGLT1 proteins were analyzed in parotid and submandibular glands, and the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) to the glands was monitored. Basal SNA was threefold higher in SHR (P < 0.001 vs. WKY), and diabetes decreased this activity (∼50%, P < 0.05) in both WKY and SHR. The catalytic subunit of PKA and the plasma membrane SGLT1 content in acinar cells were regulated in parallel to the SNA. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic branch to salivary glands increased (∼30%, P < 0.05) PKA and SGLT1 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the observed regulations of SGLT1, revealing its location in basolateral membrane of acinar cells. Taken together, our results show highly coordinated regulation of sympathetic activity upon PKA activity and plasma membrane SGLT1 content in salivary glands. Furthermore, the present findings show that diabetic- and/or hypertensive-induced changes in the sympathetic activity correlate with changes in SGLT1 expression in basolateral membrane of acinar cells, which can participate in the salivary glands dysfunctions reported by patients with these pathologies.

  14. Variability in diagnostic opinion among pathologists for single small atypical foci in prostate biopsies.

    PubMed

    Van der Kwast, Theodorus H; Evans, Andrew; Lockwood, Gina; Tkachuk, Doug; Bostwick, David G; Epstein, Jonathan I; Humphrey, Peter A; Montironi, Rodolfo; Van Leenders, Geert J L H; Pihl, Carl-Gustaf; Neetens, Ingrid; Kujala, Paula M; Laurila, Marita; Mazerolles, Catharine; Bubendorf, Lukas; Finelli, Antonio; Watson, Kemp; Srigley, John

    2010-02-01

    Pathologists are increasingly exposed to prostate biopsies with small atypical foci, requiring differentiation between adenocarcinoma, atypical small acinar proliferation suspicious for malignancy, and a benign diagnosis. We studied the level of agreement for such atypical foci among experts in urologic pathology and all-round reference pathologists of the European Randomized Screening study of Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). For this purpose, we retrieved 20 prostate biopsies with small (most <1 mm) atypical foci. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides, including 10 immunostained slides were digitalized for virtual microscopy. The lesional area was not marked. Five experts and 7 ERSPC pathologists examined the cases. Multirater kappa statistics was applied to determine agreement and significant differences between experts and ERSPC pathologists. The kappa value of experts (0.39; confidence interval, 0.29-0.49) was significantly higher than that of ERSPC pathologists (0.21; confidence interval, 0.14-0.27). Full (100%) agreement was reached by the 5 experts for 7 of 20 biopsies. Experts and ERSPC pathologists rendered diagnoses ranging from benign to adenocarcinoma on the same biopsy in 5 and 9 biopsies, respectively. Most of these lesions comprised between 2 and 5 atypical glands. The experts diagnosed adenocarcinoma (49%) more often than the ERSPC pathologists (32%) (P<0.001). As agreement was particularly poor for foci comprising <6 glands, we would encourage pathologists to obtain intercollegial consultation of a specialized pathologist for these lesions before a carcinoma diagnosis, whereas clinicians may consider to perform staging biopsies before engaging on deferred or definite therapy. PMID:20061936

  15. [Screening for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Koch, Klaus; Büchter, Roland; Lange, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer screening has been a controversial for decades. The recently published findings of large trials have further intensified the debate. The prospect of reducing mortality from prostate cancer is measured against the risk of over-diagnosing the disease. In individual cases, the trade-off between possible benefits and harms is possible to ascertain, so general recommendations in favor of or against PSA tests for individuals cannot be made. The majority of men, however, are not well-informed on the possible advantages and drawbacks of screening. This situation urgently needs to be corrected. The PSA test is promoted to healthy men, who need to be provided with especially detailed information. If not provided with clear and unbiased information on the risks associated with the test (above all over-diagnosis and over-treatment), these men cannot be considered to be fully informed. PMID:23535548

  16. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated.

  17. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  18. [Diagnostic problems and prognostic factors in prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Tarján, Miklós

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to refine the methodology for discriminating ductal (DAP) and acinar adenocarcinomas (AAP) of the prostate preoperatively with a high degree of accuracy, and confirm that prostate carcinoma of ductal origin is a more aggressive subtype. Moreover, we intended to evaluate the clinical utility of transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic sextant or octant biopsies in prediction of extracapsular extension (ECE) at radical prostatectomy. A blinded retrospective analysis of 3-dimensional histology specimens from 110 consecutive radical prostatectomy (RP) cases operated between 2000 and 2006 was carried out (average follow-up: 5.1 years). The samples were also analyzed for 9 different biomarkers. We performed a retrospective analysis of 84 cases of patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided systematic sextant (in 60 cases) or octant (in 24 cases) biopsy. The presence of ECE was correlated to the number of positive biopsies on each side of the prostate by chi-square analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated for both positive (two or three positive biopsies per side) and negative (no or only one positive biopsy per side) test results. The number of positive cores was thereafter combined with two other parameters: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and Gleason score. 3-dimensional and conventional histology classified 97 cases of AAP and 13 cases of DAP. DAP cases had a significantly greater frequency of pT3a and more advanced cancers (p<0.0001), >20 mm tumor focus (p=0.0020), highgrade PIN (p=0.0079), Gleason score ≥7 (p<0.0001), positive surgical margin (p=0.0219), ECE (p<0.0001), vascular invasion (p=0.0033), seminal vesicle infiltration (p=0.0213), biochemical/local recurrence (p=0.0015), regional lymph node metastases and distant metastases (p<0.0001). Three biomarkers in combination (chromogranine A, EGFR, p53) distinguished DAP from AAP with an accuracy of 94% (AUC 0.94; 95% CI: 0.88-0.99). ECE was

  19. Chronic prostatitis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ram; Mishra, Vibhash C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic prostatitis (CP) is a common condition. It causes significant suffering to the patients and constitutes a sizeable workload for the urologists. The purpose of this review is to describe the currently accepted concepts regarding the aspects of CP. Materials and Methods: Relevant papers on the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, evaluation and management of CP were identified through a search of MEDLINE using text terms “prostatitis”, “chronic prostatitis” and “chronic pelvic pain syndrome”. The list of articles thus obtained was supplemented by manual search of bibliographies of the identified articles and also by exploring the MEDLINE option “Related Articles”. Results: The salient points of the relevant articles on each aspect of CP have been summarized in the form of a non-systematic narrative review. Conclusion: Chronic prostatitis is caused by a variety of infective and non-infective factors and is characterized by a rather long remitting and relapsing clinical course. The diagnosis is based on symptoms comprising pain and nonspecific urinary and/or ejaculatory disturbances and microbiological tests to localize bacteria and/or leucocytes in segmented urinary tract specimens. The contemporary classification was proposed by the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Diabetes Digestive Kidney Diseases (NIH/NIDDK). National Institutes of Health - Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) is the patient evaluation tool used extensively in clinical practice and research. Management should be individualized, multimodal and of an appropriate duration. PMID:19468353

  20. The Endogenous Cell-Fate Factor Dachshund restrains Prostate Epithelial Cell Migration via Repression of Cytokine Secretion via a CXCL Signaling Module

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Wu, Kongming; Jiao, Xuanmao; Wang, Liping; Ju, Xiaoming; Wang, Min; Di Sante, Gabriele; Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Qiong; Li, Kevin; Sun, Xin; Xu, Congwen; Li, Zhiping; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; McCue, Peter; Lisanti, Michael P.; Wang, Chenguang; Davis, Richard J.; Mardon, Graeme; Pestell, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading form of cancer death in men. In a subset of PCa patients increased chemokine signaling IL-8 and IL-6 correlates with androgen therapy-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). IL-8 and IL-6 are produced by prostate epithelial cells and promote PCa cell invasion, however the mechanisms restraining prostate epithelial cell cytokine secretion are poorly understood. Herein the cell-fate determinant factor DACH1 inhibited androgen therapy-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) tumor growth in mice. Using Dach1fl/fl/Probasin-Cre bi-transgenic mice, we show IL-8 and IL-6 secretion was altered ~1000 fold by endogenous Dach1. Endogenous Dach1 is shown to serve as a key endogenous restraint to prostate epithelial cell growth and restrains migration via CXCL signaling. DACH1 inhibited expression, transcription and secretion of the CXCL genes (IL-8, IL-6) by binding to their promoter regulatory regions in chromatin. DACH1 is thus a newly defined determinant of benign and malignant prostate epithelium cellular growth, migration and cytokine abundance in vivo. PMID:25769723

  1. Selective secretion of annexin 1, a protein without a signal sequence, by the human prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Christmas, P; Callaway, J; Fallon, J; Jones, J; Haigler, H T

    1991-02-01

    Annexins are primarily intracellular proteins as would be predicted from their lack of hydrophobic signal sequences. However, we now report that the human prostate gland selectively secretes high concentrations of annexin 1 (also called lipocortin 1 and p35) and a proteolytic cleavage product, des1-29-annexin 1, into seminal plasma. Secreted annexin 1 had a blocked amino terminus and was structurally indistinguishable from intracellular annexin 1. Although annexin 1 and the structurally related protein, annexin 4, co-localized to many of the same cells of the ductal epithelium of the prostate, annexin 4 was not secreted. Thus, the secretion of annexin 1 appears to involve a highly selective mechanism that does not involve targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum by a hydrophobic signal sequence.

  2. Incidental fleurodeoxyglucose uptake in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wong, W L; Moule, R N; Nunan, T

    2010-01-01

    This commentary confirms the rarity of prostatic cancer associated with incidental prostatic fleurodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. The study adds to the literature by showing that even if a prostate lesion is FDG avid it is unlikely to be due to cancer. The commentary considers the management of incidental prostate FDG uptake on the basis of the available evidence. PMID:20965899

  3. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  4. Methylseleninic Acid Superactivates p53-Senescence Cancer Progression Barrier in Prostate Lesions of Pten-Knockout Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Xiaolan; Wang, Ji; Jiang, Cheng; Bosland, Maarten C; Lü, Junxuan; Deng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Monomethylated selenium (MM-Se) forms that are precursors of methylselenol, such as methylseleninic acid (MSeA), differ in metabolism and anticancer activities in preclinical cell and animal models from seleno-methionine that had failed to exert preventive efficacy against prostate cancer in North American men. Given that human prostate cancer arises from precancerous lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN), which frequently have lost phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) tumor suppressor permitting phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (AKT) oncogenic signaling, we tested the efficacy of MSeA to inhibit HG-PIN progression in Pten prostate-specific knockout (KO) mice and assessed the mechanistic involvement of p53-mediated cellular senescence and of the androgen receptor (AR). We observed that short-term (4 weeks) oral MSeA treatment significantly increased expression of P53 and P21Cip1 proteins and senescence-associated-β-galactosidase staining, and reduced Ki67 cell proliferation index in Pten KO prostate epithelium. Long-term (25 weeks) MSeA administration significantly suppressed HG-PIN phenotype, tumor weight, and prevented emergence of invasive carcinoma in Pten KO mice. Mechanistically, the long-term MSeA treatment not only sustained P53-mediated senescence, but also markedly reduced AKT phosphorylation and AR abundance in the Pten KO prostate. Importantly, these cellular and molecular changes were not observed in the prostate of wild-type littermates which were similarly treated with MSeA. Because p53 signaling is likely to be intact in HG-PIN compared with advanced prostate cancer, the selective superactivation of p53-mediated senescence by MSeA suggests a new paradigm of cancer chemoprevention by strengthening a cancer progression barrier through induction of irreversible senescence with additional suppression of AR and AKT oncogenic signaling.

  5. Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) is regulated by androgens and enhances androgen-dependent prostate development.

    PubMed

    Keil, Kimberly P; Mehta, Vatsal; Branam, Amanda M; Abler, Lisa L; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A; Joshi, Pinak S; Schmitz, Christopher T; Marker, Paul C; Vezina, Chad M

    2012-12-01

    Fetal prostate development from urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium requires androgen receptor (AR) activation in UGS mesenchyme (UGM). Despite growing awareness of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the UGS, we are still limited in our knowledge of androgen-responsive genes in UGM that initiate prostate ductal development. We found that WNT inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) mRNA is more abundant in male vs. female mouse UGM in which its expression temporally and spatially overlaps androgen-responsive steroid 5α-reductase 2 (Srd5a2). Wif1 mRNA is also present in prostatic buds during their elongation and branching morphogenesis. Androgens are necessary and sufficient for Wif1 expression in mouse UGS explant mesenchyme, and testicular androgens remain necessary for normal Wif1 expression in adult mouse prostate stroma. WIF1 contributes functionally to prostatic bud formation. In the presence of androgens, exogenous WIF1 protein increases prostatic bud number and UGS basal epithelial cell proliferation without noticeably altering the pattern of WNT/β-catenin-responsive Axin2 or lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (Lef1) mRNA. Wif1 mutant male UGSs exhibit increased (Sfrp)2 and (Sfrp)3 expression and form the same number of prostatic buds as the wild-type control males. Collectively our results reveal Wif1 as one of the few known androgen-responsive genes in the fetal mouse UGM and support the hypothesis that androgen-dependent Wif1 expression is linked to the mechanism of androgen-induced prostatic bud formation.

  6. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  7. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2–ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  8. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  9. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  10. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  11. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh; Patel, Payal; Verma, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person's genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed. PMID:24213111

  12. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md.; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  13. Orthogonal arrays in normal and injured respiratory airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R E

    1985-02-01

    Orthogonal arrays are found on plasma membranes of glial cells, in the central nervous system, on muscle plasma membranes at neuromuscular junctions, and on a variety of epithelial cells. These structures have been correlated with ion flux. With the aid of freeze fracture technique, orthogonal particle arrays were found on plasma membranes on airway epithelial cells of rats and hamsters. They have been found in abundance at the base of secretory cells throughout normal airway epithelium. These structures were found to increase in number during regeneration in response to injury and they were found in great numbers on plasma membranes of all airway cells in response to acute and chronic NO2 exposure. The lateral and basal plasma membranes of the respiratory epithelium are a new source for studying orthogonal arrays. The normal number and distribution of these arrays can be perturbed in response to mechanical and chemical injury. PMID:3968185

  14. [Hormone-mediated reactions in the endosalpinx epithelium].

    PubMed

    Glukhovets, B I; Ukhov, Iu I; Lebedev, S S; Plastun, G A; Bulaeva, V P

    1983-07-01

    The epithelium of normal uterine tubes resected in 38 young women of the child-bearing age during the periods of the maximal physiological fluctuations of the ovarian steroid hormones levels has been studied. The correlative dependence between the morphometrical data and the results of quanitative biochemical analysis of the estrogen excretion has been investigated. The morphometric method reliably reflects the hormone-dependent variabilities of the oviduct epithelium and makes it possible to perform an objective morphological evaluation of the ovarian functional activity. The height and specific density of cells in the epithelial layer, portion of the aciliary cells and nuclear volume of the ciliary cells are the most important for diagnosis as compared to the excretory level of the estrogenic hormones. PMID:6625907

  15. Hydrodynamics of stratified epithelium: Steady state and linearized dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for stratified epithelium is presented. The viscoelastic properties of the tissue are assumed to be dependent on the spatial distribution of proliferative and differentiated cells. Based on this assumption, a hydrodynamic description of tissue dynamics at the long-wavelength, long-time limit is developed, and the analysis reveals important insights into the dynamics of an epithelium close to its steady state. When the proliferative cells occupy a thin region close to the basal membrane, the relaxation rate towards the steady state is enhanced by cell division and cell apoptosis. On the other hand, when the region where proliferative cells reside becomes sufficiently thick, a flow induced by cell apoptosis close to the apical surface enhances small perturbations. This destabilizing mechanism is general for continuous self-renewal multilayered tissues; it could be related to the origin of certain tissue morphology, tumor growth, and the development pattern.

  16. The dorsal lingual epithelium of Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima incisa (Chelonia, Cryptodira).

    PubMed

    Josef Beisser, Christian; Lemell, Patrick; Weisgram, Josef

    2004-03-01

    This study employed light microscopic (LM), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods to provide detailed morphological information on the histological and ultrastructural features of the dorsal tongue epithelium of Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima incisa. SEM revealed columnar papillae laterally, as well as papillae, which tend to have a ridge-like appearance in the center of the tongue. LM and TEM showed three different zones of lingual epithelium: a stratified apical area with serous cells at the top of the papillae, a stratified lateral area with both serous and mucus cells, and an unstratified glandular area consisting of distinct glandular ducts with mucus cells. Comparison with morphological data from other turtles shows that the lingual epithelial structure in R. p. incisa is in accordance with that observed for other generalized omnivores which prefer a terrestrial lifestyle, thus matching the ecological information about this species.

  17. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. PMID:27660464

  18. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation.

  19. Platelet-activating factor promotes motility in breast cancer cells and disrupts non-transformed breast acinar structures.

    PubMed

    Anandi, V Libi; Ashiq, K A; Nitheesh, K; Lahiri, M

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of studies have demonstrated that chronic inflammatory microenvironment influences the genesis and progression of tumors. Such microenvironments are enriched with various lipid mediators. Platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is one such lipid mediator that is secreted by different immune cell types during inflammation and by breast cancer cells upon stimulation with growth factors. Overexpression of PAF-receptor has also been observed in many other cancers. Here we report the possible roles of PAF in tumor initiation and progression. MCF10A, a non-transformed and non-malignant mammary epithelial cell line, when grown as 3D 'on-top' cultures form spheroids that have a distinct hollow lumen surrounded by a monolayer of epithelial cells. Exposure of these spheroids to PAF resulted in the formation of large deformed acinar structures with disrupted lumen, implying transformation. We then examined the response of transformed cells such as MDA-MB 231 to stimulation with PAF. We observed collective cell migration as well as motility at the single cell level on PAF induction, suggesting its role during metastasis. This increase in collective cell migration is mediated via PI3-kinase and/or JNK pathway and is independent of the MAP-kinase pathway. Taken together this study signifies a novel role of PAF in inducing transformation of non-tumorigenic cells and the vital role in promotion of breast cancer cell migration. PMID:26531049

  20. Formation of post-confluence structure in human parotid gland acinar cells on PLGA through regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yen-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Chou, Ya-Shuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Su, Wei-Fang; Lou, Pei-Jen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2012-01-01

    As a potential solution for patients to retrieve their lost salivary gland functions, tissue engineering of an auto-secretory device is profoundly needed. Under serum-free environment, primary human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells can be obtained. After reaching confluence, PGAC cells spontaneously form three-dimension (3D) cell aggregations, termed post-confluence structure (PCS), and change their behaviors. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been widely used in the field of biomedical applications because of its biodegradable properties for desired functions. Nonetheless, the role of PLGA in facilitating PGAC cells to form PCS has seldom been explored to recover epithelial characteristics. In this study, PGAC cells were found to have a greater tendency to form PCS on PLGA than on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). By tracing cell migration paths and modulating E-cadherin activity with specific inhibitor or antibody, we demonstrated that the static force of homophilic interaction on surfaces of individual cells, but not the dynamics of cell migration, played a more important role in PCS formation. Thus, PLGA was successfully confirmed to support PGAC cells to form more PCS through the effects on enhancing E-cadherin expression, which is associated with FAK/ILK/Snail expression in PGAC cells. This result indicates that selective appropriate biomaterials may be potentially useful in generating 3D PCS on two-dimension (2D) substrate without fabricating a complex 3D scaffold.

  1. A comparison study of pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with ductal adenocarcinoma using computed tomography in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingbing; Wang, Xiaolin; Guo, Rongfang; Li, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare tumor that is difficult to diagnose preoperatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the computed tomography (CT) features of ACC and compare the results with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (DAC) for improving preoperative diagnosis. The control group consisted of 34 patients with DAC collected from the pathology electronic database. The CT imaging from nine patients with pathologically confirmed ACC was retrospectively reviewed. Two radiologists independently assessed the tumor location, size, texture, and enhancement patterns. We found that 64.3% (9/14) of ACC tumors were homogeneous and 35.7% (5/14) had necrosis. The percentage of common bile duct and pancreatic ductal dilation was 14.3% (2/14) and 7.1% (1/14), respectively. The mean size of ACC was 50.1±24.2 mm. The mean attenuation of ACC was 35.4±3.9 Hounsfield unit (HU) before enhancement, 73.1±42.9 HU in arterial phase, and 71.8±15.6 HU in port venous phase. It is difficult to distinguish ACC from DAC preoperatively only based on CT findings. However, compared with DAC, we found that ACC tumors are likely to be larger and contain more heterogeneous intratumoral necrotic hypovascular regions, and less pancreatic ductal and common biliary dilation. PMID:27660464

  2. Gallbladder epithelium as a niche for chronic Salmonella carriage.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Gunn, John S

    2013-08-01

    Although typhoid fever has been intensively studied, chronic typhoid carriage still represents a problem for the transmission and persistence of the disease in areas of endemicity. This chronic state is highly associated with the presence of gallstones in the gallbladder of infected carriers upon which Salmonella can form robust biofilms. However, we hypothesize that in addition to gallstones, the gallbladder epithelium aids in the establishment/maintenance of chronic carriage. In this work, we present evidence of the role of the gallbladder epithelium in chronic carriage by a mechanism involving invasion, intracellular persistence, and biofilm formation. Salmonella was able to adhere to and invade polarized gallbladder epithelial cells apically in the absence and presence of bile in a Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1)-dependent manner. Intracellular replication of Salmonella was also evident at 12 and 24 h postinvasion. A flowthrough system revealed that Salmonella is able to adhere to and form extensive bacterial foci on gallbladder epithelial cells as early as 12 h postinoculation. In vivo experiments using a chronic mouse model of typhoid carriage showed invasion and damage of the gallbladder epithelium and lamina propria up to 2 months after Salmonella infection, with an abundant presence of macrophages, a relative absence of neutrophils, and extrusion of infected epithelial cells. Additionally, microcolonies of Salmonella cells were evident on the surface of the mouse gallbladder epithelia up to 21 days postinfection. These data reveal a second potential mechanism, intracellular persistence and/or bacterial aggregation in/on the gallbladder epithelium with luminal cell extrusion, for Salmonella maintenance in the gallbladder.

  3. Intraocular involvement with subretinal pigment epithelium infiltrates by mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed Central

    Erny, B. C.; Egbert, P. R.; Peat, I. M.; Shorrock, K.; Rosenthal, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    We report a case of intraocular mycosis fungoides in a 48-year-old man. The patient presented with decreased visual acuity, white subretinal lesions, and vitritis. Post-mortem histopathology revealed malignant T cell infiltrates consistent with mycosis fungoides in the retina, vitreous, and between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane Focal atrophy of the RPE, along with the sub-RPE infiltrates, correlated with the clinically visible fundus lesions. Images PMID:1751471

  4. Dietary nitrogen reduction enhances urea transport across goat rumen epithelium.

    PubMed

    Muscher, A S; Schröder, B; Breves, G; Huber, K

    2010-10-01

    Ruminants are very capable of adapting their N homeostasis to a reduced dietary N intake. However, the limits of this physiological adaptation are still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine the quantity of dietary N intake at which the needs of the animal are still satisfied. A study was performed in young White Saanen goats under conditions of dietary N reduction. Different semisynthetic diets with 19 to 7% CP were fed. Urea transport rates across the rumen epithelium from the blood into the ruminal fluid were quantified by Ussing chamber experiments. Reduced N intake increased urea transport rates across the mucosa, which could be inhibited by phloretin. The role of parietal urease in driving urea transfer across the epithelium was negligible because its activity was inhibited by antibiotics during in vitro incubations of the epithelium. Concentrations of ammonia in the ruminal fluid were decreased by reducing dietary N intake, accompanied by diminished urease activity at the smallest dietary N intake. Over the range of plasma urea concentrations observed in the different feeding groups, salivary urea concentrations were 73% of plasma urea concentrations. By plotting plasma urea concentrations against serosal to mucosal urea flux rates, a threshold at 1.75 mmol of urea/L of plasma could be assessed, below which urea flux was strongly increased. This indicates that rumen urea transfer could be stimulated by decreased plasma urea concentrations via unknown mechanisms. The physiological relevance of this adaptation of the rumen epithelium is that it is considered a central mechanism in the N homeostasis of growing goats under reduced N intake.

  5. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  6. Genetic Regulation of Prostate Development

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Joshua; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2011-01-01

    Prostatic development is a dynamic process in which basic mechanisms of epithelial outgrowth and epithelial-mesenchymal interaction are initiated by androgens and androgen receptor signaling. Even in adulthood, the prostate's function remains tightly regulated by androgens--without them, pathologic diseases including hyperplastic and malignant growth which together plague nearly 50% of aging males does not occur. Unraveling the etiology of these pathologic processes is a complex and important goal. In fact, many insights into these processes have come from an intimate understanding of the complex signaling networks that regulate physiologic prostatic growth in development. This review aims to highlight important key molecules such as Nkx3.1, sonic hedgehog and Sox9 as well as key signaling pathways including the Fibroblast growth factor and Wnt pathways. These molecules and pathways are critical for prostate development with both know and postulated roles in prostatic pathology. PMID:20930191

  7. New drugs in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sangjun; Choi, Se Young; You, Dalsan; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2016-06-01

    The standard primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy since the 1940s. However, prostate cancer inevitably progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after a median duration of 18 months of androgen deprivation therapy. In patients with CRPC, docetaxel has been regarded as the standard treatment. However, survival advantages of docetaxel over other treatments are slim, and the need for new agents persists. In recent years, novel agents, including abiraterone, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223, and sipuleucel-T, have been approved for the treatment of CRPC, and more such agents based on diverse mechanisms are under investigation or evaluation. In this article, the authors reviewed the current literature on recent advances in medical treatment of prostate cancer, especially CRPC. In addition, the authors elaborated on novel drugs for prostate cancer currently undergoing investigation and their mechanisms. PMID:27358841

  8. Utilization trends and positive biopsy rates for prostate biopsies in the United States: 2005 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Deepak A; Bostwick, David G; Mendrinos, Savvas E; Anderson, Ann E; Olsson, Carl A

    2013-01-01

    This article assesses the positive biopsy rate and core sampling pattern in patients undergoing needle biopsy of the prostate in the United States at a national reference laboratory (NRL) and anatomic pathology laboratories integrated into urology group practices, and analyzes the relationship between positive biopsy rates and the number of specimen vials per biopsy. For the years 2005 to 2011 we collected pathology data from an NRL, including number of urologists and urology practices referring samples, total specimen vials submitted for prostate biopsies, and final pathologic diagnosis for each case. The diagnoses were categorized as benign, malignant, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or atypical small acinar proliferation. Over the same period, similar data were gathered from urology practices with in-house laboratories performing global pathology services (urology practice laboratories; UPLs) as identified by a survey of members of the Large Urology Group Practice Association. For each year studied, positive biopsy rate and number of specimen vials per biopsy were calculated in aggregate and separately for each site of service. From 2005 to 2011, 437,937 biopsies were submitted in > 4.23 million vials (9.4 specimen vials/biopsy); overall positive biopsy rate was 40.3%-this was identical at both the NRL and UPL (P = .97). Nationally, the number of specimen vials per biopsy increased sharply from a mean of 8.8 during 2005 to 2008 to a mean of 10.3 from 2009 to 2011 (difference, 1.5 specimen vials/biopsy; P = .03). For the most recent 3-year period (2009-2011), the difference of 0.6 specimen vials per biopsy between the NRL (10.0) and UPL (10.6) was not significant (P = 0.08). Positive biopsy rate correlated strongly (P < .01) with number of specimen vials per biopsy. The positive prostate biopsy rate is 40.3% and is identical across sites of service. Although there was a national trend toward increased specimen vials per biopsy from 2005 to 2011, from 2009 to

  9. Utilization Trends and Positive Biopsy Rates for Prostate Biopsies in the United States: 2005 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Deepak A; Bostwick, David G; Mendrinos, Savvas E; Anderson, Ann E; Olsson, Carl A

    2013-01-01

    This article assesses the positive biopsy rate and core sampling pattern in patients undergoing needle biopsy of the prostate in the United States at a national reference laboratory (NRL) and anatomic pathology laboratories integrated into urology group practices, and analyzes the relationship between positive biopsy rates and the number of specimen vials per biopsy. For the years 2005 to 2011 we collected pathology data from an NRL, including number of urologists and urology practices referring samples, total specimen vials submitted for prostate biopsies, and final pathologic diagnosis for each case. The diagnoses were categorized as benign, malignant, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or atypical small acinar proliferation. Over the same period, similar data were gathered from urology practices with in-house laboratories performing global pathology services (urology practice laboratories; UPLs) as identified by a survey of members of the Large Urology Group Practice Association. For each year studied, positive biopsy rate and number of specimen vials per biopsy were calculated in aggregate and separately for each site of service. From 2005 to 2011, 437,937 biopsies were submitted in > 4.23 million vials (9.4 specimen vials/biopsy); overall positive biopsy rate was 40.3%-this was identical at both the NRL and UPL (P = .97). Nationally, the number of specimen vials per biopsy increased sharply from a mean of 8.8 during 2005 to 2008 to a mean of 10.3 from 2009 to 2011 (difference, 1.5 specimen vials/biopsy; P = .03). For the most recent 3-year period (2009–2011), the difference of 0.6 specimen vials per biopsy between the NRL (10.0) and UPL (10.6) was not significant (P = 0.08). Positive biopsy rate correlated strongly (P < .01) with number of specimen vials per biopsy. The positive prostate biopsy rate is 40.3% and is identical across sites of service. Although there was a national trend toward increased specimen vials per biopsy from 2005 to 2011, from 2009

  10. The oxidant role of 4-hydroxynonenal in corneal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Longlong; Zong, Rongrong; Zhou, Jing; Ge, Lianping; Zhou, Tong; Ma, Jian-xing; Liu, Zuguo; Zhou, Yueping

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE or HNE) is a main endogenous product of cellular lipid peroxidation in tissues and is reported to play pathogenic roles in eye diseases. Here we investigated the association between 4-HNE and oxidative stress in the corneal epithelium. 4-HNE suppressed the cell viability of human corneal epithelial cells (HCE) in a concentration dependent manner. 4-HNE significantly increased the level of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT), a marker of oxidative stress, in HCE cells and corneal epithelium of rats by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot analysis. To its underlying mechanistic on ROS system, 4-HNE elevated the ROS generation enzyme NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and induced the activation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (NRF2) and its downstream effectors: NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1) (NQO1) and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP). Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and ROS scavenger, antagonized the inhibitory and oxidant effects of 4-HNE on the corneal epithelial cells. In conclusion, 4-HNE plays an oxidant role in the corneal epithelium and this work provides a new strategy for the pathogenesis and treatment of corneal diseases.

  11. Zinc uptake in vitro by human retinal pigment epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.A.; Rothman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, is present in unusually high concentrations in the chorioretinal complex relative to most other tissues. Because little has been known about the interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium and free or protein-associated zinc, we studied /sup 65/Zn uptake by human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro. When monolayers were exposed to differing concentrations from 0 to 30 microM /sup 65/Zn in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 5.4 gm/l glucose at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, we observed a temperature-dependent saturable accumulation of the radiolabel. With 15 microM /sup 65/Zn, we saw a biphasic pattern of uptake with a rapid first phase and a slower second phase over 120 min. Uptake of /sup 65/Zn was inhibited by iodacetate and cold, and reduced approximately 50% by the addition of 2% albumin to the labelling medium. Neither ouabain nor 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake. Cells previously exposed to /sup 65/Zn retained approximately 70% of accumulated /sup 65/Zn 60 min after being changed to radiolabel-free medium. Following removal of cells from the extracellular matrix adherent to the dish bottom, a variable amount of nonspecific binding of /sup 65/Zn to the residual matrix was demonstrated. These observations are consistent with a facilitated type of transport and demonstrate the ability of human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro to accumulate and retain zinc.

  12. Integrin Beta 1 Suppresses Multilayering of a Simple Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jichao; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelia are classified as either simple, a single cell layer thick, or stratified (multilayered). Stratified epithelia arise from simple epithelia during development, and transcription factor p63 functions as a key positive regulator of epidermal stratification. Here we show that deletion of integrin beta 1 (Itgb1) in the developing mouse airway epithelium abrogates airway branching and converts this monolayer epithelium into a multilayer epithelium with more than 10 extra layers. Mutant lung epithelial cells change mitotic spindle orientation to seed outer layers, and cells in different layers become molecularly and functionally distinct, hallmarks of normal stratification. However, mutant lung epithelial cells do not activate p63 and do not switch to the stratified keratin profile of epidermal cells. These data, together with previous data implicating Itgb1 in regulation of epidermal stratification, suggest that the simple-versus-stratified developmental decision may involve not only stratification inducers like p63 but suppressors like Itgb1 that prevent simple epithelia from inappropriately activating key steps in the stratification program. PMID:23285215

  13. In vitro biology of corneal epithelium and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Yanoff, M

    1975-01-01

    Four main areas are explored: (1) the proper culture medium for corneal tissue; (2) the effect of serum on in vitro tissue growth; (3) the in vitro interrelationships between corneal epithelium and endothelium; and (4) the biology of cultures of whole corneas (organ cultures). Modified Eagle's minimal essential medium (MEM) proved to be an excellent culture fluid. Corneal tissue could be grown in MEM without serum or clot, thus providing a defined culture medium. The in vitro biology of outgrowths of multilayered corneal epithelium and monolayered corneal endothelium are discussed. Contact inhibition between epithelium and endothelium is demonstrated in whole corneal (organ) cultures. Images FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 10 A FIGURE 10 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 6 A FIGURE 6 B FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B FIGURE 8 A FIGURE 8 B FIGURE 9 A FIGURE 9 B FIGURE 11 A FIGURE 11 B FIGURE 12 A FIGURE 12 B FIGURE 12 C FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 A FIGURE 14 B FIGURE 15 A FIGURE 15 B FIGURE 16 A FIGURE 16 B FIGURE 17 A FIGURE 17 B FIGURE 17 C FIGURE 18 A FIGURE 18 B PMID:1246815

  14. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  15. Effect of carbonated drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, Ayesha; Ilyas, Muhammad Sharjeel; Jafari, Fahim Haider; Farzana, Fauzia

    2015-01-01

    Background Carbonated drinks are the second most consumed non-alcoholic beverages in the world after tea. The effects of these drinks on hard tissues and vital organs of the body have been proved beyond doubt. This study, however, explains the effect of these drinks on wound healing of oral epithelium. Methods Thirty-six male Wistar rats were considered for the study. A circular wound of 3.0 mm was created on the buccal mucosa of all animals and they were divided into two groups. Animals in group 1 were fed with chow pellet and water, while those in group 2 were fed with a commercially available carbonated drink instead of water. Six animals from each group were euthanized at 0, 7, and 21 days. Wound site was histologically assessed for differences in thickness and characteristics of the regenerating epithelium between two groups. Results There was a marked difference in the healing pattern between the two groups. Animals in group 1 showed a normal healing pattern at the end of day 21. In the group 2, the regenerated epithelium showed hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis along with acanthosis at the end of the experiment with a subsequent delayed inflammatory reaction at day 21. Conclusion Consumption of carbonated drinks can disrupt oral wound healing. The contents in carbonated drinks have a proinflammatory action on the soft tissue. Results suggest that epithelial changes seen in experimental group 2 could be a result of constant irritation by the acidic and fizzy nature of carbonated drinks. PMID:26937370

  16. The pocket epithelium: a light- and electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Müller-Glauser, W; Schroeder, H E

    1982-03-01

    The POCKET epithelium is important for the pathogenesis of gingivitis and periodontitis. However, this epithelial variant has never been adequately described. The bioptic material with supraalveolar pockets originated from previous studies in which cotton floss ligatures were placed around the crowns of premolars in eight dogs. After periods of 4 to 21 days or up to 5 months, block biopsies comprising dental and gingival tissues were taken on the buccal side. The tissues were processed for light- and electron microscopic examination. The observations revealed that the pocket epithelium (1) does not attach to the tooth, (2) forms irregular ridges and, over connective tissue papillae, thin coverings which occasionally ulcerate, (3) consists of cells only some of which show a tendency to differentiate, (4) presents a basal lamina complex with discontinuities and multiplications, and (5) is infiltrated mainly by lymphocytes, T- and B-blasts and plasma cells, and is transmigrated by neutrophilic granulocytes. It is concluded that the mosaic-like structure of the pocket epithelium reflects the heterogeneity of the adjacent plaque, that this structure together with the absence of membrane coating granules is the basis for an extremely high permeability, and that epithelial ridges may conduct and collect foreign substances which thereby become more easily recognizable for leukocytes.

  17. Partial wave spectroscopic microscopy can predict prostate cancer progression and mitigate over-treatment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Graff, Taylor; Crawford, Susan; Subramanian, Hariharan; Thompson, Sebastian; Derbas, Justin R.; Lyengar, Radha; Roy, Hemant K.; Brendler, Charles B.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American men. While prostate specific antigen (PSA) test has been widely used for screening PC, >60% of the PSA detected cancers are indolent, leading to unnecessary clinical interventions. An alternative approach, active surveillance (AS), also suffer from high expense, discomfort and complications associated with repeat biopsies (every 1-3 years), limiting its acceptance. Hence, a technique that can differentiate indolent from aggressive PC would attenuate the harms from over-treatment. Combining microscopy with spectroscopy, our group has developed partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy, which can quantify intracellular nanoscale organizations (e.g. chromatin structures) that are not accessible by conventional microscopy. PWS microscopy has previously been shown to predict the risk of cancer in seven different organs (N ~ 800 patients). Herein we use PWS measurement of label-free histologically-normal prostatic epithelium to distinguish indolent from aggressive PC and predict PC risk. Our results from 38 men with low-grade PC indicated that there is a significant increase in progressors compared to non-progressors (p=0.002, effect size=110%, AUC=0.80, sensitivity=88% and specificity=72%), while the baseline clinical characteristics were not significantly different. We further improved the diagnostic power by performing nuclei-specific measurements using an automated system that separates in real-time the cell nuclei from the remaining prostate epithelium. In the long term, we envision that the PWS based prognostication can be coupled with AS without any change to the current procedure to mitigate the harms caused by over-treatment.

  18. The human retrovirus XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Robert H; Nguyen, Carvell; Weight, Christopher J; Klein, Eric A

    2010-07-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is an authentic, newly recognized human retrovirus first identified in prostate cancer tissues from men with a deficiency in the innate immunity gene RNASEL. At present, studies have detected XMRV at widely different rates in prostate cancer cases (0-27%) and in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS; 0-67%). Indirect or direct modes of carcinogenesis by XMRV have been suggested depending on whether the virus was found in stroma or malignant epithelium. Viral replication in the prostate might be affected by androgens, which stimulate XMRV through a transcriptional enhancer site in viral DNA. By contrast, host restriction factors, such as APOBEC3 and tetherin, inhibit virus replication. Immune dysfunction mediated by XMRV has been suggested as a possible factor in CFS. Recent studies show that some existing antiretroviral drugs suppress XMRV infections and diagnostic assays are under development. Although other retroviruses of the same genus as XMRV (gammaretroviruses) cause cancer and neurological disease in animals, whether XMRV is a cause of either prostate cancer or CFS remains unknown. Emerging science surrounding XMRV is contributing to our knowledge of retroviral infections while focusing intense interest on two major human diseases.

  19. PEDF and IL-6 CONTROL PROSTATE NEUROENDOCRINE DIFFERENTIATION VIA FEED-FORWARD MECHANISM

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Norm D.; Schulze-Hoepfner, Frank Thilo; Veliceasa, Dorina; Filleur, Stephanie; Huang, Lijun; Huang, Xue-Mei; Volpert, Olga V.

    2010-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) promotes differentiation and survival of neuronal cells and expands the adult neuronal stem cell niche. In the prostate, PEDF is suppressed by androgen, with unclear physiological consequences. Ectopic and endogenous PEDF cause neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells, manifested by neurite-like outgrowths and expression of chromogranin A. The trans-differentiated cells expressed both axonal and dendritic markers, as was ascertained by immunoblotting specific markers. Neuroendocrine cells formed multiple synaptophysin-positive protrusions resembling dendritic spines, and vesicles containing serotonin, pointing to a possibility of synapse formation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a known trans-differentiating agent, induced PEDF secretion. Moreover, PEDF neutralizing antibodies abolished trans-differentiation of IL-6 treated cells, suggesting an autocrine loop. Neurogenic events were independent of cyclic AMP. Instead, PEDF activated, in this order, RhoA, NFκB and Stat3. Inhibitors of Rho, NFκB or STAT pathways abolished differentiation and synapse formation. Additionally, NFκB activation caused IL-6 expression. Thus we discovered that NFκB controls formation of neuronal communications in the prostate due to PEDF and defined a feed-forward loop where NFκB induction elicits Stat3 activation and pro-differentiating IL-6 expression causing further expansion of the neuroendocrine communications. Our findings point to the role of NFκB and PEDF in coordinated prostate development. PMID:18433784

  20. ERG signaling in prostate cancer is driven through PRMT5-dependent methylation of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mounir, Zineb; Korn, Joshua M; Westerling, Thomas; Lin, Fallon; Kirby, Christina A; Schirle, Markus; McAllister, Gregg; Hoffman, Greg; Ramadan, Nadire; Hartung, Anke; Feng, Yan; Kipp, David Randal; Quinn, Christopher; Fodor, Michelle; Baird, Jason; Schoumacher, Marie; Meyer, Ronald; Deeds, James; Buchwalter, Gilles; Stams, Travis; Keen, Nicholas; Sellers, William R; Brown, Myles; Pagliarini, Raymond A

    2016-01-01

    The TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion is common in androgen receptor (AR) positive prostate cancers, yet its function remains poorly understood. From a screen for functionally relevant ERG interactors, we identify the arginine methyltransferase PRMT5. ERG recruits PRMT5 to AR-target genes, where PRMT5 methylates AR on arginine 761. This attenuates AR recruitment and transcription of genes expressed in differentiated prostate epithelium. The AR-inhibitory function of PRMT5 is restricted to TMPRSS2:ERG-positive prostate cancer cells. Mutation of this methylation site on AR results in a transcriptionally hyperactive AR, suggesting that the proliferative effects of ERG and PRMT5 are mediated through attenuating AR’s ability to induce genes normally involved in lineage differentiation. This provides a rationale for targeting PRMT5 in TMPRSS2:ERG positive prostate cancers. Moreover, methylation of AR at arginine 761 highlights a mechanism for how the ERG oncogene may coax AR towards inducing proliferation versus differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13964.001 PMID:27183006

  1. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds in ex vivo prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Kang, Hyun Jae; DeJournett, Travis; Spicer, James; Boctor, Emad

    2011-03-01

    The localization of brachytherapy seeds in relation to the prostate is a key step in intraoperative treatment planning (ITP) for improving outcomes in prostate cancer patients treated with low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) has traditionally been the modality of choice to guide the prostate brachytherapy procedure due to its relatively low cost and apparent ease of use. However, TRUS is unable to visualize seeds well, precluding ITP and producing suboptimal results. While other modalities such as X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging have been investigated to localize seeds in relation to the prostate, photoacoustic imaging has become an emerging and promising modality to solve this challenge. Moreover, photoacoustic imaging may be more practical in the clinical setting compared to other methods since it adds little additional equipment to the ultrasound system already adopted in procedure today, reducing cost and simplifying engineering steps. In this paper, we demonstrate the latest efforts of localizing prostate brachytherapy seeds using photoacoustic imaging, including visualization of multiple seeds in actual prostate tissue. Although there are still several challenges to be met before photoacoustic imaging can be used in the operating room, we are pleased to present the current progress in this effort.

  2. Prostate MRI can reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Taneja, Samir S

    2015-08-01

    The contemporary management of prostate cancer (PCa) has been criticized as fostering overdetection and overtreatment of indolent disease. In particular, the historical inability to identify those men with an elevated PSA who truly warrant biopsy, and, for those needing biopsy, to localize aggressive tumors within the prostate, has contributed to suboptimal diagnosis and treatment strategies. This article describes how modern multi-parametric MRI of the prostate addresses such challenges and reduces both overdiagnosis and overtreatment. The central role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in contributing to MRI's current impact is described. Prostate MRI incorporating DWI achieves higher sensitivity than standard systematic biopsy for intermediate-to-high risk tumor, while having lower sensitivity for low-grade tumors that are unlikely to impact longevity. Particular applications of prostate MRI that are explored include selection of a subset of men with clinical suspicion of PCa to undergo biopsy as well as reliable confirmation of only low-risk disease in active surveillance patients. Various challenges to redefining the standard of care to incorporate solely MRI-targeted cores, without concomitant standard systematic cores, are identified. These include needs for further technical optimization of current systems for performing MRI-targeted biopsies, enhanced education and expertise in prostate MRI among radiologists, greater standardization in prostate MRI reporting across centers, and recognition of the roles of pre-biopsy MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy by payers. Ultimately, it is hoped that the medical community in the United States will embrace prostate MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy, allowing all patients with known or suspected prostate cancer to benefit from this approach.

  3. The Prostate Tumor Microenvironment Exhibits differentially expressed Genes Useful for Diagnosis — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    To develop a multi-site prospective clinical validation trial of the multigene diagnostic signature for the diagnosis of prostate cancer from non tumor containing biopsy tissue. Prostate cancer now affects one in five men in the U.S. It is diagnosed by examination of a biopsy sample of the prostate gland by a pathologist and treatment decisions such as the choice of surgery are usually not made without direct visualization of the presence of cancer by a pathologist. There are about one million such biopsy procedures in the U.S. every year. However about 1-200,000 are ambiguous owing to the absence of tumor but the presence of small changes such as atypical small acinar proliferations (ASAP) or proliferations within otherwise normal glands (PIN, prostate intraepithelial neoplasia) that are highly suspicious for cancer. Studies by the UCI/NCI SPECS project on prostate cancer have led to a new way to diagnosis the presence of prostate cancer in these ambiguous changes. Researchers of the UCI/NCI SPECS project observed that the tissue around a tumor called stroma has many altered gene activities that are caused by molecules secreted by the tumor cells. Indeed these studies revealed that 114 genes exhibited altered activity in stroma near tumor compared to normal stroma. These changes can be used as a “signature” to examine new samples to determine the “presence of-tumor”. Such a test has many applications. Currently ambiguous cases are asked to return for a repeat biopsy in 3 to 12 months – an agonizing period for patients during which they receive no guidance and during which any tumor may continue to grow and spread. Thus, the new test would detect tumor 3 to 12 months prior to conventional practice. This will avoid repeated biopsy procedures. Patients who are positive by the new test may consider whether immediate medical treatment or neo adjuvant treatment is appropriate. In addition the ability to detect presence-of-tumor early will avoid the necessity

  4. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate gland is an organ that surrounds the urinary urethra in men. It secretes fluid that mixes with ... An enlarged prostate gland compresses the urethra, causing problems with ... is caused by prostate gland overgrowth (benign prostatic ...

  5. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Different Prostate Biopsy Schemes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-03

    Prostate Cancer; Local Anesthesia; Prostate-Specific Antigen/Blood; Biopsy/Methods; Image-guided Biopsy/Methods; Prostatic Neoplasms/Diagnosis; Prostate/Pathology; Prospective Studies; Humans; Male; Ultrasonography, Interventional/Methods

  6. Treating Enlarged Prostate (BPH): Which Drugs Work Best

    MedlinePlus

    ... the prostate gets larger. This is called prostate enlargement, or BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Why should I ... alpha-blocker doxazosin for a first treatment. Prostate enlargement affects millions of men, including about half of ...

  7. Bioenergetic theory of prostate malignancy.

    PubMed

    Costello, L C; Franklin, R B

    1994-09-01

    Normal and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) prostate is characterized by the presence of extraordinarily high levels of citrate. Presumably, this results from the inability of the prostate epithelial cells to oxidize citrate due to a limiting mitochondrial (m-) aconitase. In contrast, prostate carcinoma (CA) is not characterized by high citrate levels. Malignant prostate epithelial cells apparently undergo a metabolic transformation from citrate-producing to citrate-oxidizing cells. A consequence of citrate production in normal and BPH cells is an inefficient and low level of ATP production. It is proposed that the process of malignancy necessitates an energy production that cannot be provided by citrate-producing cells. Consequently, the transformation of prostate epithelial cells to citrate-oxidizing cells which increases the energy production capability is essential to the process of malignancy and metastasis. The metabolic transformation likely occurs as a premalignant or early malignant stage. This bioenergetic theory of prostate malignancy, if correct, will provide new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of CA. PMID:7520580

  8. The Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Estrogen Receptor 1 is Related to Sex Dimorphism in the Gerbil Prostate Development.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Bruno D A; Maldarine, Juliana S; Zani, Bruno C; Biancardi, Manoel F; Santos, Fernanda C A; Góes, Rejane M; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2016-08-01

    The development of the prostate gland in females has not yet been clearly elucidated, and the sexual dimorphism associated with such gland development in general is far from being understood. In the present study, we used tridimensional (3D) reconstructions and histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to describe the sexual dimorphism and its causes in the early postnatal development of the prostate in male and female Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus). We observed that the female prostate was smaller, had fewer branches throughout the development, and underwent differentiation earlier than that in males. Also, the expression of the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 or ER-alpha) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) was decreased in the periductal region, and the expression of the androgen receptor (AR) was increased in the epithelium. All together, these changes decreased proliferation and branching and led to an earlier prematuration of the female prostate. These new data shed light on the underlying mechanisms involved with the sexual dimorphism in the development of the prostate. Anat Rec, 299:1130-1139, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27184581

  9. Anatomic imaging of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Anil; Verma, Sadhna

    2014-01-01

    The important role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the anatomic evaluation, detection, and staging of prostate cancer is well established. This paper focuses on the pertinent embryologic, anatomic, and imaging facts regarding both the normal prostate and the several examples of prostate cancers as well as staging implications. The discussion primarily includes findings related to T2-weighted imaging as opposed to the other functional sequences, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) or dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging, respectively. PMID:25243174

  10. [Chronic prostatitis with chronic pelvic pain syndrome].

    PubMed

    Balvocius, Antanas

    2002-01-01

    Almost 10% of the adult male population suffer from prostatitis. The International Prostatitis Collaborative Network has devised and validated a clinically useful classification of prostatitis that urologists and primary care clinicians will find helpful. According to this schema, chronic bacterial prostatitis is clearly an infectious disease, and patients with chronic prostatitis associated with chronic pelvic pain syndrome can have either inflammatory or noninflammatory disease. Chronic bacterial prostatitis is uncommon, chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CPPS) is extremely common. Antibiotic therapy is indicated in management of chronic bacterial prostatitis and inflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Fluoroquinolones are safe and effective in managing chronic bacterial prostatitis. Based on literature, noninflammatory chronic pelvic pain syndrome can be treated using adrenergic blockade, analgesic, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepie, physical therapy. PMID:12556633

  11. Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tateishi, Yoshihisa Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2008-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by {gamma}-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10 Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment.

  12. Chronic Nicotine Exposure In Vivo and In Vitro Inhibits Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) Uptake by Pancreatic Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Thrower, Edwin C; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Balamurugan, A N; Subramanian, Veedamali S; Gorelick, Fred S; Said, Hamid M

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1), a member of the water-soluble family of vitamins, is essential for normal cellular functions; its deficiency results in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Pancreatic acinar cells (PAC) obtain thiamin from the circulation using a specific carrier-mediated process mediated by both thiamin transporters -1 and -2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; encoded by the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes, respectively). The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of chronic exposure of mouse PAC in vivo and human PAC in vitro to nicotine (a major component of cigarette smoke that has been implicated in pancreatic diseases) on thiamin uptake and to delineate the mechanism involved. The results showed that chronic exposure of mice to nicotine significantly inhibits thiamin uptake in murine PAC, and that this inhibition is associated with a marked decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein, mRNA and hnRNAs level. Furthermore, expression of the important thiamin-metabolizing enzyme, thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPKase), was significantly reduced in PAC of mice exposed to nicotine. Similarly, chronic exposure of cultured human PAC to nicotine (0.5 μM, 48 h) significantly inhibited thiamin uptake, which was also associated with a decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 proteins and mRNAs. This study demonstrates that chronic exposure of PAC to nicotine impairs the physiology and the molecular biology of the thiamin uptake process. Furthermore, the study suggests that the effect is, in part, mediated through transcriptional mechanism(s) affecting the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes.

  13. Chronic Nicotine Exposure In Vivo and In Vitro Inhibits Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) Uptake by Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Thrower, Edwin C.; Loganathan, Gopalakrishnan; Balamurugan, A. N.; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Gorelick, Fred S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin (vitamin B1), a member of the water-soluble family of vitamins, is essential for normal cellular functions; its deficiency results in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Pancreatic acinar cells (PAC) obtain thiamin from the circulation using a specific carrier-mediated process mediated by both thiamin transporters -1 and -2 (THTR-1 and THTR-2; encoded by the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes, respectively). The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of chronic exposure of mouse PAC in vivo and human PAC in vitro to nicotine (a major component of cigarette smoke that has been implicated in pancreatic diseases) on thiamin uptake and to delineate the mechanism involved. The results showed that chronic exposure of mice to nicotine significantly inhibits thiamin uptake in murine PAC, and that this inhibition is associated with a marked decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein, mRNA and hnRNAs level. Furthermore, expression of the important thiamin-metabolizing enzyme, thiamin pyrophosphokinase (TPKase), was significantly reduced in PAC of mice exposed to nicotine. Similarly, chronic exposure of cultured human PAC to nicotine (0.5 μM, 48 h) significantly inhibited thiamin uptake, which was also associated with a decrease in expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 proteins and mRNAs. This study demonstrates that chronic exposure of PAC to nicotine impairs the physiology and the molecular biology of the thiamin uptake process. Furthermore, the study suggests that the effect is, in part, mediated through transcriptional mechanism(s) affecting the SLC19A2 and SLC19A3 genes. PMID:26633299

  14. Effects of MeCh, thapsigargin, and La3+ on plasmalemmal and intracellular Ca2+ transport in lacrimal acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Kwan, C Y; Takemura, H; Obie, J F; Thastrup, O; Putney, J W

    1990-06-01

    The Ca2(+)-mobilizing actions of the muscarinic receptor agonist, methacholine (MeCh), and the microsomal Ca2+ pump inhibitor, thapsigargin, were investigated in lacrimal acinar cells. As previously shown for parotid cells (J. Biol. Chem. 264: 12266-12271, 1989), thapsigargin activates both internal Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry from the extracellular space without increasing cellular inositol phosphates. The inorganic Ca2+ antagonist La3+ inhibited MeCh- or thapsigargin-activated Ca2+ entry. However, when added before MeCh or thapsigargin, La3+ inhibited the extrusion of Ca2+ at the plasma membrane. This phenomenon was exploited in protocols designed to investigate the pathways for filling agonist-sensitive Ca2+ stores in lacrimal cells. The results show that, in contrast to previous suggestions that external Ca2+ is required to replenish agonist-regulated Ca2+ stores, the inhibition of Ca2+ extrusion permits recycling of Ca2+ released by MeCh back into an MeCh- and thapsigargin-sensitive pool. Thus, although extracellular Ca2+ is the major source for refilling the intracellular Ca2+ stores under physiological conditions, the pathway by which this Ca2+ enters the pool need not be a direct one. These results are consistent with the recently revised capacitative model for the refilling of intracellular Ca2+ stores through Ca2+ influx subsequent to Ca2+ depletion, according to which refilling of intracellular Ca2+ stores occurs via a cytoplasmic route rather than a direct channel between intracellular Ca2+ stores and the extracellular space.

  15. Ionizing irradiation induces apoptotic damage of salivary gland acinar cells via NADPH oxidase 1-dependent superoxide generation.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Yoshihisa; Sasabe, Eri; Ueta, Eisaku; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2008-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have important roles in various physiological processes. Recently, several novel homologues of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase have been discovered and this protein family is now designated as the Nox family. We investigated the involvement of Nox family proteins in ionizing irradiation-induced ROS generation and impairment in immortalized salivary gland acinar cells (NS-SV-AC), which are radiosensitive, and immortalized ductal cells (NS-SV-DC), which are radioresistant. Nox1-mRNA was upregulated by gamma-ray irradiation in NS-SV-AC, and the ROS level in NS-SV-AC was increased to approximately threefold of the control level after 10Gy irradiation. The increase of ROS level in NS-SV-AC was suppressed by Nox1-siRNA-transfection. In parallel with the suppression of ROS generation and Nox1-mRNA expression by Nox1-siRNA, ionizing irradiation-induced apoptosis was strongly decreased in Nox1-siRNA-transfected NS-SV-AC. There were no large differences in total SOD or catalase activities between NS-SV-AC and NS-SV-DC although the post-irradiation ROS level in NS-SV-AC was higher than that in NS-SV-DC. In conclusion, these results indicate that Nox1 plays a crucial role in irradiation-induced ROS generation and ROS-associated impairment of salivary gland cells and that Nox1 gene may be targeted for preservation of the salivary gland function from radiation-induced impairment.

  16. Estrogen signaling is not required for prostatic bud patterning or for its disruption by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Allgeier, Sarah Hicks; Vezina, Chad M.; Lin, T.-M.; Moore, Robert W.; Silverstone, Allen E.; Mukai, Motoko; Gavalchin, Jerrie; Cooke, Paul S.; Peterson, Richard E.

    2009-08-15

    Estrogens play an important role in prostatic development, health, and disease. While estrogen signaling is essential for normal postnatal prostate development, little is known about its prenatal role in control animals. We tested the hypothesis that estrogen signaling is needed for normal male prostatic bud patterning. Budding patterns were examined by scanning electron microscopy of urogenital sinus epithelium from wild-type mice, mice lacking estrogen receptor (ER){alpha}, ER{beta}, or both, and wild-type mice exposed to the antiestrogen ICI 182,780. Budding phenotypes did not detectably differ among any of these groups, strongly suggesting that estrogen signaling is not needed to establish the prototypical prostatic budding pattern seen in control males. This finding contributes to our understanding of the effects of low-level estrogen exposure on early prostate development. In utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) can greatly alter the pattern in which prostatic buds form and reduce their number. For several reasons, including a prior observation that inhibitory effects of TCDD on prostatic budding in rats depend heavily on the sex of adjacent fetuses, we tested the hypothesis that estrogen signaling is needed for TCDD to disrupt prostatic budding. However, budding did not detectably differ among wild-type mice, or mice lacking ER{alpha}, ER{beta}, or both, that were exposed prenatally to TCDD (5 {mu}g/kg on embryonic day 13.5). Nor did ICI 182,780 detectably affect the response to TCDD. These results strongly suggest that estrogen signaling is not needed for TCDD to inhibit prostatic epithelial budding.

  17. Ion transport across an isolated preparation of sheep rumen epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, H G; Harrison, F A; Keynes, R D; Zurich, L

    1972-04-01

    1. The fluxes of isotopically labelled sodium, potassium and chloride passing in each direction across isolated sheets of rumen epithelium from the sheep have been measured under short-circuit conditions.2. With both sides of the epithelium bathed in chloride Ringer the mean sodium fluxes were 2.85 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 1.28 mumole/cm(2).hr in the reverse direction. In sulphate Ringer the sodium fluxes were 1.64 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 0.54 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen.3. In chloride Ringer the mean potassium fluxes were 0.18 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 0.54 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen. In sulphate Ringer the potassium fluxes were 0.07 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 0.35 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen.4. In chloride Ringer the mean chloride fluxes were 4.89 mumole/cm(2).hr from rumen to blood and 3.78 mumole/cm(2).hr from blood to rumen.5. In chloride Ringer the mean value of the short-circuit current was 13 muA/cm(2), corresponding to a flux of 0.49 muequiv/cm(2).hr. When sulphate was substituted for chloride, the short-circuit current was increased by about 40%, and the net flux of sodium from rumen to blood fell by 30%.6. Neither the sodium nor the chloride fluxes changed significantly when the epithelium was temporarily open-circuited.

  18. Lack of Dystrophin Affects Bronchial Epithelium in mdx Mice.

    PubMed

    Morici, Giuseppe; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Pace, Elisabetta; Pace, Andrea; Mudò, Giuseppa; Crescimanno, Grazia; Belluardo, Natale; Bonsignore, Maria R

    2016-10-01

    Mild exercise training may positively affect the course of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Training causes mild bronchial epithelial injury in both humans and mice, but no study assessed the effects of exercise in mdx mice, a well known model of DMD. The airway epithelium was examined in mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmdmdx) mice, and in wild type (WT, C57BL/10ScSc) mice either under sedentary conditions (mdx-SD, WT-SD) or during mild exercise training (mdx-EX, WT-EX). At baseline, and after 30 and 45 days of training (5 d/wk for 6 weeks), epithelial morphology and markers of regeneration, apoptosis, and cellular stress were assessed. The number of goblet cells in bronchial epithelium was much lower in mdx than in WT mice under all conditions. At 30 days, epithelial regeneration (PCNA positive cells) was higher in EX than SD animals in both groups; however, at 45 days, epithelial regeneration decreased in mdx mice irrespective of training, and the percentage of apoptotic (TUNEL positive) cells was higher in mdx-EX than in WT-EX mice. Epithelial expression of HSP60 (marker of stress) progressively decreased, and inversely correlated with epithelial apoptosis (r = -0.66, P = 0.01) only in mdx mice. Lack of dystrophin in mdx mice appears associated with defective epithelial differentiation, and transient epithelial regeneration during mild exercise training. Hence, lack of dystrophin might impair repair in bronchial epithelium, with potential clinical consequences in DMD patients. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2218-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Response of macaque bronchiolar epithelium to ambient concentrations of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R.; Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; St. George, J.A.; Wilson, D.W.; Dungworth, D.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Recently, we reported that exposure to ambient concentrations of ozone, near the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (0.12 ppm), induced significant nasal epithelial lesions in a non-human primate, the bonnet monkey. The present study defines the effects of ambient concentrations of ozone on the surface epithelium lining respiratory bronchioles and on the underlying bronchiolar interstitium in these same monkeys. Bonnet monkeys were exposed to filtered air or to 0.15 or 0.30 ppm ozone 8 hours/day for 6 or 90 days. At the end of exposures, monkeys were anesthetized and killed by exsanguination. Microdissected bronchiolar airways of infusion-fixed lungs were evaluated morphometrically by light microscopy and quantitatively by scanning and transmission electron microscopy for ozone-induced epithelial changes. Hyperplasia of nonciliated, cuboidal epithelial cells and intraluminal accumulation of macrophages characterized ozone-induced lesions in respiratory bronchioles. There were no significant differences in epithelial thickness or cell numbers among ozone-exposed groups. Ozone-exposed epithelium was composed of 80% cuboidal and 20% squamous cells compared with 40% cuboidal and 60% squamous cells in filtered air controls. In addition, the arithmetic mean thickness of the surface epithelium, a measure of tissue mass per unit area of basal lamina, was significantly increased in all of the ozone-exposed groups. The number of cuboidal epithelial cells per surface area of basal lamina was increased above control values by 780% after 6 days exposure to 0.15 ppm, 777% after 90 days to 0.15 ppm, and 996% after 90 days exposure to 0.30 ppm. There was also a significant ozone-induced increase in the thickness of the bronchiolar interstitium that was due to an increase in both cellular and acellular components.

  20. Morphologic changes in basal cells during repair of tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C. Z.; Evans, M. J.; Cox, R. A.; Burke, A. S.; Zhu, Q.; Herndon, D. N.; Barrow, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Basal cells are differentiated with respect to junctional adhesion mechanisms and play a role in attachment of columnar epithelium to the basal lamina. Although much is known about nonciliated and ciliated cell differentiation during the repair process after injury, little is known about the basal cell. We studied the morphology of basal cells and quantitated junctional adhesion structures during repair of tracheal epithelium exposed to toxic cotton smoke. Ten adult ewes were given a smoke injury to a portion of the upper cervical trachea and were killed at 4, 6, 8, 10, and 18 days after injury for morphometric studies. At 4 days, there was a stratified reparative epithelium over the basal lamina, which was two to four cells in depth. The basal cells were identified by their hemidesmosome (HD) attachment to the basal lamina. Basal cells were about 69% larger than controls and flattened rather than columnar. The amount of HD attachment was 192% greater than controls. In contrast, volume density of cytokeratin filaments had decreased about 47%. Basal cells had returned to normal numbers and size and a columnar shape by day 18. The amount of desmosome (D) and HD attachment and volume density of cytokeratins had also reached control levels by day 18. These data indicate that morphology of basal cells changes during the initial stages of reparative regeneration but returns to normal by 18 days. Morphologic changes appear to reflect changes in size of the cell associated with cell division rather than differentiation of recently divided basal cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1381564

  1. In vitro reconstruction of human junctional and sulcular epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Dabija-Wolter, G; Bakken, V; Cimpan, M R; Johannessen, A C; Costea, D E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to develop and characterize standardized in vitro three-dimensional organotypic models of human junctional epithelium (JE) and sulcular epithelium (SE). METHODS Organotypic models were constructed by growing human normal gingival keratinocytes on top of collagen matrices populated with gingival fibroblasts (GF) or periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PLF). Tissues obtained were harvested at different time points and assessed for epithelial morphology, proliferation (Ki67), expression of JE-specific markers (ODAM and FDC-SP), cytokeratins (CK), transglutaminase, filaggrin, and basement membrane proteins (collagen IV and laminin1). RESULTS The epithelial component in 3- and 5-day organotypics showed limited differentiation and expressed Ki-67, ODAM, FDC-SP, CK 8, 13, 16, 19, and transglutaminase in a similar fashion to control JE samples. PLF supported better than GF expression of CK19 and suprabasal proliferation, although statistically significant only at day 5. Basement membrane proteins started to be deposited only from day 5. The rate of proliferating cells as well as the percentage of CK19-expressing cells decreased significantly in 7- and 9-day cultures. Day 7 organotypics presented higher number of epithelial cell layers, proliferating cells in suprabasal layers, and CK expression pattern similar to SE. CONCLUSION Both time in culture and fibroblast type had impact on epithelial phenotype. Five-day cultures with PLF are suggested as JE models, 7-day cultures with PLF or GF as SE models, while 9-day cultures with GF as gingival epithelium (GE) models. Such standard, reproducible models represent useful tools to study periodontal bacteria–host interactions in vitro. PMID:22947066

  2. Connexins form functional hemichannels in porcine ciliary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The expression of connexins in the ciliary epithelium is consistent with gap junctions between the pigmented (PE) and nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPE) that form when connexon hemichannels from adjacent cells pair to form a channel. Here we present evidence that suggests undocked connexons may form functional hemichannels that permit exchange of substances between NPE and the aqueous humor. Intact porcine eyes were perfused via the ciliary artery and propidium iodide (PI) (MW 668) was added to the aqueous humor compartment as a tracer. After calcium-free solution containing PI was introduced into the aqueous humor compartment for 30 min, fluorescence microscopy revealed PI in the NPE cell layer. PI entry into the NPE was inhibited by calcium and by the connexin antagonist 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18-AGA). Studies also were carried out with cultured porcine NPE. Under normal conditions, little PI entered the cultured cells but calcium-free medium stimulated PI accumulation and the entry was inhibited by 18-AGA. In cells loaded with calcein (MW 622), calcium-free solution stimulated calcein exit. 18-AGA partially suppressed calcein exit in calcium-free medium. Connexin 43 and connexin 50 proteins were detected by western blot analysis in both native and cultured NPE. In the intact eye, immunolocalization studies revealed connexin 50 at the basolateral, aqueous humor-facing, margin of the NPE. In contrast, connexin 43 was observed at the junction of the PE and NPE layer and on the basolateral membrane of PE. The results point to functional hemichannels at the NPE basolateral surface. It is feasible that hemichannels might contribute to the transfer of substances between the ciliary epithelium cytoplasm and aqueous humor. PMID:24262135

  3. Connexins form functional hemichannels in porcine ciliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Delamere, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    The expression of connexins in the ciliary epithelium is consistent with gap junctions between the pigmented (PE) and nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPE) that form when connexon hemichannels from adjacent cells pair to form a channel. Here we present evidence that suggests undocked connexons may form functional hemichannels that permit exchange of substances between NPE and the aqueous humor. Intact porcine eyes were perfused via the ciliary artery and propidium iodide (PI) (MW 668) was added to the aqueous humor compartment as a tracer. After calcium-free solution containing PI was introduced into the aqueous humor compartment for 30 min, fluorescence microscopy revealed PI in the NPE cell layer. PI entry into the NPE was inhibited by calcium and by the connexin antagonist 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18-AGA). Studies also were carried out with cultured porcine NPE. Under normal conditions, little PI entered the cultured cells but calcium-free medium stimulated PI accumulation and the entry was inhibited by 18-AGA. In cells loaded with calcein (MW 622), calcium-free solution stimulated calcein exit. 18-AGA partially suppressed calcein exit in calcium-free medium. Connexin 43 and connexin 50 proteins were detected by western blot analysis in both native and cultured NPE. In the intact eye, immunolocalization studies revealed connexin 50 at the basolateral, aqueous humor-facing, margin of the NPE. In contrast, connexin 43 was observed at the junction of the PE and NPE layer and on the basolateral membrane of PE. The results point to functional hemichannels at the NPE basolateral surface. It is feasible that hemichannels might contribute to the transfer of substances between the ciliary epithelium cytoplasm and aqueous humor.

  4. Expression of signaling components in embryonic eyelid epithelium.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the "eyelid closure pathways". However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms.

  5. Nonequilibrium thermodynamic model of the rat proximal tubule epithelium.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, A M

    1983-11-01

    The rat proximal tubule epithelium is represented as well-stirred, compliant cellular and paracellular compartments bounded by mucosal and serosal bathing solutions. With a uniform pCO2 throughout the epithelium, the model variables include the concentrations of Na, K, Cl, HCO3, H2PO4, HPO4, and H, as well as hydrostatic pressure and electrical potential. Except for a metabolically driven Na-K exchanger at the basolateral cell membrane, all membrane transport within the epithelium is passive and is represented by the linear equations of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. In particular, this includes the cotransport of Na-Cl and Na-H2PO4 and countertransport of Na-H at the apical cell membrane. Experimental constraints on the choice of ionic conductivities are satisfied by allowing K-Cl cotransport at the basolateral membrane. The model equations include those for mass balance of the nonreacting species, as well as chemical equilibrium for the acidification reactions. Time-dependent terms are retained to permit the study of transient phenomena. In the steady state the energy dissipation is computed and verified equal to the sum of input from the Na-K exchanger plus the Gibbs free energy of mass addition to the system. The parameter dependence of coupled water transport is studied and shown to be consistent with the predictions of previous analytical models of the lateral intercellular space. Water transport in the presence of an end-proximal (HCO3-depleted) luminal solution is investigated. Here the lower permeability and higher reflection coefficient of HCO3 enhance net sodium and water transport. Due to enhanced flux across the tight junction, this process may permit proximal tubule Na transport to proceed with diminished energy dissipation.

  6. Expression of Signaling Components in Embryonic Eyelid Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qinghang; Jin, Chang; Chen, Yinglei; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Closure of an epithelium opening is a critical morphogenetic event for development. An excellent example for this process is the transient closure of embryonic eyelid. Eyelid closure requires shape change and migration of epithelial cells at the tip of the developing eyelids, and is dictated by numerous signaling pathways. Here we evaluated gene expression in epithelial cells isolated from the tip (leading edge, LE) and inner surface epithelium (IE) of the eyelid from E15.5 mouse fetuses by laser capture microdissection (LCM). We showed that the LE and IE cells are different at E15.5, such that IE had higher expression of muscle specific genes, while LE acquired epithelium identities. Despite their distinct destinies, these cells were overall similar in expression of signaling components for the “eyelid closure pathways”. However, while the LE cells had more abundant expression of Fgfr2, Erbb2, Shh, Ptch1 and 2, Smo and Gli2, and Jag1 and Notch1, the IE cells had more abundant expression of Bmp5 and Bmpr1a. In addition, the LE cells had more abundant expression of adenomatosis polyposis coli down-regulated 1 (Apcdd1), but the IE cells had high expression of Dkk2. Our results suggest that the functionally distinct LE and IE cells have also differential expression of signaling molecules that may contribute to the cell-specific responses to morphogenetic signals. The expression pattern suggests that the EGF, Shh and NOTCH pathways are preferentially active in LE cells, the BMP pathways are effective in IE cells, and the Wnt pathway may be repressed in LE and IE cells via different mechanisms. PMID:24498290

  7. Stomatin immunoreactivity in ciliated cells of the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Britta; Stewart, Gordon W; Treharne, Kathryn J; Mehta, Anil; Knöpfle, Gisela; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Müller, Klaus-Michael; von Düring, Monika

    2003-07-01

    Stomatin is a widely distributed 32kD membrane protein of unknown function. In biochemical studies it is associated with cholesterol+sphingomyelin-rich 'rafts' in the cytomembrane. Genetic studies in C. elegans, supported by microscopic studies in mammalian tissue and co-expression studies in oocytes, suggest a functional link with the DEG/ENaC (degenerin/epithelial Na+ channel) superfamily of monovalent ion channels. Since ENaC channels play a prominent role in the physiology of the respiratory epithelium, we have studied the immunolocalization of stomatin in mature and developing human airway epithelium by means of Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Stomatin immunoreactivity (stomatin-IR) was found in the ciliated cells of the conductive airway epithelium in a distinct distribution pattern with the strongest signal along the cilia. Immunogold labelling revealed immunogold particles at the basal bodies, along the cilia, and at the membrane of the microvilli. The presence of stomatin-IR paralleled the stages of ciliogenesis in airway development, and its appearance preceded the elongation of the axoneme and the cilial outgrowth. Due to its presence in the different cellular locations in the ciliated cell, we suggest that stomatin is involved in various cellular functions. From its ultrastructural position, stomatin could be a candidate for a membrane-associated mechanotransducer with a role in the control of ciliary motility. Stomatin as a raft protein might be a microtubule associated protein moving along the outer surface of the microtubules to its terminal site of action in the cilia. Stomatin-IR in microvilli supports the hypothesis of a co-localization with beta- and gamma- ENaC and, in conclusion, their potential functional interaction to control the composition of periciliary mucus electrolytes. PMID:12759749

  8. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    PubMed

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer. PMID:26877198

  9. Regulation of Ca²⁺ release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors by adenine nucleotides in parotid acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Seo; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Zhang, Yu; Yule, David I

    2012-01-01

    Secretagogue-stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) signals are fundamentally important for initiating the secretion of the fluid and ion component of saliva from parotid acinar cells. The Ca(2+) signals have characteristic spatial and temporal characteristics, which are defined by the specific properties of Ca(2+) release mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)R). In this study we have investigated the role of adenine nucleotides in modulating Ca(2+) release in mouse parotid acinar cells. In permeabilized cells, the Ca(2+) release rate induced by submaximal [InsP(3)] was increased by 5 mM ATP. Enhanced Ca(2+) release was not observed at saturating [InsP(3)]. The EC(50) for the augmented Ca(2+) release was ∼8 μM ATP. The effect was mimicked by nonhydrolysable ATP analogs. ADP and AMP also potentiated Ca(2+) release but were less potent than ATP. In acini isolated from InsP(3)R-2-null transgenic animals, the rate of Ca(2+) release was decreased under all conditions but now enhanced by ATP at all [InsP(3)]. In addition the EC(50) for ATP potentiation increased to ∼500 μM. These characteristics are consistent with the properties of the InsP(3)R-2 dominating the overall features of InsP(3)R-induced Ca(2+) release despite the expression of all isoforms. Finally, Ca(2+) signals were measured in intact parotid lobules by multiphoton microscopy. Consistent with the release data, carbachol-stimulated Ca(2+) signals were reduced in lobules exposed to experimental hypoxia compared with control lobules only at submaximal concentrations. Adenine nucleotide modulation of InsP(3)R in parotid acinar cells likely contributes to the properties of Ca(2+) signals in physiological and pathological conditions.

  10. Diet, Microbiome, and the Intestinal Epithelium: An Essential Triumvirate?

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Rivera; Conlin, Victoria Susan; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium represents a critical barrier protecting the host against diverse luminal noxious agents, as well as preventing the uncontrolled uptake of bacteria that could activate an immune response in a susceptible host. The epithelial monolayer that constitutes this barrier is regulated by a meshwork of proteins that orchestrate complex biological function such as permeability, transepithelial electrical resistance, and movement of various macromolecules. Because of its key role in maintaining host homeostasis, factors regulating barrier function have attracted sustained attention from the research community. This paper will address the role of bacteria, bacterial-derived metabolism, and the interplay of dietary factors in controlling intestinal barrier function. PMID:23586037

  11. Expression of stanniocalcin in the epithelium of human choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Franzén, A M; Zhang, K Z; Westberg, J A; Zhang, W M; Arola, J; Olsen, H S; Andersson, L C

    2000-12-29

    Stanniocalcin (STC) is a 28 kD glycoprotein hormone originally found in bony fish in which it regulates calcium/phosphate homeostasis and protects against hypercalcemia. The recently characterized mammalian STC shows about 70% homology with fish STC. The epithelial cells of proximal tubuli in human and rat kidney and brain neurons have been found to express STC. Here we show that the epithelium of the choroid plexus, already at 16 weeks of fetal age, and of plexus papillomas, synthesize and express STC. Our findings suggest that STC may be of importance for the distribution of calcium and phosphate between the cerebrospinal fluid and blood. PMID:11134638

  12. Combined hamartoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Kanmin; Mellington, Faye; Gout, Irina; Rokerya, Sofia; Olurin, Oyinkan Ibironke; El-Amir, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    We report two cases of combined hamatoma of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (CHR-RPE), illustrated with ultrasonography, optical coherence tomography, fundus fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography images. CHR-RPE could clinically mimic several other retinal conditions. Failure to distinguish it from serious malignancies such as choroidal melanoma or retinoblastoma has led to unnecessary enucleation in the past. Through these case reports and a review of literature, we show the diagnostic features of CHR-RPE, its key differential diagnoses and the management options. PMID:23162024

  13. Prostate Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Liza; Choyke, Peter; Dahut, William

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging of prostate cancer is in a dynamic phase of development. Currently approved techniques are limited and researchers have been working on novel agents to improve accuracy in targeting and detecting prostate tumors. In addition, the complexity of various prostate cancer states also contributes to the challenges in evaluating suitable radiotracer candidates. We have highlighted nuclear medicine tracers that focus on mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, prostate cancer cell membrane synthesis, amino acid analogs, androgen analogs, and the prostate specific membrane antigen. Encouraging results with many of these innovative radiotracer compounds will not only advance diagnostic capabilities for prostate cancer but open opportunities for theranostic applications to treat this worldwide malignancy.

  14. Dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dru, Christopher; Bender, Leon

    2014-01-01

    We present a previously undocumented complication of dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy. An 87-year-old male presented with recurrent lower urinary tract infections and was found to have an obstructing large calcified mass in the right lobe of the prostate. Subsequently, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and bladder neck with laser lithotripsy to remove the calculus. We propose that chronic inflammation and necrosis of the prostate from cryotherapy resulted in dystrophic calcification of the prostate. As the use of cryotherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer continues to increase, it is important that clinicians be aware of this scenario and the technical challenges it poses.

  15. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  16. Prostatic carcinosarcoma with lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Stefanie R; Kang, David J; Armas, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma of the prostate is an uncommon malignancy with poor long-term prognosis. The cancer is typically discovered at an advanced stage, and with less than 100 reported cases, there is limited literature concerning treatment options. Our patient presented with a history of benign prostatic hypertrophy, erectile dysfunction, and nocturia. Biopsy of his prostate indicated that the patient had prostatic adenocarcinoma, but histopathology after prostatectomy revealed carcinosarcoma. It has been over six years since this patient's diagnosis of carcinosarcoma. Over this span of time, he has received a radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, and androgen ablative therapy. The patient also developed multiple lung metastases that have been treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery and stereotactic body radiosurgery. Overall, he has remained unimpaired and in good condition despite his aggressive form of cancer. PMID:24294528

  17. Prostatic carcinosarcoma with lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Stefanie R; Kang, David J; Armas, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma of the prostate is an uncommon malignancy with poor long-term prognosis. The cancer is typically discovered at an advanced stage, and with less than 100 reported cases, there is limited literature concerning treatment options. Our patient presented with a history of benign prostatic hypertrophy, erectile dysfunction, and nocturia. Biopsy of his prostate indicated that the patient had prostatic adenocarcinoma, but histopathology after prostatectomy revealed carcinosarcoma. It has been over six years since this patient's diagnosis of carcinosarcoma. Over this span of time, he has received a radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, and androgen ablative therapy. The patient also developed multiple lung metastases that have been treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery and stereotactic body radiosurgery. Overall, he has remained unimpaired and in good condition despite his aggressive form of cancer.

  18. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  19. Prostate Cancer Genetics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Christopher J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, research has focussed on identifying the genetic underpinnings of prostate cancer. It has been recognized that a number of forms of genetic changes coupled with epigenetic and gene expression changes can increase the prediction to develop prostate cancer. This review outlines the role of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs), structural rearrangements, point mutations, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as well as miRNAs. Identifying relevant genetic changes offers the ability to develop novel biomarkers to allow early and accurate detection of prostate cancer as well as provide risk stratification of patients following their diagnosis. The concept of personalized or individualized medicine has gained significant attention. Therefore, a better understanding of the genetic and metabolic pathways underlying prostate cancer development offers the opportunity to explore new therapeutic interventions with the possibility of offering patient-specific targeted therapy.

  20. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  1. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F.; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  2. Evidence that zymogen granules are not a physiologically relevant calcium pool. Defining the distribution of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Yule, D I; Ernst, S A; Ohnishi, H; Wojcikiewicz, R J

    1997-04-01

    A key event leading to exocytosis of pancreatic acinar cell zymogen granules is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-mediated release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Studies using digital imaging microscopy and laser-scanning confocal microscopy have indicated that the initial release of Ca2+ is localized to the apical region of the acinar cell, an area of the cell dominated by secretory granules. Moreover, a recent study has shown that InsP3 is capable of releasing Ca2+ from a preparation enriched in secretory granules (Gerasimenko, O., Gerasimenko, J., Belan, P., and Petersen, O. H., (1996) Cell 84, 473-480). In the present study, we have investigated the possibility that zymogen granules express InsP3 receptors and are thus Ca2+ release sites. Immunofluorescence staining, obtained with antisera specific to types I, II, or III InsP3 receptors and analyzed by confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed that all InsP3 receptor types were present in acinar cells. The type II receptor localized exclusively to an area close to or at the luminal plasma membrane. While types I and III InsP3 receptors displayed a similar luminal distribution, these receptors were also present at low levels in nuclei. The localization of InsP3 receptor was in marked contrast to the distribution of amylase, a zymogen granule content protein. In a zymogen granule fraction prepared in an identical manner to the aforementioned report demonstrating InsP3-induced Ca2+ release, immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of types I, II, and III InsP3 receptors. Ca2+ release from this preparation in response to InsP3, but not thapsigargin, could also be demonstrated. In contrast, when the zymogen granules were further purified on a Percoll gradient, InsP3 receptors were undetectable, and InsP3 failed to release Ca2+. Transmission electron microscopy performed on both preparations showed that the Percoll-purified granule preparation consisted of essentially pure zymogen granules, whereas the

  3. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  4. TGF-β1 signaling plays a dominant role in the crosstalk between TGF-β1 and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Staršíchová, Andrea; Hrubá, Eva; Slabáková, Eva; Pernicová, Zuzana; Procházková, Jiřina; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Seda, Václav; Kabátková, Markéta; Vondráček, Jan; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav; Souček, Karel

    2012-08-01

    Crosstalk between the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling has been observed in various experimental models. However, both molecular mechanism underlying this crosstalk and tissue-specific context of this interaction are still only partially understood. In a model of human non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells BPH-1, derived from the benign prostatic hyperplasia, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) persistently activates the AhR signaling pathway and induces expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as CYP1A1 or CYP1B1. Here we demonstrate that TGF-β1 suppresses the AhR-mediated gene expression through multiple mechanisms, involving inhibition of AhR expression and down-regulation of nuclear AhR, via a SMAD4-dependent pathway. In contrast, TCDD-induced AhR signaling does not affect either TGF-β1-regulated gene expression or epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These observations suggest that, in the context of prostate epithelium, TGF-β1 signaling plays a dominant role in the crosstalk with AhR signaling pathway. Given the importance of TGF-β1 signaling in regulation of prostate epithelial tissue homeostasis, as well as the recently revealed role of AhR in prostate development and tumorigenesis, the above findings contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the crosstalk between the two signaling pathways in the prostate-specific context.

  5. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  6. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  7. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  8. Emerging Roles of Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent non-skin related cancers. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males in most Western countries. If prostate cancer is diagnosed in its early stages, there is a higher probability that it will be completely cured. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a non-specific phosphomonoesterase synthesized in prostate epithelial cells and its level proportionally increases with prostate cancer progression. PAP was the biochemical diagnostic mainstay for prostate cancer until the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which improved the detection of early-stage prostate cancer and largely displaced PAP. Recently, however, there is a renewed interest in PAP because of its usefulness in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers and its success in the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Although PAP is believed to be a key regulator of prostate cell growth, its exact role in normal prostate as well as detailed molecular mechanism of PAP regulation is still unclear. Here, many different aspects of PAP in prostate cancer are revisited and its emerging roles in other environment are discussed. PMID:24009853

  9. Interleukin-6 regulates androgen receptor activity and prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Culig, Zoran; Bartsch, Georg; Hobisch, Alfred

    2002-11-29

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine which is involved in regulation of growth of various malignant tumors. IL-6 binds to its receptor, which is composed of a ligand-binding and a signal-transducing subunit and activates pathways of signal transducers and activators of transcription and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). In prostate cancer cells, IL-6 induces divergent proliferative responses. Serum levels of IL-6 are elevated in patients with therapy-resistant carcinoma of the prostate. We have investigated whether IL-6 interacts with the androgen signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells. In DU-145 cells, transiently transfected with androgen receptor (AR) cDNA, IL-6 caused ligand-independent and synergistic activation of the AR. Nonsteroidal antagonists of the AR down-regulated AR activity induced by IL-6. In LNCaP cells, IL-6-induced expression of the AR-regulated prostate-specific antigen gene. Inhibitors of protein kinase A and C and MAPK down-regulated IL-6-induced AR activity. IL-6 expression in human prostate tissue was studied by immunohistochemistry. In benign prostatic tissue, IL-6 immunoreactivity was confined to basal cells. In prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and in cancer tissue, atypical intraluminal and cancer cells expressed IL-6. The expression of IL-6 receptor was demonstrated in benign and malignant tissue in both epithelium and stroma. In the authors' laboratory, IL-6-inhibited proliferation of parental LNCaP cells. A new LNCaP subline was generated to investigate changes in signal transduction which might occur after prolonged treatment with IL-6. In the subline LNCaP-IL-6+, IL-6 neither reduced a number of cells nor caused G1 growth arrest. IL-6 receptor expression declined during long-term IL-6 treatment. However, IL-6-up-regulated AR expression and was capable of inducing AR activity in LNCaP-IL-6+ cells. Parental LNCaP cells do not express IL-6. In contrast, IL-6 mRNA and protein expression were detectable in

  10. The effects of lithogenic bile on gallbladder epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Moody, F G; Haley-Russell, D; Li, Y F; Husband, K J; Weisbrodt, N W; Dewey, R B

    1989-01-01

    Prairie dogs were fed a 1.2% cholesterol diet for up to 24 weeks to evaluate the effects of lithogenic bile on the mucosa of the gallbladder. There was a progressive increase in the lithogenic index of the gallbladder bile (1.44 +/- 0.15 at 4 weeks, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five of 70 animals developed gallstones between the second and fourth week. Increasing stone burden was associated with a 27% (p less than 0.05) decrease in the electrical resistance of the epithelium and a 60% (p less than 0.05) decrease in net sodium transport when measured isotopically in an Ussing chamber (3 weeks). After 4 months, seven of ten animals developed inflammatory mucosal polyps characterized by a heavy infiltration of plasma cells into an expanded matrix. Cellular infiltration began as early as 2 weeks. These changes occurred without alterations in the ultrastructural appearance of the epithelium. Images Figs. 3A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Figs. 5A and B. PMID:2774711

  11. The growth and differentiation of transitional epithelium in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    The development of rat transitional epithelial cells grown on conventional non-permeable surfaces was compared with development on permeable collagen supports. On glass or plastic surfaces, cells grew as expanding nomolayer sheets. Once confluent, growth continued with a bilayer being formed in most areas and apical cells being continuously sloughed off. Although most cells were interconnected by desmosomes, and junctional complexes were formed, no other indications of differentiation were observed. After 2-3 wk of growth, division stopped and cel death ensued. In contrast, single-cell suspensions plated on collagen-coated nylon disks reassociated into multicellular islands and commenced growth. Mitoses were confined to the basal cells in contact with the permeable substrate. The islands developed into epithelial trilayers, tapering to monolayers along spreading edges. Once the islands were confluent, stratification was completed and appeared similar to that observed in vivo. Germinal cells formed a basal lamina, and the upper layer was composed of large, flattened cells with an unusually thick asymmetrical plasma membrane on the apical surface. Electron microscopic and radioactive tracers demonstrated "leaky" zonulae occludentes with a restricted permeability to small molecules. The movement of urea was retarded in comparison to water. Unlike the slow turnover of adult epithelium in vivo, maturation and sloughing of apical cells were measurable. Transfer of cells could be effected and growth maintained for up to 4 mo. These results may indicate the necessity of a nutrient-permeable growth surface for the polarized differentiation of adult transitional epithelium. PMID:574872